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Sample records for 2d atomic crystals

  1. TUNABLE Band Structures of 2d Multi-Atom Archimedean-Like Phononic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Chen, C. Q.; Tian, X. G.

    2012-06-01

    Two dimensional multi-atom Archimedean-like phononic crystals (MAPCs) can be obtained by adding "atoms" at suitable positions in primitive cells of traditional simple lattices. Band structures of solid-solid and solid-air MAPCs are computed by the finite element method in conjunction with the Bloch theory. For the solid-solid system, our results show that the MAPCs can be suitably designed to split and shift band gaps of the corresponding traditional simple phononic crystal (i.e., with only one scatterer inside a primitive cell). For the solid-air system, the MAPCs have more and wider band gaps than the corresponding traditional simple phononic crystal. Numerical calculations for both solid-solid and solid-air MAPCs show that the band gap of traditional simple phononic crystal can be tuned by appropriately adding "atoms" into its primitive cell.

  2. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  3. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Feng; Chen, YiPing; You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)₃]₃[CoW₁₂O₄₀]·9H₂O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)₃]₂[FeW₁₂O₄₀]·H₃O·H₂O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)₃]²⁺ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm⁻¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  4. How isopolyanions self-assemble and condense into a 2D tungsten oxide crystal: HRTEM imaging of atomic arrangement in an intermediate new hexagonal phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chemseddine, A. Bloeck, U.

    2008-10-15

    The structure and structural evolution of tungstic acid solutions, sols and gels are investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). Acidification of sodium tungstate solutions, through a proton exchange resin, is achieved in a way that ensures homogeneity in size and shape of intermediate polytungstic species. Gelation is shown to involve polycondensation followed by a self-assembling process of polytungstic building blocks leading to sheets with a layered hexagonal structure. Single layers of this new metastable phase are composed of three-, four- and six-membered rings of WO{sub 6} octahedra located in the same plane. This is the first time that a 2D oxide crystal is isolated and observed by direct atomic resolution. Further ageing and structural evolution leading to single sheets of 2D ReO{sub 3}-type structure is directly observed by HRTEM. Based on this atomic level imaging, a model for the formation of the oxide network structure involving a self-assembling process of tritungstic based polymeric chain is proposed. The presence of tritungstic groups and their packing in electrochromic WO{sub 3} films made by different techniques is discussed. - Graphical abstract: From the isopolyanion to the extended bulk tungsten oxide: HRTEM imaging.

  5. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-09

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  6. The crystal nucleation theory revisited: The case of 2D colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A. E.; Ixtlilco-Cortés, L.

    2011-03-01

    Most of the theories and studies of crystallization and crystal nucleation consider the boundaries between the crystallites and the fluid as smooth. The crystallites are the small clusters of atoms, molecules and/or particles with the symmetry of the crystal lattice that, with a slight chance of success, would grow to form the crystal grains. In fact, in the classical nucleation theory, the crystallites are assumed to have a spherical shape (circular in 2D). As far are we are aware, there is only one experimental work [1] on colloidal crystals that founds rough surfaces for the crystallites and for the crystal grains. Motivated by this work, we performed large Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations in 2D, that would follow the eventual growing of a few crystallites to form the crystal grains. The used potential has, besides the impenetrable hard core, a soft core followed by a potential well. We found that indeed the crystallites have a fractal boundary, whose value we were able to obtain. See the figure below of a typical isolated crystallite. We were also able to obtain the critical crystallite size, measured by its number of particles, Nc, and not by any critical radius. The boundaries of the crystals above Nc also have a fractal structure but of a lower value, closer to one. Finally, we also obtained the line tension between the crystallites and the surrounding fluid, as function of temperature and particle diameter, as well as the chemical potential difference between these two phases. In the URL: www.fis.unam.mx˜˜agus˜ there are posted two movies that can be downloaded: (1) 2D_crystal_nucleation.mp4, and (2) 2D_crystal_growth.mp4, that illustrate the crystal nucleation and its further growth.

  7. Cooperative dynamics in ultrasoft 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprakel, Joris; van der Meer, Berend; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-03-01

    The creation, annihilation, and diffusion of defects in crystal lattices play an important role during crystal melting and deformation. Although it is well understood how defects form and react when crystals are subjected to external stresses, it remains unclear how crystals cope with internal stresses. We report a study in which we create a highly localized internal stress, by means of optical tweezing, in a crystal formed from micrometer-sized colloidal spheres and directly observe how the solid reacts using microscopy. We find that, even though the excitation is highly localized, a collective dance of colloidal particles results; these collective modes take the form of closed rings or open-ended strings, depending on the sequence of events which nucleate the rearrangements. Surprisingly, we find from Brownian Dynamics simulations that these cooperative dynamics are thermally-activated modes inherent to the crystal, and can even occur through a single, sufficiently large thermal fluctuation, resulting in the irreversible displacement of 100s of particles from their lattice sites.

  8. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  9. 2D Crystal Semiconductors New Materials for GHz-THz Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-02

    frequency operation. 4) Identify methods to improve carrier transport in 2D Crystal semiconductors. 5) Compare FETs made from naturally occuring and... chemically synthesized 2D Crystal semic???ductors. 6) Elucidate the effect of contact resistance, and gauge the challenges for GHz-THz electronics by... chemical doping, which involved replac- ing a small number of atoms of the 3-D semiconductor by those with higher or lower valence. The next advance

  10. Combining 2D synchrosqueezed wave packet transform with optimization for crystal image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Wirth, Benedikt; Yang, Haizhao

    2016-04-01

    We develop a variational optimization method for crystal analysis in atomic resolution images, which uses information from a 2D synchrosqueezed transform (SST) as input. The synchrosqueezed transform is applied to extract initial information from atomic crystal images: crystal defects, rotations and the gradient of elastic deformation. The deformation gradient estimate is then improved outside the identified defect region via a variational approach, to obtain more robust results agreeing better with the physical constraints. The variational model is optimized by a nonlinear projected conjugate gradient method. Both examples of images from computer simulations and imaging experiments are analyzed, with results demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout. PMID:27464908

  12. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  13. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X-L

    2016-07-28

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  14. Electron-Phonon Scattering in Atomically Thin 2D Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi; Wu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Tong; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Huang, Libai

    2016-11-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomically thin perovskites with strongly bound excitons are highly promising for optoelectronic applications. However, the nature of nonradiative processes that limit the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency remains elusive. Here, we present time-resolved and temperature-dependent PL studies to systematically address the intrinsic exciton relaxation pathways in layered (C4H9NH3)2(CH3NH3)n-1PbnI3n+1 (n = 1, 2, 3) structures. Our results show that scatterings via deformation potential by acoustic and homopolar optical phonons are the main scattering mechanisms for excitons in ultrathin single exfoliated flakes, exhibiting a T(γ) (γ = 1.3 to 1.9) temperature dependence for scattering rates. We attribute the absence of polar optical phonon and defect scattering to efficient screening of Coulomb potential, similar to what has been observed in 3D perovskites. These results establish an understanding of the origins of nonradiative pathways and provide guidelines for optimizing PL efficiencies of atomically thin 2D perovskites.

  15. Brillouin light scattering studies of 2D magnonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tacchi, S; Gubbiotti, G; Madami, M; Carlotti, G

    2017-02-22

    Magnonic crystals, materials with periodic modulation of their magnetic properties, represent the magnetic counterpart of photonic, phononic and plasmonic crystals, and have been largely investigated in recent years because of the possibility of using spin waves as a new means for carrying and processing information over a very large frequency bandwidth. Here, we review recent Brillouin light scattering studies of 2D magnonic crystals consisting of single- and bi-component arrays of interacting magnetic dots or antidot lattices. In particular, we discuss the principal properties of the magnonic band diagram of such systems, with emphasis given to its dependence on both magnetic and the geometrical parameters. Thanks to the possibility of tailoring their band structure by means of several degrees of freedom, planar magnonic crystals offer a good opportunity to design an innovative class of nanoscale microwave devices.

  16. Brillouin light scattering studies of 2D magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacchi, S.; Gubbiotti, G.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.

    2017-02-01

    Magnonic crystals, materials with periodic modulation of their magnetic properties, represent the magnetic counterpart of photonic, phononic and plasmonic crystals, and have been largely investigated in recent years because of the possibility of using spin waves as a new means for carrying and processing information over a very large frequency bandwidth. Here, we review recent Brillouin light scattering studies of 2D magnonic crystals consisting of single- and bi-component arrays of interacting magnetic dots or antidot lattices. In particular, we discuss the principal properties of the magnonic band diagram of such systems, with emphasis given to its dependence on both magnetic and the geometrical parameters. Thanks to the possibility of tailoring their band structure by means of several degrees of freedom, planar magnonic crystals offer a good opportunity to design an innovative class of nanoscale microwave devices.

  17. 2D photonic crystal and its angular reflective azimuthal spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderakova, Dagmar; Drzik, Milan; Tomekova, Juliana

    2016-12-01

    Contemporary, attention is paid to photonic crystals, which can strongly modify light propagation through them and enable a controllable light manipulation. The contribution is focused on a sub-wavelength 2D structure formed by Al2O3 layer on silicon substrate, patterned with periodic hexagonal lattice of deep air holes. Using various laser sources of light at single wavelength, azimuthal angle dependence of the mirror-like reflected light intensity was recorded photo-electrically. The results obtained can be used to sample the band-structure of leaky modes of the photonic crystal more reliably and help us to map the photonic dispersion diagram.

  18. Two-Dimensional Atomic Crystals: Paving New Ways for Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jincheng; Li, Tengfei; Djerdj, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals are attractive for use in next-generation nanoelectronics, due to their unique performances, which may lead to the resolution of the technological and fundamental challenges in semiconductor industry. Based on the introduction of 2D atomic crystal-based transistors and ambipolar behavior, the review presents a brief summary of 2D atomic crystal integration circuits, including memory, logic gate, amplifier, inverter, oscillator, mixer, switch and modulator. The devices show promising performances for the application in future nanoelectronics. In particular, the 2D atomic crystals, such as graphene, demonstrate good compatibility with the existing semiconductor process. The quaternary digital modulations have been achieved with flexible and transparent all-graphene circuits. Moreover, the heterojunction based on 2D atomic crystals may enable new devices beyond conventional field-effect transistors. The results make us be optimistic that practical 2D atomic crystal technologies with complex functionality will be achieved in the near future. Therefore, 2D atomic crystals are paving new ways for nanoelectronics.

  19. D2-D1 phase transition of columnar liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. F.; Swift, J.

    1986-04-01

    The D2-D1 phase transition in columnar liquid crystals of the HAT series [e.g., HAT11 (triphenelene hexa-n-dodecanoate)] is discussed within the framework of Landau theory. The order parameters which describe the transition are abstracted from a tensor density function, and are associated with two irreducible representations of the symmetry group of the high-temperature D2 phase. A mechanism for a first-order transition is then suggested in accordance with both theoretical considerations and the experimental result for the D2-D1 transition. Two possible arrangements of the herringbone structure of the D1 phase are obtained, each of which gives six orientational states in the low-temperature D1 phase.

  20. The 2DX robot: a membrane protein 2D crystallization Swiss Army knife.

    PubMed

    Iacovache, Ioan; Biasini, Marco; Kowal, Julia; Kukulski, Wanda; Chami, Mohamed; van der Goot, F Gisou; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2010-03-01

    Among the state-of-the-art techniques that provide experimental information at atomic scale for membrane proteins, electron crystallography, atomic force microscopy and solid state NMR make use of two-dimensional crystals. We present a cyclodextrin-driven method for detergent removal implemented in a fully automated robot. The kinetics of the reconstitution processes is precisely controlled, because the detergent complexation by cyclodextrin is of stoichiometric nature. The method requires smaller volumes and lower protein concentrations than established 2D crystallization methods, making it possible to explore more conditions with the same amount of protein. The method yielded highly ordered 2D crystals diffracting to high resolution from the pore-forming toxin Aeromonas hydrophila aerolysin (2.9A), the plant aquaporin SoPIP2;1 (3.1A) and the human aquaporin-8 (hAQP8; 3.3A). This new method outperforms traditional 2D crystallization approaches in terms of accuracy, flexibility, throughput, and allows the usage of detergents having low critical micelle concentration (CMC), which stabilize the structure of membrane proteins in solution.

  1. Defect formation and coarsening in hexagonal 2D curved crystals.

    PubMed

    García, Nicolás A; Pezzutti, Aldo D; Register, Richard A; Vega, Daniel A; Gómez, Leopoldo R

    2015-02-07

    In this work we study the processes of defect formation and coarsening of two-dimensional (2D) curved crystal structures. These processes are found to strongly deviate from their counterparts in flat systems. In curved backgrounds the process of defect formation is deeply affected by the curvature, and at the onset of a phase transition the early density of defects becomes highly inhomogeneous. We observe that even a single growing crystal can produce varying densities of defects depending on its initial position and local orientation with regard to the substrate. This process is completely different from flat space, where grain boundaries are formed due to the impingement of different propagating crystals. Quenching the liquid into the crystal phase leads to the formation of a curved polycrystalline structure, characterized by complex arrays of defects. During annealing, mechanisms of geodesic curvature-driven grain boundary motion and defect annihilation lead to increasing crystalline order. Linear arrays of defects diffuse to regions of high curvature, where they are absorbed by disclinations. At the early stage of coarsening the density of dislocations is insensitive to the geometry while the population of isolated disclinations is deeply affected by curvature. The regions with high curvature act as traps for the diffusion of different structures of defects, including disclinations and domain walls.

  2. A journey from order to disorder - atom by atom transformation from graphene to a 2D carbon glass.

    PubMed

    Eder, Franz R; Kotakoski, Jani; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Jannik C

    2014-02-11

    One of the most interesting questions in solid state theory is the structure of glass, which has eluded researchers since the early 1900's. Since then, two competing models, the random network theory and the crystallite theory, have both gathered experimental support. Here, we present a direct, atomic-level structural analysis during a crystal-to-glass transformation, including all intermediate stages. We introduce disorder on a 2D crystal, graphene, gradually, utilizing the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope, which allows us to capture the atomic structure at each step. The change from a crystal to a glass happens suddenly, and at a surprisingly early stage. Right after the transition, the disorder manifests as a vitreous network separating individual crystallites, similar to the modern version of the crystallite theory. However, upon increasing disorder, the vitreous areas grow on the expense of the crystallites and the structure turns into a random network. Thereby, our results show that, at least in the case of a 2D structure, both of the models can be correct, and can even describe the same material at different degrees of disorder.

  3. Asymmetric 2D spatial beam filtering by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, D.; Purlys, V.; Maigyte, L.; Gaizauskas, E.; Peckus, M.; Gadonas, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-04-01

    Spatial filtering techniques are important for improving the spatial quality of light beams. Photonic crystals (PhCs) with a selective spatial (angular) transmittance can also provide spatial filtering with the added benefit transversal symmetries, submillimeter dimensions and monolithic integration in other devices, such as micro-lasers or semiconductor lasers. Workable bandgap PhC configurations require a modulated refractive index with period lengths that are approximately less than the wavelength of radiation. This imposes technical limitations, whereby the available direct laser write (DLW) fabrication techniques are limited in resolution and refractive index depth. If, however, a deflection mechanism is chosen instead, a functional filter PhC can be produced that is operational in the visible wavelength regime. For deflection based PhCs glass is an attractive choice as it is highly stable medium. 2D and 3D PhC filter variations have already been produced on soda-lime glass. However, little is known about how to control the scattering of PhCs when approaching the smallest period values. Here we look into the internal structure of the initially symmetric geometry 2D PhCs and associating it with the resulting transmittance spectra. By varying the DLW fabrication beam parameters and scanning algorithms, we show that such PhCs contain layers that are comprised of semi-tilted structure voxels. We show the appearance of asymmetry can be compensated in order to circumvent some negative effects at the cost of potentially maximum scattering efficiency.

  4. Machine Learning Energies of 2 Million Elpasolite (A B C2D6) Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Felix A.; Lindmaa, Alexander; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2016-09-01

    Elpasolite is the predominant quaternary crystal structure (AlNaK2F6 prototype) reported in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. We develop a machine learning model to calculate density functional theory quality formation energies of all ˜2 ×106 pristine A B C2D6 elpasolite crystals that can be made up from main-group elements (up to bismuth). Our model's accuracy can be improved systematically, reaching a mean absolute error of 0.1 eV /atom for a training set consisting of 10 ×103 crystals. Important bonding trends are revealed: fluoride is best suited to fit the coordination of the D site, which lowers the formation energy whereas the opposite is found for carbon. The bonding contribution of the elements A and B is very small on average. Low formation energies result from A and B being late elements from group II, C being a late (group I) element, and D being fluoride. Out of 2 ×106 crystals, 90 unique structures are predicted to be on the convex hull—among which is NFAl2Ca6, with a peculiar stoichiometry and a negative atomic oxidation state for Al.

  5. Nonlinear optical response of a two-dimensional atomic crystal.

    PubMed

    Merano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The theory of Bloembergen and Pershan for the light waves at the boundary of nonlinear media is extended to a nonlinear two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystal, i.e., a single planar atomic lattice, placed between linear bulk media. The crystal is treated as a zero-thickness interface, a real 2D system. Harmonic waves emanate from it. Generalization of the laws of reflection and refraction give the direction and the intensity of the harmonic waves. As a particular case that contains all the essential physical features, second-order harmonic generation is considered. The theory, due to its simplicity that stems from the special character of a single planar atomic lattice, is able to elucidate and explain the rich experimental details of harmonic generation from a 2D atomic crystal.

  6. Enhanced Absorption in 2D Materials Via Fano- Resonant Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenyi; Klotz, Andrey; Yang, Yuanmu; Li, Wei; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Bolotin, Kirill; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The use of two-dimensional (2D) materials in optoelectronics has attracted much attention due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties. For instance, graphenebased devices have been employed for applications such as ultrafast and broadband photodetectors and modulators while transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) based photodetectors can be used for ultrasensitive photodetection. However, the low optical absorption of 2D materials arising from their atomic thickness limits the maximum attainable external quantum efficiency. For example, in the visible and NIR regimes monolayer MoS2 and graphene absorb only ~10% and 2.3% of incoming light, respectively. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the use of Fano-resonant photonic crystals to significantly boost absorption in atomically thin materials. Using graphene as a test bed, we demonstrate that absorption in the monolayer thick material can be enhanced to 77% within the telecommunications band, the highest value reported to date. We also show that the absorption in the Fano-resonant structure is non-local, with light propagating up to 16 μm within the structure. This property is particularly beneficial in harvesting light from large areas in field-effect-transistor based graphene photodetectors in which separation of photo-generated carriers only occurs ~0.2 μm adjacent to the graphene/electrode interface.

  7. Enhanced Absorption in 2D Materials Via Fano- Resonant Photonic Crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wenyi; Klotz, Andrey; Yang, Yuanmu; ...

    2015-05-01

    The use of two-dimensional (2D) materials in optoelectronics has attracted much attention due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties. For instance, graphenebased devices have been employed for applications such as ultrafast and broadband photodetectors and modulators while transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) based photodetectors can be used for ultrasensitive photodetection. However, the low optical absorption of 2D materials arising from their atomic thickness limits the maximum attainable external quantum efficiency. For example, in the visible and NIR regimes monolayer MoS2 and graphene absorb only ~10% and 2.3% of incoming light, respectively. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the use of Fano-resonant photonicmore » crystals to significantly boost absorption in atomically thin materials. Using graphene as a test bed, we demonstrate that absorption in the monolayer thick material can be enhanced to 77% within the telecommunications band, the highest value reported to date. We also show that the absorption in the Fano-resonant structure is non-local, with light propagating up to 16 μm within the structure. This property is particularly beneficial in harvesting light from large areas in field-effect-transistor based graphene photodetectors in which separation of photo-generated carriers only occurs ~0.2 μm adjacent to the graphene/electrode interface.« less

  8. One-atom-thick 2D copper oxide clusters on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kano, Emi; Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Sakai, Seiji; Chernozatonskii, Leonid A; Sorokin, Pavel B; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2017-03-17

    The successful isolation and remarkable properties of graphene have recently triggered investigation of two-dimensional (2D) materials from layered compounds; however, one-atom-thick 2D materials without bulk layered counterparts are scarcely reported. Here we report the structure and properties of novel 2D copper oxide studied by experimental and theoretical methods. Electron microscopy observations reveal that copper oxide can form monoatomic layers with an unusual square lattice on graphene. Density functional theory calculations suggest that oxygen atoms at the centre of the square lattice stabilizes the 2D Cu structure, and that the 2D copper oxide sheets have unusual electronic and magnetic properties different from 3D bulk copper oxide.

  9. Epitaxial Growth of Ternary Topological Insulator Bi2 Te2 Se 2D Crystals on Mica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujing; Tang, Min; Meng, Mengmeng; Wang, Mingzhan; Wu, Jinxiong; Yin, Jianbo; Zhou, Yubing; Guo, Yunfan; Tan, Congwei; Dang, Wenhui; Huang, Shaoyun; Xu, H Q; Wang, Yong; Peng, Hailin

    2017-03-06

    Nanostructures of ternary topological insulator (TI) Bi2 Te2 Se are, in principle, advantageous to the manifestation of topologically nontrivial surface states, due to significantly enhanced surface-to-volume ratio compared with its bulk crystals counterparts. Herein, the synthesis of 2D Bi2 Te2 Se crystals on mica via the van der Waals epitaxy method is explored and systematically the growth behaviors during the synthesis process are investigated. Accordingly, 2D Bi2 Te2 Se crystals with domain size up to 50 µm large and thickness down to 2 nm are obtained. A pronounced weak antilocalization effect is clearly observed in the 2D Bi2 Te2 Se crystals at 2 K. The method for epitaxial growth of 2D ternary Bi2 Te2 Se crystals may inspire materials engineering toward enhanced manifestation of the subtle surface states of TIs and thereby facilitate their potential applications in next-generation spintronics.

  10. The yield of N/2D/ atoms in the dissociative recombination of NO/+/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kley, D.; Lawrence, G. M.; Stone, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The quantum yield or branching ratio of N(2D) atoms formed in the reaction e + NO(+) yields N + O was measured to be 76% plus or minus 6%. Photoionization of buffered nitric oxide by a flash lamp was studied using time-resolved atomic absorption. Atoms were produced both by direct photodissociation and by dissociative recombination, and these two effects were separated by means of SF6 as an electron scavenger.

  11. 2D Plasma Photonic Crystals in resonantly pumped Cesium Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, Fabio; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Plasma photonic crystals (PCs) afford the opportunity for dynamic reconfigurability. In this presentation we describe the conditions required for constructing an all-plasma PC that can interact with sub mm-wavelength radiation. Conditions required for this interaction are high plasma densities (>1014 cm-3) and small lattice constant (<1 mm). We describe the construction of a two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of several sub-millimeter plasma filaments in a 1 Torr heated cesium vapor cell. The cesium is ionized by 1 W continuous-wave laser excitation with the wavelength centered around the 852 nm resonance line. The filaments are produced by focusing the laser through a microlens array with a 500 µm pitch. Small departures from line center are found to produce a strong variation in the plasma filament structure and density. Stark broadening measurements of the cesium 9F-5D transition at 647.4 nm yield plasma density. We present preliminary terahertz transmission spectrum of the two-dimensional plasma photonic crystal structure. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations which predict the presence of bandgaps in regions of both negative and positive plasma dielectric constant.

  12. Controllable liquid crystal gratings for an adaptive 2D/3D auto-stereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. A.; Jin, T.; He, L. C.; Chu, Z. H.; Guo, T. L.; Zhou, X. T.; Lin, Z. X.

    2017-02-01

    2D/3D switchable, viewpoint controllable and 2D/3D localizable auto-stereoscopic displays based on controllable liquid crystal gratings are proposed in this work. Using the dual-layer staggered structure on the top substrate and bottom substrate as driven electrodes within a liquid crystal cell, the ratio between transmitting region and shielding region can be selectively controlled by the corresponding driving circuit, which indicates that 2D/3D switch and 3D video sources with different disparity images can reveal in the same auto-stereoscopic display system. Furthermore, the controlled region in the liquid crystal gratings presents 3D model while other regions maintain 2D model in the same auto-stereoscopic display by the corresponding driving circuit. This work demonstrates that the controllable liquid crystal gratings have potential applications in the field of auto-stereoscopic display.

  13. Global regularity and uniqueness of weak solution for the 2-D liquid crystal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhifei

    We prove the global existence and regularity of weak solution for the 2-D liquid crystal flows with the large initial velocity. The uniqueness of weak solution is also proved by using the Littlewood-Paley analysis.

  14. Application of a 2-D atomic force microscope system to metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyyssonen, Diana; Landstein, Laszlo; Coombs, E.

    1992-02-01

    This paper describes a 2-D atomic force microprobe (AFM) system designed specifically for accurate submicron critical dimension (CD) metrology. The system includes 2-D AFM sensing, 3-D position interferometry with 1.25 nm sensitivity, and a special tip design. Unlike conventional AFM scanning systems, the system operates like a nanorobot moving from point to point under computer control and sensing surfaces without making contact. The system design, operating characteristics, and application to metrology are

  15. Large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin Mo2C superconducting crystals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuan; Wang, Libin; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Long; Guo, Jingkun; Kang, Ning; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal carbides (TMCs) are a large family of materials with many intriguing properties and applications, and high-quality 2D TMCs are essential for investigating new physics and properties in the 2D limit. However, the 2D TMCs obtained so far are chemically functionalized, defective nanosheets having maximum lateral dimensions of ∼10 μm. Here we report the fabrication of large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin α-Mo2C crystals by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The crystals are a few nanometres thick, over 100 μm in size, and very stable under ambient conditions. They show 2D characteristics of superconducting transitions that are consistent with Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless behaviour and show strong anisotropy with magnetic field orientation; moreover, the superconductivity is also strongly dependent on the crystal thickness. Our versatile CVD process allows the fabrication of other high-quality 2D TMC crystals, such as ultrathin WC and TaC crystals, which further expand the large family of 2D materials.

  16. Large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin Mo2C superconducting crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuan; Wang, Libin; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Long; Guo, Jingkun; Kang, Ning; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal carbides (TMCs) are a large family of materials with many intriguing properties and applications, and high-quality 2D TMCs are essential for investigating new physics and properties in the 2D limit. However, the 2D TMCs obtained so far are chemically functionalized, defective nanosheets having maximum lateral dimensions of ~10 μm. Here we report the fabrication of large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin α-Mo2C crystals by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The crystals are a few nanometres thick, over 100 μm in size, and very stable under ambient conditions. They show 2D characteristics of superconducting transitions that are consistent with Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless behaviour and show strong anisotropy with magnetic field orientation; moreover, the superconductivity is also strongly dependent on the crystal thickness. Our versatile CVD process allows the fabrication of other high-quality 2D TMC crystals, such as ultrathin WC and TaC crystals, which further expand the large family of 2D materials.

  17. Cavity optomechanics with 2D photonic crystal membrane reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingaraju, Navin B.; Shuai, Yichen; Lawall, John

    2016-03-01

    Membranes made from silicon nitride have significantly higher mechanical Q-factors under tensile stress than those made of other dielectric materials. This makes them ideal candidates for membrane reflectors that provide high finesse in Fabry-Perot cavities or membrane-in-the-middle optomechanical systems. Building on our previous work with one-dimensional gratings on suspended membranes, we patterned two-dimensional photonic crystal gratings on monolithic, suspended membranes made from silicon nitride. These high-Q membranes exhibited high reflectivity, upwards of 99%, over several nanometers in the telecom band. To probe their optical response in a cavity environment, we used these membrane reflectors as the moving mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity. We were able to realize cavities with a finesse of over 4,500.

  18. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  19. Mirror effects and optical meta-surfaces in 2d atomic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Wild, Dominik; Lukin, Mikhail; Yelin, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Strong optical response of natural and artificial (meta-) materials typically relies on the fact that the lattice constant that separates their constituent particles (atoms or electromagnetic resonators, respectively) is much smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we consider a single layer of a 2d atom array with a lattice constant on the order of an optical wavelength, which can be thought of as a highly dilute 2d metamaterial (meta-surface). Our theoretical analysis shows how strong scattering of resonant incoming light off the array can be controlled by choosing its lattice constant, e.g. allowing the array to operate as a perfect mirror or a retro-reflector for most incident angles of the incoming light. We discuss the prospects for quantum metasurfaces, i.e. the ability to shape the output quantum state of light by controlling the atomic states, and the possible generality of our results as a universal wave phenomena.

  20. Holographic method for site-resolved detection of a 2D array of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Daniel Kai; Deissler, Benjamin; Limmer, Wolfgang; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel approach to site-resolved detection of a 2D gas of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A near-resonant laser beam is coherently scattered by the atomic array, and after passing a lens its interference pattern is holographically recorded by superimposing it with a reference laser beam on a CCD chip. Fourier transformation of the recorded intensity pattern reconstructs the atomic distribution in the lattice with single-site resolution. The holographic detection method requires only about two hundred scattered photons per atom in order to achieve a high reconstruction fidelity of 99.9 %. Therefore, additional cooling during detection might not be necessary even for light atomic elements such as lithium. Furthermore, first investigations suggest that small aberrations of the lens can be post-corrected in imaging processing.

  1. Multi-resonant optical parametric oscillator based on 2D-PPLT nonlinear photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Lazoul, Mohamed; Boudrioua, Azzedine; Simohamed, Lotfy-Mokhtar; Peng, Lung-Han

    2015-04-15

    The aim of this work is to achieve an optical parametric oscillator based on two-dimensional periodically poled lithium tantalate (2D-PPLT) crystals that are designed to allow multiple reciprocal lattice-vector contribution to the quasi-phase matching scheme. We are particularly interested in the effect of the multi-wavelength parametric generation performed by the 2D nonlinear photonic crystal to achieve a multi-resonant optical parametric oscillator. The performances are studied in terms of generation efficiency and multi-wavelength generation.

  2. Atomic-Scale Variations of the Mechanical Response of 2D Materials Detected by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, B; Ellner, M; Pou, P; Nicoara, N; Pérez, Rubén; Gómez-Rodríguez, J M

    2016-06-17

    We show that noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) is sensitive to the local stiffness in the atomic-scale limit on weakly coupled 2D materials, as graphene on metals. Our large amplitude AFM topography and dissipation images under ultrahigh vacuum and low temperature resolve the atomic and moiré patterns in graphene on Pt(111), despite its extremely low geometric corrugation. The imaging mechanisms are identified with a multiscale model based on density-functional theory calculations, where the energy cost of global and local deformations of graphene competes with short-range chemical and long-range van der Waals interactions. Atomic contrast is related with short-range tip-sample interactions, while the dissipation can be understood in terms of global deformations in the weakly coupled graphene layer. Remarkably, the observed moiré modulation is linked with the subtle variations of the local interplanar graphene-substrate interaction, opening a new route to explore the local mechanical properties of 2D materials at the atomic scale.

  3. The microstrip filters based on electromagnetic crystal of resonators 2d disposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, B. A.; Khodenkov, S. A.; Balva, Ya F.; Aplesnin, S. S.; Bandurina, O. N.

    2016-11-01

    Filters of the 6th order, based on 2D electromagnetic crystals were developed. Application in structures of resonators with convolved and earthed on its base with strip conductors enables the implementation of filters having high frequency-selective properties and demanded in the aerospace equipment.

  4. Processable 2D materials beyond graphene: MoS2 liquid crystals and fibres.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Rouhollah; Aminorroaya-Yamini, Sima; Benedetti, Tania M; Aboutalebi, Seyed Hamed; Chao, Yunfeng; Wallace, Gordon G; Officer, David L

    2016-09-29

    Herein, we show properly engineered MoS2 crystals can readily form liquid crystalline dispersions in water making them ideal candidates for large-scale manufacturing processes. The guideline provided here can serve as the basis to develop practical protocols to address the long-standing goal of large-scale manufacturing of 2D materials.

  5. Gate-induced superconductivity in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystals are attracting growing interest in condensed matter physics, since these systems exhibit not only rich electronic and photonic properties but also exotic electronic phase transitions including superconductivity and charge density wave. Moreover, owing to the recent development of transfer methods after exfoliation and electric-double-layer transistors, superconducting 2D atomic crystals, the thicknesses of which are below 1-2 nm, have been successfully obtained. Here, we present a topical review on the recent discoveries of 2D crystalline superconductors by ionic-liquid gating and a series of their novel properties. In particular, we highlight two topics; quantum metallic states (or possible metallic ground states) and superconductivity robust against in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena can be discussed with the effects of weakened disorder and/or broken spacial inversion symmetry leading to valley-dependent spin-momentum locking (spin-valley locking). These examples suggest the superconducting 2D crystals are new platforms for investigating the intrinsic quantum phases as well as exotic nature in 2D superconductors.

  6. Graphene and Other 2D Colloids: Liquid Crystals and Macroscopic Fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjun; Xu, Zhen; Gao, Weiwei; Cheng, Zhengdong; Gao, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Two-dimensional colloidal nanomaterials are running into renaissance after the enlightening researches of graphene. Macroscopic one-dimensional fiber is an optimal ordered structural form to express the in-plane merits of 2D nanomaterials, and the formation of liquid crystals (LCs) allows the creation of continuous fibers. In the correlated system from LCs to fibers, understanding their macroscopic organizing behavior and transforming them into new solid fibers is greatly significant for applications. Herein, we retrospect the history of 2D colloids and discuss about the concept of 2D nanomaterial fibers in the context of LCs, elaborating the motivation, principle and possible strategies of fabrication. Then we highlight the creation, development and typical applications of graphene fibers. Additionally, the latest advances of other 2D nanomaterial fibers are also summarized. Finally, conclusions, challenges and perspectives are provided to show great expectations of better and more fibrous materials of 2D nanomaterials. This review gives a comprehensive retrospect of the past century-long effort about the whole development of 2D colloids, and plots a clear roadmap - "lamellar solid - LCs - macroscopic fibers - flexible devices", which will certainly open a new era of structural-multifunctional application for the conventional 2D colloids.

  7. Systematic Approach to Electrostatically Induced 2D Crystallization of Nanoparticles at Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuto, M.; Kewalramani, S.; Wang, S.; Lin, Y.; Nguyen, G.; Wang, Q.; Yang, L.

    2011-02-07

    We report an experimental demonstration of a strategy for inducing two-dimensional (2D) crystallization of charged nanoparticles on oppositely charged fluid interfaces. This strategy aims to maximize the interfacial adsorption of nanoparticles, and hence their lateral packing density, by utilizing a combination of weakly charged particles and a high surface charge density on the planar interface. In order to test this approach, we investigated the assembly of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) on positively charged lipid monolayers at the aqueous solution surface, by means of in situ X-ray scattering measurements at the liquid-vapor interface. The assembly was studied as a function of the solution pH, which was used to vary the charge on CPMV, and of the mole fraction of the cationic lipid in the binary lipid monolayer, which set the interface charge density. The 2D crystallization of CPMV occurred in a narrow pH range just above the particle's isoelectric point, where the particle charge was weakly negative, and only when the cationic-lipid fraction in the monolayer exceeded a threshold. The observed 2D crystals exhibited nearly the same packing density as the densest lattice plane within the known 3D crystals of CPMV. The above electrostatic approach of maximizing interfacial adsorption may provide an efficient route to the crystallization of nanoparticles at aqueous interfaces.

  8. The 2D Selfassembly of Benzimidazole and its Co-crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Paulo; Teeter, Jacob; Kunkel, Donna; Sinitskii, Alexander; Enders, Axel

    Benzimidazoles (BI) are organic molecules that form ferroelectric crystals. Key to their ferroelectric behavior are the switchable N . . . HN type bonds and how they couple to the electron system of the molecules. We attempted to crystallize BI on various metal surfaces and studied them using STM. We observed that on Au and Ag, BI joins into zipper chains characteristic of its bulk structure that can pack into a continuous 2D layer. Because the dipole of BI lies in the direction of its switchable hydrogen bond, these zippers should in principle have reversible polarizations that point along the direction they run. BI's crystallization is reminiscent to how croconic acid (CA) crystallizes in 2D using O . . . HO bonding, suggesting that these molecules may be able to co-crystallize through OH . . . N bonds. This would present the opportunity to modify BI's properties, such as the energy needed to switch a hydrogen from a donor to acceptor site. When co-deposited, CA and BI successfully combine into a co-crystal formed by building blocks consisting of 2 CA and 2 BI molecules. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of using STM as a preliminary check to verify if two molecules are compatible with each other without having to attempt crystallization with multiple solvents and mixing methods.

  9. THz quantum cascade lasers operating on the radiative modes of a 2D photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Halioua, Y; Xu, G; Moumdji, S; Li, L H; Davies, A G; Linfield, E H; Colombelli, R

    2014-07-01

    Photonic-crystal lasers operating on Γ-point band-edge states of a photonic structure naturally exploit the so-called "nonradiative" modes. As the surface output coupling efficiency of these modes is low, they have relatively high Q factors, which favor lasing. We propose a new 2D photonic-crystal design that is capable of reversing this mode competition and achieving lasing on the radiative modes instead. Previously, this has only been shown in 1D structures, where the central idea is to introduce anisotropy into the system, both at unit-cell and resonator scales. By applying this concept to 2D photonic-crystal patterned terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers, surface-emitting devices with diffraction-limited beams are demonstrated, with 17 mW peak output power.

  10. Facile Assembly of Large-Area 2D Microgel Colloidal Crystals Using Charge-Reversible Substrates.

    PubMed

    Weng, Junying; Li, Xiaoyun; Guan, Ying; Zhu, X X; Zhang, Yongjun

    2016-12-06

    2D colloidal crystals (CCs) have important applications; however, the fabrication of large-area, high-quality 2D CCs is still far from being trivial, and the fabrication of 2D microgel CCs is even harder. Here, we have demonstrated that they can be facilely fabricated using charge-reversible substrates. The charge-reversible substrates were prepared by modification with amino groups. The amino groups were then protected by amidation with 2,2-dimethylsuccinic anhydride. At acidic pH, the surface charge of the modified substrate will change from negative to positive as a result of the hydrolysis of the amide bonds and the regeneration of the amino groups. 2D microgel CCs can be simply fabricated by applying a concentrated microgel dispersion on the modified substrate. The negatively charged surface of the substrate allows the negatively charged microgel spheres, especially those close to the substrate, to self-assemble into 3D CCs. With the gradual hydrolysis of the amide bonds and the charge reversal of the substrate, the first 111 plane of the 3D assembly is fixed in situ on the substrate. The resulting 2D CC has a high degree of ordering because of the high quality of the parent 3D microgel CC. Because large-area 3D microgel CCs can be facilely fabricated, this method allows for the fabrication of 2D CCs of any size. Nonplanar substrates can also be used. In addition, the interparticle distance of the 2D array can be tuned by the concentration of the microgel dispersion. Besides rigid substrates (such as glass slides, quartz slides, and silicon wafers), flexible polymer films, including polyethylene terephthalate and poly(vinyl chloride) films, were also successfully used as substrates for the fabrication of 2D microgel CCs.

  11. Birefringence-Directed Raman Selection Rules in 2D Black Phosphorus Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mao, Nannan; Wu, Juanxia; Han, Bowen; Lin, Jingjing; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    The incident and scattered light engaged in the Raman scattering process of low symmetry crystals always suffer from the birefringence-induced depolarization. Therefore, for anisotropic crystals, the classical Raman selection rules should be corrected by taking the birefringence effect into consideration. The appearance of the 2D anisotropic materials provides an excellent platform to explore the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules, due to its controllable thickness at the nanoscale that greatly simplifies the situation comparing with bulk materials. Herein, a theoretical and experimental investigation on the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules in the anisotropic black phosphorus (BP) crystals is presented. The abnormal angle-dependent polarized Raman scattering of the Ag modes in thin BP crystal, which deviates from the normal Raman selection rules, is successfully interpreted by the theoretical model based on birefringence. It is further confirmed by the examination of different Raman modes using different laser lines and BP samples of different thicknesses.

  12. Responsive ionic liquid-polymer 2D photonic crystal gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Natasha L; Hong, Zhenmin; Asher, Sanford A

    2014-12-21

    We developed novel air-stable 2D polymerized photonic crystal (2DPC) sensing materials for visual detection of gas phase analytes such as water and ammonia by utilizing a new ionic liquid, ethylguanidine perchlorate (EGP) as the mobile phase. Because of the negligible ionic liquid vapor pressure these 2DPC sensors are indefinitely air stable and, therefore, can be used to sense atmospheric analytes. 2D arrays of ~640 nm polystyrene nanospheres were attached to the surface of crosslinked poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA)-based polymer networks dispersed in EGP. The wavelength of the bright 2D photonic crystal diffraction depends sensitively on the 2D array particle spacing. The volume phase transition response of the EGP-pHEMA system to water vapor or gaseous ammonia changes the 2DPC particle spacing, enabling the visual determination of the analyte concentration. Water absorbed by EGP increases the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, which shrinks the polymer network and causes a blue shift in the diffracted light. Ammonia absorbed by the EGP deprotonates the pHEMA-co-acrylic acid carboxyl groups, swelling the polymer which red shifts the diffracted light.

  13. 2D Crystal heterostructures properties and growth by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Grace Huili

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystals such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) along with other families of layered materials including graphene, SnSe2, GaSe, BN etc, has attracted intense attention from the scientific community. One monolayer of such materials represent the thinnest ``quantum wells''. These layered materials typically possess an in-plane hexagonal crystal structure, and can be stacked together by interlayer van der Waals interactions. Therefore, it is possible to create novel heterostructures by stacking materials with large lattice mismatches and different properties, for instance, superconductors (NbSe2) , metals, semi-metals (graphene), semiconductors (MoS2) and insulators (BN). Numerous novel material properties and device concepts have been discovered, proposed and demonstrated lately. However, the low internal photoluminescence efficiency (IPE, <1%) and low carrier mobility observed in the 2D semiconductors suggest strongly that the materials under investigation today most likely suffer from a high concentration of defects. In this talk, I will share our progress and the challenges we face in terms of preparing, characterizing these 2D crystals as well as pursuing their applications. This work has been supported in part by NSF, AFOSR and LEAST, one of the STARnet centers.

  14. Bovine F1Fo ATP synthase monomers bend the lipid bilayer in 2D membrane crystals

    PubMed Central

    Jiko, Chimari; Davies, Karen M; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Mills, Deryck J; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Gerle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We have used a combination of electron cryo-tomography, subtomogram averaging, and electron crystallographic image processing to analyse the structure of intact bovine F1Fo ATP synthase in 2D membrane crystals. ATPase assays and mass spectrometry analysis of the 2D crystals confirmed that the enzyme complex was complete and active. The structure of the matrix-exposed region was determined at 24 Å resolution by subtomogram averaging and repositioned into the tomographic volume to reveal the crystal packing. F1Fo ATP synthase complexes are inclined by 16° relative to the crystal plane, resulting in a zigzag topology of the membrane and indicating that monomeric bovine heart F1Fo ATP synthase by itself is sufficient to deform lipid bilayers. This local membrane curvature is likely to be instrumental in the formation of ATP synthase dimers and dimer rows, and thus for the shaping of mitochondrial cristae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06119.001 PMID:25815585

  15. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  16. From Homochiral Clusters to Racemate Crystals: Viable Nuclei in 2D Chiral Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Johannes; Parschau, Manfred; Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2015-07-01

    The quest for enantiopure compounds raises the question of which factors favor conglomerate crystallization over racemate crystallization. Studying nucleation and crystal growth at surfaces with submolecular-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy is a suitable approach to better understand intermolecular chiral recognition. Racemic heptahelicene on the Ag(100) surface shows a transition from homochiral nuclei to larger racemic motifs, although the extended homochiral phase exhibits higher density. The homochiral-heterochiral transition is explained by the higher stability of growing nuclei due to a better match of the molecular lattice to the substrate surface. Our observations are direct visual proof of viable nuclei.

  17. Mechanisms of protein and virus crystal growth: An atomic force microscopy study of Canavalin crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T.A.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Malkin, A.J.; Kutznesov, Y.G.; McPherson, A.

    1995-03-10

    The evolution of surface morphology and step dynamics during growth of single crystals of the protein Canavalin and of the cubic satellite tobacco mosaic virus crystals (STMV) have been investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy. These two crystals were observed to grow by very different mechanisms. Growth of Canavalin occurs on complex vicinal hillocks formed by multiple, independently acting screw dislocations. Small cluster were observed on the terraces. STMV on the other hand, was observed to grow by 2D nucleation of islands. No dislocations were found on the crystal. The results are used to determine the growth mechanisms and estimate fundamental materials parameters. The images also illustrate the important mechanism of defect incorporation and provide insight to the processes that limit the growth rate and uniformity of these crystals.

  18. Production of Excited Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium from H2, D2 and HD Photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Landers, A. L.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2009-10-01

    We have measured the production of Lyα and Hα fluorescence from atomic H and D resulting from the photodissociation of H2, D2 and HD by linearly-polarized photons with energies between 20 and 65 eV. In this energy range, excited photofragments result primarily from the production of doubly-excited molecular species which promptly autoionize or dissociate into two neutrals. Comparison between the relative cross sections of H2 and D2 and the available theory show only qualitative agreement. We will discuss the various systematic effects which affect this and other types of synchrotron-based measurements in this energy range. Support provided by the NSF (Grant PHY-0653379), DOE (LBNL/ALS) and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  19. Production of Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium from H2, D2 and HD Photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Andrianarijaona, V. A.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Landers, A. L.; Litaker, E. T.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2010-03-01

    We have measured the production of Lyα and Hα fluorescence from atomic H and D resulting from the photodissociation of H2, D2 and HD by linearly-polarized photons with energies between 22 and 64 eV. In this energy range, excited photofragments result primarily from the production of doubly-excited molecular species which promptly autoionize or dissociate into two neutrals. Comparison between the current relative cross section results, previous absolute and relative experimental results and the available theory show only qualitative agreement. We will discuss the various systematic effects which affect this and other types of synchrotron-based measurements in this energy range. Support provided by the NSF (Grant PHY-0653379), DOE (LBNL/ALS) and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  20. Atomic layer deposition of 1D and 2D nickel nanostructures on graphite.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seung Wook; Yoon, Jaehong; Moon, Hyoung-Seok; Shong, Bonggeun; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2017-03-17

    One-dimensional (1D) nanowires (NWs) and two-dimensional (2D) thin films of Ni were deposited on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), using NH3 as a counter reactant. Thermal ALD using NH3 gas forms 1D NWs along step edges, while NH3 plasma enables the deposition of a continuous 2D film over the whole surface. The lateral and vertical growth rates of the Ni NWs are numerically modeled as a function of the number of ALD cycles. Pretreatment with NH3 gas promotes selectivity in deposition by the reduction of oxygenated functionalities on the HOPG surface. On the other hand, NH3 plasma pretreatment generates surface nitrogen species, and results in a morphological change in the basal plane of graphite, leading to active nucleation across the surface during ALD. The effects of surface nitrogen species on the nucleation of ALD Ni were theoretically studied by density functional theory calculations. Our results suggest that the properties of Ni NWs, such as their density and width, and the formation of Ni thin films on carbon surfaces can be controlled by appropriate use of NH3.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of 1D and 2D nickel nanostructures on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seung Wook; Yoon, Jaehong; Moon, Hyoung-Seok; Shong, Bonggeun; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2017-03-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanowires (NWs) and two-dimensional (2D) thin films of Ni were deposited on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), using NH3 as a counter reactant. Thermal ALD using NH3 gas forms 1D NWs along step edges, while NH3 plasma enables the deposition of a continuous 2D film over the whole surface. The lateral and vertical growth rates of the Ni NWs are numerically modeled as a function of the number of ALD cycles. Pretreatment with NH3 gas promotes selectivity in deposition by the reduction of oxygenated functionalities on the HOPG surface. On the other hand, NH3 plasma pretreatment generates surface nitrogen species, and results in a morphological change in the basal plane of graphite, leading to active nucleation across the surface during ALD. The effects of surface nitrogen species on the nucleation of ALD Ni were theoretically studied by density functional theory calculations. Our results suggest that the properties of Ni NWs, such as their density and width, and the formation of Ni thin films on carbon surfaces can be controlled by appropriate use of NH3.

  2. High-resistance liquid-crystal lens array for rotatable 2D/3D autostereoscopic display.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Jen, Tai-Hsiang; Ting, Chih-Hung; Huang, Yi-Pai

    2014-02-10

    A 2D/3D switchable and rotatable autostereoscopic display using a high-resistance liquid-crystal (Hi-R LC) lens array is investigated in this paper. Using high-resistance layers in an LC cell, a gradient electric-field distribution can be formed, which can provide a better lens-like shape of the refractive-index distribution. The advantages of the Hi-R LC lens array are its 2D/3D switchability, rotatability (in the horizontal and vertical directions), low driving voltage (~2 volts) and fast response (~0.6 second). In addition, the Hi-R LC lens array requires only a very simple fabrication process.

  3. Enhanced detection limit by dark mode perturbation in 2D photonic crystal slab refractive index sensors.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Costa; Lau, Wah Tung; Gad, Raanan; Akhavan, Hooman; Schilling, Ryan; Levi, Ofer

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate for the first time a 300nm thick, 300μm × 300μm 2D dielectric photonic crystal slab membrane with a quality factor of 10,600 by coupling light to slightly perturbed dark modes through alternating nano-hole sizes. The newly created fundamental guided resonances greatly reduce nano-fabrication accuracy requirements. Moreover, we created a new layer architecture resulting in electric field enhancement at the interface between the slab and sensing regions, and spectral sensitivity of >800 nm/RIU, that is, >0.8 of the single-mode theoretical upper limit of spectral sensitivity.

  4. Atomic displacements in quantum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusseault, Marisa; Boninsegni, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Displacements of atoms and molecules away from lattice sites in helium and parahydrogen solids at low temperature have been studied by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In the bcc phases of 3He and 4He, atomic displacements are largely quantum-mechanical in character, even at melting. The computed Lindemann ratio at melting is found to be in good agreement with experimental results for 4He. Unlike the case of helium, in solid parahydrogen there exists near melting a significant thermal contribution to molecular vibrations, accounting for roughly half of the total effect. Although the Lindemann ratio at melting is in quantitative agreement with experiment, computed molecular mean square fluctuations feature a clear temperature dependence, in disagreement with recent experimental observations.

  5. Stanene: Atomically Thick Free-standing Layer of 2D Hexagonal Tin

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sumit; Chaudhary, Raghvendra Pratap; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    Stanene is one of most important of 2D materials due to its potential to demonstrate room temperature topological effects due to opening of spin-orbit gap. In this pursuit we report synthesis and investigation of optical properties of stanene up to few layers, a two-dimensional hexagonal structural analogue of graphene. Atomic scale morphological and elemental characterization using HRTEM equipped with SAED and EDAX detectors confirm the presence of hexagonal lattice of Sn atoms. The position of Raman peak along with the inter-planar ‘d’ spacing obtained from SAED for prepared samples are in good agreement with that obtained from first principles calculations and confirm that the sheets are not (111) α-Sn sheets. Further, the optical signature calculated using density functional theory at ~191 nm and ~233 nm for low buckled stanene are in qualitative agreement with the measured UV-Vis absorption spectrum. AFM measurements suggest interlayer spacing of ~0.33 nm in good agreement with that reported for epitaxial stanene sheets. No traces of oxygen were observed in the EDAX spectrum suggesting the absence of any oxidized phases. This is also confirmed by Raman measurements by comparing with oxidized stanene sheets. PMID:27492139

  6. Cylindrical liquid crystal lenses system for autostereoscopic 2D/3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Huang, Yi-Pai; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Po-Hao; Chen, Po-Chuan; Tsai, Chao-Hsu

    2012-06-01

    The liquid crystal lenses system, which could be electrically controlled easily for autostereoscopic 2D/3D switchable display was proposed. The High-Resistance liquid crystal (HRLC) lens utilized less controlled electrodes and coated a high-resistance layer between the controlled-electrodes was proposed and was used in this paper. Compare with the traditional LC lens, the HR-LC Lens could provide smooth electric-potential distribution within the LC layer under driving status. Hence, the proposed HR-LC Lens had less circuit complexity, low driving voltage, and good optical performance also could be obtained. In addition, combining with the proposed driving method called dual-directional overdriving method, the above method could reduce the switching time by applying large voltage onto cell. Consequently, the total switching time could be further reduced to around 2second. It is believed that the LC lens system has high potential in the future.

