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Sample records for 2d axisymmetric finite

  1. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  2. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  3. 2-D/Axisymmetric Formulation of Multi-dimensional Upwind Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-dimensional upwind discretization of the two-dimensional/axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations is detailed for unstructured meshes. The algorithm is an extension of the fluctuation splitting scheme of Sidilkover. Boundary conditions are implemented weakly so that all nodes are updated using the base scheme, and eigen-value limiting is incorporated to suppress expansion shocks. Test cases for Mach numbers ranging from 0.1-17 are considered, with results compared against an unstructured upwind finite volume scheme. The fluctuation splitting inviscid distribution requires fewer operations than the finite volume routine, and is seen to produce less artificial dissipation, leading to generally improved solution accuracy.

  4. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  5. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  6. Finite temperature corrections in 2d integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Hasenbusch, M.

    2002-09-01

    We study the finite size corrections for the magnetization and the internal energy of the 2d Ising model in a magnetic field by using transfer matrix techniques. We compare these corrections with the functional form recently proposed by Delfino and LeClair-Mussardo for the finite temperature behaviour of one-point functions in integrable 2d quantum field theories. We find a perfect agreement between theoretical expectations and numerical results. Assuming the proposed functional form as an input in our analysis we obtain a relevant improvement in the precision of the continuum limit estimates of both quantities.

  7. Computer program BL2D for solving two-dimensional and axisymmetric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the formulation, validation, and user's manual for the computer program BL2D. The program is a fourth-order-accurate solution scheme for solving two-dimensional or axisymmetric boundary layers in speed regimes that range from low subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers. A basic implementation of the transition zone and turbulence modeling is also included. The code is a result of many improvements made to the program VGBLP, which is described in NASA TM-83207 (February 1982), and can effectively supersede it. The code BL2D is designed to be modular, user-friendly, and portable to any machine with a standard fortran77 compiler. The report contains the new formulation adopted and the details of its implementation. Five validation cases are presented. A detailed user's manual with the input format description and instructions for running the code is included. Adequate information is presented in the report to enable the user to modify or customize the code for specific applications.

  8. Computer program BL2D for solving two-dimensional and axisymmetric boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the formulation, validation, and user's manual for the computer program BL2D. The program is a fourth-order-accurate solution scheme for solving two-dimensional or axisymmetric boundary layers in speed regimes that range from low subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers. A basic implementation of the transition zone and turbulence modeling is also included. The code is a result of many improvements made to the program VGBLP, which is described in NASA TM-83207 (February 1982), and can effectively supersede it. The code BL2D is designed to be modular, user-friendly, and portable to any machine with a standard fortran77 compiler. The report contains the new formulation adopted and the details of its implementation. Five validation cases are presented. A detailed user's manual with the input format description and instructions for running the code is included. Adequate information is presented in the report to enable the user to modify or customize the code for specific applications.

  9. NIKE2D: a vectorized, implicit, finite-deformation, finite-element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1983-02-01

    This report provides a user's manual for NIKE2D and a brief description of the implicit algorithm. Sample applications are presented including a simulation of the necking of a uniaxial tension specimen, a static analysis of an O-ring seal, and a cylindrical bar impacting a rigid wall. NIKE2D is a fully vectorized, implicit, finite-deformation, large-strain, finite-element code for analyzing the response of two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane-strain solids. A variety of loading conditions can be handled including traction boundary conditions, displacement boundary conditions, concentrated nodal point laods, body force loads due to base accelerations, and body-force loads due to spinning. Slide-lines with interface friction are available. Elastic, orthotropic-elastic-plastic, thermo-elastic-plactic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, thermo-orthotropic elastic, and elastic-creep materials models are implemented. Nearly incompressible behavior that arises in plasticity problems and elasticity problems with Poisson's ratio approaching 0.5 is accounted for in the element formulation to preclude mesh lock-ups and associated anomalous stress states. Four-node isoparametric elements are used for the spatial discretization, and profile (bandwidth) minimization is optional.

  10. ELLIPT2D: A Flexible Finite Element Code Written Python

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Mollis, J.C.

    2001-03-22

    The use of the Python scripting language for scientific applications and in particular to solve partial differential equations is explored. It is shown that Python's rich data structure and object-oriented features can be exploited to write programs that are not only significantly more concise than their counter parts written in Fortran, C or C++, but are also numerically efficient. To illustrate this, a two-dimensional finite element code (ELLIPT2D) has been written. ELLIPT2D provides a flexible and easy-to-use framework for solving a large class of second-order elliptic problems. The program allows for structured or unstructured meshes. All functions defining the elliptic operator are user supplied and so are the boundary conditions, which can be of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robbins type. ELLIPT2D makes extensive use of dictionaries (hash tables) as a way to represent sparse matrices.Other key features of the Python language that have been widely used include: operator over loading, error handling, array slicing, and the Tkinter module for building graphical use interfaces. As an example of the utility of ELLIPT2D, a nonlinear solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation is computed using a Newton iterative scheme. A second application focuses on a solution of the toroidal Laplace equation coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic stability code, a problem arising in the context of magnetic fusion research.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of 2-D Elastic Contacts Involving FGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhilash, M. N.; Murthy, H.

    2014-05-01

    The response of elastic indenters in contact with Functionally Graded Material (FGM) coated homogeneous elastic half space has been presented in the current paper. Finite element analysis has been used due to its ability to handle complex geometry, material, and boundary conditions. Indenters of different typical surface profiles have been considered and the problem has been idealized as a two-dimensional (2D) plane strain problem considering only normal loads. Initially, indenters were considered to be rigid and the results were validated with the solutions presented in the literature. The analysis has then been extended to the case of elastic indenters on FGM-coated half spaces and the results are discussed.

  12. FEATS - Finite element thermal stress analysis of plane or axisymmetric solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    FEATS computer code uses finite element analysis to calculate steady state temperature and thermal stress fields for either axisymmetric or plane two-dimensional bodies with boundary conditions, including specified displacements, loads, and thermal boundary conditions.

  13. FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1983-08-01

    The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

  14. User's manual for DYNA2D: an explicit two-dimensional hydrodynamic finite-element code with interactive rezoning

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1982-02-01

    This revised report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane strain finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 4-node solid elements, and the equations-of motion are integrated by the central difference method. An interactive rezoner eliminates the need to terminate the calculation when the mesh becomes too distorted. Rather, the mesh can be rezoned and the calculation continued. The command structure for the rezoner is described and illustrated by an example.

  15. Experimental Database with Baseline CFD Solutions: 2-D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock-Wave/Turbulent-Boundary-Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.; Brown, James L.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    A database compilation of hypersonic shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer experiments is provided. The experiments selected for the database are either 2D or axisymmetric, and include both compression corner and impinging type SWTBL interactions. The strength of the interactions range from attached to incipient separation to fully separated flows. The experiments were chosen based on criterion to ensure quality of the datasets, to be relevant to NASA's missions and to be useful for validation and uncertainty assessment of CFD Navier-Stokes predictive methods, both now and in the future. An emphasis on datasets selected was on surface pressures and surface heating throughout the interaction, but include some wall shear stress distributions and flowfield profiles. Included, for selected cases, are example CFD grids and setup information, along with surface pressure and wall heating results from simulations using current NASA real-gas Navier-Stokes codes by which future CFD investigators can compare and evaluate physics modeling improvements and validation and uncertainty assessments of future CFD code developments. The experimental database is presented tabulated in the Appendices describing each experiment. The database is also provided in computer-readable ASCII files located on a companion DVD.

  16. Axisymmetric analysis of a tube-type acoustic levitator by a finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hatano, H

    1994-01-01

    A finite element approach was taken for the study of the sound field and positioning force in a tube-type acoustic levitator. An axisymmetric model, where a rigid sphere is suspended on the tube axis, was introduced to model a cylindrical chamber of a levitation tube furnace. Distributions of velocity potential, magnitudes of positioning force, and resonance frequency shifts of the chamber due to the presence of the sphere were numerically estimated in relation to the sphere's position and diameter. Experiments were additionally made to compare with the simulation. The finite element method proved to be a useful tool for analyzing and designing the tube-type levitator. PMID:18263265

  17. A Cartesian grid finite-difference method for 2D incompressible viscous flows in irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmiguel-Rojas, Enrique; Ortega-Casanova, Joaquin; del Pino, Carlos; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2004-11-01

    A method for generating a non-uniform cartesian grid for irregular two-dimensional (2D) geometries such that all the boundary points are regular mesh points is given. The resulting non-uniform grid is used to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations for 2D incompressible viscous flows using finite difference approximations. To that end, finite-difference approximations of the derivatives on a non-uniform mesh are given. We test the method with two different examples: the shallow water flow on a lake with irregular contour, and the pressure driven flow through an irregular array of circular cylinders.

  18. Shape optimization of axisymmetric solids with the finite cell method using a fixed grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Zhu, Ji-Hong; Xu, Zhao; Cai, Shou-Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a design procedure extending the B-spline based finite cell method into shape optimization is developed for axisymmetric solids involving the centrifugal force effect. We first replace the traditional conforming mesh in the finite element method with structured cells that are fixed during the whole design process with a view to avoid the sophisticated re-meshing and eventual mesh distortion. Then, B-spline shape functions are further implemented to yield a high-order continuity field along the cell boundary in stress analysis. By means of the implicit description of the shape boundary, stress sensitivity is analytically derived with respect to shape design variables. Finally, we illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed protocol by several numerical test cases as well as a whole design procedure carried out on an aeronautic turbine disk.

  19. CAST2D: A finite element computer code for casting process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D has the following features in addition to all the features contained in the TOPAZ2D and NIKE2D codes: (1) a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm (i.e., slide line) that calculates the thermal contact resistance across the part-mold interface as a function of interface pressure and gap opening; (2) a new phase change algorithm, the delta function method, that is a robust method for materials undergoing isothermal phase change; (3) a constitutive model that transitions between fluid behavior and solid behavior, and accounts for material volume change on phase change; and (4) a modified plot file data base that allows plotting of thermal variables (e.g., temperature, heat flux) on the deformed geometry. Although the code is specialized for casting modeling, it can be used for other thermal stress problems (e.g., metal forming).

  20. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  1. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  2. 2D resistivity inversion using conjugate gradients for a finite element discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, C. A.; Santos, F. M.; Porsani, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present a DC 2D inversion algorithm using conjugate gradients relaxation to solve the maximum likelihood inverse equations. We apply, according to Zhang (1995), the maximum likelihood inverse theory developed by Tarantola and Valette (1982) to our 2D resistivity inversion. This algorithm was chosen to this research because it doesn't need to calculate the field's derivatives. Since conjugate gradient techniques only need the results of the sensitivity matrix à or its transpose ÃT multiplying a vector, the actual computation of the sensitivity matrix are not performed, according to the methodology described in Zhang (1995). In Zhang (1995), the terms Ãx and ÃTy, are dependent of the stiffness matrix K and its partial derivative ∂K⁄∂ρ. The inversion methodology described in Zhang (1995) is for the case of 3D electrical resistivity by finite differences discretization. So it was necessary to make a series of adjustments to obtain a satisfactory result for 2D electrical inversion using finite element method. The difference between the modeling of 3D resistivity with finite difference and the 2D finite element method are in the integration variable, used in the 2D case. In the 2D case the electrical potential are initially calculated in the transformed domain, including the stiffness matrix, and only in the end is transformed in Cartesian domain. In the case of 3D, described by Zhang (1995) this is done differently, the calculation is done directly in the Cartesian domain. In the literature was not found any work describing how to deal with this problem. Because the calculations of Ãx and ÃTy must be done without having the real stiffness matrix, the adaptation consist in calculate the stiffness matrix and its partial derivative using a set of integration variables. We transform those matrix in the same form has in the potential case, but with different sets of variables. The results will be presented and are very promising.

  3. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  4. Global synthetic seismograms using a 2-D finite-difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dunzhu; Helmberger, Don; Clayton, Robert W.; Sun, Daoyuan

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference (FD) synthetics, which fill the gap between fast 1-D analytic synthetics and time-consuming full 3-D synthetics in our ability to model seismograms, have been used in many studies. We address several issues involving 2-D FD methods in generating global synthetic seismograms. These include: (1) interfacing point source excitation for earthquakes with 2-D FD methods; (2) out-of-plane spreading corrections and (3) reducing the spherical Earth to the flattened models. The first issue is tackled using two methods, a `transparent source box' approach and a moment tensor excitation approach, where each has its own advantages. Moreover, our `source box' excitation does not have the late-time drift problem that occurred in previous studies. The out-of-plane geometric spreading correction is accounted for by estimating the ray parameter and applying a post-simulation filter to 2-D synthetics. Finally, parameters of the Earth-flattening transformation are discussed and validated. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated by comparing our synthetics with frequency-wavenumber summation, normal-mode and 3-D spectral-element synthetics.

  5. Simulation of 2D Brain's Potential Distribution Based on Two Electrodes ECVT Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirait, S. H.; Edison, R. E.; Baidillah, M. R.; Taruno, W. P.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to simulate the potential distribution of 2D brain geometry based on two electrodes ECVT. ECVT (electrical capacitance tomography) is a tomography modality which produces dielectric distribution image of a subject from several capacitance electrodes measurements. This study begins by producing the geometry of 2D brain based on MRI image and then setting the boundary conditions on the boundaries of the geometry. The values of boundary conditions follow the potential values used in two electrodes brain ECVT, and for this reason the first boundary is set to 20 volt and 2.5 MHz signal and another boundary is set to ground. Poisson equation is implemented as the governing equation in the 2D brain geometry and finite element method is used to solve the equation. Simulated Hodgkin-Huxley action potential is applied as disturbance potential in the geometry. We divide this study into two which comprises simulation without disturbance potential and simulation with disturbance potential. From this study, each of time dependent potential distributions from non-disturbance and disturbance potential of the 2D brain geometry has been generated.

  6. Justification for a 2D versus 3D fingertip finite element model during static contact simulations.

    PubMed

    Harih, Gregor; Tada, Mitsunori; Dolšak, Bojan

    2016-10-01

    The biomechanical response of a human hand during contact with various products has not been investigated in details yet. It has been shown that excessive contact pressure on the soft tissue can result in discomfort, pain and also cumulative traumatic disorders. This manuscript explores the benefits and limitations of a simplified two-dimensional vs. an anatomically correct three-dimensional finite element model of a human fingertip. Most authors still use 2D FE fingertip models due to their simplicity and reduced computational costs. However we show that an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model can provide additional insight into the biomechanical behaviour. The use of 2D fingertip FE models is justified when observing peak contact pressure values as well as displacement during the contact for the given studied cross-section. On the other hand, an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model provides a contact pressure distribution, which reflects the fingertip's anatomy.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Stability of Free-Boundary Quasi-Axisymmetric Stellarator Equilibria with Finite Bootstrap Current

    SciTech Connect

    Coope, Wilfred Anthony; Ferrando i Margalet, Sergi; Allfrey, Simon J.; Kisslinger, Johann; Wobig, Horst F.G.; Narushima, Yoshiro; Okamura, Shoichi; Suzuki, Chihiro; Watanabe, Kiyomasa Y.; Yamazaki, Kozo; Isaev, Maxim Yu

    2004-09-15

    The impact of the bootstrap current is investigated on the equilibrium properties of a two-period quasi-axisymmetric stellarator reactor with free boundary and on the corresponding ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability properties. Although the magnetic field strength B spectrum is dominated by a m/n = 1/0 component, the discrete filamentary coils trigger some small-amplitude symmetry-breaking components that can disturb the quasi-symmetry of B. Finite {beta} causes the plasma column to shift outward in the absence of bootstrap current. With a self-consistent bootstrap current in the 1/{nu} regime, the plasma becomes more elongated and more distorted in the horizontally elongated up-down symmetric cross section. At {beta} (approximately equal to) 3.25%, the plasma can be restored to its near-vacuum shape with the application of a vertical field with coil currents 20% of those of the modular coils, but at the expense of a significant mirror component in the B-field spectrum. The bootstrap current causes the rotational transform {iota} profile to increase above the critical resonant value ({iota}{sub c} = 1/2 for {beta} {>=}1.1%) and combines with the Pfirsch-Schlueter current to destabilize a m/n = 2/1 external kink mode for {beta} {>=}1.8%.

  8. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near {{e}2}/π h .

  9. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near [Formula: see text]. PMID:27270084

  10. Study of non-axisymmetric divertor footprints using 2-D IR and visible cameras and a 3-D heat conduction solver in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J-W.; Gan, K. F.; Scotti, F.; Lore, J. D.; Maingi, R.; Canik, J. M.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A. G.; Roquemore, A. L.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-01-12

    Toroidally non-axisymmetric divertor profiles during the 3-D field application and for ELMs are studied with simultaneous observation by a new wide angle visible camera and a high speed IR camera. A newly implemented 3-D heat conduction code, TACO, is used to obtain divertor heat flux. The wide angle camera data confirmed the previously reported result on the validity of vacuum field line tracing on the prediction of split strike point pattern by 3-D fields as well as the phase locking of ELM heat flux to the 3-D fields. TACO calculates the 2- D heat flux distribution allowing assessment of toroidal asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width. Lastly, the degree of asymmetry (εDA) is defined to quantify the asymmetric heat deposition on the divertor surface and is found to have a strong positive dependence on peak heat flux.

  11. Evaluation of gas radiation heat transfer in a 2D axisymmetric geometry using the line-by-line integration and WSGG models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Felipe Roman; Brittes, Rogério; França, Francis. H. R.; Ezekoye, Ofodike A.

    2015-05-01

    The weighted-sum-of-gray-gases (WSGG) model is widely used in engineering computations of radiative heat transfer due to its relative simplicity, robustness and flexibility. This paper presents the computation of radiative heat transfer in a 2D axisymmetric chamber using two WSGG models to compute radiation in H2O and CO2 mixtures. The first model considers a fixed ratio between the molar concentrations of H2O and CO2, while the second allows the solution for arbitrary ratios. The correlations for both models are based on the HITEMP2010 database. The test case considers typical conditions found in turbulent methane flames, with steep variations in the temperature field as well as in the molar concentrations of the participating species. To assess the accuracy of the WSGG model, the results are compared with a solution obtained by line-by-line integration (LBL) of the spectrum.

  12. A framework for grand scale parallelization of the combined finite discrete element method in 2d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.; Rougier, E.; Knight, E. E.; Munjiza, A.

    2014-09-01

    Within the context of rock mechanics, the Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM) has been applied to many complex industrial problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques (tunneling, pillar strength, etc.), rock blasting, seismic wave propagation, packing problems, dam stability, rock slope stability, rock mass strength characterization problems, etc. The reality is that most of these were accomplished in a 2D and/or single processor realm. In this work a hardware independent FDEM parallelization framework has been developed using the Virtual Parallel Machine for FDEM, (V-FDEM). With V-FDEM, a parallel FDEM software can be adapted to different parallel architecture systems ranging from just a few to thousands of cores.

  13. Numerical method of crack analysis in 2D finite magnetoelectroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghao; Xu, Guangtao; Fan, Cuiying

    2010-04-01

    The present paper extends the hybrid extended displacement discontinuity fundamental solution method (HEDD-FSM) (Eng Anal Bound Elem 33:592-600, 2009) to analysis of cracks in 2D finite magnetoelectroelastic media. The solution of the crack is expressed approximately by a linear combination of fundamental solutions of the governing equations, which includes the extended point force fundamental solutions with sources placed at chosen points outside the domain of the problem under consideration, and the extended Crouch fundamental solutions with extended displacement discontinuities placed on the crack. The coefficients of the fundamental solutions are determined by letting the approximated solution satisfy the prescribed boundary conditions on the boundary of the domain and on the crack face. The Crouch fundamental solution for a parabolic element at the crack tip is derived to model the square root variations of near tip fields. The extended stress intensity factors are calculated under different electric and magnetic boundary conditions.

  14. A New Cell-Centered Implicit Numerical Scheme for Ions in the 2-D Axisymmetric Code Hall2de

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez Ortega, Alejandro; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm in the Hall2De code to simulate the ion hydrodynamics in the acceleration channel and near plume regions of Hall-effect thrusters. This implementation constitutes an upgrade of the capabilities built in the Hall2De code. The equations of mass conservation and momentum for unmagnetized ions are solved using a conservative, finite-volume, cell-centered scheme on a magnetic-field-aligned grid. Major computational savings are achieved by making use of an implicit predictor/multi-corrector algorithm for time evolution. Inaccuracies in the prediction of the motion of low-energy ions in the near plume in hydrodynamics approaches are addressed by implementing a multi-fluid algorithm that tracks ions of different energies separately. A wide range of comparisons with measurements are performed to validate the new ion algorithms. Several numerical experiments with the location and value of the anomalous collision frequency are also presented. Differences in the plasma properties in the near-plume between the single fluid and multi-fluid approaches are discussed. We complete our validation by comparing predicted erosion rates at the channel walls of the thruster with measurements. Erosion rates predicted by the plasma properties obtained from simulations replicate accurately measured rates of erosion within the uncertainty range of the sputtering models employed.

  15. Use of finite volume radiation for predicting the Knudsen minimum in 2D channel flow

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Chetan P.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2014-12-09

    In an earlier paper we employed an analogy between surface-to-surface radiation and free-molecular flow to model Knudsen flow through tubes and onto planes. In the current paper we extend the analogy between thermal radiation and molecular flow to model the flow of a gas in a 2D channel across all regimes of rarefaction. To accomplish this, we break down the problem of gaseous flow into three sub-problems (self-diffusion, mass-motion and generation of pressure gradient) and use the finite volume method for modeling radiation through participating media to model the transport in each sub-problem as a radiation problem. We first model molecular self-diffusion in the stationary gas by modeling the transport of the molecular number density through the gas starting from the analytical asymptote for free-molecular flow to the kinetic theory limit of gaseous self-diffusion. We then model the transport of momentum through the gas at unit pressure gradient to predict Poiseuille flow and slip flow in the 2D gas. Lastly, we predict the generation of pressure gradient within the gas due to molecular collisions by modeling the transport of the forces generated due to collisions per unit volume of gas. We then proceed to combine the three radiation problems to predict flow of the gas over the entire Knudsen number regime from free-molecular to transition to continuum flow and successfully capture the Knudsen minimum at Kn ∼ 1.

  16. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite-differences to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P, slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High order explicit finite-differences (FD) can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  17. 2D time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a tradeoff between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second-order in time and fourth-order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  18. Experimental verification of a non-axisymmetric displacement field predicted by finite element analysis of a composite disk subjected to an axisymmetric loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Stanley T.

    -processor provides a simple process for establishing contact regions. Finally, a test is conducted to experimentally measure the displacement profile of a disk subjected to the pre-stressed condition using speckle metrology and digital image correlation. A comparison between the experimental and analytical results shows a good agreement, thereby validating the finite element models and confirming the original observation made regarding the non-axisymmetric out-of-plane displacement.

  19. 2-D Finite Difference Modeling of the D'' Structure Beneath the Eastern Cocos Plate: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, D. V.; Song, T. A.; Sun, D.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of phase transition from Perovskite (Pv) to Post-Perovskite (PPv) at depth nears the lowermost mantle has revealed a new view of the earth's D'' layer (Oganov et al. 2004; Murakami et al. 2004). Hernlund et al. (2004) recently pusposed that, depending on the geotherm at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a double-crossing of the phase boundary by the geotherm at two different depths may also occur. To explore these new findings, we adopt 2-D finite difference scheme (Helmberger and Vidale, 1988) to model wave propagation in rapidly varying structure. We collect broadband waveform data recorded by several Passcal experiments, such as La Ristra transect and CDROM transect in the southwest US to constrain the lateral variations in D'' structure. These data provide fairly dense sampling (~ 20 km) in the lowermost mantle beneath the eastern Cocos plate. Since the source-receiver paths are mostly in the same azimuth, we make 2-D cross-sections from global tomography model (Grand, 2002) and compute finite difference synthetics. We modify the lowermost mantle below 2500 km with constraints from transverse-component waveform data at epicentral distances of 70-82 degrees in the time window between S and ScS, essentially foward modeling waveforms. Assuming a velocity jump of 3 % at D'', our preferred model shows that the D'' topography deepens from the north to the south by about 120 km over a lateral distance of 300 km. Such large topography jumps have been proposed by Thomas et al. (2004) using data recorded by TriNet. In addition, there is a negative velocity jump (-3 %) 100 km above the CMB in the south. This simple model compare favorably with results from a study by Sun, Song and Helmberger (2005), who follow Sidorin et al. (1999) approach and produce a thermodynamically consistent velocity model with Pv-PPv phase boundary. It appears that much of this complexity exists in Grand's tomographic maps with rapid variation in velocities just above the D''. We also

  20. Diverse Geological Applications For Basil: A 2d Finite-deformation Computational Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory A.; Barr, Terence D.; Evans, Lynn

    Geological processes are often characterised by large finite-deformation continuum strains, on the order of 100% or greater. Microstructural processes cause deformation that may be represented by a viscous constitutive mechanism, with viscosity that may depend on temperature, pressure, or strain-rate. We have developed an effective com- putational algorithm for the evaluation of 2D deformation fields produced by Newto- nian or non-Newtonian viscous flow. With the implementation of this algorithm as a computer program, Basil, we have applied it to a range of diverse applications in Earth Sciences. Viscous flow fields in 2D may be defined for the thin-sheet case or, using a velocity-pressure formulation, for the plane-strain case. Flow fields are represented using 2D triangular elements with quadratic interpolation for velocity components and linear for pressure. The main matrix equation is solved by an efficient and compact conjugate gradient algorithm with iteration for non-Newtonian viscosity. Regular grids may be used, or grids based on a random distribution of points. Definition of the prob- lem requires that velocities, tractions, or some combination of the two, are specified on all external boundary nodes. Compliant boundaries may also be defined, based on the idea that traction is opposed to and proportional to boundary displacement rate. In- ternal boundary segments, allowing fault-like displacements within a viscous medium have also been developed, and we find that the computed displacement field around the fault tip is accurately represented for Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosities, in spite of the stress singularity at the fault tip. Basil has been applied by us and colleagues to problems that include: thin sheet calculations of continental collision, Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the continental mantle lithosphere, deformation fields around fault terminations at the outcrop scale, stress and deformation fields in and around porphyroblasts, and

  1. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite differences (FD) to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10 kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P and slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High-order explicit FD can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here, we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  2. Finite difference methods for reducing numerical diffusion in TEACH-type calculations. [Teaching Elliptic Axisymmetric Characteristics Heuristically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, S. A.; Chiappetta, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    A methodological evaluation for two-finite differencing schemes for computer-aided gas turbine design is presented. The two computational schemes include; a Bounded Skewed Finite Differencing Scheme (BSUDS); and a Quadratic Upwind Differencing Scheme (QSDS). In the evaluation, the derivations of the schemes were incorporated into two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions of the Teaching Axisymmetric Characteristics Heuristically (TEACH) computer code. Assessments were made according to performance criteria for the solution of problems of turbulent, laminar, and coannular turbulent flow. The specific performance criteria used in the evaluation were simplicity, accuracy, and computational economy. It is found that the BSUDS scheme performed better with respect to the criteria than the QUDS. Some of the reasons for the more successful performance BSUDS are discussed.

  3. TSAAS: finite-element thermal and stress analysis of plane and axisymmetric solids with orthotropic temperature-dependent material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.V.; Anderson, C.A.

    1982-02-01

    The finite element method is used to determine the temperatures, displacements, stresses, and strains in axisymmetric solids with orthotropic, temperature-dependent material properties under axisymmetric thermal and mechanical loads. The mechanical loads can be surface pressures, surface shears, and nodal point forces as well as an axial or centripetal acceleration. The continuous solid is replaced by a system of ring elements with triangular or quadrilateral cross sections. Accordingly, the method is valid for solids that are composed of many different materials and that have complex geometry. Nonlinear mechanical behavior as typified by plastic, locking, or creeping materials can be approximated. Two dimensional mesh generation, plotting, and editing features allow the computer program to be readily used. In addition to a stress analysis program that is based on a modified version of the SAAS code, TSAAS can carry out a transient thermal analysis with the finite element mesh used in stress analysis. An implicit time differencing scheme allows the use of arbitrary time steps with consequent fast running times. At specified times, the program will return to SAAS for thermal stress analysis. Nonlinear thermal properties and Arrhenius reaction kinetics are also incorporated into TSAAS. Several versions of TSAAS are in use at Los Alamos, running on CDC-7600, CRAY-1 and VAX 11/780 computers. This report describes the nominal TSAAS; other versions may have some unique features.

  4. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  5. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  6. 2D Global Rayleigh Wave Attenuation Model Using Finite Frequency Focusing and Defocusing Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.; Dalton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed an efficient technique to process and measure surface-wave amplitude and phase from a large collection of seismic waveforms. These amplitude and phase data sets are used to jointly invert for 2D phase velocity and attenuation maps. As demonstrated by Dalton and Ekstrom (2006), correcting for the effects of focusing and defocusing by elastic structure is crucial in order to obtain reliable attenuation structures. A robust theory that can reliably predict focusing-defocusing effects and is insensitive to the details of making the phase velocity maps is preferred. Great circle ray theory can give useful predictions for the focusing-defocusing effects if careful attention is paid to how the phase velocity model is smoothed. However, the predictions of the finite frequency kernels are more robust at the low-intermediate frequency range (below 25mHz) and suggest that they are better suited as a basis for inversion.We invert for the phase velocity, attenuation, source, and receiver terms simultaneously. Our models provide 60-70% variance reduction to the raw data though the source terms are the biggest contribution to the fit of the data. The attenuation maps show structures that correlate well with surface tectonics and the age-dependent trend of attenuation is clearly seen in the ocean basins. We have also identified problematic stations and earthquake sources as a by-product of our data selection process. Although our approach was developed for a global study, it can be extended to regional studies. Our first regional-scale application of this approach is to the Atlantic upper mantle.

  7. CLFE2D: A generalized plane strain finite element program laminated composites subject to mechanical and hygrothermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buczek, M. B.; Gregory, M. A.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    CLFE2D is a two dimensional generalized plane strain finite element code, using a linear, four node, general quadrilateral, isoparametric element. The program is developed to calculate the displacements, strains, stresses, and strain energy densities in a finite width composite laminate. CLFE2D offers any combination of the following load types: nodal displacements, nodal forces, uniform normal strain, or hygrothermal. The program allows the user to input one set of three dimensional orthotropic material properties. The user can then specify the angle of material principal orientation for each element in the mesh. Output includes displacements, stresses, strains and strain densities at points selected by the user. An option is also available to plot the underformed and deformed finite element meshes.

  8. A finite element algorithm for sound propagation in axisymmetric ducts containing compressible mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    An accurate mathematical model for sound propagation in axisymmetric aircraft engine ducts with compressible mean flow is reported. The model is based on the usual perturbation of the basic fluid mechanics equations for small motions. Mean flow parameters are derived in the absence of fluctuating quantities and are then substituted into the equations for the acoustic quantities which were linearized by eliminating higher order terms. Mean swirl is assumed to be zero from the restriction of axisymmetry. A linear rectangular serendipity element is formulated from these equations using a Galerkin procedure and assembled in a special purpose computer program in which the matrix map for a rectangular mesh was specifically coded. Representations of the fluctuating quantities, mean quantities and coordinate transformations are isoparametric. The global matrix is solved by foreward and back substitution following an L-U decomposition with pivoting restricted internally to the blocks. Results from the model were compared with results from several alternative analyses and yielded satisfactory agreement.

  9. Transport theory for potato orbits in an axisymmetric torus with finite toroidal flow speed

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2004-01-01

    Transport theory for potato orbits in the region near the magnetic axis in an axisymmetric torus such as tokamaks and spherical tori is extended to the situation where the toroidal flow speed is of the order of the sonic speed as observed in National Spherical Torus Experiment [E. J. Synakowski, M. G. Bell, R. E. Bell et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1653 (2003)]. It is found that transport fluxes such as ion radial heat flux, and bootstrap current density are modified by a factor of the order of the square of the toroidal Mach number. The consequences of the orbit squeezing are also presented. The theory is developed for parabolic (in radius r) plasma profiles. A method to apply the results of the theory for the transport modeling is discussed.

  10. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  11. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference method: 2-D aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.-J.; Giraldo, F. X.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-06-01

    The non-hydrostatic (NH) compressible Euler equations of dry atmosphere are solved in a simplified two dimensional (2-D) slice framework employing a spectral element method (SEM) for the horizontal discretization and a finite difference method (FDM) for the vertical discretization. The SEM uses high-order nodal basis functions associated with Lagrange polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) quadrature points. The FDM employs a third-order upwind biased scheme for the vertical flux terms and a centered finite difference scheme for the vertical derivative terms and quadrature. The Euler equations used here are in a flux form based on the hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate, which are the same as those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, but a hybrid sigma-pressure vertical coordinate is implemented in this model. We verified the model by conducting widely used standard benchmark tests: the inertia-gravity wave, rising thermal bubble, density current wave, and linear hydrostatic mountain wave. The results from those tests demonstrate that the horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference model is accurate and robust. By using the 2-D slice model, we effectively show that the combined spatial discretization method of the spectral element and finite difference method in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, offers a viable method for the development of a NH dynamical core.

  12. A 2D finite element simulation of liquid coupled ultrasonic NDT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this work is to improve modelling capabilities and reliability of wave propagation models using a commercial finite element package (COMSOL). The current model focusses on investigating the error and accuracy with the change in spatial and temporal discretization. To increase the reliability and inclusiveness of the finite element method, wave propagation has been modelled in solid medium with a cylindrical defect (side drilled hole), in a fluid medium and in a fluid-solid immersion model. The numerical predictions are validated through comparisons with available analytical solutions and experimental data. The model is being developed to incorporate additional complexity and ranges of properties, including operation at elevated temperature.

  13. Avalanches, loading and finite size effects in 2D amorphous plasticity: results from a finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandfeld, Stefan; Budrikis, Zoe; Zapperi, Stefano; Fernandez Castellanos, David

    2015-02-01

    Crystalline plasticity is strongly interlinked with dislocation mechanics and nowadays is relatively well understood. Concepts and physical models of plastic deformation in amorphous materials on the other hand—where the concept of linear lattice defects is not applicable—still are lagging behind. We introduce an eigenstrain-based finite element lattice model for simulations of shear band formation and strain avalanches. Our model allows us to study the influence of surfaces and finite size effects on the statistics of avalanches. We find that even with relatively complex loading conditions and open boundary conditions, critical exponents describing avalanche statistics are unchanged, which validates the use of simpler scalar lattice-based models to study these phenomena.

  14. Extreme value statistics of 2D Gaussian free field: effect of finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Rosso, A.; Santachiara, R.

    2016-01-01

    We study minima statistics of the 2D Gaussian free field (GFF) on circles in the unit disk with Dirichlet boundary condition. Free energy distributions of the associated random energy models are exactly calculated in the high temperature phase, and shown to satisfy the duality property, which enables us to predict the minima distribution by assuming the freezing scenario. Numerical tests are provided. Related questions concerning the GFF on a sphere are also considered.

  15. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  16. TOPAZ - a finite element heat conduction code for analyzing 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1984-03-01

    TOPAZ is a two-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat conduction analysis. This report provides a user's manual for TOPAZ and a description of the numerical algorithms used. Sample problems with analytical solutions are presented. TOPAZ has been implemented on the CRAY and VAX computers.

  17. VARSAT2D: Finite-element analysis of variably saturated two-dimensional flow. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nieber, J.L.; Friedel, M.J.; Munir, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    This information circular describes a computer program called VARSAT2D, a comprehensive unsaturated fluid flow simulator developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. VARSAT2D solves for either a vertical or horizontal, transient or steady-state solution in variably saturated, heterogeneous, anisotropic porous media using the Galerkin finite-element approach. Simplex triangular elements are used. Moisture retention characteristics are described by specifying either the Brooks and Corey, Brutsaert, or Van Genuchten power functions, with hysteresis described using the Maulem independent domain model. Boundary conditions may include any combination of time-varying seepage, pressure along solution domain boundaries and/or at internal node points, unit hydraulic gradient at the lower boundary, and a uniform source and/or sink. The program should be a welcome addition for mining and environmental hydrologists, researchers, and engineers interested in modeling unsaturated fluid flow.

  18. Mixed-RKDG Finite Element Methods for the 2-D Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zhangxin; Cockburn, Bernardo; Jerome, Joseph W.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method for numerically solving the equations of the hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices in two space dimensions. The method combines a standard mixed finite element method, used to obtain directly an approximation to the electric field, with the so-called Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method, originally devised for numerically solving multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, which is applied here to the convective part of the equations. Numerical simulations showing the performance of the new method are displayed, and the results compared with those obtained by using Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes. Frommore » the perspective of device modeling, these methods are robust, since they are capable of encompassing broad parameter ranges, including those for which shock formation is possible. The simulations presented here are for Gallium Arsenide at room temperature, but we have tested them much more generally with considerable success.« less

  19. Superconducting axisymmetric finite elements based on a gauged potential variational principle. Part 1: Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James J.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1994-01-01

    The present work is part of a research program for the numerical simulation of electromagnetic (EM) fields within conventional Ginzburg-Landau (GL) superconductors. The final goal of this research is to formulate, develop and validate finite element (FE) models that can accurately capture electromagnetic thermal and material phase changes in a superconductor. The formulations presented here are for a time-independent Ginzburg-Landau superconductor and are derived from a potential-based variational principle. We develop an appropriate variational formulation of time-independent supercontivity for the general three-dimensional case and specialize it to the one-dimensional case. Also developed are expressions for the material-dependent parameters alpha and beta of GL theory and their dependence upon the temperature T. The one-dimensional formulation is then discretized for finite element purposes and the first variation of these equations is obtained. The resultant Euler equations contain nonlinear terms in the primary variables. To solve these equations, an incremental-iterative solution method is used. Expressions for the internal force vector, external force vector, loading vector and tangent stiffness matrix are therefore developed for use with the solution procedure.

  20. A cell-centered Lagrangian finite volume approach for computing elasto-plastic response of solids in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Shashkov, Mikhail J.; Burton, Donald E.

    2013-03-01

    A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian formulation is presented for solving large deformation problems in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries. Since solid materials can sustain significant shear deformation, evolution equations for stress and strain fields are solved in addition to mass, momentum and energy conservation laws. The total strain-rate realized in the material is split into an elastic and plastic response. The elastic and plastic components in turn are modeled using hypo-elastic theory. In accordance with the hypo-elastic model, a predictor-corrector algorithm is employed for evolving the deviatoric component of the stress tensor. A trial elastic deviatoric stress state is obtained by integrating a rate equation, cast in the form of an objective (Jaumann) derivative, based on Hooke's law. The dilatational response of the material is modeled using an equation of state of the Mie-Grüneisen form. The plastic deformation is accounted for via an iterative radial return algorithm constructed from the J2 von Mises yield condition. Several benchmark example problems with non-linear strain hardening and thermal softening yield models are presented. Extensive comparisons with representative Eulerian and Lagrangian hydrocodes in addition to analytical and experimental results are made to validate the current approach.

  1. Using Multi-threading for the Automatic Load Balancing of 2D Adaptive Finite Element Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-threaded approach for the automatic load balancing of adaptive finite element (FE) meshes The platform of our choice is the EARTH multi-threaded system which offers sufficient capabilities to tackle this problem. We implement the adaption phase of FE applications oil triangular meshes and exploit the EARTH token mechanism to automatically balance the resulting irregular and highly nonuniform workload. We discuss the results of our experiments oil EARTH-SP2, on implementation of EARTH on the IBM SP2 with different load balancing strategies that are built into the runtime system.

  2. Coupling finite and boundary element methods for 2-D elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.; Sistla, R.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-boundary element (FE-BE) coupling method for two-dimensional elasticity problems is developed based on a weighted residual variational method in which a portion of the domain of interest is modeled by FEs and the remainder of the region by BEs. The performance of the FE-BE coupling method is demonstrated via applications to a simple 'patch test' problem and three-crack problems. The method passed the patch tests for various modeling configurations and yielded accurate strain energy release rates for the crack problems studied.

  3. Electromagnetic induction by finite wavenumber source fields in 2-D lateral heterogeneities - The transverse electric mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction in a laterally homogeneous earth is analyzed in terms of a source field with finite dimensions. Attention is focused on a time-varying two-dimensional current source directed parallel to the strike of a two-dimensional anomalous structure within the earth, i.e., the E-parallel mode. The spatially harmonic source field is expressed as discontinuities in the magnetic (or electric) field of the current in the source. The model is applied to describing the magnetic gradients across megatectonic features, and may be used to predict the magnetic fields encountered by a satellite orbiting above the ionosphere.

  4. Modeling of 2D photonic bandgap structures using a triangular mesh finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2001-10-01

    A numerical model is presented for computing the out-of- plane losses of a general class of row-defect waveguides formed by the superposition of a 2D photonic crystal onto a slab confinement structure. The usefulness of this model is demonstrated here by calculating the propagation loss of a single-row-defect waveguide composed of hexagonal air holes etched into two different slab structures. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple coupled-mode-theory picture in which loss is due to coupling by the waveguide corrugation between the fundamental and certain radiative slab modes. These calculations show that low-loss photonic crystal waveguides should be possible by carefully engineering the radiation modes of the slab waveguide.

  5. Finite-volume component-wise TVD schemes for 2D shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gwo-Fong; Lai, Jihn-Sung; Guo, Wen-Dar

    Four finite-volume component-wise total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are proposed for solving the two-dimensional shallow water equations. In the framework of the finite volume method, a proposed algorithm using the flux-splitting technique is established by modifying the MacCormack scheme to preserve second-order accuracy in both space and time. Based on this algorithm, four component-wise TVD schemes, including the Liou-Steffen splitting (LSS), van Leer splitting, Steger-Warming splitting and local Lax-Friedrichs splitting schemes, are developed. These schemes are verified through the simulations of the 1D dam-break, the oblique hydraulic jump, the partial dam-break and circular dam-break problems. It is demonstrated that the proposed schemes are accurate, efficient and robust to capture the discontinuous shock waves without any spurious oscillations in the complex flow domains with dry-bed situation, bottom slope or friction. The simulated results also show that the LSS scheme has the best numerical accuracy among the schemes tested.

  6. Solution of the 2D shallow water equations using the finite volume method on unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, K.; Chan, C. T.

    1997-06-01

    A 2D, depth-integrated, free surface flow solver for the shallow water equations is developed and tested. The solver is implemented on unstructured triangular meshes and the solution methodology is based upon a Godunov-type second-order upwind finite volume formulation, whereby the inviscid fluxes of the system of equations are obtained using Roes flux function. The eigensystem of the 2D shallow water equations is derived and is used for the construction of Roes matrix on an unstructured mesh. The viscous terms of the shallow water equations are computed using a finite volume formulation which is second-order-accurate. Verification of the solution technique for the inviscid form of the governing equations as well as for the full system of equations is carried out by comparing the model output with documented published results and very good agreement is obtained. A numerical experiment is also conducted in order to evaluate the performance of the solution technique as applied to linear convection problems. The presented results show that the solution technique is robust.

  7. Finite-size limitations on Quality factor of guided resonance modes in 2D photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Grepstad, Jon Olav; Greve, Martin M; Holst, Bodil; Johansen, Ib-Rune; Solgaard, Olav; Sudbø, Aasmund

    2013-10-01

    High-Q guided resonance modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals, enable high field intensity in small volumes that can be exploited to realize high performance sensors. We show through simulations and experiments how the Q-factor of guided resonance modes varies with the size of the photonic crystal, and that this variation is due to loss caused by scattering of in-plane propagating modes at the lattice boundary and coupling of incident light to fully guided modes that exist in the homogeneous slab outside the lattice boundary. A photonic crystal with reflecting boundaries, realized by Bragg mirrors with a band gap for in-plane propagating modes, has been designed to suppress these edge effects. The new design represents a way around the fundamental limitation on Q-factors for guided resonances in finite photonic crystals. Results are presented for both simulated and fabricated structures.

