Science.gov

Sample records for 2d bar code

  1. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  2. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  3. Bar-Code-Scribing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badinger, Michael A.; Drouant, George J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed hand-held tool applies indelible bar code to small parts. Possible to identify parts for management of inventory without tags or labels. Microprocessor supplies bar-code data to impact-printer-like device. Device drives replaceable scribe, which cuts bar code on surface of part. Used to mark serially controlled parts for military and aerospace equipment. Also adapts for discrete marking of bulk items used in food and pharmaceutical processing.

  4. 2-D stationary gas dynamics in a barred galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.

    2015-06-01

    A code for solving the 2-D isothermal Euler equations of gas dynamics in a rotating disc is presented. The gravitational potential represents a weak bar and controls the flow. A damped Newton method solves the second-order upwind discretisation of the equations for a steady-state solution, using a consistent linearisation and a direct solver. Successive grid refinement, starting from a finite-volume grid with 8 by 8 cells, is applied to find solutions on subsequently finer meshes. On coarser meshes, a first-order spatial discretisation is used. The method obtains quadratic convergence once the solution approaches the steady state. The initial search is quick with the first-order scheme and slower with the second-order discretisation, up to 256 by 256 cells. Beyond, with 512 by 512 cells, the number of iterations becomes too large to be of practical use. Potential causes are discussed. The code can be applied as a tool for generating flow models if used on not too fine meshes.

  5. Property Control through Bar Coding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingma, Gerben J.

    1984-01-01

    A public utility company uses laser wands to read bar-coded labels on furniture and equipment. The system allows an 80 percent savings of the time required to create reports for inventory control. (MLF)

  6. Blurring in bar code signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong

    1997-10-01

    When a bar code symbol is passed over a scanner, it is struck across by a fast moving laser beam. The laser light is scattered by the bar code. The total scattered power is modulated by the reflectivity of the bars and spaces in the symbol. A fraction of the scattered light is collected and focused onto a photodetector that converts the light variation into an electronic signal. The electronic signal is then digitized for analysis by a computer. The scanning and detection process can be modeled by a convolution of the laser beam profile and the bar code reflectivity function. The switching between states in the digitized bar code signal, which represents transitions from a space to a bar or vice versa, is determined by a zero-crossing point in the second derivative of the analog signal. The laser profile acts like a smoothing function. It blurs the analog electronic signal. If the width of the laser profile is less than the minimum width of bars and spaces in the bar code reflectivity function, the transition point is not affected by the location of its neighboring edges. If the laser profile is wider than the minimum width in the bar code, the transition point can be shifted due to the locations of its neighboring edges. The behavior of the shift of transition is analyzed here for all cases in a UPC symbol. It is found that the amount of shift in the transition point is almost the same for several different cases within the depth of field of the scanner. The knowledge of the behavior of transition point shift can be used to accurately compensate printing errors in an over-printed bar code. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of bar code scanning is the Fourier transform of the marginal function of the scanning laser beam. The MTF through focus for a scanning system is presented. By using an aperture with central obscuration in the laser focusing system, the high frequency resolution of bar code scanning can be enhanced and the depth of field of the scanner can

  7. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  8. Modulation transfer function of bar code scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Milster, Tom D.

    1998-09-01

    Bar code scanners are ubiquitous in supermarkets. As a bar code is passed over a scanner, a laser beam scans across the bar code. The scattered light is modulated by the reflectivity of the bars and spaces of the bar code. The bar code scanning process can be described as a 1D convolution of the scanning laser profile and the bar code reflectivity function. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of bar code scanning is the Fourier transform of the marginal profile of the laser beam. The properties of the MTF of bar code scanning is similar to that of an incoherent imaging system. Measurements of the MTF of bar code scanning at one focus position are presented. The experimental results are then discussed.