  7. Transport properties of high quality heterostructures from unstable 2D crystals prepared in inert atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Geliang; Yang, Cao; Khestanova, Ekaterina; Mishchenko, Artem; Kretinin, Andy; Gorbachev, Roman; Novoselov, Konstantin; Andre, Geim; Manchester Group Team

    Many layered materials can be cleaved down to individual atomic planes, similar to graphene, but only a small minority of them are stable under ambient conditions. The rest reacts and decomposes in air, which has severely hindered their investigation and possible uses. Here we introduce a remedial approach based on cleavage, transfer, alignment and encapsulation of airsensitive crystals, all inside a controlled inert atmosphere. To illustrate the technology, we choose two archetypal two-dimensional crystals unstable in air: black phosphorus and niobium diselenide. Our field-effect devices made from their monolayers are conductive and fully stable under ambient conditions, in contrast to the counterparts processed in air. NbSe2 remains superconducting down to the monolayer thickness. Starting with a trilayer, phosphorene devices reach sufficiently high mobilities to exhibit Landau quantization. The approach offers a venue to significantly expand the range of experimentally accessible two-dimensional crystals and their heterostructures.

  8. Spectral Approach to Anderson Localization in a Disordered 2D Complex Plasma Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinova, Eva; Liaw, Constanze; Matthews, Lorin; Busse, Kyle; Hyde, Truell

    2016-10-01

    In condensed matter, a crystal without impurities acts like a perfect conductor for a travelling wave-particle. As the level of impurities reaches a critical value, the resistance in the crystal increases and the travelling wave-particle experiences a transition from an extended to a localized state, which is called Anderson localization. Due to its wide applicability, the subject of Anderson localization has grown into a rich field in both physics and mathematics. Here, we introduce the mathematics behind the spectral approach to localization in infinite disordered systems and provide physical interpretation in context of both quantum mechanics and classical physics. We argue that the spectral analysis is an important contribution to localization theory since it avoids issues related to the use of boundary conditions, scaling, and perturbation. To test accuracy and applicability we apply the spectral approach to the case of a 2D hexagonal complex plasma crystal used as a macroscopic analog for a graphene-like medium. Complex plasma crystals exhibit characteristic distance and time scales, which are easily observable by video microscopy. As such, these strongly coupled many-particle systems are ideal for the study of localization phenomena. The goal of this research is to both expand the spectral method into the classical regime and show the potential of complex plasma as a macroscopic tool for localization experiments. NSF / DOE funding is gratefully acknowledged - PHY1414523 & PHY1262031.

  9. 2D coordination polymers of macrocyclic oxamide with polycarboxylates: syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Qiu; Xu, Yan-Yan; Gao, Dong-Zhao; Zhang, Guo-Ying; Liu, Yiao-Xu; Wang, Jing; Liao, Dai-Zheng

    2012-05-14

    Five new 2D coordination polymers, [Co(nip)(CuL)(H(2)O)]·CH(3)OH (1), [Mn(ip)(NiL)]·0.63H(2)O (2), [Cu(ip)(CuL)] (3), [Mn(6)(CuL)(6)(btc)(4)(H(2)O)(4)]·7H(2)O (4), and [Cu(CuL)(Hbtc)(H(2)O)] (5)(ML, H(2)L = 2,3-dioxo-5,6,14,15-dibenzo-1,4,8,12-tetraazacyclo-pentadeca-7,13-diene; H(2)nip = 5-nitroisophthalic acid; H(2)ip = m-isophthalic acid; H(3)btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid) have been synthesized by a solvothermal method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complexes 1-5 exhibit different 2D layered structures formed by Co(2)Cu(2) (1), Mn(2)Ni(2) (2), Cu(4) (3), Mn(3)Ni(3) (4), Cu(4) (5) units, respectively, via the oxamide and diverse carboxylic acid bridges. Compounds 1, 2, 3 and 5 are uninodal 4-connected (4, 4)-grids topology, while complex 4 possesses a 2D network with (3, 4)-connected (4(2).8)(4)(4(3).6(2).8)(3) topology. The results of magnetic determination show pronounced antiferromagnetic interactions in 1-4.

  10. Evidence for a New Intermediate Phase in a Strongly Correlated 2D System near Wigner Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuan; Qiu, Richard; Goble, Nicholas; Serafin, Alex; Yin, Liang; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Sullivan, Neil; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    How the two dimensional (2D) quantum Wigner crystal (WC) transforms into the metallic liquid phase remains an outstanding problem in physics. In theories considering the 2D WC to liquid transition in the clean limit, it was suggested that a number of intermediate phases might exist. We have studied the transformation between the metallic fluid phase and the low magnetic field reentrant insulating phase (RIP) which was interpreted as due to the WC [Qiu et al., PRL 108, 106404 (2012)], in a strongly correlated 2D hole system in GaAs quantum well with large interaction parameter rs (~20-30) and high mobility. Instead of a sharp transition, we found that increasing density (or lowering rs) drives the RIP into a state where the incipient RIP coexists with Fermi liquid. This apparent mixture phase intermediate between Fermi liquid and WC also exhibits a non-trivial temperature dependent resistivity behavior which can be qualitatively understood by the reversed melting of WC in the mixture, in analogy to the Pomeranchuk effect in the solid-liquid mixture of Helium-3. X.G. thanks NSF (DMR-0906415) for supporting work at CWRU. Experiments at the NHMFL High B/T Facility were supported by NSF Grant 0654118 and the State of Florida. L.P. thanks the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and NSF MRSEC (DMR-0819860) for support.

  11. PMN-PT single crystal for endoscopic ultrasound 2D array application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuhang; Liang, Huageng; Zhu, Benpeng; Zhou, Dan; Yang, Xiaofei

    2017-03-01

    Based on lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single crystal, a 24 × 24 row-column addressing endoscopic two-dimensional array has been successfully fabricated using novel flanged electrodes and "semi-kerf" technologies. Each row/column array element was measured to have an electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.81, a center frequency of 5MHz, and a fractional bandwidth of approximately 88% at -6 dB. Of particular significance was that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate element exhibits much higher sensitivity compared with lead zirconate titanate-based 2D arrays with similar operational frequency and element area. According to the Field II simulated results, although the obtained beamwidth at -6 dB was a little inferior to that of the fully sampled 24 × 24 two-dimensional array, it is believed that the beamwidth can be improved by appropriately increasing the element number. These results demonstrated that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single-crystal 2D array is a promising candidate for real-time three-dimensional endoscopic ultrasound imaging.

  12. Red-green-blue 2 D tuneable liquid crystal laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, H. J.; Morris, S. M.; Ford, A. D.; Hands, P. J. W.; Wilkinson, T. D.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we review our recent experimental work on coherent and blue phase liquid crystal lasers.We will present results on thin-film photonic band edge lasing devices using dye-doped low molar mass liquid crystals in self-organised chiral nematic and blue phases. We show that high Q-factor lasers can be achieved in these materials and demonstrate that a single mode output with a very narrow line width can be readily achievable in well-aligned mono-domain samples. Further, we have found that the performance of the laser, i.e. the slope efficiency and the excitation threshold, are dependent upon the physical parameters of the low molar mass chiral nematic liquid crystals. Specifically, slope efficiencies greater than 60% could be achieved depending upon the materials used and the device geometry employed. We will discuss the important parameters of the liquid crystal host/dye guest materials and device configuration that are needed to achieve such high slope efficiencies. Further we demonstrate how the wavelength of the laser can be tuned using an in-plane electric field in a direction perpendicular to the helix axis via a flexoelectric mechanism as well as thermally using thermochromic effects. We will then briefly outline data on room temperature blue phase lasers and further show how liquid crystal/lenslet arrays have been used to demonstrate 2D laser emission of any desired wavelength. Finally, we present preliminary data on LED/incoherent pumping of RG liquid crystal lasers leading to a continuous wave output.

  13. Tight-Binding Approximations in 1D and 2D Coupled-Cavity Photonic Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Nicole C. L.

    Light confinement and controlling an optical field has numerous applications in the field of telecommunications for optical signals processing. When the wavelength of the electromagnetic field is on the order of the period of a photonic microstructure, the field undergoes reflection, refraction, and coherent scattering. This produces photonic bandgaps, forbidden frequency regions or spectral stop bands where light cannot exist. Dielectric perturbations that break the perfect periodicity of these structures produce what is analogous to an impurity state in the bandgap of a semiconductor. The defect modes that exist at discrete frequencies within the photonic bandgap are spatially localized about the cavity-defects in the photonic crystal. In this thesis the properties of two tight-binding approximations (TBAs) are investigated in one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled-cavity photonic crystal structures. We require an efficient and simple approach that ensures the continuity of the electromagnetic field across dielectric interfaces in complex structures. In this thesis we develop E- and D-TBAs to calculate the modes in finite 1D and 2D two-defect coupled-cavity photonic crystal structures. In the E- and D-TBAs we expand the coupled-cavity [vector electron]-modes in terms of the individual [vector electron]- and [vector D meson]-modes, respectively. We investigate the dependence of the defect modes, their frequencies and quality factors on the relative placement of the defects in the photonic crystal structures. We then elucidate the differences between the two TBA formulations, and describe the conditions under which these formulations may be more robust when encountering a dielectric perturbation. Our 1D analysis showed that the 1D modes were sensitive to the structure geometry. The antisymmetric D mode amplitudes show that the D. TBA did not capture the correct (tangential [vector electron]-field) boundary conditions. However, the D-TBA did not yield

  14. Crystal and electronic characterization of Nd{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}BO{sub 2+d} semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkendir, Osman Murat

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Crystal and electronic structure properties of Nd{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}BO{sub 2+d} structure were investigated. • New crystal structures for Nd–Ti complexes are determined. • Distortions in the crystal structure were observed as a result of Boron shortage. • Prominent change in electronic properties of the samples with the increasing Nd amount. - Abstract: Neodymium substituted TiBO{sub 3} samples were investigated according to their crystal, electric and electronic properties. Studies were conducted by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technique for the samples with different substitutions in the preparation processes. To achieve better crystal structure results during the study, XRD pattern results were supported by extended-XAFS (EXAFS) analysis. The electronic structure analysis were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) measurements at the room temperatures. Due to the substituted Nd atoms, prominent changes in crystal structure, new crystal geometries for Nd-Ti complexes, phase transitions in the crystals structure were detected according to the increasing Nd substitutions in the samples. In the entire stages of the substitutions, Nd atoms were observed as governing the whole phenomena due to their dominant characteristics in Ti geometries. Besides, electrical resistivity decay was determined in the materials with the increasing amount of Nd substitution.

  15. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-01

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model.

  16. Polymorphic polytypic transition induced in crystals by interaction of spirals and 2D growth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilano, Dino; Veesler, Stéphane; Astier, Jean Pierre; Pastero, Linda

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between crystal polymorphism and polytypism can be revealed by surface patterns through the interlacing of the growth spirals. Simple high-symmetry structures as SiC, ZnS, CdI2 and more complex low-symmetry layered structures as n-paraffins, n-alcohols and micas are concerned with polymorphic-polytypic transition. In this paper, we will show for the first time, through in situ AFM observations and X-ray diffractometry, that a protein polymorph (P2 12 12 1α-amylase) locally changes, during growth, to a monoclinic P2 1 polytype, thanks to the screw dislocation activity. The interplay between spiral steps and 2D nuclei of the polytypes coexisting in the same crystalline individual allows to foresee the consequences on the crystal quality. The discussion is extended to other mineral and biological molecules and a new general rule is proposed to explain the interactions between surface patterns and the bulk crystal structure.

  17. Insight into the crystallization of amorphous imine-linked polymer networks to 2D covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Overholts, Anna C; Hwang, Nicky; Dichtel, William R

    2016-03-04

    We explore the crystallization of a high surface area imine-linked two-dimensional covalent organic framework (2D COF). The growth process reveals rapid initial formation of an amorphous network that subsequently crystallizes into the layered 2D network. The metastable amorphous polymer may be isolated and resubjected to growth conditions to form the COF. These experiments provide the first mechanistic insight into the mechanism of imine-linked 2D COF formation, which is distinct from that of boronate-ester linked COFs.

  18. Strain-engineered diffusive atomic switching in two-dimensional crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalikka, Janne; Zhou, Xilin; Dilcher, Eric; Wall, Simon; Li, Ju; Simpson, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Strain engineering is an emerging route for tuning the bandgap, carrier mobility, chemical reactivity and diffusivity of materials. Here we show how strain can be used to control atomic diffusion in van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional (2D) crystals. We use strain to increase the diffusivity of Ge and Te atoms that are confined to 5 Å thick 2D planes within an Sb2Te3-GeTe van der Waals superlattice. The number of quintuple Sb2Te3 2D crystal layers dictates the strain in the GeTe layers and consequently its diffusive atomic disordering. By identifying four critical rules for the superlattice configuration we lay the foundation for a generalizable approach to the design of switchable van der Waals heterostructures. As Sb2Te3-GeTe is a topological insulator, we envision these rules enabling methods to control spin and topological properties of materials in reversible and energy efficient ways.

  19. Spontaneous Crystallization of Light and Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, S.; Piazza, F.; Ritsch, H.

    2016-04-01

    Coherent scattering of light from ultracold atoms involves an exchange of energy and momentum introducing a wealth of nonlinear dynamical phenomena. As a prominent example, particles can spontaneously form stationary periodic configurations that simultaneously maximize the light scattering and minimize the atomic potential energy in the emerging optical lattice. Such self-ordering effects resulting in periodic lattices via bimodal symmetry breaking have been experimentally observed with cold gases and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) inside an optical resonator. Here, we study a new regime of periodic pattern formation for an atomic BEC in free space, driven by far off-resonant counterpropagating and noninterfering lasers of orthogonal polarization. In contrast to previous works, no spatial light modes are preselected by any boundary conditions and the transition from homogeneous to periodic order amounts to a crystallization of both light and ultracold atoms breaking a continuous translational symmetry. In the crystallized state the BEC acquires a phase similar to a supersolid with an emergent intrinsic length scale whereas the light field forms an optical lattice allowing phononic excitations via collective backscattering, which are gapped due to the infinte-range interactions. The system we study constitutes a novel configuration allowing the simulation of synthetic solid-state systems with ultracold atoms including long-range phonon dynamics.

  20. Influence of lattice defects on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour of 2D magnonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Manzin, Alessandra; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Coïsson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies, from a modelling point of view, the influence of randomly distributed lattice defects (non-patterned areas and variable hole size) on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour and spin wave mode profiles of 2D magnonic crystals based on Ni80Fe20 antidot arrays with hexagonal lattice. A reference sample is first defined via the comparison of experimental and simulated hysteresis loops and magnetoresistive curves of patterned films, prepared by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Second, a parametric analysis of the dynamic response is performed, investigating how edge, quasi-uniform and localized modes are affected by alterations of the lattice geometry and bias field amplitude. Finally, some results about the possible use of magnetic antidot arrays in frequency-based sensors for magnetic bead detection are presented, highlighting the need for an accurate control of microstructural features. PMID:26911336

  1. Vertically magnetic-controlled THz modulator based on 2-D magnetized plasma photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Chen, He-ming; Ji, Ke; Zhuang, Yuyang

    2017-02-01

    A novel magnetized plasma modulator for THz range is proposed. The structure is based on 2-D photonic crystal (PC) constructed by triangular lattice of Si rods in air with line defects and an InSb rod as a point defect. Based on the magneto-optic effect, the resonant frequency can be tuned by the external magnetic field and the radius of point defect. The transfer and disappearance of the PC-based mode can be realized by utilizing a waveguide and a plasma cavity. The simulation results show that PC-based mode disappearance modulator has the potential for THz wireless broadband communication system with a good performance of high contrast ratio (<33.61 dB), low insertion loss (<0.36 dB) and high modulation rate (∼4 GHz).

  2. 2D photonic crystals on the Archimedean lattices (tribute to Johannes Kepler (1571 1630))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajić, R.; class="cross-out">D. Jovanović,

    2008-03-01

    Results of our research on 2D Archemedean lattice photonic crystals are presented. This involves the calculations of the band structures, band-gap maps, equifrequency contours and FDTD simulations of electromagnetic propagation through the structures as well as an experimental verification of negative refraction at microwaves. The band-gap dependence on dielectric contrast is established both for dielectric rods in air and air-holes in dielectric materials. A special emphasis is placed on possibilities of negative refraction and left-handedness in these structures. Together with the familiar Archimedean lattices like square, triangular, honeycomb and Kagome' ones, we consider also, the less known, (3 2, 4, 3, 4) (ladybug) and (3, 4, 6, 4) (honeycomb-ring) structures.

  3. Nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses in a 2D nonlinear photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Vyunishev, A M; Arkhipkin, V G; Slabko, V V; Baturin, I S; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya; Chirkin, A S

    2015-09-01

    We study second-harmonic generation (SHG) of femtosecond laser pulses in a rectangular two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal (NLPC). Multiple SH beams were observed in the vicinity of the propagation direction of the fundamental beam. It has been verified that the angular positions of these beams obey the conditions of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction (NRND). The measured SH spectra of specific NRND orders consist of narrow peaks that experience a high-frequency spectral shift as the order grows. We derive an analytical expression for the process studied and find the theoretical results to be in good agreement with the experimental data. We estimate the enhancement factor of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction in 2D NLPC to be 70.

  4. Atomic force microscopy on liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Christian; Schulz, Benjamin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the atomic force microscopy (AFM) on thermotropic liquid crystals. We first give a general introduction to the technique of AFM and then describe the special requirements that have to be met for the imaging of liquid-crystalline surfaces. We also discuss the relation between the quality or reliability of the imaging results and various parameters of the scanning conditions. We briey review the existing work on AFM on liquid crystals and finally describe applications beyond the imaging, such as molecular force spectroscopy or manipulation of surface structures.

  5. Determining ice water content from 2D crystal images in convective cloud systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Coutris, Pierre; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2016-04-01

    Cloud microphysical in-situ instrumentation measures bulk parameters like total water content (TWC) and/or derives particle size distributions (PSD) (utilizing optical spectrometers and optical array probes (OAP)). The goal of this work is to introduce a comprehensive methodology to compute TWC from OAP measurements, based on the dataset collected during recent HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals)/HIWC (High Ice Water Content) field campaigns. Indeed, the HAIC/HIWC field campaigns in Darwin (2014) and Cayenne (2015) provide a unique opportunity to explore the complex relationship between cloud particle mass and size in ice crystal environments. Numerous mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were sampled with the French Falcon 20 research aircraft at different temperature levels from -10°C up to 50°C. The aircraft instrumentation included an IKP-2 (isokinetic probe) to get reliable measurements of TWC and the optical array probes 2D-S and PIP recording images over the entire ice crystal size range. Based on the known principle relating crystal mass and size with a power law (m=α•Dβ), Fontaine et al. (2014) performed extended 3D crystal simulations and thereby demonstrated that it is possible to estimate the value of the exponent β from OAP data, by analyzing the surface-size relationship for the 2D images as a function of time. Leroy et al. (2015) proposed an extended version of this method that produces estimates of β from the analysis of both the surface-size and perimeter-size relationships. Knowing the value of β, α then is deduced from the simultaneous IKP-2 TWC measurements for the entire HAIC/HIWC dataset. The statistical analysis of α and β values for the HAIC/HIWC dataset firstly shows that α is closely linked to β and that this link changes with temperature. From these trends, a generalized parameterization for α is proposed. Finally, the comparison with the initial IKP-2 measurements demonstrates that the method is able to predict TWC values

  6. 2D photonic crystal complete band gap search using a cyclic cellular automaton refination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, R.; Castañón, G.; Hernández-Figueroa, H. E.

    2014-11-01

    We present a refination method based on a cyclic cellular automaton (CCA) that simulates a crystallization-like process, aided with a heuristic evolutionary method called differential evolution (DE) used to perform an ordered search of full photonic band gaps (FPBGs) in a 2D photonic crystal (PC). The solution is proposed as a combinatorial optimization of the elements in a binary array. These elements represent the existence or absence of a dielectric material surrounded by air, thus representing a general geometry whose search space is defined by the number of elements in such array. A block-iterative frequency-domain method was used to compute the FPBGs on a PC, when present. DE has proved to be useful in combinatorial problems and we also present an implementation feature that takes advantage of the periodic nature of PCs to enhance the convergence of this algorithm. Finally, we used this methodology to find a PC structure with a 19% bandgap-to-midgap ratio without requiring previous information of suboptimal configurations and we made a statistical study of how it is affected by disorder in the borders of the structure compared with a previous work that uses a genetic algorithm.

  7. New optimization problems arising in modelling of 2D-crystal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, Yury; Lurie, Sergey; Posypkin, Mikhail

    2016-10-01

    The paper considers the problem of finding the structure of a fragment of two-dimensional crystal lattice with the minimal energy. Atoms in a lattice reside on parallel lines (layers). The interatomic distances are the same within one layer but can differ for distinct layers. The energy of the piece of material is computed using so-called potential functions. We used Lennard-Jones, Morse and Tersoff potentials. The proposed formulation can serve as a scalable complex non-smooth optimization test. The paper evaluates various optimization techniques for the problem under consideration, compares their performances and draws the conclusion about the best choice of optimization methods for the problem under test. As a result we were able to locate minima meaningful from the physical point of view, e.g. reproducing graphene lattice.

  8. Single crystal diamond boron 'delta doped' nanometric layers for 2D electronic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, James

    2016-10-01

    Use of diamond as a semiconductor material suffers from the high activation energy of all known impurity dopants (0.37 eV for Boron, 0.6 eV for Phosphorous). To achieve the simultaneous carrier concentration and mobility desired for devices operating at room temperature, growth of a nanometric thick `delta' layer doped to above the metal insulator transition adjacent to high mobility intrinsic material can provide a 2D high mobility conduction layer. Critical to obtaining the enhanced mobility of the carriers in the layer next to the `delta' doped layer is the abruptness of the doping interface. Single and multiple nanometer thick epitaxial layers of heavily boron `delta' doped diamond have been grown on high quality, intrinsic lab grown diamond single crystals. These layers were grown in a custom microwave plasma activated chemical vapor deposition reactor based on a rapid reactant switching technique. Characterization of the `delta' layers by various analytical techniques will be presented. Electrical measurements demonstrating enhanced hole mobility (100 to 800 cm2/V sec) as well as other electrical characterizations will be presented.

  9. Fabrication of an Omnidirectional 2D Photonic Crystal Emitter for Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmakh, V.; Chan, W. R.; Ghebrebrhan, M.; Soljacic, M.; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Celanovic, I.

    2016-11-01

    In a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system, a heat source brings an emitter to incandescence and the spectrally confined thermal radiation is converted to electricity by a low-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cell. Efficiency is dominated by the emitter's ratio of in-band emissivity (convertible by the PV cell) to out-of-band emissivity (inconvertible). Two-dimensional photonic crystals (PhCs) offer high in-band emissivity and low out-of-band emissivity at normal incidence, but have reduced in-band emissivity off-normal. According to Lambert's law, most thermal radiation occurs off-normal. An omnidirectional PhC capable of high in-band emissivity at all angles would increase total in-band power by 55% at 1200°C. In this work, we present the first experimental demonstration an omnidirectional hafnia-filled 2D tantalum PhC emitter suitable for TPV applications such as combustion, radioisotope, and solar TPV. Dielectric filling improved the hemispherical performance without sacrificing stability or ease of fabrication. The numerical simulations, fabrication processes, and optical and thermal characterizations of the PhC are presented in this paper.

  10. Experimental Studies of Pinning Effects in 2D Colloidal Crystals Using Microstructured Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullin, Sylvia; Gerritsen, H. J.; Ling, Xinsheng

    1998-03-01

    We use microstructured substrates as tunable quenched symmetry-breaking fields to study the pinning effects in 2D colloidal crystals. The colloids are monodisperse charged polystyrene microspheres in pure water. In the sealed sample cell, the colloids are confined by two glass slides. A patterned plastic grating is glued on one side of the confining slides. The corrugated surface of the plastic grating becomes charged in water and exerts a periodic electric field on the charged microspheres, tunable by adjusting the confinement distance. We show that, for the first time, by using video microscopy one can observe in real time the novel effects due to the competing interactions. For example, with a square grating we have observed the Novaco-McTague rotation in a floating phase and the Pokrovsky-Talapov domain wall superlattice in a pinned phase. The results from a rough plastic substrate which simulates a random potential (in an attempt to search for a colloidal Bragg glass phase) will also be discussed. This work was supported by the startup funds and a Richard Salomon Faculty Research Award from Brown.

  11. Atomic-scale insights into 1D and 2D nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Migliorato, M.; Pan, C.-T.; Harvey, A. J.; Kepatsoglou, D. M.; Ramasse, Q. M.

    2015-10-01

    Atomic resolution imaging and narrow-energy spread spectroscopy in aberration corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, in combination with DFT modelling has made it possible to uncover atomic-scale morphology, defect constellations, lattice impurities and ad-atoms in nano-materials, as well as revealing their influence on the surrounding bandstructure. Using atomic-scale imaging, EEL spectroscopy and EFTEM, we address issues beyond the more common investigations of their atomic lattice structure. We focus on the demonstration of (i) ripples in graphene and on effects of (ii) metal ad-atoms as well as of (iii) controllably introduced impurities -via low energy ion implantation- in both, graphene and carbon nanotubes, on the electronic band structure. We demonstrate the creation of a new feature with collective charge carrier behaviour (plasmon) in the UV/vis range in graphene and carbon nanotubes via EEL spectrum imaging and EFTEM, and support this with dielectric theory modelling.

  12. Atomic thin titania nanosheet-coupled reduced graphene oxide 2D heterostructures for enhanced photocatalytic activity and fast lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong Jun; Huang, Zhegang; Hwang, Tae Hoon; Narayan, Rekha; Choi, Jang Wook; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Realizing practical high performance materials and devices using the properties of 2D materials is of key research interest in the materials science field. In particular, building well-defined heterostructures using more than two different 2D components in a rational way is highly desirable. In this paper, a 2D heterostructure consisting of atomic thin titania nanosheets densely grown on reduced graphene oxide surface is successfully prepared through incorporating polymer functionalized graphene oxide into the novel TiO2 nanosheets synthesis scheme. As a result of the synergistic combination of a highly accessible surface area and abundant interface, which can modulate the physicochemical properties, the resultant heterostructure can be used in high efficiency visible light photocatalysis as well as fast energy storage with a long lifecycle. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. International Technical Exchange on 2D Atomic Sheets: Optoelectronics, Strain, and Energy Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd, Austin, TX 78758, U.S.A. etutuc@mer.utexas.edu Abstract Vertical heterostructures consisting of atomic layers separated...accessible in single layer devices. In this presentation we discuss two examples of vertical heterostructures of atomic layer materials, where...Engineering Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 In this paper, we will discuss recent advances in the study of atomically thin layers of

  14. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  15. Probing Magnetism in 2D Molecular Networks after in Situ Metalation by Transition Metal Atoms.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, K; Ivanova, Ts; Li, Z; Iancu, V; Janssens, E; Van Haesendonck, C

    2015-03-19

    Metalated molecules are the ideal building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of, e.g., two-dimensional arrays of magnetic particles for spintronics applications. Compared to chemical synthesis, metalation after network formation by an atom beam can yield a higher degree of control and flexibility and allows for mixing of different types of magnetic atoms. We report on successful metalation of tetrapyridyl-porphyrins (TPyP) by Co and Cr atoms, as demonstrated by scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. For the metalation, large periodic networks formed by the TPyP molecules on a Ag(111) substrate are exposed in situ to an atom beam. Voltage-induced dehydrogenation experiments support the conclusion that the porphyrin macrocycle of the TPyP molecule incorporates one transition metal atom. The newly synthesized Co-TPyP and Cr-TPyP complexes exhibit striking differences in their electronic behavior, leading to a magnetic character for Cr-TPyP only as evidenced by Kondo resonance measurements.

  16. Atomic density functional and diagram of structures in the phase field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankudinov, V. E.; Galenko, P. K.; Kropotin, N. V.; Krivilyov, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    The phase field crystal model provides a continual description of the atomic density over the diffusion time of reactions. We consider a homogeneous structure (liquid) and a perfect periodic crystal, which are constructed from the one-mode approximation of the phase field crystal model. A diagram of 2D structures is constructed from the analytic solutions of the model using atomic density functionals. The diagram predicts equilibrium atomic configurations for transitions from the metastable state and includes the domains of existence of homogeneous, triangular, and striped structures corresponding to a liquid, a body-centered cubic crystal, and a longitudinal cross section of cylindrical tubes. The method developed here is employed for constructing the diagram for the homogeneous liquid phase and the body-centered iron lattice. The expression for the free energy is derived analytically from density functional theory. The specific features of approximating the phase field crystal model are compared with the approximations and conclusions of the weak crystallization and 2D melting theories.

  17. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kukk, E.; Wills, A.A.; Langer, B.; Bozek, J.D.; Berrah, N.

    2004-09-02

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions.

  18. A 2D Rods-in-Air Square-Lattice Photonic Crystal Optical Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    photonic crystal switches, IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 18 (2) (2006) 358–360. [8] Y. Kanamori , K. Inoue, K. Horie, K. Hane, Photonic crystal switch by...Waikoloa, Hawaii, USA, pp. 107–108. [9] K. Umemori, Y. Kanamori , K. Hane, A photonic crystal waveguide switch with a movable bridge slab, in: Proceedings of...Umemori, Yoshiaki Kanamori , Kazuhiro Hane, Photonic crystal waveguide switch with a microelectromechanical actuator, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 (2) (2006

  19. 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1) surface: atomic arrangement and electronic band structure.

    PubMed

    Gruznev, D V; Bondarenko, L V; Tupchaya, A Y; Eremeev, S V; Mihalyuk, A N; Chou, J P; Wei, C M; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2017-01-25

    Structural transformations and evolution of the electron band structure in the (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) system have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The two 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1), [Formula: see text]-(Tl, Pb) and [Formula: see text]-(Tl, Pb), have been found and their composition, atomic arrangement and electron properties has been characterized. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compound is almost identical to the alike (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] system from the viewpoint of its atomic structure and electronic properties. They contain 1.0 ML of Tl atoms arranged into a honeycomb network of chained trimers and 1/3 ML of Pb atoms occupying the centers of the honeycomb units. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compound contains six Tl atoms and seven Pb atoms per [Formula: see text] unit cell (i.e.  ∼0.67 ML Tl and  ∼0.78 ML Pb). Its atomic structure can be visualized as consisting of Pb hexagons surrounded by Tl trimers. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] and (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compounds are metallic and their band structures contain spin-split surface-state bands. By analogy with the (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text], these (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) compounds are believed to be promising objects for prospective studies of superconductivity in one-atom-layer systems.

  20. 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1) surface: atomic arrangement and electronic band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruznev, D. V.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Eremeev, S. V.; Mihalyuk, A. N.; Chou, J. P.; Wei, C. M.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Structural transformations and evolution of the electron band structure in the (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) system have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The two 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1), \\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} -(Tl, Pb) and 3× 3 -(Tl, Pb), have been found and their composition, atomic arrangement and electron properties has been characterized. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} compound is almost identical to the alike (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} system from the viewpoint of its atomic structure and electronic properties. They contain 1.0 ML of Tl atoms arranged into a honeycomb network of chained trimers and 1/3 ML of Pb atoms occupying the centers of the honeycomb units. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)3× 3 compound contains six Tl atoms and seven Pb atoms per 3× 3 unit cell (i.e.  ˜0.67 ML Tl and  ˜0.78 ML Pb). Its atomic structure can be visualized as consisting of Pb hexagons surrounded by Tl trimers. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} and (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)3× 3 compounds are metallic and their band structures contain spin-split surface-state bands. By analogy with the (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} , these (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) compounds are believed to be promising objects for prospective studies of superconductivity in one-atom-layer systems.

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Cytochrome P450 2D6 with Prinomastat Bound*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An; Savas, Uzen; Hsu, Mei-Hui; Stout, C. David; Johnson, Eric F.

    2012-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2D6 contributes to the metabolism of >15% of drugs used in clinical practice. This study determined the structure of P450 2D6 complexed with a substrate and potent inhibitor, prinomastat, to 2.85 Å resolution by x-ray crystallography. Prinomastat binding is well defined by electron density maps with its pyridyl nitrogen bound to the heme iron. The structure of ligand-bound P450 2D6 differs significantly from the ligand-free structure reported for the P450 2D6 Met-374 variant (Protein Data Bank code 2F9Q). Superposition of the structures reveals significant differences for β sheet 1, helices A, F, F′, G″, G, and H as well as the helix B-C loop. The structure of the ligand complex exhibits a closed active site cavity that conforms closely to the shape of prinomastat. The closure of the open cavity seen for the 2F9Q structure reflects a change in the direction and pitch of helix F and introduction of a turn at Gly-218, which is followed by a well defined helix F′ that was not observed in the 2F9Q structure. These differences reflect considerable structural flexibility that is likely to contribute to the catalytic versatility of P450 2D6, and this new structure provides an alternative model for in silico studies of substrate interactions with P450 2D6. PMID:22308038

  2. Determination of absolute configuration using heavy atom based co-crystallization method: Halogen atom effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Fan, Xiaowu; Ding, Qiaoce; Mei, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Heavy atom (chloride, bromide, and iodide) based co-crystals for determination of absolute configuration (AC) for chiral molecules were synthesized and evaluated. Co-crystals of cholestanol and L-ascorbic acid were analysed and the effects and potential benefits of varying the heavy atom are discussed. Changing the halogen atoms (chloride, bromide, or iodide) affects the co-crystal formation, X-ray absorption, and anomalous dispersion, and hence the ability to determine AC.

  3. FDTD analysis of 2D triangular-lattice photonic crystals with arbitrary-shape inclusions based on unit cell transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zetao; Ogusu, Kazuhiko

    2009-04-01

    A finite-difference time-domain method based on Yee's orthogonal cell is utilized to calculate the band structures of 2D triangular-lattice-based photonic crystals through a simple modification to properly shifting the boundaries of the original unit cell. A strategy is proposed for transforming the triangular unit cell into an orthogonal one, which can be used to calculate the band structures of 2D PhCs with various shapes of inclusions, such as triangular, quadrangular, and hexagonal shapes, to overcome the shortage of plane-wave expansion method for circular one. The band structures of 2D triangular-lattice-based PhCs with hexagonal air-holes are calculated and discussed for different values of its radius and rotation angle. The obtained results provide an insight to manipulate the band structures of PhCs.

  4. 2D and 3D crystallization of a bacterial homologue of human vitamin C membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Harder, Daniel; Ucurum, Zöhre; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-10-01

    Most organisms are able to synthesize vitamin C whereas humans are not. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the molecular working mechanism of vitamin C transport through biological membranes, we cloned, overexpressed, purified, functionally characterized, and 2D- and 3D-crystallized a bacterial protein (UraDp) with 29% of amino acid sequence identity to the human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 (SVCT1). Ligand-binding experiments by scintillation proximity assay revealed that uracil is a substrate preferably bound to UraDp. For structural analysis, we report on the production of tubular 2D crystals and present a first projection structure of UraDp from negatively stained tubes. On the other hand the successful growth of UraDp 3D crystals and their crystallographic analysis is described. These 3D crystals, which diffract X-rays to 4.2Å resolution, pave the way towards the high-resolution crystal structure of a bacterial homologue with high amino acid sequence identity to human SVCT1.

  5. William Barlow and the Determination of Atomic Arrangement in Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mauskopf, Seymour H

    2015-04-01

    William Barlow (1845-1934) was an important if unconventional scientist, known for having developed the 'closest-packing' atomic models of crystal structure. He resumed an early nineteenth-century tradition of utilizing crystallographical and chemical data to determine atomic arrangements in crystals. This essay recounts Barlow's career and scientific activity in three parts: (a) His place in the tradition of determining atomic arrangement in context of this earlier tradition and of contemporaneous developments of crystallography and chemistry, (b) his unconventional career, and (c) the 'success' of his program to determine atomic arrangements in crystals and its influence on the work of William Lawrence Bragg.

  6. Beyond Graphene: Advanced 2D Electronic and Optoelectronic Crystals and Devices for Next Generation Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-25

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The discovery of graphene, made of an individual atomic -thick layer of carbon, could be considered as a defining point in...fascinating properties of atomic layers of other layered materials in the form of MeX2 (where Me = transition metal such as Mo, W, Ti, Nb, etc. and X = S...Se, or Te), and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), which upon reduction to single/few atomic layers , will offer functional flexibility, new physico

  7. Quantitative Subsurface Atomic Structure Fingerprint for 2D Materials and Heterostructures by First-Principles-Calibrated Contact-Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Parlak, Zehra; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J; Blum, Volker; Zauscher, Stefan

    2016-07-26

    Interfaces and subsurface layers are critical for the performance of devices made of 2D materials and heterostructures. Facile, nondestructive, and quantitative ways to characterize the structure of atomically thin, layered materials are thus essential to ensure control of the resultant properties. Here, we show that contact-resonance atomic force microscopy-which is exquisitely sensitive to stiffness changes that arise from even a single atomic layer of a van der Waals-adhered material-is a powerful experimental tool to address this challenge. A combined density functional theory and continuum modeling approach is introduced that yields sub-surface-sensitive, nanomechanical fingerprints associated with specific, well-defined structure models of individual surface domains. Where such models are known, this information can be correlated with experimentally obtained contact-resonance frequency maps to reveal the (sub)surface structure of different domains on the sample.

  8. Atomically Precise Prediction of 2D Self-Assembly of Weakly Bonded Nanostructures: STM Insight into Concentration-Dependent Architectures.

    PubMed

    El Garah, Mohamed; Dianat, Arezoo; Cadeddu, Andrea; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cecchini, Marco; Cook, Timothy R; Ciesielski, Artur; Stang, Peter J; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-01-20

    A joint experimental and computational study is reported on the concentration-dependant self-assembly of a flat C3 -symmetric molecule on a graphite surface. As a model system a tripodal molecule, 1,3,5-tris(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)benzene, has been chosen, which can adopt either C3h or Cs symmetry when planar, as a result of pyridyl rotation along the alkynyl spacers. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations of 2D nanopatterns with different surface coverage reveal that the molecule can generate different types of self-assembled motifs. The stability of fourteen 2D patterns and the influence of concentration are analyzed. It is found that ordered, densely packed monolayers and 2D porous networks are obtained at high and low concentrations, respectively. A concentration-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigation of this molecular self-assembly system at a solution/graphite interface reveals four supramolecular motifs, which are in perfect agreement with those predicted by simulations. Therefore, this DFT method represents a key step forward toward the atomically precise prediction of molecular self-assembly on surfaces and at interfaces.

  9. Watching Silica's Dance: Imaging the Structure and Dynamics of the Atomic (Re-) Arrangements in 2D Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, David

    2014-03-01

    Even though glasses are almost ubiquitous--in our windows, on our iPhones, even on our faces--they are also mysterious. Because glasses are notoriously difficult to study, basic questions like: ``How are the atoms arranged? Where and how do glasses break?'' are still under contention. We use aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image the atoms in a new two-dimensional phase of silica glass - freestanding it becomes the world's thinnest pane of glass at only 3-atoms thick, and take a unique look into these questions. Using atom-by-atom imaging and spectroscopy, we are able to reconstruct the full structure and bonding of this 2D glass and identify it as a bi-tetrahedral layer of SiO2. Our images also strikingly resemble Zachariasen's original cartoon models of glasses, drawn in 1932. As such, our work realizes an 80-year-old vision for easily understandable glassy systems and introduces promising methods to test theoretical predictions against experimental data. We image atoms in the disordered solid and track their motions in response to local strain. We directly obtain ring statistics and pair distribution functions that span short-, medium-, and long-range order, and test these against long-standing theoretical predictions of glass structure and dynamics. We use the electron beam to excite atomic rearrangements, producing surprisingly rich and beautiful videos of how a glass bends and breaks, as well as the exchange of atoms at a solid/liquid interface. Detailed analyses of these videos reveal a complex dance of elastic and plastic deformations, phase transitions, and their interplay. These examples illustrate the wide-ranging and fundamental materials physics that can now be studied at atomic-resolution via transmission electron microscopy of two-dimensional glasses. Work in collaboration with: S. Kurasch, U. Kaiser, R. Hovden, Q. Mao, J. Kotakoski, J. S. Alden, A. Shekhawat, A. A. Alemi, J. P. Sethna, P. L. McEuen, A.V. Krasheninnikov

  10. Second-harmonic generation in quaternary atomically thin layered AgInP2S6 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingzhi; Du, Kezhao; Liu, Weiwei; Hu, Peng; Lu, Xin; Xu, Weigao; Kloc, Christian; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear effects in two-dimensional (2D) atomic layered materials have attracted increasing interest. Here, we report the observation of optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) in two-dimensional atomically thin silver indium phosphorus sulfide (AgInP2S6) crystals, with odd layer thickness. The nonlinear signal facilitates the use of thickness-dependent SHG intensity to investigate the stacking type of this material, while the crystal-orientation dependent SHG intensity of the monolayer sample reveals the rotational symmetry of the AgInP2S6 lattice in plane. Our studies expand the 2D crystal family in nonlinear effect field, which opened considerable promise to the functionalities and potential applications of 2D materials.

  11. Effects of NKG2D haplotypes on the cell-surface expression of NKG2D protein on natural killer and CD8 T cells of peripheral blood among atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kazue; Hayashi, Tomonori; Yamaoka, Mika; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Nakachi, Kei

    2012-06-01

    NKG2D is a primary activating receptor that triggers cell-mediated cytotoxicity in NK cells against tumor and virus-infected cells. We previously identified the NKG2D haplotypes in the natural killer gene complex region on chromosome 12p. Two major haplotype alleles, LNK1 and HNK1, were closely related to low and high natural cytotoxic activity phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, the haplotype of HNK1/HNK1 has revealed a decreased risk of cancer compared with LNK1/LNK1. In the present study, using flow cytometry, we evaluated the functional effects of NKG2D haplotypes and five htSNPs in terms of the cell-surface expression of NKG2D protein on NK and CD8 T cells of peripheral blood among 732 atomic-bomb survivors. NKG2D expression on NK cells showed significant increases, in the order of LNK1/LNK1, LNK1/HNK1 and HNK1/HNK1 haplotypes (p for trend=0.003), or with major homozygous, heterozygous, and minor homozygous genotypes for individual htSNPs (p for trend=0.02-0.003). The same trend was observed for NKG2D expression on CD8 T cells. Our findings indicate that the NKG2D haplotypes are associated with the expression levels of NKG2D protein on NK and CD8 T cells, resulting in inter-individual variations in human cytotoxic response.

  12. Formation of 2D photonic crystal bars by simultaneous photoelectrochemical etching of trenches and macropores in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Astrova, E. V. Fedulova, G. V.; Guschina, E. V.

    2010-12-15

    Joint electrochemical etching of deep macropores and trenches in n-Si (100) has been studied. After the substrate was removed, regions of a sample, bounded on all sides by a closed contour of through trenches, were extracted from the sample, with narrow bars of a 2D photonic crystal remaining. The influence exerted by the distance between pores and a trench and by the modes of etching and subsequent oxidation on the roughness of the side walls of the structures and also on the size and shape of pores near the trench is analyzed for the example of a photonic crystal with a square lattice of macropores. Conditions are found in which the lattice distortion of the photonic crystal is at a minimum and the side walls of the structure are the smoothest (root-mean-square roughness height {approx}60 nm).

  13. The development of a 2D ultrasonic array system for the in situ inspection of single crystal turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Dunhill, A. K.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    Modern jet-engine turbine blades are cast from single crystals of nickel-based superalloys because of the excellent mechanical properties that these materials exhibit at high temperatures. However, the anisotropic behavior of single crystals causes difficulties when using ultrasound to inspect these components for defects that could potentially initiate in-service. This paper describes the development of a 2D ultrasonic array system for the in situ inspection of these components. The problems associated with the inspection of anisotropic single crystal materials such as the directional dependence of the ultrasonic velocity, beam directivities in anisotropic media and the variation in the crystallographic orientation, are all addressed in this paper. In addition, constraints regarding access to the inspection location within the engine are discussed. Finally, the defect detection sensitivity and sizing capability of the developed system is evaluated.

  14. Monitoring Morphological Changes in 2D Monolayer Semiconductors Using Atom-Thick Plasmonic Nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanometer-sized gaps between plasmonically coupled adjacent metal nanoparticles enclose extremely localized optical fields, which are strongly enhanced. This enables the dynamic investigation of nanoscopic amounts of material in the gap using optical interrogation. Here we use impinging light to directly tune the optical resonances inside the plasmonic nanocavity formed between single gold nanoparticles and a gold surface, filled with only yoctograms of semiconductor. The gold faces are separated by either monolayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) or two-unit-cell thick cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoplatelets. This extreme confinement produces modes with 100-fold compressed wavelength, which are exquisitely sensitive to morphology. Infrared scattering spectroscopy reveals how such nanoparticle-on-mirror modes directly trace atomic-scale changes in real time. Instabilities observed in the facets are crucial for applications such as heat-assisted magnetic recording that demand long-lifetime nanoscale plasmonic structures, but the spectral sensitivity also allows directly tracking photochemical reactions in these 2-dimensional solids. PMID:25495220

  15. Coherent phenomena in terahertz 2D plasmonic structures: strong coupling, plasmonic crystals, and induced transparency by coupling of localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gregory C.; Aizin, Gregory R.; Allen, S. James; Grine, Albert D.; Bethke, Don; Reno, John L.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2014-05-01

    The device applications of plasmonic systems such as graphene and two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in III-V heterostructures include terahertz detectors, mixers, oscillators and modulators. These two dimensional (2D) plasmonic systems are not only well-suited for device integration, but also enable the broad tunability of underdamped plasma excitations via an applied electric field. We present demonstrations of the coherent coupling of multiple voltage tuned GaAs/AlGaAs 2D plasmonic resonators under terahertz irradiation. By utilizing a plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism to downconvert the near field of plasma waves to a DC signal, we directly detect the spectrum of coupled plasmonic micro-resonator structures at cryogenic temperatures. The 2DEG in the studied devices can be interpreted as a plasmonic waveguide where multiple gate terminals control the 2DEG kinetic inductance. When the gate tuning of the 2DEG is spatially periodic, a one-dimensional finite plasmonic crystal forms. This results in a subwavelength structure, much like a metamaterial element, that nonetheless Bragg scatters plasma waves from a repeated crystal unit cell. A 50% in situ tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges is observed. By introducing gate-controlled defects or simply terminating the lattice, localized states arise in the plasmonic crystal. Inherent asymmetries at the finite crystal boundaries produce an induced transparency-like phenomenon due to the coupling of defect modes and crystal surface states known as Tamm states. The demonstrated active control of coupled plasmonic resonators opens previously unexplored avenues for sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detection, planar metamaterials, and slow-light devices.

  16. Evaporative thinning: a facile synthesis method for high quality ultrathin layers of 2D crystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Kai; Cain, Jeffrey D; Peng, Lintao; Hao, Shiqiang; Chasapis, Thomas; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Wolverton, Christopher; Grayson, Matthew; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2014-10-28

    The palette of two-dimensional materials has expanded beyond graphene in recent years to include the chalcogenides among other systems. However, there is a considerable paucity of methods for controlled synthesis of mono- and/or few-layer two-dimensional materials with desirable quality, reproducibility, and generality. Here we show a facile top-down synthesis approach for ultrathin layers of 2D materials down to monolayer. Our method is based on controlled evaporative thinning of initially large sheets, as deposited by vapor mass-transport. Rather than optimizing conditions for monolayer deposition, our approach makes use of selective evaporation of thick sheets to control the eventual thickness, down to a monolayer, a process which appears to be self-stopping. As a result, 2D sheets with high yield, high reproducibility, and excellent quality can be generated with large (>10 μm) and thin (∼ 1-2 nm) dimensions. Evaporative thinning promises to greatly reduce the difficulty involved in isolating large, mono- and few-layers of 2D materials for subsequent studies.

  17. Reactions of State-Selected Atomic Oxygen Ions O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) with Methane.

    PubMed

    Cunha de Miranda, Barbara; Romanzin, Claire; Chefdeville, Simon; Vuitton, Véronique; Žabka, Jan; Polášek, Miroslav; Alcaraz, Christian

    2015-06-11

    An experimental study has been carried out on the reactions of state selected O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) ions with methane with the aims of characterizing the effects of both the parent ion internal energy and collision energy on the reaction dynamics and determining the fate of oxygen species in complex media, in particular the Titan ionosphere. Absolute cross sections and product velocity distributions have been determined for the reactions of (16)O(+) or (18)O(+) ions with CH4 or CD4 from thermal to 5 eV collision energies by using the guided ion beam (GIB) technique. Dissociative photoionization of O2 with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation delivered by the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL storage ring and the threshold photoion photoelectron coincidence (TPEPICO) technique are used for the preparation of purely state-selected O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) ions. A complete inversion of the product branching ratio between CH4(+) and CH3(+) ions in favor of the latter is observed for excitation of O(+) ions from the (4)S ground state to either the (2)D or the (2)P metastable state. CH4(+) and CH3(+) ions, which are by far the major products for the reaction of ground state and excited states, are strongly backward scattered in the center of mass frame relative to O(+) parent ions. For the reaction of O(+)((4)S), CH3(+) production also rises with increasing collision energy but with much less efficiency than with O(+) excitation. We found that a mechanism of dissociative charge transfer, mediated by an initial charge transfer step, can account very well for all the observations, indicating that CH3(+) production is associated with the formation of H and O atoms (CH3(+) + H + O) rather than with OH formation by an hydride transfer process (CH3(+) + OH). Therefore, as the CH4(+) production by charge transfer is also associated with O atoms, the fate of oxygen species in these reactions is essentially the O production, except for the reaction of O(+)((4)S), which also

  18. Lateral elasticity and X-ray diffraction of protein 2D crystals bound to lipid monolayers at the water surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenne, P. F.; Berge, B.; Renault, A.; Vénien-Bryan, C.; Courty, S.; Konovalov, O.; Legrand, J. F.; Brisson, A.; Balavoine, F.; Lal, J.; Gruebel, G.

    1998-03-01

    We present high resolution X-ray grazing incidence diffraction experiments and macroscopic lateral rigidity measurements performed on two-dimensional crystals of proteins bound to lipid monolayers at the water surface. For four different protein systems, Streptavidin bound to biotinylated lipids, an hystidin-tagged transcription factor HupR bound to Nickel lipids, Annexin-V bound to PS and Cholera toxin subunit-B bound to GM1 lipids, we record a non-zero shear elastic constant. For the three first systems, we observe narrow diffraction peaks and measure the Bragg rods intensities. In the case of Streptavidin we found two different possible structures, one of them exhibiting 19 Bragg rods, diffracting at about 10Åin the plane. After injecting glutaraldehyde (a protein linker) under the already formed 2D-crystals, the shear rigidity increases by a factor of two and additional diffraction peaks appear. This illustrates the correlation between the macroscopic shear elastic constant and the maximum in-plane wave vector transfer of the diffraction pattern, as expected in two dimensions. It also shows the interest of keeping the 2D-crystal in the water for subsequent action of various agents.