  8. Finite-size effects for anisotropic 2D Ising model with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the exact partition function of the anisotropic Ising model on finite M × N rectangular lattices under four different boundary conditions (periodic-periodic (pp), periodic-antiperiodic (pa), antiperiodic-periodic (ap) and antiperiodic-antiperiodic (aa)) obtained by Kaufman (1949 Phys. Rev. 76 1232), Wu and Hu (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5189) and Kastening (2002 Phys. Rev. E 66 057103)). We express the partition functions in terms of the partition functions Zα, β(J, k) with (α, β) = (0, 0), (1/2, 0), (0, 1/2) and (1/2, 1/2), J is an interaction coupling and k is an anisotropy parameter. Based on such expressions, we then extend the algorithm of Ivashkevich et al (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5543) to derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function for all boundary conditions mentioned above. Our result is f = fbulk + ∑∞p = 0fp(ρ, k)S-p - 1, where f is the free energy of the system, fbulk is the free energy of the bulk, S = MN is the area of the lattice and ρ = M/N is the aspect ratio. All coefficients in this expansion are expressed through analytical functions. We have introduced the effective aspect ratio ρeff = ρ/sinh 2Jc and show that for pp and aa boundary conditions all finite size correction terms are invariant under the transformation ρeff → 1/ρeff. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  9. An energy stable, hexagonal finite difference scheme for the 2D phase field crystal amplitude equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhen; Heinonen, Vili; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Cheng; Wise, Steven M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we construct an energy stable finite difference scheme for the amplitude expansion equations for the two-dimensional phase field crystal (PFC) model. The equations are formulated in a periodic hexagonal domain with respect to the reciprocal lattice vectors to achieve a provably unconditionally energy stable and solvable scheme. To our knowledge, this is the first such energy stable scheme for the PFC amplitude equations. The convexity of each part in the amplitude equations is analyzed, in both the semi-discrete and fully-discrete cases. Energy stability is based on a careful convexity analysis for the energy (in both the spatially continuous and discrete cases). As a result, unique solvability and unconditional energy stability are available for the resulting scheme. Moreover, we show that the scheme is point-wise stable for any time and space step sizes. An efficient multigrid solver is devised to solve the scheme, and a few numerical experiments are presented, including grain rotation and shrinkage and grain growth studies, as examples of the strength and robustness of the proposed scheme and solver.

  10. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  11. AC Loss Calculation of REBCO Cables by the Combination of Electric Circuit Model and 2D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noji, H.

    This study investigates the losses in a two conducting-layer REBCO cable fabricated by researchers at Furukawa Electric Co. Ltd. The losses were calculated using a combination of my electric circuit (EC) model with a two-dimensional finite element method (2D FEM). The helical pitches of the tapes in each layer, P1 and P2, were adjusted to equalize the current in both cable layers, although the loss calculation assumed infinite helical pitches and the same current in each layer at first. The results showed that the losses depended on the relative tape-position angle between the layers (θ/θ'), because the vertical field between adjacent tapes in the same layer varied with θ/θ'. When simulating the real cable, the helical pitches were adjusted and the layer currents were calculated by the EC model. These currents were input to the 2D FEM to compute the losses. The losses changed along the cable length because the difference between P1 and P2 altered the θ/θ' along this direction. The average angle-dependent and position-dependent losses were equal and closely approximated the measured losses. As an example to reduce the loss in this cable, the angle and the helical pitches were fixed at θ/θ' = 0.5 and P1 = P2 = 100 mm (S-direction). The calculation with these conditions indicated that the loss is about one order of magnitude lower than the measurement.

  12. An Approximate Axisymmetric Viscous Shock Layer Aeroheating Method for Three-Dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brykina, Irina G.; Scott, Carl D.

    1998-01-01

    A technique is implemented for computing hypersonic aeroheating, shear stress, and other flow properties on the windward side of a three-dimensional (3D) blunt body. The technique uses a 2D/axisymmetric flow solver modified by scale factors for a, corresponding equivalent axisymmetric body. Examples are given in which a 2D solver is used to calculate the flow at selected meridional planes on elliptic paraboloids in reentry flight. The report describes the equations and the codes used to convert the body surface parameters into input used to scale the 2D viscous shock layer equations in the axisymmetric viscous shock layer code. Very good agreement is obtained with solutions to finite rate chemistry 3D thin viscous shock layer equations for a finite rate catalytic body.

  13. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  14. Finite-Difference Solution for Laminar or Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Axisymmetric Bodies with Ideal Gas, CF4, or Equilibrium Air Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Millman, Daniel R.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code was developed that uses an implicit finite-difference technique to solve nonsimilar, axisymmetric boundary layer equations for both laminar and turbulent flow. The code can treat ideal gases, air in chemical equilibrium, and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4), which is a useful gas for hypersonic blunt-body simulations. This is the only known boundary layer code that can treat CF4. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated that accurate solutions are obtained. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing calculations with wind tunnel experiments and for making calculations about flight vehicles where equilibrium air chemistry assumptions are valid.

  15. Computation of self-field hysteresis losses in conductors with helicoidal structure using a 2D finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenvall, A.; Siahrang, M.; Grilli, F.; Sirois, F.

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that twisting current-carrying conductors helps to reduce their coupling losses. However, the impact of twisting on self-field hysteresis losses has not been as extensively investigated as that on the reduction of coupling losses. This is mostly because the reduction of coupling losses has been an important issue to tackle in the past, and it is not possible to consider twisting within the classical two-dimensional (2D) approaches for the computation of self-field hysteresis losses. Recently, numerical codes considering the effect of twisting in continuous symmetries have appeared. For general three-dimensional (3D) simulations, one issue is that no robust, widely accepted and easy to obtain model for expressing the relationship between the current density and the electric field is available. On the other hand, we can consider that in these helicoidal structures currents flow only along the helicoidal trajectories. This approach allows one to use the scalar power-law for superconductor resistivity and makes the eddy current approach to a solution of a hysteresis loss problem feasible. In this paper we use the finite element method to solve the eddy current model in helicoidal structures in 2D domains utilizing the helicoidal symmetry. The developed tool uses the full 3D geometry but allows discretization which takes advantage of the helicoidal symmetry to reduce the computational domain to a 2D one. We utilize in this tool the non-linear power law for modelling the resistivity in the superconducting regions and study how the self-field losses are influenced by the twisting of a 10-filament wire. Additionally, in the case of high aspect ratio tapes, we compare the results computed with the new tool and a one-dimensional program based on the integral equation method and developed for simulating single layer power cables made of ReBCO coated conductors. Finally, we discuss modelling issues and present open questions related to helicoidal structures

  16. 2-D finite difference time domain model of ultrasound reflection from normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, Erna; Liukkonen, Jukka; Toyras, Juha; Saarakkala, Simo; Kiviranta, Panu; Jurvelin, Jukka

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative high-frequency ultrasonic evaluation of articular cartilage has shown a potential for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, where the roughness of the surface, collagen and proteoglycan contents, and the density and mechanical properties of cartilage change concurrently. Experimentally, these factors are difficult to investigate individually and thus a numerical model is needed. The present study is the first one to use finite difference time domain modeling of pulse-echo measurements of articular cartilage. Ultrasound reflection from the surface was investigated with varying surface roughness, material parameters (Young's modulus, density, longitudinal, and transversal velocities) and inclination of the samples. The 2-D simulation results were compared with the results from experimental measurements of the same samples in an identical geometry. Both the roughness and the material parameters contributed significantly to the ultrasound reflection. The angular dependence of the ultrasound reflection was strong for a smooth cartilage surface but disappeared for the samples with a rougher surface. These results support the findings of previous experimental studies and indicate that ultrasound detects changes in the cartilage that are characteristic of osteoarthritis. In the present study there are differences between the results of the simulations and the experimental measurements. However, the systematic patterns in the experimental behavior are correctly reproduced by the model. In the future, our goal is to develop more realistic acoustic models incorporating inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the cartilage. PMID:20378451

  17. Elucidating the origin of spurious modes in aluminum nitride microresonators using a 2-D finite-element model.

    PubMed

    Branch, Darren W; Wojciechowski, Kenneth E; Olsson, Roy H

    2014-05-01

    In this work, an approach has been developed to predict the location of large spurious modes in the resonant response of aluminum nitride (AlN) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators over a wide range of desired operating frequencies. This addresses significant challenges in the design of more complex AlN devices, namely the prediction and elimination of spurious modes in the resonance response. Using the finite element method (FEM), the dispersion curves at wavelengths ranging from 8 to 20 μm were computed. It was determined that the velocities of symmetric Lamb (S0) and high-order antisymmetric (A) modes overlap at specific wavelengths. A 2-D FEM analysis showed that both the S0 and higher order A modes are mutually excited at a common operating wavelength. From this analysis, the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters were extracted and used to compute the P-matrix and S-parameters using a 6-port transmission matrix. The P-matrix simulation was able to predict the electrical response of the S0 and nearby spurious modes. This work identified specific wavelength regions where COM has limited accuracy because of mode conversion. In these regions, the reflection (κ(p)) and transduction (ζ(p)) parameters change rapidly.

  18. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 1: Model Description and User's Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torak, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    A MODular, Finite-Element digital-computer program (MODFE) was developed to simulate steady or unsteady-state, two-dimensional or axisymmetric ground-water flow. Geometric- and hydrologic-aquifer characteristics in two spatial dimensions are represented by triangular finite elements and linear basis functions; one-dimensional finite elements and linear basis functions represent time. Finite-element matrix equations are solved by the direct symmetric-Doolittle method or the iterative modified, incomplete-Cholesky, conjugate-gradient method. Physical processes that can be represented by the model include (1) confined flow, unconfined flow (using the Dupuit approximation), or a combination of both; (2) leakage through either rigid or elastic confining beds; (3) specified recharge or discharge at points, along lines, and over areas; (4) flow across specified-flow, specified-head, or bead-dependent boundaries; (5) decrease of aquifer thickness to zero under extreme water-table decline and increase of aquifer thickness from zero as the water table rises; and (6) head-dependent fluxes from springs, drainage wells, leakage across riverbeds or confining beds combined with aquifer dewatering, and evapotranspiration. The report describes procedures for applying MODFE to ground-water-flow problems, simulation capabilities, and data preparation. Guidelines for designing the finite-element mesh and for node numbering and determining band widths are given. Tables are given that reference simulation capabilities to specific versions of MODFE. Examples of data input and model output for different versions of MODFE are provided.

  19. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2-D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-09-01

    The 2-D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly to computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2-D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional second-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2M)th-order accuracy in space and (2N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra

  20. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-07-01

    The 2D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2 M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2 M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional 2nd-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy in space and (2 N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra computational

  1. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  2. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  3. The Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) : LST, Linear and Nonlinear PSE for 2-D, Axisymmetric, and Infinite Swept Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2003-01-01

    During the past two decades, our understanding of laminar-turbulent transition flow physics has advanced significantly owing to, in a large part, the NASA program support such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), High-speed Civil Transport (HSCT), and Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST). Experimental, theoretical, as well as computational efforts on various issues such as receptivity and linear and nonlinear evolution of instability waves take part in broadening our knowledge base for this intricate flow phenomenon. Despite all these advances, transition prediction remains a nontrivial task for engineers due to the lack of a widely available, robust, and efficient prediction tool. The design and development of the LASTRAC code is aimed at providing one such engineering tool that is easy to use and yet capable of dealing with a broad range of transition related issues. LASTRAC was written from scratch based on the state-of-the-art numerical methods for stability analysis and modem software technologies. At low fidelity, it allows users to perform linear stability analysis and N-factor transition correlation for a broad range of flow regimes and configurations by using either the linear stability theory (LST) or linear parabolized stability equations (LPSE) method. At high fidelity, users may use nonlinear PSE to track finite-amplitude disturbances until the skin friction rise. Coupled with the built-in receptivity model that is currently under development, the nonlinear PSE method offers a synergistic approach to predict transition onset for a given disturbance environment based on first principles. This paper describes the governing equations, numerical methods, code development, and case studies for the current release of LASTRAC. Practical applications of LASTRAC are demonstrated for linear stability calculations, N-factor transition correlation, non-linear breakdown simulations, and controls of stationary crossflow instability in supersonic swept wing boundary

  4. Finite element analysis of bolted flange connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, D. Y.; Stallings, J. M.

    1994-06-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric finite element model and a 3-D solid finite element model of a high pressure bolted flange joint were generated to investigate the stress behaviors. This investigation includes comparisons for axisymmetric loading of both the 2-D and 3-D models, the effects of non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions in the 3-D models, and the differences between 2-D and 3-D models subjected to non-axisymmetric loading. Comparisons indicated differences in von Mises stress up to 12% at various points due to the non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions. Applied bending moments were converted to equivalent axial forces for use in the 2-D model. It was found that the largest von Mises stresses in 3-D model did not occur on the side of the connection where the bending stresses and applied axial stresses were additive. Hence, in the 2-D model where the equivalent axial force (for bending moment) and applied axial forces were added, the 2-D model under estimated the maximum von Mises stress obtained from the 3-D model by 30%.

  5. The effect of damping on the stability of a finite element model of a flexible non-axisymmetric rotor on tilting pad bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Anthony G.; Craggs, Anthony

    1995-09-01

    A finite element model of a rotor-bearing system with non-axisymmetric stiffness and mass properties was analyzed in a previous study. In this paper the model is extended to include the effects of external damping due to symmetrical tilting-pad bearings. The same instability mechanisms, due to the lack of axisymmetry and shear deflection occurred in the damped case as for the undamped case, but within the normal operating speed of typical industrial rotor systems, a quite high degree of asymmetry is necessary. A ratio of the difference in a diametral second moments of area to mean diametral second moment of area, greater than 0.3 is necessary for instability for the configuration modelled. The instabilities involving antisymmetric modes in the undamped case are not present in the damped case. The first backward mode is involved in the instabilities of most practical interest. The effect of internal damping is also examined for an axisymmetric rotor and the behaviour, involving instability of the first forward mode, compares well with purely analytical methods for simple rotors.

  6. Users manual for AUTOMESH-2D: A program of automatic mesh generation for two-dimensional scattering analysis by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Chongyu; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    AUTOMESH-2D is a computer program specifically designed as a preprocessor for the scattering analysis of two dimensional bodies by the finite element method. This program was developed due to a need for reproducing the effort required to define and check the geometry data, element topology, and material properties. There are six modules in the program: (1) Parameter Specification; (2) Data Input; (3) Node Generation; (4) Element Generation; (5) Mesh Smoothing; and (5) Data File Generation.

  7. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 2: Derivation of finite-element equations and comparisons with analytical solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    MODFE, a modular finite-element model for simulating steady- or unsteady-state, area1 or axisymmetric flow of ground water in a heterogeneous anisotropic aquifer is documented in a three-part series of reports. In this report, part 2, the finite-element equations are derived by minimizing a functional of the difference between the true and approximate hydraulic head, which produces equations that are equivalent to those obtained by either classical variational or Galerkin techniques. Spatial finite elements are triangular with linear basis functions, and temporal finite elements are one dimensional with linear basis functions. Physical processes that can be represented by the model include (1) confined flow, unconfined flow (using the Dupuit approximation), or a combination of both; (2) leakage through either rigid or elastic confining units; (3) specified recharge or discharge at points, along lines, or areally; (4) flow across specified-flow, specified-head, or head-dependent boundaries; (5) decrease of aquifer thickness to zero under extreme water-table decline and increase of aquifer thickness from zero as the water table rises; and (6) head-dependent fluxes from springs, drainage wells, leakage across riverbeds or confining units combined with aquifer dewatering, and evapotranspiration. The matrix equations produced by the finite-element method are solved by the direct symmetric-Doolittle method or the iterative modified incomplete-Cholesky conjugate-gradient method. The direct method can be efficient for small- to medium-sized problems (less than about 500 nodes), and the iterative method is generally more efficient for larger-sized problems. Comparison of finite-element solutions with analytical solutions for five example problems demonstrates that the finite-element model can yield accurate solutions to ground-water flow problems.

  8. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  9. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  10. A Piecewise Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation in 2D Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Chang, J H

    2008-10-01

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional cylindrical (RZ) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. This discretization is a discontinuous finite element method that utilizes the piecewise linear basis functions developed by Stone and Adams. We describe an asymptotic analysis that shows this method to be accurate for many problems in the thick diffusion limit on arbitrary polygons, allowing this method to be applied to radiative transfer problems with these types of meshes. We also present numerical results for multiple problems on quadrilateral grids and compare these results to the well-known bi-linear discontinuous finite element method.

  11. Methods for Solving Gas Damping Problems in Perforated Microstructures Using a 2D Finite-Element Solver

    PubMed Central

    Veijola, Timo; Råback, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present a straightforward method to solve gas damping problems for perforated structures in two dimensions (2D) utilising a Perforation Profile Reynolds (PPR) solver. The PPR equation is an extended Reynolds equation that includes additional terms modelling the leakage flow through the perforations, and variable diffusivity and compressibility profiles. The solution method consists of two phases: 1) determination of the specific admittance profile and relative diffusivity (and relative compressibility) profiles due to the perforation, and 2) solution of the PPR equation with a FEM solver in 2D. Rarefied gas corrections in the slip-flow region are also included. Analytic profiles for circular and square holes with slip conditions are presented in the paper. To verify the method, square perforated dampers with 16–64 holes were simulated with a three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes solver, a homogenised extended Reynolds solver, and a 2D PPR solver. Cases for both translational (in normal to the surfaces) and torsional motion were simulated. The presented method extends the region of accurate simulation of perforated structures to cases where the homogenisation method is inaccurate and the full 3D Navier-Stokes simulation is too time-consuming.

  12. Finite Element Method for Analysis of Band Structures of 2D Phononic Crystals with Archimedean-like tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianbao; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, a finite element method based on the ABAQUS code and user subroutine is presented to evaluate the propagation of acoustic waves in the two-dimensional phononic crystals with Archimedean-like tilings. Two systems composed of cylinder scatters embedded in a host in Ladybug and Bathroom lattices are considered. Complete and accurate band structures and transmission spectra are obtained to identify the band gaps and eigenmodes. We found that Archimedean-like structures can have some advantages over the traditional square lattice regarding the completeness of the gap and its position and width. Also, due to the same square primitive unit cell and the first Brillouin zone, the two square-like lattices have similar acoustic response in lower bands. The results indicate that the finite element method is precise for the band structure computation of the complex phononic crystals with Archimedean tilings.

  13. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  14. Solution of the 2-D steady-state radiative transfer equation in participating media with specular reflections using SUPG and DG finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hardy, D.; Favennec, Y.; Rousseau, B.

    2016-08-01

    The 2D radiative transfer equation coupled with specular reflection boundary conditions is solved using finite element schemes. Both Discontinuous Galerkin and Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin variational formulations are fully developed. These two schemes are validated step-by-step for all involved operators (transport, scattering, reflection) using analytical formulations. Numerical comparisons of the two schemes, in terms of convergence rate, reveal that the quadratic SUPG scheme proves efficient for solving such problems. This comparison constitutes the main issue of the paper. Moreover, the solution process is accelerated using block SOR-type iterative methods, for which the determination of the optimal parameter is found in a very cheap way.

  15. Coupled 2D-3D finite element method for analysis of a skin panel with a discontinuous stiffener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Lotts, C. G.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient analysis method which was used to predict detailed stress states in a typical composite compression panel with a discontinuous hat stiffener. A global-local approach was used. The global model incorporated both 2D shell and 3D brick elements connected by newly developed transition elements. Most of the panel was modeled with 2D elements, while 3D elements were employed to model the stiffener flange and the adjacent skin. Both linear and geometrically nonlinear analyses were performed on the global model. The effect of geometric nonlinearity induced by the eccentric load path due to the discontinuous hat stiffener was significant. The local model used a fine mesh of 3D brick elements to model the region at the end of the stiffener. Boundary conditions of the local 3D model were obtained by spline interpolation of the nodal displacements from the global analysis. Detailed in-plane and through-the-thickness stresses were calculated in the flange-skin interface near the end of the stiffener.

  16. An Analysis of Peristaltic Flow of Finitely Extendable Nonlinear Elastic- Peterlin Fluid in Two-Dimensional Planar Channel and Axisymmetric Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Asghar, Zaheer

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the peristaltic motion of a non-Newtonian fluid characterized by the finitely extendable nonlinear elastic-Peterlin (FENE-P) fluid model. A background for the development of the differential constitutive equation of this model has been provided. The flow analysis is carried out both for two-dimensional planar channel and axisymmetric tube. The governing equations have been simplified under the widely used assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number in a frame of reference that moves with constant wave speed. An exact solution is obtained for the stream function and longitudinal pressure gradient with no slip condition. We have portrayed the effects of Deborah number and extensibility parameter on velocity profile, trapping phenomenon, and normal stress. It is observed that normal stress is an increasing function of Deborah number and extensibility parameter. As far as the velocity at the channel (tube) center is concerned, it decreases (increases) by increasing Deborah number (extensibility parameter). The non-Newtonian rheology also affect the size of trapped bolus in a sense that it decreases (increases) by increasing Deborah number (extensibility parameter). Further, it is observed through numerical integration that both Deborah number and extensibility parameter have opposite effects on pressure rise per wavelength and frictional forces at the wall. Moreover, it is shown that the results for the Newtonian model can be deduced as a special case of the FENE-P model

  17. Unified Nusselt- and Sherwood-number correlations in axisymmetric finite-gap stagnation and rotating-disk flows

    DOE PAGES

    Coltrin, Michael E.; Kee, Robert J.

    2016-06-18

    This paper develops a unified analysis of stagnation flow heat and mass transport, considering both semi-infinite domains and finite gaps, with and without rotation of the stagnation surface. An important objective is to derive Nusselt- and Sherwood-number correlations that represent heat and mass transport at the stagnation surface. The approach is based on computationally solving the governing conservation equations in similarity form as a boundary-value problem. The formulation considers ideal gases and incompressible fluids. The correlated results depend on fluid properties in terms of Prandtl, Schmidt, and Damkohler numbers. Heterogeneous chemistry at the stagnation surface is represented as a singlemore » first-order reaction. A composite Reynolds number represents the combination of stagnation flows with and without stagnation-surface rotation.« less

  18. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  19. A finite analytic method for solving the 2-D time-dependent advection diffusion equation with time-invariant coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Thomas; Li, Shu-Guang

    2005-02-01

    Difficulty in solving the transient advection-diffusion equation (ADE) stems from the relationship between the advection derivatives and the time derivative. For a solution method to be viable, it must account for this relationship by being accurate in both space and time. This research presents a unique method for solving the time-dependent ADE that does not discretize the derivative terms but rather solves the equation analytically in the space-time domain. The method is computationally efficient and numerically accurate and addresses the common limitations of numerical dispersion and spurious oscillations that can be prevalent in other solution methods. The method is based on the improved finite analytic (IFA) solution method [Lowry TS, Li S-G. A characteristic based finite analytic method for solving the two-dimensional steady-state advection-diffusion equation. Water Resour Res 38 (7), 10.1029/2001WR000518] in space coupled with a Laplace transformation in time. In this way, the method has no Courant condition and maintains accuracy in space and time, performing well even at high Peclet numbers. The method is compared to a hybrid method of characteristics, a random walk particle tracking method, and an Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method using various degrees of flow-field heterogeneity across multiple Peclet numbers. Results show the IFALT method to be computationally more efficient while producing similar or better accuracy than the other methods.

  20. Local finite element enrichment strategies for 2D contact computations and a corresponding post-processing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Roger A.

    2013-08-01

    Recently an enriched contact finite element formulation has been developed that substantially increases the accuracy of contact computations while keeping the additional numerical effort at a minimum reported by Sauer (Int J Numer Meth Eng, 87: 593-616, 2011). Two enrich-ment strategies were proposed, one based on local p-refinement using Lagrange interpolation and one based on Hermite interpolation that produces C 1-smoothness on the contact surface. Both classes, which were initially considered for the frictionless Signorini problem, are extended here to friction and contact between deformable bodies. For this, a symmetric contact formulation is used that allows the unbiased treatment of both contact partners. This paper also proposes a post-processing scheme for contact quantities like the contact pressure. The scheme, which provides a more accurate representation than the raw data, is based on an averaging procedure that is inspired by mortar formulations. The properties of the enrichment strategies and the corresponding post-processing scheme are illustrated by several numerical examples considering sliding and peeling contact in the presence of large deformations.

  1. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 3: Design philosophy and programming details

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torak, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    A MODular Finite-Element, digital-computer program (MODFE) was developed to simulate steady or unsteady-state, two-dimensional or axisymmetric ground-water-flow. The modular structure of MODFE places the computationally independent tasks that are performed routinely by digital-computer programs simulating ground-water flow into separate subroutines, which are executed from the main program by control statements. Each subroutine consists of complete sets of computations, or modules, which are identified by comment statements, and can be modified by the user without affecting unrelated computations elsewhere in the program. Simulation capabilities can be added or modified by either adding or modifying subroutines that perform specific computational tasks, and the modular-program structure allows the user to create versions of MODFE that contain only the simulation capabilities that pertain to the ground-water problem of interest. MODFE is written in a Fortran programming language that makes it virtually device independent and compatible with desk-top personal computers and large mainframes. MODFE uses computer storage and execution time efficiently by taking advantage of symmetry and sparseness within the coefficient matrices of the finite-element equations. Parts of the matrix coefficients are computed and stored as single-subscripted variables, which are assembled into a complete coefficient just prior to solution. Computer storage is reused during simulation to decrease storage requirements. Descriptions of subroutines that execute the computational steps of the modular-program structure are given in tables that cross reference the subroutines with particular versions of MODFE. Programming details of linear and nonlinear hydrologic terms are provided. Structure diagrams for the main programs show the order in which subroutines are executed for each version and illustrate some of the linear and nonlinear versions of MODFE that are possible. Computational aspects of

  2. Finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling with phase cycling for 2D 1H/1H correlation at ultrafast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-06-01

    The first-order recoupling sequence radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) is commonly used in single-quantum/single-quantum homonuclear correlation 2D experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS) to determine homonuclear proximities. From previously reported analysis of the use of XY-based super-cycling schemes to enhance the efficiency of the finite-pulse-RFDR (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence, XY814 phase cycling was found to provide the optimum performance for 2D correlation experiments on low-γ nuclei. In this study, we analyze the efficiency of different phase cycling schemes for proton-based fp-RFDR experiments. We demonstrate the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle XY414 that only recouples the zero-quantum homonuclear dipolar coupling, for the fp-RFDR sequence in 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies. The dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY414 and XY814 phase cycling schemes are compared based on results obtained from 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments, utilizing the fp-RFDR pulse sequence, on powder samples of U-13C,15N-L-alanine, N-acetyl-15N-L-valyl-15N-L-leucine, and glycine. Experimental results and spin dynamics simulations show that XY414 performs the best when a high RF power is used for the 180° pulse, whereas XY4 renders the best performance when a low RF power is used. The effects of RF field inhomogeneity and chemical shift offsets are also examined. Overall, our results suggest that a combination of fp-RFDR-XY414 employed in the recycle delay with a large RF-field to decrease the recycle delay, and fp-RFDR-XY4 in the mixing period with a moderate RF-field, is a robust and efficient method for 2D single-quantum/single-quantum 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies.

  3. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using the horizontal spectral element method and vertical finite difference method: 2-D aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.-J.; Giraldo, F. X.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-11-01

    The non-hydrostatic (NH) compressible Euler equations for dry atmosphere were solved in a simplified two-dimensional (2-D) slice framework employing a spectral element method (SEM) for the horizontal discretization and a finite difference method (FDM) for the vertical discretization. By using horizontal SEM, which decomposes the physical domain into smaller pieces with a small communication stencil, a high level of scalability can be achieved. By using vertical FDM, an easy method for coupling the dynamics and existing physics packages can be provided. The SEM uses high-order nodal basis functions associated with Lagrange polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) quadrature points. The FDM employs a third-order upwind-biased scheme for the vertical flux terms and a centered finite difference scheme for the vertical derivative and integral terms. For temporal integration, a time-split, third-order Runge-Kutta (RK3) integration technique was applied. The Euler equations that were used here are in flux form based on the hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate. The equations are the same as those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, but a hybrid sigma-pressure vertical coordinate was implemented in this model. We validated the model by conducting the widely used standard tests: linear hydrostatic mountain wave, tracer advection, and gravity wave over the Schär-type mountain, as well as density current, inertia-gravity wave, and rising thermal bubble. The results from these tests demonstrated that the model using the horizontal SEM and the vertical FDM is accurate and robust provided sufficient diffusion is applied. The results with various horizontal resolutions also showed convergence of second-order accuracy due to the accuracy of the time integration scheme and that of the vertical direction, although high-order basis functions were used in the horizontal. By using the 2-D slice model, we effectively showed that the combined spatial

  4. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Christian D

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests. PMID:18384599

  5. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  6. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  7. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation.more » By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  8. ALL-CERAMIC AND PORCELAIN-FUSED-TO-METAL FIXED PARTIAL DENTURES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY BY 2D FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSES

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Andréia Barreira; Pereira, Luiz Carlos; da Cunha, Andréia R.C.C

    2007-01-01

    All-ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have an esthetic approach for oral rehabilitation. However, metal-ceramic FPDs are best indicated in the posterior area where the follow-up studies found a lower failure rate. This 2D finite element study compared the stress distribution on 3-unit all-ceramic and metal-ceramic FPDs and identified the areas of major risk of failure. Three FPD models were designed: (1) metal-ceramic FPD; (2) All-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain on the occlusal and cervical surface of the abutment tooth; (3) All-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain only on the occlusal surface. A 100 N load was applied in an area of 0.5 mm2 on the working cusps, following these simulations: (1) on the abutment teeth and the pontic; (2) only on the abutment teeth; and (3) only on the pontic. Relative to the maximum stress values found for the physiological load, all-ceramic FPD with only occlusal veneering porcelain produced the lowest stress value (220 MPa), followed by all-ceramic FPD with cervical veneering porcelain (322 MPa) and metal-ceramic FPD (387 MPa). The stress distribution of the load applied on the abutments was significantly better compared to the other two load simulations. The highest principal stress values were low and limited in a small area for the three types of models under this load. When the load was applied on the pontic, the highest stress values appeared on the connector areas between the abutments and pontic. In conclusion, the best stress values and distribution were found for the all-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain only on the occlusal surface. However, in under clinical conditions, fatigue conditions and restoration defects must be considered. PMID:19089168

  9. Cancellous bone lamellae strongly affect microcrack propagation and apparent mechanical properties: Separation of patients with osteoporotic fracture from normal controls using a 2D nonlinear finite element method (biomechanical stereology)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Zauel, Roger R.; Rao, D. Sudhaker; Fyhrie, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Biomechanical stereology is proposed as a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) method to estimate the ability of bone tissue to sustain damage and to separate patients with osteoporotic fracture from normal controls. Briefly, 2D nonlinear compact tension FE models were created from quantitative back scattered electron images taken of iliac crest bone specimens collected from the individuals with or without osteoporotic fracture history. The effects of bone mineral microstructure on predicted bone fracture toughness and microcrack propagation were examined. The 2D FE models were used as surrogates for the real bone tissues. The calculated microcrack propagation results and bone mechanical properties were examined as surrogates for measurements from mechanical testing of actual specimens. The results for the 2D FE simulation separated patients with osteoporotic fracture from normal controls even though only the variability in tissue mineral microstructure was used to build the models. The models were deliberately created to ignore all differences in mean mineralization. Hence, the current results support the following hypotheses: (1) that material heterogeneity is important to the separation of patients with osteoporotic fracture from normal controls and; and (2) that 2D nonlinear finite element modeling can produce surrogate mechanical parameters that separate patients with fracture from normal controls. PMID:18378204

  10. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Edwards, A. L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available.

  11. Verification and benchmarking of MAGNUM-2D: a finite element computer code for flow and heat transfer in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    The objective of this work is to assess prediction capabilities and features of the MAGNUM-2D computer code in relation to its intended use in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). This objective is accomplished through a code verification and benchmarking task. Results are documented which support correctness of prediction capabilities in areas of intended model application. 10 references, 43 figures, 11 tables.

  12. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

  13. Numerical models of diapiric structures: comparison of the 2D finite deformation field between Rayleigh-Taylor like and down-built like diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Lukas; Schmeling, Harro; Koyi, Hemin

    2013-04-01

    Magmatic and salt diapirs are common structures in different tectonic regimes. Salt diapirs can act as possible hydrocarbon traps and, moreover, they could be used as repositories for nuclear waste disposal. Understanding the evolution and the dynamics of diapirs as well as their driving mechanisms has fundamental and applied significance. In general, salt diapirs seem to be driven by differential loading of sediments creating an uneven load that drives the salt from high to low pressure areas, e.g. a down-built diapir. Magmatic diapirs, instead, seem to be driven by buoyancy where lighter material rises vertically through a heavier overburden, i.e. a classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability [RTI]. These different driving mechanisms and dynamics strongly govern the internal deformation of the diapirs. In this study, we use a two-dimensional finite difference code (FDCON) in combination with a marker and cell method to calculate the finite deformation within diapiric structures. Thereby, we distinguish between the two different driving mechanisms, i.e. the differential loading and the buoyancy. We calculate the different finite deformation patterns during the evolution of RTI's and down-built diapirs for different viscosity ratios m = -?buoyant- ?overburden. The deformation pattern in the buoyant layer shows similarities for both diapiric structures, like high shear deformation at the bottom, a high finite deformation within the middle of the stem, and an increasing maximum finite deformation for a decreasing m. However, the strain partitioning between the overburden and the source layer is different within down-built diapirs compared to the RTI's, even for down-built diapirs with m = 1. Thus a higher amount of the total strain induced by down-building is concentrated within the buoyant layer. Moreover, in the case of viscosity ratios of m = 0.1 or 1 the sinking overburden units create an internal rotation within the diapiric bulb. This rotation depends indirectly on

  14. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  15. Finite difference time domain method for calculating the band structure of a 2D photonic crystal and simulating the lensing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee Dastjerdi, S.; Ghanaatshoar, M.

    2013-08-01

    A finite difference time domain method based on regular Yee's algorithm in an orthogonal coordinate system is utilized to calculate the band structure of a two-dimensional square-lattice photonic crystal comprising dielectric cylinders in air background and to simulate the image formation of mentioned structure incorporating the perfectly matched layer boundary condition. By analyzing the photonic band diagram of this system, we find that the frequency region of effective negative refraction exists in the second band in near-infrared domain. In this case, electromagnetic wave propagates with a negative phase velocity and the evanescent waves can be supported to perform higher image resolution.

  16. Justification of the Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation for the Evolution of Gravity Driven 2D Surface Water Waves in a Canal of Finite Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düll, Wolf-Patrick; Schneider, Guido; Wayne, C. Eugene

    2016-05-01

    In 1968 V.E. Zakharov derived the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the two-dimensional water wave problem in the absence of surface tension, that is, for the evolution of gravity driven surface water waves, in order to describe slow temporal and spatial modulations of a spatially and temporarily oscillating wave packet. In this paper we give a rigorous proof that the wave packets in the two-dimensional water wave problem in a canal of finite depth can be approximated over a physically relevant timespan by solutions of the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  17. Influence of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions on Debonding Prediction for Composite Skin-stiffener Specimens Subjected to Tension and Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed deflections, skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with lamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  18. Modal analysis of delaminated composite plates using the finite element method and damage detection via combined Ritz/2D-wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Moreno-García, P.; Casanova, Cesar F.

    2013-06-01

    Structural studies to find defects (in particular delaminations) in composite plates have been very prevalent in the Structural Health Monitoring field. The present work develops a new method to detect delaminations in CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) plates. In this paper the method is validated with numerical simulations, which come to support its adequacy for use with real acquisition data. This is done firstly through the implementation of a delaminated plate finite element. Using the classical lamination plate theory, delamination is considered in the kinematic equations through jump functions and additional degrees of freedom. The element allows the introduction of nd delaminations through its thickness. Classical QMITC (Quadrilateral Mixed Interpolation Tensorial Components) and DKQ (Discrete Kirchhoff Quadrilateral) elements are used for the membrane and bending FEM (Finite Element Method) formulation. Second, using the vibration modes obtained with the FEM, a damage location technique based on the variational Ritz method and Wavelet Analysis is proposed. The approach has the advantage of requiring only damaged modes and not the healthy ones. Both FEM simulations and Ritz/Wavelet damage detection schemes are applied in an orthotropic CFRP plate with the stacking sequence [0/90]3S. In addition, the influence of delamination thickness position, boundary conditions and added noise (in order to simulate experimental measures) was studied.

  19. Simulation of seismic wave propagation in 2D poroelastic media using weighted-averaging finite difference stencils in the frequency-space domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingjie; Mao, Weijian

    2016-10-01

    The poroelastodynamic equations are used to describe the dynamic solid-fluid interaction in the reservoir. To obtain the intrinsic properties of reservoir rocks from geophysical data measured in both laboratory and field, we need an accurate solution of the wave propagation in porous media. At present, the poroelastic wave equations are mostly solved in the time domain, which involves a difficult and complicated time convolution. In order to avoid the issues caused by the time convolution, we propose a frequency-space domain method. The poroelastic wave equations are composed of a linear system in the frequency domain, which easily takes into account the effects of all frequencies on the dispersion and attenuation of seismic wave. A 25-point weighted-averaging finite different scheme is proposed to discretize the equations. For the finite model, the perfectly matched layer technique is applied at the model boundaries. We validated the proposed algorithm by testing three numerical examples of poroelastic models, which are homogenous, two-layered and heterogeneous with different fluids, respectively. The testing results are encouraging in the aspects of both computational accuracy and efficiency.

  20. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional droplet trajectory calculations in the vicinity of finite wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, Stanley R., Jr.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1992-01-01

    Computational predictions of ice accretion on flying aircraft most commonly rely on modeling in two dimensions (2D). These 2D methods treat an aircraft geometry either as wing-like with infinite span, or as an axisymmetric body. Recently, fully three dimensional (3D) methods have been introduced that model an aircrafts true 3D shape. Because 3D methods are more computationally expensive than 2D methods, 2D methods continue to be widely used. However, a 3D method allows us to investigate whether it is valid to continue applying 2D methods to a finite wing. The extent of disagreement between LEWICE, a 2D method, and LEWICE3D, a 3D method, in calculating local collection efficiencies at the leading edge of finite wings is investigated in this paper.

  1. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional droplet trajectory calculations in the vicinity of finite wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, Stanley R., Jr.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1992-01-01

    Computational predictions of ice accretion on flying aircraft most commonly rely on modeling in 2D. These 2D methods treat an aircraft geometry either as wing-like with infinite span, or as an axisymmetric body. Recently, fully 3D methods have been introduced that model an aircraft's true 3D shape. Because 3D methods are more computationally expensive than 2D methods, 2D methods continue to be widely used. However, a 3D method allows investigation of whether it is valid to continue applying 2D methods to a finite wing. The extent of disagreement between LEWICE, a 2D method, and LEWICE3D, a 3D method, in calculating local collection efficiencies at the leading edge of finite wings is investigated.

  2. Form finding and analysis of extensible membranes attached to 2-D and 3-D frames intended for micro air vehicles via experimentally validated finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaram, Yaakov Jack

    This work is concerned with a new method to apply consistent and known pretension to silicone rubber membranes intended for micro air vehicles as well as an understanding in the science of developed pre-tension in membranes constrained by 2- D and 3-D frames and structures. Pre-tension has a marked effect on the static and dynamic response of membrane wings and controls the overall deflections, as such control and measurement of the membrane pre-tension is important. Two different 2-D frame geometries were fabricated to evaluate the technique. For open-cell frames, the pretension was not uniform, whereas it was for closed-cell frames. Results show developed full-field stress and strain fields as a function of membrane attachment temperature and frame geometry along with experimental iterations to prove repeatability. The membranes can be stretched to a specific pretension according to the temperature at which it adheres to frames. Strain fields in membranes attached to 3-D frames at various temperatures are modeled through FEA utilizing Abaqus to be able to predict the developed membrane deformations, stresses, and strains. Rigid frames with various curvatures are built via appropriate molds and then adhered to silicone rubber membranes and elevated to various temperatures to achieve different pre-strains for experimental validation. Additional experiments are conducted for more complex frame geometries involving both convex and concave topologies embedded within frames. Results are then compared with the Abaqus outputs to validate the accuracy of the FEA model. Highly compliant wings have been used for MAV platforms, where the wing structure is determined by some combination of carbon fiber composites and a membrane skin, adhered in between the layers of composite material. Another new technique of attaching membranes firmly on wing structures is introduced, which involves the application of a technology known as corona treatment coupled with another method of

  3. Regional subsidence modelling in Murcia city (SE Spain) using 1-D vertical finite element analysis and 2-D interpolation of ground surface displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessitore, S.; Fernández-Merodo, J. A.; Herrera, G.; Tomás, R.; Ramondini, M.; Sanabria, M.; Duro, J.; Mulas, J.; Calcaterra, D.

    2015-11-01

    Subsidence is a hazard that may have natural or anthropogenic origin causing important economic losses. The area of Murcia city (SE Spain) has been affected by subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation since the year 1992. The main observed historical piezometric level declines occurred in the periods 1982-1984, 1992-1995 and 2004-2008 and showed a close correlation with the temporal evolution of ground displacements. Since 2008, the pressure recovery in the aquifer has led to an uplift of the ground surface that has been detected by the extensometers. In the present work an elastic hydro-mechanical finite element code has been used to compute the subsidence time series for 24 geotechnical boreholes, prescribing the measured groundwater table evolution. The achieved results have been compared with the displacements estimated through an advanced DInSAR technique and measured by the extensometers. These spatio-temporal comparisons have showed that, in spite of the limited geomechanical data available, the model has turned out to satisfactorily reproduce the subsidence phenomenon affecting Murcia City. The model will allow the prediction of future induced deformations and the consequences of any piezometric level variation in the study area.

  4. A 2D magnetic and 3D mechanical coupled finite element model for the study of the dynamic vibrations in the stator of induction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.; Belahcen, A.; Detoni, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled Finite Element Model in order to study the vibrations in induction motors under steady-state. The model utilizes a weak coupling strategy between both magnetic and elastodynamic fields on the structure. Firstly, the problem solves the magnetic vector potential in an axial cut and secondly the former solution is coupled to a three dimensional model of the stator. The coupling is performed using projection based algorithms between the computed magnetic solution and the three-dimensional mesh. The three-dimensional model of the stator includes both end-windings and end-shields in order to give a realistic picture of the motor. The present model is validated using two steps. Firstly, a modal analysis hammer test is used to validate the material characteristic of this complex structure and secondly an array of accelerometer sensors is used in order to study the rotating waves using multi-dimensional spectral techniques. The analysis of the radial vibrations presented in this paper firstly concludes that slot harmonic components are visible when the motor is loaded. Secondly, the multidimensional spectrum presents the most relevant mechanical waves on the stator such as the ones produced by the space harmonics or the saturation of the iron core. The direct retrieval of the wave-number in a multi-dimensional spectrum is able to show the internal current distribution in a non-intrusive way. Experimental results for healthy induction motors are showing mechanical imbalances in a multi-dimensional spectrum in a more straightforward form.