  9. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Bar Coding and Tracking in Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Matthew G; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2015-06-01

    Bar coding and specimen tracking are intricately linked to pathology workflow and efficiency. In the pathology laboratory, bar coding facilitates many laboratory practices, including specimen tracking, automation, and quality management. Data obtained from bar coding can be used to identify, locate, standardize, and audit specimens to achieve maximal laboratory efficiency and patient safety. Variables that need to be considered when implementing and maintaining a bar coding and tracking system include assets to be labeled, bar code symbologies, hardware, software, workflow, and laboratory and information technology infrastructure as well as interoperability with the laboratory information system. This article addresses these issues, primarily focusing on surgical pathology. PMID:26065787

  11. Bar Coding and Tracking in Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Matthew G; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-03-01

    Bar coding and specimen tracking are intricately linked to pathology workflow and efficiency. In the pathology laboratory, bar coding facilitates many laboratory practices, including specimen tracking, automation, and quality management. Data obtained from bar coding can be used to identify, locate, standardize, and audit specimens to achieve maximal laboratory efficiency and patient safety. Variables that need to be considered when implementing and maintaining a bar coding and tracking system include assets to be labeled, bar code symbologies, hardware, software, workflow, and laboratory and information technology infrastructure as well as interoperability with the laboratory information system. This article addresses these issues, primarily focusing on surgical pathology. PMID:26851661

  12. The Role of 2D Circulation in Sand Bar Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, K. D.; Holman, R. A.; Plant, N. G.; Holland, K. T.

    2006-12-01

    Models of bar dynamics typically involve moments of the cross-shore flow, with offshore movement associated with the strong offshore directed undertow and onshore migration related to wave asymmetry and skewness [Gallagher, et al., 1998]. Based on these hypotheses, models and laboratory studies have used the alongshore-mean bar position and alongshore-uniform wave conditions (a 1DH approach) to study bar response to varying wave conditions. Commonly, cases of offshore migration were reproduced with reasonable accuracy, but predictions of onshore migration were less successful. However, examination of time-exposure images of waves show that during periods of offshore migration, bars tend to be alongshore uniform and move rapidly offshore, but during onshore migration, sand bars are rarely straight, instead becoming very sinuous, violating the 1DH approach. We hypothesize that under milder wave conditions, the 2DH circulation associated with this alongshore-variable morphology is, in fact, largely responsible for increased onshore net sand transport and the resulting onshore bar movement. We extend the work of Plant et al. [in review] that relates bar position, sinuosity, and wave forcing within a dynamical feedback model. The model consists of coupled differential equations that govern the rates of change of cross-shore position and horizontal sinuosity as a function of the current cross-shore position and sinuosity and a proxy for wave forcing. Using a short data set from Duck, NC, they solve for the unknown coupling coefficients by doing a least-squares fit. They find that the coefficients for the self-interaction terms have a negative sign, indicating the overall system is stable. The coefficients of the cross-interaction terms (the effect of sinuosity on rate of change of bar position and visa versa), however, are non-zero and have opposite signs indicating the systems are coupled and stability is not affected by these terms. We expand this study, relating bar

  13. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, W.T.

    1983-07-01

    The age old method of physically taking an inventory of materials by listing each item's identification number has lived beyond its usefulness. In this age of computerization, which offers the local grocery store a quick, sure, and easy means to inventory, it is time for nuclear materials facilities to automate accountability activities. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At that time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable; however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented.

  14. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At this time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable, however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented.

  15. A Real-time D-bar Algorithm for 2-D Electrical Impedance Tomography Data

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Melody; Mueller, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the feasibility of the D-bar method for real-time 2-D EIT reconstructions. A fast implementation of the D-bar method for reconstructing conductivity changes on a 2-D chest-shaped domain is described. Cross-sectional difference images from the chest of a healthy human subject are presented, demonstrating what can be achieved in real time. The images constitute the first D-bar images from EIT data on a human subject collected on a pairwise current injection system. PMID:25937856

  16. Materials management with a bar code reader.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, R S

    1990-01-01

    A materials management system capable of inventory control, accounting and the automatic recording of supplies for a clinical department has been developed for the George Washington University Hospital Department of Anesthesia. This system combines a microprocessor-based computer for data storage and a hand-held bar code reader to record the bar code scan of each item in the inventory. A relational software program with easy-to-use menus and help keys was written. Bar code information stored for each item includes item number, quantity, date and time of issue. Accumulated bar code scans are loaded into the computer by use of a serial port and then used to update current inventory in the computer. Comparison between current inventory and reorder levels by the computer will initiate automatic printing of appropriate purchase orders. Reorder levels are adjusted regularly, by comparing previous year or month usage to current needs; items already on order, items on back order and delivery lag time are also taken into account. PMID:10104851

  17. In search of a 2-dB coding gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H.; Vo, Q. D.

    1985-01-01

    A recent code search found a (15,1/5), a (14,1/6), and a (15,1/6) convolutional code which, when concatenated with a 10-bit (1023,959) Reed-Solomon (RS) code, achieves a bit-error rate (BER) of 0.000001 at a bit signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 0.50 dB, 0.47 dB and 0.42 B, respectively. All of these three codes outperform the Voyager communication system, our baseline, which achieves a BER of 10.000001 at bit SNR of 2.53 db, by more than 2 dB. The 2 dB coding improvement goal was exceeded.