  19. Fano Resonance in GaAs 2D Photonic Crystal Nanocavities

    SciTech Connect

    Valentim, P. T.; Guimaraes, P.S. S.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Szymanski, D.; Whittaker, D. M.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Vasco, J. P.; Vinck-Posada, H.

    2011-12-23

    We report the results of polarization resolved reflectivity experiments in GaAs air-bridge photonic crystals with L3 cavities. We show that the fundamental L3 cavity mode changes, in a controlled way, from a Lorentzian symmetrical lineshape to an asymmetrical form when the linear polarization of the incident light is rotated in the plane of the crystal. The different lineshapes are well fitted by the Fano asymmetric equation, implying that a Fano resonance is present in the reflectivity. We use the scattering matrix method to model the Fano interference between a localized discrete state (the cavity fundamental mode) and a background of continuum states (the light reflected from the crystal slab in the vicinity of the cavity) with very good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. All-optical XNOR gate based on 2D photonic-crystal ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2017-02-01

    A novel all-optical XNOR gate is proposed, which combines the nonlinear Kerr effect with photonic-crystal ring resonators (PCRRs). The total size of the proposed optical XNOR gate based on photonic crystals with a square lattice of silicon rods is equal to 35 × 21 μm. The proposed structure has a bandgap in the range from 0.32 to 0.44. To confirm the operation and feasibility of the overall system use is made of analytical and numerical simulation using the dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) and plane wave expansion (PWE) methods.

  1. Intermolecular atom-atom bonds in crystals - a chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-03-01

    Short atom-atom distances between molecules are almost always indicative of specific intermolecular bonding. These distances may be used to assess the significance of all hydrogen bonds, including the C-H⋯O and even weaker C-H⋯F varieties.

  2. Optical properties of GaAs 2D hexagonal and cubic photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, F. Assali, A.; Grain, R.; Kanouni, F.

    2015-03-30

    In this paper we present our theoretical study of 2D hexagonal and cubic rods GaAs in air, with plan wave expansion (PWE) and finite difference time domain (FDTD) by using BandSOLVE and FullWAVE of Rsoft photonic CAD package. In order to investigate the effect of symmetry and radius, we performed calculations of the band structures for both TM and TE polarization, contour and electromagnetic propagation and transmission spectra. Our calculations show that the hexagonal structure gives a largest band gaps compare to cubic one for a same filling factor.

  3. AFM-Patterned 2-D Thin-Film Photonic Crystal Analyzed by Complete Angle Scatter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Scatter Distribution Function of Photonic Crystals,” Air Force Institute of Technology, Dayton, OH, Thesis 2009. [5] I. Prieto , B. Galiana, P. A... Francisco : Addison Wesley, 2002. 76 [38] Bahaa E. A. Saleh and Malvin Carl Teich, Fundamentals of Photonics, 2nd ed. Hoboken: Wiley, 2007. [39

  4. Direct detection of antihydrogen atoms using a BGO crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Y.; Kuroda, N.; Ohtsuka, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Tajima, M.; Torii, H. A.; Zurlo, N.; Matsuda, Y.; Venturelli, L.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed a detector consisting of a large size BGO crystal to detect an atomic antihydrogen beam, and performed the direct detection of antihydrogen atoms. Energy spectra from antihydrogen annihilation on the BGO crystal are discussed in comparison to simulation results from the GEANT4 toolkit. Background mainly originating from cosmic rays were strongly suppressed by analyzing the energy deposited in the BGO and requiring a multiplicity of charged pions. Thus antihydrogen events were identified.

  5. Strain-engineered diffusive atomic switching in two-dimensional crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kalikka, Janne; Zhou, Xilin; Dilcher, Eric; Wall, Simon; Li, Ju; Simpson, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering is an emerging route for tuning the bandgap, carrier mobility, chemical reactivity and diffusivity of materials. Here we show how strain can be used to control atomic diffusion in van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional (2D) crystals. We use strain to increase the diffusivity of Ge and Te atoms that are confined to 5 Å thick 2D planes within an Sb2Te3–GeTe van der Waals superlattice. The number of quintuple Sb2Te3 2D crystal layers dictates the strain in the GeTe layers and consequently its diffusive atomic disordering. By identifying four critical rules for the superlattice configuration we lay the foundation for a generalizable approach to the design of switchable van der Waals heterostructures. As Sb2Te3–GeTe is a topological insulator, we envision these rules enabling methods to control spin and topological properties of materials in reversible and energy efficient ways. PMID:27329563

  6. Terahertz all-optical NOR and AND logic gates based on 2D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parandin, Fariborz; Karkhanehchi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Usually, photonic crystals are used in designing optical logic gates. This study focuses on the design and simulation of an all optical NOR and AND logic gates based on two dimensional photonic crystals. The simplicity of the proposed structure is a characteristic feature of this designation. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) as well as Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) methods have been used for this structural analysis. The simulation results revealed an increase in the interval between "zero" and "one" logic levels. Also, the simple structure and its small size demonstrate the usefulness of this structure in optical integrated circuits. The proposed optical gates can operate with a bit rate of about 1.54 Tbit/s.

  7. Microcavity properties of 2D photonic crystal made by silica matrix doped with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhtari, R.; Hocini, A.; Khedrouche, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this present paper, quality factor of two-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals microcavity fabricated by SiO2/ZrO2 or SiO2/TiO2 matrix doped with magnetic nanoparticles, in which the refractive index varied in the range of 1.51 to 1.58, has been investigated. Finite difference time domain method (3D FDTD) with perfectly matched layers (PML) was used to calculate the transmission spectrum. We demonstrate that the Q factor for the designed cavity increases as the refractive index increases, and found that the Q factor decreases as the volume fraction VF% increases. The obtained results are useful for better designs of magneto photonic crystal devices.

  8. Characterization of the bistable wideband optical filter on the basis of nonlinear 2D photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Guryev, I. V. Sukhoivanov, I. A. Andrade Lucio, J. A. Manzano, O. Ibarra Rodriguez, E. Vargaz Gonzales, D. Claudio Chavez, R. I. Mata Gurieva, N. S.

    2014-05-15

    In our work, we investigated the wideband optical filter on the basis of nonlinear photonic crystal. The all-optical flip-flop using ultra-short pulses with duration lower than 200 fs is obtained in such filters. Here we pay special attention to the stability problem of the nonlinear element. To investigate this problem, the temporal response demonstrating the flip-flop have been computed within the certain range of the wavelengths as well as at different input power.

  9. Waves in periodic media: Fourier analysis shortcuts and physical insights, case of 2D phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, S.; Gazalet, J.; Kastelik, J. C.

    2014-03-01

    Phononic crystal is a structured media with periodic modulation of its physical properties that influences the propagation of elastic waves and leads to a peculiar behaviour, for instance the phononic band gap effect by which elastic waves cannot propagate in certain frequency ranges. The formulation of the problem leads to a second order partial differential equation with periodic coefficients; different methods exist to determine the structure of the eigenmodes propagating in the material, both in the real or Fourier domain. Brillouin explains the periodicity of the band structure as a direct result of the discretization of the crystal in the real domain. Extending the Brillouin vision, we introduce digital signal processing tools developed in the frame of distribution functions theory. These tools associate physical meaning to mathematical expressions and reveal the correspondence between real and Fourier domains whatever is the physical domain under consideration. We present an illustrative practical example concerning two dimensions phononic crystals and highlight the appreciable shortcuts brought by the method and the benefits for physical interpretation.

  10. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O'Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic-photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided.

  11. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O’Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O’Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic–photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided. PMID:27877904

  12. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs. PMID:26843122

  13. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-02-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs.

  14. Analytic theory for the selection of 2-D needle crystal at arbitrary Peclet number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, Saleh

    1989-01-01

    An accurate analytic theory is presented for the velocity selection of a two-dimensional needle crystal for arbitrary Peclet number for small values of the surface tension parameter. The velocity selection is caused by the effect of transcendentally small terms which are determined by analytic continuation to the complex plane and analysis of nonlinear equations. The work supports the general conclusion of previous small Peclet number analytical results of other investigators, though there are some discrepancies in details. It also addresses questions raised on the validity of selection theory owing to assumptions made on shape corrections at large distances from the tip.

  15. A global 2D well-posedness result on the order tensor liquid crystal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Anna, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    In [18] Paicu and Zarnescu have studied an order tensor system which describes the flow of a liquid crystal. They have proven the existence of weak solutions, the propagation of higher regularity, namely Hs with s > 1 and the weak-strong uniqueness in dimension two. This paper is devoted to fill the gap of their results, namely to propagate the low regularity, namely Hs for 0 < s < 1 and to prove the uniqueness of the weak solutions. For the completeness of this research, we also propose an alternative approach in order to prove the existence of weak solutions.

  16. Laser heating of a transparent crystal via adsorbed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Smaalen, Sander; Arnoldus, Henk F.; George, Thomas F.

    1987-01-01

    A coated surface of a crystal is irradiated by intense infrared light. The optically active atomic bonds absorb photons from the laser field, and the subsequent spontaneous decay goes together with emissions of phonons into the crystal. This photon-to-phonon conversion results in an energy flux into the crystal. An equation for this flux is derived from the master equation for the level populations of the dressed atomic states. The saturation limit is discussed, and the general theory is illustrated with two examples. Furthermore, it is outlined with qualitative arguments that the quantum yield of photodesorption is not sensitive to the laser power.

  17. Tuning the Structural Color of a 2D Photonic Crystal Using a Bowl-like Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Umh, Ha Nee; Yu, Sungju; Kim, Yong Hwa; Lee, Su Young; Yi, Jongheop

    2016-06-22

    Structural colors of the ordered photonic nanostructures are widely used as an effective platform for manipulating the propagation of light. Although several approaches have been explored in attempts to mimic the structural colors, improving the reproducibility, mechanical stability, and the economic feasibility of sophisticated photonic crystals prepared by complicated processes continues to pose a challenge. In this study, we report on an alternative, simple method for fabricating a tunable photonic crystal at room temperature. A bowl-like nanostructure of TiO2 was periodically arranged on a thin Ti sheet through a two-step anodization process where its diameters were systemically controlled by changing the applied voltage. Consequently, they displayed a broad color distribution, ranging from red to indigo, and the principal reason for color generation followed the Bragg diffraction theory. This noncolorant method was capable of reproducing a Mondrian painting on a centimeter scale without the need to employ complex architectures, where the generated structural colors were highly stable under mechanical or chemical influence. Such a color printing technique represents a potentially promising platform for practical applications for anticounterfeit trademarks, wearable sensors, and displays.

  18. Two-dimensional atomic crystals beyond graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures have been the center of intense research and development for more than two decades now. Of these materials, graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) layered material system, has had a significant impact on science and technology over the past decade after monolayers of this material were experimentally isolated in 2004. The recent emergence of other classes of 2D graphene-like layered materials has added yet more exciting dimensions for research in exploring the diverse properties and applications arising from these 2D material systems. For example, hexagonal-BN, a layered material closest in structure to graphene, is an insulator, while NbSe2, a transition metal di-chalcogenide, is metallic and monolayers of other transition metal di-chalcogenides such as MoS2 are direct band-gap semiconductors. The rich spectrum of properties that 2D layered material systems offer can potentially be engineered ondemand, and creates exciting prospects for using such materials in applications ranging from electronics, sensing, photonics, energy harvesting and flexible electronics over the coming years.

  19. Exfoliation and characterization of bismuth telluride atomic quintuples and quasi-two-dimensional crystals.

    PubMed

    Teweldebrhan, Desalegne; Goyal, Vivek; Balandin, Alexander A

    2010-04-14

    Bismuth telluride (Bi(2)Te(3)) and its alloys are the best bulk thermoelectric materials known today. In addition, stacked quasi-two-dimensional (2D) layers of Bi(2)Te(3) were recently identified as promising topological insulators. In this Letter we describe a method for "graphene-inspired" exfoliation of crystalline bismuth telluride films with a thickness of a few atoms. The atomically thin films were suspended across trenches in Si/SiO(2) substrates, and subjected to detail material characterization, which included atomic force microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The presence of the van der Waals gaps allowed us to disassemble Bi(2)Te(3) crystal into its quintuple building blocks-five monatomic sheets-consisting of Te((1))-Bi-Te((2))-Bi-Te((1)). By altering the thickness and sequence of atomic planes, we were able to create "designer" nonstoichiometric quasi-2D crystalline films, change their composition and doping, the type of charge carriers as well as other properties. The exfoliated quintuples and ultrathin films have low thermal conductivity, high electrical conductivity, and enhanced thermoelectric properties. The obtained results pave the way for producing stacks of crystalline bismuth telluride quantum wells with the strong spatial confinement of charge carriers and acoustic phonons, beneficial for thermoelectric devices. The developed technology for producing free-standing quasi-2D layers of Te((1))-Bi-Te((2))-Bi-Te((1)) creates an impetus for investigation of the topological insulators and their possible practical applications.

  20. A non-enzymatic urine glucose sensor with 2-D photonic crystal hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zequn; Xue, Min; He, Qian; Lu, Wei; Meng, Zihui; Yan, Dan; Qiu, Lili; Zhou, Lijun; Yu, Yingjie

    2016-11-01

    A novel polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) sensing material for the detection of urine glucose was developed by embedding a two-dimensional (2-D) polystyrene crystalline colloidal array (CCA) in 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (3-APBA)-functionalized hydrogel. After adjusting the cross-linker concentration, this material showed significant sensitivity for glucose under lab conditions, the particle spacing of the PCCA changed from 917 to 824 nm (93 nm) within 3 min as the glucose concentration increased from 0 to 10 mM, and the structural color of the PCCA changed from red through orange, to green, and finally, to cyan. In further experiments, this material was used to semi-quantitatively detect glucose in 20 human urine (HU) samples. Compared with the traditional dry-chemistry method, which was applied widely in clinical diagnosis, the PCCA method was more accurate and cost-effective. Moreover, this method can efficiently avoid the errors induced by most of the urine-interfering elements like vitamin C and ketone body. With a homemade portable optical detector, this low-cost intelligent sensing material can provide a more convenient and efficient strategy for the urine glucose detection in clinical diagnosis and point-of-care monitoring.

  1. Self-Assembly under Confinement: Nanocorrals for Understanding Fundamentals of 2D Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Lander; Greenwood, John; Hirsch, Brandon E; De Feyter, Steven

    2016-12-27

    Nanocorrals with different size, shape, and orientation are created on covalently modified highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces using scanning probe nanolithography, i.e., nanoshaving. Alkylated diacetylene molecules undergo laterally confined supramolecular self-assembly within these corrals. When nanoshaving is performed in situ, at the liquid-solid interface, the orientation of the supramolecular lamellae structure is directionally influenced by the gradual graphite surface exposure. Careful choice of the nanoshaving direction with respect to the substrate symmetry axes promotes alignment of the supramolecular lamellae within the corral. Self-assembly occurring inside corrals of different size and shape reveals the importance of geometric and kinetic constraints controlled by the nanoshaving process. Finally, seed-mediated crystallization studies demonstrate confinement control over nucleation and growth principles.

  2. Efficient Design Tool for 2D and 3D NIMS Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-28

    and  Le‐Wei  Li, “Analysis  of  Probe‐fed  Conformal  Microstrip   Antennas  on Finite Ground Plane and Substrate”, IEEE Transactions on  Antennas  and...approach will be very  flexible   in handling many different  types of photonic crystals of  various geometrical  structures. Most  importantly,  the...Because of many different choices of the basis functions for the volume cells, the approach will be very flexible in handling many different types of

  3. Self-Assembly under Confinement: Nanocorrals for Understanding Fundamentals of 2D Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanocorrals with different size, shape, and orientation are created on covalently modified highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces using scanning probe nanolithography, i.e., nanoshaving. Alkylated diacetylene molecules undergo laterally confined supramolecular self-assembly within these corrals. When nanoshaving is performed in situ, at the liquid–solid interface, the orientation of the supramolecular lamellae structure is directionally influenced by the gradual graphite surface exposure. Careful choice of the nanoshaving direction with respect to the substrate symmetry axes promotes alignment of the supramolecular lamellae within the corral. Self-assembly occurring inside corrals of different size and shape reveals the importance of geometric and kinetic constraints controlled by the nanoshaving process. Finally, seed-mediated crystallization studies demonstrate confinement control over nucleation and growth principles. PMID:27749033

  4. Noncontact atomic force microscopy of perfect single crystals of pentacene prepared by crystallization from solution.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuya; Sawaguchi, Takahiro; Sakata, Masafumi; Itaya, Kingo

    2007-12-18

    Nearly perfect single crystals of pentacene were grown from trichlorobenzene solution. The surface structure of pentacene single crystals has been investigated by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. Molecularly flat and extraordinarily wide terraces, extended over the width of more than a few micrometers with monomolecular steps, were consistently observed, suggesting that those pentacene crystals were nearly perfect single crystals. Molecular packing arrangements were revealed by FM-AFM for the first time.

  5. An energy stable, hexagonal finite difference scheme for the 2D phase field crystal amplitude equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhen; Heinonen, Vili; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Cheng; Wise, Steven M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we construct an energy stable finite difference scheme for the amplitude expansion equations for the two-dimensional phase field crystal (PFC) model. The equations are formulated in a periodic hexagonal domain with respect to the reciprocal lattice vectors to achieve a provably unconditionally energy stable and solvable scheme. To our knowledge, this is the first such energy stable scheme for the PFC amplitude equations. The convexity of each part in the amplitude equations is analyzed, in both the semi-discrete and fully-discrete cases. Energy stability is based on a careful convexity analysis for the energy (in both the spatially continuous and discrete cases). As a result, unique solvability and unconditional energy stability are available for the resulting scheme. Moreover, we show that the scheme is point-wise stable for any time and space step sizes. An efficient multigrid solver is devised to solve the scheme, and a few numerical experiments are presented, including grain rotation and shrinkage and grain growth studies, as examples of the strength and robustness of the proposed scheme and solver.

  6. A super narrow band filter based on silicon 2D photonic crystal resonator and reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Deyuan; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Juebin; Tao, Shangbin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel structure of super narrow band filter based on two-dimensional square lattice photonic crystals of silicon rods in air for 1.5 um communication is proposed and studied. COMSOL Multiphysics4.3b software is used to simulate the optical behavior of the filter. The filter consists of one point-defect-based resonator and two line-defect-based reflectors. The resonance frequency, transmission coefficient and quality factor are investigated by varying the parameters of the structure. In design, a silicon rod is removed to form the resonator; for the rows of rods above and below the resonator, a part of the rods are removed to form the reflectors. By optimizing the parameters of the filter, the quality factor and transmission coefficient of the filter at the resonance frequency of 2e14 Hz can reach 1330 and 0.953, respectively. The super narrow band filter can be integrated into optical circuit for its micron size. Also, it can be used for wavelength selection and noise filtering of optical amplifier in future communication application.

  7. Flexible 2D Crystals of Polycyclic Aromatics Stabilized by Static Distortion Waves

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The epitaxy of many organic films on inorganic substrates can be classified within the framework of rigid lattices which helps to understand the origin of energy gain driving the epitaxy of the films. Yet, there are adsorbate–substrate combinations with distinct mutual orientations for which this classification fails and epitaxy cannot be explained within a rigid lattice concept. It has been proposed that tiny shifts in atomic positions away from ideal lattice points, so-called static distortion waves (SDWs), are responsible for the observed orientational epitaxy in such cases. Using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we provide direct experimental evidence for SDWs in organic adsorbate films, namely hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene on graphite. They manifest as wave-like sub-Ångström molecular displacements away from an ideal adsorbate lattice which is incommensurate with graphite. By means of a density-functional-theory based model, we show that, due to the flexibility in the adsorbate layer, molecule–substrate energy is gained by straining the intermolecular bonds and that the resulting total energy is minimal for the observed domain orientation, constituting the orientational epitaxy. While structural relaxation at an interface is a common assumption, the combination of the precise determination of the incommensurate epitaxial relation, the direct observation of SDWs in real space, and their identification as the sole source of epitaxial energy gain constitutes a comprehensive proof of this effect. PMID:27014920

  8. A first attempt to enhance the 2-D single-crystal growth of a protein at an air/water interface from hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drazek, L.; Legrand, J.-F.; Davoust, L.

    2005-02-01

    An alternative technique to grow a 2-D crystal of protein at a functionalized air/water interface is proposed. The first part of this paper briefly reviews 2-D crystal growth at a fluid interface and deals with our first experiments on streptavidin whose 2-D (poly)crystallization ability is well known. In the experiments, the involved air/water interface is functionalized with a mixed lipidic monolayer made of DOPC and biotinylated lipids. The second part of the paper relates to an alternative strategy we propose in order to enhance the 2-D single-crystal growth of a protein at a liquid interface. The idea is to get benefit from an axisymmetric swirling flow driven in a water sub-phase confined within an annular channel. The swirl is expected to control the distribution of the proteins at the air/water interface and to promote the growth of a 2-D single crystal from the smallest to the largest radii (radial segregation). An analytical modelling based on a low Reynolds number asymptotic development demonstrates how two control parameters, the mean channel curvature and the Reynolds number of the shear flow, can be helpful in tuning the magnitude of the swirl and therefore the crystal growth.

  9. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hood, Jonathan D; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E; Kimble, H J

    2016-09-20

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields [Formula: see text] outside the bandgap to localized fields [Formula: see text] within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the [Formula: see text] line of atomic cesium for [Formula: see text] atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode.

  10. An overview of heavy-atom derivatization of protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Ashley C. W.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Krojer, Tobias; von Delft, Frank; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy-atom derivatization is one of the oldest techniques for obtaining phase information for protein crystals and, although it is no longer the first choice, it remains a useful technique for obtaining phases for unknown structures and for low-resolution data sets. It is also valuable for confirming the chain trace in low-resolution electron-density maps. This overview provides a summary of the technique and is aimed at first-time users of the method. It includes guidelines on when to use it, which heavy atoms are most likely to work, how to prepare heavy-atom solutions, how to derivatize crystals and how to determine whether a crystal is in fact a derivative. PMID:26960118

  11. Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of Ag Doping in 2D Layered Material (PbSe)5(Bi2Se3)3.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaochen; Singh, Arunima K; Fang, Lei; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Tavazza, Francesca; Davydov, Albert V; Lauhon, Lincoln J

    2016-10-12

    Impurity doping in two-dimensional (2D) materials can provide a route to tuning electronic properties, so it is important to be able to determine the distribution of dopant atoms within and between layers. Here we report the tomographic mapping of dopants in layered 2D materials with atomic sensitivity and subnanometer spatial resolution using atom probe tomography (APT). APT analysis shows that Ag dopes both Bi2Se3 and PbSe layers in (PbSe)5(Bi2Se3)3, and correlations in the position of Ag atoms suggest a pairing across neighboring Bi2Se3 and PbSe layers. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirm the favorability of substitutional doping for both Pb and Bi and provide insights into the observed spatial correlations in dopant locations.

  12. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  13. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals.

    PubMed

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  14. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  15. Phenomenological model of spin crossover in molecular crystals as derived from atom-atom potentials.

    PubMed

    Sinitskiy, Anton V; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2011-08-07

    The method of atom-atom potentials, previously applied to the analysis of pure molecular crystals formed by either low-spin (LS) or high-spin (HS) forms (spin isomers) of Fe(II) coordination compounds (Sinitskiy et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2009, 11, 10983), is used to estimate the lattice enthalpies of mixed crystals containing different fractions of the spin isomers. The crystals under study were formed by LS and HS isomers of Fe(phen)(2)(NCS)(2) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline), Fe(btz)(2)(NCS)(2) (btz = 5,5',6,6'-tetrahydro-4H,4'H-2,2'-bi-1,3-thiazine), and Fe(bpz)(2)(bipy) (bpz = dihydrobis(1-pyrazolil)borate, and bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). For the first time the phenomenological parameters Γ pertinent to the Slichter-Drickamer model (SDM) of several materials were independently derived from the microscopic model of the crystals with use of atom-atom potentials of intermolecular interaction. The accuracy of the SDM was checked against the numerical data on the enthalpies of mixed crystals. Fair semiquantitative agreement with the experimental dependence of the HS fraction on temperature was achieved with use of these values. Prediction of trends in Γ values as a function of chemical composition and geometry of the crystals is possible with the proposed approach, which opens a way to rational design of spin crossover materials with desired properties.

  16. Radiation damping in atomic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Horsley, S A R; Artoni, M; La Rocca, G C

    2011-07-22

    The force exerted on a material by an incident beam of light is dependent upon the material's velocity in the laboratory frame of reference. This velocity dependence is known to be difficult to measure, as it is proportional to the incident optical power multiplied by the ratio of the material velocity to the speed of light. Here we show that this typically tiny effect is greatly amplified in multilayer systems composed of resonantly absorbing atoms exhibiting ultranarrow photonic band gaps. The amplification effect for optically trapped 87Rb is shown to be as much as 3 orders of magnitude greater than for conventional photonic-band-gap materials. For a specific pulsed regime, damping remains observable without destroying the system and significant for material velocities of a few ms(-1).

  17. Density Functional Theory Study of Bandgap Modulation of Si2N-h2D Crystal Nanoribbons and Nanotubes Under Elastic Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, ShengQian; Li, Feng; Geng, JiGuo

    2017-04-01

    Since efficient synthesis of C2N holey two-dimensional (h2D) crystal has been possible, bandgap modulation through use of analogous nanoribbon and nanotube structures has attracted strong interest. In this study, bandgap modulation of Si2N-h2D nanoribbons and nanotubes under elastic strain has been deeply researched using density functional theory calculations. The results indicate that the bandgap of Si2N-h2D nanoribbons and nanotubes in zigzag and armchair configurations can be tuned in both directions, namely by stretching or compressing, in the range of ɛ = ( d - d 0)/ d 0 from -10% to 10%. It is also found that the bandgap of Si2N-h2D nanoribbons and nanotubes varies with their width. Therefore, it is predicted that Si2N-h2D nanoribbons and nanotubes have great potential for application in nanoscale strain sensors and optoelectronics.

  18. Optimized Purification of a Heterodimeric ABC Transporter in a Highly Stable Form Amenable to 2-D Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Galián, Carmen; Manon, Florence; Dezi, Manuela; Torres, Cristina; Ebel, Christine; Lévy, Daniel; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Optimized protocols for achieving high-yield expression, purification and reconstitution of membrane proteins are required to study their structure and function. We previously reported high-level expression in Escherichia coli of active BmrC and BmrD proteins from Bacillus subtilis, previously named YheI and YheH. These proteins are half-transporters which belong to the ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) superfamily and associate in vivo to form a functional transporter able to efflux drugs. In this report, high-yield purification and functional reconstitution were achieved for the heterodimer BmrC/BmrD. In contrast to other detergents more efficient for solubilizing the transporter, dodecyl-ß-D-maltoside (DDM) maintained it in a drug-sensitive and vanadate-sensitive ATPase-competent state after purification by affinity chromatography. High amounts of pure proteins were obtained which were shown either by analytical ultracentrifugation or gel filtration to form a monodisperse heterodimer in solution, which was notably stable for more than one month at 4°C. Functional reconstitution using different lipid compositions induced an 8-fold increase of the ATPase activity (kcat∼5 s−1). We further validated that the quality of the purified BmrC/BmrD heterodimer is suitable for structural analyses, as its reconstitution at high protein densities led to the formation of 2-D crystals. Electron microscopy of negatively stained crystals allowed the calculation of a projection map at 20 Å resolution revealing that BmrC/BmrD might assemble into oligomers in a lipidic environment. PMID:21602923

  19. Ultrathin two-dimensional atomic crystals as stable interfacial layer for improvement of lithium metal anode.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Gao, Teng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Yao, Hongbin; Wang, Haotian; Lu, Zhenda; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Zheng; Liu, Zhongfan; Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi

    2014-10-08

    Stable cycling of lithium metal anode is challenging due to the dendritic lithium formation and high chemical reactivity of lithium with electrolyte and nearly all the materials. Here, we demonstrate a promising novel electrode design by growing two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystal layers including hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene directly on Cu metal current collectors. Lithium ions were able to penetrate through the point and line defects of the 2D layers during the electrochemical deposition, leading to sandwiched lithium metal between ultrathin 2D layers and Cu. The 2D layers afford an excellent interfacial protection of Li metal due to their remarkable chemical stability as well as mechanical strength and flexibility, resulting from the strong intralayer bonds and ultrathin thickness. Smooth Li metal deposition without dendritic and mossy Li formation was realized. We showed stable cycling over 50 cycles with Coulombic efficiency ∼97% in organic carbonate electrolyte with current density and areal capacity up to the practical value of 2.0 mA/cm(2)and 5.0 mAh/cm(2), respectively, which is a significant improvement over the unprotected electrodes in the same electrolyte.

  20. Contribution of NAD 2D-NMR in liquid crystals to the determination of hydrogen isotope profile of methyl groups in miliacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdagué, Philippe; Lesot, Philippe; Jacob, Jérémy; Terwilliger, Valery J.; Le Milbeau, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD or (D/H) value) of molecular biomarkers preserved in sedimentary archives is increasingly used to provide clues about the evolution of past climatic conditions. The rationale is that intact biomarkers retain isotopic information related to the climatic conditions that prevailed at the time of their synthesis. Some of these biomarkers may be degraded during diagenesis, however. The extent to which these degradations alter the original δD value of the source biomarker is presently debated and the capacity to resolve this question by determination of compound-specific δD values alone is limited. The "bulk" or "global" δD value of any molecule is in fact a composite of δD values at each site within this molecule (δDi or (D/H)i with i = number of hydrogen/deuterium atoms in the considered molecule). Determination of this site-specific δDi value in biomarkers could not only yield outstanding paleoenvironmental information but also help forecast the impacts of diagenesis and define essential steps in biosynthetic pathways. This task is analytically challenging. Here, we examined the capabilities of natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) using homopolypeptide liquid crystals as an NMR solvent to: (i) analyze the NAD spectra of biomakers; (ii) determine the site-specific distribution of hydrogen in the nine methyl groups (δDMei with i = 23-31) of miliacin, a pentacyclic triterpene of the amyrin family and key biomarker for broomcorn millet in sedimentary archives. Relative (D/H)Mei values were established by anisotropic NAD 2D-NMR. Then absolute δDMei values were obtained by determining δDMei value of the methoxy group of miliacin using two independent approaches: isotropic NAD NMR (SNIF-NMR™) and GC-irMS. The resulting isotope profile for miliacin shows, for the first time, large variations in δDMei values that can directly be explained by biosynthetic processes. This approach has also the potential to permit

  1. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  2. Synthesis of green emitting and transparent zn2siO4:mn2+ thin film phosphors on 2D photonic crystal patterned quartz substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyuk; Han, Ji Yeon; Jeon, Duk Young

    2012-02-01

    Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ thin film phosphors (TFPs) have been synthesized by RF magnetron sputtering, using a single multicomponent stoichiometric target. And 2D photonic crystal patterns were introduced on a quartz substrate to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In order to introduce 2D photonic crystal patterns on a quartz substrate, nanosphere lithography was used. Polystyrene spheres, with diameter of 330 nm, were transferred on the quartz substrate and subsequently were served as an etch mask. Quartz substrates were patterned by CF4 gas-based reactive ion etching. Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ were deposited on that 2D photonic crystal patterned quartz substrate and the effect of height of photonic crystal layers were investigated. The light extraction efficiency of Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ thin film phosphors deposited on the photonic crystal patterned quartz substrate was enhanced three times to compared with that of flat Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ thin film phosphors due to the Bragg diffraction and leaky mode caused by PCLs. Transmittance of Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ TFPs deposited on the photonic crystal patterned substrate was high enough, above 70% in the visible light region with respect to that of quartz substrate.

  3. Atom-Thin SnS2-xSex with Adjustable Compositions by Direct Liquid Exfoliation from Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhanhai; Liang, Hui; Wang, Xusheng; Ma, Xinlei; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Yanlian; Xie, Liming; Chen, Dong; Long, Yujia; Chen, Jitao; Chang, Yunjie; Yan, Chunhua; Zhang, Xinxiang; Zhang, Xueji; Ge, Binghui; Ren, Zhian; Xue, Mianqi; Chen, Genfu

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide materials are fundamentally and technologically fascinating for their suitable band gap energy and carrier type relevant to their adjustable composition, structure, and dimensionality. Here, we demonstrate the exfoliation of single-crystal SnS2-xSex (SSS) with S/Se vacancies into an atom-thin layer by simple sonication in ethanol without additive. The introduction of vacancies at the S/Se site, the conflicting atomic radius of sulfur in selenium layers, and easy incorporation with an ethanol molecule lead to high ion accessibility; therefore, atom-thin SSS flakes can be effectively prepared by exfoliating the single crystal via sonication. The in situ pyrolysis of such materials can further adjust their compositions, representing tunable activation energy, band gap, and also tunable response to analytes of such materials. As the most basic and crucial step of the 2D material field, the successful synthesis of an uncontaminated and atom-thin sample will further push ahead the large-scale applications of 2D materials, including, but not limited to, electronics, sensing, catalysis, and energy storage fields.

  4. Trapped Atoms in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, H.

    2013-05-01

    I describe one-dimensional photonic crystals that support a guided mode suitable for atom trapping within a unit cell, as well as a second probe mode with strong atom-photon interactions. A new hybrid trap is analyzed that combines optical and Casimir-Polder forces to form stable traps for neutral atoms in dielectric nanostructures. By suitable design of the band structure, the atomic spontaneous emission rate into the probe mode can exceed the rate into all other modes by more than tenfold. The unprecedented single-atom reflectivity r0 ~= 0 . 9 for the guided probe field could create new scientific opportunities, including quantum many-body physics for 1 D atom chains with photon-mediated interactions and high-precision studies of vacuum forces. Towards these goals, my colleagues and I are pursuing numerical simulation, device fabrication, and cold-atom experiments with nanoscopic structures. Funding is provided by by the IQIM, an NSF PFC with support of the Moore Foundation, by the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, by the DoD NSSEFF program (HJK), and by NSF Grant PHY0652914 (HJK). DEC acknowledges funding from Fundacio Privada Cellex Barcelona.

  5. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  6. Single crystal optic elements for helium atom microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, D. A.; Allison, W.; Holst, B.

    2000-07-01

    Focusing characteristics of asymmetrically bent single crystal mirrors are discussed in the context of fabricating an optic element for an helium atom microscope. We demonstrate the principle that deforming a clamped, elliptical, single crystal under electrostatic pressure can produce submicron focusing of an helium beam. We present a systematic procedure that may be used to fabricate high precision mirrors close to the Cartesian ideal of any chosen optical configuration. In particular, imaging systems with asymmetric mirror profiles are discussed. Results are independent of crystal characteristics and can be adapted to fit a range of experimental geometries. The calculations indicate that mirror-induced aberrations can be eliminated to fourth order by use of a single actuation electrode in an ideal system.

  7. Atomic- Resolution Crystal Structure of the Antiviral Lectin Scytovirin

    SciTech Connect

    Moulaei,T.; Botos, I.; Ziolkowska, N.; Bokesch, H.; Krumpe, L.; McKee, T.; O'Keefe, B.; Dauter, Z.; Wlodawer, A.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of the natural and recombinant antiviral lectin scytovirin (SVN) were solved by single-wavelength anomalous scattering and refined with data extending to 1.3 Angstroms and 1.0 Angstroms resolution, respectively. A molecule of SVN consists of a single chain 95 amino acids long, with an almost perfect sequence repeat that creates two very similar domains (RMS deviation 0.25 Angstroms for 40 pairs of Ca atoms). The crystal structure differs significantly from a previously published NMR structure of the same protein, with the RMS deviations calculated separately for the N- and C-terminal domains of 5.3 Angstroms and 3.7 Angstroms, respectively, and a very different relationship between the two domains. In addition, the disulfide bonding pattern of the crystal structures differs from that described in the previously published mass spectrometry and NMR studies.

  8. Crystal structure solution from experimentally determined atomic pair distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Juhas, P.; Granlund, L.; Gujarathi, S.R.; Duxbury, P.M.; Billinge, S.J.L.

    2010-05-25

    An extension of the Liga algorithm for structure solution from atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), to handle periodic crystal structures with multiple elements in the unit cell, is described. The procedure is performed in three separate steps. First, pair distances are extracted from the experimental PDF. In the second step the Liga algorithm is used to find unit-cell sites consistent with these pair distances. Finally, the atom species are assigned over the cell sites by minimizing the overlap of their empirical atomic radii. The procedure has been demonstrated on synchrotron X-ray PDF data from 16 test samples. The structure solution was successful for 14 samples, including cases with enlarged supercells. The algorithm success rate and the reasons for the failed cases are discussed, together with enhancements that should improve its convergence and usability.

  9. A nonempirical anisotropic atom-atom model potential for chlorobenzene crystals.

    PubMed

    Day, Graeme M; Price, Sarah L

    2003-12-31

    A nearly nonempirical, transferable model potential is developed for the chlorobenzene molecules (C6ClnH6-n, n = 1 to 6) with anisotropy in the atom-atom form of both electrostatic and repulsion interactions. The potential is largely derived from the charge densities of the molecules, using a distributed multipole electrostatic model and a transferable dispersion model derived from the molecular polarizabilities. A nonempirical transferable repulsion model is obtained by analyzing the overlap of the charge densities in dimers as a function of orientation and separation and then calibrating this anisotropic atom-atom model against a limited number of intermolecular perturbation theory calculations of the short-range energies. The resulting model potential is a significant improvement over empirical model potentials in reproducing the twelve chlorobenzene crystal structures. Further validation calculations of the lattice energies and rigid-body k = 0 phonon frequencies provide satisfactory agreement with experiment, with the discrepancies being primarily due to approximations in the theoretical methods rather than the model intermolecular potential. The potential is able to give a good account of the three polymorphs of p-dichlorobenzene in a detailed crystal structure prediction study. Thus, by introducing repulsion anisotropy into a transferable potential scheme, it is possible to produce a set of potentials for the chlorobenzenes that can account for their crystal properties in an unprecedentedly realistic fashion.

  10. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    PubMed Central

    Jelsch, Christian; Bibila Mayaya Bisseyou, Yvon

    2017-01-01

    The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds) and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl⋯O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers) are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols) are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between two phenol groups

  11. Atom pair 2D-fingerprints perceive 3D-molecular shape and pharmacophores for very fast virtual screening of ZINC and GDB-17.

    PubMed

    Awale, Mahendra; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2014-07-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) molecular shape and pharmacophores are important determinants of the biological activity of organic molecules; however, a precise computation of 3D-shape is generally too slow for virtual screening of very large databases. A reinvestigation of the concept of atom pairs initially reported by Carhart et al. and extended by Schneider et al. showed that a simple atom pair fingerprint (APfp) counting atom pairs at increasing topological distances in 2D-structures without atom property assignment correlates with various representations of molecular shape extracted from the 3D-structures. A related 55-dimensional atom pair fingerprint extended with atom properties (Xfp) provided an efficient pharmacophore fingerprint with good performance for ligand-based virtual screening such as the recovery of active compounds from decoys in DUD, and overlap with the ROCS 3D-pharmacophore scoring function. The APfp and Xfp data were organized for web-based extremely fast nearest-neighbor searching in ZINC (13.5 M compounds) and GDB-17 (50 M random subset) freely accessible at www.gdb.unibe.ch .

  12. Statistical Nature of Atomic Disorder in Irradiated Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, A.; Debelle, A.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic disorder in irradiated materials is investigated by means of x-ray diffraction, using cubic SiC single crystals as a model material. It is shown that, besides the determination of depth-resolved strain and damage profiles, x-ray diffraction can be efficiently used to determine the probability density function (PDF) of the atomic displacements within the crystal. This task is achieved by analyzing the diffraction-order dependence of the damage profiles. We thereby demonstrate that atomic displacements undergo Lévy flights, with a displacement PDF exhibiting heavy tails [with a tail index in the γ =0.73 - 0.37 range, i.e., far from the commonly assumed Gaussian case (γ =2 )]. It is further demonstrated that these heavy tails are crucial to account for the amorphization kinetics in SiC. From the retrieved displacement PDFs we introduce a dimensionless parameter fDXRD to quantify the disordering. fDXRD is found to be consistent with both independent measurements using ion channeling and with molecular dynamics calculations.

  13. Ab Initio Based 2D Continuum Mechanics - Sensitivity Prediction for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy Based Structure Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Lopes, J. Marcelo J.; Zauscher, Stefan; Blum, Volker

    Contact resonance AFM is demonstrated as a powerful tool for mapping differences in the mechanical properties of 2D materials and heterostructures, permitting to resolve surface and subsurface structural differences of different domains. Measured contact resonance frequencies are related to the contact stiffness of the combined tip-sample system. Based on first principles predicted elastic properties and a continuum approach to model the mechanical impedance, we find contact stiffness ratios between different domains of few-layer graphene on 3C-SiC(111) in excellent agreement with experiment. We next demonstrate that the approach is able to quantitatively resolve differences between other 2D materials domains, e.g., for h-BN, MoS2 and MoO3 on graphene on SiC. We show that the combined effect of several materials parameters, especially the in-plane elastic properties and the layer thickness, determines the contact stiffness, therefore boosting the sensitivity even if the out-of-plane elastic properties are similar.

  14. Investigation of the nitrogen hyperfine coupling of the second stable radical in γ-irradiated L-alanine crystals by 2D-HYSCORE spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltar-Strmečki, Nadica; Rakvin, Boris

    2012-09-01

    The second stable radical, NH3+C(CH3)COO, R2, in the γ-irradiated single crystal of L-alanine and its fully 15N-enriched analogue were studied by an advanced pulsed EPR technique, 2D-HYSCORE (two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation) spectroscopy at 200 K. The nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor of the R2 radical was determined from the HYSCORE data and provides new experimental data for improved characterization of the R2 radical in the crystal lattice. The results obtained complement the experimental proton data available for the R2 radical and could lead to increased accuracy and reliability of EPR spectrum simulations.

  15. Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and Other Properties of Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A

    2006-02-01

    This report is part of a series of documents that provide a background to those involved in the construction of beryllium components and their applications. This report is divided into five sub-sections: Atomic/Crystal Structure, Elastic Properties, Thermal Properties, Nuclear Properties, and Miscellaneous Properties. In searching through different sources for the various properties to be included in this report, inconsistencies were at times observed between these sources. In such cases, the values reported by the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics was usually used. In equations, except where indicated otherwise, temperature (T) is in degrees Kelvin.

  16. Atomic force microscopy of lead iodide crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. A.; Azoulay, M.; Jayatirtha, H. N.; Biao, Y.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface of lead iodide crystals. The high vapor pressure of lead iodide prohibits the use of traditional high resolution surface study techniques that require high vacuum conditions. AFM was used to image numerous insulating surface in various ambients, with very little sample preparation techniques needed. Freshly cleaved and modified surfaces, including, chemical and vacuum etched, and air aged surfaces, were examined. Both intrinsic and induced defects were imaged with high resolution. The results were compared to a similar AFM study of mercuric iodide surfaces and it was found that, at ambient conditions, lead iodide is significantly more stable than mercuric iodide.

  17. Electronic and magnetic properties of TM atoms adsorption on 2D silicon carbide by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, M.; Shen, Y. H.; Yin, T. L.

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic properties of different transition-metal (TM) atoms (TM=Co, Cu, Mn, Fe, and Ni) adsorption on SiC monolayer are investigated using density functional theory (DFT). Magnetism appears in the cases of Co, Cu, Mn, and Fe. Among all the magnetic cases, the Co-adsorbed system has the most stable structure. Therefore, we further study the interaction in the two-Co-adsorbed system. Our results show that the interaction between two Co atoms is always FM and the p-d hybridization mechanism results in such ferromagnetic states. However, the FM interaction is obviously depressed by the increasing Co-Co distance, which could be well explained by the Zener-RKKY theory. Moreover, different magnetic behavior is observed in the two-Mn-adsorbed system and a long-range AFM state is showing. Such multiple magnetic properties may suggest promising applications of TM-adsorbed SiC monolayer in the future.

  18. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-17

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the (1)S0-(3)P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  19. Metastable phase formation during α2(D019) to γ(L10) transformation in as-atomized γ-TiAl alloy powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadge, M.; Gouma, P. I.

    2004-11-01

    α2(D019) to γ(L10) transformation during heating of as-atomized γ-TiAl powder was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffraction. The as-atomized coarse powder particles (γ-TiAl powder: Ti -45Al-2Nb-0.7Mo-0.1W-2Cr-0.27O-0.2Si) with large amounts of retained α2 are a perfect candidate to investigate this transformation. It was observed that α2 to γ transformation is a two-step process involving the formation of a disordered face-centered-cubic γ 'TiAl [with a (γ')=c(γ)] as an intermediate phase followed by ordering.

  20. Label-free optical detection of C-reactive protein by nanoimprint lithography-based 2D-photonic crystal film.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tatsuro; Kajita, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Yukio; Kosaka, Terumasa; Himi, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-sensitive, and cost-effective novel biosensors have been strongly desired for future medical diagnostics. To develop novel biosensor, the authors focused on the specific optical characteristics of photonic crystal. In this study, a label-free optical biosensor, polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PhC) film fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL), was developed for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum. The nano-hole array constructed NIL-based 2D-PhC (hole diameter: 230 nm, distance: 230, depth: 200 nm) was fabricated on a cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) film (100 µm) using thermal NIL and required surface modifications to reduce nonspecific adsorption of target proteins. Antigen-antibody reactions on the NIL-based 2D-PhC caused changes to the surrounding refractive index, which was monitored as reflection spectrum changes in the visible region. By using surface modified 2D-PhC, the calculated detection limit for CRP was 12.24 pg/mL at an extremely short reaction time (5 min) without the need for additional labeling procedures and secondary antibody. Furthermore, using the dual-functional random copolymer, CRP could be detected in a pooled blood serum diluted 100× with dramatic reduction of nonspecific adsorption. From these results, the NIL-based 2D-PhC film has great potential for development of an on-site, high-sensitivity, cost-effective, label-free biosensor for medical diagnostics applications.

  1. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-04-20

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  2. Friction. Tuning friction atom-by-atom in an ion-crystal simulator.

    PubMed

    Bylinskii, Alexei; Gangloff, Dorian; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-06-05

    Friction between ordered, atomically smooth surfaces at the nanoscale (nanofriction) is often governed by stick-slip processes. To test long-standing atomistic models of such processes, we implemented a synthetic nanofriction interface between a laser-cooled Coulomb crystal of individually addressable ions as the moving object and a periodic light-field potential as the substrate. We show that stick-slip friction can be tuned from maximal to nearly frictionless via arrangement of the ions relative to the substrate. By varying the ion number, we also show that this strong dependence of friction on the structural mismatch, as predicted by many-particle models, already emerges at the level of two or three atoms. This model system enables a microscopic and systematic investigation of friction, potentially even into the quantum many-body regime.

  3. Two 2D Cd(II) coordination polymers based on asymmetrical Schiff-base ligand: synthesis, crystal structures and luminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Dang, Dong-Bin; Li, Meng-Meng; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Rui-Min

    2013-02-15

    Two new two-dimensional coordination polymers [Cd(3)L(2)(SCN)(6)](n) (1) and [CdLI(2)](n) (2) have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, TG technique, XRPD and complete single crystal structure analysis, where L is 4-(pyridine-2-yl)methyleneamino-1,2,4-trizaole. Asymmetrical Schiff-base ligand L with five- and six-membered N-containing heterocyclic rings acts as a tridentate bridging ligand to bind two Cd(II) centers through one terminal N(triazolyl) and one pyridylimine chelate unit in 1 and 2. For polymer 1, tridentate bridging ligands link Cd-(1,3-μ-SCN(-)) 1D inorganic chains to form a 2D layer network. The existence of C-H···π and π-π stacking interactions between 2D hybrid layers further gives rise to a 3D supramolecular network. In comparison with 1, polymer 2 shows a 2D layer network containing hexanuclear macrometallacyclic units. The 2D layers are staggered together through the combination of C-H···π and π-π stacking interactions and forming a 3D supramolecular structure. The luminescent properties of the polymers 1 and 2 were investigated in the solid state at room temperature.

  4. Quantum interference of fast atoms scattered off crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    The striking observation of interference structures produced by grazing impact of fast atoms on crystal surfaces reported a few years ago [1,2] has given rise to the development of a powerful surface analysis technique. This article gives a brief account of the main features of the process, using the Surface Eikonal (SE) approximation as a theoretical tool to analyze the different mechanisms responsible for the quantum interference. The SE approach is a semiclassical method based on the use of the eikonal wave function, which takes into account the coherent superposition of transition amplitudes for different axially channeled trajectories. It has proved to provide a quite good description of experimental diffraction patterns for different collision systems.

  5. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)e±ikxxE(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)e-κx|x|E(x)∝e-κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5

  6. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    PubMed Central

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  7. Accelerating NLTE radiative transfer by means of the Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration: A two-level atom line formation in 2D Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milić, Ivan; Atanacković, Olga

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art methods in multidimensional NLTE radiative transfer are based on the use of local approximate lambda operator within either Jacobi or Gauss-Seidel iterative schemes. Here we propose another approach to the solution of 2D NLTE RT problems, Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration (FBILI), developed earlier for 1D geometry. In order to present the method and examine its convergence properties we use the well-known instance of the two-level atom line formation with complete frequency redistribution. In the formal solution of the RT equation we employ short characteristics with two-point algorithm. Using an implicit representation of the source function in the computation of the specific intensities, we compute and store the coefficients of the linear relations J=a+bS between the mean intensity J and the corresponding source function S. The use of iteration factors in the ‘local’ coefficients of these implicit relations in two ‘inward’ sweeps of 2D grid, along with the update of the source function in other two ‘outward’ sweeps leads to four times faster solution than the Jacobi’s one. Moreover, the update made in all four consecutive sweeps of the grid leads to an acceleration by a factor of 6-7 compared to the Jacobi iterative scheme.

  8. An analysis of electrochemical energy storage using electrodes fabricated from atomically thin 2D structures of MoS2, graphene and MoS2/graphene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffstutler, Jacob D.

    The behavior of 2D materials has become of great interest in the wake of development of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and the discovery of monolayer graphene by Geim and Novoselov. This study aims to analyze the response variance of 2D electrode materials for EDLCs prepared through the liquid-phase exfoliation method when subjected to differing conditions. Once exfoliated, samples are tested with a series of structural characterization methods, including tunneling electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A new ionic liquid for EDLC use, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate is compared in performance to 6M potassium hydroxide aqueous electrolyte. Devices composed of liquid-phase exfoliated graphene / MoS2 composites are analyzed by concentration for ideal performance. Device performance under cold extreme temperatures for the ionic fluid is presented as well. A brief overview of by-layer analysis of graphene electrode materials is presented as-is. All samples were tested with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, with good capacitive results. The evolution of electrochemical behavior through the altered parameters is tracked as well.

  9. Self-energy shift of the energy levels of atomic hydrogen in photonic crystal medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, R. Kh; Khamadeev, M. A.; Steryakov, O. V.; Ziyatdinova, K. A.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2016-05-01

    Corrections to the average kinetic energy of atomic electrons caused by the change in electron mass in the photonic crystal medium are investigated. Corresponding shift of energy levels of atoms placed in a photonic crystal is shown to be of order of the ordinary Lamb shift.