  5. Galaxies, Axisymmetric Systems and Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCallum, M. A. H.

    2011-06-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Prof. W. B. Bonnor: a biological sketch; Part I. Galaxies and Cosmology: 1. The origin of large scale cosmic structure B. J. T. Jones and P. L. Palmer; 2. The problem of origin of the primordial pertubations and the modern cosmology V. N. Lukash and I. D. Novikov; 3. The automorphism group and field equations for Bianchi universes W. L. Rogue and G. F. R. Ellis; 4. New perspectives on galaxy formation J. Silk; Part II. Axisymmetric Systems: 5. On exact radiative solutions representing finite sources J. Bicak; 6. Proof of a generalized Geroch conjecture I. Hauser and F. J. Ernst; 7. Limits of the double Kerr solution C. Hoenselaers; 8. Non-inheritance of static symmetry by Maxwell fields M. A. H. MacCallum and N. Van den Bergh; 9. Stationary axisymmetric electrovacuum fields in general relativity G. Neugebauer and D. Kramer; 10. An almost conformal approach to axial symmetry Z. Perjes; 11. Conformally stationary axisymmetric space-times J. Winicour; Part III. Relativity: 12. A family of conformally flat space-times having the same curvature tensor in a given co-ordinate frame C. D. Collinson; 13. On the Bell-Szekeres solution for colliding electromagnetic waves J. B. Griffiths; 14. A remark on the Hauser metric A. Held; 15. Numerical relativity by power series R. Penrose; 16. Projective relativity and the equation of motion E. Schmutzer; 17. On generalized equations of goedesic deviation B. F. Schutz; 18. Lobatchevski plane gravitational waves S. T. C. Siklos; 19. Perfect fluid and vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations with flat 3-dimensional slices H. Stephani and Th. Wolf; 20. Self-similar solutions of Einstein's equations J. Wainwright.

  6. JAC2D: A two-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.; Blanford, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    JAC2D is a two-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equations. The method is implemented in a two-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic/plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  7. QUENCH2D. Two-Dimensional IHCP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, A.; Beck, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    QUENCH2D* is developed for the solution of general, non-linear, two-dimensional inverse heat transfer problems. This program provides estimates for the surface heat flux distribution and/or heat transfer coefficient as a function of time and space by using transient temperature measurements at appropriate interior points inside the quenched body. Two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric geometries such as turnbine disks and blades, clutch packs, and many other problems can be analyzed using QUENCH2D*.

  8. Fluid dynamics analysis of a rotating axisymmetric part using FIDAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, G. E.; Kirkpatrick, J. R.; Wendel, M. W.; Bullock, J. S., IV

    1990-03-01

    The effect of fluid flow on electrochemical plating on a rotating axisymmetric part was investigated by using a finite element computer code, FIDAP. The results from these investigations compare well with analytical results for laminar flow conditions. The addition of a nonrotating shield was also investigated for laminar flow conditions. An attempt to extend these analyses to turbulent conditions was unsuccessful.

  9. MHD-stable plasma confinement in an axisymmetric mirror system

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.

    1988-02-01

    If the magnetic field of a nonparaxial mirror system is chosen appropriately, it is possible to maintain a sharp plasma boundary in an open axisymmetric confinement system in a manner which is stable against flute modes (both global and small-scale). Stability prevails in the ideal MHD approximation without finite-ion-Larmor radius effects.

  10. Axisymmetric multiwormholes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Gérard

    2016-06-01

    The construction of stationary axisymmetric multiwormhole solutions to gravitating field theories admitting toroidal reductions to three-dimensional gravitating sigma models is reviewed. We show that, as in the multi-black hole case, strut singularities always appear in this construction, except for very special configurations with an odd number of centers. We also review the analytical continuation of the multicenter solution across the n cuts associated with the wormhole mouths. The resulting Riemann manifold has 2^n sheets interconnected by 2^{n-1}n wormholes. We find that the maximally extended multicenter solution can never be asymptotically locally flat in all the Riemann sheets.

  11. MODFLOW procedure to simulate axisymmetric flow in radially heterogeneous and layered aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louwyck, Andy; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Bakker, Mark; Lebbe, Luc

    2014-08-01

    A procedure is outlined to simulate axisymmetric groundwater flow in radially heterogeneous and layered aquifer systems using the unmodified version of MODFLOW. The procedure is straightforward, as it only requires correction of some of the input parameters. In contrast to other MODFLOW procedures to simulate axisymmetric flow, no restrictions are imposed on the type of flow, the discretization of radial distance, or the parameter values. Hence, the method can deal with both confined and unconfined flow, wellbore storage, and axisymmetric aquifer inhomogeneities including effects of finite-thickness skin and gravel pack. Several test cases are presented, which compare the calculated results with existing analytical solutions, the analytic element solver TTim, and the axisymmetric, finite-difference model MAxSym. It is concluded that the MODFLOW procedure is capable of simulating accurately axisymmetric flow in radially heterogeneous multi-aquifer systems.

  12. Magneto-hydrodynamically stable axisymmetric mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, Dmitri

    2010-11-01

    The achievement of high beta (60%) plasma with near classical confinement in a linear axisymmetric magnetic configuration has sparked interest in the Gas Dynamic Trap concept. The significance of these results is that they can be projected directly to a neutron source for materials testing. The possibility of axisymmetric mirrors (AM) being magneto-hydrodynamically (MHD) stable is also of interest from a general physics standpoint (as it seemingly contradicts to well-established criteria of curvature-driven instabilities). The axial symmetry allows for much simpler and more reliable designs of mirror-based fusion facilities than the well-known quadrupole mirror configurations. In this tutorial, after a brief summary of classical results (in particular of the Rosenbluth-Longmire theory and of the energy principle as applied to AM) several approaches towards achieving MHD stabilization of the AM will be considered: 1) Employing the favorable field-line curvature in the end tanks; 2) Using the line-tying effect; 3) Setting the plasma in a slow or fast differential rotation; 4) Imposing a divertor configuration on the solenoidal magnetic field; 5) Controlling the plasma dynamics by the ponderomotive force; 6) Other techniques. Several of these approaches go beyond pure MHD and require accounting for finite Larmor radius effects and trapped particle modes. Some illuminative theoretical approaches for understanding axisymmetric mirror stability will be described. Wherever possible comparison of theoretical and experimental results on AM will be provided. The applicability of the various stabilization techniques to axisymmetric mirrors as neutron sources, hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors will be discussed and the constraints on the plasma parameters will be formulated. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Structure of axisymmetric mantle plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Peter; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The structure of axisymmetric subsolidus thermal plumes in the earth's lower mantle is inferred from calculations of axisymmetric thermal plumes in an infinite Prandtl number fluid with thermally activated viscosity. The velocity and temperature distribution is determined for axisymmetric convection above a heated disk in an incompressible fluid cylinder 2,400 km in height and 1,200 km in diameter. Several calculations of plumes with heat transport in the range 100-400 GW, similar to the advective heat transport at the Hawaiian hotspot, are presented. Hotspot formation by plumes originating at the base of the mantle requires both large viscosity variations and a minimum heat transport.

  14. Preserving spherical symmetry in axisymmetric coordinates for diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, T. A.; Kolev, T. V.; Bailey, T. S.; Till, A. T.

    2013-07-01

    Persevering symmetric solutions, even in the under-converged limit, is important to the robustness of production simulation codes. We explore the symmetry preservation in both a continuous nodal and a mixed finite element method. In their standard formulation, neither method preserves spherical solution symmetry in axisymmetric (RZ) coordinates. We propose two methods, one for each family of finite elements, that recover spherical symmetry for low-order finite elements on linear or curvilinear meshes. This is a first step toward understanding achieving symmetry for higher-order elements. (authors)

  15. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  16. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  17. Periodic forcing of a Turbulent Axisymmetric Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Jonathan; Qubain, Ala

    2008-11-01

    The near wake of a blunt, axisymmetric body subject to periodic forcing is investigated. A high-fidelity speaker located inside the cylinder is used to generate a pulsed jet from a small circumferential gap located on the underside of the separating boundary layer, with its axis aligned in the streamwise direction. A detailed investigation of the growth of the disturbances is performed using hot wires, PIV and base-pressure transducers. It is shown that, with azimuthal symmetric forcing (m =0), the base pressure may be reduced by 30% at ``low'' frequencies or increased by 10%, at ``high'' frequencies with consistent changes to the velocity field. As in previous, similar investigations, it is shown that the important scaling parameter is the boundary-layer momentum thickness at separation - in contrast to other geometries such as a 2D bluff body for example, where the von Kármán vortex shedding is universal, or control of separating-reattaching flows, where a range of actuation frequencies is often effective. Moreover, caution is required when comparing to other axisymmetric bodies because the wake is quite sensitive to boundary conditions and the nature of separation from the body. Many previous studies have demonstrated successful alterations of the wake of a 3D bluff body, all using passive geometric modifications.

  18. Axisymmetric magnetic gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.L.; Alrick, K.R.; Fritz, J.N.

    1994-05-01

    Axisymmetric magnetic (ASM) gauges are useful diagnostic tools in the study of the conversion of energy from underground explosions to distant seismic signals. Requiring no external power, they measure the strength (particle velocity) of the emerging shock wave under conditions that would destroy most instrumentation. Shock pins are included with each gauge to determine the angle of the shock front. For the Non-Proliferation Experiment, two ASM gauges were installed in the ANFO mixture to monitor the detonation wave and 10 were grouted into boreholes at various ranges in the surrounding rock (10 to 64 m from the center of explosion). These gauges were of a standard 3.8-inch-diameter design. In addition, two unique Jumbo ASM gauges (3-ft by 3-ft in cross section) were grouted to the wall of a drift at a range of 65 m. We discuss issues encountered in data analysis, present the results of our measurements, and compare these results with those of model simulations of the experiment.

  19. Theoretical and numerical study of axisymmetric lattice Boltzmann models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haibo; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2009-07-01

    The forcing term in the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is usually used to mimic Navier-Stokes equations with a body force. To derive axisymmetric model, forcing terms are incorporated into the two-dimensional (2D) LBE to mimic the additional axisymmetric contributions in 2D Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates. Many axisymmetric lattice Boltzmann D2Q9 models were obtained through the Chapman-Enskog expansion to recover the 2D Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates [I. Halliday , Phys. Rev. E 64, 011208 (2001); K. N. Premnath and J. Abraham, Phys. Rev. E 71, 056706 (2005); T. S. Lee, H. Huang, and C. Shu, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 17, 645 (2006); T. Reis and T. N. Phillips, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056703 (2007); J. G. Zhou, Phys. Rev. E 78, 036701 (2008)]. The theoretical differences between them are discussed in detail. Numerical studies were also carried out by simulating two different flows to make a comparison on these models’ accuracy and τ sensitivity. It is found all these models are able to obtain accurate results and have the second-order spatial accuracy. However, the model C [J. G. Zhou, Phys. Rev. E 78, 036701 (2008)] is the most stable one in terms of τ sensitivity. It is also found that if density of fluid is defined in its usual way and not directly relevant to source terms, the lattice Boltzmann model seems more stable.

  20. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  1. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  2. Numerical computation of gravitational field for general axisymmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    We developed a numerical method to compute the gravitational field of a general axisymmetric object. The method (i) numerically evaluates a double integral of the ring potential by the split quadrature method using the double exponential rules, and (ii) derives the acceleration vector by numerically differentiating the numerically integrated potential by Ridder's algorithm. Numerical comparison with the analytical solutions for a finite uniform spheroid and an infinitely extended object of the Miyamoto-Nagai density distribution confirmed the 13- and 11-digit accuracy of the potential and the acceleration vector computed by the method, respectively. By using the method, we present the gravitational potential contour map and/or the rotation curve of various axisymmetric objects: (i) finite uniform objects covering rhombic spindles and circular toroids, (ii) infinitely extended spheroids including Sérsic and Navarro-Frenk-White spheroids, and (iii) other axisymmetric objects such as an X/peanut-shaped object like NGC 128, a power-law disc with a central hole like the protoplanetary disc of TW Hya, and a tear-drop-shaped toroid like an axisymmetric equilibrium solution of plasma charge distribution in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak. The method is directly applicable to the electrostatic field and will be easily extended for the magnetostatic field. The FORTRAN 90 programs of the new method and some test results are electronically available.

  3. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  4. Axisymmetric instability in a thinning electrified jet.

    PubMed

    Dharmansh; Chokshi, Paresh

    2016-04-01

    The axisymmetric stability of an electrified jet is analyzed under electrospinning conditions using the linear stability theory. The fluid is considered Newtonian with a finite electrical conductivity, modeled as a leaky dielectric medium. While the previous studies impose axisymmetric disturbances on a cylindrical jet of uniform radius, referred to as the base state, in the present study the actual thinning jet profile, obtained as the steady-state solution of the one-dimensional slender filament model, is treated as the base state. The analysis takes into account the role of variation in the jet variables like radius, velocity, electric field, and surface charge density along the thinning jet in the stability behavior. The eigenspectrum of the axisymmetric disturbance growth rate is constructed from the linearized disturbance equations discretized using the Chebyshev collocation method. The most unstable growth rate for the thinning jet is significantly different from that for the uniform radius jet. For the same electrospinning conditions, while the uniform radius jet is predicted to be highly unstable, the thinning jet profile is found to be unstable but with a relatively very low growth rate. The stabilizing role of the thinning jet is attributed to the variation in the surface charge density as well as the extensional deformation rate in the fluid ignored in the uniform radius jet analysis. The dominant mode for the thinning jet is an oscillatory conducting mode driven by the field-charge coupling. The disturbance energy balance finds the electric force to be the dominant force responsible for the disturbance growth, potentially leading to bead formation along the fiber. The role of various material and process parameters in the stability behavior is also investigated.

  5. Axisymmetric instability in a thinning electrified jet.

    PubMed

    Dharmansh; Chokshi, Paresh

    2016-04-01

    The axisymmetric stability of an electrified jet is analyzed under electrospinning conditions using the linear stability theory. The fluid is considered Newtonian with a finite electrical conductivity, modeled as a leaky dielectric medium. While the previous studies impose axisymmetric disturbances on a cylindrical jet of uniform radius, referred to as the base state, in the present study the actual thinning jet profile, obtained as the steady-state solution of the one-dimensional slender filament model, is treated as the base state. The analysis takes into account the role of variation in the jet variables like radius, velocity, electric field, and surface charge density along the thinning jet in the stability behavior. The eigenspectrum of the axisymmetric disturbance growth rate is constructed from the linearized disturbance equations discretized using the Chebyshev collocation method. The most unstable growth rate for the thinning jet is significantly different from that for the uniform radius jet. For the same electrospinning conditions, while the uniform radius jet is predicted to be highly unstable, the thinning jet profile is found to be unstable but with a relatively very low growth rate. The stabilizing role of the thinning jet is attributed to the variation in the surface charge density as well as the extensional deformation rate in the fluid ignored in the uniform radius jet analysis. The dominant mode for the thinning jet is an oscillatory conducting mode driven by the field-charge coupling. The disturbance energy balance finds the electric force to be the dominant force responsible for the disturbance growth, potentially leading to bead formation along the fiber. The role of various material and process parameters in the stability behavior is also investigated. PMID:27176407

  6. Axisymmetric instability in a thinning electrified jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmansh; Chokshi, Paresh

    2016-04-01

    The axisymmetric stability of an electrified jet is analyzed under electrospinning conditions using the linear stability theory. The fluid is considered Newtonian with a finite electrical conductivity, modeled as a leaky dielectric medium. While the previous studies impose axisymmetric disturbances on a cylindrical jet of uniform radius, referred to as the base state, in the present study the actual thinning jet profile, obtained as the steady-state solution of the one-dimensional slender filament model, is treated as the base state. The analysis takes into account the role of variation in the jet variables like radius, velocity, electric field, and surface charge density along the thinning jet in the stability behavior. The eigenspectrum of the axisymmetric disturbance growth rate is constructed from the linearized disturbance equations discretized using the Chebyshev collocation method. The most unstable growth rate for the thinning jet is significantly different from that for the uniform radius jet. For the same electrospinning conditions, while the uniform radius jet is predicted to be highly unstable, the thinning jet profile is found to be unstable but with a relatively very low growth rate. The stabilizing role of the thinning jet is attributed to the variation in the surface charge density as well as the extensional deformation rate in the fluid ignored in the uniform radius jet analysis. The dominant mode for the thinning jet is an oscillatory conducting mode driven by the field-charge coupling. The disturbance energy balance finds the electric force to be the dominant force responsible for the disturbance growth, potentially leading to bead formation along the fiber. The role of various material and process parameters in the stability behavior is also investigated.

  7. Axisymmetric annular curtain stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zahir U.; Khayat, Roger E.; Maissa, Philippe; Mathis, Christian

    2012-06-01

    A temporal stability analysis was carried out to investigate the stability of an axially moving viscous annular liquid jet subject to axisymmetric disturbances in surrounding co-flowing viscous gas media. We investigated in this study the effects of inertia, surface tension, the gas-to-liquid density ratio, the inner-to-outer radius ratio and the gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio on the stability of the jet. With an increase in inertia, the growth rate of the unstable disturbances is found to increase. The dominant (or most unstable) wavenumber decreases with increasing Reynolds number for larger values of the gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio. However, an opposite tendency for the most unstable wavenumber is predicted for small viscosity ratio in the same inertia range. The surrounding gas density, in the presence of viscosity, always reduces the growth rate, hence stabilizing the flow. There exists a critical value of the density ratio above which the flow becomes stable for very small viscosity ratio, whereas for large viscosity ratio, no stable flow appears in the same range of the density ratio. The curvature has a significant destabilizing effect on the thin annular jet, whereas for a relatively thick jet, the maximum growth rate decreases as the inner radius increases, irrespective of the surrounding gas viscosity. The degree of instability increases with Weber number for a relatively large viscosity ratio. In contrast, for small viscosity ratio, the growth rate exhibits a dramatic dependence on the surface tension. There is a small Weber number range, which depends on the viscosity ratio, where the flow is stable. The viscosity ratio always stabilizes the flow. However, the dominant wavenumber increases with increasing viscosity ratio. The range of unstable wavenumbers is affected only by the curvature effect.

  8. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  9. Multispecies transport theory for axisymmetric rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tessarotto, M.; White, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gyrokinetic equation is derived for a multi-species toroidal axisymmetric plasma with arbitrary toroidal differential rotation speeds and in the presence of a finite induced electric field. The kinetic equation obtained, extending previous results obtained by Hinton and Wong and by Catto, Bernstein and Tessarotto, has a form suited for transport applications, via variational techniques; in particular it exhibits the feature that all source terms, including the Spitzer source term, carrying the contribution due to the inductive electric field, appear to be acted upon by the collision operator. Moreover, the equation displays a new contribution due to ``explicit`` velocity perturbations, here proven to be consistent with transport ordering, whose evaluation appears relevant for transport calculations. In addition, general expressions are obtained for the neoclassical fluxes in terms of a variational principle, as well as for the classical ones, retaining, in both cases, the contributions due to the Spitzer`s inductive terms.

  10. Multispecies transport theory for axisymmetric rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tessarotto, M. . Dipt. di Scienze Matematiche); White, R.B. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gyrokinetic equation is derived for a multi-species toroidal axisymmetric plasma with arbitrary toroidal differential rotation speeds and in the presence of a finite induced electric field. The kinetic equation obtained, extending previous results obtained by Hinton and Wong and by Catto, Bernstein and Tessarotto, has a form suited for transport applications, via variational techniques; in particular it exhibits the feature that all source terms, including the Spitzer source term, carrying the contribution due to the inductive electric field, appear to be acted upon by the collision operator. Moreover, the equation displays a new contribution due to explicit'' velocity perturbations, here proven to be consistent with transport ordering, whose evaluation appears relevant for transport calculations. In addition, general expressions are obtained for the neoclassical fluxes in terms of a variational principle, as well as for the classical ones, retaining, in both cases, the contributions due to the Spitzer's inductive terms.

  11. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  12. STEALTH - a Lagrange explicit finite-difference code for solid, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 8A: STEALTH/WHAMSE - a 2-D fluid-structure interaction code. Computer code manual

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.B.

    1984-10-01

    STEALTH is a family of computer codes that can be used to calculate a variety of physical processes in which the dynamic behavior of a continuum is involved. The version of STEALTH described in this volume is designed for calculations of fluid-structure interaction. This version of the program consists of a hydrodynamic version of STEALTH which has been coupled to a finite-element code, WHAMSE. STEALTH computes the transient response of the fluid continuum, while WHAMSE computes the transient response of shell and beam structures under external fluid loadings. The coupling between STEALTH and WHAMSE is performed during each cycle or step of a calculation. Separate calculations of fluid response and structural response are avoided, thereby giving a more accurate model of the dynamic coupling between fluid and structure. This volume provides the theoretical background, the finite-difference equations, the finite-element equations, a discussion of several sample problems, a listing of the input decks for the sample problems, a programmer's manual and a description of the input records for the STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program.

  13. Axisymmetric Shearing Box Models of Magnetized Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoyue; Gammie, Charles F.

    2008-01-01

    The local model, or shearing box, has proven a useful model for studying the dynamics of astrophysical disks. Here we consider the evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in an axisymmetric local model in order to evaluate the limitations of global axisymmetric models. An exploration of the model parameter space shows the following: (1) The magnetic energy and α-decay approximately exponentially after an initial burst of turbulence. For our code, HAM, the decay time τ propto Res , where Res/2 is the number of zones per scale height. (2) In the initial burst of turbulence the magnetic energy is amplified by a factor proportional to Res3/4λR, where λR is the radial scale of the initial field. This scaling applies only if the most unstable wavelength of the magnetorotational instability is resolved and the final field is subthermal. (3) The shearing box is a resonant cavity and in linear theory exhibits a discrete set of compressive modes. These modes are excited by the MHD turbulence and are visible as quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in temporal power spectra of fluid variables at low spatial resolution. At high resolution the QPOs are hidden by a noise continuum. (4) In axisymmetry disk turbulence is local. The correlation function of the turbulence is limited in radial extent, and the peak magnetic energy density is independent of the radial extent of the box LR for LR > 2H. (5) Similar results are obtained for the HAM, ZEUS, and ATHENA codes; ATHENA has an effective resolution that is nearly double that of HAM and ZEUS. (6) Similar results are obtained for 2D and 3D runs at similar resolution, but only for particular choices of the initial field strength and radial scale of the initial magnetic field.

  14. Application of the PTT model to axisymmetric free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merejolli, R.; Paulo, G. S.; Tomé, M. F.

    2013-10-01

    This work is concerned with numerical simulation of axisymmetric viscoelastic free surface flows using the Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation. A finite difference technique for solving the governing equations for unsteady incompressible flows written in Cylindrical coordinates on a staggered grid is described. The fluid is modelled by a Marker-and-Cell type method and an accurate representation of the fluid surface is employed. The full free surface stress conditions are applied. The numerical method is verified by comparing numerical predictions of fully developed flow in a pipe with the corresponding analytic solutions. To demonstrate that the numerical method can simulate axisymmetric free surface flows governed by the PTT model, numerical results of the flow evolution of a drop impacting on a rigid dry plate are presented. In these simulations, the rheological effects of the parameters ɛ and ξ are investigated.

  15. Stability of axisymmetric liquid bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel, Leonid G.; Rubinstein, Boris Y.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the Weierstrass representation of second variation, we develop a non-spectral theory of stability for isoperimetric problem with minimized and constrained two-dimensional functionals of general type and free endpoints allowed to move along two given planar curves. We establish the stability criterion and apply this theory to the axisymmetric liquid bridge between two axisymmetric solid bodies without gravity to determine the stability of menisci with free contact lines. For catenoid and cylinder menisci and different solid shapes, we determine the stability domain. The other menisci (unduloid, nodoid and sphere) are considered in a simple setup between two plates. We find the existence conditions of stable unduloid menisci with and without inflection points.

  16. Inversions for axisymmetric galactic disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiotelis, N.; Patsis, P. A.

    1993-08-01

    We use two models for the distribution function to solve an inverse problem for axisymmetric disks. These systems may be considered - under certain assumptions - as galactic disks. In some cases the solutions of the resulting integral equations are simple, which allows the determination of the kinematic properties of self-consistent models for these systems. These properties for then = 1 Toomre disk are presented in this study.

  17. Stability and Halo Formation in Axisymmetric Intense Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluckstern, Robert L.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1996-05-01

    Beam stability and halo formation in high-intensity axisymmetric 2D beams in a uniform focusing channel are analyzed using particle-in-cell simulations. The tune depression - mismatch space is explored for the uniform distribution of the particle transverse phase space density (K-V), as well as for more realistic ones (in particular, the water-bag distribution), to determine the stability limits and halo parameters. The numerical results obtained are compared and show an agreement with the predictions of the analytical model for halo formation developed earlier.(R.L. Gluckstern, Phys. Rev. Lett., 73), 1247 (1994).

  18. Stability and Halo Formation in Axisymmetric Intense Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluckstern, Robert L.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1997-05-01

    Beam stability and halo formation in high-intensity axisymmetric 2D beams in a uniform focusing channel are analyzed using particle-in-cell simulations. The tune depression - mismatch space is explored for the uniform distribution of the particle transverse phase space density (Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky), as well as for more realistic ones (in particular, the water-bag distribution), to determine the stability limits and halo parameters. The numerical results obtained are compared and show an agreement with the predictions of the analytical model for halo formation developed earlier (R.L. Gluckstern, Phys. Rev. Lett., 73), 1247 (1994)..

  19. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Control of an axisymmetric turbulent wake by a pulsed jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. F.; Qubain, A.

    It has been shown [1] that the axisymmetric wake is dominated by three types of instability mechanism: an axisymmetric "pumping" of the recirculation bubble at very low frequencies, antisymmetric fluctuations induced by a helical vortex structure that forms just downstream of the rear stagnation point and several higher-frequency, axisymmetric instability modes of the separated shear layer. The environmental requirement for drag reduction has placed a greater emphasis on base-pressure recovery of bluff bodies. The active control of separating flow around bluff bodies has tended to focus on 2D bodies [2, 3] demonstrating that large drag reductions are possible, usually by controlled blowing, at frequencies close to the von Kármán shedding frequency. However, in terms of control, 3D bluff bodies have received considerably less attention even though this configuration appears in many practical problems. Even then, active control has tended to focus on the delay of separation [4]. In the present work, we show that the base pressure of a blunt trailing edge may be increased by a high-frequency jet from a zero-net-mass-flux (ZNMF) device.

  1. Minimum weight design of a generic axisymmetric inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadell, Shari-Beth

    1996-01-01

    A new minimum weight design method for high-speed axisymmetric inlets was demonstrated on a generic inlet. The method uses Classical Beam Theory and shell buckling to determine the minimum required equivalent isotropic thickness for a stiffened shell based on prescribed structural design requirements and load conditions. The optimum spacing and equivalent isotropic thickness of ring frame supports are computed to prevent buckling. The method thus develops a preliminary structural design for the inlet and computes the structural weight. Finite element analyses were performed on the resulting inlet design to evaluate the analytical results. Comparisons between the analytical and finite element stresses and deflections identified areas needing improvement in the analytical method. The addition of the deflection due to shear and a torsional buckling failure mode to the new method brought its results in line with those from the finite element analyses. Final validation of the new method will be made using data from actual inlets.

  2. Solution-Adaptive Program for Computing 2D/Axi Viscous Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    2003-01-01

    A computer program solves the Navier- Stokes equations governing the flow of a viscous, compressible fluid in an axisymmetric or two-dimensional (2D) setting. To obtain solutions more accurate than those generated by prior such programs that utilize regular and/or fixed computational meshes, this program utilizes unstructured (that is, irregular triangular) computational meshes that are automatically adapted to solutions. The adaptation can refine to regions of high change in gradient or can be driven by a novel residual minimization technique. Starting from an initial mesh and a corresponding data structure, the adaptation of the mesh is controlled by use of minimization functional. Other improvements over prior such programs include the following: (1) Boundary conditions are imposed weakly; that is, following initial specification of solution values at boundary nodes, these values are relaxed in time by means of the same formulations as those used for interior nodes. (2) Eigenvalues are limited in order to suppress expansion shocks. (3) An upwind fluctuation-splitting distribution scheme applied to inviscid flux requires fewer operations and produces less artificial dissipation than does a finite-volume scheme, leading to greater accuracy of solutions.

  3. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  4. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  5. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  6. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  7. Finite length Taylor Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cylinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  8. Non-axisymmetric annular curtain stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zahir U.; Khayat, Roger E.; Maissa, Philippe; Mathis, Christian

    2013-08-01

    A stability analysis of non-axisymmetric annular curtain is carried out for an axially moving viscous jet subject in surrounding viscous gas media. The effect of inertia, surface tension, gas-to-liquid density ratio, inner-to-outer radius ratio, and gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio on the stability of the jet is studied. In general, the axisymmetric disturbance is found to be the dominant mode. However, for small wavenumber, the non-axisymmetric mode is the most unstable mode and the one likely observed in reality. Inertia and the viscosity ratio for non-axisymmetric disturbances show a similar stability influence as observed for axisymmetric disturbances. The maximum growth rate in non-axisymmetric flow, interestingly, appears at very small wavenumber for all inertia levels. The dominant wavenumber increases (decreases) with inertia for non-axisymmetric (axisymmetric) flow. Gas-to-liquid density ratio, curvature effect, and surface tension, however, exhibit an opposite influence on growth rate compared to axisymmetric disturbances. Surface tension tends to stabilize the flow with reductions of the unstable wavenumber range and the maximum growth rate as well as the dominant wavenumber. The dominant wavenumber remains independent of viscosity ratio indicating the viscosity ratio increases the breakup length of the sheet with very little influence on the size of the drops. The range of unstable wavenumbers is affected only by curvature in axisymmetric flow, whereas all the stability parameters control the range of unstable wavenumbers in non-axisymmetric flow. Inertia and gas density increase the unstable wavenumber range, whereas the radius ratio, surface tension, and the viscosity ratio decrease the unstable wavenumber range. Neutral curves are plotted to separate the stable and unstable domains. Critical radius ratio decreases linearly and nonlinearly with the wavenumber for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric disturbances, respectively. At smaller Weber numbers, a

  9. A New Axi-Symmetric Element for Thin Walled Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rui P. R.; Yoon, Jeong Whan; Dick, Robert E.

    2010-06-01

    A new axi-symmetric finite element for sheet metal forming applications is presented in this work. It uses the solid-shell element's concept with only a single element layer and multiple integration points along the thickness direction. The cross section of the element is composed of four nodes with two degrees of freedom each. The proposed formulation overcomes major locking pathologies including transverse shear locking, Poisson's locking and volumetric locking. Some examples are shown to demonstrate the performance and accuracy of the proposed element with special focus on the numerical simulations for the beverage can industry.

  10. Ideal MHD stability calculations in axisymmetric toroidal coordinate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, R.C.; Dewar, R.L.; Manickam, J.

    1982-03-01

    A scalar form of the ideal MHD energy principle is shown to provide a more accurate and efficient numerical method for determining the stability of an axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium than the usual vector form. Additional improvement is obtained by employing a class of straight magnetic field line flux coordinates which allow for an optimal choice of the poloidal angle in the minor cross section of the torus. The usefulness of these techniques is illustrated by a study (using a new code, PEST 2) of the convergence properties of the finite element Galerkin representation in tokamak and spheromak geometries, and by the accurate determination of critical ..beta.. values for ballooning modes.

  11. Accuracy Improvement in Magnetic Field Modeling for an Axisymmetric Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Gurieva, Yana L.; Il,in, Valery P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the accuracy and calculation speed for the magnetic field computation in an axisymmetric electromagnet. Different numerical techniques, based on an adaptive nonuniform grid, high order finite difference approximations, and semi-analitical calculation of boundary conditions are considered. These techniques are being applied to the modeling of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket. For high-accuracy calculations, a fourth-order scheme offers dramatic advantages over a second order scheme. For complex physical configurations of interest in plasma propulsion, a second-order scheme with nonuniform mesh gives the best results. Also, the relative advantages of various methods are described when the speed of computation is an important consideration.

  12. Axisymmetric Simulations of the ITER Vertical Stability Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, Peter H.

    2013-07-09

    The ITER in-vessel coil system includes Vertical Stability (VS) coils and Edge Localized Mode (ELM) coils. There are two large VS ring coils, one upper and one lower. Each has four turns which are independently connected. The VS coils are needed for successful operation of ITER for most all of its operating modes. The VS coils must be highly reliable and fault tolerant. The operating environment includes normal and disruption Lorentz forces. To parametrically address all these design conditions in a tractable analysis requires a simplified model. The VS coils are predominately axisymmetric, and this suggests that an axisymmetric model can be meaningfully used to address the variations in mechanical design, loading, material properties, and time dependency. The axisymmetric finite element analysis described in this paper includes simulations of the bolted frictional connections used for the mounting details. Radiation and elastic-plastic response are modeled particularly for the extreme faulted conditions. Thermal connectivity is varied to study the effects of partial thermal connection of the actively cooled conductor to the remaining structure.

  13. Nonlinear Heat Transfer 2d Structure

    1987-09-01

    DOT-BPMD is a general-purpose, finite-element, heat-transfer program used to predict thermal environments. The code considers linear and nonlinear transient or steady-state heat conduction in two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric representations of structures. Capabilities are provided for modeling anisotropic heterogeneous materials with temperature-dependent thermal properties and time-dependent temperature, heat flux, convection and radiation boundary conditions, together with time-dependent internal heat generation. DOT-BPMD may be used in the evaluation of steady-state geothermal gradients as well as in themore » transient heat conduction analysis of repository and waste package subsystems. Strengths of DOT-BPMD include its ability to account for a wide range of possible boundary conditions, nonlinear material properties, and its efficient equation solution algorithm. Limitations include the lack of a three-dimensional analysis capability, no radiative or convective internal heat transfer, and the need to maintain a constant time-step in each program execution.« less

  14. Modeling and simulation of axisymmetric stagnation flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Kazuo

    Laminar flame modeling is an important element in turbulent combustion research. The accuracy of a turbulent combustion model is highly dependent upon our understanding of laminar flames and their behavior in many situations. How much we understand combustion can only be measured by how well the model describes and predicts combustion phenomena. One of the most commonly used methane combustion models is GRI-Mech 3.0. However, how well the model describes the reacting flow phenomena is still uncertain even after many attempts to validate the model or quantify uncertainties. In the present study, the behavior of laminar flames under different aerodynamic and thermodynamic conditions is studied numerically in a stagnation-flow configuration. In order to make such a numerical study possible, the spectral element method is reformulated to accommodate the large density variations in methane reacting flows. In addition, a new axisymmetric basis function set for the spectral element method that satisfies the correct behavior near the axis is developed, and efficient integration techniques are developed to accurately model axisymmetric reacting flow within a reasonable amount of computational time. The numerical method is implemented using an object-oriented programming technique, and the resulting computer program is verified with several different verification methods. The present study then shows variances with the commonly used GRI-Mech 3.0 chemical kinetics model through a direct simulation of laboratory flames that allows direct comparison to experimental data. It is shown that the methane combustion model based on GRI-Mech 3.0 works well for methane-air mixtures near stoichiometry. However, GRI-Mech 3.0 leads to an overprediction of laminar flame speed for lean mixtures and an underprediction for rich mixtures. This result is slightly different from conclusion drawn in previous work, in which experimental data are compared with a one-dimensional numerical solutions

  15. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  16. On axisymmetric and stationary solutions of the self-gravitating Vlasov system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Ellery; Andréasson, Håkan; Logg, Anders

    2016-08-01

    Axisymmetric and stationary solutions are constructed to the Einstein–Vlasov and Vlasov–Poisson systems. These solutions are constructed numerically, using finite element methods and a fixed-point iteration in which the total mass is fixed at each step. A variety of axisymmetric stationary solutions are exhibited, including solutions with toroidal, disk-like, spindle-like, and composite spatial density configurations, as are solutions with non-vanishing net angular momentum. In the case of toroidal solutions, we show for the first time, solutions of the Einstein–Vlasov system which contain ergoregions.

  17. On axisymmetric and stationary solutions of the self-gravitating Vlasov system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Ellery; Andréasson, Håkan; Logg, Anders

    2016-08-01

    Axisymmetric and stationary solutions are constructed to the Einstein-Vlasov and Vlasov-Poisson systems. These solutions are constructed numerically, using finite element methods and a fixed-point iteration in which the total mass is fixed at each step. A variety of axisymmetric stationary solutions are exhibited, including solutions with toroidal, disk-like, spindle-like, and composite spatial density configurations, as are solutions with non-vanishing net angular momentum. In the case of toroidal solutions, we show for the first time, solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system which contain ergoregions.

  18. Status of Axisymmetric CFD of an Eleven Inch Diameter Hybrid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Sullivan, Matthew R.; Wang, Ten See

    1993-01-01

    Current status of a steady state, axisymmetric analysis of an experimental 11 inch diameter hybrid rocket motor internal flow field is given. The objective of this effort is to develop a steady state axisymmetric model of the 11 inch hybrid rocket motor which can be used as a design and/or analytical tool. A test hardware description, modeling approach, and future plans are given. The analysis was performed with FDNS implementing several finite rate chemistry sets. A converged solution for a two equation and five species set on a 'fine' grid is shown.

  19. Fast 2D fluid-analytical simulation of ion energy distributions and electromagnetic effects in multi-frequency capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Graves, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    A fast 2D axisymmetric fluid-analytical plasma reactor model using the finite elements simulation tool COMSOL is interfaced with a 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) code to study ion energy distributions (IEDs) in multi-frequency capacitive argon discharges. A bulk fluid plasma model, which solves the time-dependent plasma fluid equations for the ion continuity and electron energy balance, is coupled with an analytical sheath model, which solves for the sheath parameters. The time-independent Helmholtz equation is used to solve for the fields and a gas flow model solves for the steady-state pressure, temperature and velocity of the neutrals. The results of the fluid-analytical model are used as inputs to a PIC simulation of the sheath region of the discharge to obtain the IEDs at the target electrode. Each 2D fluid-analytical-PIC simulation on a moderate 2.2 GHz CPU workstation with 8 GB of memory took about 15-20 min. The multi-frequency 2D fluid-analytical model was compared to 1D PIC simulations of a symmetric parallel-plate discharge, showing good agreement. We also conducted fluid-analytical simulations of a multi-frequency argon capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) with a typical asymmetric reactor geometry at 2/60/162 MHz. The low frequency 2 MHz power controlled the sheath width and sheath voltage while the high frequencies controlled the plasma production. A standing wave was observable at the highest frequency of 162 MHz. We noticed that adding 2 MHz power to a 60 MHz discharge or 162 MHz to a dual frequency 2 MHz/60 MHz discharge can enhance the plasma uniformity. We found that multiple frequencies were not only useful for controlling IEDs but also plasma uniformity in CCP reactors.

  20. Guided waves by axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric surface loading on hollow cylinders

    PubMed

    Shin; Rose

    1999-06-01

    Guided waves generated by axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric surface loading on a hollow cylinder are studied. For the theoretical analysis of the superposed guided waves, a normal mode concept is employed. The amplitude factors of individual guided wave modes are studied with respect to varying surface pressure loading profiles. Both theoretical and experimental focus is given to the guided waves generated by both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric excitation. For the experiments, a comb transducer and high power tone burst function generator system are used on a sample Inconel tube. Surface loading conditions, such as circumferential loading angles and axial loading lengths, are used with the frequency and phase velocity to control the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric mode excitations. The experimental study demonstrates the use of a practical non-axisymmetric partial loading technique in generating axisymmetric modes, particularly useful in the inspection of tubing and piping with limited circumferential access. From both theoretical and experimental studies, it also could be said that the amount of flexural modes reflected from a defect contains information on the reflector's circumferential angle, as well as potentially other classification and sizing feature information. The axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric guided wave modes should both be carefully considered for improvement of the overall analysis of guided waves generated in hollow cylinders.

  1. A Computationally Efficient Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Method for Axisymmetric Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Chen, T.

    2003-01-01

    The Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method is one of the recently developed element-free methods. The method is convenient and can produce accurate results with continuous secondary variables, but is more computationally expensive than the finite element method. To overcome this disadvantage, a simple Heaviside test function is chosen. The computational effort is significantly reduced by eliminating the domain integral for the axisymmetric potential problems and by simplifying the domain integral for the axisymmetric elasticity problems. The method is evaluated through several patch tests for axisymmetric problems and example problems for which the exact solutions are available. The present method yielded very accurate solutions. The sensitivity of several parameters of the method is also studied.

  2. On the sensitivity of the 2D electromagnetic invisibility cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaproulias, S.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2012-10-01

    A computational study of the sensitivity of the two dimensional (2D) electromagnetic invisibility cloaks is performed with the finite element method. A circular metallic object is covered with the cloak and the effects of absorption, gain and disorder are examined. Also the effect of covering the cloak with a thin dielectric layer is studied.

  3. SANTOS - a two-dimensional finite element program for the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    SANTOS is a finite element program designed to compute the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric solids. The code is derived from the transient dynamic code PRONTO 2D. The solution strategy used to compute the equilibrium states is based on a self-adaptive dynamic relaxation solution scheme, which is based on explicit central difference pseudo-time integration and artificial mass proportional damping. The element used in SANTOS is a uniform strain 4-node quadrilateral element with an hourglass control scheme to control the spurious deformation modes. Finite strain constitutive models for many common engineering materials are included. A robust master-slave contact algorithm for modeling sliding contact is implemented. An interface for coupling to an external code is also provided. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  4. Axisymmetric Coanda-assisted vectoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Dustin; Smith, Barton L.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental demonstration of a jet vectoring technique used in our novel spray method called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM makes use of the Coanda effect on axisymmetric geometries through the interaction of two jets: a primary jet and a control jet. The primary jet has larger volume flow rate but generally a smaller momentum flux than the control jet. The primary jet flows through the center of a rounded collar. The control jet is parallel to the primary and is adjacent to the convex collar. The Reynolds number range for the primary jet at the exit plane was between 20,000 and 80,000. The flow was in the incompressible Mach number range (Mach < 0.3). The control jet attaches to the convex wall and vectors according to known Coanda effect principles, entraining and vectoring the primary jet, resulting in controllable r - θ directional spraying. Several annular control slots and collar radii were tested over a range of momentum flux ratios to determine the effects of these variables on the vectored jet angle and spreading. Two and Three-component Particle Image Velocimetry systems were used to determine the vectoring angle and the profile of the combined jet in each experiment. The experiments show that the control slot and expansion radius, along with the momentum ratios of the two jets predominantly affected the vectoring angle and profile of the combined jets.

  5. Numerical analyses of radiative heat transfer in any arbitrarily-shaped axisymmetric enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, M. Ben; Askri, F.; Jemni, A.; Nasrallah, S. Ben

    2006-02-01

    A numerical approach for the treatment of radiative heat transfer in any irregularly-shaped axisymmetric enclosure filled with absorbing, emitting and scattering gray media is developed. Radiative transfer equation (RTE) is formulated for a general axisymmetric geometrical configurations, and the discretized equation is conducted using an unstructured meshes, generated by an appropriate computer algorithm, and the control volume finite element method which frequently adopted in CFD problems. A computer procedure has been done to solve the discretized RTE and to examine the accuracy and the computational efficiency of the proposed numerical approach. By using this computer algorithm, five test cases, a cylindrical enclosure with absorbing and emitting medium, a diffuser shaped axisymmetric enclosure, a finite axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure with a curved wall, a furnace with axially varying medium temperature and a rocket nozzle, are treated and the obtained results agree very well with other published works. Furthermore, the developed computer procedure has an accurate CPU time and it can be coupled easily with CFD codes.

  6. High order curvilinear finite elements for elastic–plastic Lagrangian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, Veselin A.; Kolev, Tzanio V.; Rieben, Robert N.