  18. Validation and testing of the VAM2D computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. )

    1991-10-01

    This document describes two modeling studies conducted by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. for the US NRC under contract no. NRC-04089-090, entitled, Validation and Testing of the VAM2D Computer Code.'' VAM2D is a two-dimensional, variably saturated flow and transport code, with applications for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal. The computer code itself is documented in a separate NUREG document (NUREG/CR-5352, 1989). The studies presented in this report involve application of the VAM2D code to two diverse subsurface modeling problems. The first one involves modeling of infiltration and redistribution of water and solutes in an initially dry, heterogeneous field soil. This application involves detailed modeling over a relatively short, 9-month time period. The second problem pertains to the application of VAM2D to the modeling of a waste disposal facility in a fractured clay, over much larger space and time scales and with particular emphasis on the applicability and reliability of using equivalent porous medium approach for simulating flow and transport in fractured geologic media. Reflecting the separate and distinct nature of the two problems studied, this report is organized in two separate parts. 61 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Recent update of the RPLUS2D/3D codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Y.-L. Peter

    1991-01-01

    The development of the RPLUS2D/3D codes is summarized. These codes utilize LU algorithms to solve chemical non-equilibrium flows in a body-fitted coordinate system. The motivation behind the development of these codes is the need to numerically predict chemical non-equilibrium flows for the National AeroSpace Plane Program. Recent improvements include vectorization method, blocking algorithms for geometric flexibility, out-of-core storage for large-size problems, and an LU-SW/UP combination for CPU-time efficiency and solution quality.

  20. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject to these bar code...

  1. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  2. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  3. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  4. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  5. AnisWave2D: User's Guide to the 2d Anisotropic Finite-DifferenceCode

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Aoife

    2005-01-06

    This document describes a parallel finite-difference code for modeling wave propagation in 2D, fully anisotropic materials. The code utilizes a mesh refinement scheme to improve computational efficiency. Mesh refinement allows the grid spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, so that fine grid spacing can be used in low velocity zones where the seismic wavelength is short, and coarse grid spacing can be used in zones with higher material velocities. Over-sampling of the seismic wavefield in high velocity zones is therefore avoided. The code has been implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and allows large-scale models and models with large velocity contrasts to be simulated with ease.

  6. ELLIPT2D: A Flexible Finite Element Code Written Python

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Mollis, J.C.

    2001-03-22

    The use of the Python scripting language for scientific applications and in particular to solve partial differential equations is explored. It is shown that Python's rich data structure and object-oriented features can be exploited to write programs that are not only significantly more concise than their counter parts written in Fortran, C or C++, but are also numerically efficient. To illustrate this, a two-dimensional finite element code (ELLIPT2D) has been written. ELLIPT2D provides a flexible and easy-to-use framework for solving a large class of second-order elliptic problems. The program allows for structured or unstructured meshes. All functions defining the elliptic operator are user supplied and so are the boundary conditions, which can be of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robbins type. ELLIPT2D makes extensive use of dictionaries (hash tables) as a way to represent sparse matrices.Other key features of the Python language that have been widely used include: operator over loading, error handling, array slicing, and the Tkinter module for building graphical use interfaces. As an example of the utility of ELLIPT2D, a nonlinear solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation is computed using a Newton iterative scheme. A second application focuses on a solution of the toroidal Laplace equation coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic stability code, a problem arising in the context of magnetic fusion research.

  7. CBEAM. 2-D: a two-dimensional beam field code

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, K.A.

    1985-05-01

    CBEAM.2-D is a two-dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations for the case of an electron beam propagating through an air medium. Solutions are performed in the beam-retarded time frame. Conductivity is calculated self-consistently with field equations, allowing sophisticated dependence of plasma parameters to be handled. A unique feature of the code is that it is implemented on an IBM PC microcomputer in the BASIC language. Consequently, it should be available to a wide audience.