  10. 2D materials. Graphene, related two-dimensional crystals, and hybrid systems for energy conversion and storage.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Francesco; Colombo, Luigi; Yu, Guihua; Stoller, Meryl; Tozzini, Valentina; Ferrari, Andrea C; Ruoff, Rodney S; Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2015-01-02

    Graphene and related two-dimensional crystals and hybrid systems showcase several key properties that can address emerging energy needs, in particular for the ever growing market of portable and wearable energy conversion and storage devices. Graphene's flexibility, large surface area, and chemical stability, combined with its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, make it promising as a catalyst in fuel and dye-sensitized solar cells. Chemically functionalized graphene can also improve storage and diffusion of ionic species and electric charge in batteries and supercapacitors. Two-dimensional crystals provide optoelectronic and photocatalytic properties complementing those of graphene, enabling the realization of ultrathin-film photovoltaic devices or systems for hydrogen production. Here, we review the use of graphene and related materials for energy conversion and storage, outlining the roadmap for future applications.

  11. Optimal Boundary Control of a Simplified Ericksen-Leslie System for Nematic Liquid Crystal Flows in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaterra, Cecilia; Rocca, Elisabetta; Wu, Hao

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate an optimal boundary control problem for a two dimensional simplified Ericksen-Leslie system modelling the incompressible nematic liquid crystal flows. The hydrodynamic system consists of the Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid velocity coupled with a convective Ginzburg-Landau type equation for the averaged molecular orientation. The fluid velocity is assumed to satisfy a no-slip boundary condition, while the molecular orientation is subject to a time-dependent Dirichlet boundary condition that corresponds to the strong anchoring condition for liquid crystals. We first establish the existence of optimal boundary controls. Then we show that the control-to-state operator is Fréchet differentiable between appropriate Banach spaces and derive first-order necessary optimality conditions in terms of a variational inequality involving the adjoint state variables.

  12. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  13. Functional 2D nanoparticle/polymer array: Interfacial assembly, transfer, characterization, and coupling to photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shisheng

    We developed a universal, facile and robust method to prepare free-standing, ordered and patternable nanoparticle/polymer monolayer arrays by evaporation-induced self-assembly at a fluid interface. The ultra-thin monolayer nanoparticle/polymer arrays are sufficiently robust that they can be transferred to arbitrary substrates, even with complex topographies. More importantly, the Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in the system serves as a photoresist enabling two modes of electron beam (e-beam) nanoparticle patterning. These ultra-thin films of monolayer nanoparticle arrays are of fundamental interest as 2D artificial solids for electronic, magnetic and optical properties and are also of technological interest for a diverse range of applications in micro- and macro-scale devices including photovoltaics, sensors, catalysis, and magnetic storage. By co-assembly with block co-polymers, the nanoparticles were selectively positioned in one specific phase, representing a high throughput route for creating nanoparticle patterns. The self-assembly process was investigated by combined in-situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and numerical simulation. By e-beam irradiation of free-standing 2D NP/polymer arrays, anisotropic nanowire arrays have been fabricated. Additionally, preliminary investigation on assembly of binary nanoparticle arrays has also been introduced, serving as promising future directions of interfacial assembly. Controlling the rate of spontaneous emission and thus promoting the photon generation efficiency is a key step toward fabrication of Quantum dot based single-photon sources, and harnessing of light energy from emitters with a broad emitting spectrum. Coupling of photo emitters to photonic cavities without perturbing the optical performance of cavities remains as a challenge in study of Purcell effect based on quantum electrodynamics. Taking advantage of interfacial assembly and transfer, we have achieved controlled deposition

  14. Band structure of a 2D photonic crystal based on ferrofluids of Co(1-x)Znx Fe2O4 nanoparticles under perpendicular applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Javier; Gonzalez, Luz Esther; Quinonez, Mario; Porras, Nelson; Zambrano, Gustavo; Gomez, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Using a ferrfluid of cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles Co(1 - x)ZnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid and suspended in ethanol, we have fabricated a 2D photonic crystal (PC) by the application of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the ferrofluid. The 2D PC is made by rods of nanoparticles organized in a hexagonal structure. By means of the plane-wave expansion method, we study its photonic band structure (PBS) which depends on the effective permittivity and on the area ratio of the liquid phase. Additionaly, taking into account the Maxwell-Garnett theory we calculated the effective permittivity of the rods. We have found that the effective refractive index of the ferrofluid increases with its magnetization. Using these results we calculate the band structure of the photonic crystal at different applied magnetic fields, finding that the increase of the applied magnetic field shifts the band structure to lower frequencies with the appearance of more band gaps. Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali, Colombia

  15. Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations from WINDII O+(2P→2D) 732 nm emission: Comparisons with the NRLMSISE-00 and C-IAM models and with GUVI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Cho, Young-Min; Fomichev, Victor I.; Martynenko, Oleg V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations have been retrieved from observations by the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) O+(2P→2D) 732 and 733 nm emissions and are compared with results obtained by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI). Although the observations compared were taken ten years apart, the periods were selected on the basis of solar activity, using the Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) to bridge the time gap. Results from all of these were compared with those from the Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter (NRLMSISE-00) model. Comparisons were made on the basis of F10.7 solar flux, day of year, local time, season, latitude and longitude. The WINDII local time variations showed enhanced values for the Northern spring season. Latitude and longitude plots showed smooth variations for NRLMSISE-00 and large variations for both WINDII and GUVI observations; in particular a depression in atomic oxygen concentration around 40 °S latitude and 100 °E longitude that is tentatively identified with a longitudinal wave 1 that does not propagate in local time but has an annual variation. The averaged values showed the WINDII values to be 0.75 that of NRLMSISE-00 compared with 0.80 for GUVI. Thus the WINDII values agreed with those of GUVI to within 6%, although taken 10 years apart.

  16. Influence of elliptical shaped holes on the sensitivity and Q factor in 2D photonic crystals sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmerkhi, A.; Bouchemat, M.; Bouchemat, T.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the refractive index sensor based on L2 photonic crystal cavity where neighboring holes are locally infiltrated with polymers. The photonic crystal is composed of periodic triangular hole array patterned perpendicularly to an InP-based confining heterostructure. The number of the holes surrounding a L2 cavity and their shape were modified in order to optimize the sensitivity and quality factor. From this study we have selected two structures that have good results. The first one is called locally which has a very high Q factor and a good sensitivity. Their values are 6.03 × 106 and 163 nm/RIU, respectively. The second optimized structure is called design B, which has a high sensitivity toward 227.78 nm/RIU with a Q factor of 5 × 105. The calculated detect limit for the two designs are lower than 1.59 × 10-6 and 1.4 × 10-5 RIU, respectively.

  17. Crystal structures and fluorescence properties of two 2D MnII/CdII trimellitic complexes containing terpyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yixia; Chai, Hongmei; Hou, Xiangyang; Wang, Jijiang; Fu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of manganese (II)/cadmium(II) salts with 1,2,4-trimellitic acid (H3tma) and 2,2‧:6‧,2-terpyridine (tpy) result in two novel complexes formulated with [M(Htma)(tpy)]·H2O (M = Mn(1) and Cd(2)). X-ray diffraction structural analyses of two complexes reveal they are isomorphic except for the different center metal ions and crystallize in the monoclinic crystal system of P(2)/n space group. The metal ion lies in a six-coordinated distorted octahedral environment coordinated with three Htma2- anions and one tpy ligand. There is an infinite two-dimensional rhombic network based on the metallic dimmers and Htma2- anions with the tpy ligands in void. Furthermore, the tpy ligands from the adjacent network weakly interact each other by π⋯π packing interactions into 3D supramolecular structure. The fluorescence properties could be assigned to the π - π* transition of organic ligands.

  18. Automated screening of 2D crystallization trials using transmission electron microscopy: a high-throughput tool-chain for sample preparation and microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Nicolas; Hermann, Gilles; Caujolle-Bert, Daniel; Karathanou, Argyro; Erne-Brand, Françoise; Buessler, Jean-Luc; Daum, Pamela; Plitzko, Juergen M; Chami, Mohamed; Mueller, Urs; Kihl, Hubert; Urban, Jean-Philippe; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2011-02-01

    We have built and extensively tested a tool-chain to prepare and screen two-dimensional crystals of membrane proteins by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature. This automated process is an extension of a new procedure described recently that allows membrane protein 2D crystallization in parallel (Iacovache et al., 2010). The system includes a gantry robot that transfers and prepares the crystalline solutions on grids suitable for TEM analysis and an entirely automated microscope that can analyze 96 grids at once without human interference. The operation of the system at the user level is solely controlled within the MATLAB environment: the commands to perform sample handling (loading/unloading in the microscope), microscope steering (magnification, focus, image acquisition, etc.) as well as automatic crystal detection have been implemented. Different types of thin samples can efficiently be screened provided that the particular detection algorithm is adapted to the specific task. Hence, operating time can be shared between multiple users. This is a major step towards the integration of transmission electron microscopy into a high throughput work-flow.

  19. Influence of atomic physics on EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations of JET divertor detachment with carbon and beryllium/tungsten plasma-facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Pitts, R. A.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Gunn, J. P.; Bucalossi, J.; Arnoux, G.; Belo, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Corrigan, G.; Devaux, S.; Flanagan, J.; Groth, M.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Meyer, O.; Stamp, M.; Strachan, J. D.; Wiesen, S.; Wischmeier, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-09-01

    The EDGE2D-EIRENE code is applied for simulation of divertor detachment during matched density ramp experiments in high triangularity, L-mode plasmas in both JET-Carbon (JET-C) and JET-ITER-Like Wall (JET-ILW). The code runs without drifts and includes either C or Be as impurity, but not W, assuming that the W targets have been coated with Be via main chamber migration. The simulations reproduce reasonably well the observed particle flux detachment as density is raised in both JET-C and JET-ILW experiments and can better match the experimental in-out divertor target power asymmetry if the heat flux entering the outer divertor is artificially set at around 2-3 times that entering the inner divertor. A careful comparison between different sets of atomic physics processes used in EIRENE shows that the detachment modelled by EDGE2D-EIRENE relies only on an increase of the particle sinks and not on a decrease of the ionization source. For the rollover and the beginning of the partially detached phase, the particle losses by perpendicular transport and the molecular activated recombination processes are mainly involved. For a deeper detachment with significant target ion flux reduction, volume recombination appears to be the main contributor. The elastic molecule-ion collisions are also important to provide good neutral confinement in the divertor and thus stabilize the simulations at low electron temperature (Te), when the sink terms are strong. Comparison between EDGE2D-EIRENE and SOLPS4.3 simulations of the density ramp in C shows similar detachment trends, but the importance of the elastic ion-molecule collisions is reduced in SOLPS4.3. Both codes suggest that any process capable of increasing the neutral confinement in the divertor should help to improve the modelling of the detachment. A further outcome of this work has been to demonstrate that key JET divertor diagnostic signals—Langmuir probe Te and bolometric tomographic reconstructions—are running beyond

  20. Structure of the novel ternary hydrides Li4Tt2D (Tt=Si and Ge).

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Hartman, Michael R; Udovic, Terrence J; Rush, John J; Zhou, Wei; Bowman, Robert C; Vajo, John J

    2007-02-01

    The crystal structures of newly discovered Li4Ge2D and Li4Si2D ternary phases were solved by direct methods using neutron powder diffraction data. Both structures can be described using a Cmmm orthorhombic cell with all hydrogen atoms occupying Li6-octahedral interstices. The overall crystal structure and the geometry of these interstices are compared with those of other related phases, and the stabilization of this novel class of ternary hydrides is discussed.

  1. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    DOE PAGES

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a highmore » crystallinity and very low defect concentration.« less

  2. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a high crystallinity and very low defect concentration.

  3. Electron momentum distribution and singlet-singlet annihilation in the organic anthracene molecular crystals using positron 2D-ACAR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Sellaiyan; Sivaji, Krishnan; Arulchakkaravarthi, Arjunan; Sankar, Sambasivam

    2014-08-14

    We present the mapping of electron momentum distribution (EMD) in a single crystal of anthracene by two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained on the basis of the crystallographic features of the material. The EMD spectra provide information about the positron states and their behavior and also about the hindrance of the positronium (Ps) formation in this material. The EMD has exhibited evidence for the absence of free volume defects. The characteristic EMD features regarding the delocalized electronic states are explained. Further, scintillation characteristics such as fluorescence and time-correlated single photon counting have also been studied. The emission peaks are attributed to vibrational bands of fluorescence emission from the singlet excitons and lifetime components are observed to be due to singlet fission and the singlet-singlet excitons annihilation.

  4. Crystal structure and antiferromagnetic ordering of quasi-2D [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]TaF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine).

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; McDonald, R. D.; Singleton, J.; Materials Science Division; Eastern Washington Univ.; LANL

    2010-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction at 90 and 295 K. Copper(II) ions are coordinated to four bridging pyz ligands to form square layers in the ab-plane. Bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} ligands join the layers together along the c-axis to afford a tetragonal, three-dimensional (3D) framework that contains Taf{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every cavity. At 295 K, the pyz rings lie exactly perpendicular to the layers and cooling to 90 K induces a canting of those rings. Magnetically, the compound exhibits 2D antiferromagnetic correlations within the 2D layers with an exchange interaction of -13.1(1) K. Weak interlayer interactions, as mediated by Cu-F-H-F-Cu, leads to long-range magnetic order below 4.2 K. Pulsed-field magnetization data at 0.5 K show a concave curvature with increasing B and reveal a saturation magnetization at 35.4 T.

  5. Heavy-atom Database System: a tool for the preparation of heavy-atom derivatives of protein crystals based on amino-acid sequence and crystallization conditions.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Michihiro; Asada, Yukuhiko; Ayama, Haruhiko; Ukawa, Hisashi; Taka, Hideyuki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-09-01

    Heavy-atom Database System (HATODAS) is a WWW-based tool designed to assist the heavy-atom derivatization of proteins. The conventional procedure for the preparation of derivatives is usually a time-consuming 'trial-and-error' process. The present program provides a solution for this problem using a database of known heavy-atom derivatives. A database search suggests potential heavy-atom reagents for any target protein based on its amino-acid sequence and crystallization conditions. A mining of the database identified 93 preferred motifs for heavy-atom binding. The motifs are observed frequently at the actual heavy-atom-binding sites encountered in the process of structure determination.

  6. Characterization of the growth of 2D protein crystals on a lipid monolayer by ellipsometry and rigidity measurements coupled to electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Vénien-Bryan, C; Lenne, P F; Zakri, C; Renault, A; Brisson, A; Legrand, J F; Berge, B

    1998-01-01

    We present here some sensitive optical and mechanical experiments for monitoring the process of formation and growth of two-dimensional (2D) crystals of proteins on a lipid monolayer at an air-water interface. The adsorption of proteins on the lipid monolayer was monitored by ellipsometry measurements. An instrument was developed to measure the shear elastic constant (in plane rigidity) of the monolayer. These experiments have been done using cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and annexin V as model proteins interacting with a monosialoganglioside (GM1) and dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), respectively. Electron microscopy observations of the protein-lipid layer transferred to grids were systematically used as a control. We found a good correlation between the measured in-plane rigidity of the monolayer and the presence of large crystalline domains observed by electron microscopy grids. Our interpretation of these data is that the crystallization process of proteins on a lipid monolayer passes through at least three successive stages: 1) molecular recognition between protein and lipid-ligand, i.e., adsorption of the protein on the lipid layer; 2) nucleation and growth of crystalline patches whose percolation is detected by the appearance of a non-zero in-plane rigidity; and 3) annealing of the layer producing a slower increase of the lateral or in-plane rigidity. PMID:9591688

  7. Anisotropic dipole polarizability of transition metal atoms: Sc(2D), Ti(3F,3P), V(4F,4P,6D), Ni(3F) and ions: Sc2+(2D), Ti2+(3F,3P).

    PubMed

    Kłos, J

    2005-07-08

    Dipole polarizability tensor components and quadrupole moments of transition-metal atoms Sc, Ti, V, Ni, and Cu and ions Sc2+ and Ti2+ are computed using finite field complete active space self-consistent field and multireference configuration interaction ab initio methods. Perpendicular components of the dipole polarizability tensor are calculated from equations involving only parallel components of the polarizability tensor and its average value. Mean polarizability and polarizability anisotropy decrease in the Sc-Ni series. Relativistic effects are accounted for with the Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian. The consequences of the anisotropic properties of these atoms to their interactions with spherically symmetric rare gases are also discussed.

  8. Crystallized and amorphous vortices in rotating atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Fei; Fan, Heng; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Vortex is a topological defect with a quantized winding number of the phase in superfluids and superconductors. Here, we investigate the crystallized (triangular, square, honeycomb) and amorphous vortices in rotating atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) by using the damped projected Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The amorphous vortices are the result of the considerable deviation induced by the interaction of atomic-molecular vortices. By changing the atom-molecule interaction from attractive to repulsive, the configuration of vortices can change from an overlapped atomic-molecular vortices to carbon-dioxide-type ones, then to atomic vortices with interstitial molecular vortices, and finally into independent separated ones. The Raman detuning can tune the ratio of the atomic vortex to the molecular vortex. We provide a phase diagram of vortices in rotating atomic-molecular BECs as a function of Raman detuning and the strength of atom-molecule interaction. PMID:24573303

  9. Critical Slowing of Density Fluctuations Approaching the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals: 2D IR Measurements and Mode Coupling Theory.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Kathleen P; Bailey, Heather E; Hoffman, David J; Andersen, Hans C; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) data are presented for a vibrational probe in three nematogens: 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl, and 4-(trans-4-amylcyclohexyl)-benzonitrile. The spectral diffusion time constants in all three liquids in the isotropic phase are proportional to [T*/(T - T*)](1/2), where T* is 0.5-1 K below the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TNI). Rescaling to a reduced temperature shows that the decays of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) for all three nematogens fall on the same curve, suggesting a universal dynamic behavior of nematogens above TNI. Spectral diffusion is complete before significant orientational relaxation in the liquid, as measured by optically heterodyne detected-optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) spectroscopy, and before any significant orientational randomization of the probe measured by polarization selective IR pump-probe experiments. To interpret the OHD-OKE and FFCF data, we constructed a mode coupling theory (MCT) schematic model for the relationships among three correlation functions: ϕ1, a correlator for large wave vector density fluctuations; ϕ2, the orientational correlation function whose time derivative is the observable in the OHD-OKE experiment; and ϕ3, the FFCF for the 2D IR experiment. The equations for ϕ1 and ϕ2 match those in the previous MCT schematic model for nematogens, and ϕ3 is coupled to the first two correlators in a straightforward manner. Resulting models fit the data very well. Across liquid crystals, the temperature dependences of the coupling constants show consistent, nonmonotonic behavior. A remarkable change in coupling occurs at ∼5 K above TNI, precisely where the rate of spectral diffusion in 5CB was observed to deviate from that of a similar nonmesogenic liquid.

  10. Spatial crystal imaging by means of atomic electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luehr, Tobias; Winkelmann, Aimo; Nolze, Gert; Westphal, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    The determination of atom structures is the key for the understanding of basic functional properties of matter or for designing new high-tech materials. For structure determination, holography is a very attractive option, since this method enables lensless three-dimensional imaging. In principle, x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) experiments correspond to a microscopic holography setup. The electron diffraction pattern is highly sensitive to the local structure of the emitter environment, since the emitting atom is located in the near-field of the scattering atoms. Hence, holographic reconstructions of XPD-patterns should yield a spatial image of the sample's atom arrangement. However, anisotropic electron scattering and multiple scattering effects generally cause strong artifacts in the reconstruction. In this contribution we show how to circumvent this problem with electrons at kinetic energies of Ekin >= 10 keV. The resulting spatial images contain hundreds of clearly separated atoms at their correct locations. Furthermore, XPD-patterns allow an element-specific assignment of the reconstructed atoms within the image. This is the first demonstration of true atom imaging following Dennis Gabor's idea of electron holography.

  11. Trapped Atoms in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-09

    Guided mode resonances 13 Appendix E. Effective area and mode volume for probe 14 References 14 1. Introduction New opportunities in atomic, molecular...largely insensitive to the particular atomic Zeeman sublevel owing to negligible vector shifts due to the high degree of linear polarization of the...surrounded by NA ‘mirror’ atoms along a 1D-lattice [16], the ratio of the coherent coupling rate g1 = √ NAγ1D/2 to the effective dissipative rate γ ′ would

  12. All-atom crystal simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Janowski, Pawel A.; Case, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics simulations can complement experimental measures of structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of such simulations can be tested by comparisons to models refined against experimental crystallographic data. Methods We report simulations of a DNA and RNA duplex in their crystalline environment. The calculations mimic the conditions for PDB entries 1D23 [d(CGATCGATCG)2] and 1RNA [(UUAUAUAUAUAUAA)2], and contain 8 unit cells, each with 4 copies of the Watson-Crick duplex; this yields in aggregate 64 µs of duplex sampling for DNA and 16 µs for RNA. Results The duplex structures conform much more closely to the average structure seen in the crystal than do structures extracted from a solution simulation with the same force field. Sequence-dependent variations in helical parameters, and in groove widths, are largely maintained in the crystal structure, but are smoothed out in solution. However, the integrity of the crystal lattice is slowly degraded in both simulations, with the result that the interfaces between chains become heterogeneous. This problem is more severe for the DNA crystal, which has fewer inter-chain hydrogen bond contacts than does the RNA crystal. Conclusions Crystal simulations using current force fields reproduce many features of observed crystal structures, but suffer from a gradual degradation of the integrity of the crystal lattice. General significance The results offer insights into force-field simulations that tests their ability to preserve weak interactions between chains, which will be of importance also in non-crystalline applications that involve binding and recognition. PMID:25255706

  13. Chiral Asymmetric Structures in Aspartic Acid and Valine Crystals Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez

    2016-03-29

    Structures of crystallized deposits formed by the molecular self-assembly of aspartic acid and valine on silicon substrates were imaged by atomic force microscopy. Images of d- and l-aspartic acid crystal surfaces showing extended molecularly flat sheets or regions separated by single molecule thick steps are presented. Distinct orientation surfaces were imaged, which, combined with the single molecule step size, defines the geometry of the crystal. However, single molecule step growth also reveals the crystal chirality, i.e., growth orientations. The imaged ordered lattice of aspartic acid (asp) and valine (val) mostly revealed periodicities corresponding to bulk terminations, but a previously unreported molecular hexagonal lattice configuration was observed for both l-asp and l-val but not for d-asp or d-val. Atomic force microscopy can then be used to identify the different chiral forms of aspartic acid and valine crystals.

  14. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  15. Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Bajcsy, M.; Hofferberth, S.; Balic, V.; Zibrov, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.; Peyronel, T.; Liang, Q.; Vuletic, V.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We describe different loading methods and compare their trade-offs in terms of implementation complexity and atom-loading efficiency. The most efficient procedure results in loading of {approx}30,000 rubidium atoms, which creates a medium with an optical depth of {approx}180 inside the fiber. Compared to our earlier study this represents a sixfold increase in the maximum achieved optical depth in this system.

  16. Tunable phonon polaritons in atomically thin van der Waals crystals of boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Dai, S; Fei, Z; Ma, Q; Rodin, A S; Wagner, M; McLeod, A S; Liu, M K; Gannett, W; Regan, W; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Thiemens, M; Dominguez, G; Castro Neto, A H; Zettl, A; Keilmann, F; Jarillo-Herrero, P; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2014-03-07

    van der Waals heterostructures assembled from atomically thin crystalline layers of diverse two-dimensional solids are emerging as a new paradigm in the physics of materials. We used infrared nanoimaging to study the properties of surface phonon polaritons in a representative van der Waals crystal, hexagonal boron nitride. We launched, detected, and imaged the polaritonic waves in real space and altered their wavelength by varying the number of crystal layers in our specimens. The measured dispersion of polaritonic waves was shown to be governed by the crystal thickness according to a scaling law that persists down to a few atomic layers. Our results are likely to hold true in other polar van der Waals crystals and may lead to new functionalities.

  17. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-15

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, ([Ni(btec)(Himb){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Cd(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)(H{sub 2}O)]·1.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), and ([Zn(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (H{sub 4}btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (5{sup 3}·6{sup 2}·7)(5{sup 2}·6{sup 4}). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·6{sup 4}·8)(4{sup 2}·6{sup 2}·8{sup 2}). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three new 1D to 3D complexes with different structural and topological motifs have been obtained by modifying the central metal ions. Additionally, their IR, TG analyses and fluorescent properties are also investigated. - Highlights: • Three complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands. • The complexes are characterized by IR, luminescence and TGA techniques. • Benzenetetracarboxylates display different coordination modes in complexes 1–3. • Changing the metal ions can result in complexes with completely different structures.

  18. Atomic force microscopy of three-dimensional membrane protein crystals. Ca-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Lacapère, J J; Stokes, D L; Chatenay, D

    1992-01-01

    We have observed three-dimensional crystals of the calcium pump from sarcoplasmic reticulum by atomic force microscopy (AFM). From AFM images of dried crystals, both on graphite and mica, we measured steps in the crystal thickness, corresponding to the unit cell spacing normal to the substrate. It is known from transmission electron microscopy that crystal periodicity in the plane of the substrate is destroyed by drying, and it was therefore not surprising that we were unable to observe this periodicity by AFM. Thus, we were motivated to use the AFM on hydrated crystals. In this case, crystal adsorption appeared to be a limiting factor, and our studies indicate that adsorption is controlled by the composition of the medium and by the physical-chemical properties of the substrate. We used scanning electron microscopy to determine the conditions yielding the highest adsorption of crystals, and, under these conditions, we have obtained AFM images of hydrated crystals with a resolution similar to that observed with dried samples (i.e., relatively poor). In the same preparations, we have observed lipid bilayers with a significantly better resolution, indicating that the poor quality of crystal images was not due to instrumental limitations. Rather, we attribute poor images to the intrinsic flexibility of these multilamellar crystals, which apparently allow movement of one layer relative to another in response to shear forces from the AFM tip. We therefore suggest some general guidelines for future studies of membrane proteins with AFM. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420878

  19. Atom–atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)∝e−κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom–atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom–atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5 atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom–atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode. PMID:27582467

  20. On atom–atom ‘short contact’ bonding interactions in crystals1

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Claude; Espinosa, Enrique; Matta, Cherif F.

    2015-01-01

    Professor Dunitz questions the usefulness of ascribing crystalline structural stability to individual atom–atom intermolecular interactions viewed as bonding (hence stabilizing) whenever linked by a bond path. An alternative view is expressed in the present essay that articulates the validity and usefulness of the bond path concept in a crystallographic and crystal engineering context. PMID:25866651

  1. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase.

  2. Density functional theory calculations of stability and diffusion mechanisms of impurity atoms in Ge crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maeta, Takahiro; Sueoka, Koji

    2014-08-21

    Ge-based substrates are being developed for applications in advanced nano-electronic devices because of their higher intrinsic carrier mobility than Si. The stability and diffusion mechanism of impurity atoms in Ge are not well known in contrast to those of Si. Systematic studies of the stable sites of 2nd to 6th row element impurity atoms in Ge crystal were undertaken with density functional theory (DFT) and compared with those in Si crystal. It was found that most of the impurity atoms in Ge were stable at substitutional sites, while transition metals in Si were stable at interstitial sites and the other impurity atoms in Si were stable at substitutional sites. Furthermore, DFT calculations were carried out to clarify the mechanism responsible for the diffusion of impurity atoms in Ge crystals. The diffusion mechanism for 3d transition metals in Ge was found to be an interstitial-substitutional diffusion mechanism, while in Si this was an interstitial diffusion mechanism. The diffusion barriers in the proposed diffusion mechanisms in Ge and Si were quantitatively verified by comparing them to the experimental values in the literature.

  3. Solid sampling determination of magnesium in lithium niobate crystals by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Laczai, Nikoletta; Hajdara, Ivett; Bencs, László

    2016-12-01

    The vaporization/atomization processes of Mg in high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS) were investigated by evaporating solid (powder) samples of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) optical single crystals doped with various amounts of Mg in a transversally heated graphite atomizer (THGA). Optimal analytical conditions were attained by using the Mg I 215.4353 nm secondary spectral line. An optimal pyrolysis temperature of 1500 °C was found for Mg, while the compromise atomization temperature in THGAs (2400 °C) was applied for analyte vaporization. The calibration was performed against solid (powered) lithium niobate crystal standards. The standards were prepared with exactly known Mg content via solid state fusion of the oxide components of the matrix and analyte. The correlation coefficient (R value) of the linear calibration was not worse than 0.9992. The calibration curves were linear in the dopant concentration range of interest (0.74-7.25 mg/g Mg), when dosing 3-10 mg of the powder samples into the graphite sample insertion boats. The Mg content of the studied 19 samples was in the range of 1.69-4.13 mg/g. The precision of the method was better than 6.3%. The accuracy of the results was verified by means of flame atomic absorption spectrometry with solution sample introduction after digestion of several crystal samples.

  4. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts. PMID:27650485

  5. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-09-21

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts.

  6. Mermin–Wagner fluctuations in 2D amorphous solids

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Kaiser, Herbert; Klix, Christian L.; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In a recent commentary, J. M. Kosterlitz described how D. Thouless and he got motivated to investigate melting and suprafluidity in two dimensions [Kosterlitz JM (2016) J Phys Condens Matter 28:481001]. It was due to the lack of broken translational symmetry in two dimensions—doubting the existence of 2D crystals—and the first computer simulations foretelling 2D crystals (at least in tiny systems). The lack of broken symmetries proposed by D. Mermin and H. Wagner is caused by long wavelength density fluctuations. Those fluctuations do not only have structural impact, but additionally a dynamical one: They cause the Lindemann criterion to fail in 2D in the sense that the mean squared displacement of atoms is not limited. Comparing experimental data from 3D and 2D amorphous solids with 2D crystals, we disentangle Mermin–Wagner fluctuations from glassy structural relaxations. Furthermore, we demonstrate with computer simulations the logarithmic increase of displacements with system size: Periodicity is not a requirement for Mermin–Wagner fluctuations, which conserve the homogeneity of space on long scales. PMID:28137872

  7. Kinetic Roughening and Energetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth: A Preliminary Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We examined particulars of crystal growth from measurements obtained at both microscopic and molecular levels. The crystal growth measurements performed at the microscopic level are well characterized by a model that balances the flux of macromolecules towards the crystal surface with the flux of the crystal surface. Numerical evaluation of model with measurements of crystal growth, in time, provided accurate estimates for the average growth velocities. Growth velocities thus obtained were also interpreted using well-established phenomenological theories. Moreover, we find that microscopic measurements of growth velocity measurements obtained as a function of temperature best characterizes changes in crystal growth modes, when present. We also examined the possibility of detecting a change in crystal growth modes at the molecular level using atomic force microscopy, AFM. From preliminary AFM measurements performed at various supersaturations, we find that magnitude of surface height fluctuations, h(x), increases with supersaturation. Further examination of surface height fluctuations using methods established for fluctuation spectroscopy also enabled the discovery of the existence of a characteristic length, c, which may possibly determine the mode of crystal growth. Although the results are preliminary, we establish the non- critical divergence of 5 and the root-mean-square (rms) magnitude of height-height fluctuations as the kinetic roughening transition temperatures are approached. Moreover, we also examine approximate models for interpreting the non-critical behavior of both 6 and rms magnitude of height-height fluctuations, as the solution supersaturation is increased towards the kinetic roughening supersaturation.

  8. Rydberg atoms in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres

    PubMed Central

    Epple, G.; Kleinbach, K. S.; Euser, T. G.; Joly, N. Y.; Pfau, T.; Russell, P. St. J.; Löw, R.

    2014-01-01

    The exceptionally large polarizability of highly excited Rydberg atoms—six orders of magnitude higher than ground-state atoms—makes them of great interest in fields such as quantum optics, quantum computing, quantum simulation and metrology. However, if they are to be used routinely in applications, a major requirement is their integration into technically feasible, miniaturized devices. Here we show that a Rydberg medium based on room temperature caesium vapour can be confined in broadband-guiding kagome-style hollow-core photonic crystal fibres. Three-photon spectroscopy performed on a caesium-filled fibre detects Rydberg states up to a principal quantum number of n=40. Besides small energy-level shifts we observe narrow lines confirming the coherence of the Rydberg excitation. Using different Rydberg states and core diameters we study the influence of confinement within the fibre core after different exposure times. Understanding these effects is essential for the successful future development of novel applications based on integrated room temperature Rydberg systems. PMID:24942281

  9. Gamma induced atom displacements in LYSO and LuYAP crystals as used in medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñera, Ibrahin; Cruz, Carlos M.; Abreu, Yamiel; Leyva, Antonio; Van Espen, Piet; Díaz, Angelina; Cabal, Ana E.; Van Remortel, Nick

    2015-08-01

    The radiation damage, in terms of atom displacements, induced by gamma irradiation in LYSO and LuYAP crystals is presented. 44Sc, 22Na and 48V are used as gamma sources for this study. The energy of gammas from the electron-positron annihilation processes (511 keV) is also included in the study. The atom displacements distributions inside each material are calculated following the Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method introduced by the authors. This procedure also allows to study the atom displacements in-depth distributions inside each crystal. The atom displacements damage in LYSO crystals is found to be higher than in LuYAP crystals, mainly provoked by the displacements of silicon and oxygen atoms. But the difference between atom displacements produced in LYSO and LuYAP decreases when more energetic sources are used. On the other hand, the correlation between the atom displacements and energy deposition in-depth distributions is excellent. The atom displacements to energy deposition ratio is found to increases with more energetic photon sources. LYSO crystals are then more liable to the atom displacements damage than LuYAP crystals.

  10. Lattice site specific diffusion properties for substitutional and interstitial impurity atoms in ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoob, Faisal; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-09-01

    Fundamental understanding of impurity diffusion in crystals remains a challenge due to lack of experimental capabilities for measuring the diffusion properties of atoms according to their substitutional and interstitial lattice locations. With examples of indium and silver in ZnO crystals, we demonstrate an ion beam based method to experimentally determine the energetics and entropy changes in diffusion of substitutional and interstitial impurity atoms. While the interstitial Ag diffuses much faster than the substitutional Ag, as normally expected, the interstitial In migrates slower than the substitutional In, which is attributed to a large negative entropy change (˜-10 kB), possibly caused by the large atomic size of In. The activation energy and the diffusivity pre-exponential factor for the interstitial Ag are significantly enhanced, being more than a factor of two and ˜13 orders of magnitude, respectively, relative to the case for the interstitial In. This implies two different diffusion mechanisms between these two types of interstitial atoms in ZnO crystals: the direct interstitial diffusion mechanism for the interstitial In and the kick-out diffusion mechanism for the interstitial Ag. In addition, the activation energies and the diffusivity prefactors follow the Meyer-Neldel relationship with an excitation energy of ˜92 meV.

  11. Polarizable atomic multipole X-ray refinement: application to peptide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Schnieders, Michael J.; Fenn, Timothy D.; Pande, Vijay S.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2009-09-01

    A method to accelerate the computation of structure factors from an electron density described by anisotropic and aspherical atomic form factors via fast Fourier transformation is described for the first time. Recent advances in computational chemistry have produced force fields based on a polarizable atomic multipole description of biomolecular electrostatics. In this work, the Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications (AMOEBA) force field is applied to restrained refinement of molecular models against X-ray diffraction data from peptide crystals. A new formalism is also developed to compute anisotropic and aspherical structure factors using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of Cartesian Gaussian multipoles. Relative to direct summation, the FFT approach can give a speedup of more than an order of magnitude for aspherical refinement of ultrahigh-resolution data sets. Use of a sublattice formalism makes the method highly parallelizable. Application of the Cartesian Gaussian multipole scattering model to a series of four peptide crystals using multipole coefficients from the AMOEBA force field demonstrates that AMOEBA systematically underestimates electron density at bond centers. For the trigonal and tetrahedral bonding geometries common in organic chemistry, an atomic multipole expansion through hexadecapole order is required to explain bond electron density. Alternatively, the addition of interatomic scattering (IAS) sites to the AMOEBA-based density captured bonding effects with fewer parameters. For a series of four peptide crystals, the AMOEBA–IAS model lowered R{sub free} by 20–40% relative to the original spherically symmetric scattering model.

  12. Determining the Molecular Packing Arrangements on Protein Crystal Faces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Perozzo, Mary A.; Konnert, John H.; Nadarajan, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Periodic Bond Chain (PBC) analysis of the packing of tetragonal lysozyme crystals have revealed that there are two possible molecular packing arrangements for the crystal faces. The analysis also predicted that only one of these, involving the formation of helices about the 4(sub 3) axes, would prevail during crystal growth. In this study high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to verify these predictions for the (110) crystal face. A computer program was developed which constructs the expected AFM image for a given tip shape for each possible molecular packing arrangement. By comparing the actual AFM image with the predicted images the correct packing arrangement was determined. The prediction of an arrangement involving 4(sub 3) helices was confirmed in this manner,"while the alternate arrangement was not observed. The investigation also showed the protein molecules were packed slightly closer about the 4(sub 3) axes than in the crystallographic arrangement of the crystal interior. This study demonstrates a new approach for determining the molecular packing arrangements on protein crystal faces. It also shows the power of combining a theoretical PBC analysis with experimental high resolution AFM techniques in probing protein crystal growth processes at the molecular level.

  13. α-amylase crystal growth investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astier, J. P.; Bokern, D.; Lapena, L.; Veesler, S.

    2001-06-01

    The growth behavior of porcine pancreatic α-amylase at defined supersaturation has been investigated by means of temperature controlled in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The step velocities measured by AFM were in overall agreement with the normal growth rates of an individual face measured by optical microscopy. In addition, highly local growth dynamics could be visualized. Imaging in tapping mode revealed crystalline amylase aggregates attached to the basal face and their subsequent incorporation into growing terraces producing a macrodefect. At high supersaturation ( β=1.6) 2-D nucleation was found to be the dominating growth mechanism, whereas at lower supersaturation ( β=1.3) the growth process appears to be defect controlled (spiral growth). The analysis of step heights on 2-D nucleation islands (monomolecular protein layers) and growth steps (two molecules in height) in combination with results from light scattering experiments suggest that a single protein molecule is the basic growth unit.

  14. Crystal lattice imaging of the silica and alumina faces of kaolinite using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Miller, Jan D

    2010-12-01

    The crystal lattice images of the two faces of kaolinite (the silica face and the alumina face) have been obtained using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. Lattice resolution images reveal the hexagonal surface lattice of these two faces of kaolinite. Analysis of the silica face of kaolinite showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of oxygen atoms had a periodicity of 0.50±0.04nm between neighboring oxygen atoms, which is in good agreement with the surface lattice structure of the mica basal plane. The center of the hexagonal ring of oxygen atoms is vacant. Analysis of the alumina face of kaolinite showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of hydroxyls surround a hydroxyl in the center of the ring. The atomic spacing between neighboring hydroxyls was determined as 0.36±0.04nm. Ordering of the kaolinite particles for examination of the silica and alumina surfaces was accomplished using different substrates, a procedure previously established. Crystal lattice imaging supports previous results and independently confirms that the two faces of kaolinite have been properly identified.

  15. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-12

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  16. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  17. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  18. Zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons: one-dimensional resonant channels in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Páez, Carlos J; Pereira, Ana L C; Schulz, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate phosphorene zigzag nanoribbons as a platform for constriction engineering. In the presence of a constriction at one of the edges, quantum confinement of edge-protected states reveals conductance peaks, if the edge is uncoupled from the other edge. If the constriction is narrow enough to promote coupling between edges, it gives rise to Fano-like resonances as well as antiresonances in the transmission spectrum. These effects are shown to mimic an atomic chain like behavior in a two dimensional atomic crystal. PMID:28144546

  19. Counting the atoms in a 28Si crystal for a new kilogram definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, B.; Azuma, Y.; Bartl, G.; Becker, P.; Bettin, H.; Borys, M.; Busch, I.; Fuchs, P.; Fujii, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Kessler, E.; Krumrey, M.; Kuetgens, U.; Kuramoto, N.; Mana, G.; Massa, E.; Mizushima, S.; Nicolaus, A.; Picard, A.; Pramann, A.; Rienitz, O.; Schiel, D.; Valkiers, S.; Waseda, A.; Zakel, S.

    2011-04-01

    This paper concerns an international research project aimed at determining the Avogadro constant by counting the atoms in an isotopically enriched silicon crystal. The counting procedure was based on the measurement of the molar volume and the volume of an atom in two 1 kg crystal spheres. The novelty was the use of isotope dilution mass spectrometry as a new and very accurate method for the determination of the molar mass of enriched silicon. Because of an unexpected metallic contamination of the sphere surfaces, the relative measurement uncertainty, 3 × 10-8 NA, is larger by a factor 1.5 than that targeted. The measured value of the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.022 140 82(18) × 1023 mol-1, is the most accurate input datum for the kilogram redefinition and differs by 16 × 10-8 NA from the CODATA 2006 adjusted value. This value is midway between the NIST and NPL watt-balance values.

  20. Determination of the Avogadro Constant by Counting the Atoms in a Si28 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, B.; Azuma, Y.; Bartl, G.; Becker, P.; Bettin, H.; Borys, M.; Busch, I.; Gray, M.; Fuchs, P.; Fujii, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Kessler, E.; Krumrey, M.; Kuetgens, U.; Kuramoto, N.; Mana, G.; Manson, P.; Massa, E.; Mizushima, S.; Nicolaus, A.; Picard, A.; Pramann, A.; Rienitz, O.; Schiel, D.; Valkiers, S.; Waseda, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Avogadro constant links the atomic and the macroscopic properties of matter. Since the molar Planck constant is well known via the measurement of the Rydberg constant, it is also closely related to the Planck constant. In addition, its accurate determination is of paramount importance for a definition of the kilogram in terms of a fundamental constant. We describe a new approach for its determination by counting the atoms in 1 kg single-crystal spheres, which are highly enriched with the Si28 isotope. It enabled isotope dilution mass spectroscopy to determine the molar mass of the silicon crystal with unprecedented accuracy. The value obtained, NA=6.02214078(18)×1023mol-1, is the most accurate input datum for a new definition of the kilogram.

  1. Atomic force microscopy of AgBr crystals and adsorbed gelatin films

    SciTech Connect

    Haugstad, G.; Gladfelter, W.L.; Keyes, M.P.; Weberg, E.B.

    1993-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy of the (111) surface of macroscopic AgBr crystals revealed steps ranging in height from two atomic layers up to 10 nm, lying predominantly along the (110) and (112) families of crystal directions. Rods of elemental Ag, formed via photoreduction, were observed along the (110) family of directions. Images of adsorbed gelatin films revealed circular pores with diameters of order 10-100 nm, extending to the AgBr surface. The length of deposition time, the pH and concentration of the gelatin solution, and the presence of steps on the AgBr surface were observed to affect the size, number, and location of pores in the gelatin films. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Determination of the Avogadro constant by counting the atoms in a 28Si crystal.

    PubMed

    Andreas, B; Azuma, Y; Bartl, G; Becker, P; Bettin, H; Borys, M; Busch, I; Gray, M; Fuchs, P; Fujii, K; Fujimoto, H; Kessler, E; Krumrey, M; Kuetgens, U; Kuramoto, N; Mana, G; Manson, P; Massa, E; Mizushima, S; Nicolaus, A; Picard, A; Pramann, A; Rienitz, O; Schiel, D; Valkiers, S; Waseda, A

    2011-01-21

    The Avogadro constant links the atomic and the macroscopic properties of matter. Since the molar Planck constant is well known via the measurement of the Rydberg constant, it is also closely related to the Planck constant. In addition, its accurate determination is of paramount importance for a definition of the kilogram in terms of a fundamental constant. We describe a new approach for its determination by counting the atoms in 1 kg single-crystal spheres, which are highly enriched with the 28Si isotope. It enabled isotope dilution mass spectroscopy to determine the molar mass of the silicon crystal with unprecedented accuracy. The value obtained, NA = 6.022,140,78(18) × 10(23) mol(-1), is the most accurate input datum for a new definition of the kilogram.

  3. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  4. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  5. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms.

    PubMed

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Boothroyd, C; Pan, C-T; Gwilliam, R

    2016-06-07

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  6. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O; Thompson, Hugh P G; Day, Graeme M

    2016-08-01

    We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%.

  7. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Thompson, Hugh P. G.; Day, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%. PMID:27484370

  8. Landau levels in 2D materials using Wannier Hamiltonians obtained by first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, J. L.; Fernández-Rossier, J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a method to calculate the Landau levels and the corresponding edge states of two dimensional (2D) crystals using as a starting point their electronic structure as obtained from standard density functional theory (DFT). The DFT Hamiltonian is represented in the basis of maximally localized Wannier functions. This defines a tight-binding Hamiltonian for the bulk that can be used to describe other structures, such as ribbons, provided that atomic scale details of the edges are ignored. The effect of the orbital magnetic field is described using the Peierls substitution in the hopping matrix elements. Implementing this approach in a ribbon geometry, we obtain both the Landau levels and the dispersive edge states for a series of 2D crystals, including graphene, Boron Nitride, MoS2, Black Phosphorous, Indium Selenide and MoO3. Our procedure can readily be used in any other 2D crystal, and provides an alternative to effective mass descriptions.

  9. Designing exotic many-body states of atomic spin and motion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, Marco T.; Mathey, Ludwig; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-03-01

    Cold atoms coupled to photonic crystals constitute an exciting platform for exploring quantum many-body physics. For example, such systems offer the potential to realize strong photon-mediated forces between atoms, which depend on the atomic internal (spin) states, and where both the motional and spin degrees of freedom can exhibit long coherence times. An intriguing question then is whether exotic phases could arise, wherein crystalline or other spatial patterns and spin correlations are fundamentally tied together, an effect that is atypical in condensed matter systems. Here, we analyse one realistic model Hamiltonian in detail. We show that this previously unexplored system exhibits a rich phase diagram of emergent orders, including spatially dimerized spin-entangled pairs, a fluid of composite particles comprised of joint spin-phonon excitations, phonon-induced Néel ordering, and a fractional magnetization plateau associated with trimer formation.

  10. Gate-induced superconductivity in atomically thin MoS2 crystals.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Davide; Jo, Sanghyun; Berger, Helmuth; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2016-04-01

    When thinned down to the atomic scale, many layered van der Waals materials exhibit an interesting evolution of their electronic properties, whose main aspects can be accounted for by changes in the single-particle bandstructure. Phenomena driven by interactions are also observed, but identifying experimentally systematic trends in their thickness dependence is challenging. Here, we explore the evolution of gate-induced superconductivity in exfoliated MoS2 multilayers ranging from bulk-like to individual monolayers. We observe a clear transition for all thicknesses down to the ultimate atomic limit, providing the first demonstration of gate-induced superconductivity in atomically thin exfoliated crystals. Additionally, we characterize the superconducting state by measuring the critical temperature TC and magnetic field BC in a large number of multilayer devices while decreasing their thickness. We find that the superconducting properties exhibit a pronounced reduction in TC and BC when going from bilayers to monolayers, for which we discuss possible microscopic mechanisms.

  11. Designing exotic many-body states of atomic spin and motion in photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Marco T.; Mathey, Ludwig; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-01-01

    Cold atoms coupled to photonic crystals constitute an exciting platform for exploring quantum many-body physics. For example, such systems offer the potential to realize strong photon-mediated forces between atoms, which depend on the atomic internal (spin) states, and where both the motional and spin degrees of freedom can exhibit long coherence times. An intriguing question then is whether exotic phases could arise, wherein crystalline or other spatial patterns and spin correlations are fundamentally tied together, an effect that is atypical in condensed matter systems. Here, we analyse one realistic model Hamiltonian in detail. We show that this previously unexplored system exhibits a rich phase diagram of emergent orders, including spatially dimerized spin-entangled pairs, a fluid of composite particles comprised of joint spin-phonon excitations, phonon-induced Néel ordering, and a fractional magnetization plateau associated with trimer formation. PMID:28272466

  12. Designing exotic many-body states of atomic spin and motion in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Marco T; Mathey, Ludwig; Chang, Darrick E

    2017-03-08

    Cold atoms coupled to photonic crystals constitute an exciting platform for exploring quantum many-body physics. For example, such systems offer the potential to realize strong photon-mediated forces between atoms, which depend on the atomic internal (spin) states, and where both the motional and spin degrees of freedom can exhibit long coherence times. An intriguing question then is whether exotic phases could arise, wherein crystalline or other spatial patterns and spin correlations are fundamentally tied together, an effect that is atypical in condensed matter systems. Here, we analyse one realistic model Hamiltonian in detail. We show that this previously unexplored system exhibits a rich phase diagram of emergent orders, including spatially dimerized spin-entangled pairs, a fluid of composite particles comprised of joint spin-phonon excitations, phonon-induced Néel ordering, and a fractional magnetization plateau associated with trimer formation.

  13. Density functional theory study of stable configurations of substitutional and interstitial C and Sn atoms in Si and Ge crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Hiroki; Sueoka, Koji

    2017-04-01

    Group IV semiconductor compounds, e.g., Si and Ge containing substitutional C (Cs) and/or Sn (Sns) atoms (mono-doping and co-doping) with contents of several % are attracting attention for application to solar cells because they are good for the environment and have an affinity with Si materials. In this study, we evaluate the stable configurations of C and/or Sn atoms in Si (Ge) crystals with a focus on the formation of interstitial C (Ci) atoms by means of density functional theory calculations. The Hakoniwa method proposed by Kamiyama et al. (2016) is applied to a 64-atom supercell to obtain the thermal equilibrium ratio of Ci to the total C atoms. The results of the analysis are fourfold. First, the isolated Cs atom is stabler than the isolated Ci atom in both Si and Ge crystals, and it is stabler in Si than in Ge. The isolated Sns atom is much stabler that Sni as well, but it is stabler in Ge than Si. Second, a Ci atom is formed in a [0 0 1] oriented Ci-Cs pair in Ge crystals with the ratio of 7.7% to total C atoms at 450 °C when the concentration of uniformly distributed C atoms is about 3%. Third, the difference of the formation energy of Ci and Cs in Si decreases to about 0.3 eV with an increase in the concentration of uniformly distributed C atoms up to 6%. Fourth, the co-doping of C and Sn suppresses the formation of Ci atoms in Si and Ge crystals. The results obtained here are useful for the prediction of possible atomic configurations of C and/or Sn in Si and Ge for solar cell application.

  14. Atomic force microscopy of crystalline insulins: the influence of sequence variation on crystallization and interfacial structure.

    PubMed Central

    Yip, C M; Brader, M L; DeFelippis, M R; Ward, M D

    1998-01-01

    The self-association of proteins is influenced by amino acid sequence, molecular conformation, and the presence of molecular additives. In the presence of phenolic additives, LysB28ProB29 insulin, in which the C-terminal prolyl and lysyl residues of wild-type human insulin have been inverted, can be crystallized into forms resembling those of wild-type insulins in which the protein exists as zinc-complexed hexamers organized into well-defined layers. We describe herein tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) studies of single crystals of rhombohedral (R3) LysB28ProB29 that reveal the influence of sequence variation on hexamer-hexamer association at the surface of actively growing crystals. Molecular scale lattice images of these crystals were acquired in situ under growth conditions, enabling simultaneous identification of the rhombohedral LysB28ProB29 crystal form, its orientation, and its dynamic growth characteristics. The ability to obtain crystallographic parameters on multiple crystal faces with TMAFM confirmed that bovine and porcine insulins grown under these conditions crystallized into the same space group as LysB28ProB29 (R3), enabling direct comparison of crystal growth behavior and the influence of sequence variation. Real-time TMAFM revealed hexamer vacancies on the (001) terraces of LysB28ProB29, and more rounded dislocation noses and larger terrace widths for actively growing screw dislocations compared to wild-type bovine and porcine insulin crystals under identical conditions. This behavior is consistent with weaker interhexamer attachment energies for LysB28ProB29 at active growth sites. Comparison of the single crystal x-ray structures of wild-type insulins and LysB28ProB29 suggests that differences in protein conformation at the hexamer-hexamer interface and accompanying changes in interhexamer bonding are responsible for this behavior. These studies demonstrate that subtle changes in molecular conformation due to a single sequence

  15. Modeling of the diffraction efficiency and polarization sensitivity for a liquid crystal 2D spatial light modulator for reconfigurable beam steering.