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents a high-order finite element method for calculating elastic–plastic flow on moving curvilinear meshes and is an extension of our general high-order curvilinear finite element approach for solving the Euler equations of gas dynamics in a Lagrangian frame [1,2]. In order to handle transition to plastic flow, we formulate the stress–strain relation in rate (or incremental) form and augment our semi-discrete equations for Lagrangian hydrodynamics with an additional evolution equation for the deviatoric stress which is valid for arbitrary order spatial discretizations of the kinematic and thermodynamic variables. The semi-discrete equation for the deviatoric stress rate is developed for 2D planar, 2D axisymmetric and full 3D geometries. For each case, the strain rate is approximated via a collocation method at zone quadrature points while the deviatoric stress is approximated using an L{sub 2} projection onto the thermodynamic basis. We apply high order, energy conserving, explicit time stepping methods to the semi-discrete equations to develop the fully discrete method. We conclude with numerical results from an extensive series of verification tests that demonstrate several practical advantages of using high-order finite elements for elastic–plastic flow.

  7. Acoustic intensity calculations for axisymmetrically modeled fluid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Everstine, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating acoustic intensities from a time harmonic pressure field in an axisymmetric fluid region is presented. Acoustic pressures are computed in a mesh of NASTRAN triangular finite elements of revolution (TRIAAX) using an analogy between the scalar wave equation and elasticity equations. Acoustic intensities are then calculated from pressures and pressure derivatives taken over the mesh of TRIAAX elements. Intensities are displayed as vectors indicating the directions and magnitudes of energy flow at all mesh points in the acoustic field. A prolate spheroidal shell is modeled with axisymmetric shell elements (CONEAX) and submerged in a fluid region of TRIAAX elements. The model is analyzed to illustrate the acoustic intensity method and the usefulness of energy flow paths in the understanding of the response of fluid-structure interaction problems. The structural-acoustic analogy used is summarized for completeness. This study uncovered a NASTRAN limitation involving numerical precision issues in the CONEAX stiffness calculation causing large errors in the system matrices for nearly cylindrical cones.

  8. Generalized energy principle for flute perturbations in axisymmetric mirror machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lansky, I.M.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1993-01-20

    Axial symmetry is a very desirable property of the mirror devices both for fusion and neutron source applications. The main obstacle to be circumvented in the development of such systems, is the flute instability of axisymmetric mirrors. In recent years there appeared a number of proposals, devoted to the stabilization of the flute perturbations in the framework of axisymmetric magnetic configurations, which are based on the combining of the MHD unstable central cell with various types of end-cell stabilizers. In the present paper we concentrate ourselves just on this scheme, including long solenoid with a uniform field, conjugated with the end stabilizing anchor, intended to provide MHD stability of the system as a whole. The attractive feature of such a configuration is that it allows to exploit finite larmor radius (FLR) effects for the stabilization of the flute perturbations. As is well known, FLR effects, being strong, stabilize all flute modes, except the one with azimuthal number m = 1, corresponding to the ``rigid`` displacement of the plasma column (the ``global`` mode). Consequently, in the conditions when FLR effects dominate, the anchor has to stabilize the ``global` mode only. Bearing in mind a favorable influence of FLR effects we, however, don`t restrict our paper by discussion of only ``global`` mode stability and consider a general case of an arbitrary azimuthal mode.

  9. MHD Simulations of Plasma Dynamics with Non-Axisymmetric Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Chris; Levesque, Jeffrey; Morgan, Kyle; Jarboe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The arbitrary geometry, 3D extended MHD code PSI-TET is applied to linear and non-linear simulations of MCF plasmas with non-axisymmetric boundaries. Progress and results from simulations on two experiments will be presented: 1) Detailed validation studies of the HIT-SI experiment with self-consistent modeling of plasma dynamics in the helicity injectors. Results will be compared to experimental data and NIMROD simulations that model the effect of the helicity injectors through boundary conditions on an axisymmetric domain. 2) Linear studies of HBT-EP with different wall configurations focusing on toroidal asymmetries in the adjustable conducting wall. HBT-EP studies the effect of active/passive stabilization with an adjustable ferritic wall. Results from linear verification and benchmark studies of ideal mode growth with and without toroidal asymmetries will be presented and compared to DCON predictions. Simulations of detailed experimental geometries are enabled by use of the PSI-TET code, which employs a high order finite element method on unstructured tetrahedral grids that are generated directly from CAD models. Further development of PSI-TET will also be presented including work to support resistive wall regions within extended MHD simulations. Work supported by DoE.

  10. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  11. On axisymmetric/diamond-like mode transitions in axially compressed core-shell cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Potier-Ferry, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Recent interests in curvature- and stress-induced pattern formation and pattern selection motivate the present study. Surface morphological wrinkling of a cylindrical shell supported by a soft core subjected to axial compression is investigated based on a nonlinear 3D finite element model. The post-buckling behavior of core-shell cylinders beyond the first bifurcation often leads to complicated responses with surface mode transitions. The proposed finite element framework allows predicting and tracing these bifurcation portraits from a quantitative standpoint. The occurrence and evolution of 3D instability modes including sinusoidally deformed axisymmetric patterns and non-axisymmetric diamond-like modes will be highlighted according to critical dimensionless parameters. Besides, the phase diagram obtained from dimensional analyses and numerical results could be used to guide the design of core-shell cylindrical systems to achieve the desired instability patterns.

  12. EM 2dV1.0.F

    2012-01-05

    Code is for a layered electric medium with 2d structure. Includes air-earth interface at node z=2.. The electric ex and ez fields are calculated on edges of elemental grid and magnetic field hy is calculated on the face of the elemental grid. The code allows for a layered earth with 2d structures. Solutions of coupled first order Maxwell's equations are solved in the two dimensional environment using a finite- difference scheme on a staggered spationamore » and temporal grid.« less

  13. Ideal, steady-state, axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic equations with flow

    SciTech Connect

    Baransky, Y.A.

    1987-01-01

    The motivation of this study is to gain additional understanding of the effect of rotation on the equilibrium of a plasma. The axisymmetric equilibria of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with flow have been studied numerically and analytically. A general discussion is provided of previous work on plasmas with flow and comparisons are made to the static model. A variational principle has been derived for the two dimensional problem with comments as to appropriate boundary conditions. An inverse aspect ratio expansion has been used for a study of the toroidal flow equation for both low- and high-..beta... The inverse aspect ratio expansion has also been used for a study of equations with both poloidal and toroidal flow. An overview is provided of the adaptive finite-difference code which was developed to solve the full equations. (FI)

  14. Induced stresses due to fluid extraction from axisymmetric reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segall, P.

    1992-01-01

    Earthquakes can be induced by fluid extraction, as well as by fluid injection. Segall (1989) proposed that poroelastic stresses are responsible for inducing earthquakes associated with fluid extraction. Here, I present methods for computing poroelastic stress changes due to fluid extraction for general axisymmetric reservoir geometries. The results of Geertsma (1973) for a thin disk reservoir with uniform pressure drop are recovered as a special case. Predicted surface subsidence agrees very well with measured leveling changes over the deep Lacq gas field in southwestern France. The induced stresses are finite if the reservoir pressure changes are continuous. Computed stress changes are on the order of several bars, suggesting that the preexisting stress states in regions of extraction induced seismicity are very close to frictional instability prior to production. ?? 1992 Birkha??user Verlag.

  15. Buoyancy Driven Flow in an Axisymmetric Spherical Annular Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamire, Chandrasekhar; Wright, Neil T.; von Kerczek, Christian H.

    1996-11-01

    Results from analysis of axisymmetric, laminar buoyancy driven flows in a spherical annular sector with its outer radius equal to 1.5 times the inner radius and a sector angle of .75π are presented. The spherical surfaces of the enclosure are assumed to be heated and cooled isothermally, the radial surface being insulated. A time marching finite differencing scheme is used to solve the governing equations. The effects of Grashof number Gr and Prandtl number Pr on convective motion and heat transfer are examined. Flow patterns, changing from unicellular to multicellular flows with increasing Gr, and heat transfer results are graphically illustrated. Interesting recirculation zones develop at the insulated boundary for Gr = 10^5. The heat transfer calculations indicate that the Nusselt number depends strongly on Gr, and weakly on Pr in the range of parameters studied.

  16. Numerical modeling in induction heating for axisymmetric geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Chaboudez, C.; Glardon, R.; Mari, D.; Clain, S.; Rappaz, J.; Swierkosz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Induction heating is widely used in today`s industry, in operations such as metal hardening, preheating for forging operations, or brazing. It is a complex process, involving both electromagnetic and thermal phenomena. Since the design and the investigation of an induction heating system usually relies upon a series of tedious, expensive and long experiments, numerical simulation can be a valuable help in this field. This paper deals with numerical simulation of induction heating for axisymmetric geometries. A mathematical model is presented, together with a numerical scheme based on the Finite Element Method. A numerical simulation code was implemented using the model presented in this paper. A comparison between results given by the code and experimental measurements is provided.

  17. Natural gas production from hydrate dissociation: An axisymmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.; Ji, Chuang; Smith, D.H.

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes an axisymmetric model for natural gas production from the dissociation of methane hydrate in a confined reservoir by a depressurizing well. During the hydrate dissociation, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are analyzed. The system of governing equations is solved by a finite difference scheme. For different well pressures and reservoir temperatures, distributions of temperature and pressure in the reservoir, as well as the natural gas production from the well are evaluated. The numerical results are compared with those obtained by a linearization method. It is shown that the gas production rate is a sensitive function of well pressure. The simulation results are compared with the linearization approach and the shortcomings of the earlier approach are discussed.

  18. Two-dimensional and axisymmetric bifurcated channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A.

    1981-10-01

    Flow characteristics within the turbofan engine passageway for arbitrary geometries over a range of Reynolds numbers (1350 to 750,000) are determined by constructing a numerical model capable of handling irregularly shaped flow regions with laminar or turbulent flow. This is accomplished by using a vorticity-stream function formulation of the governing equations for two-dimensional and axisymmetrical flows with a two-equation eddy viscosity model for turbulence closure. A body-fitted coordinate system (Chu, 1971; Amsden and Hirt, 1973; Thompson et al., 1974) is used to treat the arbitrary geomtry. All equations are solved using finite-difference techniques (Goldman, 1980). Conclusions are presented, including: first-order terms must be separately upwind differenced to form stable solutions, regardless of whether the term is a true velocity term of a geometrically generated term created by the transformation.

  19. Numerical solutions of ICRF fields in axisymmetric mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.W.

    1985-07-01

    The results of a new numerical code called GARFIELD (Grumman Aerospace Rf Field code) that calculates ICRF Fields in axisymmetric mirror geometry (such as the central cell of a tandem mirror or an RF test stand) are presented. The code solves the electromagnetic wave equation using a cold plasma dispersion relation with a small collision frequency to simulate absorption. The purpose of the calculation is to examine how ICRF wave structure and propagation is effected by the axial variation of the magnetic field in a mirror for various antenna designs. In the code the wave equation is solved in flux coordinates using a finite element method. This should allow more complex dielectric tensors to be modeled in the future. The resulting matrix is solved iteratively, to maximize the allowable size of the spatial grid. Results for a typical antenna array in a simple mirror will be shown.

  20. Fast optimization of static axisymmetric shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Jeffrey

    An axisymmetric shell optimization procedure is developed which is a fast, user-friendly and practical tool for design use in disciplines including aerospace, mechanical and civil engineering. The shape and thickness of a shell can be optimized to minimize shell mass, mass/volume ratio or stress with constraints imposed on von Mises stress and local buckling. The procedure was created with the aid of the GENOPT optimization development system (Dr. D. Bushnell, Lockheed Missiles and Space Co) and uses the FAST1 shell analysis program (Prof. C. R. Steele, Stanford University) to perform the constraint analysis. The optimization method used is the modified method of feasible directions. The procedure is fast because exact analysis methods allow complex shells to be modelled with only a few large shell elements and still retain a sufficiently accurate solution. This is of particular advantage near shell boundaries and intersections which can have small regions of very detailed variation in the solution. Finite element methods would require many small elements to capture accurately this detail with a resulting increase in computation time and model complexity. Reducing the complexity of the model also reduces the size of the required input and contributes to the simplicity of the procedure. Optimization design variables are the radial and axial coordinates of nodes and the shape parameters and thicknesses of the elements. Thickness distribution within an element can be optimized by specifying the thickness at evenly spaced control points. Spline interpolation is used to provide a smooth thickness variation between the control points. An effective method is developed for reducing the number of required stress constraint equations. Various shells have been optimized and include models for comparison with published results. Shape, thickness and shape/thickness optimization has been performed on examples including a simple aerobrake, sphere-nozzle intersections, ring

  1. Development of a moderately sized finite element program for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    AGGIE 1 is a computer program for predicting the linear and nonlinear, static and dynamic structural response of two- and three-dimensional continuum solids. The program is based on isoparametric finite elements and allows for 2-D plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric analyses and general 3-D analyses. Large strain kinematics is based on the total Lagrangian formulation. Materially nonlinear models include several elastic-plastic work-hardening models as well as an incompressible Mooney-Rivlin model. Included in this report is a brief description of the theoretical bases of the program, the material models used, the element library and the overall program organization. Instructions for data input preparation are given in detail. Several sample problems are given along with the required program input and program generated solutions.

  2. Practical Algorithm For Computing The 2-D Arithmetic Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Choi, Y. Y.; Yu, Xiaoli

    1989-05-01

    Recently, Tufts and Sadasiv [10] exposed a method for computing the coefficients of a Fourier series of a periodic function using the Mobius inversion of series. They called this method of analysis the Arithmetic Fourier Transform(AFT). The advantage of the AFT over the FN 1' is that this method of Fourier analysis needs only addition operations except for multiplications by scale factors at one stage of the computation. The disadvantage of the AFT as they expressed it originally is that it could be used effectively only to compute finite Fourier coefficients of a real even function. To remedy this the AFT developed in [10] is extended in [11] to compute the Fourier coefficients of both the even and odd components of a periodic function. In this paper, the improved AFT [11] is extended to a two-dimensional(2-D) Arithmetic Fourier Transform for calculating the Fourier Transform of two-dimensional discrete signals. This new algorithm is based on both the number-theoretic method of Mobius inversion of double series and the complex conjugate property of Fourier coefficients. The advantage of this algorithm over the conventional 2-D FFT is that the corner-turning problem needed in a conventional 2-D Discrete Fourier Transform(DFT) can be avoided. Therefore, this new 2-D algorithm is readily suitable for VLSI implementation as a parallel architecture. Comparing the operations of 2-D AFT of a MxM 2-D data array with the conventional 2-D FFT, the number of multiplications is significantly reduced from (2log2M)M2 to (9/4)M2. Hence, this new algorithm is faster than the FFT algorithm. Finally, two simulation results of this new 2-D AFT algorithm for 2-D artificial and real images are given in this paper.

  3. An inverse design method for 2D airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi-Yong; Cui, Peng; Zhang, Gen-Bao

    2010-03-01

    The computational method for aerodynamic design of aircraft is applied more universally than before, in which the design of an airfoil is a hot problem. The forward problem is discussed by most relative papers, but inverse method is more useful in practical designs. In this paper, the inverse design of 2D airfoil was investigated. A finite element method based on the variational principle was used for carrying out. Through the simulation, it was shown that the method was fit for the design.

  4. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  5. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  6. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  7. Axisymmetric whole pin life modelling of advanced gas-cooled reactor nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, R.; Wenman, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Thermo-mechanical contributions to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) in advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs) are modelled in the ABAQUS finite element (FE) code. User supplied sub-routines permit the modelling of the non-linear behaviour of AGR fuel through life. Through utilisation of ABAQUS's well-developed pre- and post-processing ability, the behaviour of the axially constrained steel clad fuel was modelled. The 2D axisymmetric model includes thermo-mechanical behaviour of the fuel with time and condition dependent material properties. Pellet cladding gap dynamics and thermal behaviour are also modelled. The model treats heat up as a fully coupled temperature-displacement study. Dwell time and direct power cycling was applied to model the impact of online refuelling, a key feature of the AGR. The model includes the visco-plastic behaviour of the fuel under the stress and irradiation conditions within an AGR core and a non-linear heat transfer model. A multiscale fission gas release model is applied to compute pin pressure; this model is coupled to the PCI gap model through an explicit fission gas inventory code. Whole pin, whole life, models are able to show the impact of the fuel on all segments of cladding including weld end caps and cladding pellet locking mechanisms (unique to AGR fuel). The development of this model in a commercial FE package shows that the development of a potentially verified and future-proof fuel performance code can be created and used. The usability of a FE based fuel performance code would be an enhancement over past codes. Pre- and post-processors have lowered the entry barrier for the development of a fuel performance model to permit the ability to model complicated systems. Typical runtimes for a 5 year axisymmetric model takes less than one hour on a single core workstation. The current model has implemented: Non-linear fuel thermal behaviour, including a complex description of heat flow in the fuel. Coupled with a variety of

  8. Axisymmetric instabilities between coaxial rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécheux, Jean; Foucault, E.

    2006-09-01

    This paper concerns the stability of the von Kármán swirling flow between coaxial disks. A linear stability analysis shows that for moderate Reynolds numbers (Re≤50) and for any rotation ratio sin[-1,1[ there is a radial location r_{pc} from which the self-similar von Kármán solutions become unstable to axisymmetric disturbances. When the disks are moderately counter-rotating (sin[-0.56,0[), two different disturbances (types I and II) appear at the same critical radius. A spatio-temporal analysis shows that, at a very short distance from this critical radius, the first disturbance (type I) becomes absolutely unstable whereas the second (type II) remains convectively unstable. Outside this range of aspect ratios, all the disturbances examined are found to be absolutely unstable. The flow between two coaxial rotating disks enclosed in a stationary sidewall is then numerically investigated. For sufficently large aspect ratios, the cavity flow is found to be globally unstable for axisymmetric disturbances similar to that calculated with the self-similar solutions. The flow in cavities with aspect ratios smaller than R {≈} 10.3 (and Re {≤} 50) is not destabilized by these axisymmetric disturbances. An experimental investigation conducted for a cavity with aspect ratio R {=} 15 confirms the numerical results. Axisymmetric disturbances similar to those calculated for the same cavity are detected and three-dimensional modes can also be observed near the sidewall.

  9. Magneto-hydrodynamically stable axisymmetric mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Cohen, B. I.; Molvik, A. W.; Berk, H. L.; Simonen, T. C.

    2011-09-15

    Making axisymmetric mirrors magnetohydrodynamically (MHD) stable opens up exciting opportunities for using mirror devices as neutron sources, fusion-fission hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors. This is also of interest from a general physics standpoint (as it seemingly contradicts well-established criteria of curvature-driven instabilities). The axial symmetry allows for much simpler and more reliable designs of mirror-based fusion facilities than the well-known quadrupole mirror configurations. In this tutorial, after a summary of classical results, several techniques for achieving MHD stabilization of the axisymmetric mirrors are considered, in particular: (1) employing the favorable field-line curvature in the end tanks; (2) using the line-tying effect; (3) controlling the radial potential distribution; (4) imposing a divertor configuration on the solenoidal magnetic field; and (5) affecting the plasma dynamics by the ponderomotive force. Some illuminative theoretical approaches for understanding axisymmetric mirror stability are described. The applicability of the various stabilization techniques to axisymmetric mirrors as neutron sources, hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors are discussed; and the constraints on the plasma parameters are formulated.

  10. Axisymmetric ideal MHD stellar wind flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Olbert, S.

    1978-01-01

    The ideal MHD equations are reduced to a single equation under the assumption of axisymmetric flow. A variational principle from which the equation is derivable is given. The characteristics of the equation are briefly discussed. The equation is used to rederive the theorem of Gussenhoven and Carovillano.

  11. Non-Ideal ELM Stability and Non-Axisymmetric Field Penetration Calculations with M3D-C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Chu, M. S.; Snyder, P. B.; Jardin, S. C.; Luo, X.

    2009-11-01

    Numerical studies of ELM stability and non-axisymmetric field penetration in diverted DIII-D and NSTX equilibria are presented, with resistive and finite Larmor radius effects included. These results are obtained with the nonlinear two-fluid code M3D-C1, which has recently been extended to allow linear non-axisymmetric calculations. Benchmarks of M3D-C1 with ideal codes ELITE and GATO show good agreement for the linear stability of peeling-ballooning modes in the ideal limit. New calculations of the resistive stability of ideally stable DIII-D equilibria are presented. M3D-C1 has also been used to calculate the linear response to non-axisymmetric external fields; these calculations are benchmarked with Surfmn and MARS-F. New numerical methods implemented in M3D-C1 are presented, including the treatment of boundary conditions with C^1 elements in a non-rectangular mesh.

  12. Integrated transient thermal-structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Wieting, A. R.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated thermal structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of transient thermal and structural analysis is presented. Integrated thermal structural rod and one dimensional axisymmetric elements considering conduction and convection are developed and used in transient thermal structural applications. The improved accuracy of the integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with exact transient heat conduction elasticity solutions and conventional finite element thermal finite element structural analyses.

  13. AXISYMMETRIC, NONSTATIONARY BLACK HOLE MAGNETOSPHERES: REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yoo Geun; Park, Seok Jae E-mail: sjpark@kasi.re.kr

    2015-10-10

    An axisymmetric, stationary, general-relativistic, electrodynamic engine model of an active galactic nucleus was formulated by Macdonald and Thorne that consisted of a supermassive black hole surrounded by a plasma magnetosphere and a magnetized accretion disk. Based on this initial formulation, a nonstationary, force-free version of their model was constructed by Park and Vishniac (PV), with the simplifying assumption that the poloidal component of the magnetic field line velocity be confined along the radial direction in cylindrical polar coordinates. In this paper, we derive the new, nonstationary “Transfield Equation,” which was not specified in PV. If we can solve this “Transfield Equation” numerically, then we will understand the axisymmetric, nonstationary black hole magnetosphere in more rigorous ways.

  14. Axisymmetric, Nonstationary Black Hole Magnetospheres: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yoo Geun; Park, Seok Jae

    2015-10-01

    An axisymmetric, stationary, general-relativistic, electrodynamic engine model of an active galactic nucleus was formulated by Macdonald and Thorne that consisted of a supermassive black hole surrounded by a plasma magnetosphere and a magnetized accretion disk. Based on this initial formulation, a nonstationary, force-free version of their model was constructed by Park & Vishniac (PV), with the simplifying assumption that the poloidal component of the magnetic field line velocity be confined along the radial direction in cylindrical polar coordinates. In this paper, we derive the new, nonstationary “Transfield Equation,” which was not specified in PV. If we can solve this “Transfield Equation” numerically, then we will understand the axisymmetric, nonstationary black hole magnetosphere in more rigorous ways.

  15. Frequency Split Elimination Method for a Solid-State Vibratory Angular Rate Gyro with an Imperfect Axisymmetric-Shell Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Fu, Mengyin; Deng, Zhihong; Liu, Ning; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The resonator of a solid-state vibratory gyro is responsible for sensing angular motion. Frequency splitting of an axisymmetric-shell resonator is a common problem caused by manufacturing defects. The defect causes a frequency difference between two working modes which consist of two nodes and two antinodes. The difference leads to the loss of gyroscopic effect, and thus the resonator cannot sense angular motion. In this paper, the resonator based on an axisymmetric multi-curved surface shell structure is investigated and an approach to eliminate frequency splits is proposed. Since axisymmetric multi-curved surface shell resonators are too complex to be modeled, this paper proposes a simplified model by focusing on a common property of the axisymmetric shell. The resonator with stochastic imperfections is made equivalent to a perfect shell with an imperfect mass point. Rayleigh's energy method is used in the theoretical analysis. Finite element modeling is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the elimination approach. In real cases, a resonator's frequency split is eliminated by the proposed approach. In this paper, errors in the theoretical analysis are discussed and steps to be taken when the deviation between assumptions and the real situation is large are figured out. The resonator has good performance after processing. The elimination approach can be applied to any kind of solid-state vibratory gyro resonators with an axisymmetric shell structure. PMID:25648707

  16. Axisymmetric vibrations of layered tapered plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navaneethakrishnan, P. V.; Chandrasekaran, K.; Ravisrinivas, N.

    1992-12-01

    The study of Navaneethakrishnan and Chandrasekaran (1989) on axisymmetric free vibrations of layered annular plates is extended to the vibrations of layered annular plates whose thickness can vary as the radial distance from the arbitrary concentric circle. Numerical results are presented, showing the relationship between the circular frequency of the plate vibration and the ratio between the inner and the outer radii of the plate.

  17. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data are presented for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  18. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data were obtained for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  19. Numerical description of cavitation on axisymmetric bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Hickox, C.E.; Hailey, C.E.; Wolfe, W.P.; Watts, H.A.; Gross, R.J.; Ingber, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on ongoing studies which are directed toward the development of predictive techniques for the modeling of steady cavitation on axisymmetric bodies. The primary goal of the modeling effort is the prediction of cavity shape and pressure distribution from which forces and moments can be calculated. Here we present an overview of the modeling techniques developed and compare predictions with experimental data obtained from water tunnel tests for both limited and supercavitation. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  1. A 2D model of axial symmetry for proximal tubule of an average human nephron: indicative results of diffusion, convection and absorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insfrán, J. F.; Ubal, S.; Di Paolo, y. J.

    2016-04-01

    A simplified model of a proximal convoluted tubule of an average human nephron is presented. The model considers the 2D axisymmetric flow of the luminal solution exchanging matter with the tubule walls and the peritubular fluid by means of 0D models for the epithelial cells. The tubule radius is considered to vary along the conduit due to the trans-epithelial pressure difference. The fate of more than ten typical solutes is tracked down by the model. The Navier-Stokes and Reaction-Diffusion-Advection equations (considering the electro-neutrality principle) are solved in the lumen, giving a detailed picture of the velocity, pressure and concentration fields, along with trans-membrane fluxes and tubule deformation, via coupling with the 0D model for the tubule wall. The calculations are carried out numerically by means of the finite element method. The results obtained show good agreement with those published by other authors using models that ignore the diffusive transport and disregard a detailed calculation of velocity, pressure and concentrations. This work should be seen as a first approach towards the development of a more comprehensive model of the filtration process taking place in the kidneys, which ultimately helps in devising a device that can mimic/complement the renal function.

  2. Intense Flows in Librationally Driven Non-Axisymmetric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, A. M.; Le Bars, M.; Cebron, D.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present laboratory experimental results that demonstrate that librational forcing can drive intense motions of interior, low viscosity fluid layers. Longitudinal libration refers to small periodic changes in a satellite's mean rotation rate as it orbits a primary body. These libration studies are conducted using ellipsoidal acrylic containers filled with water. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) methods are used to measure the 2D velocity field in the equatorial plane over hundreds and thousands of libration cycles. In doing so we determine the coupled modes of the triadic resonance responsible for the instability that produces both intermittent and persistent turbulent motions in the bulk fluid. Additionally, we measure the amplitude and the growth rate for the instability and compare it with previous studies [1][2]. Excitation of global turbulence by librational forcing provides a mechanism for transferring rotational energy into fluid turbulence and thus may play an important role in the thermal evolution, interior dynamics, and magneto-hydrodynamics of librating bodies. [1] Cébron, D., M. Le Bars, J. Noir, J.M. Aurnou. (2012). Libration driven elliptical instability. Physics of Fluids 24, 061703. [2] Noir J., D. Cébron, M. Le Bars, A. Sauret, J.M. Aurnou (2012). Experimental study of libration-driven flows in non-axisymmetric containers, Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 204-205, 1-10.

  3. Continuum Nonsimple Loops and 2D Critical Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camia, Federico; Newman, Charles M.

    2004-08-01

    Substantial progress has been made in recent years on the 2D critical percolation scaling limit and its conformal invariance properties. In particular, chordal SLE 6(the Stochastic Loewner Evolution with parameter κ=6) was, in the work of Schramm and of Smirnov, identified as the scaling limit of the critical percolation "exploration process." In this paper we use that and other results to construct what we argue is the fullscaling limit of the collection of allclosed contours surrounding the critical percolation clusters on the 2D triangular lattice. This random process or gas of continuum nonsimple loops in Bbb R2is constructed inductively by repeated use of chordal SLE 6. These loops do not cross but do touch each other—indeed, any two loops are connected by a finite "path" of touching loops.

  4. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  5. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  6. A parallel splitting wavelet method for 2D conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alex A.; Kozakevicius, Alice J.; Jakobsson, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The current work presents a parallel formulation using the MPI protocol for an adaptive high order finite difference scheme to solve 2D conservation laws. Adaptivity is achieved at each time iteration by the application of an interpolating wavelet transform in each space dimension. High order approximations for the numerical fluxes are computed by ENO and WENO schemes. Since time evolution is made by a TVD Runge-Kutta space splitting scheme, the problem is naturally suitable for parallelization. Numerical simulations and speedup results are presented for Euler equations in gas dynamics problems.

  7. Numerical investigation of transitional supersonic axisymmetric wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard D.; Fasel, Hermann F.

    2006-09-01

    Transitional supersonic axisymmetric wakes are investigated by conducting various numerical experiments. The main objective is to identify hydrodynamic instability mechanisms in the flow at M {=} 2.46 for several Reynolds numbers, and to relate these to coherent structures that are found from various visualization techniques. The premise for this approach is the assumption that flow instabilities lead to the formation of coherent structures. Three high-order accurate compressible codes were developed in cylindrical coordinates for this work: a spatial Navier Stokes (N-S) code to conduct direct numerical simulations (DNS), a linearized N-S code for linear stability investigations using axisymmetric basic states, and a temporal N-S code for performing local stability analyses. The ability of numerical simulations to exclude physical effects deliberately is exploited. This includes intentionally eliminating certain azimuthal/helical modes by employing DNS for various circumferential domain sizes. With this approach, the impact of structures associated with certain modes on the global wake-behaviour can be scrutinized. Complementary spatial and temporal calculations are carried out to investigate whether instabilities are of local or global nature. Circumstantial evidence is presented that absolutely unstable global modes within the recirculation region co-exist with convectively unstable shear-layer modes. The flow is found to be absolutely unstable with respect to modes k {>} 0 for Re_D {>} 5000 and with respect to the axisymmetric mode k {=} 0 for Re_D {>} 100 000. It is concluded that azimuthal modes k {=} 2 and k {=} 4 are the dominant modes in the trailing wake, producing a ‘four-lobe’ wake pattern. Two possible mechanisms responsible for the generation of longitudinal structures within the recirculation region are suggested.

  8. Axisymmetric oscillations of magnetic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Umin

    2007-01-01

    We calculate axisymmetric oscillations of rotating neutron stars composed of the surface fluid ocean, solid crust and fluid core, taking account of a dipole magnetic field as strong as BS ~ 1015 G at the surface. The adiabatic oscillation equations for the solid crust threaded by a dipole magnetic field are derived in Newtonian dynamics, on the assumption that the axis of rotation is aligned with the magnetic axis so that perturbations on the equilibrium can be represented by series expansions in terms of spherical harmonic functions Yml(θ, φ) with different degrees l for a given azimuthal wave number m around the magnetic axis. Although the three component models can support a rich variety of oscillation modes, axisymmetric (m = 0) toroidal ltn and spheroidal lsn shear waves propagating in the solid crust are our main concerns, where l and n denote the harmonic degree and the radial order of the modes, respectively. In the absence of rotation, axisymmetric spheroidal and toroidal modes are completely decoupled, and we consider the effects of rotation on the oscillation modes only in the limit of slow rotation. We find that the oscillation frequencies of the fundamental toroidal torsional modes ltn in the crust are hardly affected by the magnetic field as strong as BS ~ 1015 G at the surface. As the radial order n of the shear modes in the crust becomes higher, however, both spheroidal and toroidal modes become susceptible to the magnetic field, and their frequencies in general get higher with increasing BS. We also find that the surface g modes and the crust/ocean interfacial modes are suppressed by a strong magnetic field, and that there appear magnetic modes in the presence of a strong magnetic field.

  9. Magnetic-divertor stabilization of an axisymmetric plasma with anisotropic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasagawa, Y.; Katanuma, I.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Cho, T.; Pastukhov, V. P.

    2006-12-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic stabilization of an axisymmetric mirror plasma with a magnetic divertor is studied. An equation is found for the flute modes, which includes the stabilizing influence of ion temperature anisotropy and nonparaxial magnetic fields, as well as a finite ion Larmor radius. It is shown that if the density profile is sufficiently gentle, then the nonparaxial configuration can stabilize all modes as long as ion temperature is radially uniform. This can be demonstrated even when the density vanishes on the separatrix and even for small ion Larmor radii. It is found, however, that the ion temperature gradient makes the unstable region wider; high ion temperature is required to stabilize the flute mode.

  10. Suppression of the first flute mode in a long axisymmetric mirror system

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.

    1982-05-01

    The lowest mode of the flute instability of a plasma with ..beta..<<1 in a confinement system with a simple mirror field: the displacement of the plasma as a whole: can be suppressed if the confinement system is connected with another plasma-filled, axisymmetric, annular confinement system, so that there is a sharp maximum in B beyond the outer boundary of the bell-shaped plasma in the annular system. If the simple mirror is so long that all the other flute modes are stabilized by the finite-Larmor-radius effect, the plasma proves stable with respect to flute perturbations.

  11. Quantitative shearography in axisymmetric gas temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes the use of shearing interferometry (shearography) for the quantitative measurement of gas temperatures in axisymmetric systems in which vibration and shock are substantial, and measurement time is limited. The setup and principle of operation of the interferometer are described, as well as Fourier-transform-based fringe pattern analysis, Abel transform, and sensitivity of the phase lead to temperature calculation. A helium jet and a Bunsen burner flame are shown as verification of the diagnostic. The accuracy of the measured temperature profile is shown to be limited by the Abel transform and is critically dependent on the reference temperature used.

  12. Super-collimation by axisymmetric photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Purlys, V.; Gailevičius, D.; Peckus, M.; Gadonas, R.; Maigyte, L.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-06-02

    We propose and experimentally show the mechanism of beam super-collimation by axisymmetric photonic crystals, specifically by periodic (in propagation direction) structure of layers of concentric rings. The physical mechanism behind the effect is an inverse scattering cascade of diffracted wave components back into on- and near-axis angular field components, resulting in substantial enhancement of intensity of these components. We explore the super-collimation by numerical calculations and prove it experimentally. We demonstrate experimentally the axial field enhancement up to 7 times in terms of field intensity.

  13. Mach disk from underexpanded axisymmetric nozzle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I.-S.; Chow, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The flowfield associated with the underexpanded axisymmetric nozzle freejet flow including the appearance of a Mach disk has been studied. It is shown that the location and size of the Mach disk are governed by the appearance of a triple-point shock configuration and the condition that the central core flow will reach a state of 'choking at a throat'. It is recognized that coalescence of waves requires special attention and the reflected wave, as well as the vorticity generated from these wave interactions, have to be taken accurately into account. The theoretical results obtained agreed well with the experimental data.

  14. Axisymmetric scrape-off plasma transport

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Langer, W.D.

    1983-05-01

    The two-dimensional flow of a collision dominated hydrogen scrape-off plasma in an axisymmetric tokamak is examined. This flow is described by a set of equations which contain the dominant terms in a maximal ordering appropriate to high density experimental divertors and reactor scrape-off plasmas. Comparison of the theory to estimates of scrape-off parameters in the Doublet III expanded boundary plasmas suggests that analysis of classical and neoclassical processes alone may be sufficient to predict plasma transport in high density scrape-off plasmas of practical importance.

  15. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo’s configuration)

  16. A new axi-symmetric element for thin walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rui P. R.; Yoon, Jeong Whan; Dick, Robert E.

    2010-03-01

    A new axi-symmetric finite element for thin walled structures is presented in this work. It uses the solid-shell element’s concept with only a single element and multiple integration points along the thickness direction. The cross-section of the element is composed of four nodes with two degrees of freedom each. The proposed formulation overcomes many locking pathologies including transverse shear locking, Poisson’s locking and volumetric locking. For transverse shear locking, the formulation uses the selective reduced integration technique, for Poisson’s locking it uses the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) method with only one enhancing variable. The B-bar approach is used to eliminate the isochoric deformations in the hourglass field while the EAS method is used to alleviate the volumetric locking in the constant part of the deformation tensor. Several examples are shown to demonstrate the performance and accuracy of the proposed element with special focus on the numerical simulations for the beverage can industry.

  17. Axisymmetric Time-Dependent Computations of Expansion Tube Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this work is to add insight about the flow within expansion tubes by using computational fluid dynamics. This is accomplished by comparing the results of axisymmetric numerical simulations with finite-rate chemistry to data from the HYPULSE expansion tube facility which was previously the NASA Langley expansion tube. The numerical simulations begin at the opening of the primary diaphragm and compute the flow throughout the whole facility and, thus, are able to follow and assess the effect of many of the flow features created during operation of the facility. One particular issue that will be investigated is the effect of boundary layer formation in the acceleration tube on the test gas volume and test gas conditions. Both laminar and turbulent boundary layers will be implemented. The effect of momentary shock reflection off the secondary diaphragm will also be investigated. There is concern that such a reflection will stagnate the test gas and create high levels of dissociated molecules. This is particularly important in propulsion experiments where a freestream composition different from flight conditions may influence ignition and burning data. Several different models of diaphragm rupture will be implemented in order to help understand the importance of this issue.

  18. Rapid Numerical Simulation of Viscous Axisymmetric Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been developed for rapid numerical simulation of axisymmetric flow fields, including flow fields with an azimuthal velocity component. The azimuthal-invariant Navier-Stokes equations in a cylindrical coordinate system are mapped to a general body-fitted coordinate system, with the streamwise viscous terms then neglected by applying the thin-layer approximation. Turbulence effects are modeled using an algebraic model, typically the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, although a modified Cebeci-Smith model can also be used. The equations are discretized using central finite differences and solved using a multistage Runge-Kutta algorithm with a spatially varying time step and implicit residual smoothing. Results are presented for calculations of supersonic flow over a waisted body-of-revolution, transonic flow through a normal shock wave in a straight circular duct of constant cross sectional area, swirling supersonic (inviscid) flow through a strong shock in a straight radial duct, and swirling subsonic flow in an annular-to-circular diffuser duct. Comparisons between computed and experimental results are in fair to good agreement, demonstrating that the viscous code can be a useful tool for practical engineering design and analysis work.

  19. Kinetic extensions of magnetohydrodynamic models for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1989-04-01

    A nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) has been developed to integrate a set of non-Hermitian integro-differential eigenmode equations due to energetic particles for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas in a general flux coordinate system with an arbitrary Jacobian. The NOVA-K code employs the Galerkin method involving Fourier expansions in the generalized poloidal angle theta and generalized toroidal angle /zeta/ directions, and cubic-B spline finite elements in the radial /Psi/ direction. Extensive comparisons with the existing variational ideal MHD codes show that the ideal MHD version of the NOVA-K code converges faster and gives more accurate results. The NOVA-K code is employed to study the effects of energetic particles on MHD-type modes: the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of ''fishbone'' internal kink modes; and the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are also presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n = 1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of the core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to have negligible effects on the stability of the n = 1 internal kink mode, but the circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 60 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2005-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous

  1. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  2. Finite element analysis of wrinkling membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.; Hedgepeth, J. M.; Weingarten, V. I.; Das, P.; Kahyai, S.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a nonlinear numerical algorithm for the analysis of stresses and displacements in partly wrinkled flat membranes, and its implementation on the SAP VII finite-element code are described. A comparison of numerical results with exact solutions of two benchmark problems reveals excellent agreement, with good convergence of the required iterative procedure. An exact solution of a problem involving axisymmetric deformations of a partly wrinkled shallow curved membrane is also reported.

  3. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  4. Installed Transonic 2D Nozzle Nacelle Boattail Drag Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Michael B.; Peavey, Charles C.

    1999-01-01

    The Transonic Nozzle Boattail Drag Study was initiated in 1995 to develop an understanding of how external nozzle transonic aerodynamics effect airplane performance and how strongly those effects are dependent on nozzle configuration (2D vs. axisymmetric). MDC analyzed the axisymmetric nozzle. Boeing subcontracted Northrop-Grumman to analyze the 2D nozzle. AU participants analyzed the AGARD nozzle as a check-out and validation case. Once the codes were checked out and the gridding resolution necessary for modeling the separated flow in this region determined, the analysis moved to the installed wing/body/nacelle/diverter cases. The boat tail drag validation case was the AGARD B.4 rectangular nozzle. This test case offered both test data and previous CFD analyses for comparison. Results were obtained for test cases B.4.1 (M=0.6) and B.4.2 (M=0.938) and compared very well with the experimental data. Once the validation was complete a CFD grid was constructed for the full Ref. H configuration (wing/body/nacelle/diverter) using a combination of patched and overlapped (Chimera) grids. This was done to ensure that the grid topologies and density would be adequate for the full model. The use of overlapped grids allowed the same grids from the full configuration model to be used for the wing/body alone cases, thus eliminating the risk of grid differences affecting the determination of the installation effects. Once the full configuration model was run and deemed to be suitable the nacelle/diverter grids were removed and the wing/body analysis performed. Reference H wing/body results were completed for M=0.9 (a=0.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0), M=1.1 (a=4.0 and 6.0) and M=2.4 (a=0.0, 2.0, 4.4, 6.0 and 8.0). Comparisons of the M=0.9 and M=2.4 cases were made with available wind tunnel data and overall comparisons were good. The axi-inlet/2D nozzle nacelle was analyzed isolated. The isolated nacelle data coupled with the wing/body result enabled the interference effects of the

  5. CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR ORBITS IN AXISYMMETRIC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Khan, Fazeel Mahmood E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2015-09-20

    It is known that two supermassive black holes (SMBHs) cannot merge in a spherical galaxy within a Hubble time; an emerging picture is that galaxy geometry, rotation, and large potential perturbations may usher the SMBH binary through the critical three-body scattering phase and ultimately drive the SMBH to coalesce. We explore the orbital content within an N-body model of a mildly flattened, non-rotating, SMBH-embedded elliptical galaxy. When used as the foundation for a study on the SMBH binary coalescence, the black holes bypassed the binary stalling often seen within spherical galaxies and merged on gigayear timescales. Using both frequency-mapping and angular momentum criteria, we identify a wealth of resonant orbits in the axisymmetric model, including saucers, that are absent from an otherwise identical spherical system and that can potentially interact with the binary. We quantified the set of orbits that could be scattered by the SMBH binary, and found that the axisymmetric model contained nearly six times the number of these potential loss cone orbits compared to our equivalent spherical model. In this flattened model, the mass of these orbits is more than three times that of the SMBH, which is consistent with what the SMBH binary needs to scatter to transition into the gravitational wave regime.

  6. Vortexons in axisymmetric Poiseuille pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, F.; Dutykh, D.

    2013-02-01

    We present a study on the nonlinear dynamics of small long-wave disturbances to the laminar state in non-rotating axisymmetric Poiseuille pipe flows. At high Reynolds numbers, the associated Navier-Stokes equations can be reduced to a set of coupled Korteweg-de Vries-type (KdV) equations that support inviscid and smooth travelling waves numerically computed using the Petviashvili method. In physical space they correspond to localized toroidal vortices concentrated near the pipe boundaries (wall vortexons) or that wrap around the pipe axis (centre vortexons), in agreement with the analytical soliton solutions derived by Fedele (Fluid Dyn. Res., 44 (2012) 45509). The KdV dynamics of a perturbation is also investigated by means of a high accurate Fourier-based numerical scheme. We observe that an initial vortical patch splits into a centre vortexon radiating patches of vorticity near the wall. These can undergo further splitting leading to a proliferation of centre vortexons that eventually decay due to viscous effects. The splitting process originates from a radial flux of azimuthal vorticity from the wall to the pipe axis in agreement with the inverse cascade of cross-stream vorticity identified in channel flows by Eyink (Plysica D, 237 (2008) 1956). The inviscid vortexon most likely is unstable to non-axisymmetric disturbances and may be a precursor to puffs and slug flow formation.