  8. System analysis of bar code laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianpu; Chen, Zhaofeng; Lu, Zukang

    1996-10-01

    This paper focuses on realizing the three important aspects of bar code scanner: generating a high quality scanning light beam, acquiring a fairly even distribution characteristic of light collection, achieving a low signal dynamic range over a large depth of field. To do this, we analyze the spatial distribution and propagation characteristics of scanning laser beam, the vignetting characteristic of optical collection system and their respective optimal design; propose a novel optical automatic gain control method to attain a constant collection over a large working depth.

  9. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation.more » By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  10. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  11. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  12. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  13. A Program Evaluation of Classroom Data Collection with Bar Codes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Muriel D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A special education record-keeping system using bar code symbols and optical scanners is described. Bar code symbols were created for each Individualized Educational Plan objective, and symbols are scanned when students emit targeted behaviors. A weekly printed report of student performance is produced. Advantages, disadvantages, and costs are…

  14. 21 CFR 610.67 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 610.67 Section 610.67 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.67 Bar code label...

  15. 21 CFR 610.67 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 610.67 Section 610.67 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.67 Bar code label...

  16. 21 CFR 610.67 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 610.67 Section 610.67 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.67 Bar code label...

  17. 21 CFR 610.67 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Bar code label requirements. 610.67 Section 610.67 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.67 Bar code label...

  18. 21 CFR 610.67 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 610.67 Section 610.67 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.67 Bar code label...

  19. An Innovative Class Registration Method Based on Bar Code Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Raoul J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes system of computerized class registration utilizing bar code input which is part of the Student Data System, developed by Management Information Division of the Los Angeles Unified School District. An explanation of the system notes the hardware used, printing of bar code labels, registration procedures, and operational aspects. (EJS)

  20. Bar-Code System for a Microbiological Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, Jennifer; Kirschner, Larry

    2007-01-01

    A bar-code system has been assembled for a microbiological laboratory that must examine a large number of samples. The system includes a commercial bar-code reader, computer hardware and software components, plus custom-designed database software. The software generates a user-friendly, menu-driven interface.

  1. Objectivity in Grading: The Promise of Bar Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jae, Haeran; Cowling, John

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes the use of a new technology to assure student anonymity and reduce bias hazards: identifying students by using bar codes. The limited finding suggests that the use of bar codes for assuring student anonymity could potentially cause students to perceive that grades are assigned more fairly and reassure teachers that they are…

  2. Deuterium chemistry in the Orion Bar PDR. ``Warm'' chemistry starring CH{2}D^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, B.; Leurini, S.; Schilke, P.; Roueff, E.; Thorwirth, S.; Lis, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    Context: High levels of deuterium fractionation in gas-phase molecules are usually associated with cold regions, such as prestellar cores. Significant fractionation ratios are also observed in hot environments such as hot cores or hot corinos, where they are believed to be produced by the evaporation of the icy mantles surrounding dust grains, and are thus remnants of a previous cold (either gas-phase or grain surface) chemistry. The recent detection of DCN towards the Orion Bar, in a clump at a characteristic temperature of 70 K, has shown that high deuterium fractionation can also be detected in PDRs. The Orion Bar clumps thus appear to be a good environment for the observational study of deuterium fractionation in luke warm gas, allowing us to validate chemistry models for a different temperature range, where dominating fractionation processes are predicted to differ from those in cold gas (<20 K). Aims: We aimed to study observationally in detail the chemistry at work in the Orion Bar PDR, to understand whether DCN is either produced by ice mantle evaporation or is the result of warm gas-phase chemistry, involving the CH2D+ precursor ion (which survives higher temperatures than the usual H2D+ precursor). Methods: Using the APEX and the IRAM 30 m telescopes, we targeted selected deuterated species towards two clumps in the Orion Bar. Results: We confirmed the detection of DCN and detected two new deuterated molecules (DCO+ and HDCO) towards one clump in the Orion Bar PDR. Significant deuterium fractionations are found for HCN and H2CO, but we measured a low fractionation in HCO^+. We also provide upper limits to other molecules relevant to deuterium chemistry. Conclusions: We argue that grain evaporation in the clumps is unlikely to be a dominant process, and we find that the observed deuterium fractionation ratios are consistent with predictions of pure gas-phase chemistry models at warm temperatures (T ~ 50 K). We show evidence that warm deuterium chemistry

  3. Bar code technology improves positive patient identification and transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G; Langeberg, A; Dohnalek, L