    PubMed

    James, Richard; Fernández, F Aníbal; Day, Sally E; Komarcević, Milos; Crossland, William A

    2007-08-01

    A nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator used as a phase-modulating device and operating in the reflective mode is analyzed using three-dimensional modeling. Two configurations, which differ in their electrode placement relative to a fixed quarter-wave plate, are considered across a range of steering directions, with the grating conformal and in some cases oblique to the pixel grid. For each steering direction the sensitivity of the diffraction orders to the polarization state of the incident wavefront is studied. Optimal alignment of the liquid crystal is suggested to reduce this sensitivity.

  16. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature. PMID:27220411

  17. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  18. Positron states and nanoobjects in proton-irradiated quartz single crystals: Positronium atom in quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Grafutin, V. I.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Timoshenkov, S. P.; Britkov, O. M.; Ilyukhina, O. V.; Myasishcheva, G. G.; Prokop'ev, E. P. Funtikov, Yu. V.

    2008-04-15

    The influence of proton bombardment and metal atom impurities on the structure of quartz single crystals has been studied. The related defects have been studied using positron annihilation spectroscopy (angular correlation of positron-annihilation photons), acoustic absorption, and optical absorption measurements. It is shown that the presence of a narrow component f in the angular distribution of annihilation photons (ADAP), which is related to the formation of parapositronium, determines a high sensitivity of this method with respect to features of the crystal structure of quartz. It is established that the defectness of the structure of irradiated quartz crystals can be characterized by the ratio f/f{sub 0} of the relative intensities of narrow components in the ADAP curves measured before (f{sub 0}) and after (f) irradiation. Any process leading to a decrease in the probability of positronium formation (e.g., positron loss as a result of the trapping on defects and the interaction with impurity atoms and lattice distortions) decreases the intensity of the narrow component. Based on the ADAP data, estimates of the radii and concentrations of nanodefects in quartz have been obtained and their variation upon annealing at temperatures up to T = 873 K has been studied.

  19. Elastic properties of heavy rare-gas crystals under pressure in the model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, Val. V.; Pilipenko, E. A.; Zhikharev, I. V.; Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.

    2013-11-01

    The quantum-mechanical model of deformable and polarizable atoms has been developed for the purpose of investigating the elastic properties of crystals of rare gases Kr and Xe over a wide range of pressures. The inclusion of the deformable electron shells in the analysis is particularly important for the shear moduli of heavy rare-gas crystals. It has been shown that the observed deviation from the Cauchy relation δ( p) for Kr and Xe cannot be adequately reproduced when considering only the many-body interaction. The individual dependence δ( p) for each of the rare-gas crystals is the result of two competitive interactions, namely, the many-body and electron-phonon interactions, which manifests itself in a quadrupole deformation of the electron shells of the atoms due to displacements of the nuclei. The contributions of these interactions in Kr and Xe are compensated with good accuracy, which provides a weakly pressure-dependent value for the parameter δ. The ab initio calculated dependences δ( p) for the entire series Ne-Xe are in good agreement with the experiment.

  20. Novel Protein Crystal Growth Electrochemical Cell For Applications in X-ray Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    G Gil-Alvaradejo; R Ruiz-Arellano; C Owen; A Rodriguez-Romero; E Rudino-Pinera; M Antwi; V Stojanoff; A Moreno

    2011-12-31

    A new crystal growth cell based on transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) glass-electrodes for electrochemically assisted protein crystallization allows for reduced nucleation and crystal quality enhancement. The crystallization behavior of lysozyme and ferritin was monitored as a function of the electric current applied to the growth cell. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that for specific currents, the crystal quality is substantially improved. No conformational changes were observed in the 3D crystallographic structures determined for crystals grown under different electric current regimes. Finally, the strong crystal adhesion on the surface of ITO electrode because of the electroadhesion allows a sufficiently strong fixing of the protein crystals, to undergo atomic force microscopy investigations in a fluid cell.

  1. Single-crystal diamond pyramids: synthesis and application for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyakova, Feruza T.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the results of investigations aimed at the development and testing of robust, chemically inert single-crystal diamond probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The probes were prepared by assembling common silicon probes with micrometer-sized pyramid-shaped single-crystal diamonds (SCD). The SCD were obtained by the selective thermal oxidation of the polycrystalline films grown by chemical vapor deposition. Electrostatic spray of adhesive coating onto silicon probes was used to attach individual SCD. Geometrical parameters of produced AFM SCD probes were revealed with transmission electron microscopy: the apex angle of the pyramidal diamond crystallite was ˜10 deg, and the curvature radius at the apex was ˜2 to 10 nm. The diamond AFM probes were used for surface imaging of deoxyribonucleic acid deposited on graphite substrate. Obtained results demonstrate high efficiency of the diamond AFM probes, allowing improvement of the image quality compared to standard silicon probes.

  2. Atomic resolution crystal structure of Sapp2p, a secreted aspartic protease from Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Dostál, Jiří; Pecina, Adam; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Marečková, Lucie; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlina; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří

    2015-12-01

    The virulence of the Candida pathogens is enhanced by the production of secreted aspartic proteases, which therefore represent possible targets for drug design. Here, the crystal structure of the secreted aspartic protease Sapp2p from Candida parapsilosis was determined. Sapp2p was isolated from its natural source and crystallized in complex with pepstatin A, a classical aspartic protease inhibitor. The atomic resolution of 0.83 Å allowed the protonation states of the active-site residues to be inferred. A detailed comparison of the structure of Sapp2p with the structure of Sapp1p, the most abundant C. parapsilosis secreted aspartic protease, was performed. The analysis, which included advanced quantum-chemical interaction-energy calculations, uncovered molecular details that allowed the experimentally observed equipotent inhibition of both isoenzymes by pepstatin A to be rationalized.

  3. Atomic resolution ADF-STEM imaging of organic molecular crystal of halogenated copper phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Mitsutaka; Yoshida, Kaname; Kurata, Hiroki; Isoda, Seiji

    2008-05-01

    Annular dark-field (ADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) measurements are demonstrated for the first time to be applicable for acquiring Z-contrast images of organic molecules at atomic resolution. High-angle ADF imaging by STEM is a new technique that provides incoherent high-resolution Z-contrast images for organic molecules. In the present study, low-angle ADF-STEM is successfully employed to image the molecular crystal structure of hexadecachloro-Cu-phthalocyanine (Cl16-CuPc), an organic molecule. The structures of CuPc derivatives (polyhalogenated CuPc with Br and Cl) are determined quantitatively using the same technique to determine the occupancy of halogens at each chemical site. By comparing the image contrasts of atomic columns, the occupancy of Br is found to be ca. 56% at the inner position, slightly higher than that for random substitution and in good agreement with previous TEM results.

  4. Towards solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function.

    PubMed

    Prill, Dragica; Juhás, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J L; Schmidt, Martin U

    2016-01-01

    A method towards the solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) is developed. Approximate lattice parameters and molecular geometry must be given as input. The molecule is generally treated as a rigid body. The positions and orientations of the molecules inside the unit cell are optimized starting from random values. The PDF is obtained from carefully measured X-ray powder diffraction data. The method resembles `real-space' methods for structure solution from powder data, but works with PDF data instead of the diffraction pattern itself. As such it may be used in situations where the organic compounds are not long-range-ordered, are poorly crystalline, or nanocrystalline. The procedure was applied to solve and refine the crystal structures of quinacridone (β phase), naphthalene and allopurinol. In the case of allopurinol it was even possible to successfully solve and refine the structure in P1 with four independent molecules. As an example of a flexible molecule, the crystal structure of paracetamol was refined using restraints for bond lengths, bond angles and selected torsion angles. In all cases, the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with structures from single-crystal data.

  5. Towards solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function

    DOE PAGES

    Prill, Dragica; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J. L.; ...

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a method towards the solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) is developed. Approximate lattice parameters and molecular geometry must be given as input. The molecule is generally treated as a rigid body. The positions and orientations of the molecules inside the unit cell are optimized starting from random values. The PDF is obtained from carefully measured X-ray powder diffraction data. The method resembles `real-space' methods for structure solution from powder data, but works with PDF data instead of the diffraction pattern itself. As such it may bemore » used in situations where the organic compounds are not long-range-ordered, are poorly crystalline, or nanocrystalline. The procedure was applied to solve and refine the crystal structures of quinacridone (β phase), naphthalene and allopurinol. In the case of allopurinol it was even possible to successfully solve and refine the structure in P1 with four independent molecules. As an example of a flexible molecule, the crystal structure of paracetamol was refined using restraints for bond lengths, bond angles and selected torsion angles. In all cases, the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with structures from single-crystal data.« less

  6. Towards solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, Dragica; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a method towards the solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) is developed. Approximate lattice parameters and molecular geometry must be given as input. The molecule is generally treated as a rigid body. The positions and orientations of the molecules inside the unit cell are optimized starting from random values. The PDF is obtained from carefully measured X-ray powder diffraction data. The method resembles `real-space' methods for structure solution from powder data, but works with PDF data instead of the diffraction pattern itself. As such it may be used in situations where the organic compounds are not long-range-ordered, are poorly crystalline, or nanocrystalline. The procedure was applied to solve and refine the crystal structures of quinacridone (β phase), naphthalene and allopurinol. In the case of allopurinol it was even possible to successfully solve and refine the structure in P1 with four independent molecules. As an example of a flexible molecule, the crystal structure of paracetamol was refined using restraints for bond lengths, bond angles and selected torsion angles. In all cases, the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with structures from single-crystal data.

  7. Local determination of the amount of integration of an atom into a crystal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volgmann, K.; Gawronski, H.; Zaum, Ch; Rusina, G. G.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.; Morgenstern, K.

    2014-10-01

    Collective vibrational modes of crystal lattices, called phonons, determine fundamental material properties, such as their thermal and electrical conductivities. Bulk phonon spectra are influenced by point defects. More recently, the importance of phonons on nanostructures has come into the focus of attention. Here we show a spatially resolved phonon spectra of point defects that reveal distinctly different signatures for a cavity alone and an impurity atom fully integrated into the surface as opposed to one placed into a cavity. The spectra are indicative for delocalized phonons and localized vibrations, respectively, as confirmed by theory.

  8. Local determination of the amount of integration of an atom into a crystal surface.

    PubMed

    Volgmann, K; Gawronski, H; Zaum, Ch; Rusina, G G; Borisova, S D; Chulkov, E V; Morgenstern, K

    2014-10-09

    Collective vibrational modes of crystal lattices, called phonons, determine fundamental material properties, such as their thermal and electrical conductivities. Bulk phonon spectra are influenced by point defects. More recently, the importance of phonons on nanostructures has come into the focus of attention. Here we show a spatially resolved phonon spectra of point defects that reveal distinctly different signatures for a cavity alone and an impurity atom fully integrated into the surface as opposed to one placed into a cavity. The spectra are indicative for delocalized phonons and localized vibrations, respectively, as confirmed by theory.

  9. Elastic properties of compressed rare-gas crystals in a model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Troitskaya, E. P.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The elastic properties of compressed Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe rare-gas crystals were studied in a model of deformable and polarizable atoms. The second-order Fuchs elasticity moduli, their pressure derivatives, and the Zener elastic anisotropy ratio were calculated with allowance for three-body interaction and quadrupole deformation in electron shells within a wide pressure range. Comparison with the experiment and results of other authors was performed. In xenon at a compression of 0.6, the shear modulus B 44 was observed to become zero, thus corresponding to the FCC-HCP transition at 75 GPa.

  10. The emission of atoms and molecules accompanying fracture of single-crystal MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jensen, L. C.; Mckay, M. R.; Freund, F.

    1986-01-01

    The emission of particles due to deformation and fracture of materials has been investigated. The emission of electrons (exoelectron emission), ions, neutral species, photons (triboluminescence), as well as long wavelength electromagnetic radiation was observed; collectively these emissions are referred to as fractoemission. This paper describes measurements of the neutral emission accompanying the fracture of single-crystal MgO. Masses detected are tentatively assigned to the emission of H2, CH4, H2O, CO, O2, CO2, and atomic Mg. Other hydrocarbons are also observed. The time dependencies of some of these emissions relative to fracture are presented for two different loading conditions.

  11. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  12. Optoelectronic crystal of artificial atoms in strain-textured molybdenum disulphide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Contryman, Alex W.; Qian, Xiaofeng; Ardakani, Sina Moeini; Gong, Yongji; Wang, Xingli; Weisse, Jeffery M.; Lee, Chi Hwan; Zhao, Jiheng; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Li, Ju; Manoharan, Hari C.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of the two-dimensional semiconductor molybdenum disulphide introduced a new optically active material possessing a band gap that can be facilely tuned via elastic strain. As an atomically thin membrane with exceptional strength, monolayer molybdenum disulphide subjected to biaxial strain can embed wide band gap variations overlapping the visible light spectrum, with calculations showing the modified electronic potential emanating from point-induced tensile strain perturbations mimics the Coulomb potential in a mesoscopic atom. Here we realize and confirm this ‘artificial atom' concept via capillary-pressure-induced nanoindentation of monolayer molybdenum disulphide from a tailored nanopattern, and demonstrate that a synthetic superlattice of these building blocks forms an optoelectronic crystal capable of broadband light absorption and efficient funnelling of photogenerated excitons to points of maximum strain at the artificial-atom nuclei. Such two-dimensional semiconductors with spatially textured band gaps represent a new class of materials, which may find applications in next-generation optoelectronics or photovoltaics. PMID:26088550

  13. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  14. Existence of Dirac cones in the Brillouin zone of diperiodic atomic crystals according to group theory.

    PubMed

    Damljanović, V; Gajić, R

    2016-03-02

    We have considered non-magnetic materials with weak spin-orbit coupling, that are periodic in two non-collinear directions, and finite in the third, orthogonal direction. In some cases, the combined time-reversal and crystal symmetry of such systems, allows the existence of Dirac cones at certain points in the reciprocal space. We have investigated in a systematic way, all points of the Brillouin zone of all 80 diperiodic groups and have found sufficient conditions for the existence of s  =  1/2 Dirac fermions, with symmetry-provided band touching at the vertex of the Dirac cones. Conversely, complete linear dispersion is forbidden for orbital wave functions belonging to two-dimensional (2D) irreducible representations (irreps) of little groups that do not satisfy certain group theoretical conditions given in this paper. Our results are illustrated by a tight-binding example.

  15. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A.; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases. PMID:26318383

  16. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases.

  17. Photoluminescence polarization anisotropy for studying long-range structural ordering within semiconductor multi-atomic alloys and organic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Prutskij, T.; Percino, J.; Orlova, T.; Vavilova, L.

    2013-12-04

    Long-range structural ordering within multi-component semiconductor alloys and organic crystals leads to significant optical anisotropy and, in particular, to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PL emission of ternary and quaternary semiconductor alloys is polarized if there is some amount of the atomic ordering within the crystal structure. We analyze the polarization of the PL emission from the quaternary GaInAsP semiconductor alloy grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) and conclude that it could be caused by low degree atomic ordering within the crystal structure together with the thermal biaxial strain due to difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of the layer and the substrate. We also study the state of polarization of the PL from organic crystals in order to identify different features of the crystal PL spectrum.

  18. Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of crystal growth process in water by phase modulation atomic force microscopy at one frame per second

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-11-11

    Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of a calcite crystal growth process in water at one frame per second. The significant improvement in the imaging speed should enable various studies on unexplored atomic-scale interfacial processes.

  19. The new kilogram definition based on counting the atoms in a 28Si crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The kilogram is the only unit of measure still defined by a physical object. Now, a marathon effort to tie the kilogram to a constant of nature is nearing the finish line. This paper concerns an international research project aimed at determining the Avogadro constant by counting the atoms in an isotopically enriched silicon crystal. The counting procedure was based on the measurement of the molar volume and the volume of an atom in two 1 kg crystal spheres. The novelty was the use of isotope dilution mass spectrometry as a new and very accurate method for the determination of the molar mass of enriched silicon. Because of an unexpected metallic contamination of the sphere surfaces, the relative measurement uncertainty, ? , results were larger by a factor 1.5 than that targeted. The measured value of the Avogadro constant, ? mol-1 is the most accurate input datum for the kilogram redefinition and differs only by ? from the CODATA 2010 adjusted value. This value is midway between the watt-balance values.

  20. Strong light-matter coupling in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoze; Galfsky, Tal; Sun, Zheng; Xia, Fengnian; Lin, Erh-Chen; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Menon, Vinod M.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional atomic crystals of graphene, as well as transition-metal dichalcogenides, have emerged as a class of materials that demonstrate strong interaction with light. This interaction can be further controlled by embedding such materials into optical microcavities. When the interaction rate is engineered to be faster than dissipation from the light and matter entities, one reaches the ‘strong coupling’ regime. This results in the formation of half-light, half-matter bosonic quasiparticles called microcavity polaritons. Here, we report evidence of strong light-matter coupling and the formation of microcavity polaritons in a two-dimensional atomic crystal of molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) embedded inside a dielectric microcavity at room temperature. A Rabi splitting of 46 ± 3 meV is observed in angle-resolved reflectivity and photoluminescence spectra due to coupling between the two-dimensional excitons and the cavity photons. Realizing strong coupling at room temperature in two-dimensional materials that offer a disorder-free potential landscape provides an attractive route for the development of practical polaritonic devices.

  1. On the reproducibility of protein crystal structures: five atomic resolution structures of trypsin

    PubMed Central

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Dauter, Miroslawa; Brzuszkiewicz, Anna; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Structural studies of proteins usually rely on a model obtained from one crystal. By investigating the details of this model, crystallographers seek to obtain insight into the function of the macromolecule. It is therefore important to know which details of a protein structure are reproducible or to what extent they might differ. To address this question, the high-resolution structures of five crystals of bovine trypsin obtained under analogous conditions were compared. Global parameters and structural details were investigated. All of the models were of similar quality and the pairwise merged intensities had large correlation coefficients. The Cα and backbone atoms of the structures superposed very well. The occupancy of ligands in regions of low thermal motion was reproducible, whereas solvent molecules containing heavier atoms (such as sulfur) or those located on the surface could differ significantly. The coordination lengths of the calcium ion were conserved. A large proportion of the multiple conformations refined to similar occupancies and the residues adopted similar orientations. More than three quarters of the water-molecule sites were conserved within 0.5 Å and more than one third were conserved within 0.1 Å. An investigation of the protonation states of histidine residues and carboxylate moieties was consistent for all of the models. Radiation-damage effects to disulfide bridges were observed for the same residues and to similar extents. Main-chain bond lengths and angles averaged to similar values and were in agreement with the Engh and Huber targets. Other features, such as peptide flips and the double conformation of the inhibitor molecule, were also reproducible in all of the trypsin structures. Therefore, many details are similar in models obtained from different crystals. However, several features of residues or ligands located in flexible parts of the macromolecule may vary significantly, such as side-chain orientations and the occupancies

  2. Determining the Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystal faces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) study had shown that the molecular packing on the tetragonal lysozyme (110) face corresponded to only one of two possible packing arrangements, suggesting that growth layers on this face were of bimolecular height (Li et al., 1998). Theoretical analyses of the packing had also indicated that growth of this face should proceed by the addition of growth units of at least tetramer size corresponding to the 43 helices in the crystal. In this study an AFM linescan technique was devised to measure the dimensions of individual growth units on protein crystal faces. The growth process of tetragonal lysozyme crystals was slowed down by employing very low supersaturations. As a result images of individual growth events on the (110) face were observed, shown by jump discontinuities in the growth step in the linescan images. The growth unit dimension in the scanned direction was obtained by suitably averaging these images. A large number of scans in two directions on the (110) face were performed and the distribution of lysozyme aggregate sizes were obtained. A variety of growth units, all of which were 43 helical lysozyme aggregates, were shown to participate in the growth process with a 43 tetramer being the minimum observed size. This technique represents a new application for AFM allowing time resolved studies of molecular process to be carried out.

  3. Determining the Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystal Faces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Li, Huayu; Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    A high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) study had shown that the molecular packing on the tetragonal lysozyme (110) face corresponded to only one of two possible packing arrangements, suggesting that growth layers on this face were of bimolecular height. Theoretical analyses of the packing also indicated that growth of this face should proceed by the addition of growth units of at least tetramer size corresponding to the 43 helices in the crystal. In this study an AFM linescan technique was devised to measure the dimensions of individual growth units on protein crystal faces as they were being incorporated into the lattice. Images of individual growth events on the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme crystals were observed, shown by jump discontinuities in the growth step in the linescan images as shown in the figure. The growth unit dimension in the scanned direction was obtained from these images. A large number of scans in two directions on the (110) face were performed and the distribution of lysozyme growth unit sizes were obtained. A variety of unit sizes corresponding to 43 helices, were shown to participate in the growth process, with the 43 tetramer being the minimum observed size. This technique represents a new application for AFM allowing time resolved studies of molecular process to be carried out.

  4. Spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Wan, Ren-Gang; Yao, Zhi-Hai

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom embedded in an anisotropic photonic crystal is studied. Due to the modified density of state (DOS) in the anisotropic photonic band gap (PBG) and the coherent control induced by the coupling fields, spontaneous emission can be significantly enhanced when the position of the spontaneous emission peak gets close to the band gap edge. As a result of the closed-loop interaction between the fields and the atom, the spontaneous emission depends on the dynamically induced Autler-Townes splitting and its position relative to the PBG. Interesting phenomena, such as spectral-line suppression, enhancement and narrowing, and fluorescence quenching, appear in the spontaneous emission spectra, which are modulated by amplitudes and phases of the coherently driven fields and the effect of PBG. This theoretical study can provide us with more efficient methods to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11447232, 11204367, 11447157, and 11305020).

  5. QPlus: atomic force microscopy on single-crystal insulators with small oscillation amplitudes at 5 K.

    PubMed

    Bettac, Andreas; Koeble, Juergen; Winkler, Konrad; Uder, Bernd; Maier, Markus; Feltz, Albrecht

    2009-07-01

    Based on a proven low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) platform, we have integrated a QPlus sensor, which employs a quartz tuning fork for force detection in non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). For combined STM operation, this sensor has key advantages over conventional sensors. For quantitative force spectroscopy on insulating thin films or semiconductors, decoupling of the tunneling current and the piezo-electrically induced AFM signal is important. In addition, extremely low signals require the first amplification stage to be very close to the sensor, i.e. to be compatible with low temperatures. We present atomic resolution imaging on single-crystal NaCl(100) with oscillation amplitudes below 100 pm (peak-to-peak) and operation at higher flexural modes in constant frequency shift (df) imaging feedback. We also present atomic resolution measurements on MgO(100) and Au(111), and first evaluation measurements of the QPlus sensor in Kelvin probe microscopy on Si(111) 7 x 7.

  6. Fluctuations of tensile strength and hardness of c-BC₂N crystals induced by difference in atomic configuration.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhao, Jijun; Samra, H Abu; Jiang, Xin

    2011-11-23

    At the atomistic level, the physical properties of a material are determined by its structure such as atomic arrangements. Here first-principles calculations were performed to investigate the effect of atomic configuration on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of cubic-BC₂N (c-BC₂N) crystals. Depending on the degree of mixture between diamond and c-BN, the tensile strength of c-BC2N crystals can vary drastically from 27 to 77 GPa. The magnitude of the Vickers hardness fluctuations (~10 GPa) is also comparable to the experimental difference (~14 GPa). Thus, atomic-scale characterization of c-BC₂N crystal structures may unveil the discrepancy of the measured Vickers hardness in experiments, and uncover the obvious differences of tensile strength described in theoretical calculations.

  7. Metal-induced crystallization of amorphous Si thin films assisted by atomic layer deposition of nickel oxide layers.

    PubMed

    So, Byung-Soo; Bae, Seung-Muk; You, Yil-Hwan; Jo, DaiHui; Lee, Sun Sook; Chung, Taek-Mo; Kim, Chang Gyoun; An, Ki-Seok; Hwang, Jin-Ha

    2011-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of nickel oxide was applied to the nickel-induced crystallization of amorphous Si thin films. The nickel-induced crystallization was monitored as a function of annealing temperature and time using Raman spectroscopy. Since Raman spectroscopy allows for the numerical quantification of structural components, the incubation time and the crystallization rates were estimated as functions of the annealing temperature. The spatial locations of a nickel-based species, probably NiSi2, were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. The formed NiSi2 seeds appeared to accelerate the crystallization kinetics in amorphous Si thin films deposited onto glass substrates. The ramifications of the atomic layer deposition are discussed with regard to large-panel displays, with special emphasis on the sophisticated control of the catalytic elements, especially nickel.

  8. On the reproducibility of protein crystal structures: five atomic resolution structures of trypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Dauter, Miroslawa; Brzuszkiewicz, Anna; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2013-08-01

    Details of five very high-resolution accurate structures of bovine trypsin are compared in the context of the reproducibility of models obtained from crystals grown under identical conditions. Structural studies of proteins usually rely on a model obtained from one crystal. By investigating the details of this model, crystallographers seek to obtain insight into the function of the macromolecule. It is therefore important to know which details of a protein structure are reproducible or to what extent they might differ. To address this question, the high-resolution structures of five crystals of bovine trypsin obtained under analogous conditions were compared. Global parameters and structural details were investigated. All of the models were of similar quality and the pairwise merged intensities had large correlation coefficients. The C{sup α} and backbone atoms of the structures superposed very well. The occupancy of ligands in regions of low thermal motion was reproducible, whereas solvent molecules containing heavier atoms (such as sulfur) or those located on the surface could differ significantly. The coordination lengths of the calcium ion were conserved. A large proportion of the multiple conformations refined to similar occupancies and the residues adopted similar orientations. More than three quarters of the water-molecule sites were conserved within 0.5 Å and more than one third were conserved within 0.1 Å. An investigation of the protonation states of histidine residues and carboxylate moieties was consistent for all of the models. Radiation-damage effects to disulfide bridges were observed for the same residues and to similar extents. Main-chain bond lengths and angles averaged to similar values and were in agreement with the Engh and Huber targets. Other features, such as peptide flips and the double conformation of the inhibitor molecule, were also reproducible in all of the trypsin structures. Therefore, many details are similar in models obtained

  9. Sidewall roughness measurement inside photonic crystal holes by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, P.; Robin, F.; Carlström, C. F.; Wüest, R.; Kappeler, R.; Jäckel, H.

    2007-10-01

    We present a measurement technique to quantify sidewall roughness inside planar photonic crystal (PhC) holes. Atomic force microscopy is used to scan hole cross-section profiles. By fitting a circle onto each scan line and subtracting this circle from the measurement data, a quantitative value for the deviation from the ideal cylindrical hole shape is extracted. We investigate the sidewall roughness of InP-based PhC holes depending on the nitrogen content of the semiconductor etching plasma. The existence of a trade-off between hole undercut and surface roughness by optimizing the flux of nitrogen during the plasma etching of the PhC holes is confirmed. We further quantify with this technique the influence of the direct-writing of octagons instead of circles by electron-beam lithography on the measured roughness.

  10. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in atomic crystal layers from in-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yafei; Zeng, Junjie; Deng, Xinzhou; Yang, Fei; Pan, Hui; Qiao, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that with in-plane magnetization, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) can be realized in two-dimensional atomic crystal layers with preserved inversion symmetry but broken out-of-plane mirror reflection symmetry. By taking the honeycomb lattice system as an example, we find that the low-buckled structure satisfying the symmetry criteria is crucial to induce QAHE. The topologically nontrivial bulk gap carrying a Chern number of C =±1 opens in the vicinity of the saddle points M , where the band dispersion exhibits strong anisotropy. We further show that the QAHE with electrically tunable Chern number can be achieved in Bernal-stacked multilayer systems, and the applied interlayer potential differences can dramatically decrease the critical magnetization to make the QAHE experimentally feasible.

  11. Clean surface processing of rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquid by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Imanishi, Akihito; Fukui, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun

    2014-06-30

    Surface processing of a rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquids is valuable for further development of low voltage transistors operated by an electric double layer. We performed a precise and clean surface processing based on the tip-induced dissolution of rubrene molecules at the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. Molecular resolution imaging revealed that the tip-induced dissolution proceeded via metastable low density states derived from the anisotropic intermolecular interactions within the crystal structure.

  12. On the elastic–plastic decomposition of crystal deformation at the atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Stukowski, Alexander; Arsenlis, A.

    2012-03-02

    Given two snapshots of an atomistic system, taken at different stages of the deformation process, one can compute the incremental deformation gradient field, F, as defined by continuum mechanics theory, from the displacements of atoms. However, such a kinematic analysis of the total deformation does not reveal the respective contributions of elastic and plastic deformation. We develop a practical technique to perform the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation field, F = FeFp, into elastic and plastic parts for the case of crystalline materials. The described computational analysis method can be used to quantify plastic deformation in a material due to crystal slip-based mechanisms in molecular dynamics and molecular statics simulations. The knowledge of the plastic deformation field, Fp, and its variation with time can provide insight into the number, motion and localization of relevant crystal defects such as dislocations. As a result, the computed elastic field, Fe, provides information about inhomogeneous lattice strains and lattice rotations induced by the presence of defects.

  13. On the elastic–plastic decomposition of crystal deformation at the atomic scale

    DOE PAGES

    Stukowski, Alexander; Arsenlis, A.

    2012-03-02

    Given two snapshots of an atomistic system, taken at different stages of the deformation process, one can compute the incremental deformation gradient field, F, as defined by continuum mechanics theory, from the displacements of atoms. However, such a kinematic analysis of the total deformation does not reveal the respective contributions of elastic and plastic deformation. We develop a practical technique to perform the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation field, F = FeFp, into elastic and plastic parts for the case of crystalline materials. The described computational analysis method can be used to quantify plastic deformation in a material due tomore » crystal slip-based mechanisms in molecular dynamics and molecular statics simulations. The knowledge of the plastic deformation field, Fp, and its variation with time can provide insight into the number, motion and localization of relevant crystal defects such as dislocations. As a result, the computed elastic field, Fe, provides information about inhomogeneous lattice strains and lattice rotations induced by the presence of defects.« less

  14. Direct observation of the growth of gibbsite crystals by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freij, Sawsan J.; Parkinson, Gordon M.; Reyhani, Manijeh M.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to investigate the mechanism of gibbsite crystallization on all the morphologically important faces. Growth on single crystal faces has been observed by a series of ex situ experiments, in which the same area was repeatedly located and imaged after growth had occurred in synthetic solution. At the same supersaturation level and temperature, the ex situ experiments have revealed a variety of growth modes: (1) Continuous birth and spread on a flat surface, the nuclei forming as approximately circular features that develop into elongated features, indicating anisotropic growth, followed by restoration of the flatness of the original area after further growth. (2) Step growth followed by rough growth on a surface that contains growth hillocks. (3) Two-dimensional nucleation on a surface that contains a surface defect (tilt boundary). The results are used to establish a clearer picture of the growth mechanism of gibbsite, and the effect of the seed surface structure. On the prismatic faces of gibbsite, steps parallel to the (0 0 1) face and block formation were imaged. Step growth was observed in both the [0 0 1] direction and parallel to the (0 0 1) plane. No nucleation was observed, and no emergent screw dislocations have been resolved.

  15. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  16. Slow light enhanced atomic frequency comb quantum memories in photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenzhi; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a slow light-enhanced quantum memory with high efficiency based on atomic frequency comb (AFC) in ion-doped photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). The performance of the quantum memory is investigated theoretically, considering the impact of the signal bandwidth. Both the forward and backward retrieval schemes are analyzed. In the forward retrieval scheme, the analysis shows that a moderate slow light effect can improve the retrieval efficiency to above 50% with very high fidelity, even when the intrinsic optical depth is very low and the signal bandwidth is comparable with the AFC bandwidth. In the backward retrieval scheme, retrieval efficiency larger than 90% can be obtained and fidelity can remain above 90% for signal with bandwidth much narrower than AFC bandwidth, when moderate slow light is introduced into waveguide with low intrinsic optical depth. Although the phase mismatching effect limits the slow light enhancement on retrieval efficiency and decreases the fidelity for signal with bandwidth approaching AFC bandwidth, we design a modified atomic frequency comb structure (MAFC) based on which a moderate slow light can make the retrieval efficiency larger than 85% and keep the fidelity above 80%. Our calculations show that the proposed scheme provides a promising way to realize high efficiency on-chip quantum memory.

  17. A general method for phasing novel complex RNA crystal structures without heavy-atom derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Michael P.; Scott, William G.

    2008-01-01

    The crystallographic phase problem [Muirhead & Perutz (1963 ▶), Nature (London), 199, 633–638] remains the single major impediment to obtaining a three-dimensional structure of a macromolecule once suitable crystals have been obtained. Recently, it was found that it was possible to solve the structure of a 142-nucleotide L1 ligase ribozyme heterodimer that possesses no noncrystallographic symmetry without heavy-atom derivatives, anomalous scattering atoms or other modifications and without a model of the tertiary structure of the ribozyme [Robertson & Scott (2007 ▶), Science, 315, 1549–1553]. Using idealized known RNA secondary-structural fragments such as A-form helices and GNRA tetraloops in an iterative molecular-replacement procedure, it was possible to obtain an estimated phase set that, when subjected to solvent flattening, yielded an interpretable electron-density map with minimized model bias, allowing the tertiary structure of the ribozyme to be solved. This approach has also proven successful with other ribozymes, structured RNAs and RNA–protein complexes. PMID:18566509

  18. The enrichment ratio of atomic contacts in crystals, an indicator derived from the Hirshfeld surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Jelsch, Christian; Ejsmont, Krzysztof; Huder, Loïc

    2014-03-01

    The partitioning of space with Hirshfeld surfaces enables the analysis of fingerprint molecular interactions in crystalline environments. This study uses the decomposition of the crystal contact surface between pairs of interacting chemical species to derive an enrichment ratio. This quantity enables the analysis of the propensity of chemical species to form intermolecular interactions with themselves and other species. The enrichment ratio is obtained by comparing the actual contacts in the crystal with those computed as if all types of contacts had the same probability to form. The enrichments and contact tendencies were analyzed in several families of compounds, based on chemical composition and aromatic character. As expected, the polar contacts of the type H⋯N, H⋯O and H⋯S, which are generally hydrogen bonds, show enrichment values larger than unity. O⋯O and N⋯N contacts are impoverished while H⋯H interactions display enrichment ratios which are generally close to unity or slightly lower. In aromatic compounds, C⋯C contacts can display large enrichment ratios due to extensive π⋯π stacking in the crystal packings of heterocyclic compounds. C⋯C contacts are, however, less enriched in pure (C,H) hydrocarbons as π⋯π stacking is not so favourable from the electrostatic point of view compared with heterocycles. C⋯H contacts are favoured in (C,H) aromatics, but these interactions occur less in compounds containing O, N or S as some H atoms are then involved in hydrogen bonds. The study also highlights the fact that hydrogen is a prefered interaction partner for fluorine.

  19. Atomic-Sized Pores Enhanced Electrocatalysis of TaS2 Nanosheets for Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Tan, Yongwen; Liu, Pan; Guo, Chenguang; Luo, Min; Han, Jiuhui; Lin, Tianquan; Huang, Fuqiang; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-10-01

    A plasma oxidation method is developed to fabricate atomic-scale pores in the basal planes of electrochemically inert TaS2 nanosheets to functionalize the 2D crystals with high electrocatalysis for hydrogen evolution reaction. Quantitative measurements of under-coordinated atoms at edges of the pores by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy reveal the intrinsic correlation between the defective atomic sites and electrocatalytic activities of 2D TaS2 .

  20. He atom-surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory have focused on the surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators and on epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals. In the later the homoepitaxial growth of NaCl/NaCl(001) and the heteroepitaxial growth of KBr/NaCl(001), NaCl/KBr(001) and KBr/RbCl(001) have been studied by monitoring the specular He scattering as a function of the coverage and by measuring the angular and energy distributions of the scattered He atoms. These data provide information on the surface structure, defect densities, island sizes and surface strain during the layer-by-layer growth. The temperature dependence of these measurements also provides information on the mobilities of the admolecules. He atom scattering is unique among surface probes because the low-energy, inert atoms are sensitive only to the electronic structure of the topmost surface layer and are equally applicable to all crystalline materials. It is proposed for the next year to exploit further the variety of combinations possible with the alkali halides in order to carry out a definitive study of epitaxial growth in the ionic insulators. The work completed so far, including measurements of the Bragg diffraction and surface dispersion at various stages of growth, appears to be exceptionally rich in detail, which is particularly promising for theoretical modeling. In addition, because epitaxial growth conditions over a wide range of lattice mismatches is possible with these materials, size effects in growth processes can be explored in great depth. Further, as some of the alkali halides have the CsCl structure instead of the NaCl structure, we can investigate the effects of the heteroepitaxy with materials having different lattice preferences. Finally, by using co-deposition of different alkali halides, one can investigate the formation and stability of alloys and even alkali halide superlattices.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  2. Aspherical-atom modeling of coordination compounds by single-crystal X-ray diffraction allows the correct metal atom to be identified.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Birger; Wandtke, Claudia M; Meents, Alke; Pröpper, Kevin; Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Amin Sk, Nurul; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Sidhu, Navdeep

    2015-02-02

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is often considered the gold standard in analytical chemistry, as it allows element identification as well as determination of atom connectivity and the solid-state structure of completely unknown samples. Element assignment is based on the number of electrons of an atom, so that a distinction of neighboring heavier elements in the periodic table by XRD is often difficult. A computationally efficient procedure for aspherical-atom least-squares refinement of conventional diffraction data of organometallic compounds is proposed. The iterative procedure is conceptually similar to Hirshfeld-atom refinement (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A- 2008, 64, 383-393; IUCrJ. 2014, 1,61-79), but it relies on tabulated invariom scattering factors (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B- 2013, 69, 91-104) and the Hansen/Coppens multipole model; disordered structures can be handled as well. Five linear-coordinate 3d metal complexes, for which the wrong element is found if standard independent-atom model scattering factors are relied upon, are studied, and it is shown that only aspherical-atom scattering factors allow a reliable assignment. The influence of anomalous dispersion in identifying the correct element is investigated and discussed.

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the atomically smooth (001) surface of vanadium pentoxide V2O5 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslimov, A. E.; Butashin, A. V.; Kanevsky, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    The (001) cleavage surface of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) crystal has been studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STM). It is shown that the surface is not reconstructed; the STM image allows geometric lattice parameters to be determined with high accuracy. The nanostructure formed on the (001) cleavage surface of crystal consists of atomically smooth steps with a height multiple of unit-cell parameter c = 4.37 Å. The V2O5 crystal cleavages can be used as references in calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope under atmospheric conditions both along the ( x, y) surface and normally to the sample surface (along the z axis). It is found that the terrace surface is not perfectly atomically smooth; its roughness is estimated to be 0.5 Å. This circumstance may introduce an additional error into the microscope calibration along the z coordinate.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of epitaxial layers of anatase on strontium titanate single crystals: Morphological and photoelectrochemical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Theodore J.; Nepomnyashchii, Alexander B.; Parkinson, B. A.

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition was used to grow epitaxial layers of anatase (001) TiO{sub 2} on the surface of SrTiO{sub 3} (100) crystals with a 3% lattice mismatch. The epilayers grow as anatase (001) as confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic force microscope images of deposited films showed epitaxial layer-by-layer growth up to about 10 nm, whereas thicker films, of up to 32 nm, revealed the formation of 2–5 nm anatase nanocrystallites oriented in the (001) direction. The anatase epilayers were used as substrates for dye sensitization. The as received strontium titanate crystal was not sensitized with a ruthenium-based dye (N3) or a thiacyanine dye (G15); however, photocurrent from excited state electron injection from these dyes was observed when adsorbed on the anatase epilayers. These results show that highly ordered anatase surfaces can be grown on an easily obtained substrate crystal.

  5. X-ray diffraction analysis of LiCu2O2 crystals with additives of silver atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotinkin, V. P.; Bush, A. A.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Dau, H. S.; Yakovlev, K. A.; Tishchenko, E. A.

    2015-09-01

    Silver-containing LiCu2O2 crystals up to 4 × 8 × 8 mm in size were grown by the crystallization of 80(1- x)CuO · 20 x AgNO3 · 20Li2CO3 (0 ≤ х ≤ 0.5) mixture melt. According to the X-ray spectral and Rietveld X-ray diffraction data, the maximum amount of silver incorporated in the LiCu2O2 structure is about 4 at % relative to the copper content. It was established that silver atoms occupy statistically crystallographic positions of lithium atoms. The incorporation of silver atoms is accompanied by a noticeable increase in parameter с of the LiCu2O2 rhombic unit cell, a slight increase in parameter а, and a slight decrease in parameter b.

  6. Atomic Migration Induced Crystal Structure Transformation and Core-Centered Phase Transition in Single Crystal Ge2Sb2Te5 Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Jeon, Deok-Jin; Han, Jaehyun; Yeo, Jong-Souk

    2016-10-12

    A phase change nanowire holds a promise for nonvolatile memory applications, but its transition mechanism has remained unclear due to the analytical difficulties at atomic resolution. Here we obtain a deeper understanding on the phase transition of a single crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5 nanowire (GST NW) using atomic scale imaging, diffraction, and chemical analysis. Our cross-sectional analysis has shown that the as-grown hexagonal close-packed structure of the single crystal GST NW transforms to a metastable face-centered cubic structure due to the atomic migration to the pre-existing vacancy layers in the hcp structure going through iterative electrical switching. We call this crystal structure transformation "metastabilization", which is also confirmed by the increase of set-resistance during the switching operation. For the set to reset transition between crystalline and amorphous phases, high-resolution imaging indicates that the longitudinal center of the nanowire mainly undergoes phase transition. According to the atomic scale analysis of the GST NW after repeated electrical switching, partial crystallites are distributed around the core-centered amorphous region of the nanowire where atomic migration is mainly induced, thus potentially leading to low power electrical switching. These results provide a novel understanding of phase change nanowires, and can be applied to enhance the design of nanowire phase change memory devices for improved electrical performance.

  7. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  8. Probing the conformation and 2D-distribution of pyrene-terminated redox-labeled poly(ethylene glycol) chains end-adsorbed on HOPG using cyclic voltammetry and atomic force electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe; Taofifenua, Cécilia

    2014-03-14

    The present paper aims at illustrating how end-attachment of water-soluble flexible chains bearing a terminal functional group onto graphene-like surfaces has to be carefully tuned to ensure the proper positioning of the functional moiety with respect to the anchoring surface. The model experimental system considered here consists of a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains, bearing an adsorbing pyrene foot and a ferrocene (Fc) redox functional head, self-assembled onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Cyclic voltammetry is used to accurately measure the chain coverage and gain insights into the microenvironment experienced by the Fc heads. Molecule-touching atomic force electrochemical microscopy (Mt/AFM-SECM) is used to simultaneously probe the chain conformation and the position of the Fc heads within the layer, and also to map the 2D-distribution of the chains over the surface. This multiscale electrochemical approach allows us to show that whereas Fc-PEG-pyrene readily self-assembles to form extremely homogeneous layers, the strongly hydrophobic nature of graphite planes results in a complex coverage-dependent structure of the PEG layer due to the interaction of the ferrocene label with the HOPG surface. It is shown that, even though pyrene is known to adsorb particularly strongly onto HOPG, the more weakly adsorbing terminal ferrocene can also act as the chain anchoring moiety especially at low coverage. However we show that beyond a critical coverage value the Fc-PEG-pyrene chains adopt an ideal "foot-on" end-attached conformation allowing the Fc head to explore a volume away from the surface solely limited by the PEG chain elasticity.

  9. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, optical properties and DFT studies of a new 2D layered iodide bridged Pb(II) coordination polymer with 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Saghatforoush, Lotfali Bakhtiari, Akbar; Gheleji, Hojjat

    2015-01-15

    The synthesis of two dimensional (2D) coordination polymer [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} (dpp=2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) is reported. As determined by X-ray diffraction of a twinned crystal, the dpp ligand simultaneously adopts a bis–bidentate and bis–monodentate coordination mode in the crystal structure of compound. The electronic band structure along with density of states (DOS) calculated by the DFT method indicates that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. According to the DFT calculations, the observed emission of the compound at 600 nm in solid phase could be attributed to arise from an excited LLCT state (dpp-π{sup ⁎} [C-2p and N-2p states, CBs] to I-6p state [VBs]). The linear optical properties of the compound are also calculated by DFT method. The structure of the compound in solution phase is discussed based on the measured {sup 1}H NMR and fluorescence spectra in DMSO. TGA studies indicate that the compound is thermally stable up to 210 °C. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure and emission spectra of [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} is presented. The electronic band structure and linear optical properties of the compound are calculated by the DFT method. - Highlights: • Two dimensional [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} has been prepared. • The structure of the compound is determined by XRD of a twinned crystal. • DFT calculations indicate that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. • As shown by DFT calculations, the emission band of the compound is LLCT. • Solution phase structure of compound is explored by {sup 1}H NMR and emission spectra.

  10. He atom surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Safron, S. A.; Skofronick, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations have focused primarily on surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators, epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals and multiphoton studies. The surface dynamics of RbCl has been re-examined. We have developed a simple force constant model which provides insight into the dynamics of KBr overlayers on NaCl(001), a system with a large lattice mismatch. The KBr/NaCl(001) results are compared to Na/Cu(001) and NaCl/Ge(001). We have completed epitaxial growth experiments for KBr onto RbCl(001). Slab dynamics calculations using a shell model for this system with very small lattice mismatch are being carried out in collaboration with Professor Manson of Clemson University and with Professor Schroeder in Regensburg, Germany. Extensive experiments on multiphoton scattering of helium atoms onto NaCl and, particularly, LiF have been carried out and the theory has been developed to a rather advanced stage by Professor Manson. This work will permit the extraction of more information from time-of-flight spectra. It is shown that the theoretical model provides a very good description of the multiphoton scattering from organic films. Work has started on self-assembling organic films on gold (alkyl thiols/Au(111)). We have begun to prepare and characterize the gold crystal; one of the group members has spent two weeks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory learning the proper Au(111) preparation techniques. One of our students has carried out neutron scattering experiments on NiO, measuring both bulk phonon and magnon dispersion curves.

  11. Crystal structure of the [Mg2+-(chromomycin A3)2]-d(TTGGCCAA)2 complex reveals GGCC binding specificity of the drug dimer chelated by a metal ion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ming-Hon; Robinson, Howard; Gao, Yi-Gui; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2004-01-01

    The anticancer antibiotic chromomycin A3 (Chro) is a DNA minor groove binding drug belonging to the aureolic family. Chro likely exerts its activity by interfering with replication and transcription. Chro forms a dimer, mediated by a divalent metal ion, which binds to G/C-rich DNA. Herein we report the first crystal structure of Chro bound to d(TTG GCCAA)2 DNA duplex solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) based on the chelated Co3+ ion. The structure of the Mg2+ complex was subsequently refined at 2.15 A resolution, which revealed two complexes of metal-coordinated dimers of Chro bound to the octamer DNA duplex in the asymmetric unit. The metal ion is octahedrally coordinated to the O1 and O9 oxygen atoms of the chromophore (CPH), and two water molecules act as the fifth and sixth ligands. The two coordinated water molecules are hydrogen bonded to O2 atoms of C5 and C13 bases. The Chro dimer binds at and significantly widens the minor groove of the GGCC sequence. The long axis of each chromophore lies along and stacks over the sugar-phosphate backbone with the two attached saccharide moieties (rings A/B and C/D/E) wrapping across the minor groove. DNA is kinked by 30 degrees and 36 degrees in the two complexes, respectively. Six G-specific hydrogen bonds between Chro and DNA provide the GGCC sequence specificity. Interestingly, DNA in concert with Chro appears to act as an effective template to catalyze the deamination of Co(NH3)6(3+), as shown by circular dichroism and crystal structure data. Our results present useful structural information for designing new anticancer drug derivatives in the future.

  12. A preliminary 3D model for cytochrome P450 2D6 constructed by homology model building.

    PubMed

    Koymans, L M; Vermeulen, N P; Baarslag, A; Donné-Op den Kelder, G M

    1993-06-01

    A homology model building study of cytochrome P450 2D6 has been carried out based on the crystal structure of cytochrome P450 101. The primary sequences of P450 101 and P450 2D6 were aligned by making use of an automated alignment procedure. This alignment was adjusted manually by matching alpha-helices (C, D, G, I, J, K and L) and beta-sheets (beta 3/beta 4) of P450 101 that are proposed to be conserved in membrane-bound P450s (Ouzounis and Melvin [Eur. J. Biochem., 198 (1991) 307]) to the corresponding regions in the primary amino acid sequence of P450 2D6. Furthermore, alpha-helices B, B' and F were found to be conserved in P450 2D6. No significant homology between the remaining regions of P450 101 and P450 2D6 could be found and these regions were therefore deleted. A 3D model of P450 2D6 was constructed by copying the coordinates of the residues from the crystal structure of P450 101 to the corresponding residues in P450 2D6. The regions without a significant homology with P450 101 were not incorporated into the model. After energy-minimization of the resulting 3D model of P450 2D6, possible active site residues were identified by fitting the substrates debrisoquine and dextrometorphan into the proposed active site. Both substrates could be positioned into a planar pocket near the heme region formed by residues Val370, Pro371, Leu372, Trp316, and part of the oxygen binding site of P450 2D6. Furthermore, the carboxylate group of either Asp100 or Asp301 was identified as a possible candidate for the proposed interaction with basic nitrogen atom(s) of the substrates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Cholesterol oxidase: ultrahigh-resolution crystal structure and multipolar atom model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarychta, Bartosz; Lyubimov, Artem; Ahmed, Maqsood; Munshi, Parthapratim; Guillot, Benoît; Vrielink, Alice; Jelsch, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Examination of protein structure at the subatomic level is required to improve the understanding of enzymatic function. For this purpose, X-ray diffraction data have been collected at 100 K from cholesterol oxidase crystals using synchrotron radiation to an optical resolution of 0.94 Å. After refinement using the spherical atom model, nonmodelled bonding peaks were detected in the Fourier residual electron density on some of the individual bonds. Well defined bond density was observed in the peptide plane after averaging maps on the residues with the lowest thermal motion. The multipolar electron density of the protein-cofactor complex was modelled by transfer of the ELMAM2 charge-density database, and the topology of the intermolecular interactions between the protein and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor was subsequently investigated. Taking advantage of the high resolution of the structure, the stereochemistry of main-chain bond lengths and of C=O···H-N hydrogen bonds was analyzed with respect to the different secondary-structure elements.