  7. Linear lateral vibration of axisymmetric liquid briges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, C.; Montanero, J. M.; Cabezas, M. G.

    A liquid bridge is a mass of liquid sustained by the action of the surface tension force between two parallel supporting disks Apart from their basic scientific interest a liquid bridge can be considered as the simplest idealization of the configuration appearing in the floating zone technique used for crystal growth and purification of high melting point materials footnote Messeguer et al emph Crystal Growth Res bf 5 27 1999 This has conferred considerable interest on the study of liquid bridges not only in fluid mechanics but also in the field of material engineering The axisymmetric dynamics of an isothermal liquid bridge has been frequently analysed over the past years The studies have considered different phenomena such as free oscillations footnote Montanero emph E J Mech B Fluids bf 22 169 2003 footnote Acero and Montanero emph Phys Fluids bf 17 078105 2005 forced vibrations footnote Perales and Messeguer emph Phys Fluids A bf 4 1110 1992 g-jitter effects footnote Messeguer and Perales emph Phys Fluids A bf 3 2332 1991 extensional deformation footnote Zhang et al emph J Fluid Mech bf 329 207 1996 and breakup process footnote Espino et al emph Phys Fluids bf 14 3710 2002 among others Works considering the nonaxisymmetric dynamical behaviour of a liquid bridge has been far less common footnote Sanz and Diez emph J Fluid Mech bf 205 503 1989 In the present study the linear vibration of an axisymmetric liquid

  8. Uncertainty Assessments of 2D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock Wave - Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction Simulations at Compression Corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Berry, Scott A.; VanNorman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of five papers in a special session organized by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that addresses uncertainty assessments for CFD simulations in hypersonic flow. Simulations of a shock emanating from a compression corner and interacting with a fully developed turbulent boundary layer are evaluated herein. Mission relevant conditions at Mach 7 and Mach 14 are defined for a pre-compression ramp of a scramjet powered vehicle. Three compression angles are defined, the smallest to avoid separation losses and the largest to force a separated flow engaging more complicated flow physics. The Baldwin-Lomax and the Cebeci-Smith algebraic models, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model with the Catrix-Aupoix compressibility modification and two-equation models including Menter SST, Wilcox k-omega 98, and Wilcox k-omega 06 turbulence models are evaluated. Each model is fully defined herein to preclude any ambiguity regarding model implementation. Comparisons are made to existing experimental data and Van Driest theory to provide preliminary assessment of model form uncertainty. A set of coarse grained uncertainty metrics are defined to capture essential differences among turbulence models. Except for the inability of algebraic models to converge for some separated flows there is no clearly superior model as judged by these metrics. A preliminary metric for the numerical component of uncertainty in shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions at compression corners sufficiently steep to cause separation is defined as 55%. This value is a median of differences with experimental data averaged for peak pressure and heating and for extent of separation captured in new, grid-converged solutions presented here. This value is consistent with existing results in a literature review of hypersonic shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions by Roy and Blottner and with more recent computations of MacLean.

  9. Stabilization of the vertical instability by non-axisymmetric coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Reiman, A. H.; Lao, L. L.; Cooper, W. A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Buttery, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    In a published Physical Review Letter (Reiman 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 135007), it was shown that axisymmetric (or vertical) stability can be improved by placing a set of parallelogram coils above and below the plasma oriented at an angle to the constant toroidal planes. The physics of this stabilization can be understood as providing an effective additional positive stability index. The original work was based on a simplified model of a straight tokamak and is not straightforwardly applicable to a finite aspect ratio, strongly shaped plasma such as in DIII-D. Numerical calculations were performed in a real DIII-D -like configuration to provide a proof of principal that 3-D fields can, in fact raise the elongation limits as predicted. A four field period trapezioid-shaped coil set was developed in toroidal geometry and 3D equilibria were computed using trapezium coil currents of 10 kA , 100 kA , and 500 kA . The ideal magnetohydrodynamics growth rates were computed as a function of the conformal wall position for the n = 0 symmetry-preserving family. The results show an insignificant relative improvement in the stabilizing wall location for the two lower coil current cases, of the order of 10‑3 and less. In contrast, the marginal wall position is increased by 7% as the coil current is increased to 500 kA , confirming the main prediction from the original study in a real geometry case. In DIII-D the shift in marginal wall position of 7% would correspond to being able to move the existing wall outward by 5 to 10 cm. While the predicted effect on the axisymmetric stability is real, it appears to require higher coil currents than could be provided in an upgrade to existing facilities. Additional optimization over the pitch of the coils, the number of field periods and the coil positions, as well as plasma parameters, such as the internal inductivity {{\\ell}\\text{i}} , β , and {{q}95} would mitigate this but seem unlikely to change the conclusion.

  10. Stabilization of the vertical instability by non-axisymmetric coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Reiman, A. H.; Lao, L. L.; Cooper, W. A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Buttery, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    In a published Physical Review Letter (Reiman 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 135007), it was shown that axisymmetric (or vertical) stability can be improved by placing a set of parallelogram coils above and below the plasma oriented at an angle to the constant toroidal planes. The physics of this stabilization can be understood as providing an effective additional positive stability index. The original work was based on a simplified model of a straight tokamak and is not straightforwardly applicable to a finite aspect ratio, strongly shaped plasma such as in DIII-D. Numerical calculations were performed in a real DIII-D -like configuration to provide a proof of principal that 3-D fields can, in fact raise the elongation limits as predicted. A four field period trapezioid-shaped coil set was developed in toroidal geometry and 3D equilibria were computed using trapezium coil currents of 10 kA , 100 kA , and 500 kA . The ideal magnetohydrodynamics growth rates were computed as a function of the conformal wall position for the n = 0 symmetry-preserving family. The results show an insignificant relative improvement in the stabilizing wall location for the two lower coil current cases, of the order of 10-3 and less. In contrast, the marginal wall position is increased by 7% as the coil current is increased to 500 kA , confirming the main prediction from the original study in a real geometry case. In DIII-D the shift in marginal wall position of 7% would correspond to being able to move the existing wall outward by 5 to 10 cm. While the predicted effect on the axisymmetric stability is real, it appears to require higher coil currents than could be provided in an upgrade to existing facilities. Additional optimization over the pitch of the coils, the number of field periods and the coil positions, as well as plasma parameters, such as the internal inductivity {{\\ell}\\text{i}} , β , and {{q}95} would mitigate this but seem unlikely to change the conclusion.

  11. Local currents in a 2D topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaoqian; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y

    2015-12-23

    Symmetry protected edge states in 2D topological insulators are interesting both from the fundamental point of view as well as from the point of view of potential applications in nanoelectronics as perfectly conducting 1D channels and functional elements of circuits. Here using a simple tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism we explore local current distributions in a 2D topological insulator focusing on effects of non-magnetic impurities and vacancies as well as finite size effects. For an isolated edge state, we show that the local conductance decays into the bulk in an oscillatory fashion as explained by the complex band structure of the bulk topological insulator. We demonstrate that although the net conductance of the edge state is topologically protected, impurity scattering leads to intricate local current patterns. In the case of vacancies we observe vortex currents of certain chirality, originating from the scattering of current-carrying electrons into states localized at the edges of hollow regions. For finite size strips of a topological insulator we predict the formation of an oscillatory band gap in the spectrum of the edge states, the emergence of Friedel oscillations caused by an open channel for backscattering from an impurity and antiresonances in conductance when the Fermi energy matches the energy of the localized state created by an impurity. PMID:26610145

  12. Local currents in a 2D topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaoqian; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y

    2015-12-23

    Symmetry protected edge states in 2D topological insulators are interesting both from the fundamental point of view as well as from the point of view of potential applications in nanoelectronics as perfectly conducting 1D channels and functional elements of circuits. Here using a simple tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism we explore local current distributions in a 2D topological insulator focusing on effects of non-magnetic impurities and vacancies as well as finite size effects. For an isolated edge state, we show that the local conductance decays into the bulk in an oscillatory fashion as explained by the complex band structure of the bulk topological insulator. We demonstrate that although the net conductance of the edge state is topologically protected, impurity scattering leads to intricate local current patterns. In the case of vacancies we observe vortex currents of certain chirality, originating from the scattering of current-carrying electrons into states localized at the edges of hollow regions. For finite size strips of a topological insulator we predict the formation of an oscillatory band gap in the spectrum of the edge states, the emergence of Friedel oscillations caused by an open channel for backscattering from an impurity and antiresonances in conductance when the Fermi energy matches the energy of the localized state created by an impurity.

  13. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  14. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  15. A Comparison between the Properties of Solid Cylinders and Tube Products in Multi-Pass Hot Radial Forging Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedian, A.; Poursina, M.; Golestanian, H.

    2007-05-01

    Radial forging is an open die forging process used for reducing the diameter of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, and creating internal profiles for tubes such as rifling of gun barrels. In this work, a comprehensive study of multi-pass hot radial forging of short hollow and solid products are presented using 2-D axisymmetric finite element simulation. The workpiece is modeled as an elastic-viscoplastic material. A mixture of Coulomb law and constant limit shear is used to model the die-workpiece and mandrel-workpiece contacts. Thermal effects are also taken in to account. Three-pass radial forging of solid cylinders and tube products are considered. Temperature, stress, strain and metal flow distribution are obtained in each pass through thermo-mechanical simulation. The numerical results are compared with available experimental data and are in good agreement with them.

  16. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  17. Finite length effects in Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cyclinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  18. Optimal design of 2D digital filters based on neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-hua; He, Yi-gang; Zheng, Zhe-zhao; Zhang, Xu-hong

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) digital filters are widely useful in image processing and other 2-D digital signal processing fields,but designing 2-D filters is much more difficult than designing one-dimensional (1-D) ones.In this paper, a new design approach for designing linear-phase 2-D digital filters is described,which is based on a new neural networks algorithm (NNA).By using the symmetry of the given 2-D magnitude specification,a compact express for the magnitude response of a linear-phase 2-D finite impulse response (FIR) filter is derived.Consequently,the optimal problem of designing linear-phase 2-D FIR digital filters is turned to approximate the desired 2-D magnitude response by using the compact express.To solve the problem,a new NNA is presented based on minimizing the mean-squared error,and the convergence theorem is presented and proved to ensure the designed 2-D filter stable.Three design examples are also given to illustrate the effectiveness of the NNA-based design approach.

  19. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  20. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  1. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  2. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  3. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  4. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  5. Experimental study of turbulent axisymmetric cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Sung, H. J.

    1994-08-01

    An experimental study is made of turbulent axisymmetric cavity flow. The flow configuration consists of a sudden expansion and contraction pipe joint. In using the LDV system, in an effort to minimize refraction of laser beams at the curved interface, a refraction correction formula for the Reynolds shear stress is devised. Three values of the cavity length ( L = 300, 600 and 900 mm) are chosen, and the cavity height ( H) is fixed at 55 mm. Both open and closed cavities are considered. Special attention is given to the critical case L = 600 mm, where the cavity length L is nearly equal to the reattachment length of the flow. The Reynolds number, based on the inlet diameter ( D = 110 mm) is 73,000. Measurement data are presented for the static wall pressure, mean velocity profiles, vorticity thickness distributions, and turbulence quantities.

  6. Nonlinear axisymmetric liquid currents in spherical annuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astafyeva, N. M.; Vvedenskaya, N. D.; Yavorskaya, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical analysis of non-linear axisymmetric viscous flows in spherical annuli of different gap sizes is presented. Only inner sphere was supposed to rotate at a constant angular velocity. The streamlines, lines of constant angular velocity, kinetic energy spectra, and spectra of velocity components are obtained. A total kinetic energy and torque needed to rotate the inner sphere are calculated as functions of Re for different gap sizes. In small-gap annulus nonuniqueness of steady solutions of Navier-Stokes equations is established and regions of different flow regime existences are found. Numerical solutions in a wide-gap annulus and experimental results are used in conclusions about flow stability in the considered range of Re. The comparison of experimental and numerical results shows close qualitative and quantitative agreement.

  7. A Compact Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarator Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Ku; the ARIES-CS Team

    2003-10-20

    We report the progress made in assessing the potential of compact, quasi-axisymmetric stellarators as power-producing reactors. Using an aspect ratio A=4.5 configuration derived from NCSX and optimized with respect to the quasi-axisymmetry and MHD stability in the linear regime as an example, we show that a reactor of 1 GW(e) maybe realizable with a major radius *8 m. This is significantly smaller than the designs of stellarator reactors attempted before. We further show the design of modular coils and discuss the optimization of coil aspect ratios in order to accommodate the blanket for tritium breeding and radiation shielding for coil protection. In addition, we discuss the effects of coil aspect ratio on the peak magnetic field in the coils.

  8. Axisymmetric supersonic flow in rotating impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W

    1952-01-01

    General equations are developed for isentropic, frictionless, axisymmetric flow in rotating impellers with blade thickness taken into account and with blade forces eliminated in favor of the blade-surface function. It is shown that the total energy of the gas relative to the rotating coordinate system is dependent on the stream function only, and that if the flow upstream of the impeller is vortex-free, a velocity potential exists which is a function of only the radial and axial distances in the impeller. The characteristic equations for supersonic flow are developed and used to investigate flows in several configurations in order to ascertain the effect of variations of the boundary conditions on the internal flow and the work input. Conditions varied are prerotation of the gas, blade turning rate, gas velocity at the blade tips, blade thickness, and sweep of the leading edge.

  9. Compact neutron imaging system using axisymmetric mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Khaykovich, Boris; Moncton, David E; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Ramsey, Brian D; Engelhaupt, Darell E

    2014-05-27

    A dispersed release of neutrons is generated from a source. A portion of this dispersed neutron release is reflected by surfaces of a plurality of nested, axisymmetric mirrors in at least an inner mirror layer and an outer mirror layer, wherein the neutrons reflected by the inner mirror layer are incident on at least one mirror surface of the inner mirror layer N times, wherein N is an integer, and wherein neutrons reflected by the outer mirror are incident on a plurality of mirror surfaces of the outer layer N+i times, where i is a positive integer, to redirect the neutrons toward a target. The mirrors can be formed by a periodically reversed pulsed-plating process.

  10. The evolution of swirling axisymmetric vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargan-Shingles, C.; Rudman, M.; Ryan, K.

    2015-08-01

    Swirling vortex rings form in any turbulent flow where a swirling component is present, such as in combustion chambers or the downwash of helicopter blades. Instabilities on initially non-swirling vortex rings result in a localized swirl velocity being generated within the core. The presence of a swirl component of velocity in a vortex ring modifies the relaxation and evolution of numerical Gaussian cores in a manner that is currently unknown. The evolution of Gaussian axisymmetric vortex rings of size 0.2 < Λ < 0.5, with Gaussian swirls of magnitude 0.0 < W < 0.5, is analyzed with reference to the governing equations. A relaxation time, at which the initial Gaussian approximation has minimal influence on the subsequent evolution, has been estimated for each case. An axial vortex forms along the axis of the ring and is responsible for the growth of a shear layer that is found to form at the leading edge. The circulation based Reynolds number is set at 10 000 to encourage the growth of shear layer instabilities from within this region. Secondary vortex rings are subsequently shown to evolve from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for shear layers of sufficient strength and are convected around the original ring and shed from the system. It is shown that complete settling of the strain rate within the core does not occur until all sheddings have ceased. Increasing the swirl magnitude past that considered in this paper is expected to result in the original ring losing its structure before the instability can occur. The evolution is found to be qualitatively similar to that of a piston generated axisymmetric vortex ring with swirl, with both cases eventually reaching a similar quasi-steady state.

  11. Parallel algorithms for 2-D cylindrical transport equations of Eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Yang, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, aimed at the neutron transport equations of eigenvalue problem under 2-D cylindrical geometry on unstructured grid, the discrete scheme of Sn discrete ordinate and discontinuous finite is built, and the parallel computation for the scheme is realized on MPI systems. Numerical experiments indicate that the designed parallel algorithm can reach perfect speedup, it has good practicality and scalability. (authors)

  12. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  13. The field lines of an axisymmetric magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1988-01-01

    The equations of Willis and Young (1987) for the field lines of an arbitrary axisymmetric multipole are generalized to an arbitrary linear combination of multipoles, i.e., to an arbitrary axisymmetric magnetic field B outside a sphere of radius a, S(a), centered on the origin, and containing all the sources of B. For this field, axisymmetric Stokes stream function is expressed in terms of the Gauss coefficients. It is shown that if only one Gauss coefficient is nonzero, the field line equations are identical to those obtained by Willis and Young.

  14. Coupled neoclassical-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of axisymmetric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Brendan C.

    2014-10-01

    Neoclassical effects (e.g., the bootstrap current and neoclassical toroidal viscosity [NTV]) have a profound impact on many magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, including tearing modes, edge-localized modes (ELMs), and resistive wall modes. High-fidelity simulations of such phenomena require a multiphysics code that self-consistently couples the kinetic and fluid models. We present the first results of the DK4D code, a dynamic drift-kinetic equation (DKE) solver being developed for this application. In this study, DK4D solves a set of time-dependent, axisymmetric DKEs for the non-Maxwellian part of the electron and ion distribution functions (fNM) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. The plasma is formally assumed to be in the low- to finite-collisionality regimes. The form of the DKEs used were derived in a Chapman-Enskog-like fashion, ensuring that fNM carries no density, momentum, or temperature. Rather, these quantities are contained within the background Maxwellian and are evolved by an appropriate set of extended MHD equations. We will discuss computational methods used and benchmarks to other neoclassical models and codes. Furthermore, DK4D has been coupled to a reduced, transport-timescale MHD code, allowing for self-consistent simulations of the dynamic formation of the ohmic and bootstrap currents. Several applications of this hybrid code will be presented, including an ELM-like pressure collapse. We will also discuss plans for coupling to the spatially three-dimensional, extended MHD code M3D-C1 and generalizing to nonaxisymmetric geometries, with the goal of performing self-consistent hybrid simulations of tokamak instabilities and calculations of NTV torque. This work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Grant Numbers DE-FC02-08ER54969 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Potentially singular solutions of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guo; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2014-01-01

    The question of finite-time blowup of the 3D incompressible Euler equations is numerically investigated in a periodic cylinder with solid boundaries. Using rotational symmetry, the equations are discretized in the (2D) meridian plane on an adaptive (moving) mesh and is integrated in time with adaptively chosen time steps. The vorticity is observed to develop a ring-singularity on the solid boundary with a growth proportional to ∼(ts − t)−2.46, where ts ∼ 0.0035056 is the estimated singularity time. A local analysis also suggests the existence of a self-similar blowup. The simulations stop at τ2 = 0.003505 at which time the vorticity amplifies by more than (3 × 108)-fold and the maximum mesh resolution exceeds (3 × 1012)2. The vorticity vector is observed to maintain four significant digits throughout the computations. PMID:25157172

  16. Potentially singular solutions of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guo; Hou, Thomas Y

    2014-09-01

    The question of finite-time blowup of the 3D incompressible Euler equations is numerically investigated in a periodic cylinder with solid boundaries. Using rotational symmetry, the equations are discretized in the (2D) meridian plane on an adaptive (moving) mesh and is integrated in time with adaptively chosen time steps. The vorticity is observed to develop a ring-singularity on the solid boundary with a growth proportional to ∼(ts - t)(-2.46), where ts ∼ 0.0035056 is the estimated singularity time. A local analysis also suggests the existence of a self-similar blowup. The simulations stop at τ(2) = 0.003505 at which time the vorticity amplifies by more than (3 × 10(8))-fold and the maximum mesh resolution exceeds (3 × 10(12))(2). The vorticity vector is observed to maintain four significant digits throughout the computations.

  17. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  18. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  19. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  20. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  1. Asymmetric and axisymmetric dynamics of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persing, J.; Montgomery, M. T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Smith, R. K.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of idealized numerical experiments to examine the difference between tropical cyclone evolution in three-dimensional (3-D) and axisymmetric (AX) model configurations. We focus on the prototype problem for intensification, which considers the evolution of an initially unsaturated AX vortex in gradient-wind balance on an f-plane. Consistent with findings of previous work, the mature intensity in the 3-D model is reduced relative to that in the AX model. In contrast with previous interpretations invoking barotropic instability and related horizontal mixing processes as a mechanism detrimental to the spin-up process, the results indicate that 3-D eddy processes associated with vortical plume structures can assist the intensification process by contributing to a radial contraction of the maximum tangential velocity and to a vertical extension of tangential winds through the depth of the troposphere. These plumes contribute significantly also to the azimuthally-averaged heating rate and the corresponding azimuthal-mean overturning circulation. The comparisons show that the resolved 3-D eddy momentum fluxes above the boundary layer exhibit counter-gradient characteristics and are generally not represented properly by the subgrid-scale parameterizations in the AX configuration. The resolved eddy fluxes act to support the contraction and intensification of the maximum tangential winds. The comparisons indicate fundamental differences between convective organization in the 3-D and AX configurations for meteorologically relevant forecast time scales. While the radial and vertical gradients of the system-scale angular rotation provide a hostile environment for deep convection in the 3-D model, with a corresponding tendency to strain the convective elements in the tangential direction, deep convection in the AX model does not suffer this tendency. Also, since during the 3-D intensification process the convection has not yet organized into annular rings

  2. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  3. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  4. Thrust measurement in a 2-D scramjet nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Sean

    1995-01-01

    The two-dimensional thrust nozzle presents a challenging problem. The loading is not axisymmetric as in the case of a cone and the internal flow presents some design difficulties. A two-sting system has been chosen to accomodate the internal flow and achieve some symmetry. The situation is complicated by the fact that with the small ramp angle and the internal pressure on the nozzle walls, loading is predominantly transverse. Yet it is the axial thrust which is to be measured (i.e., the tensile waves propagating in the stings). Although bending stress waves travel at most at only 60% of the speed of the axial stress waves, the system needs to be stiffened against bending. The second sting was originally only used to preserve symmetry. However, the pressures on each thrust surface may be quite different at some conditions, so at this stage the signals from both stings are being averaged as a first order approximation of the net thrust. The expected axial thrust from this nozzle is not large so thin stings are required. In addition, the contact area between nozzle and sting needs to be maximized. The result was that it was decided to twist the stings through 90 deg, without distorting their cross-sectional shape, just aft of the nozzle. Finite element analysis showed that this would not significantly alter the propagation of the axial stress wave in the sting, while the rigidity of the system is greatly increased. A Mach 4 contoured nozzle is used in the experiments. The thrust calculated by integrating the static pressure measurements on the thrust surfaces is compared with the deconvolved strain measurement of the net thrust for the cases of air only and hydrogen fuel injected into air at approximately 9 MJ/kg nozzle supply enthalpy. The gain in thrust due to combustion is visible in this result.

  5. TOPAZ2D validation status report, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.

    1990-08-01

    Analytic solutions to two heat transfer problems were used to partially evaluate the performance TOPAZ, and LLNL finite element heat transfer code. The two benchmark analytic solutions were for: 2D steady state slab, with constant properties, constant uniform temperature boundary conditions on three sides, and constant temperature distribution according to a sine function on the fourth side; 1D transient non-linear, with temperature dependent conductivity and specific heat (varying such that the thermal diffusivity remained constant), constant heat flux on the front face and adiabatic conditions on the other face. The TOPAZ solution converged to the analytic solution in both the transient and the steady state problem. Consistent mass matrix type of analysis yielded best performance for the transient problem, in the late-time response; but notable unnatural anomalies were observed in the early-time temperature response at nodal locations near the front face. 5 refs., 22 figs.

  6. Regimes of axisymmetric flow in a rotating annulus with local convective forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolan, Helene; Su, Sylvie; Young, Roland M. B.; Read, Peter L.

    2015-11-01

    We present a numerical study of axisymmetric flows in a rotating annulus convectively forced by local thermal forcing via a heated annular ring at the bottom near the external wall and a cooled circular disk near the centre at the top surface. This new configuration is a variant of the classical thermally-driven annulus analogue of the atmosphere circulation, where thermal forcing was previously applied on the sidewalls. Two vertically and horizontally displaced heat sources/sinks are arranged so that, in the absence of rotation, statically unstable convection would be induced above the source and beneath the sink, thereby relaxing strong constraints placed on background temperature gradients in previous setup. By using the Met Office/ Oxford Rotating Annulus Laboratory code, we investigated a series of equilibrated, 2D axisymmetric flows for a large range of dimensionless parameters and characterized them in terms of velocity and temperature fields. Several distinct flow regimes were identified, depending upon the rotation rate and strength of differential heating. These regimes will be presented with reference to variations of horizontal Ekman layer thickness versus the thermal boundary layer thickness and corresponding scalings for various quantities such as the heat transport. Grants: EPSRC EP/K029428/1 and studentship Met Office/Oxford

  7. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  8. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  9. Axisymmetric inlet minimum weight design method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadell, Shari-Beth

    1995-01-01

    An analytical method for determining the minimum weight design of an axisymmetric supersonic inlet has been developed. The goal of this method development project was to improve the ability to predict the weight of high-speed inlets in conceptual and preliminary design. The initial model was developed using information that was available from inlet conceptual design tools (e.g., the inlet internal and external geometries and pressure distributions). Stiffened shell construction was assumed. Mass properties were computed by analyzing a parametric cubic curve representation of the inlet geometry. Design loads and stresses were developed at analysis stations along the length of the inlet. The equivalent minimum structural thicknesses for both shell and frame structures required to support the maximum loads produced by various load conditions were then determined. Preliminary results indicated that inlet hammershock pressures produced the critical design load condition for a significant portion of the inlet. By improving the accuracy of inlet weight predictions, the method will improve the fidelity of propulsion and vehicle design studies and increase the accuracy of weight versus cost studies.

  10. Four motional invariants in axisymmetric tori equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    A ring gren, O.; Moiseenko, V.E.

    2006-05-15

    In addition to the standard set ({epsilon},{mu},p{sub {phi}}) of three invariants in axisymmetric tori, there exists a fourth independent radial drift invariant I{sub r}. For confined particles, the net radial drift has to be zero, whereby the drift orbit average I{sub r}= of the gyro center radial Clebsch coordinate is constant. To lowest order in the banana width, the radial invariant is the gyro center radial coordinate r{sub 0}(x,v), and to this order the gyro center moves on a magnetic flux surface. The gyro center orbit projected on the (r,z) plane determines the radial invariant and first order banana width corrections to I{sub r} are calculated. The radial drift invariant exists for trapped as well as passing particles. The new invariant is applied to construct Vlasov equilibria, where the magnetic field satisfies a generalized Grad-Shafranov equation with a poloidal plasma current and a bridge to ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria is found. For equilibria with sufficiently small banana widths and radial drift excursions, the approximation I{sub r}{approx_equal}r{sub 0}(x,v) can be used for the equilibrium state.

  11. EXACT VECTORIAL LAW FOR AXISYMMETRIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galtier, S.

    2009-10-20

    Three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamics turbulence is investigated under the assumptions of homogeneity and axisymmetry. We demonstrate that previous works of Chandrasekhar may be improved significantly by using a different formalism for the representation of two-point correlation tensors. From this axisymmetric kinematics, the equations a la von Karman-Howarth are derived from which an exact relation is found in terms of measurable correlations. The relation is then analyzed in the particular case of a medium permeated by an imposed magnetic field B{sub 0} . We make the ansatz that the development of anisotropy implies an algebraic relation between the axial and the radial components of the separation vector r and we derive an exact vectorial law which is parameterized by the intensity of anisotropy. The critical balance proposed by Goldreich and Sridhar is used to fix this parameter and to obtain a unique exact expression; the particular limits of correlations transverse and parallel to B{sub 0} are given for which simple expressions are found. Predictions for the energy spectra are also proposed by a straightforward dimensional analysis of the exact law; it gives a stronger theoretical background to the heuristic spectra previously proposed in the context of the critical balance. We also discuss the wave turbulence limit of an asymptotically large external magnetic field which appears as a natural limit of the vectorial relation. A new interpretation of the anisotropic solar wind observations is eventually discussed.

  12. Transient, hypervelocity flow in an axisymmetric nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of an axisymmetric nozzle was examined which was designed to produce uniform, parallel flow with a nominal Mach number of 8. A free-piston driven shock tube was used to supply the nozzle with high-temperature, high-pressure test gas. Performance was assessed by measuring Pitot pressures across the exit plane of the nozzle and, over the range of operating conditions examined, the nozzle produced satisfactory test flows. However, there were flow disturbances that persisted for significant times after flow initiation. The detailed starting process of the nozzle was also investigated by performing numerical simulations at several nominal test conditions. The classical description of the starting process, based on a quasi-one-dimensional model, provided a reasonable approximation and was used to demonstrate that the starting process could consume a significant fraction of the otherwise usable test gas. This was especially important at high operating enthalpies where nozzle supply conditions were maintained for shorter times. Multidimensional simulations illustrated a mechanism by which the starting process in the actual nozzle could take longer than that predicted by the quasi-one-dimensional analysis. However, the cause of the persistent disturbances observed in the experimental calibration was not identified.

  13. Exact vectorial law for axisymmetric MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, S.

    2009-12-01

    3D incompressible MHD turbulence is investigated under the assumptions of homogeneity and axisymmetry. We demonstrate that previous works of Chandrasekhar (1950) may be improved significantly by using a different formalism for the representation of two-point correlation tensors. From this axisymmetric kinematics, the equations a la von Karman-Howarth are derived from which an exact relation is found in terms of measurable correlations. The relation is then analyzed in the particular case of a medium permeated by an imposed magnetic field. We make the ansatz that the development of anisotropy implies an algebraic relation between the axial and the radial components of the separation vector and we derive an exact vectorial law which is parametrized by the intensity of anisotropy. The critical balance proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995) is used to fix this parameter and to obtain a unique exact expression; the particular limits of correlations transverse and parallel to the mean field are given for which simple expressions are found. Predictions for the energy spectra are also proposed by a straightforward dimensional analysis of the exact law; it gives a stronger theoretical background to the heuristic spectra previously proposed in the context of the critical balance. We also discuss the wave turbulence limit of an asymptotically large external magnetic field which appears as a natural limit of the vectorial relation. A new interpretation of the anisotropic solar wind observations is eventually discussed.

  14. Exact Vectorial Law for Axisymmetric Magnetohydrodynamics Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, S.

    2009-10-01

    Three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamics turbulence is investigated under the assumptions of homogeneity and axisymmetry. We demonstrate that previous works of Chandrasekhar may be improved significantly by using a different formalism for the representation of two-point correlation tensors. From this axisymmetric kinematics, the equations à la von Kármán-Howarth are derived from which an exact relation is found in terms of measurable correlations. The relation is then analyzed in the particular case of a medium permeated by an imposed magnetic field B0 . We make the ansatz that the development of anisotropy implies an algebraic relation between the axial and the radial components of the separation vector r and we derive an exact vectorial law which is parameterized by the intensity of anisotropy. The critical balance proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar is used to fix this parameter and to obtain a unique exact expression; the particular limits of correlations transverse and parallel to B0 are given for which simple expressions are found. Predictions for the energy spectra are also proposed by a straightforward dimensional analysis of the exact law; it gives a stronger theoretical background to the heuristic spectra previously proposed in the context of the critical balance. We also discuss the wave turbulence limit of an asymptotically large external magnetic field which appears as a natural limit of the vectorial relation. A new interpretation of the anisotropic solar wind observations is eventually discussed.

  15. Magnetic surfaces in an axisymmetric torus

    SciTech Connect

    Skovoroda, A. A.

    2013-04-15

    A method is developed for specifying the boundary equilibrium magnetic surface in an axially symmetric torus by using the absolute values of the magnetic field B = B{sub s}({theta}) and the gradient of the poloidal flux vertical bar vertical bar {nabla}{Psi} vertical bar = vertical bar {nabla}{Psi} vertical bar {sub s}({theta}) in a special flux coordinate system. By setting two surface constants (e.g., the safety factor q and dp/d{Psi}) and matching the absolute values of the magnetic field and the flux gradient on a closed magnetic surface, it is possible to find all equilibrium magnetic functions (including n {center_dot} {nabla} ln B and the local shear s) and all constants (including the toroidal current J and the shear d{mu}/d{Psi}) on this surface. Such a non-traditional formulation of the boundary conditions in solving the stability problem in an axisymmetric torus allows one to impose intentional conditions on plasma confinement and MHD stability at the periphery of the system.

  16. The Finite Beta Effects on the Toroidal Field Ripple in a Tokamak Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunno, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Tani, K.

    2013-02-01

    The efficiency of energetic ion confinement is reduced in a tokamak plasma by the non-axisymmetric field, namely the ripple field. The ripple field is produced by a finite number of toroidal field coils. It is affected by the non-axisymmetric finite beta effect. The three-dimensional MHD equilibrium calculation code VMEC is used to analyze the non-axisymmetric finite beta effect in a ripple tokamak. In the VMEC code, the flux coordinates are used, so the calculation region is limited to the area of plasma. To calculate the orbit outside the plasma, we develop a field calculation code, which is based on the Biot-Savart law. The details of the method and results are described in this paper.

  17. Three-bosons in 2D with a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittenhouse, Seth; Johnson, Brad; Wray, Andrew; D'Incao, Jose

    2016-05-01

    Systems of interacting particles in reduced dimensions in the presence of external fields can exhibit a number of surprising behaviors, for instance the emergence of the fractional quantum Hall effect. Examining few-body interactions and effects can lead to significant insights within these systems. In this talk we examine a system of three bosons confined to two dimensions in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field within the framework of the adiabatic hyperspherical method. For the case of zero-range, regularized pseudo-potential interactions, we find that the system is nearly separable in hyperspherical coordinates and that, away from a set of narrow avoided crossings, the full energy eigenspectrum as a function of the 2D s-wave scattering length is well described by ignoring coupling between adiabatic hyperradial potentials. In the case of weak attractive or repulsive interactions, we find the lowest three-body energy states exhibit even/odd parity oscillations as a function of total internal 2D angular momentum and that for weak repulsive interactions, the universal lowest energy interacting state has an internal angular momentum of M=3. We also discuss the effect of including finite range and higher partial-wave interactions.

  18. MAZE. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-10

    MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the `ASSM` or `PASSM` command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slidelines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the `WBCD` command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the `T` terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with `C`. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of-state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands, respectively. MAZE may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials.

  19. MAZE. Generates 2D Input for DYNA, NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-12

    MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the `ASSM` or `PASSM` command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slidelines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the `WBCD` command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the `T` terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with `C`. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of-state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands, respectively. MAZE may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials.

  20. MAZE. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the `ASSM` or `PASSM` command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slidelines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the `WBCD` command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the `T` terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with `C`. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of-state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands, respectively. MAZE may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials.

  1. MAZE. Generates 2D Input for DYNA, NIKE, & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-10

    MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the `ASSM` or `PASSM` command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slidelines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the `WBCD` command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the `T` terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with `C`. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of-state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands, respectively. MAZE may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials.

  2. Spacetime encodings. IV. The relationship between Weyl curvature and Killing tensors in stationary axisymmetric vacuum spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    The problem of obtaining an explicit representation for the fourth invariant of geodesic motion (generalized Carter constant) of an arbitrary stationary axisymmetric vacuum spacetime generated from an Ernst potential is considered. The coupling between the nonlocal curvature content of the spacetime as encoded in the Weyl tensor, and the existence of a Killing tensor is explored and a constructive, algebraic test for a fourth-order Killing tensor suggested. The approach used exploits the variables defined for the Baecklund transformations to clarify the relationship between Weyl curvature, constants of geodesic motion, expressed as Killing tensors, and the solution-generation techniques. A new symmetric noncovariant formulation of the Killing equations is given. This formulation transforms the problem of looking for fourth-order Killing tensors in 4D into one of looking for four interlocking two-manifolds admitting fourth-order Killing tensors in 2D.

  3. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  4. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  5. GEO2D - Two-Dimensional Computer Model of a Ground Source Heat Pump System

    DOE Data Explorer

    James Menart

    2013-06-07

    This file contains a zipped file that contains many files required to run GEO2D. GEO2D is a computer code for simulating ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems in two-dimensions. GEO2D performs a detailed finite difference simulation of the heat transfer occurring within the working fluid, the tube wall, the grout, and the ground. Both horizontal and vertical wells can be simulated with this program, but it should be noted that the vertical wall is modeled as a single tube. This program also models the heat pump in conjunction with the heat transfer occurring. GEO2D simulates the heat pump and ground loop as a system. Many results are produced by GEO2D as a function of time and position, such as heat transfer rates, temperatures and heat pump performance. On top of this information from an economic comparison between the geothermal system simulated and a comparable air heat pump systems or a comparable gas, oil or propane heating systems with a vapor compression air conditioner. The version of GEO2D in the attached file has been coupled to the DOE heating and cooling load software called ENERGYPLUS. This is a great convenience for the user because heating and cooling loads are an input to GEO2D. GEO2D is a user friendly program that uses a graphical user interface for inputs and outputs. These make entering data simple and they produce many plotted results that are easy to understand. In order to run GEO2D access to MATLAB is required. If this program is not available on your computer you can download the program MCRInstaller.exe, the 64 bit version, from the MATLAB website or from this geothermal depository. This is a free download which will enable you to run GEO2D..

  6. Integrated transient thermal-structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Decahaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.; Wieting, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of transient thermal and structural analysis is presented. New integrated thermal-structural rod and one dimensional axisymmetric elements considering conduction and convection are developed and used in transient thermal-structural applications. The improved accuracy of the integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with exact transient heat conduction-elasticity solutions and conventional finite element thermal-finite element structural analyses. Results indicate that the approach offers significant potential for further development with other elements.

  7. Asymmetric and axisymmetric dynamics of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persing, J.; Montgomery, M. T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Smith, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of idealized numerical experiments to examine the difference between tropical cyclone evolution in three-dimensional (3-D) and axisymmetric (AX) model configurations. We focus on the prototype problem for intensification, which considers the evolution of an initially unsaturated AX vortex in gradient-wind balance on an f plane. Consistent with findings of previous work, the mature intensity in the 3-D model is reduced relative to that in the AX model. In contrast with previous interpretations invoking barotropic instability and related horizontal mixing processes as a mechanism detrimental to the spin-up process, the results indicate that 3-D eddy processes associated with vortical plume structures can assist the intensification process by contributing to a radial contraction of the maximum tangential velocity and to a vertical extension of tangential winds through the depth of the troposphere. These plumes contribute significantly also to the azimuthally averaged heating rate and the corresponding azimuthal-mean overturning circulation. The comparisons show that the resolved 3-D eddy momentum fluxes above the boundary layer exhibit counter-gradient characteristics during a key spin-up period, and more generally are not solely diffusive. The effects of these eddies are thus not properly represented by the subgrid-scale parameterizations in the AX configuration. The resolved eddy fluxes act to support the contraction and intensification of the maximum tangential winds. The comparisons indicate fundamental differences between convective organization in the 3-D and AX configurations for meteorologically relevant forecast timescales. While the radial and vertical gradients of the system-scale angular rotation provide a hostile environment for deep convection in the 3-D model, with a corresponding tendency to strain the convective elements in the tangential direction, deep convection in the AX model does not suffer this tendency. Also, since

  8. The axisymmetric stellar wind of AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Hillier, D. John; Harries, Tim J.; Howarth, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    We present optical linear spectropolarimetry of the Luminous Blue Variable AG Carinae obtained after a recent visual brightness increase. The absence of He II lambda 4686 emission, together with the weakening of the He I spectrum and the appearance of Fe lines in the region around 5300 A, confirm that AG Car has started a new excursion across the HR diagram. The H alpha line profile exhibits very extended line wings that are polarized differently in both amount and position angle from either the continuum or the line core. The polarization changes across H alpha, together with variable continuum polarization, indicate the presence of intrinsic polarization. Coexistence of the line-wing polarization with extended flux-line wings evidences that both are formed by electron scattering in a dense wind. The position angle rotates across the line profiles, in a way that presently available models suggest is due to rotation and expansion of the scattering material. AG Car displays very large variations of its linear polarization with time, Delta P approximately 1.2%, indicating significant variations in envelope opacity. We find that the polarization varies along a preferred position angle of approximately 145 deg (with a scatter of +/- 10 deg) which we interpret as a symmetry axis of the stellar wind (with an ambiguity of 90 deg). This position angle is co-aligned with the major axis of the AG Car ring nebula and perpendicular to the AG Car jet. Our observations thus suggest that the axisymmetric geometry seen in the resolved circumstellar environment at various distances already exists within a few stellar radii of AG Car. From the H alpha polarization profile we deduce an interstellar polarization of Q = 0.31%, U = -1.15% at H alpha. The inferred interstellar polarization implies that the intrinsic polarization is not always of the same sign. This indicates either significant temporal changes in the envelope geometry, or it may arise from effects of multiple scattering

  9. The water entry of slender axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodily, Kyle G.; Carlson, Stephen J.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2014-07-01

    We present a study of the forces, velocities, and trajectories of slender (length/diameter = 10) axisymmetric projectiles using an embedded inertial measurement unit (IMU). Three nose shapes (cone, ogive, and flat) were used. Projectiles were tested at vertical and oblique impact angles with different surface treatments. The trajectory of a half-hydrophobic and half-hydrophilc case impacting vertically was compared to the trajectory of symmetrically coated projectiles impacting the free surface at oblique angles. The oblique impact cases showed significantly more final lateral displacement than the half-and-half case over the same depth. The amount of lateral displacement was also affected by the nose shape, with the cone nose shape achieving the largest lateral displacement for the oblique entry case. Instantaneous lift and drag coefficients were calculated using data from the IMU for the vertical, half-and-half, and oblique entry cases. Impact forces were calculated for each nose shape and the flat nose shape experienced the largest impulsive forces up to 37 N when impacting vertically. The impact force of the flat nose decreased for the oblique entry case. The location of the center of pressure was determined at discrete time steps using a theoretical torque model and values from the IMU. Acoustic spectrograms showed that the sound produced during the water entry event predominately arises from the pinch-off for the cone and ogive nose shapes, with additional sound production from impact for the flat nose shape. Each test run was imaged using two Photron SA3 cameras.

  10. Axisymmetric modes in vertically stratified self-gravitating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamatsashvili, G. R.; Rice, W. K. M.

    2010-08-01

    We carry out a linear analysis of the vertical normal modes of axisymmetric perturbations in stratified, compressible, self-gravitating gaseous discs in the shearing-box approximation. An unperturbed disc has a polytropic vertical structure that allows us to study specific dynamics for subadiabatic, adiabatic and superadiabatic vertical stratifications, by simply varying the polytropic index. In the absence of self-gravity, four well-known principal modes can be identified in a stratified disc: acoustic p modes, surface gravity f modes, buoyancy g modes and inertial r modes. After classifying and characterizing modes in the non-self-gravitating case, we include self-gravity in the perturbation equations and in the equilibrium and investigate how it modifies the properties of these four modes. We find that self-gravity, to a certain degree, reduces their frequencies and changes the structure of the dispersion curves and eigenfunctions at radial wavelengths comparable to the disc height. Its influence on the basic branch of the r mode, in the case of subadiabatic and adiabatic stratifications, and on the basic branch of the g mode, in the case of superadiabatic stratification (which in addition exhibits convective instability), does appear to be strongest. Reducing the 3D Toomre's parameter Q3D results in the latter modes becoming unstable due to self-gravity, so that they determine the onset criterion and nature of the gravitational instability of a vertically stratified disc. By contrast, the p, f and convectively stable g modes, although their corresponding ω2 are reduced by self-gravity, never become unstable however small the value of Q3D. This is a consequence of the three dimensionality of the disc. The eigenfunctions corresponding to the gravitationally unstable modes are intrinsically three dimensional. We also contrast the more exact instability criterion based on our 3D model with that of density waves in 2D (razor-thin) discs. Based on these findings, we

  11. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  12. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  13. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  14. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  15. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  16. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  17. Optical tomography of Kerr electro-optic measurements with axisymmetric electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Uestuendag, A.; Zahn, M.