  14. Stability of crystalline solids—II: Application to temperature-induced martensitic phase transformations in a bi-atomic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Ryan S.; Shaw, John A.; Triantafyllidis, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies the stability theory of crystalline solids presented in the companion paper (Part I) to the study of martensitic transformations found in shape memory alloys (SMA's). The focus here is on temperature-induced martensitic transformations of bi-atomic crystals under stress-free loading conditions. A set of temperature-dependent atomic potentials and a multilattice description are employed to derive the energy density of a prototypical SMA ( B2 cubic austenite crystal). The bifurcation and stability behavior are then investigated with respect to two stability criteria (Cauchy-Born (CB) and phonon). Using a 4-lattice description five different equilibrium crystal structures are predicted: B2 cubic, L10 tetragonal, B19 orthorhombic, Cmmm orthorhombic, and B19' monoclinic. For our chosen model only the B2 and B19 equilibrium paths have stable segments which satisfy both the CB- and phonon-stability criteria. These stable segments overlap in temperature indicating the possibility of a hysteretic temperature-induced proper martensitic transformation. The B2 and B19 crystal structures are common in SMA's and therefore the simulated jump in the deformation gradient at a temperature for which both crystals are stable is compared to experimental values for NiTi, AuCd, and CuAlNi. Good agreement is found for the two SMA's which have cubic to orthorhombic transformations (AuCd and CuAlNi).

  15. Addendum to ‘Existence of Dirac cones in the Brillouin zone of diperiodic atomic crystals according to group theory’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanović, V.; Gajić, R.

    2016-11-01

    In our paper (Damljanović and Gajić 2016 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 28 085502) we have analyzed sufficient conditions for the existence of Dirac cones in the Brillouin zone of non-magnetic, two-dimensional atomic crystals with weak spin-orbit coupling. We have provided a list of diperiodic groups hosting Dirac-like dispersion in the vicinity of Brillouin zone corners (K-points), where the orbital degeneracy at the vertex of the cones is caused by the crystal symmetry. In this addendum, we add to our list three more hexagonal diperiodic groups, in which the mentioned double degeneracy is caused by the time reversal symmetry.

  16. The hydrogen-atom environment of the ether oxygen atom in crystal structures of some representative muscarinic agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, J.; Scherrenberg, R. L.; Kooijman, H.; Kanters, J. A.

    1990-06-01

    The hypothesis that the ether oxygen atom in muscarinic agonists acts as a hydrogen-bond acceptor is supported by evidence from crystallographic data. The same evidence suggests that in such interactions N +CH⋯O bonds donated by the ligand to the receptor may be involved.

  17. Toward cold atom guidance in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre using a blue detuned hollow laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Jerome

    This thesis describes advances and techniques toward the efficient coupling of cold 85Rb atoms into a low loss hollow core photonic crystal fibre using a blue-detuned first order hollow beam. In the proposed system, the low diffraction of the blue-detuned first order hollow beam acts as a repulsive potential optical funnel that allows the coupling of cold atoms under the influence of gravity into the fibre's hollow core. Using a low loss fibre with a blue detuned hollow beam shows potential for guiding atoms over an arbitrary path and longer distances on the laboratory scale, which would enable several new applications in nanofabrication and optical metrology. To realize this objective, a Magneto-Optical Trap of 85Rb was built from scratch and by using advanced polarization gradient cooling techniques was turned into a 9 muK cold optical molasses containing 10 7 atoms. These cold atoms were guided over 23 cm in a collimated blue detuned hollow beam tunnel and through a focused hollow beam mimicking as closely as possible the coupling conditions for a hollow core optical fibre. Three classes of atoms were observed: lost, trapped and guided atoms. The dynamics of the system as well as the optimal coupling conditions were identified through the use of a numerical model. A novel approach to modelling cold atom dynamics in an optical funnel was developed during the course of this thesis. This new model was not only able to reproduce the dynamics of atoms in the experiment but also simulate dense cold atoms cooled into the MOT and predict final temperatures attained. This was achieved by 3D modelling of the conservative and non-conservative components of optical forces acting on atoms but also through the implementation of known heat mechanisms: light scattering and momentum diffusion. The model identified the best coupling conditions of this system, confirmed by experiment, and an optimal light potential for a given distance of coupling that must not be exceeded. A

  18. Probing electric properties at the boundary of planar 2D heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jewook

    The quest for novel two-dimensional (2D) materials has led to the discovery of hybridized 2D atomic crystals. Especially, planar 2D heterostructure provides opportunities to explore fascinating electric properties at abrupt one-dimensional (1D) boundaries reminiscent to those seen in the 2D interfaces of complex oxides. By implementing the concept of epitaxy to 2D space, we developed a new growth technique to epitaxially grow hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) from the edges of graphene, forming a coherent planar heterostructure. At the interface of hBN and graphene, a polar-on-nonpolar 1D boundary can be formed which is expected to possess peculiar electronic states associated with the polarity of hBN and edge states of graphene Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S) measurements revealed an abrupt 1D zigzag oriented boundary, with boundary states about 0.6 eV below or above the Fermi level depending on the termination of the hBN at the boundary. The boundary states are extended along the boundary and exponentially decay into the bulk of graphene and hBN. Combined STM/S and first-principles theory study not only disclose spatial and energetic distribution of interfacial state but also reveal the origin of boundary states and the effect of the polarity discontinuity at the interface By probing electric properties at the boundary in the atomic scale, planar 2D heterostructure is demonstrated as a promising platform for discovering emergent phenomena at the 1D interface in 2D materials. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  19. Charge transfer on the metallic atom-pair bond, and the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, T; Seshubai, V

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued in our recent papers that the heat of formation of intermetallic compounds is mostly concentrated in the nearest neighbor unlike atom-pair bonds, and that the positive term in Miedema's equation is associated with charge transfer on the bond to maintain electroneutrality. In this paper, taking examples of some well populated crystal-structure types such as MgCu(2), AsNa(3), AuCu(3), MoSi(2) and SiCr(3) types, the effect of such charge transfer on the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds is examined. It is shown that the correlation between the observed size changes of atoms on alloying and their electronegativity differences is supportive of the idea of charge transfer between atoms. It is argued that the electronegativity and valence differences need to be of the required magnitude and direction to alter, through charge transfer, the elemental radius ratios R(A)/R(B) to the internal radius ratios r(A)/r(B) allowed by the structure types. Since the size change of atoms on alloying is highly correlated to how different R(A)/R(B) is from the ideal radius ratio for a structure type, the lattice parameters of intermetallic compounds can be predicted with excellent accuracy knowing R(A)/R(B). A practical application of the approach developed in our recent papers to superalloy design is presented.

  20. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; ...

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  1. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  2. Electron Scattering and Doping Mechanisms in Solid-Phase-Crystallized In2O3:H Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Macco, Bart; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-08-05

    Hydrogen-doped indium oxide (In2O3:H) has recently emerged as an enabling transparent conductive oxide for solar cells, in particular for silicon heterojunction solar cells because its high electron mobility (>100 cm(2)/(V s)) allows for a simultaneously high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. Here, we report on high-quality In2O3:H prepared by a low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) process and present insights into the doping mechanism and the electron scattering processes that limit the carrier mobility in such films. The process consists of ALD of amorphous In2O3:H at 100 °C and subsequent solid-phase crystallization at 150-200 °C to obtain large-grained polycrystalline In2O3:H films. The changes in optoelectronic properties upon crystallization have been monitored both electrically by Hall measurements and optically by analysis of the Drude response. After crystallization, an excellent carrier mobility of 128 ± 4 cm(2)/(V s) can be obtained at a carrier density of 1.8 × 10(20) cm(-3), irrespective of the annealing temperature. Temperature-dependent Hall measurements have revealed that electron scattering is dominated by unavoidable phonon and ionized impurity scattering from singly charged H-donors. Extrinsic defect scattering related to material quality such as grain boundary and neutral impurity scattering was found to be negligible in crystallized films indicating that the carrier mobility is maximized. Furthermore, by comparison of the absolute H-concentration and the carrier density in crystallized films, it is deduced that <4% of the incorporated H is an active dopant in crystallized films. Therefore, it can be concluded that inactive H atoms do not (significantly) contribute to defect scattering, which potentially explains why In2O3:H films are capable of achieving a much higher carrier mobility than conventional In2O3:Sn (ITO).

  3. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  4. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  5. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  6. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  7. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  8. Study of polymeric additive effect on calcium oxalate dihydrate crystal growth using real-time atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Taesung; Kim, Jong-Nam; Kim, Woo-Sik; Kyun Choi, Chang

    2011-07-01

    Microscopic events associated with crystal growth and characterization of the growth hillocks on the (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces of COD were examined by atomic force microscopy. The (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces of COD developed elliptical and triangular hillocks and pits, respectively. Each face exhibited hillocks with step sites that can be assigned to specific crystal planes, enabling direct determination of the growth rates along specific crystallographic directions. The addition of macromolecules with anionic side chains, poly- L-aspartate, poly- L-glutamate, and polyacrylate resulted in inhibition of growth on the hillock step planes. The magnitude of their effect depended on the macromolecule structures and identity of the step site. The isotropic shape of the COD hillocks mimicked the shape of the resulting macroscopic COD crystals based on step-specific binding of the macromolecules to the COD crystal, with stronger step pinning along the [0 1 0] direction than in the [0 0 1] direction. Electrostatic matching between the crystal faces and additives according to the ionic array of calcium oxalate in the COD structure was found to be responsible for the preferential binding of the macromolecules to terraces.

  9. On the solid phase crystallization of In2O3:H transparent conductive oxide films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macco, Bart; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Black, Lachlan E.; Barcones, Beatriz; Melskens, J.; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen-doped indium oxide (In2O3:H) has emerged as a highly transparent and conductive oxide, finding its application in a multitude of optoelectronic devices. Recently, we have reported on an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to prepare high quality In2O3:H. This process consists of ALD of In2O3:H films at 100 °C, followed by a solid phase crystallization step at 150-200 °C. In this work, we report on a detailed electron microscopy study of this crystallization process which reveals new insights into the crucial aspects for achieving the large grain size and associated excellent properties of the material. The key finding is that the best optoelectronic properties are obtained by preparing the films at the lowest possible temperature prior to post-deposition annealing. Electron microscopy imaging shows that such films are mostly amorphous, but feature a very low density of embedded crystallites. Upon post-deposition annealing, crystallization proceeds merely from isotropic crystal grain growth of these embedded crystallites rather than by the formation of additional crystallites. The relatively high hydrogen content of 4.2 at. % in these films is thought to cause the absence of additional nucleation, thereby rendering the final grain size and optoelectronic properties solely dependent on the density of embedded crystallites. The temperature-dependent grain growth rate has been determined, from which an activation energy of (1.39 ± 0.04) eV has been extracted. Finally, on the basis of the observed crystallization mechanism, a simple model to fully describe the crystallization process has been developed. This model has been validated with a numerical implementation thereof, which accurately predicts the observed temperature-dependent crystallization behaviour.

  10. Synthesis of Sm{sup 3+}-doped strontium barium niobate crystals in glass by samarium atom heat processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chayapiwut, Nakorn; Honma, Tsuyoshi; Benino, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Takumi; Komatsu, Takayuki . E-mail: komatsu@chem.nagaokaut.ac.jp

    2005-11-15

    New glasses giving the crystallization of Sm{sup 3+}-doped Sr {sub x} Ba{sub 1-} {sub x} Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (SBN) ferroelectrics have been developed in the Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SrO-BaO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system, and the formation of SBN crystal dots and lines by continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (wavelength:1064 nm, power: 1 W) irradiations, i.e., samarium atom heat processing, has been examined. The formation of Sm{sup 3+}-doped SBN non-linear optical crystals is confirmed from X-ray diffraction analyses, micro-Raman scattering spectra, second harmonic generations, and photoluminescence spectra. Sm{sup 3+}-doped SBN crystal dots with the diameters of 20-70 {mu}m and lines with the widths of 20-40 {mu}m are written at the surface of some glasses such as 10Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}.10SrO.10BaO.20Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}.50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol%) by Nd:YAG laser irradiations with the irradiation times of 20-70 s for the dots and with the scanning speeds of 1-5 {mu}m/s for the lines. The present study suggests that the samarium atom heat processing has a potential for the patterning of optical waveguides consisting of ferroelectric SBN crystals in glass substrates.

  11. Three-dimensional evaluation of gettering ability for oxygen atoms at small-angle tilt boundaries in Czochralski-grown silicon crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Yutaka Inoue, Kaihei; Fujiwara, Kozo; Deura, Momoko; Kutsukake, Kentaro; Yonenaga, Ichiro; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Ebisawa, Naoki; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2015-06-22

    Three-dimensional distribution of oxygen atoms at small-angle tilt boundaries (SATBs) in Czochralski-grown p-type silicon ingots was investigated by atom probe tomography combined with transmission electron microscopy. Oxygen gettering along edge dislocations composing SATBs, post crystal growth, was observed. The gettering ability of SATBs would depend both on the dislocation strain and on the dislocation density. Oxygen atoms would agglomerate in the atomic sites under the tensile hydrostatic stress larger than about 2.0 GPa induced by the dislocations. It was suggested that the density of the atomic sites, depending on the tilt angle of SATBs, determined the gettering ability of SATBs.

  12. Opto-structural studies of well-dispersed silicon nano-crystals grown by atom beam sputtering

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis and characterization of nano-crystalline silicon grown by atom beam sputtering technique are reported. Rapid thermal annealing of the deposited films is carried out in Ar + 5% H2 atmosphere for 5 min at different temperatures for precipitation of silicon nano-crystals. The samples are characterized for their optical and structural properties using various techniques. Structural studies are carried out by micro-Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. The optical properties are studied by photoluminescence and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and bandgaps are evaluated. The bandgaps are found to decrease after rapid thermal treatment. The micro-Raman studies show the formation of nano-crystalline silicon in as-deposited as well as annealed films. The shifting and broadening in Raman peak suggest formation of nano-phase in the samples. Results of micro-Raman, photoluminescence, and TEM studies suggest the presence of a bimodal crystallite size distribution for the films annealed at higher temperatures. The results show that atom beam sputtering is a suitable technique to synthesize nearly mono-dispersed silicon nano-crystals. The size of the nano-crystals may be controlled by varying annealing parameters. PMID:23031449

  13. A EPR Investigation of Atomic Silver and Divalent Silver in Irradiated Single Crystal of Potassium Fluoride Doped with Silver Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cheng

    The electron paramagnetic resonance absorption spectra of a singly ionized diatomic fluoride molecule -ion F_2^-, atomic silver Ag^0 and divalent silver Ag ^{2+} contained in single crystals of potassium fluoride have been re-examined at X-band wavelengths. The F_2^- and Ag^0 centers are produced simultaneously by gamma-irradiation at liquid nitrogen temperature. The divalent silver Ag^{2+} centers are formed by subsequently warming the irradiated samples to room temperature for a few hours and then cooling to 77 K. All field strength positions of resonance absorption lines observed at low temperatures have been satisfactorily predicted by computer simulation. The high degree of resolution exhibited by the spectra is due in part to the large nuclear magnetic moment of fluorine and in part to the fact that spectral lines in KF are narrow compared to those of similar systems in other alkali halide crystals. For an atomic silver, the hexafluoride cluster is cubic. By contrast, the divalent silver center is tetragonally distorted along a crystal cube edge as a consequence of the Jahn-Teller effect. Unexpected splittings of the central lines in the resonance absorption spectrum of divalent silver are observed and interpreted as being due to second order perturbation effects.

  14. Synthesis and structure of a 2D → 3D framework with coexistence of hydrogen bonds and polythreading character

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming-Dao Zhuang, Qi-Fan; Xu, Jing; Cao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    The title complex, ([Co(BPPA)(5-OH-bdc)] · (H{sub 2}O)){sub n} was prepared under hydrothermal conditions based on two ligands, namely, bis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)amine (BPPA) and 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (5-OH-H{sub 2}bdc). 5-OH-bdc{sup 2–} anions coordinated to Co atoms to give layers in crystal. BPPA ligands coordinate to Co atoms and thread into the adjacent layers. There are hydrogen bonds between adjacent layers, giving rise to a 2D → 3D framework.

  15. Atomic-scale configurations of synchroshear-induced deformation twins in the ionic MnS crystal

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y. T.; Xue, Y. B.; Chen, D.; Wang, Y. J.; Zhang, B.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Deformation twinning was thought as impossible in ionic compounds with rock-salt structure due to the charge effect on {111} planes. Here we report the presence and formation mechanism of deformation {111} twins in the rock-salt manganese sulphide (MnS) inclusions embedded in a hot-rolled stainless steel. Based on the atomic-scale mapping under aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, a dislocation-based mechanism involved two synchronized shear on adjacent atomic layers is proposed to describe the dislocation glide and consequently twinning formation. First-principles calculations of the energy barriers for twinning formation in MnS and comparing with that of PbS and MgO indicate the distinct dislocation glide scheme and deformation behaviors for the rock-salt compounds with different ionicities. This study may improve our understanding of the deformation mechanisms of rock-salt crystals and other ionic compounds. PMID:24874022

  16. Spontaneous emission from a two-level atom in anisotropic one-band photonic crystals: A fractional calculus approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.-N.; Huang, C.-H.; Cheng, S.-C.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2010-02-15

    Spontaneous emission (SE) from a two-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal (PC) is investigated by the fractional calculus. Physical phenomena of the SE are studied analytically by solving the fractional kinetic equations of the SE. There is a dynamical discrepancy between the SE of anisotropic and isotropic PCs. We find that, contrary to the SE phenomenon of the isotropic PC, the SE near the band edge of an anisotropic PC shows no photon-atom bound state. It is consistent with the experimental results of Barth, Schuster, Gruber, and Cichos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 243902 (2006)] that the anisotropic property of the system enhances the SE. We also study effects of dispersion curvatures on the changes of the photonic density of states and the appearance of the diffusion fields in the SE.

  17. Atomic-scale configurations of synchroshear-induced deformation twins in the ionic MnS crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y T; Xue, Y B; Chen, D; Wang, Y J; Zhang, B; Ma, X L

    2014-05-30

    Deformation twinning was thought as impossible in ionic compounds with rock-salt structure due to the charge effect on {111} planes. Here we report the presence and formation mechanism of deformation {111} twins in the rock-salt manganese sulphide (MnS) inclusions embedded in a hot-rolled stainless steel. Based on the atomic-scale mapping under aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, a dislocation-based mechanism involved two synchronized shear on adjacent atomic layers is proposed to describe the dislocation glide and consequently twinning formation. First-principles calculations of the energy barriers for twinning formation in MnS and comparing with that of PbS and MgO indicate the distinct dislocation glide scheme and deformation behaviors for the rock-salt compounds with different ionicities. This study may improve our understanding of the deformation mechanisms of rock-salt crystals and other ionic compounds.

  18. The study on the nanomachining property and cutting model of single-crystal sapphire by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ching; Weng, Yung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the nanomachining property and cutting model of single-crystal sapphire during nanomachining. The coated diamond probe is used to as a tool, and the atomic force microscopy (AFM) is as an experimental platform for nanomachining. To understand the effect of normal force on single-crystal sapphire machining, this study tested nano-line machining and nano-rectangular pattern machining at different normal force. In nano-line machining test, the experimental results showed that the normal force increased, the groove depth from nano-line machining also increased. And the trend is logarithmic type. In nano-rectangular pattern machining test, it is found when the normal force increases, the groove depth also increased, but rather the accumulation of small chips. This paper combined the blew by air blower, the cleaning by ultrasonic cleaning machine and using contact mode probe to scan the surface topology after nanomaching, and proposed the "criterion of nanomachining cutting model," in order to determine the cutting model of single-crystal sapphire in the nanomachining is ductile regime cutting model or brittle regime cutting model. After analysis, the single-crystal sapphire substrate is processed in small normal force during nano-linear machining; its cutting modes are ductile regime cutting model. In the nano-rectangular pattern machining, due to the impact of machined zones overlap, the cutting mode is converted into a brittle regime cutting model.

  19. Ab initio studies on the structure of and atomic interactions in cellulose III(I) crystals.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hayakawa, Daichi; Miyamoto, Hitomi; Ozawa, Motoyasu; Ozawa, Tomonaga; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2015-11-19

    The crystal structure of cellulose III(I)was analyzed using first-principles density functional theory (DFT). The geometry was optimized using variable-cell relaxation, as implemented in Quantum ESPRESSO. The Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional with a correction term for long-range van der Waals interactions (PBE-D) reproduced the experimental structure well. By using the optimized crystal structure, the interactions existed among the cellulose chains in the crystal were precisely investigated using the NBO analysis. The results showed that the weak bonding nature of CH/O and the hydrogen bonding occur among glucose molecules in the optimized crystal structure. To investigate the strength of interaction, dimeric and trimeric glucose units were extracted from the crystal, and analyzed using MP2 ab initio counterpoise methods with BSSE correction. The results estimated the strength of the interactions. That is, the packed chains along with a-axis interacts with weak bonding nature of CH/O and dispersion interactions by -7.50 kcal/mol, and two hydrogen bonds of O2HO2…O6 and O6HO6…O2 connect the neighboring packed chains with -11.9 kcal/mol. Moreover, FMO4 calculation was also applied to the optimized crystal structure to estimate the strength of the interactions. These methods can well estimate the interactions existed in the crystal structure of cellulose III(I).

  20. Melting behavior of single two-dimensional crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. H.; Grieve, R.

    2006-02-01

    In an experimental system millimeter-sized steel balls repel each other through the Coulomb force to imitate a two-dimensional (2D) atomic lattice in a vacuum both topologically and dynamically. Care has been taken to avoid the formation of grain boundaries. This 2D single crystal melts into a liquid via the hexatic state consistent with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young scenario. Initially in the melting process defects of the 2D lattice tend to emerge from the edge of the crystal. These defects are found to be close to the liquid state according to the Lindemann and Born criteria, confirming the idea of edge melting.

  1. Cavity-assisted atomic frequency comb memory in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+ :YLiF4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, R. A.; Gushchin, L. A.; Kalachev, A. A.; Nizov, N. A.; Nizov, V. A.; Sobgayda, D. A.; Zelensky, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present an implementation of cavity-assisted atomic frequency comb (AFC) memory protocol in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+ :YLiF4 crystal. We use a tunable confocal Fabry-Perot cavity that is placed inside the cryostat. For a 1 mm thick sample with optical depth of 0.2 we obtain total storage efficiency of 3%, which is a 15-fold enhancement compared to the no cavity case. The memory bandwidth is limited by the inhomogeneous broadening of the optical transition and allows us to store short 30 ns pulses.

  2. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  3. Structure of a heterogeneous, glycosylated, lipid-bound, in vivo-grown protein crystal at atomic resolution from the viviparous cockroach Diploptera punctata

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sanchari; Coussens, Nathan P.; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Srikanth, Jandhyam; Yagi, Koichiro J.; Gray, James S. S.; Tobe, Stephen S.; Stay, Barbara; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Ramaswamy, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular crystals for X-ray diffraction studies are typically grown in vitro from pure and homogeneous samples; however, there are examples of protein crystals that have been identified in vivo. Recent developments in micro-crystallography techniques and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers have allowed the determination of several protein structures from crystals grown in cellulo. Here, an atomic resolution (1.2 Å) crystal structure is reported of heterogeneous milk proteins grown inside a living organism in their functional niche. These in vivo-grown crystals were isolated from the midgut of an embryo within the only known viviparous cockroach, Diploptera punctata. The milk proteins crystallized in space group P1, and a structure was determined by anomalous dispersion from the native S atoms. The data revealed glycosylated proteins that adopt a lipocalin fold, bind lipids and organize to form a tightly packed crystalline lattice. A single crystal is estimated to contain more than three times the energy of an equivalent mass of dairy milk. This unique storage form of nourishment for developing embryos allows access to a constant supply of complete nutrients. Notably, the crystalline cockroach-milk proteins are highly heterogeneous with respect to amino-acid sequence, glycosylation and bound fatty-acid composition. These data present a unique example of protein heterogeneity within a single in vivo-grown crystal of a natural protein in its native environment at atomic resolution. PMID:27437115

  4. Structure of a heterogeneous, glycosylated, lipid-bound, in vivo-grown protein crystal at atomic resolution from the viviparous cockroach Diploptera punctata.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sanchari; Coussens, Nathan P; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Srikanth, Jandhyam; Yagi, Koichiro J; Gray, James S S; Tobe, Stephen S; Stay, Barbara; Chavas, Leonard M G; Ramaswamy, Subramanian

    2016-07-01

    Macromolecular crystals for X-ray diffraction studies are typically grown in vitro from pure and homogeneous samples; however, there are examples of protein crystals that have been identified in vivo. Recent developments in micro-crystallography techniques and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers have allowed the determination of several protein structures from crystals grown in cellulo. Here, an atomic resolution (1.2 Å) crystal structure is reported of heterogeneous milk proteins grown inside a living organism in their functional niche. These in vivo-grown crystals were isolated from the midgut of an embryo within the only known viviparous cockroach, Diploptera punctata. The milk proteins crystallized in space group P1, and a structure was determined by anomalous dispersion from the native S atoms. The data revealed glycosylated proteins that adopt a lipocalin fold, bind lipids and organize to form a tightly packed crystalline lattice. A single crystal is estimated to contain more than three times the energy of an equivalent mass of dairy milk. This unique storage form of nourishment for developing embryos allows access to a constant supply of complete nutrients. Notably, the crystalline cockroach-milk proteins are highly heterogeneous with respect to amino-acid sequence, glycosylation and bound fatty-acid composition. These data present a unique example of protein heterogeneity within a single in vivo-grown crystal of a natural protein in its native environment at atomic resolution.

  5. Significant reduction in errors associated with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures: automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jeffrey A; Ho, Kenneth L; Farid, Ramy

    2012-08-01

    All-atom models are essential for many applications in molecular modeling and computational chemistry. Nonbonded atomic contacts much closer than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the two atoms (clashes) are commonly observed in such models derived from protein crystal structures. A set of 94 recently deposited protein structures in the resolution range 1.5-2.8 Å were analyzed for clashes by the addition of all H atoms to the models followed by optimization and energy minimization of the positions of just these H atoms. The results were compared with the same set of structures after automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX and with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures at a resolution equal to or better than 0.9 Å. The additional PrimeX refinement produced structures with reasonable summary geometric statistics and similar R(free) values to the original structures. The frequency of clashes at less than 0.8 times the sum of van der Waals radii was reduced over fourfold compared with that found in the original structures, to a level approaching that found in the ultrahigh-resolution structures. Moreover, severe clashes at less than or equal to 0.7 times the sum of atomic radii were reduced 15-fold. All-atom refinement with PrimeX produced improved crystal structure models with respect to nonbonded contacts and yielded changes in structural details that dramatically impacted on the interpretation of some protein-ligand interactions.

  6. Controlled Vapor Phase Growth of Single Crystalline, Two-Dimensional GaSe Crystals with High Photoresponse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Idrobo, Juan C.; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Yoon, Mina; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Compared with their bulk counterparts, atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit new physical properties, and have the potential to enable next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, controlled synthesis of large uniform monolayer and multi-layer 2D crystals is still challenging. Here, we report the controlled synthesis of 2D GaSe crystals on SiO2/Si substrates using a vapor phase deposition method. For the first time, uniform, large (up to ~60 μm in lateral size), single-crystalline, triangular monolayer GaSe crystals were obtained and their structure and orientation were characterized from atomic scale to micrometer scale. The size, density, shape, thickness, and uniformity of the 2D GaSe crystals were shown to be controllable by growth duration, growth region, growth temperature, and argon carrier gas flow rate. The theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition and progressive confinement-induced bandgap shifts for 2D GaSe crystals. The 2D GaSe crystals show p-type semiconductor characteristics and high photoresponsivity (~1.7 A/W under white light illumination) comparable to exfoliated GaSe nanosheets. These 2D GaSe crystals are potentially useful for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and field-effect transistors. PMID:24975226

  7. Controlled Vapor Phase Growth of Single Crystalline, Two-Dimensional GaSe Crystals with High Photoresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Zhang, Huidong; Puretzky, Alexander A; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Yoon, Mina; Rouleau, Christopher M; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Compared with their bulk counterparts, atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit new physical properties, and have the potential to enable next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, controlled synthesis of large uniform monolayer and multi-layer 2D crystals is still challenging. Here, we report the controlled synthesis of 2D GaSe crystals on SiO2/Si substrates using a vapor phase deposition method. For the first time, uniform, large (up to ~60 m in lateral size), single-crystalline, triangular monolayer GaSe crystals were obtained and their atomic resolution structure were characterized. The size, density, shape, thickness, and uniformity of the 2D GaSe crystals were shown to be controllable by growth duration, growth region, growth temperature, and argon carrier gas flow rate. The theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition and progressive confinement-induced bandgap shifts for 2D GaSe crystals. The 2D GaSe crystals show p-type semiconductor characteristics and high photoresponsivity (~1.7 A/W under white light illumination) comparable to exfoliated GaSe nanosheets. These 2D GaSe crystals are potentially useful for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and field-effect transistors.

  8. Controlled vapor phase growth of single crystalline, two-dimensional GaSe crystals with high photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Puretzky, Alexander A; Idrobo, Juan C; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Yoon, Mina; Rouleau, Christopher M; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2014-06-30

    Compared with their bulk counterparts, atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit new physical properties, and have the potential to enable next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, controlled synthesis of large uniform monolayer and multi-layer 2D crystals is still challenging. Here, we report the controlled synthesis of 2D GaSe crystals on SiO2/Si substrates using a vapor phase deposition method. For the first time, uniform, large (up to ~60 μm in lateral size), single-crystalline, triangular monolayer GaSe crystals were obtained and their structure and orientation were characterized from atomic scale to micrometer scale. The size, density, shape, thickness, and uniformity of the 2D GaSe crystals were shown to be controllable by growth duration, growth region, growth temperature, and argon carrier gas flow rate. The theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition and progressive confinement-induced bandgap shifts for 2D GaSe crystals. The 2D GaSe crystals show p-type semiconductor characteristics and high photoresponsivity (~1.7 A/W under white light illumination) comparable to exfoliated GaSe nanosheets. These 2D GaSe crystals are potentially useful for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and field-effect transistors.

  9. Electronic and atomic structures of the Sr3Ir4Sn13 single crystal: A possible charge density wave material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.-T.; Srivastava, M. K.; Wu, C.-C.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Shao, Y.-C.; Liang, Y.-H.; Du, C.-H.; Chiou, J.-W.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chen, J.-L.; Pao, C.-W.; Lee, J.-F.; Kuo, C. N.; Lue, C. S.; Wu, M.-K.; Pong, W.-F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray scattering (XRS), x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic techniques were used to study the electronic and atomic structures of the high-quality Sr3Ir4Sn13 (SIS) single crystal below and above the transition temperature (T* ≈ 147 K). The evolution of a series of modulated satellite peaks below the transition temperature in the XRS experiment indicated the formation of a possible charge density wave (CDW) in the (110) plane. The EXAFS phase derivative analysis supports the CDW-like formation by revealing different bond distances [Sn1(2)-Sn2] below and above T* in the (110) plane. XANES spectra at the Ir L3-edge and Sn K-edge demonstrated an increase (decrease) in the unoccupied (occupied) density of Ir 5d-derived states and a nearly constant density of Sn 5p-derived states at temperatures T < T* in the (110) plane. These observations clearly suggest that the Ir 5d-derived states are closely related to the anomalous resistivity transition. Accordingly, a close relationship exists between local electronic and atomic structures and the CDW-like phase in the SIS single crystal.

  10. Electronic and atomic structures of the Sr3Ir4Sn13 single crystal: A possible charge density wave material

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H.-T.; Srivastava, M. K.; Wu, C.-C.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Shao, Y.-C.; Liang, Y.-H.; Du, C.-H.; Chiou, J.-W.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chen, J.-L.; Pao, C.-W.; Lee, J.-F.; Kuo, C. N.; Lue, C. S.; Wu, M.-K.; Pong, W.-F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray scattering (XRS), x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic techniques were used to study the electronic and atomic structures of the high-quality Sr3Ir4Sn13 (SIS) single crystal below and above the transition temperature (T* ≈ 147 K). The evolution of a series of modulated satellite peaks below the transition temperature in the XRS experiment indicated the formation of a possible charge density wave (CDW) in the (110) plane. The EXAFS phase derivative analysis supports the CDW-like formation by revealing different bond distances [Sn1(2)-Sn2] below and above T* in the (110) plane. XANES spectra at the Ir L3-edge and Sn K-edge demonstrated an increase (decrease) in the unoccupied (occupied) density of Ir 5d-derived states and a nearly constant density of Sn 5p-derived states at temperatures T < T* in the (110) plane. These observations clearly suggest that the Ir 5d-derived states are closely related to the anomalous resistivity transition. Accordingly, a close relationship exists between local electronic and atomic structures and the CDW-like phase in the SIS single crystal. PMID:28106144

  11. The Avogadro constant: determining the number of atoms in a single-crystal ²⁸Si sphere.

    PubMed

    Becker, Peter; Bettin, Horst

    2011-10-28

    The Avogadro constant, the number of entities in an amount of substance of one mole, links the atomic and the macroscopic properties of matter. Since the molar Planck constant--the product of the Planck constant and the Avogadro constant--is very well known via the measurement of the Rydberg constant, the Avogadro constant is also closely related to the Planck constant. In addition, its accurate determination is of paramount importance for a new definition of the kilogram in terms of a fundamental constant. Here, we describe a new and unique approach to determine the Avogadro constant from the number of atoms in 1 kg single-crystal spheres that are highly enriched with the (28)Si isotope. This approach has enabled us to apply isotope dilution mass spectroscopy to determine the molar mass of the silicon crystal with unprecedented accuracy. The value obtained, N(A)=6.022 140 82(18)×10(23) mol(-1), is now the most accurate input datum for a new definition of the kilogram.

  12. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal

    PubMed Central

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Eady, Robert R.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Hough, Michael A.; Strange, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07–1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a ‘catalytic reaction movie’ highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines. PMID:27437114

  13. Transfer behavior of quantum states between atoms in photonic crystal coupled cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ke; Li Zhiyuan

    2010-03-15

    In this article, we discuss the one-excitation dynamics of a quantum system consisting of two two-level atoms each interacting with one of two coupled single-mode cavities via spontaneous emission. When the atoms and cavities are tuned into resonance, a wide variety of time-evolution behaviors can be realized by modulating the atom-cavity coupling strength g and the cavity-cavity hopping strength {lambda}. The dynamics is solved rigorously via the eigenproblem of an ordinary coupled linear system and simple analytical solutions are derived at several extreme situations of g and {lambda}. In the large hopping limit where g<<{lambda}, the behavior of the system is the linear superposition of a fast and slow periodic oscillation. The quantum state transfers from one atom to the other atom accompanied with weak excitation of the cavity mode. In the large coupling limit where g>>{lambda}, the time-evolution behavior of the system is characterized by the usual slowly varying carrier envelope superimposed upon a fast and violent oscillation. At a certain instant, the energy is fully transferred from the one quantum subsystem to the other. When the two interaction strengths are comparable in magnitude, the dynamics acts as a continuous pulse having irregular frequency and line shape of peaks and valleys, and the complicated time-evolution behaviors are ascribed to the violent competition between all the one-excitation quantum states. The coupled quantum system of atoms and cavities makes a good model to study cavity quantum electrodynamics with great freedoms of many-body interaction.

  14. Giant Surfactants based on Precisely Functionalized POSS Nano-atoms: Tuning from Crystals to Frank-Kasper Phases and Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    In creating new functional materials for advanced technologies, precisely control over functionality and their hierarchical ordered structures are vital for obtaining the desired properties. Giant polyhedra are a class of materials which are designed and constructed via deliberately placing precisely functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) and fullerene (C60) molecular nano-particles (MNPs) (so-called ``nano-atoms'') at the vertices of a polyhedron. Giant surfactants are consisted of polymer tail-tethered ``nano-atoms'' which are deliberately and precisely functionalized POSS or C60 molecular nano-particles (MNPs). The ``nano-atom'' heads and polymer tails thus have drastic chemical differences to impart amphiphilicity. These giant surfactants capture the essential structural features of their small-molecule counterparts in many ways but possess much larger sizes, and therefore, they are recognized as size-amplified versions of small molecule surfactants. Two of the most illustrating examples are a series of novel giant tetrahedra and a series of giant giant surfactants as building blocks to construct into hierarchical ordered super-lattice structures ranging from crystals, Frank-Kasper phases and quasicrystals in the condensed bulk states, reveals evidently the interconnections between soft matters and hard matters in sharing their common structures and fundamental knowledge. This work was supported by National Science Foundation (DMR-1409972).

  15. Traceable atomic force microscopy of high-quality solvent-free crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzerini, Giovanni Mattia; Yacoot, Andrew; Paternò, Giuseppe Maria; Tregnago, Giulia; Cacialli, Franco; Treat, Neil; Stingelin, Natalie

    2016-02-01

    We report high-resolution, traceable atomic force microscopy measurements of high-quality, solvent-free single crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). These were grown by drop-casting PCBM solutions onto the spectrosil substrates and by removing the residual solvent in a vacuum. A home-built atomic force microscope featuring a plane mirror differential optical interferometer, fiber-fed from a frequency-stabilized laser (emitting at 632.8 nm), was used to measure the crystals' height. The optical interferometer together with the stabilized laser provides traceability (via the laser wavelength) of the vertical measurements made with the atomic force microscope. We find that the crystals can conform to the surface topography, thanks to their height being significantly smaller compared to their lateral dimensions (namely, heights between about 50 nm and 140 nm, for the crystals analysed, vs. several tens of microns lateral dimensions). The vast majority of the crystals are flat, but an isolated, non-flat crystal provides insights into the growth mechanism and allows identification of “molecular terraces” whose height corresponds to one of the lattice constants of the single PCBM crystal (1.4 nm) as measured with X-ray diffraction.

  16. Understanding Atomic-Scale Behavior of Liquid Crystals at Aqueous Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Sadati, Monirosadat; Rahimi, Mohammad; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Roux, Benoît; de Pablo, Juan J

    2017-01-10

    The ordered environment presented by liquid crystals at interfaces enables a range of novel functionalities that is only now beginning to be exploited in applications ranging from light focusing devices to biosensors. One key feature of liquid crystals is that molecular events occurring at an interface propagate over large distances through the bulk. In spite of their importance, our fundamental understanding of liquid crystal-water and liquid crystal-air interfaces remains limited. In this work, we present results from large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on the organization of the nematic and isotropic phases of the nitrile-containing mesogenic molecule 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) in the vicinity of vacuum and aqueous interfaces. Hybrid boundary conditions are imposed by confining 5CB films between vacuum and an aqueous medium to examine how those two types of interfaces influence the specific structural arrangement and ordering of 5CB. Consistent with experiments, our results indicate that 5CB exhibits homeotropic anchoring at the vacuum interface, and planar alignment at aqueous interfaces. Two-dimensional molecular dynamics potential of mean force calculations and average polarization densities show that the polar nitrile group of 5CB remains hydrated near the aqueous interface, where it modulates the orientation of water molecules. Estimates of the anchoring strength reveal an oscillatory decay and a semilinear decay with distance from the interface in vacuum and water, respectively.

  17. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Crystal structure of a trapped catalytic intermediate suggests that forced atomic proximity drives the catalysis of mIPS.

    PubMed

    Neelon, Kelly; Roberts, Mary F; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-12-07

    1-L-myo-inositol-phosphate synthase (mIPS) catalyzes the first step of the unique, de novo pathway of inositol biosynthesis. However, details about the complex mIPS catalytic mechanism, which requires oxidation, enolization, intramolecular aldol cyclization, and reduction, are not fully known. To gain further insight into this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the wild-type mIPS from Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.7 Å, as well as the crystal structures of three active-site mutants. Additionally, we obtained the structure of mIPS with a trapped 5-keto-glucose-6-phosphate intermediate at 2 Å resolution by a novel (to our knowledge) process of activating the crystal at high temperature. A comparison of all of the crystal structures of mIPS described in this work suggests a novel type of catalytic mechanism that relies on the forced atomic proximity of functional groups. The lysine cluster is contained in a small volume in the active site, where random motions of these side chains are responsible for the progress of the complex multistep reaction as well as for the low rate of catalysis. The mechanism requires that functional groups of Lys-274, Lys-278, Lys-306, and Lys-367 assume differential roles in the protonation/deprotonation steps that must occur during the mIPS reaction. This mechanism is supported by the complete loss of activity of the enzyme caused by the Leu-257 mutation to Ala that releases the lysine containment.

  19. GENERAL REGULARITIES OF FORMATION OF CRYSTAL STRUCTURES OF ELEMENTS DEPENDING ON ELECTRON STRUCTURE OF ATOMS (OBSHCHILE ZAKONOMERNOSTI OBRAZOVANIYA KRISTALLICHESKIKH STRUKTUR ELEMENTOV V ZAVISIMOSTI OT ELEKTRONNOGO STROENIYA ATOMOV),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A table is given showing the dependence of crystalline structures of elements on the number of electrons in the incompleted electronic subshells of...its atoms. The conclusion is drawn that the types of crystalline structures of the elements depend on the configuration of the outer electronic...subshells acquired by the atoms prior to crystallization. Crystalline structures of elements not governed by the 8 - N rule are determined by one or both

  20. Temperature effects on the atomic structure and kinetics in single crystal electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gründer, Yvonne; Markovic, Nenad M.; Thompson, Paul; Lucas, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the atomic structure at the electrochemical interface has been studied using in-situ surface x-ray scattering (SXS) during the formation of metal monolayers on a Au(111) electrode. For the surface reconstruction of Au(111), higher temperatures increase the mobility of surface atoms in the unreconstructed phase which then determines the surface ordering during the formation of the reconstruction. For the underpotential deposition (UPD) systems, the surface diffusion of the depositing metal adatoms is significantly reduced at low temperatures which results in the frustration of ordered structures in the case of Cu UPD, occurring on a Br-modified surface, and in the formation of a disordered Ag monolayer during Ag UPD. The results indicate that temperature changes affect the mass transport and diffusion of metal adatoms on the electrode surface. This demonstrates the importance of including temperature as a variable in studying surface structure and reactions at the electrochemical interface.

  1. Atomic modelling of crystal/complex fluid/crystal contacts—Part I. The genetic iterative multi-species (GIMS) approach and case of kaolinite/brine/kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouanna, P.; Pèpe, G.; Dweik, J.; Gouze, P.

    2010-11-01

    Predicting the impact of underground engineering on the environment requires the knowledge of natural media at different scales. In particular, understanding basic phenomena controlling the properties of rocks in the presence of complex fluids necessitates a detailed atomic description of the solid/fluid/solid contacts, the subject of Part I of the present study. First, building the solid interspace between two different crystals in a non-periodic situation is achieved using the ab initio and molecular mechanics code GenMol TM. A description of the fluid confined within the interspace is then derived from the original genetic iterative multi-species (GIMS) algorithm implemented in the same code. This approach consists of equilibrating chemical potentials, cycle after cycle and species after species, between the confined fluid and the free natural fluid. An elementary iteration for a species k consists of different steps incrementing the number Nk of particles k, with other numbers Nk' remaining constant. At each step, an optimum fluid composition is obtained by a genetic process distributing the fluid particles on a grid by stochastic shots, followed in fine by a refining process. The effectiveness of the GIMS approach is demonstrated in the case study of a fluid confined between two (0 0 1) kaolinite faces, with apertures h varying between 4 and 10 Å, connected to a 9-species external solution [H 2O, Cl -, N a+, CO 2(aq), NaCl (aq), Ca 2+, Mg 2+, HCO3-, H 3O +] where concentrations are ranging from 55 to 10 -4 mol/L. The results show a drastic variation in the solute/solvent and cations/ions ratios in the confined fluid when aperture h is lowered to less than 1 nm. These results obtained with a very rapid convergence of the iterative algorithm combined with a very competitive genetic optimizer are validated with high precision on a free solution. This description of contacts between crystals is original and unattainable by standard crystal interface approaches

  2. Ab-initio atomic level stresses in Cu-Zr crystal, liquid and glass phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Madhusudan; Nicholson, Don M.; Egami, Takeshi

    2013-03-01

    The Cu-Zr system provides interesting playground for the study of glass structure, stability, and formability and liquid dynamics. Glasses form over a wide range of concentrations while they compete against various intermetallic compounds. We have calculated from first-principles the atomic level stresses, a new tool to characterize materials, within the local approximation to Density Functional Theory (DFT) for Cu-Zr glasses and compounds from low temperature to 4500K. Comparisons between ordered crystalline compounds and liquids and glasses allow us to relate atomic level stress to relaxation of chemical short-range order and structural relaxation. The results are counter-intuitive at times; a smaller atom is under higher compressive pressure, whereas geometrically they should be under tension. Ab-initio calculations were done using Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) and Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) codes. The work at the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National laboratory was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  3. Calculation of spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom in photonic crystals using fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Wu, Jing-Nuo; Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Li, Yen-Yin

    2011-07-15

    Fractional time derivative, an abstract mathematical operator of fractional calculus, is used to describe the real optical system of a V-type three-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal. A fractional kinetic equation governing the dynamics of the spontaneous emission from this optical system is obtained as a fractional Langevin equation. Solving this fractional kinetic equation by fractional calculus leads to the analytical solutions expressed in terms of fractional exponential functions. The accuracy of the obtained solutions is verified through reducing the system into the special cases whose results are consistent with the experimental observation. With accurate physical results and avoiding the complex integration for solving this optical system, we propose fractional calculus with fractional time derivative as a better mathematical method to study spontaneous emission dynamics from the optical system with non-Markovian dynamics.

  4. Chitinase activity on amorphous chitin thin films: a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Kittle, Joshua D; Qian, Chen; Roman, Maren; Esker, Alan R

    2013-08-12

    Chitinases are widely distributed in nature and have wide-ranging pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. This work highlights a real-time and label-free method to assay Chitinase activity via a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The chitin substrate was prepared by spincoating a trimethylsilyl chitin solution onto a silica substrate, followed by regeneration to amorphous chitin (RChi). The QCM-D and AFM results clearly showed that the hydrolysis rate of RChi films increased as Chitinase (from Streptomyces griseus) concentrations increased, and the optimal temperature and pH for Chitinase activity were around 37 °C and 6-8, respectively. The Chitinase showed greater activity on chitin substrates, having a high degree of acetylation, than on chitosan substrates, having a low degree of acetylation.

  5. Atomic frequency comb memory in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+:Y7LiF4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, R. A.; Gushchin, L. A.; Kalachev, A. A.; Korableva, S. L.; Sobgayda, D. A.; Zelensky, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    We implemented the atomic frequency comb protocol for optical quantum memory in an isotopically pure crystal of Y7LiF4 doped by 143Nd3+ ions. Echo signals were observed on the 4I9/2(1)-4F3/2(1) transition, which had inhomogeneous broadening much smaller than the hyperfine splitting of the ground and excited states. We performed hole-burning spectroscopy measurements on several transitions, obtaining information about the hyperfine state lifetimes. An intrinsic hole structure was found on some of the transitions, which allowed us to prepare a comb structure with two clearly defined periods and to observe echo pulses with different time delays.

  6. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko

    2015-11-16

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10{sup 4} times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy.

  7. Evolution of crystal structure during the initial stages of ZnO atomic layer deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Boichot, R.; Tian, L.; Richard, M. -I.; ...

    2016-01-05

    In this study, a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron X-ray techniques is used to investigate both structural and chemical evolution during ZnO growth by atomic layer deposition. Focusing on the first 10 cycles of growth, we observe that the structure formed during the coalescence stage largely determines the overall microstructure of the film. Furthermore, by comparing ZnO growth on silicon with a native oxide with that on Al2O3(001), we find that even with lattice-mismatched substrates and low deposition temperatures, the crystalline texture of the films depend strongly on the nature of the interfacial bonds.

  8. T-shaped ionic liquid crystals based on the imidazolium motif: exploring substitution of the C-2 imidazolium carbon atom.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Wellens, Sil; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Cardinaels, Thomas; Binnemans, Koen

    2011-04-04

    In this contribution the first examples of so-called rigid-core, T-shaped imidazolium ionic liquid crystals, in which the C-2 atom of the imidazolium ring is substituted with an aryl moiety decorated with one or two alkoxy chains, are described. The length of the alkoxy chain(s) was varied from six to eighteen carbon atoms (n=6, 10, 14-18). Whereas the compounds with one long alkoxy chain display only smectic A phases, the salts containing two alkoxy chains exhibit smectic A, multicontinuous cubic, as well as hexagonal columnar phases, as evidenced by polarising optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffraction. Structural models are proposed for the self-assembly of the molecules within the mesophases. The imidazolium head groups and the iodide counterions were found to adopt a peculiar orientation in the central part of the columns of the hexagonal columnar phases. The enantiotropic cubic phase shown by the 1,3-dimethyl-2-[3,4-bis(pentadecyloxy)phenyl]imidazolium iodide salt has a multicontinuous Pm ̄3m structure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a thermotropic cubic mesophase of this symmetry.

  9. Topological transport and atomic tunnelling-clustering dynamics for aged Cu-doped Bi2Te3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Taishi; Chen, Qian; Schouteden, Koen; Huang, Wenkai; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Zhe; Miao, Feng; Wang, Xinran; Li, Zhaoguo; Zhao, Bo; Li, Shaochun; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Jinlan; Wang, Baigeng; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Wang, Guanghou

    2014-09-01

    Enhancing the transport contribution of surface states in topological insulators is vital if they are to be incorporated into practical devices. Such efforts have been limited by the defect behaviour of Bi2Te3 (Se3) topological materials, where the subtle bulk carrier from intrinsic defects is dominant over the surface electrons. Compensating such defect carriers is unexpectedly achieved in (Cu0.1Bi0.9)2Te3.06 crystals. Here we report the suppression of the bulk conductance of the material by four orders of magnitude by intense ageing. The weak antilocalization analysis, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy corroborate the transport of the topological surface states. Scanning tunnelling microscopy reveals that Cu atoms are initially inside the quintuple layers and migrate to the layer gaps to form Cu clusters during the ageing. In combination with first-principles calculations, an atomic tunnelling-clustering picture across a diffusion barrier of 0.57 eV is proposed.

  10. Atomic Scale Surface Structure and Morphology of InAs Nanowire Crystal Superlattices: The Effect of Epitaxial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While shell growth engineering to the atomic scale is important for tailoring semiconductor nanowires with superior properties, a precise knowledge of the surface structure and morphology at different stages of this type of overgrowth has been lacking. We present a systematic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of homoepitaxial shell growth of twinned superlattices in zinc blende InAs nanowires that transforms {111}A/B-type facets to the nonpolar {110}-type. STM imaging along the nanowires provides information on different stages of the shell growth revealing distinct differences in growth dynamics of the crystal facets and surface structures not found in the bulk. While growth of a new surface layer is initiated simultaneously (at the twin plane interface) on the {111}A and {111}B nanofacets, the step flow growth proceeds much faster on {111}A compared to {111}B leading to significant differences in roughness. Further, we observe that the atomic scale structures on the {111}B facet is different from its bulk counterpart and that shell growth on this facet occurs via steps perpendicular to the ⟨112⟩B-type directions. PMID:25710727

  11. Topological transport and atomic tunnelling–clustering dynamics for aged Cu-doped Bi2Te3 crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Taishi; Chen, Qian; Schouteden, Koen; Huang, Wenkai; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Zhe; Miao, Feng; Wang, Xinran; Li, Zhaoguo; Zhao, Bo; Li, Shaochun; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Jinlan; Wang, Baigeng; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Wang, Guanghou

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing the transport contribution of surface states in topological insulators is vital if they are to be incorporated into practical devices. Such efforts have been limited by the defect behaviour of Bi2Te3 (Se3) topological materials, where the subtle bulk carrier from intrinsic defects is dominant over the surface electrons. Compensating such defect carriers is unexpectedly achieved in (Cu0.1Bi0.9)2Te3.06 crystals. Here we report the suppression of the bulk conductance of the material by four orders of magnitude by intense ageing. The weak antilocalization analysis, Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy corroborate the transport of the topological surface states. Scanning tunnelling microscopy reveals that Cu atoms are initially inside the quintuple layers and migrate to the layer gaps to form Cu clusters during the ageing. In combination with first-principles calculations, an atomic tunnelling–clustering picture across a diffusion barrier of 0.57 eV is proposed. PMID:25247692

  12. Emergence of Zeolite Analogs and other Microporous Crystals in an Atomic Lattice Model of Silica and Related Materials.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Auerbach, Scott M; Monson, Peter A

    2012-03-15

    The potential of tailored nanopores to transform technologies such as drug delivery, biofuel production, and optical-electronic devices depends on fundamental knowledge of the self-assembly of ordered nanoporous solids. Atomic-level geometries of critical nuclei that lead to such solids have remained hidden in the nanoscale blind spot between local (<0.5 nm) and collective (>5 nm) probes of structure. Heroic efforts at molecular simulation of nanopore formation have provided massive libraries of hypothetical structures; (1-5) however, to date no statistical simulation has generated a crystallization pathway from random initial condition to ordered nanoporous solid, until now. In this work, we show that a recently developed atomic lattice model of silica and related materials can form ordered nanoporous solids with a rich variety of structures including known chalcogenides, zeolite analogs, and layered materials. We find that whereas canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the model consistently produce the amorphous solids studied in our previous work, parallel tempering Monte Carlo gives rise to ordered nanoporous solids. The utility of parallel tempering highlights the existence of barriers between amorphous and crystalline phases of our model. Moreover, the self-assembly or nanoporous crystalline phases in the model open the door to detailed understanding of nanopore nucleation.

  13. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  14. Topological Toughening of graphene and other 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huajian

    It has been claimed that graphene, with the elastic modulus of 1TPa and theoretical strength as high as 130 GPa, is the strongest material. However, from an engineering point of view, it is the fracture toughness that determines the actual strength of materials, as crack-like flaws (i.e., cracks, holes, notches, corners, etc.) are inevitable in the design, fabrication, and operation of practical devices and systems. Recently, it has been demonstrated that graphene has very low fracture toughness, in fact close to that of ideally brittle solids. These findings have raised sharp questions and are calling for efforts to explore effective methods to toughen graphene. Recently, we have been exploring the potential use of topological effects to enhance the fracture toughness of graphene. For example, it has been shown that a sinusoidal graphene containing periodically distributed disclination quadrupoles can achieve a mode I fracture toughness nearly twice that of pristine graphene. Here we report working progresses on further studies of topological toughening of graphene and other 2D materials. A phase field crystal method is adopted to generate the atomic coordinates of material with specific topological patterns. We then perform molecular dynamics simulations of fracture in the designed samples, and observe a variety of toughening mechanisms, including crack tip blunting, crack trapping, ligament bridging, crack deflection and daughter crack initiation and coalescence.

  15. Evolution of crystal structure during the initial stages of ZnO atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Boichot, R.; Tian, L.; Richard, M. -I.; Crisci, A.; Chaker, A.; Cantelli, V.; Coindeau, S.; Lay, S.; Ouled, T.; Blanquet, E.; Deschanvres, J. -L.; Renevier, H.; Chu, M. H.; Aubert, N.; Ciatto, G.; Thomas, O.

    2016-01-05

    In this study, a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron X-ray techniques is used to investigate both structural and chemical evolution during ZnO growth by atomic layer deposition. Focusing on the first 10 cycles of growth, we observe that the structure formed during the coalescence stage largely determines the overall microstructure of the film. Furthermore, by comparing ZnO growth on silicon with a native oxide with that on Al2O3(001), we find that even with lattice-mismatched substrates and low deposition temperatures, the crystalline texture of the films depend strongly on the nature of the interfacial bonds.

  16. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  17. Molecular Engineering of Liquid Crystal Polymers by Living Polymerization. 17. Characterization of Poly(10-((4-Cyano-4’-Biphenyl)oxy) decanyl Vinyl Ether)s by 1-D and 2-D H-NMR Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-30

    Spectroscopy by Virril Percec and Myongsoo Lee Department of Macromolecular Science Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH 44106-2699 and Peter L ...AUTHOrZ(S) Virgil Percec, Myongsoo Lee, Peter L . Rinaldi and Vincent E. Litman l3a TYPE OF REPORT 1131) TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year. Afot? Dy I...with CF3SO 3 H/S(CH 3)2 in CH2Cl2 at 0OC and termninated by ammoniacal methanol, by 1 -D and 2-D (COSY) 300 MHz IH-NMR spectroscopy is presented. The

  18. X-ray diffraction analysis of LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} crystals with additives of silver atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotinkin, V. P. Bush, A. A.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Dau, H. S.; Yakovlev, K. A.; Tishchenko, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    Silver-containing LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} crystals up to 4 × 8 × 8 mm in size were grown by the crystallization of 80(1-x)CuO · 20{sub x}AgNO{sub 3} · 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) mixture melt. According to the X-ray spectral and Rietveld X-ray diffraction data, the maximum amount of silver incorporated in the LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} structure is about 4 at % relative to the copper content. It was established that silver atoms occupy statistically crystallographic positions of lithium atoms. The incorporation of silver atoms is accompanied by a noticeable increase in parameter c of the LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} rhombic unit cell, a slight increase in parameter a, and a slight decrease in parameter b.

  19. Writing of nonlinear optical Sm{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystal lines at the surface of glass by samarium atom heat processing

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Benino, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Komatsu, T.; Sato, R.

    2005-06-15

    Some glasses such as 21.25Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}.63.75MoO{sub 3}.15B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol %) giving the formation of nonlinear optical Sm{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals through conventional crystallization in an electric furnace and through continuous-wave Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser (wavelength: 1064 nm) irradiation (samarium atom heat processing) have been developed. It is proposed from x-ray diffraction analyses, micro-Raman-scattering spectra, and second-harmonic generation measurements that the crystal structure of Sm{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} formed by the crystallization is the {beta}{sup '}-phase structure with an orthorhombic (noncentrosymmetric) symmetry. The lines consisting of nonlinear optical {beta}{sup '}-Sm{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals are written at the surface of glasses by YAG laser irradiation (laser power: P=0.4 W, laser scanning speed: S=1-10 {mu}m/s), and, in particular, homogeneous crystal lines are formed at the laser scanning speed of 1 {mu}m/s. Refractive index changes (not crystallization) are also induced by YAG laser irradiation of P=0.4 W and a high laser scanning speed of S=25 {mu}m/s. The crystallization mechanism in the laser-irradiated region has been proposed. The present study demonstrates that the samarium atom heat processing is a technique for the writing of rare earth containing optical nonlinear/ferroelectric crystal lines in glass.

  20. Crystal structure of α5β1 integrin ectodomain: Atomic details of the fibronectin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Masamichi; Re, Suyong; Mihara, Emiko; Nogi, Terukazu; Sugita, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Integrin α5β1 is a major cellular receptor for the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin and plays a fundamental role during mammalian development. A crystal structure of the α5β1 integrin headpiece fragment bound by an allosteric inhibitory antibody was determined at a 2.9-Å resolution both in the absence and presence of a ligand peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence. The antibody-bound β1 chain accommodated the RGD ligand with very limited structural changes, which may represent the initial step of cell adhesion mediated by nonactivated integrins. Furthermore, a molecular dynamics simulation pointed to an important role for Ca2+ in the conformational coupling between the ligand-binding site and the rest of the molecule. The RGD-binding pocket is situated at the center of a trenchlike exposed surface on the top face of α5β1 devoid of glycosylation sites. The structure also enabled the precise prediction of the acceptor residue for the auxiliary synergy site of fibronectin on the α5 subunit, which was experimentally confirmed by mutagenesis and kinetic binding assays. PMID:22451694

  1. Atomically thin epitaxial template for organic crystal growth using graphene with controlled surface wettability.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Ngan; Jo, Sae Byeok; Lee, Seong Kyu; Sin, Dong Hun; Kang, Boseok; Kim, Hyun Ho; Lee, Hansol; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-04-08

    A two-dimensional epitaxial growth template for organic semiconductors was developed using a new method for transferring clean graphene sheets onto a substrate with controlled surface wettability. The introduction of a sacrificial graphene layer between a patterned polymeric supporting layer and a monolayer graphene sheet enabled the crack-free and residue-free transfer of free-standing monolayer graphene onto arbitrary substrates. The clean graphene template clearly induced the quasi-epitaxial growth of crystalline organic semiconductors with lying-down molecular orientation while maintaining the "wetting transparency", which allowed the transmission of the interaction between organic molecules and the underlying substrate. Consequently, the growth mode and corresponding morphology of the organic semiconductors on graphene templates exhibited distinctive dependence on the substrate hydrophobicity with clear transition from lateral to vertical growth mode on hydrophilic substrates, which originated from the high surface energy of the exposed crystallographic planes of the organic semiconductors on graphene. The optical properties of the pentacene layer, especially the diffusion of the exciton, also showed a strong dependency on the corresponding morphological evolution. Furthermore, the effect of pentacene-substrate interaction was systematically investigated by gradually increasing the number of graphene layers. These results suggested that the combination of a clean graphene surface and a suitable underlying substrate could serve as an atomically thin growth template to engineer the interaction between organic molecules and aromatic graphene network, thereby paving the way for effectively and conveniently tuning the semiconductor layer morphologies in devices prepared using graphene.

  2. Morphology Change of C60 Islands on Organic Crystals Observed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Freund, Sara; Hinaut, Antoine; Pawlak, Rémy; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2016-06-28

    Organic-organic heterojunctions are nowadays highly regarded materials for light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells with the prospect of designing low-cost, flexible, and efficient electronic devices.1-3 However, the key parameter of optimized heterojunctions relies on the choice of the molecular compounds as well as on the morphology of the organic-organic interface,4 which thus requires fundamental studies. In this work, we investigated the deposition of C60 molecules at room temperature on an organic layer compound, the salt bis(benzylammonium)bis(oxalato)cupurate(II), by means of noncontact atomic force microscopy. Three-dimensional molecular islands of C60 having either triangular or hexagonal shapes are formed on the substrate following a "Volmer-Weber" type of growth. We demonstrate the dynamical reshaping of those C60 nanostructures under the local action of the AFM tip at room temperature. The dissipated energy is about 75 meV and can be interpreted as the activation energy required for this migration process.

  3. Enzymatic degradation processes of lamellar crystals in thin films for poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid] and its copolymers revealed by real-time atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Hirota, Takuya; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Tsuge, Takeharu; Iwata, Tadahisa; Abe, Hideki; Doi, Yoshiharu

    2004-01-01

    Enzymatic degradation processes of flat-on lamellar crystals in melt-crystallized thin films of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid] (P(3HB)) and its copolymers were characterized by real-time atomic force microscopy (AFM) in a phosphate buffer solution containing PHB depolymerase from Ralstonia pickettii T1. Fiberlike crystals with regular intervals were generated along the crystallographic a axis at the end of lamellar crystals during the enzymatic degradation. The morphologies and sizes of the fiberlike crystals were markedly dependent on the compositions of comonomer units in the polyesters. Length, width, interval, and thickness of the fiberlike crystals after the enzymatic degradation for 2 h were measured by AFM, and the dimensions were related to the solid-state structures of P(3HB) and its copolymers. The width and thickness decreased at the tip of fiberlike crystals, indicating that the enzymatic degradation of crystals takes place not only along the a axis but also along the b and c axes. These results from AFM measurement were compared with the data on crystal size by wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and on lamellar thickness and long period by small-angle X-ray scattering. In addition, the enzymatic erosion rate of flat-on lamellar crystals along the a axis was measured from real-time AFM height images. A schematic glacier model for the enzymatic degradation of flat-on lamellar crystals of P(3HB) by PHB depolymerase has been proposed on the basis of the AFM observations.

  4. He atom surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth. Progress report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Investigations have focused primarily on surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators, epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals and multiphoton studies. The surface dynamics of RbCl has been re-examined. We have developed a simple force constant model which provides insight into the dynamics of KBr overlayers on NaCl(001), a system with a large lattice mismatch. The KBr/NaCl(001) results are compared to Na/Cu(001) and NaCl/Ge(001). We have completed epitaxial growth experiments for KBr onto RbCl(001). Slab dynamics calculations using a shell model for this system with very small lattice mismatch are being carried out in collaboration with Professor Manson of Clemson University and with Professor Schroeder in Regensburg, Germany. Extensive experiments on multiphoton scattering of helium atoms onto NaCl and, particularly, LiF have been carried out and the theory has been developed to a rather advanced stage by Professor Manson. This work will permit the extraction of more information from time-of-flight spectra. It is shown that the theoretical model provides a very good description of the multiphoton scattering from organic films. Work has started on self-assembling organic films on gold (alkyl thiols/Au(111)). We have begun to prepare and characterize the gold crystal; one of the group members has spent two weeks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory learning the proper Au(111) preparation techniques. One of our students has carried out neutron scattering experiments on NiO, measuring both bulk phonon and magnon dispersion curves.

  5. Crystal Structures at Atomic Resolution of the Perovskite-Related GdBaMnFeO5 and Its Oxidized GdBaMnFeO6.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Susana; Manabe, Keisuke; Urones-Garrote, Esteban; Ávila-Brande, David; Ichikawa, Noriya; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2017-02-06

    Perovskite-related GdBaMnFeO5 and the corresponding oxidized phase GdBaMnFeO6, with long-range layered-type ordering of the Ba and Gd atoms have been synthesized. Oxidation retains the cation ordering but drives a modulation of the crystal structure associated with the incorporation of the oxygen atoms between the Gd layers. Oxidation of GdBaMnFeO5 increases the oxidation state of Mn from 2+ to 4+, while the oxidation state of Fe remains 3+. Determination of the crystal structure of both GdBaMnFeO5 and GdBaMnFeO6 is carried out at atomic resolution by means of a combination of advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques. Crystal structure refinements from synchrotron X-ray diffraction data support the structural models proposed from the TEM data. The oxidation states of the Mn and Fe atoms are evaluated by means of EELS and Mössbauer spectroscopy, which also reveals the different magnetic behavior of these oxides.

  6. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  7. Accurate Treatment of Electrostatics during Molecular Adsorption in Nanoporous Crystals without Assigning Point Charges to Framework Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Taku; Manz, Thomas A.; Sholl, David S.

    2011-02-28

    Molecular simulations have become an important complement to experiments for studying gas adsorption and separation in crystalline nanoporous materials. Conventionally, these simulations use force fields that model adsorbate-pore interactions by assigning point charges to the atoms of the adsorbent. The assignment of framework charges always introduces ambiguity because there are many different choices for defining point charges, even when the true electron density of a material is known. We show how to completely avoid such ambiguity by using the electrostatic potential energy surface (EPES) calculated from plane wave density functional theory (DFT). We illustrate this approach by simulating CO2 adsorption in four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): IRMOF-1, ZIF-8, ZIF-90, and Zn(nicotinate)2. The resulting CO2 adsorption isotherms are insensitive to the exchange-correlation functional used in the DFT calculation of the EPES but are sensitive to changes in the crystal structure and lattice parameters. Isotherms computed from the DFT EPES are compared to those computed from several point charge models. This comparison makes possible, for the first time, an unbiased assessment of the accuracy of these point charge models for describing adsorption in MOFs. We find an unusually high Henry’s constant (109 mmol/g·bar) and intermediate isosteric heat of adsorption (34.9 kJ/mol) for Zn(nicotinate)2, which makes it a potentially attractive material for CO2 adsorption applications.

  8. Accurate Treatment of Electrostatics during Molecular Adsorption in Nanoporous Crystals without Assigning Point Charges to Framework Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T; Manz, TA; Sholl, DS

    2011-03-24

    Molecular simulations have become an important complement to experiments for studying gas adsorption and separation in crystalline nanoporous materials. Conventionally, these simulations use force fields that model adsorbate-pore interactions by assigning point charges to the atoms of the adsorbent. The assignment of framework charges always introduces ambiguity because there are many different choices for defining point charges, even when the true electron density of a material is known. We show how to completely avoid such ambiguity by using the electrostatic potential energy surface (EPES) calculated from plane wave density functional theory (DFT). We illustrate this approach by simulating CO(2) adsorption in four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): IRMOF-1, ZIE-8, ZIE-90, and Zn(nicotinate)(2). The resulting CO(2) adsorption isotherms are insensitive to the exchange-correlation functional used in the DFT calculation of the EPES but are sensitive to changes in the crystal structure and lattice parameters. Isotherms computed from the DFT EPES are compared to those computed from several point charge models. This comparison makes possible, for the first time, an unbiased assessment of the accuracy of these point charge models for describing adsorption in MOFs. We find an unusually high Henry's constant (109 mmol/g.bar) and intermediate isosteric heat of adsorption (34.9 kJ/mol) for Zn(nicotinate)(2), which makes it a potentially attractive mateiial for CO(2) adsorption applications.

  9. Crystal structures of Toxoplasma gondii uracil phosphoribosyltransferase reveal the atomic basis of pyrimidine discrimination and prodrug binding.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, M A; Carter, D; Scott, D M; Roos, D S; Ullman, B; Brennan, R G

    1998-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the transfer of a ribosyl phosphate group from alpha-D-5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate to the N1 nitrogen of uracil. The UPRTase from the opportunistic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is a rational target for antiparasitic drug design. To aid in structure-based drug design studies against toxoplasmosis, the crystal structures of the T.gondii apo UPRTase (1.93 A resolution), the UPRTase bound to its substrate, uracil (2.2 A resolution), its product, UMP (2.5 A resolution), and the prodrug, 5-fluorouracil (2.3 A resolution), have been determined. These structures reveal that UPRTase recognizes uracil through polypeptide backbone hydrogen bonds to the uracil exocyclic O2 and endocyclic N3 atoms and a backbone-water-exocyclic O4 oxygen hydrogen bond. This stereochemical arrangement and the architecture of the uracil-binding pocket reveal why cytosine and pyrimidines with exocyclic substituents at ring position 5 larger than fluorine, including thymine, cannot bind to the enzyme. Strikingly, the T. gondii UPRTase contains a 22 residue insertion within the conserved PRTase fold that forms an extended antiparallel beta-arm. Leu92, at the tip of this arm, functions to cap the active site of its dimer mate, thereby inhibiting the escape of the substrate-binding water molecule. PMID:9628859

  10. Surface-initiated dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols: a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Qian, Chen; Roman, Maren; Glasser, Wolfgang G; Esker, Alan R

    2013-11-11

    This work highlights a real-time and label-free method to monitor the dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols initiated by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) physically immobilized on surfaces using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The dehydrogenative polymer (DHP) films are expected to provide good model substrates for studying ligninolytic enzymes. The HRP was adsorbed onto gold or silica surfaces or onto and within porous desulfated nanocrystalline cellulose films from an aqueous solution. Surface-immobilized HRP retained its activity and selectivity for monolignols as coniferyl and p-coumaryl alcohol underwent dehydrogenative polymerization in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas sinapyl alcohol polymerization required the addition of a nucleophile. The morphologies of the DHP layers on the surfaces were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM). Data from QCM-D and AFM showed that the surface-immobilized HRP-initiated dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols was greatly affected by the support surface, monolignol concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and temperature.

  11. Effects of carbon atom parity and alkyl side chain length on the crystallization and morphology of biscarbamates, a set of model compounds for polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mostofa Kamal; Sundararajan, Pudupadi R

    2011-07-14

    Solid state morphology and crystallization behavior of a homologous series of biscarbamate molecules having varying alkyl side chain lengths with different carbon atom parity were investigated. These are model compounds for polyurethanes. We synthesized a set of biscarbamates with double hydrogen bonding motifs separated by a (CH(2))(6) spacer and with alkyl side chains of various lengths ranging from C(3) to C(18) at the ends. Thermal analysis showed an odd-even alternation in their melting temperatures and heats of fusion, with the odd number of carbon atoms in the side chain having higher melting temperatures and heats of fusion than the even numbered ones, in contrast to the case of n-alkanes. The effect of carbon atom parity in the alkyl side chains on the spherulite size, spherulite growth rate, and isothermal crystallization kinetics was studied. Although the spherulite size increases with the alkyl side chain length, the maximum is seen at an intermediate length and not with a short or long alkyl chain for both the odd and even series. Along this series of molecules, a maximum in spherulite size, spherulite growth rate, and rate of crystallization is seen for C(7)C(6) (odd series) and C(8)C(6) (even series) biscarbamates. There is a significant difference in spherulite size with respect to carbon atom parity in the alkyl side chains as well as sample preparation protocol. Hence the length of the alkyl side chain, carbon atom parity in the alkyl side chains, and the sample preparation protocol (i.e., quenching versus slow cooling) play an important role in the morphology of these molecules. We rationalize this behavior with the relative contributions of hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces as discerned from IR spectroscopy. While the van der Waals interaction increases with the alkyl side chain length in this series, the hydrogen bond contribution remains invariant. The rate of crystallization follows the trend seen with the spherulitic growth. The

  12. Two-dimensional folded chain crystals composed of a single isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) chain observed by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaki, Jiro; Anzai, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    We successfully visualized crystallization behavior of a single isolated polymer chain at a molecular level by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Previously, we found that isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) (it-PMMA) formed two-dimensional folded chain crystals upon compression of its Langmuir monolayer on a water surface, and the molecular images of the crystals deposited on mica were clearly visualized by AFM (Kumaki, et al. JACS 2005, 127, 5788; J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 5594). In the present study, a high-molecular-weight it-PMMA was diluted in a monolayer of an it-PMMA oligomer which cannot crystallize due to the low molecular weight. At a low surface pressure, isolated amorphous chains of the high-molecular-weight it-PMMA solubilized in the oligomer monolayer were observed. On compression, the isolated chains converted to crystals composed of a single chain. Detailed AFM observations of the crystals indicated that the crystalline nuclei preferably formed at the ends of the chains, and the size of the nuclei was almost independent on the molecular weight of the it-PMMA in a wide range.

  13. Line patterning of (Sr,Ba)Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} crystals in borate glasses by transition metal atom heat processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, M.; Honma, T.; Benino, Y.; Komatsu, T.

    2007-09-15

    Some NiO-doped Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3},La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SrO-BaO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses giving the formation of strontium barium niobate Sr{sub 0.5}Ba{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (SBN) crystals with a tetragonal tungsten-bronze structure through conventional crystallization in an electric furnace have been developed, and SBN crystal lines have been patterned on the glass surface by heat-assisted (250-300 deg. C) laser irradiation and scanning of continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser (wavelength: 1064 nm). The surface morphology and the quality of SBN crystal lines are examined from measurements of confocal scanning laser micrographs and polarized micro-Raman scattering spectra. The surface morphology of SBN crystal lines changes from periodic bump structures to homogeneous structures, depending on laser scanning conditions. It is suggested that the line patterned at the laser irradiation condition of laser power P=1 W and of laser scanning speed S=1 {mu}m/s in 2NiO-4La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-16SrO-16BaO-32Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-30B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass has a possibility of the orientation of SBN crystals along the laser scanning direction. The present study demonstrates that the transition metal atom heat processing (i.e., a combination of cw Nd:YAG laser and Ni{sup 2+} ions) is a novel technique for spatially selected crystallization of SBN crystals in glass. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the polarization optical (a) and confocal scanning laser (b) micrographs for the sample obtained by heat-assisted (300 deg. C) Nd:YAG laser irradiation with a laser power of P=1 W and laser scanning speed of S=1 {mu}m/s in Glass C. The figure demonstrates that the transition metal atom heat processing (i.e., a combination of cw Nd:YAG laser and Ni{sup 2+} ions) is a novel technique for spatially selected crystallization of SBN crystals in glass.

  14. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  15. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  16. Quartz crystal microbalance studies of Al2O3 atomic layer deposition using trimethylaluminum and water at 125 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Wind, R A; George, S M

    2010-01-28

    Al(2)O(3) atomic layer deposition (ALD) growth with Al(CH(3))(3) (trimethylaluminum (TMA)) and H(2)O as the reactants was examined at the relatively low temperature of 125 degrees C using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. The total Al(2)O(3) ALD mass gain per cycle (MGPC) and MGPCs during the individual TMA and H(2)O reactions were measured versus TMA and H(2)O exposures. The Al(2)O(3) MGPC increased with increasing H(2)O and TMA exposures at fixed TMA and H(2)O exposures, respectively. However, the TMA and H(2)O reactions were not completely self-limiting. The slower surface reaction kinetics at lower temperature may require very long exposures for the reactions to reach completion. The Al(2)O(3) MGPCs increased quickly versus H(2)O exposure and slowly reached limiting values that were only weakly dependent on the TMA doses. Small TMA exposures were also sufficient for the Al(2)O(3) MGPCs to reach different limiting values for different H(2)O doses. The TMA MGPCs increased for higher TMA exposures at all H(2)O exposures. In contrast, the H(2)O MGPCs decreased for higher TMA exposures at all H(2)O exposures. This decrease may occur from more dehydroxylation at larger hydroxyl coverages after the H(2)O exposures. The hydroxyl coverage after the H(2)O exposure was dependent only on the H(2)O exposure. The Al(2)O(3) MGPC was also linearly dependent on the hydroxyl coverage after the H(2)O dose. Both the observed hydroxyl coverage versus H(2)O exposure and the Al(2)O(3) ALD growth versus H(2)O and TMA exposures were fit using modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm expressions where the pressures are replaced with exposures. These results should be useful for understanding low-temperature Al(2)O(3) ALD, which is important for coating organic, polymeric, and biological substrates.

  17. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  18. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  19. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  20. Electronic Transport Properties of New 2-D Materials GeH and NaSn2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Cultrara, Nicholas; Arguilla, Maxx; Goldberger, Joshua; Heremans, Joseph

    2-D materials potentially have superior thermoelectric properties compared to traditional 3-D materials due to their layered structure. Here we present electrical and thermoelectric transport properties of 2 types of 2-D materials, GeH and NaSn2As2. GeH is a graphane analog which is prepared using chemical exfoliation of CaGe2 crystals. Intrinsic GeH is proven to be a highly resistive material at room temperature. Resistance and Seebeck coefficient of Ga doped GeH are measured in a cryostat with a gating voltage varying from -100V to 100V. NaSn2As2 is another 2-D system, with Na atom embedded between nearly-2D Sn-As layers. Unlike GeH, NaSn2As2 is a metal based of Hall measurements, with p-type behavior, and with van der Pauw resistances on the order of 5m Ω/square. Thermoelectric transport properties of NaSn2As2 will be reported. This work is support by the NSF EFRI-2DARE project EFRI-1433467.

  1. Plasmonic Excitations of 1D Metal-Dielectric Interfaces in 2D Systems: 1D Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Daniel R.; Menabde, Sergey G.; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-04-01

    Surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) excitations of metal-dielectric interfaces are a fundamental light-matter interaction which has attracted interest as a route to spatial confinement of light far beyond that offered by conventional dielectric optical devices. Conventionally, SPPs have been studied in noble-metal structures, where the SPPs are intrinsically bound to a 2D metal-dielectric interface. Meanwhile, recent advances in the growth of hybrid 2D crystals, which comprise laterally connected domains of distinct atomically thin materials, provide the first realistic platform on which a 2D metal-dielectric system with a truly 1D metal-dielectric interface can be achieved. Here we show for the first time that 1D metal-dielectric interfaces support a fundamental 1D plasmonic mode (1DSPP) which exhibits cutoff behavior that provides dramatically improved light confinement in 2D systems. The 1DSPP constitutes a new basic category of plasmon as the missing 1D member of the plasmon family: 3D bulk plasmon, 2DSPP, 1DSPP, and 0D localized SP.

  2. Two-dimensional polyaniline (C3N) from carbonized organic single crystals in solid state

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Javeed; Lee, Eun Kwang; Jung, Minbok; Shin, Dongbin; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Seo, Jeong-Min; Jung, Sun-Min; Kim, Dongwook; Li, Feng; Lah, Myoung Soo; Park, Noejung; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Oh, Joon Hak; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2016-01-01

    The formation of 2D polyaniline (PANI) has attracted considerable interest due to its expected electronic and optoelectronic properties. Although PANI was discovered over 150 y ago, obtaining an atomically well-defined 2D PANI framework has been a longstanding challenge. Here, we describe the synthesis of 2D PANI via the direct pyrolysis of hexaaminobenzene trihydrochloride single crystals in solid state. The 2D PANI consists of three phenyl rings sharing six nitrogen atoms, and its structural unit has the empirical formula of C3N. The topological and electronic structures of the 2D PANI were revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with a first-principle density functional theory calculation. The electronic properties of pristine 2D PANI films (undoped) showed ambipolar behaviors with a Dirac point of –37 V and an average conductivity of 0.72 S/cm. After doping with hydrochloric acid, the conductivity jumped to 1.41 × 103 S/cm, which is the highest value for doped PANI reported to date. Although the structure of 2D PANI is analogous to graphene, it contains uniformly distributed nitrogen atoms for multifunctionality; hence, we anticipate that 2D PANI has strong potential, from wet chemistry to device applications, beyond linear PANI and other 2D materials. PMID:27313207

  3. Basal-plane dislocations in bilayer graphene - Peculiarities in a quasi-2D material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Dislocations represent one of the most fascinating and fundamental concepts in materials science. First and foremost, they are the main carriers of plastic deformation in crystalline materials. Furthermore, they can strongly alter the local electronic or optical properties of semiconductors and ionic crystals. In layered crystals like graphite dislocation movement is restricted to the basal plane. Thus, those basal-plane dislocations cannot escape enabling their confinement in between only two atomic layers of the material. So-called bilayer graphene is the thinnest imaginable quasi-2D crystal to explore the nature and behavior of dislocations under such extreme boundary conditions. Robust graphene membranes derived from epitaxial graphene on SiC provide an ideal platform for their investigation. The presentation will give an insight in the direct observation of basal-plane partial dislocations by transmission electron microscopy and their detailed investigation by diffraction contrast analysis and atomistic simulations. The investigation reveals striking size effects. First, the absence of stacking fault energy, a unique property of bilayer graphene, leads to a characteristic dislocation pattern, which corresponds to an alternating AB <--> BA change of the stacking order. Most importantly, our experiments in combination with atomistic simulations reveal a pronounced buckling of the bilayer graphene membrane, which directly results from accommodation of strain. In fact, the buckling completely changes the strain state of the bilayer graphene and is of key importance for its electronic/spin transport properties. Due to the high degree of disorder in our quasi-2D material it is one of the very few examples for a perfect linear magnetoresistance, i.e. the linear dependency of the in-plane electrical resistance on a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the graphene sheet up to field strengths of more than 60 T. This research is financed by the German Research

  4. Formation of a ZnO{sub 2} layer on the surface of single crystal ZnO substrates with oxygen atoms by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwaba, Y.; Abe, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Niikura, I.; Kashiwaba, Y.; Daibo, M.; Fujiwara, T.; Osada, H.

    2013-03-21

    Formation of a ZnO{sub 2} layer by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment for single crystal ZnO (0001) substrates was studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks of ZnO{sub 2} with a pyrite structure were observed in XRD 2{theta}-{omega} scan patterns of the O-face of single crystal ZnO (0001) substrates with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment, but these peaks were not observed in patterns of the Zn-face of ZnO (0001) substrates with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. XRD {omega} scan patterns of the ZnO (0002) plane of the O-face of single crystal ZnO (0001) substrates were broadened at the tail of the pattern by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment, but such broadening was not observed in that plane of the Zn-face. Grain structure of ZnO{sub 2} layers was clearly observed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images for the O-face of ZnO (0001) substrates with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. Spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the O-face of ZnO (0001) substrates with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment showed a definite peak shift of the O 1s peak. It is thought that a pyrite structure of ZnO{sub 2} is easily formed around an O atom of the O-face of ZnO (0001) substrates. Results of XRD measurements, the AFM image, and XPS measurement of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated single crystal ZnO (1010) substrate that has oxygen atoms on the surface appeared to be the same as those of the O-face of ZnO (0001) substrates.

  5. Revealing the preferred interlayer orientations and stackings of two-dimensional bilayer gallium selenide crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xufan; Basile, Leonardo; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo, Juan C; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-02-23

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking orders of two-dimensional (2D) bilayer crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) crystals that result from different layer stackings provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in 2D bilayer crystals. Through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method, bilayer GaSe crystals were selectively grown and their two preferred 0° or 60° interlayer rotations were investigated. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA' and AB stacking) in as-grown bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale, and the Ga-terminated edge structure was identified using scanning transmission electron microscopy. Theoretical analysis reveals that the energies of the interlayer coupling are responsible for the preferred orientations among the bilayer GaSe crystals.

  6. 2D-3D transition of gold cluster anions resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Mikael P.; Lechtken, Anne; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M.; Furche, Filipp

    2008-05-01

    Small gold cluster anions Aun- are known for their unusual two-dimensional (2D) structures, giving rise to properties very different from those of bulk gold. Previous experiments and calculations disagree about the number of gold atoms nc where the transition to 3D structures occurs. We combine trapped ion electron diffraction and state of the art electronic structure calculations to resolve this puzzle and establish nc=12 . It is shown that theoretical studies using traditional generalized gradient functionals are heavily biased towards 2D structures. For a correct prediction of the 2D-3D crossover point it is crucial to use density functionals yielding accurate jellium surface energies, such as the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functional or the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional modified for solids (PBEsol). Further, spin-orbit effects have to be included, and large, flexible basis sets employed. This combined theoretical-experimental approach is promising for larger gold and other metal clusters.

  7. A dead-zone free ⁴He atomic magnetometer with intensity-modulated linearly polarized light and a liquid crystal polarization rotator.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Peng, X; Lin, Z; Guo, H

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical (4)He atomic magnetometer experimental scheme based on an original Bell-Bloom configuration. A single intensity-modulated linearly polarized laser beam is used both for generating spin polarization within a single (4)He vapor and probing the spin precessing under a static magnetic field. The transmitted light signal from the vapor is then phase-sensitively detected at the modulation frequency and its harmonics, which lead to the atomic magnetic resonance signals. Based on this structure, a liquid crystal is added in our magnetometer system and constitutes a polarization rotator. By controlling the voltage applied on the liquid crystal, the light linear polarization vector can be kept perpendicular with the ambient magnetic field direction, which in turn provides the maximum resonance signal amplitude. Moreover, the system exhibits a magnetic-field noise floor of about 2pT/√Hz, which is not degraded due to the presence of the liquid crystal and varying magnetic field direction. The experiment results prove that our method can eliminate the dead-zone effect, improve the system spatial isotropy, and thus be suitable in mobile applications.

  8. Flow transitions in a 2D directional solidification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larroude, Philippe; Ouazzani, Jalil; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1992-01-01

    Flow transitions in a Two Dimensional (2D) model of crystal growth were examined using the Bridgman-Stockbarger me thod. Using a pseudo-spectral Chebyshev collocation method, the governing equations yield solutions which exhibit a symmetry breaking flow tansition and oscillatory behavior indicative of a Hopf bifurcation at higher values of Ra. The results are discussed from fluid dynamic viewpoint, and broader implications for process models are also addressed.

  9. Neutron diffraction study of the atomic structure of cubic sodium-tungsten bronze (Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3}) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, I. V. Kalyukanov, A. I.; Volkov, V. L.; Ozerov, R. P.; Fykin, L. E.

    2011-05-15

    The atomic structure of a single crystal of one of four Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3} phases, which exist below 293 K, has been refined from neutron diffraction data (WWR-c reactor at the Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, Obninsk Branch; {lambda} = 1.168 Angstrom-Sign ; {lambda}/2 contribution < 0.8%; sin{theta}/{lambda} {<=} 0.810; T = 288 K; crystal sphere Empty-Set = 4.4 mm; cubic unit cell with a = 7.672 Angstrom-Sign , sp. gr. Im3, z = 8, {mu} = 1.9 mm{sup -1}). The Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3} atomic structure has been refined (198 independent reflections) taking into account the anisotropy of thermal vibrations (R{sub w} = 4.0%). The stoichiometric coefficient Na(0.69) is also refined. A structural distortion is revealed, which is characterized by the displacement of oxygen atoms (0, 0.2609(2), 0.2391(2)) from the ideal perovskite positions (0, 1/4, 1/4); this displacement doubles the ideal perovskite lattice period. The oxygen displacements can be described as rotations of oxygen octahedra by 3.58 Degree-Sign around the [111] direction. The structure remains cubic because the octahedra rotations with respect to all three perovskite cubic axes are identical.

  10. Ab initio theory of many-body interaction and phonon frequencies of rare-gas crystals under pressure in the model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, V. V.; Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of phonon frequencies of compressed rare-gas crystals have been performed taking into account the many-body interaction in the model of deformable atoms. In the short-range repulsive potential, along with the previously considered three-body interaction associated with the overlap of the electron shells of atoms, the three-body forces generated by the mutual deformation of the electron shells of the nearest-neighbor atoms have been investigated in the dipole approximation. The relevant forces make no contribution to the elastic moduli but affect the equation for lattice vibrations. At high compressions, the softening of the longitudinal mode at the points L and X is observed for all the rare-gas crystals, whereas the transverse mode T 1 is softened in the direction Σ and at the point L for solid xenon. This effect is enhanced by the three-body forces. There is a good agreement between the theoretical phonon frequencies and the experimental values at zero pressure.

  11. Atomic diffraction under oblique incidence: An analytical expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiossac, Maxime; Roncin, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The semiclassical perturbation method developed by Henkel et al. [J. Phys. II 4, 1955 (1994), 10.1051/jp2:1994242] to model cold-atom diffraction by optical standing waves, is applied to the diffraction of fast atoms on crystal surfaces at grazing incidence (GIFAD or FAD). We first show that the interaction time and interaction length embedded in the obliquity factor is well suited to explain the transition from three-dimensional to two-dimensional (2D) diffraction. The situation of a slightly misaligned primary beam, corresponding to oblique incidence in the effective 2D system, is addressed pointing out discrepancies such as the absence of net deflection of the atomic beam. Guided by time-reversal considerations, we propose an arbitrarily symmetrized form significantly improving the agreement with experimental data recorded in oblique incidence.

  12. Crystallization Process of Protein Rv0731c from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis for a Successful Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure at 1.2 Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liang Cong

    2009-06-08

    Proteins are bio-macromolecules consisting of basic 20 amino acids and have distinct three-dimensional folds. They are essential parts of organisms and participate in every process within cells. Proteins are crucial for human life, and each protein within the body has a specific function, such as antibodies, contractile proteins, enzymes, hormonal proteins, structural proteins, storage proteins and transport proteins. Determining three-dimensional structure of a protein can help researchers discover the remarkable protein folding, binding site, conformation and etc, in order to understand well of protein interaction and aid for possible drug design. The research on protein structure by X-ray protein crystallography carried by Li-Wei Hung's research group in the Physical Bioscience Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is focusing on protein crystallography. The research in this lab is in the process of from crystallizing the proteins to determining the three dimensional crystal structures of proteins. Most protein targets are selected from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. TB (Tuberculosis) is a possible fatal infectious disease. By studying TB target protein can help discover antituberculer drugs, and find treatment for TB. The high-throughput mode of crystallization, crystal harvesting, crystal screening and data collection are applied to the research pipeline (Figure 1). The X-ray diffraction data by protein crystals can be processed and analyzed to result in a three dimensional representation of electron density, producing a detailed model of protein structure. Rv0731c is a conserved hypothetical protein with unknown function from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. This paper is going to report the crystallization process and brief structure information of Rv0731c.

  13. Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) Simulations of the Molecular Crystal alphaRDX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    as elastic constants, minimized crystal structures from various loading conditions and generalized stacking fault energy surfaces of the minimized... structures . Detailed descriptions of Matlab scripts are also provided for post-processing the simulation data. These procedures are well suited to...minimization of the experimental crystal structure . Each step in the flowchart references the section containing the description of the files used

  14. Structural and magnetic properties of DyMn(2)D(6) synthesized under high deuterium pressure.

    PubMed

    Paul-Boncour, V; Filipek, S M; Wierzbicki, R; André, G; Bourée, F; Guillot, M

    2009-01-07

    DyMn(2)D(6) has been prepared by applying high gaseous deuterium pressure on DyMn(2). This phase is isostructural with other RMn(2)D(6) (R = Y, Er) compounds and crystallizes with a K(2)PtCl(6) type structure having an ordered anion and a partially disordered cation arrangement because Dy and half the Mn atoms are randomly substituted in the same 8c site. The reverse susceptibility follows a Curie-Weiss law with an effective moment of 10 μ(B) similar to that of DyMn(2). Short range magnetic order, corresponding to ferromagnetic correlations, is observed in the neutron patterns up to 10 K and can be attributed to Dy-Dy interactions. The decomposition of the deuteride into Mn and DyD(2), studied by thermal gravimetric analysis, occurs between 470 and 650 K. A further deuterium desorption takes place above 920 K.

  15. Investigation of the thermal stability of 2-D patterns of Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ting-Yu; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Koel, Bruce E

    2007-08-01

    Nanoparticles can serve as useful components or sub-assemblies, i.e., building blocks, in the design and fabrication of more complex structures needed for rapid prototyping using layered nanofabrication (LNF) or for use in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). This paper describes investigations of the thermal stability of simple 2-D patterns of thiol-coated, 5-nm gold nanoparticles deposited on the native oxide surface of a Si(100) single crystal substrate. The changes in the particle structure and location on the surface were probed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) before and after heating in ambient air. Experiments were carried out on the as-deposited nanoparticles and on patterns of nanoparticles that had been pretreated (prior to heating) by a 10-min exposure in a UV-ozone ashing chamber. All individual particles and 2-D patterns were stable up to 550 degrees C. Higher temperatures caused first a reduction in particle height and eventually a loss of the particle from the field of view (presumably by rather long-range diffusion).

  16. Observation by two-photon laser spectroscopy of the 4d{sup 10}5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}4d{sup 9}5s{sup 2} {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} clock transition in atomic silver

    SciTech Connect

    Badr, T.; Plimmer, M. D.; Juncar, P.; Himbert, M. E.; Louyer, Y.; Knight, D. J. E.

    2006-12-15

    We report the observation of the very narrow 4d{sup 10}5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}4d{sup 9}5s{sup 2} {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} transition in atomic silver. The frequencies of the hyperfine components in {sup 107}Ag and {sup 109}Ag have been measured using Doppler-free two-photon laser spectroscopy of a thermal beam and heterodyne calibration with respect to the a{sub 1} component of the 62P(4-5) line in molecular iodine near 661 nm. For the center of gravity of a mixture of natural abundance, we deduce the value 906 641 295.77(19) MHz. For the isotope shift, we obtain {nu}({sup 109}Ag)-{nu}({sup 107}Ag)=564.15(37) MHz, from which we deduce the frequency and isotope shift of the 4d{sup 10}5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}4d{sup 10}6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} transition at 206 nm.

  17. Direct imaging of hydrogen-atom columns in a crystal by annular bright-field electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Okunishi, Eiji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Kondo, Yukihito; Hosokawa, Fumio; Abe, Eiji

    2011-04-01

    Enhancing the imaging power of microscopy to identify all chemical types of atom, from low- to high-atomic-number elements,would significantly contribute for a direct determination of material structures. Electron microscopes have successfully provided images of heavy-atom positions, particularly by the annular dark-field method, but detection of light atoms was difficult owing to their weak scattering power. Recent developments of aberration-correction electron optics have significantly advanced the microscope performance, enabling identification of individual light atoms such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, boron and lithium. However, the lightest hydrogen atom has not yet been observed directly, except in the specific condition of hydrogen adatoms on a graphene membrane. Here we show the first direct imaging of the hydrogen atom in a crystalline solid YH(2), based on a classic 'hollow-cone' illumination theory combined with state-of-the-art scanning transmission electronmicroscopy. The optimized hollow-cone condition derived from the aberration-corrected microscope parameters confirms that the information transfer can be extended to 22.5 nm(-1), which corresponds to a spatial resolution of about 44.4 pm. These experimental conditions can be readily realized with the annular bright-field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy according to reciprocity, revealing successfully the hydrogen-atom columns as dark dots, as anticipated from phase contrast of a weak-phase object.

  18. Crystal structure of 4-methyl-N-{(E)-meth­yl[(3aR,8aS)-2-oxo-3,3a,8,8a-tetra­hydro-2H-indeno­[1,2-d][1,3]oxazol-3-yl]-λ4-sulfanyl­idene}benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Patrícia A.; Noll, Bruce C.; Oliver, Allen G.; Silveira, Gustavo P.

    2015-01-01

    The formulation that the title compound, C18H18N2O4S2, adopts is a zwitterionic core with the charge separated to the sulfilimine S and N atoms and is supported by the two different S—N bond distances about the sulfinimine N atom [1.594 (2) and 1.631 (2) Å, respectively] that are typical for such bonds. The notably unusual bond is S—N(oxazolidinone) [1.692 (2) Å] that is longer than a typical S—N bond [1.603 (18) Å, Mogul analysis; Macrae et al. (2008 ▸). J. Appl. Cryst. 41, 466–470]. The bond-angle sum about sulfilimine sulfur (308.35°) reflects the trigonal–pyramidal geometry of this atom. Two of the angles are less than 100°. Despite the pyramidalization of this sulfur, there are no significant inter­molecular inter­actions, beyond usual van der Waals contacts, in the crystal packing. PMID:26870517

  19. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  20. Construction of cuprous oxide electrodes composed of 2D single-crystalline dendritic nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Seong; Kim, Suk Jun; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2010-10-04

    An unusual anisotropic growth of Cu(2)O is stabilized via the electrochemical synthesis of Cu(2)O in the presence of Ag(+) ions, which results in the formation of Cu(2)O electrodes composed of 2D sheetlike crystals containing complex dendritic patterns. It is quite unusual for Cu(2)O to form a 2D morphology since it has a 3D isotropic cubic crystal structure where the a, b, and c axes are equivalent. Each Cu(2)O sheet is single-crystalline in nature and is grown parallel to the {110} plane, which is rarely observed in Cu(2)O crystal shapes. A various set of experiments are performed to understand the role of Ag(+) ions on the 2D growth of Cu(2)O. The results show that Ag(+) ions are deposited as silver islands on already growing Cu(2)O crystals and serve as nucleation sites for the new growth of Cu(2)O crystals. As a result, the growth direction of the newly forming Cu(2)O crystals is governed by the diffusion layer structure created by the pre-existing Cu(2)O crystals, which results in the formation of 2D dendritic patterns. The thin 2D crystal morphology can significantly increase the surface-to-volume ratio of Cu(2)O crystals, which is beneficial for enhancing various electrochemical and photoelectrochemical properties of the electrodes. The photoelectrochemical properties of the Cu(2)O electrodes composed of 2D dendritic crystals are investigated and compared to those of 3D dendritic crystals. This study provides a unique and effective route to maximize the {110} area per unit volume of Cu(2)O, which will be beneficial for any catalytic/sensing abilities that can be anisotropically enhanced by the {110} planes of Cu(2)O.

  1. Revealing the preferred interlayer orientations and stackings of two-dimensional bilayer gallium selenide crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xufan; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A.; Yoon, Mina; ...

    2015-01-21

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0° or 60° interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA' and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale andmore » the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. Here, the combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.« less

  2. Revealing the preferred interlayer orientations and stackings of two-dimensional bilayer gallium selenide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A.; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-21

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0° or 60° interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA' and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale and the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. Here, the combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.

  3. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future.

  4. 2D Materials for Optical Modulation: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoliang; Wu, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yipei; Guo, Xin; Tong, Limin

    2017-02-21

    Owing to their atomic layer thickness, strong light-material interaction, high nonlinearity, broadband optical response, fast relaxation, controllable optoelectronic properties, and high compatibility with other photonic structures, 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have been attracting increasing attention for photonic applications. By tuning the carrier density via electrical or optical means that modifies their physical properties (e.g., Fermi level or nonlinear absorption), optical response of the 2D materials can be instantly changed, making them versatile nanostructures for optical modulation. Here, up-to-date 2D material-based optical modulation in three categories is reviewed: free-space, fiber-based, and on-chip configurations. By analysing cons and pros of different modulation approaches from material and mechanism aspects, the challenges faced by using these materials for device applications are presented. In addition, thermal effects (e.g., laser induced damage) in 2D materials, which are critical to practical applications, are also discussed. Finally, the outlook for future opportunities of these 2D materials for optical modulation is given.

  5. Comparison of precursor infiltration into polymer thin films via atomic layer deposition and sequential vapor infiltration using in-situ quartz crystal microgravimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Padbury, Richard P.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2014-07-01

    Previous research exploring inorganic materials nucleation behavior on polymers via atomic layer deposition indicates the formation of hybrid organic–inorganic materials that form within the subsurface of the polymer. This has inspired adaptations to the process, such as sequential vapor infiltration, which enhances the diffusion of organometallic precursors into the subsurface of the polymer to promote the formation of a hybrid organic–inorganic coating. This work highlights the fundamental difference in mass uptake behavior between atomic layer deposition and sequential vapor infiltration using in-situ methods. In particular, in-situ quartz crystal microgravimetry is used to compare the mass uptake behavior of trimethyl aluminum in poly(butylene terephthalate) and polyamide-6 polymer thin films. The importance of trimethyl aluminum diffusion into the polymer subsurface and the subsequent chemical reactions with polymer functional groups are discussed.

  6. DFT study of the effect of fluorine atoms on the crystal structure and semiconducting properties of poly(arylene-ethynylene) derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moral, Mónica; García, Gregorio; Garzón, Andrés; Granadino-Roldán, José M.; Fernández-Gómez, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The effect of fluorine substitution on the molecular structure, crystal packing, and n-type semiconducting properties of a set of poly(arylene-ethynylene) polymers based on alternating thiadiazole and phenyl units linked through ethynylene groups has been studied by means of Density Functional Theory. As a result, an enlargement in the interplanar distance between cofacial polymer chains, as well as a decrease of the electronic coupling and electron mobility is predicted. On the other hand, fluorination could facilitate electron injection into the material. A polymer containing both alkoxy pendant chains and fluorine atoms is proposed as a compromise solution between efficiency of electron injection and charge transport within the material.