    1996-12-31

    Dielectrics become birefringent (Kerr effect) when stressed by high electric fields so that incident linearly or circularly polarized light propagating through the medium becomes elliptically polarized. Most past experimental work has been limited to cases where the electric field magnitude and direction have been constant along the light path, while recent analysis and point/plane electrode measurements have developed the Abel transformation which describes Kerr effect measurements when an axisymmetric electric field has magnitude but not direction varying along the light path. The present work develops the governing Kerr effect differential equations for an axisymmetric electric field for the case when both magnitude and direction vary along the light path. The specific case of point/plane electrodes are studied where analytical electric field solutions are used for the space charge free case and finite element computer analyses are used to calculate the electric field distribution for postulated space charge injection from the point electrode. The authors then calculate the Kerr electro optic fringe patterns that would result. They use the onion peeling method previously used for photoelastic analysis to calculate the electric field magnitude and direction from computer-simulated optical measurements.

  18. Calculations of axisymmetric vortex sheet roll-up using a panel and a filament model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantelis, J. P.; Widnall, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    A method for calculating the self-induced motion of a vortex sheet using discrete vortex elements is presented. Vortex panels and vortex filaments are used to simulate two-dimensional and axisymmetric vortex sheet roll-up. A straight forward application using vortex elements to simulate the motion of a disk of vorticity with an elliptic circulation distribution yields unsatisfactroy results where the vortex elements move in a chaotic manner. The difficulty is assumed to be due to the inability of a finite number of discrete vortex elements to model the singularity at the sheet edge and due to large velocity calculation errors which result from uneven sheet stretching. A model of the inner portion of the spiral is introduced to eliminate the difficulty with the sheet edge singularity. The model replaces the outermost portion of the sheet with a single vortex of equivalent circulation and a number of higher order terms which account for the asymmetry of the spiral. The resulting discrete vortex model is applied to both two-dimensional and axisymmetric sheets. The two-dimensional roll-up is compared to the solution for a semi-infinite sheet with good results.

  19. Geometric stabilization of the electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient driven instability. I. Nearly axisymmetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocco, A.; Plunk, G. G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of a non-axisymmetric (3D) equilibrium magnetic field on the linear ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven mode are investigated. We consider the strongly driven, toroidal branch of the instability in a global (on the magnetic surface) setting. Previous studies have focused on particular features of non-axisymmetric systems, such as strong local shear or magnetic ripple, that introduce inhomogeneity in the coordinate along the magnetic field. In contrast, here we include non-axisymmetry explicitly via the dependence of the magnetic drift on the field line label α, i.e., across the magnetic field, but within the magnetic flux surface. We consider the limit where this variation occurs on a scale much larger than that of the ITG mode, and also the case where these scales are similar. Close to axisymmetry, we find that an averaging effect of the magnetic drift on the flux surface causes global (on the surface) stabilization, as compared to the most unstable local mode. In the absence of scale separation, we find destabilization is also possible, but only if a particular resonance occurs between the magnetic drift and the mode, and finite Larmor radius effects are neglected. We discuss the relative importance of surface global effects and known radially global effects.

  20. Stability of the laminar wake behind spinning axisymmetric bluff bodies: sensitivity and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Gonzalez, Jose Ignacio; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Coenen, Wilfried; Manglano, Carlos; Sevilla, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    We carry out direct and adjoint global stability analyses of the laminar wake behind several spinning axisymmetric bluff bodies, i.e. sphere, hemisphere, bullet-shaped bodies of ellipsoidal nose and spherical nose respectively; for moderate Reynolds numbers (Re <= 450) and values of the spin parameter (Ω <= 1), defined as the ratio between the azimuthal velocity at the outer body surface and the free-stream velocity. Both the axisymmetric base flow computations and the assembling of the eigenvalue problems are tackled by means of the finite element solver FreeFEM + + , computing finally the eigenmodes with an Arnoldi algorithm in Matlab. We show that spin acts as a stabilization mechanism for the wake behind bodies with a cylindrical trailing part, while it destabilizes the wake of the other geometries. The computation of the adjoint modes and the identification of the wavemaker allow us to discuss the nature of the different unstable modes found and understand the differences in the stabilizing or destabilizing effect of rotation due to the base flow modifications. The controllability of the unstable regimes by means of base bleed is also addressed. Supported by the Spanish MINECO, Junta de Andalucía and EU Funds under Projects DPI2011-28356-C03-03 and P11-TEP7495.

  1. Topological evolutionary computing in the optimal design of 2D and 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burczynski, T.; Poteralski, A.; Szczepanik, M.

    2007-10-01

    An application of evolutionary algorithms and the finite-element method to the topology optimization of 2D structures (plane stress, bending plates, and shells) and 3D structures is described. The basis of the topological evolutionary optimization is the direct control of the density material distribution (or thickness for 2D structures) by the evolutionary algorithm. The structures are optimized for stress, mass, and compliance criteria. The numerical examples demonstrate that this method is an effective technique for solving problems in computer-aided optimal design.

  2. Comparison of numerical methods for 2D crystals under anisotropic surface free energy and through evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Madhuri Udayanjani

    In this dissertation first, we compute the equilibrium shapes of 2D crystals under anisotropic surface free energies. An equilibrium shape minimizes the total surface free energy. The governing equation in polar coordinates is a nonlinear ordinary differential equation. Two numerical methods, finite difference and the finite element are used and compared. We investigate the accuracy, order of convergence and efficiency of the two methods in computing the equilibrium shapes. Secondly, we consider the surface of the crystal evolving under surface diffusion and compute the final shape in the evolution which is the equilibrium shape. The surface diffusion equation in polar coordinates is a time-dependent nonlinear 4th order partial differential equation. Again we apply the two methods finite difference and finite element. The results are observed at different stages of evolution of the crystal for the isotropy case. Then we compare the accuracy, order of convergence and efficiency of the two methods.

  3. New techniques for calculating heat and particle source rates due to neutral-beam injection in axisymmetric tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.; McCune, D.C.; Towner, H.H.; Davis, S.L.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1981-02-01

    A set of numerical techniques are described for calculating heat and particle source rates due to neutral beam injection in axisymmetric tokamaks. While these techniques consume a substantial amount of computer time, they take into account a number of significant, and normally neglected, effects. Examples of these effects are reionization of escaping charge exchanged beam particles, finite fast ion orbit excursions, beam deposition through collisions of beam neutrals with circulating beam ions, and the transport of thermal neutrals in the plasma due to charge changing collisions with beam ions.

  4. Axisymmetric analysis of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment building using a distributed cracking model for the concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherby, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Results of axisymmetric structural analyses of a 1:6 scale model of a reinforced concrete nuclear containment building are presented. Both a finite element shell analysis and a simplified membrane analysis were made to predict the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of the model. Analytical results indicate that the model will fail at an internal pressure of 187 psig when the stress level in the hoop reinforcement at the midsection of the cylinder exceeds the ultimate strength of the bar splices. 5 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. A Computer Code for Swirling Turbulent Axisymmetric Recirculating Flows in Practical Isothermal Combustor Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, D. G.; Rhode, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A primitive pressure-velocity variable finite difference computer code was developed to predict swirling recirculating inert turbulent flows in axisymmetric combustors in general, and for application to a specific idealized combustion chamber with sudden or gradual expansion. The technique involves a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, a line relaxation procedure for efficient solution of the equations, a two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model, a stairstep boundary representation of the expansion flow, and realistic accommodation of swirl effects. A user's manual, dealing with the computational problem, showing how the mathematical basis and computational scheme may be translated into a computer program is presented. A flow chart, FORTRAN IV listing, notes about various subroutines and a user's guide are supplied as an aid to prospective users of the code.

  6. Feedback stabilization of the axisymmetric instability of a deformable tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pomphrey, N.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-09-01

    We analyze the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of the axisymmetric system consisting of a free boundary, non-circular cross-section tokamak plasma, finite resistivity passive conductors, and an active feedback system with magnetic flux pickup loops, a proportional amplifier with gain G, and current carrying poloidal field coils. Numerical simulation of a system that is unstable with G = 0 shows that for some placements of the pickup loops, the system will remain unstable for all values of G, while for other placements of the loops, the system will be stable for G > G/sub crit/. This behavior is explained by analysis using an extended energy principle, and it is shown to result from the deformability of the plasma cross section. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. An axisymmetric boundary element formulation of sound wave propagation in fluids including viscous and thermal losses.

    PubMed

    Cutanda-Henríquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2013-11-01

    The formulation presented in this paper is based on the boundary element method (BEM) and implements Kirchhoff's decomposition into viscous, thermal, and acoustic components, which can be treated independently everywhere in the domain except on the boundaries. The acoustic variables with losses are solved using extended boundary conditions that assume (i) negligible temperature fluctuations at the boundary and (ii) normal and tangential matching of the boundary's particle velocity. The proposed model does not require constructing a special mesh for the viscous and thermal boundary layers as is the case with the existing finite element method (FEM) implementations with losses. The suitability of this approach is demonstrated using an axisymmetrical BEM and two test cases where the numerical results are compared with analytical solutions.

  8. Non-axisymmetric magnetic modes of neutron stars with purely poloidal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Hidetaka; Lee, Umin; Yoshida, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    We calculate non-axisymmetric oscillations of neutron stars magnetized by purely poloidal magnetic fields. We use polytropes of index n = 1 and 1.5 as a background model, where we ignore the equilibrium deformation due to the magnetic field. Since separation of variables is not possible for the oscillation of magnetized stars, we employ finite series expansions for the perturbations using spherical harmonic functions. Solving the oscillation equations as the boundary and eigenvalue problem, we find two kinds of discrete magnetic modes, that is, stable (oscillatory) magnetic modes and unstable (monotonically growing) magnetic modes. For isentropic models, the frequency or the growth rate of the magnetic modes is exactly proportional to BS, the strength of the field at the surface. The oscillation frequency and the growth rate are affected by the buoyant force in the interior, and the stable stratification tends to stabilize the unstable magnetic modes.

  9. Impedance Calculations of Non-Axisymmetric Transitions Using the Optical Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; Zagorodov, I.; /DESY

    2007-03-06

    In a companion report, we have derived a method for finding the impedance at high frequencies of vacuum chamber transitions that are short compared to the catch-up distance, in a frequency regime that--in analogy to geometric optics for light--we call the optical regime. In this report we apply the method to various non-axisymmetric geometries such as irises/short collimators in a beam pipe, step-in transitions, step-out transitions, and more complicated transitions of practical importance. Most of our results are analytical, with a few given in terms of a simple one dimensional integral. Our results are compared to wakefield simulations with the time-domain, finite-difference program ECHO, and excellent agreement is found.

  10. Predictions and measurements of isothermal flowfields in axisymmetric combustor geometries. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, D. L.; Lilley, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical predictions, flow visualization experiments and time-mean velocity measurements were obtained for six basic nonreacting flowfields (with inlet swirl vane angles of 0 (swirler removed), 45 and 70 degrees and sidewall expansion angles of 90 and 45 degrees) in an idealized axisymmetric combustor geometry. A flowfield prediction computer program was developed which solves appropriate finite difference equations including a conventional two equation k-epsilon eddy viscosity turbulence model. The wall functions employed were derived from previous swirling flow measurements, and the stairstep approximation was employed to represent the sloping wall at the inlet to the test chamber. Recirculation region boundaries have been sketched from the entire flow visualization photograph collection. Tufts, smoke, and neutrally buoyant helium filled soap bubbles were employed as flow tracers. A five hole pitot probe was utilized to measure the axial, radial, and swirl time mean velocity components.

  11. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  12. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of Saturn V/S1-C/F1 nozzle and plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.

    1993-01-01

    An axisymmetric single engine Computational Fluid Dynamics calculation of the Saturn V/S 1-C vehicle base region and F1 engine plume is described. There were two objectives of this work, the first was to calculate an axisymmetric approximation of the nozzle, plume and base region flow fields of S1-C/F1, relate/scale this to flight data and apply this scaling factor to a NLS/STME axisymmetric calculations from a parallel effort. The second was to assess the differences in F1 and STME plume shear layer development and concentration of combustible gases. This second piece of information was to be input/supporting data for assumptions made in NLS2 base temperature scaling methodology from which the vehicle base thermal environments were being generated. The F1 calculations started at the main combustion chamber faceplate and incorporated the turbine exhaust dump/nozzle film coolant. The plume and base region calculations were made for ten thousand feet and 57 thousand feet altitude at vehicle flight velocity and in stagnant freestream. FDNS was implemented with a 14 species, 28 reaction finite rate chemistry model plus a soot burning model for the RP-1/LOX chemistry. Nozzle and plume flow fields are shown, the plume shear layer constituents are compared to a STME plume. Conclusions are made about the validity and status of the analysis and NLS2 vehicle base thermal environment definition methodology.

  13. Parametric Study of Axisymmetric Fusion Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducar, William Scott

    1987-09-01

    Three different axisymmetric magnetic mirror fusion machines are examined in order to optimize the ratio the fusion power produced by them to the power injected into them to maintain the plasma. These three devices were chosen to study the continuum between a simple mirror and a tandem mirror. This allowed the evolutionary process leading from the simple to the tandem mirror to be examined in detail. The Kelley mirror, which corresponds to the middle step, was examined in depth for the first time. A computer code that models the plasma in these machines was written to investigate the steady state operation of these machines. The balance equations are solved by using an ordinary differential equation solver, LSODE ^{11}, to numerically solve the system of differential equations. Unlike previous methods, this technique allowed for a quick, inexpensive, and exhaustive examination of parameter space and has the added advantage that the steady state solutions obtained are numerically stable, which is not always the case with fixed point iteration. Furthermore, this computer model also permitted investigation of the use of polarized fuels, which has not been done before in mirror machines. The computer model was used to examine parameter space to optimize Q for each of the three machines. When feasible, a comparison with a Fokker-Planck code was made for the optimal Q case for each machine. It was found that the computer model compared favorably with the Fokker -Planck code, HYBRIDII^{22}. HYBRIDII used 54 minutes of Cray-1 computing time for a tandem mirror case to reach steady state, while the computer model obtained a steady state solution in one and a half minutes. Finally, the possible roles these devices might fill was discussed. It was found that none of the devices appeared suited for the role of a pure fussion electrical power plant. However, the Kelley machine and tandem machine appeared to be strong candidates for the role of a hybrid fusion-fission reactor

  14. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Stabilization and Confinement Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Fowler, T K; Bulmer, R; Byers, J; Hua, D; Tung, L

    2004-07-15

    The 'Kinetic Stabilizer' has been proposed as a means of MHD stabilizing an axisymmetric tandem mirror system. The K-S concept is based on theoretical studies by Ryutov, confirmed experimentally in the Gas Dynamic Trap experiment in Novosibirsk. In the K-S beams of ions are directed into the end of an 'expander' region outside the outer mirror of a tandem mirror. These ions, slowed, stagnated, and reflected as they move up the magnetic gradient, produce a low-density stabilizing plasma. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we have been conducting theoretical and computational studies of the K-S Tandem Mirror. These studies have employed a low-beta code written especially to analyze the beam injection/stabilization process, and a new code SYMTRAN (by Hua and Fowler) that solves the coupled radial and axial particle and energy transport in a K-S TM. Also, a 'legacy' MHD stability code, FLORA, has been upgraded and employed to benchmark the injection/stabilization code and to extend its results to high beta values. The FLORA code studies so far have confirmed the effectiveness of the K-S in stabilizing high-beta (40%) plasmas with stabilizer plasmas the peak pressures of which are several orders of magnitude smaller than those of the confined plasma. Also the SYMTRAN code has shown D-T plasma ignition from alpha particle energy deposition in T-M regimes with strong end plugging. Our studies have confirmed the viability of the K-S-T-M concept with respect to MHD stability and radial and axial confinement. We are continuing these studies in order to optimize the parameters and to examine means for the stabilization of possible residual instability modes, such as drift modes and 'trapped-particle' modes. These modes may in principle be controlled by tailoring the stabilizer plasma distribution and/or the radial potential distribution. In the paper the results to date of our studies are summarized and projected to scope out possible fusion-power versions of the K

  15. Non-axisymmetric viscous lower-branch modes in axisymmetric supersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.; Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    A previous paper by Duck and Hall (1989) considered the weakly nonlinear interaction of a pair of axisymmetric lower-branch Tollmien-Schlichting instabilities in cylindrical supersonic flows. Here, the possibility that nonaxisymmetric modes might also exist is investigated. In fact, it is found that such modes do exist and, on the basis of linear theory, it appears that these modes are the most important. The nonaxisymmetric modes are found to exist for flows around cylinders with nondimensional radius a less than some critical value a(c). This critical value a(c) is found to increase monotonically with the azimuthal wavenumber n of the disturbance, and it is found that unstable modes always occur in pairs. It is shown that, in general, instability in the form of lower-branch Tollmien-Schlichting waves will occur first for nonaxisymmetric modes and that, in the unstable regime, the largest growth rates correspond to the latter modes.

  16. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  17. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  18. Steady-state axisymmetric nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic solutions with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lile; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2014-04-01

    Axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can be invoked for describing astrophysical magnetized flows and formulated to model stellar magnetospheres including main-sequence stars (e.g. the Sun), compact stellar objects [e.g. magnetic white dwarfs (MWDs), radio pulsars, anomalous X-ray pulsars, magnetars, isolated neutron stars, etc.] and planets as a major step forward towards a full three-dimensional model construction. Using powerful and reliable numerical solvers based on two distinct finite-difference method and finite-element method schemes of algorithm, we examine axisymmetric steady-state or stationary MHD models in Throumoulopoulos & Tasso, finding that their separable semi-analytic non-linear solutions are actually not unique given their specific selection of several free functionals and chosen boundary conditions. Similar situations of multiple non-linear solutions with the same boundary conditions actually also happen to force-free magnetic field models of Low & Lou. The multiplicity of non-linear steady MHD solutions gives rise to differences in the total energies contained in the magnetic fields and flow velocity fields as well as in the asymptotic behaviours approaching infinity, which may in turn explain why numerical solvers tend to converge to a non-linear solution with a lower energy than the corresponding separable semi-analytic one. By properly adjusting model parameters, we invoke semi-analytic and numerical solutions to describe different kinds of scenarios, including nearly parallel case and the situation in which the misalignment between the plasma flow and magnetic field is considerable. We propose that these MHD models are capable of describing the magnetospheres of MWDs as examples of applications with moderate conditions (including magnetic field) where the typical values of several important parameters are consistent with observations. Physical parameters can also be estimated based on such MHD models directly. We discuss the challenges

  19. Axisymmetric scattering of scalar waves by spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lekner, John; Boyack, Rufus

    2011-06-01

    A phase shift formulation of scattering by oblate and prolate spheroids is presented, in parallel with the partial-wave theory of scattering by spherical obstacles. The crucial step is application of a finite Legendre transform to the Helmholtz equation in spheroidal coordinates. In the long-wavelength limit the spheroidal analog of the spherical scattering length immediately gives the cross section. Analytical results are readily obtained for scattering of Schrödinger particle waves by impenetrable spheroids, and for scattering of sound waves by acoustically soft spheroidal objects. The method is restricted to scattering by spheroids whose symmetry axis is coincident with the direction of the incident plane wave. PMID:21682372

  20. Axisymmetric scattering of scalar waves by spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lekner, John; Boyack, Rufus

    2011-06-01

    A phase shift formulation of scattering by oblate and prolate spheroids is presented, in parallel with the partial-wave theory of scattering by spherical obstacles. The crucial step is application of a finite Legendre transform to the Helmholtz equation in spheroidal coordinates. In the long-wavelength limit the spheroidal analog of the spherical scattering length immediately gives the cross section. Analytical results are readily obtained for scattering of Schrödinger particle waves by impenetrable spheroids, and for scattering of sound waves by acoustically soft spheroidal objects. The method is restricted to scattering by spheroids whose symmetry axis is coincident with the direction of the incident plane wave.

  1. Remarks on the global regularity for the super-critical 2D dissipative quasi-geostrophic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinwei

    2008-03-01

    In this article we apply the method used in the recent elegant proof by Kiselev, Nazarov and Volberg of the well-posedness of critically dissipative 2D quasi-geostrophic equation to the super-critical case. We prove that if the initial value satisfies for some small number cs>0, where s is the power of the fractional Laplacian, then no finite time singularity will occur for the super-critically dissipative 2D quasi-geostrophic equation.

  2. Locomotive consequences of non-axisymmetric flagellar configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Henry; Marcos, Marcos; Hyon, Yunkyong; Powers, Thomas; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Although peritrichous bacteria can form flagellar bundles at many attachment points and directions relative to the cell body, locomotion of these bacteria is often modeled as arising from a polar bundle oriented along the cell body axis. We discuss the consequences of non-axisymmetric flagellar configurations for bacterial locomotion and implications for bacterial behavior using a boundary element method (BEM) based on the method of regularized Stokeslets. We validate our BEM by comparing to analytic results for spheres and ellipsoids, as well as results in the literature for axisymmetric flagella with spherical and ellipsoidal heads obtained from other boundary element methods and slender body theory. Non-axisymmetric flagellar configurations generically lead to wobbling cell bodies and wiggling helical cell trajectories, both of which have been observed experimentally. We compare experimental and numerically calculated wiggling trajectories to deduce information about flagellar geometries of swimming B. subtilis. We discuss the implications of off-axis flagellar geometries for bacterial rheotaxis and chemotaxis.

  3. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  4. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  5. A finite element model to predict the sound attenuation of earplugs in an acoustical test fixture.

    PubMed

    Viallet, Guilhem; Sgard, Franck; Laville, Frédéric; Boutin, Jérôme

    2014-09-01

    Acoustical test fixtures (ATFs) are currently used to measure the attenuation of the earplugs. Several authors pointed out that the presence of an artificial skin layer inside the cylindrical ear canal of the ATFs strongly influenced the attenuation measurements. In this paper, this role is investigated via a 2D axisymmetric finite element model of a silicon earplug coupled to an artificial skin. The model is solved using COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL(®), Sweden) and validated experimentally. The model is exploited thereafter to better understand the role of each part of the earplug/ear canal system and how the energy circulates within the domains. This is investigated by calculating power balances and by representing the mechanical and acoustical fluxes in the system. The important dissipative role of the artificial skin is underlined and its contribution as a sound transmission pathway is quantified. In addition, the influence of both the earplug and the artificial skin parameters is assessed via sensitivities analyses performed on the model. PMID:25190400

  6. Ion temperature gradient turbulence in helical and axisymmetric RFP plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Predebon, I.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-05-15

    Turbulence induced by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is investigated in the helical and axisymmetric plasma states of a reversed field pinch device by means of gyrokinetic calculations. The two magnetic configurations are systematically compared, both linearly and nonlinearly, in order to evaluate the impact of the geometry on the instability and its ensuing transport, as well as on the production of zonal flows. Despite its enhanced confinement, the high-current helical state demonstrates a lower ITG stability threshold compared to the axisymmetric state, and ITG turbulence is expected to become an important contributor to the total heat transport.

  7. Stationary axisymmetric fields in a teleparallel theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saez, D.

    1984-12-01

    The stationary axisymmetric field in the tetrad theory of gravitation of Moller (1978) and hence (as shown by Meyre, 1982) in the teleparallel limit of the gauge theory of Hehl et al. (1978) is investigated analytically. A set of tetrads satisfying the Moller equations and giving a Kerr metric is defined, and its existence is proved. It is suggested that the introduction of suitable conditions could reduce the number of tetrads in the Kerr case to one or a small number, and that the present analytical techniques could be applied to other stationary axisymmetric metrics of general relativity.

  8. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  9. Exploring the proper experimental conditions in 2D thermal cloaking demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Run; Zhou, Shuling; Yu, Xingjian; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    Although thermal cloak has been studied extensively, the specific discussions on the proper experimental conditions to successfully observe the thermal cloaking effect are lacking. In this study, we focus on exploring the proper experimental conditions for 2D thermal cloaking demonstration. A mathematical model is established and detailed discussions are presented based on the model. The proper experimental conditions are suggested and verified with finite element simulations.

  10. FRANC2D: A two-dimensional crack propagation simulator. Version 2.7: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawrzynek, Paul; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    FRANC 2D (FRacture ANalysis Code, 2 Dimensions) is a menu driven, interactive finite element computer code that performs fracture mechanics analyses of 2-D structures. The code has an automatic mesh generator for triangular and quadrilateral elements. FRANC2D calculates the stress intensity factor using linear elastic fracture mechanics and evaluates crack extension using several methods that may be selected by the user. The code features a mesh refinement and adaptive mesh generation capability that is automatically developed according to the predicted crack extension direction and length. The code also has unique features that permit the analysis of layered structure with load transfer through simulated mechanical fasteners or bonded joints. The code was written for UNIX workstations with X-windows graphics and may be executed on the following computers: DEC DecStation 3000 and 5000 series, IBM RS/6000 series, Hewlitt-Packard 9000/700 series, SUN Sparc stations, and most Silicon Graphics models.

  11. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  12. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  13. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  14. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  15. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  16. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  17. CAS2D- NONROTATING BLADE-TO-BLADE, STEADY, POTENTIAL TRANSONIC CASCADE FLOW ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact, full-potential-equation model for the steady, irrotational, homoentropic, and homoenergetic flow of a compressible, inviscid fluid through a two-dimensional planar cascade together with its appropriate boundary conditions has been derived. The CAS2D computer program numerically solves an artificially time-dependent form of the actual full-potential-equation, providing a nonrotating blade-to-blade, steady, potential transonic cascade flow analysis code. Comparisons of results with test data and theoretical solutions indicate very good agreement. In CAS2D, the governing equation is discretized by using type-dependent, rotated finite differencing and the finite area technique. The flow field is discretized by providing a boundary-fitted, nonuniform computational mesh. This mesh is generated by using a sequence of conformal mapping, nonorthogonal coordinate stretching, and local, isoparametric, bilinear mapping functions. The discretized form of the full-potential equation is solved iteratively by using successive line over relaxation. Possible isentropic shocks are captured by the explicit addition of an artificial viscosity in a conservative form. In addition, a four-level, consecutive, mesh refinement feature makes CAS2D a reliable and fast algorithm for the analysis of transonic, two-dimensional cascade flows. The results from CAS2D are not directly applicable to three-dimensional, potential, rotating flows through a cascade of blades because CAS2D does not consider the effects of the Coriolis force that would be present in the three-dimensional case. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 200K of 8 bit bytes. The CAS2D program was developed in 1980.

  18. CYP2D6*36 gene arrangements within the cyp2d6 locus: association of CYP2D6*36 with poor metabolizer status.

    PubMed

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Bradford, L Dianne; Alander, Sarah W; Leeder, J Steven

    2006-04-01

    Unexplained cases of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype discordance continue to be discovered. In previous studies, several African Americans with a poor metabolizer phenotype carried the reduced function CYP2D6*10 allele in combination with a nonfunctional allele. We pursued the possibility that these alleles harbor either a known sequence variation (i.e., CYP2D6*36 carrying a gene conversion in exon 9 along the CYP2D6*10-defining 100C>T single-nucleotide polymorphism) or novel sequences variation(s). Discordant cases were evaluated by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to test for gene rearrangement events, and a 6.6-kilobase pair PCR product encompassing the CYP2D6 gene was cloned and entirely sequenced. Thereafter, allele frequencies were determined in different study populations comprising whites, African Americans, and Asians. Analyses covering the CYP2D7 to 2D6 gene region established that CYP2D6*36 did not only exist as a gene duplication (CYP2D6*36x2) or in tandem with *10 (CYP2D6*36+*10), as previously reported, but also by itself. This "single" CYP2D6*36 allele was found in nine African Americans and one Asian, but was absent in the whites tested. Ultimately, the presence of CYP2D6*36 resolved genotype/phenotype discordance in three cases. We also discovered an exon 9 conversion-positive CYP2D6*4 gene in a duplication arrangement (CYP2D6*4Nx2) and a CYP2D6*4 allele lacking 100C>T (CYP2D6*4M) in two white subjects. The discovery of an allele that carries only one CYP2D6*36 gene copy provides unequivocal evidence that both CYP2D6*36 and *36x2 are associated with a poor metabolizer phenotype. Given a combined frequency of between 0.5 and 3% in African Americans and Asians, genotyping for CYP2D6*36 should improve the accuracy of genotype-based phenotype prediction in these populations.

  19. Consistent lattice Boltzmann methods for incompressible axisymmetric flows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangqi; Yang, Shiliang; Zeng, Zhong; Yin, Linmao; Zhao, Ya; Chew, Jia Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this work, consistent lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods for incompressible axisymmetric flows are developed based on two efficient axisymmetric LB models available in the literature. In accord with their respective original models, the proposed axisymmetric models evolve within the framework of the standard LB method and the source terms contain no gradient calculations. Moreover, the incompressibility conditions are realized with the Hermite expansion, thus the compressibility errors arising in the existing models are expected to be reduced by the proposed incompressible models. In addition, an extra relaxation parameter is added to the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision operator to suppress the effect of the ghost variable and thus the numerical stability of the present models is significantly improved. Theoretical analyses, based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion and the equivalent moment system, are performed to derive the macroscopic equations from the LB models and the resulting truncation terms (i.e., the compressibility errors) are investigated. In addition, numerical validations are carried out based on four well-acknowledged benchmark tests and the accuracy and applicability of the proposed incompressible axisymmetric LB models are verified. PMID:27627407

  20. Non-axisymmetric instabilities in discs with imposed zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanon, R.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2016-09-01

    We conduct a linear stability calculation of an ideal Keplerian flow on which a sinusoidal zonal flow is imposed. The analysis uses the shearing sheet model and is carried out both in isothermal and adiabatic conditions, with and without self-gravity (SG). In the non-SG regime a structure in the potential vorticity (PV) leads to a non-axisymmetric Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability; in the short-wavelength limit its growth rate agrees with the incompressible calculation by Lithwick (2007), which only considers perturbations elongated in the streamwise direction. The instability's strength is analysed as a function of the structure's properties, and zonal flows are found to be stable if their wavelength is ≳ 8H, where H is the disc's scale height, regardless of the value of the adiabatic index γ. The non-axisymmetric KH instability can operate in Rayleigh-stable conditions, and it therefore represents the limiting factor to the structure's properties. Introducing SG triggers a second non-axisymmetric instability, which is found to be located around a PV maximum, while the KH instability is linked to a PV minimum, as expected. In the adiabatic regime, the same gravitational instability is detected even when the structure is present only in the entropy (not in the PV) and the instability spreads to weaker SG conditions as the entropy structure's amplitude is increased. This eventually yields a non-axisymmetric instability in the non-SG regime, albeit of weak strength, localised around an entropy maximum.

  1. Similarity Theory for an Axisymmetric Turbulent Wake with Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Axisymmetric wakes are special cases of turbulent shear flows in the sense that the local Reynolds number based on velocity deficit and wake width decreases with downstream position. Recently, Johansson et al. (Physics of Fluids, 15, no.3, 603-617, 2003) showed that two distinct similarity solutions for the non-swirling axisymmetric turbulent wake exist - one for infinite and one for low local Reynolds number. Every axisymmetric wake, no matter how high the initial Reynolds number, will eventually transition to the low Reynolds number similarity state in the far wake. Here equilibrium similarity considerations are applied to axisymmetric turbulent wakes with rotation (swirl), as can be found downstream of wind or hydrokinetic turbines. By examining under which conditions the reduced momentum and Reynolds stress transport equations for swirling wakes as well as the momentum integrals admit to similarity solutions, asymptotic scaling relations for the decay of velocity deficit and swirl are found. Swirl is introduced as an initial condition, and additional constraints on the similarity solution are introduced from the turbine (wake generator) operating parameters, e.g., tip speed ratio, angular induction, etc. The consequences of having a non-point source of thrust (drag) and angular momentum are investigated. Implications of the findings on the operation of wind and hydrokinetic turbines and turbine arrays are discussed.

  2. Consistent lattice Boltzmann methods for incompressible axisymmetric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangqi; Yang, Shiliang; Zeng, Zhong; Yin, Linmao; Zhao, Ya; Chew, Jia Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this work, consistent lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods for incompressible axisymmetric flows are developed based on two efficient axisymmetric LB models available in the literature. In accord with their respective original models, the proposed axisymmetric models evolve within the framework of the standard LB method and the source terms contain no gradient calculations. Moreover, the incompressibility conditions are realized with the Hermite expansion, thus the compressibility errors arising in the existing models are expected to be reduced by the proposed incompressible models. In addition, an extra relaxation parameter is added to the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision operator to suppress the effect of the ghost variable and thus the numerical stability of the present models is significantly improved. Theoretical analyses, based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion and the equivalent moment system, are performed to derive the macroscopic equations from the LB models and the resulting truncation terms (i.e., the compressibility errors) are investigated. In addition, numerical validations are carried out based on four well-acknowledged benchmark tests and the accuracy and applicability of the proposed incompressible axisymmetric LB models are verified.

  3. Thermal deformation of concentrators in an axisymmetric temperature field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bairamov, R.; Machuev, Y. I.; Nazarov, A.; Sokolov, Y. V.; Solodovnikova, L. A.; Fokin, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    Axisymmetric thermal deformations of paraboloid mirrors, due to heating, are examined for a mirror with a optical axis oriented toward the Sun. A governing differential equation is derived using Mushtari-Donnel-Vlasov simplifications, and a solution is presented which makes it possible to determine the principal deformation characteristics.

  4. Geometric integrator for charged particle orbits in axisymmetric fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilov, S. V.; Runov, A. M.; Kernbichler, W.

    2016-10-01

    A semi-analytical geometric integrator of guiding centre orbits in an axisymmetric tokamak is described. The integrator preserves all three invariants of motion up to computer accuracy at the expense of reduced orbit accuracy and it is roughly an order of magnitude more efficient than a direct solution of the equations of guiding centre motion with a standard high order adaptive ODE integrator.

  5. Angular-momentum--mass inequality for axisymmetric black holes.

    PubMed

    Dain, Sergio

    2006-03-17

    The inequality square root J axisymmetric data close to extreme Kerr data. The physical significance of this inequality and its relation to the standard picture of the gravitational collapse are discussed. PMID:16605722

  6. Field simulation of axisymmetric plasma screw pinches by alternating-direction-implicit methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    An axisymmetric plasma screw pinch is an axisymmetric column of ionized gaseous plasma radially confined by forces from axial and azimuthal currents driven in the plasma and its surroundings. This dissertation is a contribution to detailed, high resolution computer simulation of dynamic plasma screw pinches in 2-d {ital rz}-coordinates. The simulation algorithm combines electron fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) ion models to represent the plasma in a hybrid fashion. The plasma is assumed to be quasineutral; along with the Darwin approximation to the Maxwell equations, this implies application of Ampere`s law without displacement current. Electron inertia is assumed negligible so that advective terms in the electron momentum equation are ignored. Electrons and ions have separate scalar temperatures, and a scalar plasma electrical resistivity is assumed. Altemating-direction-implicit (ADI) methods are used to advance the electron fluid drift velocity and the magnetic fields in the simulation. The ADI methods allow time steps larger than allowed by explicit methods. Spatial regions where vacuum field equations have validity are determined by a cutoff density that invokes the quasineutral vacuum Maxwell equations (Darwin approximation). In this dissertation, the algorithm was first checked against ideal MM stability theory, and agreement was nicely demonstrated. However, such agreement is not a new contribution to the research field. Contributions to the research field include new treatments of the fields in vacuum regions of the pinch simulation. The new treatments predict a level of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence near the bulk plasma surface that is higher than predicted by other methods.

  7. Experimental investigation on cavitating flow shedding over an axisymmetric blunt body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Changli; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, most researchers focus on the cavity shedding mechanisms of unsteady cavitating flows over different objects, such as 2D/3D hydrofoils, venturi-type section, axisymmetric bodies with different headforms, and so on. But few of them pay attention to the differences of cavity shedding modality under different cavitation numbers in unsteady cavitating flows over the same object. In the present study, two kinds of shedding patterns are investigated experimentally. A high speed camera system is used to observe the cavitating flows over an axisymmetric blunt body and the velocity fields are measured by a particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique in a water tunnel for different cavitation conditions. The U-type cavitating vortex shedding is observed in unsteady cavitating flows. When the cavitation number is 0.7, there is a large scale cavity rolling up and shedding, which cause the instability and dramatic fluctuation of the flows, while at cavitation number of 0.6, the detached cavities can be conjunct with the attached part to induce the break-off behavior again at the tail of the attached cavity, as a result, the final shedding is in the form of small scale cavity and keeps a relatively steady flow field. It is also found that the interaction between the re-entrant flow and the attached cavity plays an important role in the unsteady cavity shedding modality. When the attached cavity scale is insufficient to overcome the re-entrant flow, it deserves the large cavity rolling up and shedding just as that at cavitation number of 0.7. Otherwise, the re-entrant flow is defeated by large enough cavity to induce the cavity-combined process and small scale cavity vortexes shedding just as that of the cavitation number of 0.6. This research shows the details of two different cavity shedding modalities which is worthful and meaningful for the further study of unsteady cavitation.

  8. Numerical simulation of rock cutting using 2D AUTODYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldemichael, D. E.; Rani, A. M. Abdul; Lemma, T. A.; Altaf, K.

    2015-12-01

    In a drilling process for oil and gas exploration, understanding of the interaction between the cutting tool and the rock is important for optimization of the drilling process using polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutters. In this study the finite element method in ANSYS AUTODYN-2D is used to simulate the dynamics of cutter rock interaction, rock failure, and fragmentation. A two-dimensional single PDC cutter and rock model were used to simulate the orthogonal cutting process and to investigate the effect of different parameters such as depth of cut, and back rake angle on two types of rocks (sandstone and limestone). In the simulation, the cutting tool was dragged against stationary rock at predetermined linear velocity and the depth of cut (1,2, and 3 mm) and the back rake angles(-10°, 0°, and +10°) were varied. The simulation result shows that the +10° back rake angle results in higher rate of penetration (ROP). Increasing depth of cut leads to higher ROP at the cost of higher cutting force.

  9. Iterative 2D deconvolution of portal imaging radiographs.

    PubMed

    Looe, Hui Khee; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay C; Poppe, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Portal imaging has become an integral part of modern radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and IGRT. It serves to verify the accuracy of day-to-day patient positioning, a prerequisite for treatment success. However, image blurring attributable to different physical and geometrical effects, analysed in this work, impairs the image quality of the portal images, and anatomical structures cannot always be clearly outlined. A 2D iterative deconvolution method was developed to reduce this image blurring. The affiliated data basis was generated by the separate measurement of the components contributing to image blurring. Secondary electron transport and pixel size within the EPID, as well as geometrical penumbra due to the finite photon source size were found to be the major contributors, whereas photon scattering in the patient is less important. The underlying line-spread kernels of these components were shown to be Lorentz functions. This implies that each of these convolution kernels and also their combination can be characterized by a single characteristic, the width parameter λ of the Lorentz function. The overall resulting λ values were 0.5mm for 6 MV and 0.65 mm for 15 MV. Portal images were deconvolved using the point-spread function derived from the Lorentz function together with the experimentally determined λ values. The improvement of the portal images was quantified in terms of the modulation transfer function of a bar pattern. The resulting clinical images show a clear enhancement of sharpness and contrast.

  10. Steady propagation of Bingham plugs in 2D channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Parsa; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James

    2009-11-01

    The displacement of the yield-stress liquid plugs in channels and tubes occur in many biological systems and industrial processes. Among them is the propagation of mucus plugs in the respiratory tracts as may occur in asthma, cystic fibrosis, or emphysema. In this work the steady propagation of mucus plugs in a 2D channel is studied numerically, assuming that the mucus is a pure Bingham fluid. The governing equations are solved by a mixed-discontinuous finite element formulation and the free surface is resolved with the method of spines. The constitutive equation for a pure Bingham fluid is modeled by a regularization method. Fluid inertia is neglected, so the controlling parameters in a steady displacement are; the capillary number, Ca, Bingham number ,Bn, and the plug length. According to the numerical results, the yield stress behavior of the plug modifies the plug shape, the pattern of the streamlines and the distribution of stresses in the plug domain and along the walls in a significant way. The distribution along the walls is a major factor in studying cell injuries. This work is supported through the grant NIH HL84370.

  11. 2-D Model for Normal and Sickle Cell Blood Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekleab, Yonatan; Harris, Wesley

    2011-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that alters the red blood cell (RBC) structure and function such that hemoglobin (Hb) cannot effectively bind and release oxygen. Previous computational models have been designed to study the microcirculation for insight into blood disorders such as SCD. Our novel 2-D computational model represents a fast, time efficient method developed to analyze flow dynamics, O2 diffusion, and cell deformation in the microcirculation. The model uses a finite difference, Crank-Nicholson scheme to compute the flow and O2 concentration, and the level set computational method to advect the RBC membrane on a staggered grid. Several sets of initial and boundary conditions were tested. Simulation data indicate a few parameters to be significant in the perturbation of the blood flow and O2 concentration profiles. Specifically, the Hill coefficient, arterial O2 partial pressure, O2 partial pressure at 50% Hb saturation, and cell membrane stiffness are significant factors. Results were found to be consistent with those of Le Floch [2010] and Secomb [2006].

  12. Effects of Agent's Repulsion in 2d Flocking Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Najem; Tarras, Iliass; Mazroui, M'hammed; Boughaleb, Yahya

    In nature many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex behavior of these systems, many models have been proposed and tested so far. This paper deals with an extension of the Vicsek model, by including a second zone of repulsion, where each agent attempts to maintain a minimum distance from the others. The consideration of this zone in our study seems to play an important role during the travel of agents in the two-dimensional (2D) flocking models. Our numerical investigations show that depending on the basic ingredients such as repulsion radius (R1), effect of density of agents (ρ) and noise (η), our nonequilibrium system can undergo a kinetic phase transition from no transport to finite net transport. For different values of ρ, kinetic phase diagrams in the plane (η ,R1) are found. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  14. ORMDIN. 2-D Nonlinear Inverse Heat Conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.

    1990-05-01

    ORMDIN is a finite-element program developed for two-dimensional nonlinear inverse heat conduction analysis as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized Water Reactor Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) program. One of the primary objectives of the program was to determine the transient surface temperature and surface heat flux of fuel pin simulators from internal thermocouple signals obtained during a loss-of-coolant accident experiment in the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF). ORMDIN was designed primarily to perform a transient two-dimensional nonlinear inverse heat conduction analysis of the THTF bundle 3 heater rod; however, it can be applied to other cylindrical geometries for which the thermophysical properties are prescribed functions of temperature. The program assumes that discretized temperature histories are provided at three thermocouple locations in the interior of the cylinder. Concurrent with the two-dimensional analysis, ORMDIN also generates one-dimensional solutions for each of the three thermocouple radial planes.

  15. Finite stretching of a circular plate of neo-Hookean material.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biricikoglu, V.

    1971-01-01

    The analytical solution presented is based on the assumption that the deformed thickness of the plate is approximately constant. The nonlinear equations governing finite axisymmetric deformations of a circular plate made of neo-Hookean material are used in the analysis. The variation of circumferential extension ratio and the variation of deformed thickness are shown in graphs.

  16. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  17. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  18. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  19. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  20. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  1. Chaotic cross-waves in tanks of finite sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolskaya, Tatyana; Pechuk, Evgeniy; Spektor, Viacheslav

    2014-11-01

    The phenomenon of chaotic cross-waves generation in fluid free surface in two finite size containers is studied. The waves may be excited by harmonic axisymmetric deformations of the inner shell in the volume between two cylinders and in a rectangular tank when one wall is a flap wavemaker. The existence of chaotic attractors was established for the dynamical system presenting cross-waves and forced waves interaction at fluid free-surface in a volume between two cylinders of finite length. In the case of one cross-wave in a rectangular tank no chaotic regimes were found.