  7. Influence of amino acid residue 374 of cytochrome P-450 2D6 (CYP2D6) on the regio- and enantio-selective metabolism of metoprolol.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, S W; Rowland, K; Ackland, M J; Rekka, E; Simula, A P; Lennard, M S; Wolf, C R; Tucker, G T

    1996-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is an important human drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for the oxidation of more than 30 widely used therapeutic agents. The enzymes encoded by the published genomic [Kimura, Umeno, Skoda, Meyer and Gonzalez (1989) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 45, 889-904] and cDNA [Gonzalez, Skoda, Kimura, Umeno, Zanger, Nebert, Gelboin, Hardwick and Meyer (1988) Nature 331, 442-446] sequences of CYP2D6, and presumed to represent wild-type sequences, differ at residue 374 and encode valine (CYP2D6-Val) and methionine (CYP2D6-Met) respectively. The influence of this amino acid difference on cytochrome P-450 expression, ligand binding, catalysis and stereoselective oxidation of metoprolol was investigated by the heterologous expression of the corresponding cDNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The level of expression of apo- and holo-protein was similar with each form of CYP2D6 cDNA, and the binding affinities of a series of ligands to CYP2D6-Val and CYP2D6-Met were identical. The enantioselective O-demethylation and alpha-hydroxylation of metoprolol were also similar with each form of CYP2D6, O-demethylation being R-(+)- enantioselective (CYP2D6-Val: R/S, 1.6; CYP2D6-Met: R/S, 1.4), whereas alpha-hydroxylation showed a preference for S-(-)-metoprolol (CYP2D6-Val: R/S, 0.7; CYP2D6-Met: R/S, 0.8). However, although the favoured regiomer overall was O-demethylmetoprolol (ODM), the regioselectivity for O-demethylation of each metoprolol enantiomer was significantly greater for CYP2D6-Val [R-(+)-: ODM/alpha-hydroxymetoprolol (alpha OH), 5.9; S-(-)-: ODM/alpha OH, 2.5) than that observed for CYP2D6-Met [R-(+)-: ODM/alpha OH, 2.2; S-(-)-: ODM/alpha OH, 1.4]. The stereoselective properties of CYP2D6-Val were consistent with those observed for CYP2D6 in human liver microsomes. The difference in the stereoselective properties of CYP2D6-Val and CYP2D6-Met were rationalized with respect to a homology model of the active site of CYP2D6 based on an alignment with

  8. The strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks: A 2D approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Xu, Tao; Chen, Chong-feng; Tang, Chun'an

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic rocks typically contain heterogeneities in the form of crystals and pores. We investigate here the influence of such heterogeneity on the strength of volcanic rocks using an elastic damage mechanics model in which we numerically deform two-dimensional samples comprising low-strength elements representing crystals and zero-strength elements representing pores. These circular elements are stochastically generated so that there is no overlap in a medium representing the groundmass. Our modelling indicates that increasing the fraction of pores and/or crystals reduces the strength of volcanic rocks, and that increasing the pore fraction results in larger strength reductions than increasing the crystal fraction. The model also highlights an important weakening role for pore diameter, but finds that crystal diameter has a less significant influence for strength. To account for heterogeneity (pores and crystals), we propose an effective medium approach where we define an effective pore fraction ϕp‧ = Vp/(Vp + Vg) where Vp and Vg are the pore and groundmass fractions, respectively. Highly heterogeneous samples (containing high pore and/or crystal fractions) will therefore have high values of ϕp‧, and vice-versa. When we express our numerical samples (more than 200 simulations spanning a wide range of crystal and pore fractions) in terms of ϕp‧, we find that their strengths can be described by a single curve for a given pore diameter. To provide a predictive tool for the strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks, we propose a modified version of 2D solution for the Sammis and Ashby (1986) pore-emanating crack model, a micromechanical model designed to estimate strength using microstructural attributes such as porosity, pore radius, and fracture toughness. The model, reformulated to include ϕp‧ (and therefore crystal fraction), captures the strength curves for our numerical simulations over a sample heterogeneity range relevant to volcanic systems. We find

  9. 2D Melting of Plasma Crystals: Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Ivlev, A. V.; Knapek, C. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-07-03

    Comprehensive experimental investigations of melting in two-dimensional complex plasmas were carried out. Different experiments were performed in steady and unsteady heating regimes. We demonstrate an Arrhenius dependence of the defect concentration on the kinetic temperature in steady-state experiments, and show the evidence of metastable quenching in unsteady experiments, where the defect concentration follows a power-law temperature scaling. In all experiments, independent indicators suggest a grain-boundary-induced melting scenario.

  10. Vertical 2D/3D Semiconductor Heterostructures Based on Epitaxial Molybdenum Disulfide and Gallium Nitride.

    PubMed

    Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Zhang, Kehao; Stan, Gheorghe; Kalanyan, Berc; Bhimanapati, Ganesh R; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Burke, Robert A; Shah, Pankaj B; O'Regan, Terrance P; Crowne, Frank J; Birdwell, A Glen; Robinson, Joshua A; Davydov, Albert V; Ivanov, Tony G

    2016-03-22

    When designing semiconductor heterostructures, it is expected that epitaxial alignment will facilitate low-defect interfaces and efficient vertical transport. Here, we report lattice-matched epitaxial growth of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) directly on gallium nitride (GaN), resulting in high-quality, unstrained, single-layer MoS2 with strict registry to the GaN lattice. These results present a promising path toward the implementation of high-performance electronic devices based on 2D/3D vertical heterostructures, where each of the 3D and 2D semiconductors is both a template for subsequent epitaxial growth and an active component of the device. The MoS2 monolayer triangles average 1 μm along each side, with monolayer blankets (merged triangles) exhibiting properties similar to that of single-crystal MoS2 sheets. Photoluminescence, Raman, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses identified monolayer MoS2 with a prominent 20-fold enhancement of photoluminescence in the center regions of larger triangles. The MoS2/GaN structures are shown to electrically conduct in the out-of-plane direction, confirming the potential of directly synthesized 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructures for vertical current flow. Finally, we estimate a MoS2/GaN contact resistivity to be less than 4 Ω·cm(2) and current spreading in the MoS2 monolayer of approximately 1 μm in diameter.

  11. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  12. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  13. Incorporating two different chromophores onto a silicon atom: the crystal structure and photophysical properties of 9-{4-[(9,9-dimethyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)dimethylsilyl]phenyl}-9H-carbazole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah-Rang; Han, Won-Sik

    2015-03-01

    The crystal structure of the title bifunctional silicon-bridged compound, C(35)H(31)NSi, (I), has been determined. The compound crystallizes in the centrosymmetric space group P2(1)/c. In the crystal structure, the pairs of aryl rings in the two different chromophores, i.e. 9-phenyl-9H-carbazole and 9,9-dimethyl-9H-fluorene, are positioned orthogonally. In the crystal packing, no classical hydrogen bonding is observed. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectra show that the central Si atom successfully breaks the electronic conjugation between the two different chromophores, and this was further analysed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  14. Effect of homolog doping on surface morphology and mass-loss rates from PETN crystals. Studies using atomic force microscope and thermo-gravimetric analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharya, S. K.; Maiti, A; Gee, R. H.; ...

    2012-08-28

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is an important energetic material and its performance as a secondary explosive depends strongly on the density as well as flow porosity of powdered material, which in turn is governed by the size and surface properties of the PETN crystallite particles. Historically there has been evidence that the surface properties of PETN particles can be strongly influenced by the presence of homolog impurities of PETN, in particular, dipentaerythritol hexanitrate (diPEHN) and tripentaerythritol octanitrate (triPEON), although not many systematic studies characterizing such influence exist. In this work we employ thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to measure mass-loss rates at elevatedmore » temperatures and show that doping with a small amount of diPEHN and triPEON can reduce the mass-loss rate from PETN single-crystal surfaces by as much as 35 % as compared to undoped crystals. Arrhenius plots of mass-loss rates as a function of temperature suggest that the reduction in evaporation is not due to the change in activation barrier of the molecular evaporation process, but perhaps due to the impedance to the receding motion of the steps by the immobile impurities on the surface. Removal of surface impurities through gentle washing with ethanol leads to enhanced mass-loss rate relative to pure PETN suggesting a roughened surface morphology. Some surface roughening in doped crystals is supported by Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of growth layers that show evidences of growth layer stacking and rough edges. Furthermore, we find that a larger amount of impurity added to the original solution does not necessarily lead to a more highly doped crystal, which could perhaps be interpreted as PETN crystals being able to accommodate only up to a certain weight percent of homolog impurities.« less

  15. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  16. Reactive-Atom Scattering from Liquid Crystals at the Liquid-Vacuum Interface: [C12mim][BF4] and 4-Cyano-4'-Octylbiphenyl (8CB).

    PubMed

    Purcell, Simon M; Tesa-Serrate, Maria A; Marshall, Brooks C; Bruce, Duncan W; D'Andrea, Lucía; Costen, Matthew L; Slattery, John M; Smoll, Eric J; Minton, Timothy K; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2016-10-04

    Two complementary approaches were used to study the liquid-vacuum interface of the liquid-crystalline ionic liquid 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C12mim][BF4]) in the smectic A (SmA) and isotropic phases. O atoms with two distinct incident translational energies were scattered from the surface of [C12mim][BF4]. Angle-dependent time-of-flight distributions and OH yields, respectively, were recorded from high- and low-energy O atoms. There were no significant changes in the measurements using either approach, nor the properties derived from them, accompanying the transition from the SmA to the isotropic phase. This indicates that the surface structure of [C12mim][BF4] remains essentially unchanged across the phase boundary, implying that the bulk order and surface structure are not strongly correlated for this material. This effect is ascribed to the strong propensity for the outer surfaces of ionic liquids to be dominated by alkyl chains, over an underlying layer rich in anions and cation head groups, whether or not the bulk material is a liquid crystal. In a comparative study, the OH yield from the surface of the liquid crystal, 8CB, was found to be affected by the bulk order, showing a surprising step increase at the SmA-nematic transition temperature, whose origin is the subject of speculation.

  17. In-situ atomic layer deposition of tri-methylaluminum and water on pristine single-crystal (In)GaAs surfaces: electronic and electric structures.

    PubMed

    Pi, T W; Lin, Y H; Fanchiang, Y T; Chiang, T H; Wei, C H; Lin, Y C; Wertheim, G K; Kwo, J; Hong, M

    2015-04-24

    The electronic structure of single-crystal (In)GaAs deposited with tri-methylaluminum (TMA) and water via atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented with high-resolution synchrotron radiation core-level photoemission and capacitance-voltage (CV) characteristics. The interaction of the precursor atoms with (In)GaAs is confined at the topmost surface layer. The Ga-vacant site on the GaAs(111)A-2 × 2 surface is filled with Al, thereby effectively passivating the As dangling bonds. The As-As dimers on the GaAs(001)-2 × 4 surface are entirely passivated by one cycle of TMA and water. The presumed layerwise deposition fails to happen in GaAs(001)-4 × 6. In In0.20Ga0.80As(001)-2 × 4, the edge row As atoms are partially bonded with the Al, and one released methyl then bonds with the In. It is suggested that the unpassivated surface and subsurface atoms cause large frequency dispersions in CV characteristics under the gate bias. We also found that the (In)GaAs surface is immune to water in ALD. However, the momentary exposure of it to air (less than one minute) introduces significant signals of native oxides. This indicates the necessity of in situ works of high κ/(In)GaAs-related experiments in order to know the precise interfacial atomic bonding and thus know the electronic characteristics. The electric CV measurements of the ALD-Al2O3 on these (In)GaAs surfaces are correlated with their electronic properties.

  18. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Do, Dat T; Mahanti, Subhendra D; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-11-24

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed.

  19. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Do, Dat T.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed. PMID:26596907

  20. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Dat T.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-11-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed.

  1. Unique Domain Structure of Two-Dimensional α-Mo2C Superconducting Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibo; Xu, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Wang, Libin; Jiang, Yixiao; Du, Jiao; Liu, Ying; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2016-07-13

    The properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are strongly influenced by domain boundaries. Ultrathin transition metal carbides are a class of newly emerging 2D materials that are superconducting and have many potential applications such as in electrochemical energy storage, catalysis, and thermoelectric energy conversion. However, little is known about their domain structure and the influence of domain boundaries on their properties. Here we use atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with large-scale diffraction-filtered imaging to study the microstructure of chemical vapor deposited high-quality 2D α-Mo2C superconducting crystals of different regular shapes including triangles, rectangles, hexagons, octagons, nonagons, and dodecagons. The Mo atom sublattice in all these crystals has a uniform hexagonal closely packed arrangement without any boundaries. However, except for rectangular and octagonal crystals, the C atom sublattices are composed of three or six domains with rotational-symmetry and well-defined line-shaped domain boundaries because of the presence of three equivalent off-center directions of interstitial carbon atoms in Mo octahedra. We found that there is very small lattice shear strain across the domain boundary. In contrast to the single sharp transition observed in single-domain crystals, transport studies across domain boundaries show a broad resistive superconducting transition with two distinct transition processes due to the formation of localized phase slip events within the boundaries, indicating a significant influence of the boundary on 2D superconductivity. These findings provide new understandings on not only the microstructure of 2D transition metal carbides but also the intrinsic influence of domain boundaries on 2D superconductivity.

  2. Resolving 2D Amorphous Materials with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Buechner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) materials have garnered significant scientific interest due to their potential technological applications. Alongside the emphasis on crystalline materials, such as graphene and hexagonal BN, a new class of 2D amorphous materials must be pursued. For amorphous materials, a detailed understanding of the complex structure is necessary. Here we present a structural study of 2D bilayer silica on Ru(0001), an insulating material which is weakly coupled to the substrate. Atomic structure has been determined with a dual mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) sensor in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperatures, revealing a network of different ring sizes. Liquid AFM measurements with sub-nanometer resolution bridge the gap between clean UHV conditions and the environments that many material applications demand. Samples are grown and characterized in vacuum and subsequently transferred to the liquid AFM. Notably, the key structural features observed, namely nanoscale ring networks and larger holes to the substrate, show strong quantitative agreement between the liquid and UHV microscopy measurements. This provides direct evidence for the structural stability of these silica films for nanoelectronics and other applications. KMB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  3. Method for preparing ultraflat, atomically perfect areas on large regions of a crystal surface by heteroepitaxy deposition

    DOEpatents

    El Gabaly, Farid; Schmid, Andreas K.

    2013-03-19

    A novel method of forming large atomically flat areas is described in which a crystalline substrate having a stepped surface is exposed to a vapor of another material to deposit a material onto the substrate, which material under appropriate conditions self arranges to form 3D islands across the substrate surface. These islands are atomically flat at their top surface, and conform to the stepped surface of the substrate below at the island-substrate interface. Thereafter, the deposited materials are etched away, in the etch process the atomically flat surface areas of the islands transferred to the underlying substrate. Thereafter the substrate may be cleaned and annealed to remove any remaining unwanted contaminants, and eliminate any residual defects that may have remained in the substrate surface as a result of pre-existing imperfections of the substrate.

  4. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on complex fluids and fluids in restricted geometries has attracted much attention in the scientific community. This can be attributed not only to the development of novel materials based on complex fluids but also to a variety of important physical phenomena which have barely been explored. One example is the behavior of membranes and thin fluid films, which can be described by two-dimensional (2D) rheology behavior that is quite different from 3D fluids. In this study, we have investigated the rheological properties of freely suspended films of a thermotropic liquid crystal in microgravity experiments. This model system mimics isotropic and anisotropic quasi 2D fluids [46]. We use inkjet printing technology to dispense small droplets (inclusions) onto the film surface. The motion of these inclusions provides information on the rheological properties of the films and allows the study of a variety of flow instabilities. Flat films have been investigated on a sub-orbital rocket flight and curved films (bubbles) have been studied in the ISS project OASIS. Microgravity is essential when the films are curved in order to avoid sedimentation. The experiments yield the mobility of the droplets in the films as well as the mutual mobility of pairs of particles. Experimental results will be presented for 2D-isotropic (smectic-A) and 2D-nematic (smectic-C) phases.

  5. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  6. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  7. Morphological stability of the atomically clean surface of silicon (100) crystals after microwave plasma-chemical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yafarov, R. K. Shanygin, V. Ya.

    2016-01-15

    The morphological stability of atomically clean silicon (100) surface after low-energy microwave plasma-chemical etching in various plasma-forming media is studied. It is found that relaxation changes in the surface density and atomic bump heights after plasma processing in inert and chemically active media are multidirectional in character. After processing in a freon-14 medium, the free energy is minimized due to a decrease in the surface density of microbumps and an increase in their height. After argon-plasma processing, an insignificant increase in the bump density with a simultaneous decrease in bump heights is observed. The physicochemical processes causing these changes are considered.

  8. Synthesis, crystal structure and electronic structure of the binary phase Rh2Cd5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koley, Biplab; Chatterjee, S.; Jana, Partha P.

    2017-02-01

    A new phase in the Rh-Cd binary system - Rh2Cd5 has been identified and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The stoichiometric compound Rh2Cd5 crystallizes with a unit cell containing 14 atoms, in the orthorhombic space group Pbam (55). The crystal structure of Rh2Cd5 can be described as a defect form of the In3Pd5 structure with ordered vacancies, formed of two 2D atomic layers with the stacking sequence: ABAB. The A type layers consist of (3.6.3.6)-Kagomé nets of Cd atoms while the B type layers consist of (35) (37)- nets of both Cd and Rh atoms. The stability of this line phase is investigated by first principle electronic structure calculations on the model of ordered Rh2Cd5.

  9. Hard and Soft Physics with 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEuen, Paul

    With their remarkable structural, thermal, mechanical, optical, chemical, and electronic properties, 2D materials are truly special. For example, a graphene sheet can be made into a high-performance transistor, but it is also the ultimate realization of a thin mechanical sheet. Such sheets, first studied in detail by August Föppl over a hundred years ago, are notoriously complex, since they can bend, buckle, and crumple in a variety of ways. In this talk, I will discuss a number of experiments to probe these unusual materials, from the effects of ripples on the mechanical properties of a graphene sheet, to folding with atomically thin bimorphs, to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene solitons. Finally, I discuss how the Japanese paper art of kirigami (kiru = `to cut', kami = `paper') applied to 2D materials offers a route to mechanical metamaterials and the construction of nanoscale machines.

  10. Dynamic photorefractive self-amplified angular-multiplex 2-D optical beam-array generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaomin; Yeh, Pochi; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1993-01-01

    A real-time 2-D angular-multiplex beam-array holographic storage and reconstruction technique using electrically-addressed spatial light modulators(E-SLM's) and photorefractive crystals is described. Using a liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulator (SLM) for beam steering and lithium niobate photorefractive crystal for holographic recording, experimental results of generating large and complicated arrays of laser beams with high diffraction efficiency and good uniformity are presented.

  11. Booming Development of Group IV-VI Semiconductors: Fresh Blood of 2D Family.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Gan, Lin; Li, Huiqiao; Xiong, Jie; Zhai, Tianyou

    2016-12-01

    As an important component of 2D layered materials (2DLMs), the 2D group IV metal chalcogenides (GIVMCs) have drawn much attention recently due to their earth-abundant, low-cost, and environmentally friendly characteristics, thus catering well to the sustainable electronics and optoelectronics applications. In this instructive review, the booming research advancements of 2D GIVMCs in the last few years have been presented. First, the unique crystal and electronic structures are introduced, suggesting novel physical properties. Then the various methods adopted for synthesis of 2D GIVMCs are summarized such as mechanical exfoliation, solvothermal method, and vapor deposition. Furthermore, the review focuses on the applications in field effect transistors and photodetectors based on 2D GIVMCs, and extends to flexible devices. Additionally, the 2D GIVMCs based ternary alloys and heterostructures have also been presented, as well as the applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Finally, the conclusion and outlook have also been presented in the end of the review.

  12. Structures and Luminescent Properties of Two 2D Coordination Polymers Containing Tb(III) or Dy(III) Ions.

    PubMed

    An, Xiaoping; Wang, Hongsheng; Li, Gongchun

    2014-03-01

    Two 2D rare earth terbium and dysprosium coordination polymers with 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylate and oxalate anions have been synthesized by hydrothermal method, the formula is {[RE(pda)(ox)0.5(H2O)4]·2H2O}n (RE = Tb (1) and Dy (2); H2pda = 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid; ox = oxalate anion). The two complexes are isomorphic and crystallized in monoclinic system, P21/c space group. Each pda anion connects two rare earth ions with 2- carboxyl group and the nitrogen atom but the 4- carboxyl group does not coordinate with rare earth ions. Each ox anion connects two rare earth ions by μ 2-bridge way. Both the complexes exhibit intense characteristic luminescence of Tb(III) or Dy(III) ion with excitation of UV-rays.

  13. Efficient screening of 2D molecular polymorphs at the solution-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shern-Long; Adisoejoso, Jinne; Fang, Yuan; Tahara, Kazukuni; Tobe, Yoshito; Mali, Kunal S.; de Feyter, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Formation of multiple polymorphs during two-dimensional (2D) crystallization of organic molecules is more of a routine occurrence than rarity. Although such diverse crystalline structures provide exciting possibilities for studying crystal engineering in 2D, predicting the occurrence of polymorphs for a given building block is often non-trivial. Moreover, there is scarcity of methods that can experimentally verify the presence of such crystalline polymorphs in a straightforward fashion. Here we demonstrate a relatively simple experimental approach for screening of 2D polymorphs formed at the solution-solid interface. The strategy involves use of solution flow produced by contacting a piece of tissue paper to the sample to generate a lateral density gradient along the substrate surface. In situ generation of such gradient allows rapid discovery and nanoscale separation of multiple 2D polymorphs in a single experiment. The concept is demonstrated using three structurally different building blocks that differ in terms of intermolecular interactions responsible for 2D crystal formation. The method described here represents a powerful tool for efficient screening of 2D polymorphs formed at the solution-solid interface.Formation of multiple polymorphs during two-dimensional (2D) crystallization of organic molecules is more of a routine occurrence than rarity. Although such diverse crystalline structures provide exciting possibilities for studying crystal engineering in 2D, predicting the occurrence of polymorphs for a given building block is often non-trivial. Moreover, there is scarcity of methods that can experimentally verify the presence of such crystalline polymorphs in a straightforward fashion. Here we demonstrate a relatively simple experimental approach for screening of 2D polymorphs formed at the solution-solid interface. The strategy involves use of solution flow produced by contacting a piece of tissue paper to the sample to generate a lateral density

  14. Mercury (I) nitroprusside: A 2D structure supported on homometallic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Reguera, L.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Reguera, E.

    2015-01-15

    The pentacyanonitrosylferrate complex anion, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2−}, forms an insoluble solid with Hg(I) ion, of formula unit Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, whose crystal structure and related properties are unknown. This contribution reports the preparation of that compound by the precipitation method and its structural study from X-ray powder patterns complemented with spectroscopic information from IR, Raman, and UV–vis techniques. The crystal structure was solved ab initio and then refined using the Rietveld method. The solid crystallizes with a triclinic unit cell, in the P−1 space group, with cell parameters a=10.1202(12), b=10.1000(13), c=7.4704(11) Å; α=110.664(10), β=110.114(10), γ=104.724(8) °. Within the unit cell, two formula units are accommodated (Z=2). It adopts a layered structure related with the coordination of the equatorial CN groups at their N end to the Hg atoms while the axial CN ligand remains unlinked. Within the layers neighboring Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] building units remain linked through four relatively strong Hg–Hg interactions, with an interatomic distance of 2.549(3) Å. The charge donation from the equatorial CN groups through their 5σ orbitals results into an increase for the electron density on the Hg atoms, which strengths the Hg–Hg bond. In the Raman spectrum, that metal–metal bond is detected as a stretching vibration band at 167 cm{sup −1}. The available free volume between neighboring layers accommodates two water molecules, which are stabilized within the framework through hydrogen bonds with the N end of the unlinked axial CN group. The removal of these weakly bonded water molecules results in structural disorder for the material 3D framework. - Graphical abstract: Assembling of Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] units through Hg–Hg interactions. - Highlights: • Homometallic Hg–Hg interactions in metal nitroprusside. • 2D structure supported on metal–metal interactions. • Crystal

  15. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  16. Electronic structure and optical properties of the single crystal and two-dimensional structure of CdWO4 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babamoradi, Mohsen; Liyai, Mohammad Reza; Azimirad, Rouhollah; Salehi, Hamdollah

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the electronic structure and optical properties of the single crystal and two-dimensional (2D) structure of cadmium tungstate (CdWO4). This investigation includes calculation of the density of states (DOS), dielectric tensor elements and reflectivity. All the calculations have been done by full potential augmented plane waves plus local orbitals (FP-APW+lo) with Wien2k code. The calculated band gaps for the single crystal and 2D structure along [010] direction are 4.2 and 5.02 eV, respectively. The results show that in the 2D structure of CdWO4, the electron density of the surface oxygen atoms is much more than the electron density of the inside oxygen atoms. This difference in the density has the main role in the optical properties. The results of the dielectric tensor elements and reflectivity for the single crystal are in good agreement with the experimental values. The results of the dielectric tensor elements and reflectivity for the 2D structure in comparison with the single crystal have shown that the intensity and place of the calculated peaks reduced and shifted, respectively. These results can be related to the surface oxygen atoms and thickness of the 2D structure.

  17. Calculation of 2D electronic band structure using matrix mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelich, R. L.; Marsiglio, F.

    2016-12-01

    We extend previous work, applying elementary matrix mechanics to one-dimensional periodic arrays (to generate energy bands), to two-dimensional arrays. We generate band structures for the square-lattice "2D Kronig-Penney model" (square wells), the "muffin-tin" potential (circular wells), and Gaussian wells. We then apply the method to periodic arrays of more than one atomic site in a unit cell, specifically to the case of materials with hexagonal lattices like graphene. These straightforward extensions of undergraduate-level calculations allow students to readily determine band structures of current research interest.

  18. Effects of Surface Ligand Density on Lipid-Monolayer-mediated 2D Assembly of Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuto, M.; Wang, S; Lohr, M; Kewalramani, S; Yang, L

    2010-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) assembly of the protein streptavidin on a biotin-bearing lipid monolayer was studied as a function of the surface density of biotin, a protein-binding ligand, by means of in situ X-ray scattering and optical Brewster angle microscopy measurements at the liquid-vapor interface. Although this model system has been studied extensively, the relationship between the surface biotin density and the adsorption, 2D phase behavior, and binding state of streptavidin has yet to be determined quantitatively. The observed equilibrium phase behavior provides direct structural evidence that the 2D crystallization of the lipid-bound streptavidin occurs as a density-driven first-order phase transition. The minimum biotin density required for the 2D crystallization of streptavidin is found to be remarkably close to the density of the ligand-binding sites in the protein crystal. Moreover, both above and below this transition, the observed biotin-density dependence of protein adsorption is well described by the binding of biotin-bearing lipids at both of the two available sites per streptavidin molecule. These results imply that even in the low-density noncrystalline phase, the bound proteins share a common, fixed orientation relative to the surface normal, and that the 2D crystallization occurs when the lateral protein density reaches 50-70% of the 2D crystal density. This study demonstrates that in addition to a well-defined molecular orientation, high lateral packing density is essential to the 2D crystallization of proteins.

  19. Synthesis of uniformly dispersed anatase nanoparticles inside mesoporous silica thin films via controlled breakup and crystallization of amorphous TiO2 deposited using atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Dendooven, Jolien; Masschaele, Kasper; Hamed, Heidari M; Deng, Shaoren; Bals, Sara; Detavernier, Christophe; Martens, Johan A

    2013-06-07

    Amorphous titanium dioxide was introduced into the pores of mesoporous silica thin films with 75% porosity and 12 nm average pore diameter via Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) using alternating pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium and water. Calcination provoked fragmentation of the deposited amorphous TiO2 phase and its crystallization into anatase nanoparticles inside the nanoporous film. The narrow particle size distribution of 4 ± 2 nm and the uniform dispersion of the particles over the mesoporous silica support were uniquely revealed using electron tomography. These anatase nanoparticle bearing films showed photocatalytic activity in methylene blue degradation. This new synthesis procedure of the anatase nanophase in mesoporous silica films using ALD is a convenient fabrication method of photocatalytic coatings amenable to application on very small as well as very large surfaces.

  20. Synthesis of uniformly dispersed anatase nanoparticles inside mesoporous silica thin films via controlled breakup and crystallization of amorphous TiO2 deposited using atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Dendooven, Jolien; Masschaele, Kasper; Hamed, Heidari M.; Deng, Shaoren; Bals, Sara; Detavernier, Christophe; Martens, Johan A.

    2013-05-01

    Amorphous titanium dioxide was introduced into the pores of mesoporous silica thin films with 75% porosity and 12 nm average pore diameter via Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) using alternating pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium and water. Calcination provoked fragmentation of the deposited amorphous TiO2 phase and its crystallization into anatase nanoparticles inside the nanoporous film. The narrow particle size distribution of 4 +/- 2 nm and the uniform dispersion of the particles over the mesoporous silica support were uniquely revealed using electron tomography. These anatase nanoparticle bearing films showed photocatalytic activity in methylene blue degradation. This new synthesis procedure of the anatase nanophase in mesoporous silica films using ALD is a convenient fabrication method of photocatalytic coatings amenable to application on very small as well as very large surfaces.

  1. Lattice-constant and electron-affinity effects on negative-ion conversion in atom-ionic-crystal-surface grazing scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wang; Zhou, Hu; Zhang, Meixiao; Zhou, Lihua; Li, Yuan; Li, Bowen; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-11-01

    The effects of the lattice constant and electron affinity on the negative-ion conversion of a neutral atom undergoing grazing scattering on an ionic-crystal surface over the complete velocity range were investigated. Here, a comparison of negative-ion conversion of neutral O0-KCl (100 ) , F0-KCl (100 ) , and O0-KI (100 ) surface systems shows that the pronounced difference in the efficiency of negative-ion formation between F0-KCl (100 ) and O0-KCl (100 ) is caused by the large difference in their projectile electron affinities, whereas the difference between O0-KI (100 ) and O0-KCl (100 ) is caused by the difference in their lattice constants.

  2. Interface Properties of Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2O3 Thin Films on Ultraviolet/Ozone-Treated Multilayer MoS2 Crystals.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonyoung; Kim, Seong Yeoul; Choi, Yura; Kim, Myungjun; Shin, Hyunjung; Kim, Jiyoung; Choi, Woong

    2016-05-11

    We report the interface properties of atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 thin films on ultraviolet/ozone (UV/O3)-treated multilayer MoS2 crystals. The formation of S-O bonds on MoS2 after low-power UV/O3 treatment increased the surface energy, allowing the subsequent deposition of uniform Al2O3 thin films. The capacitance-voltage measurement of Au-Al2O3-MoS2 metal oxide semiconductor capacitors indicated n-type MoS2 with an electron density of ∼10(17) cm(-3) and a minimum interface trap density of ∼10(11) cm(-2) eV(-1). These results demonstrate the possibility of forming a high-quality Al2O3-MoS2 interface by proper UV/O3 treatment, providing important implications for their integration into field-effect transistors.

  3. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  4. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  5. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  6. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  7. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  8. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  9. Automated Atom-By-Atom Three-Dimensional (3D) Reconstruction of Field Ion Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Michal; Gault, Baptiste; Smith, George D W; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-03-20

    An automated procedure has been developed for the reconstruction of field ion microscopy (FIM) data that maintains its atomistic nature. FIM characterizes individual atoms on the specimen's surface, evolving subject to field evaporation, in a series of two-dimensional (2D) images. Its unique spatial resolution enables direct imaging of crystal defects as small as single vacancies. To fully exploit FIM's potential, automated analysis tools are required. The reconstruction algorithm developed here relies on minimal assumptions and is sensitive to atomic coordinates of all imaged atoms. It tracks the atoms across a sequence of images, allocating each to its respective crystallographic plane. The result is a highly accurate 3D lattice-resolved reconstruction. The procedure is applied to over 2000 tungsten atoms, including ion-implanted planes. The approach is further adapted to analyze carbides in a steel matrix, demonstrating its applicability to a range of materials. A vast amount of information is collected during the experiment that can underpin advanced analyses such as automated detection of "out of sequence" events, subangstrom surface displacements and defects effects on neighboring atoms. These analyses have the potential to reveal new insights into the field evaporation process and contribute to improving accuracy and scope of 3D FIM and atom probe characterization.

  10. Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB2

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, Tobias; Fleurence, Antoine; Warner, Ben; ...

    2017-01-19

    We observe a new two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystal, using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and it's formed by depositing additional Si atoms onto spontaneously-formed epitaxial silicene on a ZrB2 thin film. From scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) studies, we find that this atomically-thin layered silicon has distinctly different electronic properties. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) reveals that, in sharp contrast to epitaxial silicene, the layered silicon exhibits significantly enhanced density of states at the Fermi level resulting from newly formed metallic bands. Furthermore, the 2D growth of this material could allow for direct contacting to themore » silicene surface and demonstrates the dramatic changes in electronic structure that can occur by the addition of even a single monolayer amount of material in 2D systems.« less

  11. Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB 2

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, Tobias G.; Fleurence, Antoine; Warner, Ben; ...

    2017-02-17

    We observe a new two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystal, using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and it's formed by depositing additional Si atoms onto spontaneously-formed epitaxial silicene on a ZrB2 thin film. From scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) studies, we find that this atomically-thin layered silicon has distinctly different electronic properties. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) reveals that, in sharp contrast to epitaxial silicene, the layered silicon exhibits significantly enhanced density of states at the Fermi level resulting from newly formed metallic bands. Furthermore, the 2D growth of this material could allow for direct contacting to themore » silicene surface and demonstrates the dramatic changes in electronic structure that can occur by the addition of even a single monolayer amount of material in 2D systems.« less

  12. Creation and Analysis of Atomic Structures for CdTe Bi-crystal Interfaces by the Grain Boundary Genie

    SciTech Connect

    Buurma, Christopher; Sen, Fatih G.; Paulauskas, Tadas; Sun, Ce; Kim, Moon; Sivananthan, Sivalingam; Klie, Robert F; Chan, Maria K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) in poly-CdTe solar cells play an important role in species diffusion, segregation, defect formation, and carrier recombination. While the creation of specific high-symmetry interfaces can be straight forward, the creation of general GB structures in many material systems is difficult if periodic boundary conditions are to be enforced. Here we describe a novel algorithm and implementation to generate initial general GB structures for CdTe in an automated way, and we investigate some of these structures using density functional theory (DFT). Example structures include those with bi-crystals already fabricated for comparison, and those planning to be investigated in the future.

  13. An observation of nanotwin lamellae in Cd 0.6Mn 0.4Te crystal by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. A.; Azoulay, M.; Collins, W. E.; Burger, A.; Silberman, E.

    1993-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to examine the structure of freshly cleaved Cd 0.6Mn 0.4Te surfaces. The present report complements previous results obtained with X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy which showed the existence of microtwins. The AFM analysis was performed under ambient conditions and yielded nanometer scale resolution images of single twin lamellae that ranged between 20 and 100 nm in width. This is a first observation using AFM of such a substructure, which we interpret as evidence for the presence of nonotwins.

  14. Potential and piezoelectric response imaging of 180^o domain of atomically ordered clean surfaces of BaTiO3 single crystals in UHV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yukio; Kaku, S.; Matsumoto, D.; Cheong, S. W.

    2009-03-01

    We report the electrostatic and piezoelectric properties of the clean, free surface of BaTiO3 single crystal in ultra high vacuum (UHV) The topographic imaging by AFM confirmed that the surface is atomically wellordered exhibiting clear one-lattice-height atomic steps. The amplitude and the phase image of piezoelectric response microscopy (PFM) identified 180^o domains. The electrostatic potential mapping by Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) of these domains revealed that the shapes of the domains agreed exactly with the PFM images, which confirms the correctness of the standard 180^o domain theory and disagrees with closure domains. However, the potential difference of upward and downward domain is approx. 0.1V, which is 100 times smaller than the value estimated by the standard theory. Similar measurements with changing temperature across Curie temperature show that this result cannot be explained by the compensation of the spontaneous polarization by contamination or oxygen deficiency or ionic conduction). The present results suggest that an intrinsic electrostatic shielding mechanism exists for 180^o domains, which is consistent with the reports of surface electron/hole layers [1]. [4pt] [1] Watanabe et al. PRL86332(2001);Ferroelectr.367, 23(2008) We acknowledge JSPS No.19340084.

  15. Heterogeneity and Disorder in Ti{1-x}Fe{y}O{2-d) Nanocrystal Rutile-based Flower Like Aggregates: Detection of Anatase

    SciTech Connect

    Bozin, E.S.; Kremenovic, A.; Antic, B.; Blanusa, J.; Comor, M.; Columban, P.; Mazerolles, L.

    2011-03-24

    Here we report results of systematic investigation of heterogeneity and disorder in Ti{sub 1-x}Fe{sub y}O{sub 2-d} nanorod rutile-based flowerlike aggregates. It was found that Ti{sub 1-x}Fe{sub y}O{sub 2-d} aggregates are composed of two crystalline phases: rutile as a dominant and anatase as a minor phase. Flowerlike aggregates were found to grow from an isometric core ca. 5-10 nm in diameter that was built from anatase and rutile nanorods ca. 5 x 100 nm that were grown on the anatase surface having base plane (001) intergrowth with an anatase plane. The direction of rutile nanorods growth, i.e., direction of the nanorod elongation, was [001]. Highly nonisometric rutile crystals produce anisotropic X-ray powder diffraction line broadening and doubling of vibrational bands in Raman spectra. Both these techniques confirmed nonisometric character of rutile crystals and gave a quantitative measure of crystal shape anisotropy in excellent agreement with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. In addition, from the atomic pair distribution function and Raman spectral analyses the level of vacancy concentration was determined in rutile and anatase phases of investigated samples.

  16. He atom-surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth. Progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Investigations in this laboratory have focused on the surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators and on epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals. In the later the homoepitaxial growth of NaCl/NaCl(001) and the heteroepitaxial growth of KBr/NaCl(001), NaCl/KBr(001) and KBr/RbCl(001) have been studied by monitoring the specular He scattering as a function of the coverage and by measuring the angular and energy distributions of the scattered He atoms. These data provide information on the surface structure, defect densities, island sizes and surface strain during the layer-by-layer growth. The temperature dependence of these measurements also provides information on the mobilities of the admolecules. He atom scattering is unique among surface probes because the low-energy, inert atoms are sensitive only to the electronic structure of the topmost surface layer and are equally applicable to all crystalline materials. It is proposed for the next year to exploit further the variety of combinations possible with the alkali halides in order to carry out a definitive study of epitaxial growth in the ionic insulators. The work completed so far, including measurements of the Bragg diffraction and surface dispersion at various stages of growth, appears to be exceptionally rich in detail, which is particularly promising for theoretical modeling. In addition, because epitaxial growth conditions over a wide range of lattice mismatches is possible with these materials, size effects in growth processes can be explored in great depth. Further, as some of the alkali halides have the CsCl structure instead of the NaCl structure, we can investigate the effects of the heteroepitaxy with materials having different lattice preferences. Finally, by using co-deposition of different alkali halides, one can investigate the formation and stability of alloys and even alkali halide superlattices.

  17. Stacked charge stripes in the quasi-2D trilayer nickelate La4Ni3O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junjie; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Phelan, D.; Zheng, Hong; Norman, M. R.; Mitchell, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The quasi-2D nickelate La4Ni3O8 (La-438), consisting of trilayer networks of square planar Ni ions, is a member of the so-called T' family, which is derived from the Ruddlesden-Popper (R-P) parent compound La4Ni3O10-x by removing two oxygen atoms and rearranging the rock salt layers to fluorite-type layers. Although previous studies on polycrystalline samples have identified a 105-K phase transition with a pronounced electronic and magnetic response but weak lattice character, no consensus on the origin of this transition has been reached. Here, we show using synchrotron X-ray diffraction on high-pO2 floating zone-grown single crystals that this transition is associated with a real space ordering of charge into a quasi-2D charge stripe ground state. The charge stripe superlattice propagation vector, q = (2/3, 0, 1), corresponds with that found in the related 1/3-hole doped single-layer R-P nickelate, La5/3Sr1/3NiO4 (LSNO-1/3; Ni2.33+), with orientation at 45° to the Ni-O bonds. The charge stripes in La-438 are weakly correlated along c to form a staggered ABAB stacking that reduces the Coulomb repulsion among the stripes. Surprisingly, however, we find that the charge stripes within each trilayer of La-438 are stacked in phase from one layer to the next, at odds with any simple Coulomb repulsion argument.

  18. Stacked charge stripes in the quasi-2D trilayer nickelate La4Ni3O8

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Phelan, D.; Zheng, Hong; Norman, M. R.; Mitchell, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    The quasi-2D nickelate La4Ni3O8 (La-438), consisting of trilayer networks of square planar Ni ions, is a member of the so-called T′ family, which is derived from the Ruddlesden–Popper (R-P) parent compound La4Ni3O10−x by removing two oxygen atoms and rearranging the rock salt layers to fluorite-type layers. Although previous studies on polycrystalline samples have identified a 105-K phase transition with a pronounced electronic and magnetic response but weak lattice character, no consensus on the origin of this transition has been reached. Here, we show using synchrotron X-ray diffraction on high-pO2 floating zone-grown single crystals that this transition is associated with a real space ordering of charge into a quasi-2D charge stripe ground state. The charge stripe superlattice propagation vector, q = (2/3, 0, 1), corresponds with that found in the related 1/3-hole doped single-layer R-P nickelate, La5/3Sr1/3NiO4 (LSNO-1/3; Ni2.33+), with orientation at 45° to the Ni-O bonds. The charge stripes in La-438 are weakly correlated along c to form a staggered ABAB stacking that reduces the Coulomb repulsion among the stripes. Surprisingly, however, we find that the charge stripes within each trilayer of La-438 are stacked in phase from one layer to the next, at odds with any simple Coulomb repulsion argument. PMID:27462109

  19. Broadband THz Spectroscopy of 2D Nanoscale Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Tripathi, Shivendra; Huang, Mengchen; Hsu, Jen-Feng; D'Urso, Brian; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) have attracted intense research interest in the past decade. Their unique electronic and optical properties offer the promise of novel optoelectronic applications in the terahertz regime. Recently, generation and detection of broadband terahertz (10 THz bandwidth) emission from 10-nm-scale LaAlO3/SrTiO3 nanostructures created by conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography has been demonstrated . This unprecedented control of THz emission at 10 nm length scales creates a pathway toward hybrid THz functionality in 2D-material/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. Here we report initial efforts in THz spectroscopy of 2D nanoscale materials with resolution comparable to the dimensions of the nanowire (10 nm). Systems under investigation include graphene, single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanoflakes. 1. Y. Ma, et al., Nano Lett. 13, 2884 (2013). We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: AFOSR (FA9550-12-1-0268 (JL, PRI), FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)), ONR (N00014-13-1-0806 (JL, CBE), N00014-15-1-2847 (JL)), NSF DMR-1124131 (JL, CBE) and DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  20. Thermodynamic stability and atomic and electronic structure of reduced Fe3O4 (111) single-crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, M.; Sing, M.; Claessen, R.; Schrupp, D.; Brabers, V. A. M.

    2007-08-01

    Magnetite (111) single-crystal surfaces prepared in situ under different reducing conditions and—as a result—with varying stoichiometries have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The coexistence of several surface structures has been detected, indicating only small differences in their relative stabilities. In particular, an unusual previously unreported superstructure has been found for a strongly reduced surface. Its microscopic origin is discussed against the background of recent results from scanning tunneling microscopy of the oxidized magnetite (111) surface and from ab initio thermodynamics. Partly at variance with and partly complementary to these results, we regard as driving force elastic strain due to the lateral mismatch between Fe3O4 substrate and Fe1-xO -like overlayer.

  1. Visualizing the enhanced chemical reactivity of mesoporous ceria; simulating templated crystallization in silica scaffolds at the atomic level.

    PubMed

    Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C

    2014-03-12

    Unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties can be engineered into functional nanomaterials via structural control. However, as the hierarchical structural complexity of a nanomaterial increases, so do the challenges associated with generating atomistic models, which are sufficiently realistic that they can be interrogated to reliably predict properties and processes. The structural complexity of a functional nanomaterial necessarily emanates during synthesis. Accordingly, to capture such complexity, we have simulated each step in the synthetic protocol. Specifically, atomistic models of mesoporous ceria were generated by simulating the infusion and confined crystallization of ceria in a mesoporous silica scaffold. After removing the scaffold, the chemical reactivity of the templated mesoporous ceria was calculated and predicted to be more reactive compared to mesoporous ceria generated without template; visual "reactivity fingerprints" are presented. The strategy affords a general method for generating atomistic models, with hierarchical structural complexity, which can be used to predict a variety of properties and processes enabling the nanoscale design of functional materials.

  2. Nanomanufacturing of 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Materials Using Self-Assembled DNA Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungwook; Chen, Haorong; Li, Feiran; Yang, Lingming; Kim, Steve S; Naik, Rajesh R; Ye, Peide D; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-11-04

    2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are nanomanufactured using a generalized strategy with self-assembled DNA nanotubes. DNA nanotubes of various lengths serve as lithographic etch masks for the dry etching of TMDCs. The nanostructured TMDCs are studied by atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. This parallel approach can be used to manufacture 2D TMDC nanostructures of arbitrary geometries with molecular-scale precision.

  3. Condensate fraction in a 2D Bose gas measured across the Mott-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Spielman, I B; Phillips, W D; Porto, J V

    2008-03-28

    We realize a single-band 2D Bose-Hubbard system with Rb atoms in an optical lattice and measure the condensate fraction as a function of lattice depth, crossing from the superfluid to the Mott-insulating phase. We quantitatively identify the location of the superfluid to normal transition by observing when the condensed fraction vanishes. Our measurement agrees with recent quantum Monte Carlo calculations for a finite-sized 2D system to within experimental uncertainty.

  4. 2D Heterostructure coatings of hBN-MoS2 layers for corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandana, Sajith; Kochat, Vidya; Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Yazdi, Sadegh; Shen, Jianfeng; Kosolwattana, Suppanat; Vinod, Soumya; Vajtai, Robert; Roy, Ajit K.; Sekhar Tiwary, Chandra; Ajayan, P. M.

    2017-02-01

    Heterostructures of atomically thin 2D materials could have improved physical, mechanical and chemical properties as compared to its individual components. Here we report, the effect of heterostructure coatings of hBN and MoS2 on the corrosion behavior as compared to coatings employing the individual 2D layer compositions. The poor corrosion resistance of MoS2 (widely used as wear resistant coating) can be improved by incorporating hBN sheets. Depending on the atomic stacking of the 2D sheets, we can further engineer the corrosion resistance properties of these coatings. A detailed spectroscopy and microscopy analysis has been used to characterize the different combinations of layered coatings. Detailed DFT based calculation reveals that the effect on the electrical properties due to atomic stacking is one of the major reasons for the improvement seen in corrosion resistance.

  5. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  6. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  7. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A molecular dynamics study of the effect of thermal boundary conductance on thermal transport of ideal crystal of n-alkanes with different number of carbon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zeng, Yi; Khodadadi, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    Phase change materials such as n-alkanes that exhibit desirable characteristics such as high latent heat, chemical stability, and negligible supercooling are widely used in thermal energy storage applications. However, n-alkanes have the drawback of low thermal conductivity values. The low thermal conductivity of n-alkanes is linked to formation of randomly oriented nano-domains of molecules in their solid structure that is responsible for excessive phonon scattering at the grain boundaries. Thus, understanding the thermal boundary conductance at the grain boundaries can be crucial for improving the effectiveness of thermal storage systems. The concept of the ideal crystal is proposed in this paper, which describes a simplified model such that all the nano-domains of long-chain n-alkanes are artificially aligned perfectly in one direction. In order to study thermal transport of the ideal crystal of long-chain n-alkanes, four (4) systems (C20H42, C24H50, C26H54, and C30H62) are investigated by the molecular dynamics simulations. Thermal boundary conductance between the layers of ideal crystals is determined using both non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. Both NEMD and EMD simulations exhibit no significant change in thermal conductance with the molecular length. However, the values obtained from the EMD simulations are less than the values from NEMD simulations with the ratio being nearly three (3) in most cases. This difference is due to the nature of EMD simulations where all the phonons are assumed to be in equilibrium at the interface. Thermal conductivity of the n-alkanes in three structures including liquid, solid, and ideal crystal is investigated utilizing NEMD simulations. Our results exhibit a very slight rise in thermal conductivity values as the number of carbon atoms of the chain increases. The key understanding is that thermal transport can be significantly altered by how the molecules and the

  9. Laboratory studies on N(2D) reactions of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, N.; Casavecchia, P.

    Molecular nitrogen is a very stable molecule, practically inert from a chemical point of view. For a nitrogen chemistry to occur in the planetary atmospheres which contain N2 , it is necessary to transform it into an active form, such as atoms or ions. As far as the production of atomic nitrogen in the upper atmospheres of planets (like Mars) or moons (like Titan) is concerned, several processes - as N2 dissociation induced by electron impact, EUV photolysis (λ <80 nm) and dissociative photoionization, or galactic cosmic ray absorption and N+ dissociative recombination all 2 lead to atomic nitrogen, notably in the ground, 4 S3/2 , and first electronically excited, 2 D3/2,5/2 , states with comparable yields. The radiative lifetimes of the metastable states 2 D3/2 and 2 D5/2 are quite long (12.3 and 48 hours, respectively), because the transition from a doublet to a quartet state is strongly forbidden. In addition, the physical quenching of N(2 D) is often a slow process and in some important cases the main fate of N(2 D) is chemical reaction with other constituents of the planetary atmospheres. The production of N atoms in the 2 D state is an important fact, because N(4 S) atoms exhibit very low reactivity with closed-shell molecules and the probability of collision with an open-shell radical is small. Unfortunately laboratory experiments on the gas-phase reactions of N(2 D) have been lacking until recently, because of serious experimental difficulties in studying these reactive systems. Accurate kinetic data on the reactions of N(2 D) with the some molecules of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres have finally become available in the late 90's, but a better knowledge of the reactive behavior requires a dynamical investigation of N(2 D) reactions. The capability of generating intense continuous beams of N(2 D) achieved in our laboratory some years ago has opened up the possibility of studying the reactive scattering of this species under single

  10. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  11. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  12. Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, S. K.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Kulkarni, R.; Goyal, Neeraj; Paudyal, D.

    2016-05-01

    Ti3CrCu4 is a new ternary compound which crystallizes in the tetragonal Ti3Pd5 structure type. The Cr atoms form square nets in the a-b plane (a = 3.124 Å) which are separated by an unusually large distance c = 11.228 Å along the tetragonal axis, thus forming a -2-D Cr-sublattice. The paramagnetic susceptibility is characterized by a low effective moment, μeff = 1.1 μB, a low paramagnetic Curie temperature θP (below 7 K) and a temperature independent χ0 = 6.7 x 10-4 emu/mol. The magnetization at 1.8 K increases rapidly with field nearly saturating to 0.2 μB/f.u. The zero field heat capacity C/T shows an upturn below 7 K (˜190 mJ/mol K2 at ˜0.1K) which is suppressed in applied magnetic fields and interpreted as suggesting the presence of spin fluctuations. The resistivity at low temperatures shows non-Fermi liquid behavior. Overall, the experimental data thus reveal an unusual magnetic state in Ti3CrCu4, which likely has its origin in the layered nature of the Cr sub-lattice and ferromagnetic spin fluctuations. Density functional theoretical calculations reveal a sharp Cr density of states peak just above the Fermi level, indicating the propensity of Ti3CrCu4 to become magnetic.

  13. The Ultrasonic Measurement of Crystallographic Orientation for Imaging Anisotropic Components with 2d Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Dunhill, A. K.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    Single crystal components are used widely in the gas-turbine industry. However, these components are elastically anisotropic which causes difficulties when performing NDE inspections with ultrasound. Recently an ultrasonic algorithm for a 2D array has been corrected to perform the reliable volumetric inspection of single crystals. For the algorithm to be implemented the crystallographic orientation of the components must be known. This paper, therefore, develops and reviews crystallographic orientation methods using 2D ultrasonic arrays. The methods under examination are based on the anisotropic propagation of surface and bulk waves and an image-based orientation method is also considered.

  14. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  15. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  16. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  17. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  18. Macroscopic Behavior of Nematics with D2d Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R.

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the symmetry properties and the macroscopic behavior of a nematic liquid crystal phase with D2d symmetry. Such a phase is a prime candidate for nematic phases made from banana-shaped molecules where the usual quadrupolar order coexists with octupolar (tetrahedratic) order. The resulting nematic phase is non-polar. While this phase could resemble the classic D∞h nematic in the polarizing microscope, it has many static as well as reversible and irreversible properties unknown to non-polar nematics without octupolar order. In particular, there is a linear gradient term in the free energy that selects parity leading to ambidextrously helical ground states when the molecules are achiral. In addition, there are static and irreversible coupling terms of a type only met otherwise in macroscopically chiral liquid crystals, e.g. the ambidextrous analogues of Lehmann-type effects known from cholesteric liquid crystals. Finally, we discuss certain nonlinear aspects of the dynamics related to the non-commutativity of three-dimensional finite rotations as well as other structural nonlinear hydrodynamic effects.

  19. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  20. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.