  2. Casting process modeling using CAST2D: The part mold interface

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1991-10-01

    Correctly modeling the physics across the part-mold interface is crucial in predicting the quality of a cast part. Most metals undergo a volume change on solidification (e.g., aluminum -6.6%) and shrinkage on cooling. As the cast metal shrinks, it pulls away from the mol wall creating a gap. This gap effects the thermal contact resistance between the part and mold. The thermal contact resistance increase as the gap widens. This directly effects the cooling rate and ultimately the final cast shape, stress state, and quality of the cast part. CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D is a code in development. This report presents the status of a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Investigation of Methods for the Structural Weight Analysis of a Mach 2.4 Axisymmetric Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadell, Shari-Beth

    1994-01-01

    Structural design and analysis tools appropriate for estimating the structural weight of an axisymmetric inlet designed for Mach 2.4 cruise were evaluated. Little information regarding the inlet mechanical design is available in the preliminary design phase, so it is necessary to first develop a reasonable structural design before estimating the inlet weight. The Internally Pressurized Structure Synthesis and Optimization (IPSSO) program, employing an analytical approach, was chosen for evaluation due to its combined design and analysis capabilities. The inlet design produced by IPSSO was then analyzed using the NASTRAN finite element program. The finite element analysis was performed to help identify the limitations of the analytically based code as well as to evaluate NASTRAN for this application. Comparison between the IPSSO inlet weight and that of a similar inlet developed by the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group was also made. Program evaluation concluded that the combined use of IPSSO to create an initial design and NASTRAN to perform a numerical analysis would provide the capability to evaluate a limited number of inlet design The development of a new tool for the minimum weight design and analysis of inlet structures would be required for greater flexibility in evaluating inlet conceptual designs.

  4. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  5. Position control using 2D-to-2D feature correspondences in vision guided cell micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanliang; Han, Mingli; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2007-01-01

    Conventional camera calibration that utilizes the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the camera and the objects has certain limitations for micro-level cell operations due to the presence of hardware deviations and external disturbances during the experimental process, thereby invalidating the extrinsic parameters. This invalidation is often neglected in macro-world visual servoing and affects the visual image processing quality, causing deviation from the desired position in micro-level cell operations. To increase the success rate of vision guided biological micromanipulations, a novel algorithm monitoring the changing image pattern of the manipulators including the injection micropipette and cell holder is designed and implemented based on 2 dimensional (2D)-to 2D feature correspondences and can adjust the manipulator and perform position control simultaneously. When any deviation is found, the manipulator is retracted to the initial focusing plane before continuing the operation.

  6. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Do, Dat T.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed. PMID:26596907

  7. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  8. High Order Finite Difference Methods with Subcell Resolution for 2D Detonation Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Shu, C. W.; Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2012-01-01

    In simulating hyperbolic conservation laws in conjunction with an inhomogeneous stiff source term, if the solution is discontinuous, spurious numerical results may be produced due to different time scales of the transport part and the source term. This numerical issue often arises in combustion and high speed chemical reacting flows.

  9. Edge gradients evaluation for 2D hybrid finite volume method model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a two-dimensional depth-integrated hydrodynamic model was developed using FVM on a hybrid unstructured collocated mesh system. To alleviate the negative effects of mesh irregularity and non-uniformity, a conservative evaluation method for edge gradients based on the second-order Tayl...

  10. Study of the electrical conductivity at finite temperature in 2D Si- MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Limouny, L. Kaaouachi, A. El Tata, O.; Daoudi, E.; Errai, M.; Dlimi, S.; Idrissi, H. El; Zatni, A.

    2014-01-27

    We investigate the low temperature density dependent conductivity of two dimensional electron systems in zero magnetic field for sample Si-15 MOSFETs. The first purpose of this paper is to establish that the knee of the conductivity σ{sub 0} (σ{sub 0} is the T = 0.3 conductivity obtained by linear extrapolation of the curves of σ (T) for different values of electron density, n{sub s}) as a function of the carrier densities n{sub s} for T = 0.3 K, observed by Lai et al. and Limouny et al. in previous work for two different samples, is independent of temperature. The second aim is the determination of the critical density, n{sub c}, of the metal-insulator transition. Many methods are used in this investigation of n{sub c} which have been already used for other samples. The motivation behind this last study is the observation of many values of n{sub c} that have been obtained from different methods and that are slightly different. We will use in this study three methods with the intention to infer which one is more appropriate to obtain n{sub c}.

  11. Gaps, rings, and non-axisymmetric structures in protoplanetary disks. From simulations to ALMA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, M.; Ruge, J. P.; Dzyurkevich, N.; Henning, Th.; Klahr, H.; Wolf, S.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: Recent observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of disks around young stars revealed distinct asymmetries in the dust continuum emission. In this work we wish to study axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric structures that are generated by the magneto-rotational instability in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks. We combine the results of state-of-the-art numerical simulations with post-processing radiative transfer (RT) to generate synthetic maps and predictions for ALMA. Methods: We performed non-ideal global 3D magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) stratified simulations of the dead-zone outer edge using the FARGO MHD code PLUTO. The stellar and disk parameters were taken from a parameterized disk model applied for fitting high-angular resolution multi-wavelength observations of various circumstellar disks. We considered a stellar mass of M∗ = 0.5 M⊙ and a total disk mass of about 0.085 M∗. The 2D initial temperature and density profiles were calculated consistently from a given surface density profile and Monte Carlo radiative transfer. The 2D Ohmic resistivity profile was calculated using a dust chemistry model. We considered two values for the dust-to-gas mass ratio, 10-2 and 10-4, which resulted in two different levels of magnetic coupling. The initial magnetic field was a vertical net flux field. The radiative transfer simulations were performed with the Monte Carlo-based 3D continuum RT code MC3D. The resulting dust reemission provided the basis for the simulation of observations with ALMA. Results: All models quickly turned into a turbulent state. The fiducial model with a dust-to-gas mass ratio of 10-2 developed a large gap followed by a jump in surface density located at the dead-zone outer edge. The jump in density and pressure was strong enough to stop the radial drift of particles at this location. In addition, we observed the generation of vortices by the Rossby wave instability at the jump location close to 60 AU

  12. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  13. 'Brukin2D': a 2D visualization and comparison tool for LC-MS data

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Zerefos, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Vlahou, Antonia; Baumann, Marc; Kossida, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) is a commonly used technique to resolve complex protein mixtures. Visualization of large data sets produced from LC-MS, namely the chromatogram and the mass spectra that correspond to its compounds is the focus of this work. Results The in-house developed 'Brukin2D' software, built in Matlab 7.4, which is presented here, uses the compound data that are exported from the Bruker 'DataAnalysis' program, and depicts the mean mass spectra of all the chromatogram compounds from one LC-MS run, in one 2D contour/density plot. Two contour plots from different chromatograph runs can then be viewed in the same window and automatically compared, in order to find their similarities and differences. The results of the comparison can be examined through detailed mass quantification tables, while chromatogram compound statistics are also calculated during the procedure. Conclusion 'Brukin2D' provides a user-friendly platform for quick, easy and integrated view of complex LC-MS data. The software is available at . PMID:19534737

  14. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) by methadone.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D; Otton, S V; Sproule, B A; Busto, U; Inaba, T; Kalow, W; Sellers, E M

    1993-01-01

    1. In microsomes prepared from three human livers, methadone competitively inhibited the O-demethylation of dextromethorphan, a marker substrate for CYP2D6. The apparent Ki value of methadone ranged from 2.5 to 5 microM. 2. Two hundred and fifty-two (252) white Caucasians, including 210 unrelated healthy volunteers and 42 opiate abusers undergoing treatment with methadone were phenotyped using dextromethorphan as the marker drug. Although the frequency of poor metabolizers was similar in both groups, the extensive metabolizers among the opiate abusers tended to have higher O-demethylation metabolic ratios and to excrete less of the dose as dextromethorphan metabolites than control extensive metabolizer subjects. These data suggest inhibition of CYP2D6 by methadone in vivo as well. 3. Because methadone is widely used in the treatment of opiate abuse, inhibition of CYP2D6 activity in these patients might contribute to exaggerated response or unexpected toxicity from drugs that are substrates of this enzyme. PMID:8448065

  15. Prediction of the vibroacoustic behavior of a submerged shell with non-axisymmetric internal substructures by a condensed transfer function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, V.; Maxit, L.; Guyader, J.-L.; Leissing, T.

    2016-01-01

    The vibroacoustic behavior of axisymmetric stiffened shells immersed in water has been intensively studied in the past. On the contrary, little attention has been paid to the modeling of these shells coupled to non-axisymmetric internal frames. Indeed, breaking the axisymmetry couples the circumferential orders of the Fourier series and considerably increases the computational costs. In order to tackle this issue, we propose a sub-structuring approach called the Condensed Transfer Function (CTF) method that will allow assembling a model of axisymmetric stiffened shell with models of non-axisymmetric internal frames. The CTF method is developed in the general case of mechanical subsystems coupled along curves. A set of orthonormal functions called condensation functions, which depend on the curvilinear abscissa along the coupling line, is considered. This set is then used as a basis for approximating and decomposing the displacements and the applied forces at the line junctions. Thanks to the definition and calculation of condensed transfer functions for each uncoupled subsystem and by using the superposition principle for passive linear systems, the behavior of the coupled subsystems can be deduced. A plane plate is considered as a test case to study the convergence of the method with respect to the type and the number of condensation functions taken into account. The CTF method is then applied to couple a submerged non-periodically stiffened shell described using the Circumferential Admittance Approach (CAA) with internal substructures described by Finite Element Method (FEM). The influence of non-axisymmetric internal substructures can finally be studied and it is shown that it tends to increase the radiation efficiency of the shell and can modify the vibrational and acoustic energy distribution.

  16. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  17. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  18. Stable photon orbits in stationary axisymmetric electrovacuum spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Sam R.; Shipley, Jake O.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the existence and phenomenology of stable photon orbits (SPOs) in stationary axisymmetric electrovacuum spacetimes in four dimensions. First, we review the classification of equatorial circular photon orbits on Kerr-Newman spacetimes in the charge-spin plane. Second, using a Hamiltonian formulation, we show that Reissner-Nordström diholes (a family encompassing the Majumdar-Papapetrou and Weyl-Bach special cases) admit SPOs, in a certain parameter regime that we investigate. Third, we explore the transition from order to chaos for typical SPOs bounded within a toroidal region around a dihole, via a selection of Poincaré sections. Finally, for general axisymmetric stationary spacetimes, we show that the Einstein-Maxwell field equations allow for the existence of SPOs in electro vacuum, but not in pure vacuum.

  19. On the stability of compressible flow past axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.; Spall, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Compressible linear stability theory for axisymmetric flows is presented. The theory is applied to flow past a cylinder and a sharp cone at a Mach number of 5 with adiabatic wall conditions. The effect of transverse curvature and body divergence is studied. It is found that transverse curvature has a stabilizing influence on axisymmetric (first and second mode) disturbances while it has a destabilizing influence on the asymmetric (oblique first mode) disturbances. The body divergence effects are stabilizing for both symmetric and asymmetric disturbances. Comparisons made with the results of planar stability theory show that, for a cylinder, curvature effects become more pronounced with increasing distance along the cylinder. For a sharp cone, these effects become less significant further away from the cone tip since the body radius increases faster than the growth of the boundary layer. The effect of cone angle on stability is also studied.

  20. Stability of flow over axisymmetric bodies with porous suction strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Reed, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Linear triple deck, closed form solutions for mean-flow quantities are developed for axisymmetric incompressible flow past a body with porous strips. The solutions account for upstream influence and are linear superpositions of the flow past the body without suction plus the perturbations due to the suction strips. Flow past the suctionless body is calculated using the Transition Analysis Program System, and a simple linear optimization scheme to determine number, spacing, and mass flow rate through the strips on an axisymmetric body is developed using the linear, triple-deck, closed-form solutions. The theory is demonstrated by predicting optimal strip distributions, and the effect of various adverse pressure-gradient situations on stability is studied.

  1. Resonant Absorption of Axisymmetric Modes in Twisted Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, I.; Goossens, M.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2016-06-01

    It has been shown recently that magnetic twist and axisymmetric MHD modes are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, and therefore the study of resonant absorption for these modes has become a pressing issue because it can have important consequences for heating magnetic flux tubes in the solar atmosphere and the observed damping. In this investigation, for the first time, we calculate the damping rate for axisymmetric MHD waves in weakly twisted magnetic flux tubes. Our aim is to investigate the impact of resonant damping of these modes for solar atmospheric conditions. This analytical study is based on an idealized configuration of a straight magnetic flux tube with a weak magnetic twist inside as well as outside the tube. By implementing the conservation laws derived by Sakurai et al. and the analytic solutions for weakly twisted flux tubes obtained recently by Giagkiozis et al. we derive a dispersion relation for resonantly damped axisymmetric modes in the spectrum of the Alfvén continuum. We also obtain an insightful analytical expression for the damping rate in the long wavelength limit. Furthermore, it is shown that both the longitudinal magnetic field and the density, which are allowed to vary continuously in the inhomogeneous layer, have a significant impact on the damping time. Given the conditions in the solar atmosphere, resonantly damped axisymmetric modes are highly likely to be ubiquitous and play an important role in energy dissipation. We also suggest that, given the character of these waves, it is likely that they have already been observed in the guise of Alfvén waves.

  2. Small Engine Technology (SET) - Task 14 Axisymmetric Engine Simulation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Max J.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the NPSS (Numerical Propulsion Simulation System) project, NASA Lewis has a goal of developing an U.S. industry standard for an axisymmetric engine simulation environment. In this program, AlliedSignal Engines (AE) contributed to this goal by evaluating the ENG20 software and developing support tools. ENG20 is a NASA developed axisymmetric engine simulation tool. The project was divided into six subtasks which are summarized below: Evaluate the capabilities of the ENG20 code using an existing test case to see how this procedure can capture the component interactions for a full engine. Link AE's compressor and turbine axisymmetric streamline curvature codes (UD0300M and TAPS) with ENG20, which will provide the necessary boundary conditions for an ENG20 engine simulation. Evaluate GE's Global Data System (GDS), attempt to use GDS to do the linking of codes described in Subtask 2 above. Use a turbofan engine test case to evaluate various aspects of the system, including the linkage of UD0300M and TAPS with ENG20 and the GE data storage system. Also, compare the solution results with cycle deck results, axisymmetric solutions (UD0300M and TAPS), and test data to determine the accuracy of the solution. Evaluate the order of accuracy and the convergence time for the solution. Provide a monthly status report and a final formal report documenting AE's evaluation of ENG20. Provide the developed interfaces that link UD0300M and TAPS with ENG20, to NASA. The interface that links UD0300M with ENG20 will be compatible with the industr,, version of UD0300M.

  3. Axisymmetric MHD Instabilities in Solar/Stellar Tachoclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Gilman, Peter A.; Cally, Paul S.; Miesch, Mark S.

    2009-02-01

    Extensive studies over the past decade showed that HD and MHD nonaxisymmetric instabilities exist in the solar tachocline for a wide range of toroidal field profiles, amplitudes, and latitude locations. Axisymmetric instabilities (m = 0) do not exist in two dimensions, and are excited in quasi-three-dimensional shallow-water systems only for very high field strengths (2 mG). We investigate here MHD axisymmetric instabilities in a three-dimensional thin-shell model of the solar/stellar tachocline, employing a hydrostatic, non-Boussinesq system of equations. We deduce a number of general properties of the instability by use of an integral theorem, as well as finding detailed numerical solutions for unstable modes. Toroidal bands become unstable to axisymmetric perturbations for solar-like field strengths (100 kG). The e-folding time can be months down to a few hours if the field strength is 1 mG or higher, which might occur in the solar core, white dwarfs, or neutron stars. These instabilities exist without rotation, with rotation, and with differential rotation, although both rotation and differential rotation have stabilizing effects. Broad toroidal fields are stable. The instability for modes with m = 0 is driven from the poleward shoulder of banded profiles by a perturbation magnetic curvature stress that overcomes the stabilizing Coriolis force. The nonaxisymmetric instability tips or deforms a band; with axisymmetric instability, the fluid can roll in latitude and radius, and can convert bands into tubes stacked in radius. The velocity produced by this instability in the case of low-latitude bands crosses the equator, and hence can provide a mechanism for interhemispheric coupling.

  4. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  5. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  6. On Classical Solutions to 2D Shallow Water Equations with Degenerate Viscosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yachun; Pan, Ronghua; Zhu, Shengguo

    2016-07-01

    2D shallow water equations have degenerate viscosities proportional to surface height, which vanishes in many physical considerations, say, when the initial total mass, or energy are finite. Such a degeneracy is a highly challenging obstacle for development of well-posedness theory, even local-in-time theory remains open for a long time. In this paper, we will address this open problem with some new perspectives, independent of the celebrated BD-entropy (Bresch et al in Commun Math Phys 238:211-223, 2003, Commun Part Differ Eqs 28:843-868, 2003, Analysis and Simulation of Fluid Dynamics, 2007). After exploring some interesting structures of most models of 2D shallow water equations, we introduced a proper notion of solution class, called regular solutions, and identified a class of initial data with finite total mass and energy, and established the local-in-time well-posedness of this class of smooth solutions. The theory is applicable to most relatively physical shallow water models, broader than those with BD-entropy structures. We remark that our theory is on the local strong solutions, while the BD entropy is an essential tool for the global weak solutions. Later, a Beale-Kato-Majda type blow-up criterion is also established. This paper is mainly based on our early preprint (Li et al. in 2D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with degenerate viscosities and far field vacuum, preprint. arXiv:1407.8471, 2014).

  7. Options for axisymmetric operation of MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Devoto, R.S.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1986-03-30

    The flexibility of MFTF-B for axisymmetric experiments has been investigated. Interhcanging the axicell coils and increasing their separation results in an axisymmetric plug cell with 12:1 and 6:1 inner and outer mirror ratios, respectively. For axisymmetric operation, the sloshing-ion neutral beams, ECRH gyrotrons, and the pumping system would be moved to the axicell. Stabilization by E-rings could be explored in this configuration. With the addition of octopole magnets, off-axis multipole stabilization could also be tested. Operating points for octopole and E-ring-stabilized configurations with properties similar to those of the quadrupole MFTF-B, namely T/sub ic/ = 10 - 15 keV and n/sub c/ approx. = 3 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, have been obtained. Because of the negligible radial transport of central-cell ions, the required neutral-beam power in the central cell has been dramatically reduced. In addition, because MHD stabilization is achieved by off-axis hot electrons in both cases, much lower barrier beta is possible, which aids in reducing the barrier ECRH power. Total ECRH power in the end cell is projected to be approx. =1 MW. Possible operating points for both octopole and E-ring configurations are described along with the stability considerations involved.

  8. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Holographic measurement of wave propagation in axi-symmetric shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, D. A.; Aprahamian, R.; Jacoby, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The report deals with the use of pulsed, double-exposure holographic interferometry to record the propagation of transverse waves in thin-walled axi-symmetric shells. The report is subdivided into sections dealing with: (1) wave propagation in circular cylindrical shells, (2) wave propagation past cut-outs and stiffeners, and (3) wave propagation in conical shells. Several interferograms are presented herein which show the waves reflecting from the shell boundaries, from cut-outs, and from stiffening rings. The initial response of the shell was nearly axi-symmetric in all cases, but nonsymmetric modes soon appeared in the radial response. This result suggests that the axi-symmetric response of the shell may be dynamically unstable, and thus may preferentially excite certain circumferential harmonics through parametric excitation. Attempts were made throughout to correlate the experimental data with analysis. For the most part, good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. Occasional differences were attributed primarily to simplifying assumptions used in the analysis. From the standpoint of engineering applications, it is clear that pulsed laser holography can be used to obtain quantitative engineering data. Areas of dynamic stress concentration, stress concentration factors, local anomalies, etc., can be readily determined by holography.

  10. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  11. Transition and mixing in axisymmetric jets and vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. A., Jr.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    A class of impulsively started, axisymmetric, laminar jets produced by a time dependent joint source of momentum are considered. These jets are different flows, each initially at rest in an unbounded fluid. The study is conducted at three levels of detail. First, a generalized set of analytic creeping flow solutions are derived with a method of flow classification. Second, from this set, three specific creeping flow solutions are studied in detail: the vortex ring, the round jet, and the ramp jet. This study involves derivation of vorticity, stream function, entrainment diagrams, and evolution of time lines through computer animation. From entrainment diagrams, critical points are derived and analyzed. The flow geometry is dictated by the properties and location of critical points which undergo bifurcation and topological transformation (a form of transition) with changing Reynolds number. Transition Reynolds numbers were calculated. A state space trajectory was derived describing the topological behavior of these critical points. This state space derivation yielded three states of motion which are universal for all axisymmetric jets. Third, the axisymmetric round jet is solved numerically using the unsteady laminar Navier Stokes equations. These equations were shown to be self similar for the round jet. Numerical calculations were performed up to a Reynolds number of 30 for a 60x60 point mesh. Animations generated from numerical solution showed each of the three states of motion for the round jet, including the Re = 30 case.

  12. Two-dimensional axisymmetric Child-Langmuir scaling law

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John; Feng Yang

    2009-10-15

    The classical one-dimensional (1D) Child-Langmuir law was previously extended to two dimensions by numerical calculation in planar geometries. By considering an axisymmetric cylindrical system with axial emission from a circular cathode of radius r, outer drift tube radius R>r, and gap length L, we further examine the space charge limit in two dimensions. Simulations were done with no applied magnetic field as well as with a large (100 T) longitudinal magnetic field to restrict motion of particles to 1D. The ratio of the observed current density limit J{sub CL2} to the theoretical 1D value J{sub CL1} is found to be a monotonically decreasing function of the ratio of emission radius to gap separation r/L. This result is in agreement with the planar results, where the emission area is proportional to the cathode width W. The drift tube in axisymmetric systems is shown to have a small but measurable effect on the space charge limit. Strong beam edge effects are observed with J(r)/J(0) approaching 3.5. Two-dimensional axisymmetric electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations were used to produce these results.

  13. Transport characteristics of a Glaser magnet for an axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric space charge dominated beam

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes the dynamics of space charge dominated beam through a Glaser magnet which is often used to focus charged particle beams in the low energy section of accelerators and in many other devices. Various beam optical properties of the magnet and emittance evolution that results from the coupling between the two transverse planes are studied. We have derived ten independent first order differential equations for the beam sigma matrix elements assuming the linear space-charge force consistent with the assumption of the canonically transformed KV like distribution. In addition, the feasibility of using a Glaser magnet doublet in a low energy beam injection line to match an initial non-axisymmetric high intensity beam with net angular momentum to an axisymmetric system to suppress effective emittance growth after transition back to an uncoupled system, has also been studied.

  14. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  15. A three-dimensional Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model: Initial results with axisymmetric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Teweldebirhan, Kinfe

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this paper is to introduce the STABLE (Surface flux Transport And Babcock-LEighton) solar dynamo model. STABLE is a 3D Babcock-Leighton/Flux Transport dynamo model in which the source of poloidal field is the explicit emergence, distortion, and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). Here we describe the STABLE model in more detail than we have previously and we verify it by reproducing a 2D mean-field benchmark. We also present some representative dynamo simulations, focusing on the special case of kinematic magnetic induction and axisymmetric flow fields. Not all solutions are supercritical; it can be a challenge for the BL mechanism to sustain the dynamo when the turbulent diffusion near the surface is ⩾ 1012 cm2 s-1. However, if BMRs are sufficiently large, deep, and numerous, then sustained, cyclic, dynamo solutions can be found that exhibit solar-like features. Furthermore, we find that the shearing of radial magnetic flux by the surface differential rotation can account for most of the net toroidal flux generation in each hemisphere, as has been recently argued for the Sun by Cameron and Schüssler (2015).

  16. Extension and application of the Preissmann slot model to 2D transient mixed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranzoni, Andrea; Dazzi, Susanna; Aureli, Francesca; Mignosa, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an extension of the Preissmann slot concept for the modeling of highly transient two-dimensional (2D) mixed flows. The classic conservative formulation of the 2D shallow water equations for free surface flows is adapted by assuming that two fictitious vertical slots, aligned along the two Cartesian plane directions and normally intersecting, are added on the ceiling of each integration element. Accordingly, transitions between free surface and pressurized flow can be handled in a natural and straightforward way by using the same set of governing equations. The opportunity of coupling free surface and pressurized flows is actually useful not only in one-dimensional (1D) problems concerning sewer systems but also for modeling 2D flooding phenomena in which the pressurization of bridges, culverts, or other crossing hydraulic structures can be expected. Numerical simulations are performed by using a shock-capturing MUSCL-Hancock finite volume scheme combined with the FORCE (First-Order Centred) solver for the evaluation of the numerical fluxes. The validation of the mathematical model is accomplished on the basis of both exact solutions of 1D discontinuous initial value problems and reference radial solutions of idealized test cases with cylindrical symmetry. Furthermore, the capability of the model to deal with practical field-scale applications is assessed by simulating the transit of a bore under an arch bridge. Numerical results show that the proposed model is suitable for the prediction of highly transient 2D mixed flows.

  17. 2 D patterns of soil gas diffusivity , soil respiration, and methane oxidation in a soil profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    The apparent gas diffusion coefficient in soil (DS) is an important parameter describing soil aeration, which makes it a key parameter for root growth and gas production and consumption. Horizontal homogeneity in soil profiles is assumed in most studies for soil properties - including DS. This assumption, however, is not valid, even in apparently homogeneous soils, as we know from studies using destructive sampling methods. Using destructive methods may allow catching a glimpse, but a large uncertainty remains, since locations between the sampling positions cannot be analyzed, and measurements cannot be repeated. We developed a new method to determine in situ the apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient in order to examine 2 D pattern of DS and methane oxidation in a soil profile. Different tracer gases (SF6, CF4, C2H6) were injected continuously into the subsoil and measured at several locations in the soil profile. These data allow for modelling inversely the 2 D patterns of DS using Finite Element Modeling. The 2D DS patterns were then combined with naturally occurring CH4 and CO2 concentrations sampled at the same locations to derive the 2D pattern of soil respiration and methane oxidation in the soil profile. We show that methane oxidation and soil respiration zones shift within the soil profile while the gas fluxes at the surface remain rather stable during a the 3 week campaign.

  18. Progress in Complex 2D and 3D Cohesive Fracture Modelling Considering Random Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenjun; Su, Xiangting; Chen, Jianfei; Liu, Guohua

    2010-05-01

    This paper summarises our recent efforts on finite element modelling of complex 2D and 3D fracture in quasi-brittle materials considering random heterogeneous fracture properties, using a simple yet effective method developed in associated with Abaqus. In this method, potential cracks are represented by pre-inserted cohesive elements with traction-separation softening constitutive laws modelled by spatially-varying Weibull random fields. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations of small-sized concrete specimens under uni-axial tension were carried out. It is found that the developed method is able to predict realistic 2D and 3D crack propagation processes and excellent load-displacement curves with little mesh-dependence. It provides a potentially powerful tool to assess reliability of existing structures against external loadings.

  19. Metal-dielectric photonic crystal superlattice: 1D and 2D models and empty lattice approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichin, G.; Weiss, T.; Gao, H.; Henzie, J.; Odom, T. W.; Tikhodeev, S. G.; Giessen, H.

    2012-10-01

    Periodic nanostructures are one of the main building blocks in modern nanooptics. They are used for constructing photonic crystals and metamaterials and provide optical properties that can be changed by adjusting the geometrical parameters of the structures. In this paper the optical properties of a photonic crystal slab with a 2D superlattice are discussed. The structure consists of a gold layer with a finite periodic pattern of air holes that is itself repeated periodically with a larger superperiod. We propose simplified 1D and 2D models to understand the physical nature of Wood's anomalies in the optical spectra of the investigated structure. The latter are attributed to the Rayleigh anomalies, surface plasmon Bragg resonances and the hole-localized plasmons.

  20. Thermal Conductivity and Thermopower near the 2D Metal-Insulator transition, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    SARACHIK, MYRIAM P

    2015-02-20

    STUDIES OF STRONGLY-INTERACTING 2D ELECTRON SYSTEMS – There is a great deal of current interest in the properties of systems in which the interaction between electrons (their potential energy) is large compared to their kinetic energy. We have investigated an apparent, unexpected metal-insulator transition inferred from the behavior of the temperature-dependence of the resistivity; moreover, detailed analysis of the behavior of the magnetoresistance suggests that the electrons’ effective mass diverges, supporting this scenario. Whether this is a true phase transition or crossover behavior has been strenuously debated over the past 20 years. Our measurements have now shown that the thermoelectric power of these 2D materials diverges at a finite density, providing clear evidence that this is, in fact, a phase transition to a new low-density phase which may be a precursor or a direct transition to the long sought-after electronic crystal predicted by Eugene Wigner in 1934.

  1. The Sobolev Stability Threshold for 2D Shear Flows Near Couette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedrossian, Jacob; Vicol, Vlad; Wang, Fei

    2016-08-01

    We consider the 2D Navier-Stokes equation on T × R , with initial datum that is ɛ -close in H^N to a shear flow (U(y), 0), where Vert U(y) - yVert _{H^{N+4}} ≪ 1 and N>1 . We prove that if ɛ ≪ ν ^{1/2} , where ν denotes the inverse Reynolds number, then the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation remains ɛ -close in H^1 to (e^{t ν partial _{yy}}U(y),0) for all t>0 . Moreover, the solution converges to a decaying shear flow for times t ≫ ν ^{-1/3} by a mixing-enhanced dissipation effect, and experiences a transient growth of gradients. In particular, this shows that the stability threshold in finite regularity scales no worse than ν ^{1/2} for 2D shear flows close to the Couette flow.

  2. A Neural-FEM tool for the 2-D magnetic hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Laudani, A.; Lozito, G. M.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new tool for the analysis of magnetic field problems considering 2-D magnetic hysteresis. In particular, this tool makes use of the Finite Element Method to solve the magnetic field problem in real device, and fruitfully exploits a neural network (NN) for the modeling of 2-D magnetic hysteresis of materials. The NS has as input the magnetic inductions components B at the k-th simulation step and returns as output the corresponding values of the magnetic field H corresponding to the input pattern. It is trained by vector measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. This input/output scheme is directly implemented in a FEM code employing the magnetic potential vector A formulation. Validations through measurements on a real device have been performed.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of structures. [within framework of finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H.; Pifko, A.; Levy, A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of nonlinear analysis techniques within the framework of the finite-element method is reported. Although the emphasis is concerned with those nonlinearities associated with material behavior, a general treatment of geometric nonlinearity, alone or in combination with plasticity is included, and applications presented for a class of problems categorized as axisymmetric shells of revolution. The scope of the nonlinear analysis capabilities includes: (1) a membrane stress analysis, (2) bending and membrane stress analysis, (3) analysis of thick and thin axisymmetric bodies of revolution, (4) a general three dimensional analysis, and (5) analysis of laminated composites. Applications of the methods are made to a number of sample structures. Correlation with available analytic or experimental data range from good to excellent.

  4. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  5. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  6. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  7. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) (2dFGRS Team, 1998-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, M.; Dalton, G.; Maddox, S.; Sutherland, W.; Norberg, P.; Cole, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bridges, T.; Cannon, R.; Collins, C.; Couch, W.; Cross, N.; Deeley, K.; de Propris, R.; Driver, S. P.; Efstathiou, G.; Ellis, R. S.; Frenk, C. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Jackson, C.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, I.; Lumsden, S.; Madgwick, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Price, I.; Seaborne, M.; Taylor, K.

    2007-11-01

    The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is a major spectroscopic survey taking full advantage of the unique capabilities of the 2dF facility built by the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The 2dFGRS is integrated with the 2dF QSO survey (2QZ, Cat. VII/241). The 2dFGRS obtained spectra for 245591 objects, mainly galaxies, brighter than a nominal extinction-corrected magnitude limit of bJ=19.45. Reliable (quality>=3) redshifts were obtained for 221414 galaxies. The galaxies cover an area of approximately 1500 square degrees selected from the extended APM Galaxy Survey in three regions: a North Galactic Pole (NGP) strip, a South Galactic Pole (SGP) strip, and random fields scattered around the SGP strip. Redshifts are measured from spectra covering 3600-8000 Angstroms at a two-pixel resolution of 9.0 Angstrom and a median S/N of 13 per pixel. All redshift identifications are visually checked and assigned a quality parameter Q in the range 1-5; Q>=3 redshifts are 98.4% reliable and have an rms uncertainty of 85 km/s. The overall redshift completeness for Q>=3 redshifts is 91.8% but this varies with magnitude from 99% for the brightest galaxies to 90% for objects at the survey limit. The 2dFGRS data base is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/. (6 data files).

  9. Construction of 2D quasi-periodic Rauzy tiling by similarity transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, V. G.; Maleev, A. V.

    2009-05-15

    A new approach to constructing self-similar fractal tilings is proposed based on the construction of semigroups generated by a finite set of similarity transformations. The Rauzy tiling-a 2D analog of 1D Fibonacci tiling generated by the golden mean-is used as an example to illustrate this approach. It is shown that the Rauzy torus development and the elementary fractal boundary of Rauzy tiling can be constructed in the form of a set of centers of similarity semigroups generated by two and three similarity transformations, respectively. A centrosymmetric tiling, locally dual to the Rauzy tiling, is constructed for the first time and its parameterization is developed.

  10. Line relaxation methods for the solution of 2D and 3D compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, O.; Probert, E. J.; Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.

    1993-01-01

    An implicit finite element based algorithm for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is outlined, and the solution of the resulting equation by a line relaxation on general meshes of triangles or tetrahedra is described. The problem of generating and adapting unstructured meshes for viscous flows is reexamined, and an approach for both 2D and 3D simulations is proposed. An efficient approach appears to be the use of an implicit/explicit procedure, with the implicit treatment being restricted to those regions of the mesh where viscous effects are known to be dominant. Numerical examples demonstrating the computational performance of the proposed techniques are given.

  11. Optical properties of GaAs 2D hexagonal and cubic photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, F. Assali, A.; Grain, R.; Kanouni, F.

    2015-03-30

    In this paper we present our theoretical study of 2D hexagonal and cubic rods GaAs in air, with plan wave expansion (PWE) and finite difference time domain (FDTD) by using BandSOLVE and FullWAVE of Rsoft photonic CAD package. In order to investigate the effect of symmetry and radius, we performed calculations of the band structures for both TM and TE polarization, contour and electromagnetic propagation and transmission spectra. Our calculations show that the hexagonal structure gives a largest band gaps compare to cubic one for a same filling factor.

  12. F2D users manual: A two-dimensional compressible gas flow code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    The F2D computer code is a general purpose, two-dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-corrector solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes, and flow in heated porous media.

  13. F2D. A Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow Code

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    F2D is a general purpose, two dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-correction solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.

  14. F2D users manual: A two-dimensional compressible gas flow code

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    The F2D computer code is a general purpose, two-dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-corrector solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.

  15. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  16. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-01

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs. PMID:27537619

  17. CVMAC 2D Program: A method of converting 3D to 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Lown, J.

    1990-06-20

    This paper presents the user with a method of converting a three- dimensional wire frame model into a technical illustration, detail, or assembly drawing. By using the 2D Program, entities can be mapped from three-dimensional model space into two-dimensional model space, as if they are being traced. Selected entities to be mapped can include circles, arcs, lines, and points. This program prompts the user to digitize the view to be mapped, specify the layers in which the new two-dimensional entities will reside, and select the entities, either by digitizing or windowing. The new two-dimensional entities are displayed in a small view which the program creates in the lower left corner of the drawing. 9 figs.

  18. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  19. Three-dimensional simulations of rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae: finding a neutrino-powered explosion aided by non-axisymmetric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Suwa, Yudai

    2016-09-01

    We report results from a series of three-dimensional (3D) rotational core-collapse simulations for 11.2 and 27 M⊙ stars employing neutrino transport scheme by the isotropic diffusion source approximation. By changing the initial strength of rotation systematically, we find a rotation-assisted explosion for the 27 M⊙ progenitor , which fails in the absence of rotation. The unique feature was not captured in previous two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent rotating models because the growing non-axisymmetric instabilities play a key role. In the rapidly rotating case, strong spiral flows generated by the so-called low T/|W| instability enhance the energy transport from the proto-neutron star (PNS) to the gain region, which makes the shock expansion more energetic. The explosion occurs more strongly in the direction perpendicular to the rotational axis, which is different from previous 2D predictions.

  20. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  1. Stability of perturbed geodesics in nD axisymmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coimbra-Araújo, C. H.; Anjos, R. C.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of self-gravity of a disk matter is evaluated by the simplest modes of oscillation frequencies for perturbed circular geodesics. We plotted the radial profiles of free oscillations of an equatorial circular geodesic perturbed within the orbital plane or in the vertical direction. The calculation is carried out to geodesics of an axisymmetric n-dimensional spacetime. The profiles are computed by examples of disks embeded in five-dimensional or six-dimensional spacetime, where we studied the motion of free test particles for three axisymmetric cases: (i) the Newtonian limit of a general proposed 5D and 6D axisymmetric spacetime; (ii) a simple Randall–Sundrum (RS) 5D spacetime; (iii) general 5D and 6D RS spacetime. The equation of motion of such particles is derived and the stability study is computed for both horizontal and vertical directions, to see how extra dimensions could affect the system. In particular, we investigate a disk constructed from Miyamoto–Nagai and Chazy–Curzon with a cut parameter to generate a disk potential. Those solutions have a simple extension for extra dimensions in case (i), and by solving vacuum Einstein field equations for a kind of RS–Weyl metric in cases (ii) and (iii). We find that it is possible to compute a range of possible solutions where such perturbed geodesics are stable. Basically, the stable solutions appear, for the radial direction, in special cases when the system has 5D and in all cases when the system has 6D and, for the axial direction, in all cases when the system has both 5D or 6D.

  2. Particle trajectory computer program for icing analysis of axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Walter; Chang, Ho-Pen; Kimble, Kenneth R.

    1982-01-01

    General aviation aircraft and helicopters exposed to an icing environment can accumulate ice resulting in a sharp increase in drag and reduction of maximum lift causing hazardous flight conditions. NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is conducting a program to examine, with the aid of high-speed computer facilities, how the trajectories of particles contribute to the ice accumulation on airfoils and engine inlets. This study, as part of the NASA/LeRC research program, develops a computer program for the calculation of icing particle trajectories and impingement limits relative to axisymmetric bodies in the leeward-windward symmetry plane. The methodology employed in the current particle trajectory calculation is to integrate the governing equations of particle motion in a flow field computed by the Douglas axisymmetric potential flow program. The three-degrees-of-freedom (horizontal, vertical, and pitch) motion of the particle is considered. The particle is assumed to be acted upon by aerodynamic lift and drag forces, gravitational forces, and for nonspherical particles, aerodynamic moments. The particle momentum equation is integrated to determine the particle trajectory. Derivation of the governing equations and the method of their solution are described in Section 2.0. General features, as well as input/output instructions for the particle trajectory computer program, are described in Section 3.0. The details of the computer program are described in Section 4.0. Examples of the calculation of particle trajectories demonstrating application of the trajectory program to given axisymmetric inlet test cases are presented in Section 5.0. For the examples presented, the particles are treated as spherical water droplets. In Section 6.0, limitations of the program relative to excessive computer time and recommendations in this regard are discussed.

  3. Stability of perturbed geodesics in nD axisymmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coimbra-Araújo, C. H.; Anjos, R. C.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of self-gravity of a disk matter is evaluated by the simplest modes of oscillation frequencies for perturbed circular geodesics. We plotted the radial profiles of free oscillations of an equatorial circular geodesic perturbed within the orbital plane or in the vertical direction. The calculation is carried out to geodesics of an axisymmetric n-dimensional spacetime. The profiles are computed by examples of disks embeded in five-dimensional or six-dimensional spacetime, where we studied the motion of free test particles for three axisymmetric cases: (i) the Newtonian limit of a general proposed 5D and 6D axisymmetric spacetime; (ii) a simple Randall-Sundrum (RS) 5D spacetime; (iii) general 5D and 6D RS spacetime. The equation of motion of such particles is derived and the stability study is computed for both horizontal and vertical directions, to see how extra dimensions could affect the system. In particular, we investigate a disk constructed from Miyamoto-Nagai and Chazy-Curzon with a cut parameter to generate a disk potential. Those solutions have a simple extension for extra dimensions in case (i), and by solving vacuum Einstein field equations for a kind of RS-Weyl metric in cases (ii) and (iii). We find that it is possible to compute a range of possible solutions where such perturbed geodesics are stable. Basically, the stable solutions appear, for the radial direction, in special cases when the system has 5D and in all cases when the system has 6D and, for the axial direction, in all cases when the system has both 5D or 6D.

  4. Constants of motion in stationary axisymmetric gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, C.

    2014-07-01

    The motion of test particles in stationary axisymmetric gravitational fields is generally non-integrable unless a non-trivial constant of motion, in addition to energy and angular momentum along the symmetry axis, exists. The Carter constant in Kerr-de Sitter space-time is the only example known to date. Proposed astrophysical tests of the black hole no-hair theorem have often involved integrable gravitational fields more general than the Kerr family, but the existence of such fields has been a matter of debate. To elucidate this problem, we treat its Newtonian analogue by systematically searching for non-trivial constants of motion polynomial in the momenta and obtain two theorems. First, solving a set of quadratic integrability conditions, we establish the existence and uniqueness of the family of stationary axisymmetric potentials admitting a quadratic constant. As in Kerr-de Sitter space-time, the mass moments of this class satisfy a `no-hair' recursion relation M2l +2 = a2M2l, and the constant is Noether related to a second-order Killing-Stäckel tensor. Second, solving a new set of quartic integrability conditions, we establish non-existence of quartic constants. Remarkably, a subset of these conditions is satisfied when the mass moments obey a generalized `no-hair' recursion relation M2l +4 = (a2 + b2)M2l +2 - a2b2M2l. The full set of quartic integrability conditions, however, cannot be satisfied non-trivially by any stationary axisymmetric vacuum potential.

  5. Three-dimensional MHD boundary layer flow due to an axisymmetric shrinking sheet with radiation, viscous dissipation and heat source/sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, M.; Balaswamy, B.; Kishan, N.

    2016-05-01

    An analysis is made to study a three dimensional MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer due to a porous axisymmetric shrinking sheet. The governing partial differential equations of momentum and energy are transformed into self similar non-linear ordinary differential equations by using the suitable similarity transformations. These equations are, then solved by using the variational finite element method. The flow phenomena is characterised by the magnetic parameter M, suction parameter S, porosity parameter Kp, heat source/sink parameter Q, Prandtl number Pr, Eckert number Ec and radiation parameter Rd. The numerical results of the velocity and temperature profiles are obtained and displayed graphically.

  6. Marginally stable circular orbits in stationary axisymmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti, Shabnam; Gasperín, Edgar

    2016-07-01

    We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of marginally stable circular orbits (MSCOs) of test particles in a stationary axisymmetric (SAS) spacetime which possesses a reflection symmetry with respect to the equatorial plane; photon orbits and marginally bound orbits (MBOs) are also addressed. Energy and angular momentum are shown to decouple from metric quantities, rendering a purely geometric characterization of circular orbits for this general class of metrics. The subsequent system is analyzed using resultants, providing an algorithmic approach for finding MSCO conditions. MSCOs, photon orbits and MBOs are explicitly calculated for concrete examples of physical interest.

  7. Vortex motion in axisymmetric piston-cylinder configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I. P.; Smith, G. E.; Springer, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    By using the Beam and Warming implicit-factored method of solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, velocities were calculated inside axisymmetric piston cylinder configurations during the intake and compression strokes. Results are presented in graphical form which show the formation, growth and breakup of those vortices which form during the intake stroke by the jet issuing from the valve. It is shown that at bore-to-stroke ratio of less than unity, the vortices may breakup during the intake stroke. It is also shown that vortices which do not breakup during the intake stroke coalesce during the compression stroke.

  8. Axisymmetric flows from fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Zheng, Zhong; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-02-01

    We study the axisymmetric flows generated from fluid injection into a horizontal confined porous medium that is originally saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. Neglecting the effects of surface tension and fluid mixing, we use the lubrication approximation to obtain a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the time evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ, which measures the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. For this axisymmetric geometry, the similarity solution involving R2/T (where R is the dimensionless radial coordinate and T is the dimensionless time) is an exact solution to the nonlinear governing equation for all times. Four analytical expressions are identified as asymptotic approximations (two of which are new solutions): (i) injection-driven flow with the injected fluid being more viscous than the displaced fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M < 1) where we identify a self-similar solution that indicates a parabolic interface shape; (ii) injection-driven flow with injected and displaced fluids of equal viscosity (Γ ≪ 1 and M = 1), where we find a self-similar solution that predicts a distinct parabolic interface shape; (iii) injection-driven flow with a less viscous injected fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M > 1) for which there is a rarefaction wave solution, assuming that the Saffman-Taylor instability does not occur at the reservoir scale; and (iv) buoyancy-driven flow (Γ ≫ 1) for which there is a well-known self-similar solution corresponding to gravity currents in an unconfined porous medium [S. Lyle et al. "Axisymmetric gravity currents in a porous medium," J. Fluid Mech. 543, 293-302 (2005)]. The various axisymmetric flows are summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime

  9. Area-angular-momentum inequality for axisymmetric black holes.

    PubMed

    Dain, Sergio; Reiris, Martin

    2011-07-29

    We prove the local inequality A≥8π|J|, where A and J are the area and angular momentum of any axially symmetric closed stable minimal surface in an axially symmetric maximal initial data. From this theorem it is proved that the inequality is satisfied for any surface on complete asymptotically flat maximal axisymmetric data. In particular it holds for marginal or event horizons of black holes. Hence, we prove the validity of this inequality for all dynamical (not necessarily near equilibrium) axially symmetric black holes.

  10. Axisymmetric vibrations of laminated composite conical shells with varying thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanai, G.; Suzuki, K.; Kojima, M.

    1995-11-01

    An exact solution procedure is presented for solving axisymmetric free vibrations of laminated composite conical shells with varying thickness. Based on the classical lamination theory neglecting shear deformation and rotary inertia, equations of motion and boundary conditions are obtained from the stationary conditions of the Lagrangian. The equations of motion are solved exactly by using a power series expansion for symmetrically laminated, cross-ply conical shells. Numerical studies are made for conical shells having both ends clamped to show the effects of the number of laminae, stacking sequences and other parameters upon the frequencies.

  11. Fusion-product transport in axisymmetric tokamaks: losses and thermalization

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    High-energy fusion-product losses from an axisymmetric tokamak plasma are studied. Prompt-escape loss fluxes (i.e. prior to slowing down) are calculated including the non-separable dependence of flux as a function of poloidal angle and local angle-of-incidence at the first wall. Fusion-product (fp) thermalization and heating are calculated assuming classical slowing down. The present analytical model describes fast ion orbits and their distribution function in realistic, high-..beta.., non-circular tokamak equilibria. First-orbit losses, trapping effects, and slowing-down drifts are also treated.

  12. Quasi-static axisymmetric eversion hemispherical domes made of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabrits, Sergey A.; Kolpak, Eugeny P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper considers numerical solution for the problem of quasi-static axisymmetric eversion of a spherical shell (hemisphere) under action of external pressure. Results based on the general nonlinear theory of shells made of elastomers, proposed by K. F. Chernykh. It is used two models of shells based on the hypotheses of the Kirchhoff and Timoshenko, modified K.F. Chernykh for the case of hyperelastic rubber-like material. The article presents diagrams of equilibrium states of eversion hemispheres for both models as well as the shape of the shell at different points in the diagram.

  13. Vortex motion in axisymmetric piston-cylinder configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, T.I.P.; Smith, G.E.; Springer, G.S.

    1982-09-01

    By using the Beam and Warming implicit-factored method of solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, velocities were calculated inside axisymmetric piston cylinder configurations during the intake and compression strokes. Results are presented in graphical form which show the formation, growth and breakup of those vortices which form during the intake stroke by the jet issuing from the valve. It is shown that at bore-to-stroke ratio of less than unity, the vortices may breakup during the intake stroke. It is also shown that vortices which do not breakup during the intake stroke coalesce during the compression stroke.

  14. Exact vectorial model for nonparaxial focusing by arbitrary axisymmetric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Panneton, Denis; St-Onge, Guillaume; Piché, Michel; Thibault, Simon

    2016-05-01

    We present a new approach, based on Richards-Wolf formalism, to rigorously model nonparaxial focusing of radially and azimuthally polarized electromagnetic beams by axisymmetric systems without a single-point focus. Our approach is based on a combined method that uses ray tracing and diffraction integrals. Our method is validated by comparing known results obtained with a parabolic mirror. Our integral representation of the focused beams, compliant with diffraction theory, is thoroughly discussed and solved for various conics that, so far, have not been treated analytically. The extension of the method to other polarization states is straightforward. PMID:27140877

  15. Axisymmetric inviscid swirling flows produced by bellmouth and centerbody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yasuhara, M.; Hama, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of large deformation in the flow between the bellmouth and centerbody is considered analytically for application to studies of vortex breakdown in a pipe. Basic equations are defined for axisymmetric inviscid swirling flows at the inflow and outflow sections. Axial and circumferential velocity component profiles are presented, and comparisons are made with trials involving vane angles of 42 deg and Re of 2300. Axial components of the prediction matched well in the inner half of the pipe radius and not well with the outer, while circumferential predictions were good only at the axis. A lack of viscosity was concluded to result in the inaccuracies near the wall.

  16. Axisymmetric inviscid swirling flows produced by bellmouth and centerbody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yasuhara, M.; Hama, T.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of large deformation in the flow between the bellmouth and centerbody is considered analytically for application to studies of vortex breakdown in a pipe. Basic equations are defined for axisymmetric inviscid swirling flows at the inflow and outflow sections. Axial and circumferential velocity component profiles are presented, and comparisons are made with trials involving vane angles of 42 deg and Re of 2300. Axial components of the prediction matched well in the inner half of the pipe radius and not well with the outer, while circumferential predictions were good only at the axis. A lack of viscosity was concluded to result in the inaccuracies near the wall.

  17. Constant Density Approximations for the Flow Behind Axisymmetric Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, Albert G.

    1961-01-01

    The incompressible rotational flow equations are used to obtain solutions for the flow behind axisymmetric shock waves with conic longitudinal sections. The nonlinear part of the term due to rotation is retained in the analysis. Numerical results for standoff distance and stagnation point velocity gradient are presented for the case in which the shock wave is a paraboloid, a sphere, or an oblate or prolate ellipsoid. A similarity parameter is proposed which correlates approximately the flow behind geometrically similar shock waves at different free-stream conditions.

  18. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The supersonic flow past a sharp cone is studied. The associated boundary layer flow (i.e., the velocity and temperature field) is computed. The inviscid linear temporal stability of axisymmetric boundary layers in general is considered, and in particular, a so-called 'triply generalized' inflection condition for 'subsonic' nonaxisymmetric neutral modes is presented. Preliminary numerical results for the stability of the cone boundary layer are presented for a freestream Mach number of 3.8. In particular, a new inviscid mode of instability is seen to occur in certain regimes, and this is shown to be related to a viscous mode found by Duck and Hall (1988).

  19. Macroscopic analysis of axisymmetric functionally gradient material under thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, P.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ferrari, M. )

    1994-06-01

    The axisymmetric functionally gradient materials (FGMs) subject to nonuniform temperature variations were studied with the combined use of homogenization and inhomogeneous eigenstrained media analysis. The material properties and the temperature variations were assumed to depend on the radial coordinate only. The inhomogeneous material properties of the FGM cylinder can be obtained by modulating the concentration level of spherical alumina particles in an aluminum matrix. The resulting stresses due to the temperature variation are presented for numerous distribution functions of alumina particles. It is shown that the particle distribution extensively influences the intensity and profile of the thermal stresses.

  20. Numerical boundary condition procedure for the transonic axisymmetric inverse problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.

    1981-01-01

    Two types of boundary condition procedures for the axisymmetric inverse problem are described. One is a Neumann type boundary condition (analogous to the analysis problem) and the other is a Dirichlet type boundary conditon, both requiring special treatments to make the inverse scheme numerically stable. The dummy point concept is utilized in implementing both. Results indicate the Dirichlet type inverse boundary condition is more robust and conceptually simpler to implement than the Neumann type procedure. A few results demonstrating the powerful capability of the newly developed inverse method that can handle both shocked as well as shockless body design are included.

  1. Planetoid string solutions in 3+1 axisymmetric spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    de Vega, H.J.; Egusquiza, I.L.

    1996-12-01

    The string propagation equations in axisymmetric spacetimes are exactly solved by quadratures for a planetoid ansatz. This is a straight nonoscillating string, radially disposed which rotates uniformly around the symmetry axis of the spacetime. In Schwarzschild black holes, the string stays outside the horizon pointing towards the origin. In de Sitter spacetime the planetoid rotates around its center. We quantize semiclassically these solutions and analyze the spin/(mass{sup 2}) (Regge) relation for the planetoids, which turns out to be nonlinear. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Numerical computation of shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction in transonic flow over an axisymmetric curved hill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1989-01-01

    A control-volume based finite difference computation of a turbulent transonic flow over an axisymmetric curved hill is presented. The numerical method is based on the SIMPLE algorithm, and hence the conservation of mass equation is replaced by a pressure correction equation for compressible flows. The turbulence is described by a k-epsilon turbulence model supplemented by a near-wall turbulence model. In the method, the dissipation rate in the region very close to the wall is obtained from an algebraic equation and that for the rest of the flow domain is obtained by solving a partial differential equation for the dissipation rate. The other flow equations are integrated up to the wall. It is shown that the present turbulence model yields the correct location of the compression shock. The other computational results are also in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. A new model for blood flow through an artery with axisymmetric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tandon, P N; Rana, U V

    1995-03-01

    Presented herein are the studies on the flow behavior of a blood type suspension through a circular tube with an axisymmetric stenosis. The suspension of the cells in plasma is represented by a layered fluid model, with a marginal cell-free layer of the suspending medium near the wall, a central core region and an annular layer of a biviscous fluid layer. It is understood that the proposed model may contribute to the inbuilt mechanism for drag reduction and prevention of the further development of the stenosis. The concept of lubricating pipe lining for transporting various industrial fluids is well represented through three-layered core-annular flows. The governing equations are solved numerically by using finite element method. The velocity fields, including separation and reattachment points, and the distribution of pressure and wall shear stresses have been brought out and discussed. The results of the analysis show that the presence of the marginal cell-free layer reduces the wall shear stresses and the length of the flow reversal zone. The non-Newtonian character of the suspension is helpful in reducing the abnormal effects of the stenosis. The model thus establishes the inbuilt character of blood for decreasing the stresses and this, in turn, reduces the load on the heart in propelling the blood.

  4. Global stability analysis of the flow behind an axisymmetric blunt based body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliga, Philippe; Sipp, Denis; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2006-11-01

    A three-dimensional global mode linear analysis of the flow behind an axisymmetric blunt-based body is numerically investigated. The two-dimensional steady base flow is obtained from time-dependent simulations based on a finite-element spatial discretization and a Lagrange-Galerkin temporal discretization. The generalized eigenvalue problem is solved by use of the Implicitly Restarted Arnoldi method. We show that a helical (m=1) non-oscillating mode, whose eigenmode is mainly located in the recirculating area, becomes unstable at a critical Reynolds number Re=295, and that a helical oscillating mode, whose eigenmode exhibits the spatially periodic downstream structure characteristic of the oscillatory wake instability, becomes unstable at a supercritical Reynolds number Re=409 with a frequency fD/U∞=0.14. As a step to address the relevance of the second bifurcation, we then consider the non-linear saturation amplitude of the non-oscillating mode by solving the amplitude equation associated with the first bifurcation.

  5. Implementation of REDIM reduced chemistry to model an axisymmetric laminar diffusion methane-air flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique de Almeida Konzen, Pedro; Richter, Thomas; Riedel, Uwe; Maas, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this work is to analyze the use of automatically reduced chemistry by the Reaction-Diffusion Manifold (REDIM) method in simulating axisymmetric laminar coflow diffusion flames. Detailed chemical kinetic models are usually computationally prohibitive for simulating complex reacting flows, and therefore reduced models are required. Automatic reduction model approaches usually exploit the natural multi-scale structure of combustion systems. The novel REDIM approach applies the concept of invariant manifolds to treat also the influence of the transport processes on the reduced model, which overcomes a fundamental problem of model reduction in neglecting the coupling of molecular transport with thermochemical processes. We have considered a previously well studied atmospheric pressure nitrogen-diluted methane-air flame as a test case to validate the methodology presented here. First, one-dimensional and two-dimensional REDIMs were computed and tabulated in lookup tables. Then, the full set of governing equations are projected on the REDIM and implemented in the object-oriented C++ Gascoigne code with a new add-on library to deal with the REDIM tables. The projected set of governing equations have been discretized by the Finite Element Method (FEM) and solved by a GMRES iteration preconditioned by a geometric multigrid method. Local grid refinement, adaptive mesh and parallelization are applied to ensure efficiency and precision. The numerical results obtained using the REDIM approach have shown very good agreement with detailed numerical simulations and experimental data.

  6. Numerical simulations of axisymmetric Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mellah, I.; Casse, F.

    2015-12-01

    Compact bodies which are not at rest compare to an homogeneous ambient environment are believed to undergo Bondi-Hoyle axisymmetric accretion as soon as their relative velocity reaches supersonic levels. Contrary to its spherical counterpart, B-H accretion presents flow structures difficult to analytically derive, hence the need for numerical investigations. The broad dynamics at stake when a tiny compact object engulfs surrounding material at a much larger scale has made numerical consistency a polemical issue as it has prevented both scales to be grasped for reasonable wind velocities. We designed a numerical setup which reconciliates the requirement for finite size accretor with steady states properties of the Bondi-Hoyle flow independent of the size of the inner boundary. The robustness of this setup is evaluated accordingly to predictions concerning the mass accretion rate evolution with the Mach number at infinity and the topology of the sonic surface as determined by te{Foglizzo1996}. It provides an estimation of the mass accretion rates and thus, of the expected X-ray luminosity for an idealized B-H configuration which might not be too far off for isolated compact objects like runaway neutron stars or hyper-luminous X-ray sources.

  7. Transient axial solution for plane and axisymmetric waves focused by a paraboloidal reflector.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Te; Zhu, Jinying; Haberman, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    A time domain analytical solution is presented to calculate the pressure response along the axis of a paraboloidal reflector for a normally incident plane wave. This work is inspired by Hamilton's axial solution for an ellipsoidal mirror and the same methodology is employed in this paper. Behavior of the reflected waves along reflector axis is studied, and special interest is placed on focusing gain obtained at the focal point. This analytical solution indicates that the focusing gain is affected by reflector geometry and the time derivative of the input signal. In addition, focused pressure response in the focal zone given by various reflector geometries and input frequencies are also investigated. This information is useful for selecting appropriate reflector geometry in a specific working environment to achieve the best signal enhancement. Numerical simulation employing the finite element method is used to validate the analytical solution, and visualize the wave field to provide a better understanding of the propagation of reflected waves. This analytical solution can be modified to apply to non-planar incident waves with axisymmetric wavefront and non-uniform pressure distribution. An example of incident waves with conical-shaped wavefront is presented.

  8. Axisymmetric shapes and stability of charged drops in an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1989-05-01

    A highly conducting charged drop that is surrounded by a fluid insulator of another density can be levitated by suitably applying a uniform electric field. Axisymmetric equilibrium shapes and stability of the levitated drop are found by solving simultaneously the augmented Young-Laplace equation for surface shape and the Laplace equation for the electric field, together with constraints of fixed drop volume, charge, and center of mass. The means are a method of subdomains, finite element basis functions, and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals, all facilitated by a large-scale computer. Shape families of fixed charge are treated systematically by first-order continuation. Previous analyses by Abbas et al. in 1967 and Abbas and Latham in 1969, in which the shapes of levitated drops are approximated as spheroids, are corrected. The new analysis shows that drops charged to less than the Rayleigh limit lose shape stability at turning points, with respect to external field strength, and that the instability seen in experiments of Doyle et al. in 1964 and others is not a bifurcation to a family of two-lobed shapes, but rather is a related imperfect bifurcation.

  9. Axisymmetric shapes and stability of charged drops in an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1989-05-01

    A highly conducting charged drop that is surrounded by a fluid insulator of another density can be levitated by suitably applying a uniform electric field. Axisymmetric equilibrium shapes and stability of the levitated drop are found by solving simultaneously the augmented Young-Laplace equation for surface shape and the Laplace equation for the elecric field, together with constraints of fixed drop volume, charge, and center of mass. The means are a method of subdomains, finite element basis functions, and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals, all facilitated by a large-scale computer. Shape families of fixed charge are treated systematically by first-order continuation. Previous analyses by Abbas et al. in 1967 and Abbas and Latham in 1969, in which the shapes of levitated drops are approximated as spheroids, are corrected. The new analysis shows that drops charged to less than the Rayleigh limit lose shape stability at turning points, with respect to external field strength, and that the instability seen in experiments of Doyle et al. in 1964 and others is not a bifurcation to a family of two-lobed shapes, but rather is a related imperfect bifurcation.

  10. The effect of surfactant convection and diffusion on the evolution of an axisymmetric pendant droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, D. E.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, we consider the evolution of a single axisymmetric droplet as it grows from an initially uniform thin liquid film on the underside of a solid, horizontal substrate. We consider the effects of an insoluble surfactant on the free surface, the concentration of which changes due to convection and diffusion. Employing the lubrication approximations, we derive a linear solution valid in the initial stages of drop growth, and a full nonlinear solution, which we solve numerically using finite differences. Both a linear analysis and a numerical solution show that for sufficiently thin films, corresponding to low Bond numbers, diffusion of surfactant can effectively negate the effects of surfactant convection, and the drop evolves as if there is no surfactant on the free surface. For sufficiently thick films, corresponding to high Bond numbers, gravitational forces are stronger than surface tension gradient forces, and again the droplet evolves as if there is no surfactant present. For intermediate Bond numbers, the convection of surfactant can significantly slow the growth rate and must be included in the analysis to accurately model the time evolution of a typical pendant droplet. The interactions between coating height, flux, and surface velocity are used to explain the physics of this behavior.

  11. Dynamic sensitivity analysis of frictional contact/impact response of axisymmetric composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karaoglan, Levent; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the dynamic frictional contact/impact response of axisymmetric composite structures. The structures are assumed to consist of an arbitrary number of perfectly bonded homogeneous anisotropic layers. The material of each layer is assumed to be hyperelastic, and the effect of geometric nonlinearity is included. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the response to variations in different material, lamination and geometric parameters of the structure. A displacement finite element model is used for the discretization. The normal contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the nodal displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The Lagrange multipliers are allowed to be discontinuous at interelement boundaries. Tangential contact conditions are incorporated by using a penalty method in conjunction with the classical Coulomb's friction model. Temporal integration is performed by using Newmark method. The Newton-Raphson iterative scheme is used for the solution of the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations, and for the determination of the contact region, contact conditions (sliding or sticking), and the contact pressures. The sensitivity coefficients are evaluated by using a direct differentiation approach. Numerical results are presented from the frictional contact/impact response of a composite spherical cap impacting on a rigid plate.

  12. Axisymmetric trawl cod-ends made from netting of a generalized mesh shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, F. G.

    1999-06-01

    The equations governing the geometry of axisymmetric trawl cod-ends made from netting of meshes of a particular generalized structure are derived. 6rom this, by suitable setting of the initial mesh bar lengths, the equations governing the geometry of cod-ends that are of importance to the fishing industry can be readily deduced. It is assumed that arbitrary membrane forces act normal to the edges of the mesh elements, that there is no shear force acting on the edge of a mesh element and that the twine that makes up the netting is extensible. The case where there is slackness in the mesh bars in the circumferential direction is dealt with and it is demonstrated how the finite structure of a knot can be taken into account. The case where the membrane forces arise solely as a result of and can be expressed by the appropriate components of the tensions in the mesh bars is also examined and numerical solutions are found for a range of examples.

  13. Wave Propagation in Axi-Symmetrical Magmatic Conduits Due to an Internal Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Negri, R. S.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2014-12-01

    The classical Trefftz's method is implemented to simulate wave propagation in and around axi-symmetrical magmatic conduits. In this fluid-solid system the fluid (magma) is confined by an elastic unbounded medium that represents the surrounding rock. Our aim is to associate wave behavior with mechanical and geometrical conduit characteristics. The source is assumed to be at a point along the conduit centered axis medium are constructed in both cases as linear combinations of particular solutions.Within the fluid such solutions are spherical standing waves that are smooth at the origins. In the elastic solid region the field is constructed with monopoles and dipoles for the P waves and spheroidal dipoles for SV waves. The particular solutions satisfy the elastodynamic equations that govern the wave motion at those media and are associated to origins (selected points) distributed along the conduit axis. For the surrounding rock the solutions are sources that satisfy Sommerfeld's radiation condition. These sets of solutions are assumed to be complete. This conjecture is exact in 2D acoustic problems. The conduit can be closed or open at the ends and the surrounding elastic domain is unbounded. In order to find the coefficients of Trefftz's wave expansions, boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface (null shear and continuity of pressures and normal velocities) are satisfied in the least squares sense. The solution is obtained in the frequency domain and the source time function can be introduced using Fourier analysis.Regardless the low order of the formulation our results display a rich variety of behaviors. For a uniform infinite cylinder we reproduced the exact analytical solution. In addition, this approach allows identifying some important effects of the conduit geometry, including changes of sections. Lateral and longitudinal resonances of irregular axi-symmetric conduits are well resolved. The stiffness of the solid domain with respect to the fluid

  14. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  15. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  16. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  17. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  18. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  19. Numerical simulation of vertical oscillations in an axisymmetric thick accretion flow around a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Arnab; Giri, Kinsuk; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-11-01

    We study time evolution of rotating, axisymmetric, two-dimensional inviscid accretion flows around black holes using a grid-based finite difference method. We do not use reflection symmetry on the equatorial plane in order to inspect if the disc along with the centrifugal barrier oscillated vertically. In the inviscid limit, we find that the CENtrifugal pressure supported BOundary Layer (CENBOL) is oscillating vertically, more so, when the specific angular momentum is higher. As a result, the rate of outflow produced from the CENBOL, also oscillates. Indeed, the outflow rates in the upper half and the lower half are found to be anticorrelated. We repeat the exercise for a series of specific angular momentum λ of the flow in order to demonstrate effects of the centrifugal force on this interesting behaviour. We find that, as predicted in theoretical models of discs in vertical equilibrium, the CENBOL is produced only when the centrifugal force is significant and more specifically, when λ > 1.5. Outflow rate itself is found to increase with λ as well and so is the oscillation amplitude. The cause of oscillation appears to be due to the interaction among the back flow from the centrifugal barrier, the outflowing winds and the inflow. For low angular momentum, the back flow as well as the oscillation are missing. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an oscillating solution is found with a well-tested grid-based finite difference code, and such a solution could be yet another reason of why quasi-periodic oscillations should be observed in black hole candidates that are accreting low angular momentum transonic flows.

  20. Numerical calculation of neoclassical distribution functions and current profiles in low collisionality, axisymmetric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, B. C.; Jardin, S. C.; Ramos, J. J.

    2012-08-01

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and electrons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h). We work in a 4D phase space in which ψ defines a flux surface, θ is the poloidal angle, v is the magnitude of the velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and λ is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and λ. The Rosenbluth potentials, Φ and Ψ, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cosχ, where χ is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cosθ, and finite elements in v. At each ψ, we solve a block tridiagonal system for hi (independent of fe), then solve another block tridiagonal system for he (dependent on fi). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37, 183-204 (1980)] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D -C1 [S. C. Jardin et al., Comput. Sci. Discovery 5, 014002 (2012)]).

  1. Numerical Calculation of Neoclassical Distribution Functions and Current Profiles in Low Collisionality, Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Lyons, S.C. Jardin, and J.J. Ramos

    2012-06-28

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f ) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and elec trons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h ). We work in a 4D phase space in which Ψ defines a flux surface, θ is the poloidal angle, v is the total velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and λ is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and λ . The Rosenbluth potentials, φ and ψ, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cos χ , where χ is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cos θ , and finite elements in v . At each ψ , we solve a block tridiagonal system for hi (independent of fe ), then solve another block tridiagonal system for he (dependent on fi ). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37 , pp 183-204 (1980).] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D-C1 [S.C. Jardin, et al ., Computational Science & Discovery, 4 (2012).]).

  2. Numerical calculation of neoclassical distribution functions and current profiles in low collisionality, axisymmetric plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, B. C.; Jardin, S. C.; Ramos, J. J.

    2012-08-15

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and electrons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h). We work in a 4D phase space in which {psi} defines a flux surface, {theta} is the poloidal angle, v is the magnitude of the velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and {lambda} is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and {lambda}. The Rosenbluth potentials, {Phi} and {Psi}, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cos{chi}, where {chi} is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cos{theta}, and finite elements in v. At each {psi}, we solve a block tridiagonal system for h{sub i} (independent of f{sub e}), then solve another block tridiagonal system for h{sub e} (dependent on f{sub i}). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37, 183-204 (1980)] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D-C{sup 1}[S. C. Jardin et al., Comput. Sci. Discovery 5, 014002 (2012)]).

  3. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  4. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  5. Steady-state benchmarks of DK4D: A time-dependent, axisymmetric drift-kinetic equation solver

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, B. C.; Jardin, S. C.; Ramos, J. J.

    2015-05-15

    The DK4D code has been written to solve a set of time-dependent, axisymmetric, finite-Larmor-radius drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) for the non-Maxwellian part of the electron and ion distribution functions using the full, linearized Fokker–Planck–Landau collision operator. The plasma is assumed to be in the low- to finite-collisionality regime, as is found in the cores of modern and future magnetic confinement fusion experiments. Each DKE is formulated such that the perturbed distribution function carries no net density, parallel momentum, or kinetic energy. Rather, these quantities are contained within the background Maxwellians and would be evolved by an appropriate set of extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. This formulation allows for straight-forward coupling of DK4D to existing extended MHD time evolution codes. DK4D uses a mix of implicit and explicit temporal representations and finite element and spectral spatial representations. These, along with other computational methods used, are discussed extensively. Steady-state benchmarks are then presented comparing the results of DK4D to expected analytic results at low collisionality, qualitatively, and to the Sauter analytic fits for the neoclassical conductivity and bootstrap current, quantitatively. These benchmarks confirm that DK4D is capable of solving for the correct, gyroaveraged distribution function in stationary magnetic equilibria. Furthermore, the results presented demonstrate how the exact drift-kinetic solution varies with collisionality as a function of the magnetic moment and the poloidal angle.

  6. Steady-state benchmarks of DK4D: A time-dependent, axisymmetric drift-kinetic equation solvera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, B. C.; Jardin, S. C.; Ramos, J. J.

    2015-05-01

    The DK4D code has been written to solve a set of time-dependent, axisymmetric, finite-Larmor-radius drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) for the non-Maxwellian part of the electron and ion distribution functions using the full, linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operator. The plasma is assumed to be in the low- to finite-collisionality regime, as is found in the cores of modern and future magnetic confinement fusion experiments. Each DKE is formulated such that the perturbed distribution function carries no net density, parallel momentum, or kinetic energy. Rather, these quantities are contained within the background Maxwellians and would be evolved by an appropriate set of extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. This formulation allows for straight-forward coupling of DK4D to existing extended MHD time evolution codes. DK4D uses a mix of implicit and explicit temporal representations and finite element and spectral spatial representations. These, along with other computational methods used, are discussed extensively. Steady-state benchmarks are then presented comparing the results of DK4D to expected analytic results at low collisionality, qualitatively, and to the Sauter analytic fits for the neoclassical conductivity and bootstrap current, quantitatively. These benchmarks confirm that DK4D is capable of solving for the correct, gyroaveraged distribution function in stationary magnetic equilibria. Furthermore, the results presented demonstrate how the exact drift-kinetic solution varies with collisionality as a function of the magnetic moment and the poloidal angle.

  7. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter. PMID:25943116

  8. Axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric exhaust jet induced effects on a V/STOL vehicle design. Part 3: Experimental technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    The jet induced effects of several exhaust nozzle configurations (axisymmetric, and vectoring/modulating varients) on the aeropropulsive performance of a twin engine V/STOL fighter design was determined. A 1/8 scale model was tested in an 11 ft transonic tunnel at static conditions and over a range of Mach Numbers from 0.4 to 1.4. The experimental aspects of the static and wind-on programs are discussed. Jet effects test techniques in general, fow through balance calibrations and tare force corrections, ASME nozzle thrust and mass flow calibrations, test problems and solutions are emphasized.

  9. Spatio-Temporal Reconstruction of Vortex Dynamics in Axisymmetric Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, C.

    2001-04-01

    With time recording Digital-Particle-Image Velocimetry and spatio-temporal reconstruction technique, we obtained detailed quantitative results of the evolution of the velocity and vorticity field in the wake of axisymmetric bluff bodies-a sphere and an axially oriented cylinder with an elliptic nose and a blunt base. Experiments were carried out for Reynolds numbers of Re=500, 700 and 1000 in the transition range from ``regular'' to ``irregular'' shedding. DPIV-recordings in radial cross-sections at several distances downstream of the bodies allowed us to reconstruct the dynamics of the streamwise vorticity over a large number of shedding cycles. Our results prove that the wake in this regime consists of a double-sided chain of oppositely oriented hairpin vortices. In addition, the results show a well-defined low-frequency modulation of the vortex shedding, with a distinct peak in the frequency spectrum at a Strouhal number of about Sr~0.05 (in case of the sphere). The wake pattern in this ``irregular'' shedding regime typically exhibits periodic packets of 3-4 ``regular'' shedding cycles which are interrupted by phases with less action. The results indicate the coexistence of a long-wave instability of axisymmetric wakes against helical waves in addition to the primary instability causing the vortex shedding process.

  10. Large-Eddy Simulation of Supersonic Axisymmetric Bluff Body Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourbier, D.; Fasel, H. F.

    1997-11-01

    The time-dependent behavior of the turbulent wake of an axisymmetric bluff body is investigated using Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The axisymmetric body is aligned with a supersonic free stream at a Mach number of M_∞ = 2.46 . It has been shown previously that this flow field is subject to an absolute instability for global Reynolds numbers higher than ReD = 30,000 . As a result of this instability large structures are present in the near wake and render the flow field highly unsteady. These structures have a strong influence on the global behavior of the flow field and thus on the overall drag of the body. Commonly used turbulence models (e.g. in RANS) fail to accurately describe the flow field and are inadequate for drag prediction. Preliminary LES calculations for global Reynolds numbers up to ReD = 400,000 using a Smagorinsky type subgrid-scale model with a fixed constant have shown qualitative agreement with experimental observations in terms of pressure distribution along the blunt base and magnitude of rms values in the wake. However, the model is too dissipative for most parts of the free shear layer emanating from the corner of the base and the evolution of structures in the close vicinity of the corner is suppressed. Therefore, a dynamic subgrid-scale model was implemented into the code and tested to evaluate the performance of the model for this flow configuration.

  11. Non-intrusive characterization of a dispersed, bubbly, axisymmetric jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Kevin Nathaniel

    2000-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of bubble size and phase distribution on the liquid and bubble flow fields in a dispersed, bubbly axisymmetric jet. Of primary interest was the interaction of the bubbles with large-scale structures in the developing region of the jet. Measurements were made non-intrusively via Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), Phase-Doppler Analysis (PDA) and video imaging techniques. Liquid Reynolds' numbers were varied from approximately 6,000 to 18,000 while gas volume fraction ranged from 0 to 3%. Bubble sizes varied from approximately 600 mum to 1500 mum. Axial mean velocities and RMS fluctuations have been reported for the liquid phase. Axial and radial mean velocities and RMS fluctuations have been reported for the bubbles. Measurements have been made along the centerline and radially at downstream locations of x/Djet = 0.08, 4, 8, and 16. The effects of bubble size and phase distribution on the development of the axisymmetric shear layer as well as liquid phase and bubble velocity properties in general have been examined. These data have been put into perspective with respect to traditional two-phase flow parameters as well as previous experimental, analytical and computational works. Bubble/turbulence interaction was examined in the context of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and a critical wave number corresponding to bubble diameter was found above which turbulence was enhanced, and below which it was attenuated.

  12. Kinetically Stabilized Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Summary of Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F

    2005-02-08

    The path to practical fusion power through plasma confinement in magnetic fields, if it is solely based on the present front-runner, the tokamak, is clearly long, expensive, and arduous. The root causes for this situation lie in the effects of endemic plasma turbulence and in the complexity the tokamak's ''closed'' field geometry. The studies carried out in the investigations described in the attached reports are aimed at finding an approach that does not suffer from these problems. This goal is to be achieved by employing an axisymmetric ''open'' magnetic field geometry, i.e. one generated by a linear array of circular magnet coils, and employing the magnetic mirror effect in accomplishing the plugging of end leakage. More specifically, the studies were aimed at utilizing the tandem-mirror concept in an axisymmetric configuration to achieve performance superior to the tokamak, and in a far simpler system, one for which the cost and development time could be much lower than that for the tokamak, as exemplified by ITER and its follow-ons. An important stimulus for investigating axisymmetric versions of the tandem mirror is the fact that, beginning from early days in fusion research there have been examples of axisymmetric mirror experiments where the plasma exhibited crossfield transport far below the turbulence-enhanced rates characteristic of tokamaks, in specific cases approaching the ''classical'' rate. From the standpoint of theory, axisymmetric mirror-based systems have special characteristics that help explain the low levels of turbulence that have been observed. Among these are the facts that there are no parallel currents in the equilibrium state, and that the drift surfaces of all of the trapped particles are closed surfaces, as shown early on by Teller and Northrop. In addition, in such systems it is possible to arrange that the radial boundary of the confined plasma terminates without contact with the chamber wall. This possibility reduces the

  13. THE ADVECTION OF SUPERGRANULES BY THE SUN'S AXISYMMETRIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, David H.; Williams, Peter E.; Rosa, Kevin Dela; Cuntz, Manfred E-mail: peter.williams@nasa.go

    2010-12-10

    We show that the motions of supergranules are consistent with a model in which they are simply advected by the axisymmetric flows in the Sun's surface shear layer. We produce a 10 day series of simulated Doppler images at a 15 minute cadence that reproduces most spatial and temporal characteristics seen in the SOHO/MDI Doppler data. Our simulated data have a spectrum of cellular flows with just two components-a granule component that peaks at spherical wavenumbers of about 4000 and a supergranule component that peaks at wavenumbers of about 110. We include the advection of these cellular components by the axisymmetric flows-differential rotation and meridional flow-whose variations with latitude and depth (wavenumber) are consistent with observations. We mimic the evolution of the cellular pattern by introducing random variations to the phases of the spectral components at rates that reproduce the levels of cross-correlation as functions of time and latitude. Our simulated data do not include any wave-like characteristics for the supergranules yet can reproduce the rotation characteristics previously attributed to wave-like behavior. We find rotation rates which appear faster than the actual rotation rates and attribute this to projection effects. We find that the measured meridional flow does accurately represent the actual flow and that the observations indicate poleward flow to 65{sup 0}-70{sup 0} latitude with equatorward countercells in the polar regions.

  14. Resolving the uncertainties of non-axisymmetric fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Yongkyoon; Seol, J.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, S. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Lee, H. H.; Jeon, Y. M.; Kim, J.; Bak, J. G.; Park, H.; Park, J. K.; Yun, G. S.; 3D Physics Task Force Team

    2015-11-01

    Recent study suggests that KSTAR could be a benefactor of the extremely low level of intrinsic error field in n =1 resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) driven edge localized modes (ELM) control. Specifically, when the n = 1 RMP currents increases in order to suppress/mitigate ELMs, a kink-resonant mode-locking is not usually invoked in KSTAR, unlike in other devices. Besides we have discovered that the mid-plane RMP appeared much more effective than the off-midplane RMPs in affecting the ELMs with strong density pump-outs and enhanced ELM frequency. Presently, the enhanced understanding of non-axisymmetric field in tokamaks has been in great need, in particular, for the ITER RMP requirements. As the prevailing design of in-vessel RMP coils in ITER is similar to that in KSTAR, we are keen to resolve the uncertainties of the non-axisymmetric fields on transport and stability, and their limits, contributing directly to ITER and beyond.

  15. SEAWAT-based simulation of axisymmetric heat transport.

    PubMed

    Vandenbohede, Alexander; Louwyck, Andy; Vlamynck, Nele

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of heat transport has its applications in geothermal exploitation of aquifers and the analysis of temperature dependent chemical reactions. Under homogeneous conditions and in the absence of a regional hydraulic gradient, groundwater flow and heat transport from or to a well exhibit radial symmetry, and governing equations are reduced by one dimension (1D) which increases computational efficiency importantly. Solute transport codes can simulate heat transport and input parameters may be modified such that the Cartesian geometry can handle radial flow. In this article, SEAWAT is evaluated as simulator for heat transport under radial flow conditions. The 1971, 1D analytical solution of Gelhar and Collins is used to compare axisymmetric transport with retardation (i.e., as a result of thermal equilibrium between fluid and solid) and a large diffusion (conduction). It is shown that an axisymmetric simulation compares well with a fully three dimensional (3D) simulation of an aquifer thermal energy storage systems. The influence of grid discretization, solver parameters, and advection solution is illustrated. Because of the high diffusion to simulate conduction, convergence criterion for heat transport must be set much smaller (10(-10) ) than for solute transport (10(-6) ). Grid discretization should be considered carefully, in particular the subdivision of the screen interval. On the other hand, different methods to calculate the pumping or injection rate distribution over different nodes of a multilayer well lead to small differences only.

  16. Radiative transfer in arbitrarily-shaped axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Edmundo Miguel

    2001-08-01

    A mathematical model for evaluating thermal radiative transport in axisymmetric enclosures is presented. Based on the Discrete Exchange Factor (DEF) method, exchange factors between arbitrarily-oriented differential surface/volume ring elements are systematically calculated. The formulation is capable of treating geometrically complex systems including enclosures with shadowing effects ensuing from inner and/or outer obstructing bodies. The model is developed for isotropically scattering participating media. The solutions to several cylindrical media benchmark problems are found to be in excellent agreement with existing solutions in the literature. The solutions to several rocket-nozzle and plug-chamber geometries are presented for a host of geometric conditions and optical thicknesses. In addition, two variants of the DEF method are presented for anisotropically scattering media. The N-bounce method approximates total exchange factors by summing direct and user-designated higher order terms representative of multiple reflections/scattering. The source function approach is an intensity-based method relating the source function (gas leaving intensity) to the surface leaving intensity. The results obtained via these methods are found to be in good agreement with the existing solutions to several axisymmetric benchmark problems. A mathematical formulation is additionally proposed for addressing the effects of nonhomogeneous property distributions. Several nonhomogeneous benchmark problems are solved in an effort to validate the model.

  17. Two-integral distribution functions for axisymmetric galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, C.; Qian, Edward

    1993-01-01

    The new method presented for finding distribution functions, which depend only on the classical integrals of energy and angular momentum for stellar systems with known axisymmetric densities, is the analog for the axisymmetric case of Eddington's classical solution for the isotropic distribution function, depending only on energy, of a known spherical density. It is required that density be expressed as a function of the potential and of a radial coordinate. Our solution is also an integral which is derived directly from the density, and hence can be used with complicated densities. A numerical quadrature is generally required to evaluate this solution, but contour integrals can be computed accurately by numerical quadrature; this is preferable to an explicit evaluation if the latter is an infinite series, such as is obtained using Fricke's method. We give several examples, including some for which our distribution functions are new. Our method can be extended simply to the related problems of finding anisotropic distribution functions for spherical or disk systems.

  18. Non-axisymmetric Plasma Response to External Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Lao, L. L.; Evans, T. E.; Schaffer, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lanctot, M. J.; Reimerdes, H.

    2009-11-01

    Very low frequency non-axisymmetric magnetic response in tokamaks excited by external magnetic perturbations is studied with the MARS-F code [1] using different assumptions on the plasma dynamics. In the limit of vacuum plasma response, the fields are benchmarked against the SURFMN [2] code and an analytic model. In other plasma models, the response is affected by plasma pressure, resistivity, toroidal flow, and the kinetic effects associated with the particle drifts. Depending on the coil arrangement, the plasma response could be dominated by the resonant or non-resonant components of the external field. The responses can be tested by employing different combinations of currents in appropriately designed external coils as those in DIII-D. The combined magnetic field of the axisymmetric plasma equilibrium and its non-axisymmetic responses corresponds to a perturbed 3D plasma equilibrium. 8pt [1] Y.Q. Liu, et al., Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000) 3681. [2] M.J. Schaffer, et al., Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 024004.

  19. Dynamic modeling of a turbulent axisymmetric bluff-body wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Georgios; Morgans, Aimee; Morrison, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    En route to chaos the stable laminar wake past axisymmetric bluff bodies undergoes two well-documented transitions by increasing the Reynolds number: a steady bifurcation of the m = 1 azimuthal mode followed by an unsteady bifurcation with m = +/- 1 , the latter giving rise to periodic shedding of vortices with opposite signs, known as vortex shedding. In this study we present experimental evidence that these structures persist far from the critical points at high Reynolds numbers (Re = 2 ×105). We show that a low-order model based on the normal form describing the codimension-two bifurcation captures accurately the dynamic behavior of the large-scale coherent structures associated with the destabilized modes, if noise is appropriately accounted for in the model. The model is validated based on simultaneous aerodynamic force measurements on the base of an axisymmetric bullet-shaped body and Time-Resolved Stereo PIV in the near wake. Finally, we extend the model to include external forcing when periodic blowing and suction is applied at the base below the point of separation.

  20. SEAWAT-based simulation of axisymmetric heat transport.

    PubMed

    Vandenbohede, Alexander; Louwyck, Andy; Vlamynck, Nele

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of heat transport has its applications in geothermal exploitation of aquifers and the analysis of temperature dependent chemical reactions. Under homogeneous conditions and in the absence of a regional hydraulic gradient, groundwater flow and heat transport from or to a well exhibit radial symmetry, and governing equations are reduced by one dimension (1D) which increases computational efficiency importantly. Solute transport codes can simulate heat transport and input parameters may be modified such that the Cartesian geometry can handle radial flow. In this article, SEAWAT is evaluated as simulator for heat transport under radial flow conditions. The 1971, 1D analytical solution of Gelhar and Collins is used to compare axisymmetric transport with retardation (i.e., as a result of thermal equilibrium between fluid and solid) and a large diffusion (conduction). It is shown that an axisymmetric simulation compares well with a fully three dimensional (3D) simulation of an aquifer thermal energy storage systems. The influence of grid discretization, solver parameters, and advection solution is illustrated. Because of the high diffusion to simulate conduction, convergence criterion for heat transport must be set much smaller (10(-10) ) than for solute transport (10(-6) ). Grid discretization should be considered carefully, in particular the subdivision of the screen interval. On the other hand, different methods to calculate the pumping or injection rate distribution over different nodes of a multilayer well lead to small differences only. PMID:24571415