    2005-01-01

    As a result of human error, an estimated 1 in 12,000 blood transfusions is given to the wrong patient. The cause of nearly all of these errors is failure of hospital personnel to identify positively intended transfusion recipients, their blood samples for cross-matching, or their correct blood components. We describe our experience using a point-of-care bar code transfusion safety system that links patients' bar-coded wristbands, with bar-coded labels on blood sample tubes, blood component bags, and nurses' identification badges. The result was 100 % accuracy of matching patients, their blood samples, and components for transfusions. For verifying information before starting blood transfusions, nurses preferred bar code "double checks" to conventional visual "double checks" by a second nurse. Methods are needed to reinforce nurses' proficiency with technological approaches to transfusion safety, such as software-driven bar code scanning, in situations where transfusions are administered infrequently. PMID:16050151

  4. Application of laser bar code technology in power fitting evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohong; Liu, Shuhuab

    2007-12-01

    In this work, an automatic encoding and management system on power fittings (PFEMS) is developed based on laser bar coding technology. The system can encode power fittings according to their types, structure, dimensions, materials, and technical characteristics. Both the character codes and the laser bar codes of power fittings can be produced from the system. The system can evaluate power fittings and search process-paper automatically. The system analyzes the historical values and technical information of congeneric fittings, and forms formulae of evaluation with recursive analytical method. And then stores the formulae and technical documents into the database for index. Scanning the bar code with a laser bar code reader, accurate evaluation and corresponding process-paper of the fittings can be produced. The software has already been applied in some power stations and worked very well.

  5. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Species Codes-Non-FMP Species 2d Table 2d to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 2d Table 2d to Part...

  6. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Species Codes-Non-FMP Species 2d Table 2d to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 2d Table 2d to Part 679—Species Codes—Non-FMP Species General use...

  7. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Species Codes-Non-FMP Species 2d Table 2d to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 2d Table 2d to Part 679—Species Codes—Non-FMP Species General use...

  8. Optical System Design For High Speed Bar Code Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellekson, Ronald; Reddersen, Brad; Campbell, Scott

    1987-04-01

    Spectra-Physics recently introduced the Model 750 SL scanner for use in the European point-of-sale market, to meet the European requirement for a scanner of less than 13 cm height. The model 750 SL uses a higher density computer designed scan pattern with a retrodirective collection system to scan and detect UPC, EAN, and JAN bar codes. The scanner "reads" these bar codes in such a way that the user need not precisely align the bar code symbol with respect to the window in the scanner even at package speeds up to 100 inches per second. By using a unique geometrical arrangement of mirrors, a polygonal mirror assembly, and a custom-designed plastic bifocal lens, a design was developed to meet these requirements. This paper describes the design of this new low cost scanner, the use of computer-aided design in the development of this scanner, and some observations on the future of bar code scanning.

  9. 2-D skin-current toroidal-MHD-equilibrium code

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Niland, R.A.; Coonrod, J.; Levine, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    A two-dimensional, toroidal, ideal MHD skin-current equilibrium computer code is described. The code is suitable for interactive implementation on a minicomptuer. Some examples of the use of the code for design and interpretation of toroidal cusp experiments are presented.

  10. Effects of bar coding on a pharmacy stock replenishment system.

    PubMed

    Chester, M I; Zilz, D A

    1989-07-01

    A bar-code stock ordering system installed in the ambulatory-care pharmacy and sterile products area of a hospital pharmacy was compared with a manual paper system to quantify overall time demands and determine the error rate associated with each system. The bar-code system was implemented in the ambulatory-care pharmacy in November 1987 and in the sterile products area in January 1988. It consists of a Trakker 9440 transaction manager with a digital scanner; labels are printed with a dot matrix printer. Electronic scanning of bar-code labels and entry of the amount required using the key-pad on the transaction manager replaced use of a preprinted form for ordering items. With the bar-code system, ordering information is transferred electronically via cable to the pharmacy inventory computer; with the manual system, this information was input by a stockroom technician. To compare the systems, the work of technicians in the ambulatory-care pharmacy and sterile products area was evaluated before and after implementation of the bar-code system. The time requirements for information gathering and data transfer were recorded by direct observation; the prevalence of errors under each system was determined by comparing unprocessed ordering information with the corresponding computer-generated "pick lists" (itemized lists including the amount of each product ordered). Time consumed in extra trips to the stockroom to replace out-of-stock items was self-reported. Significantly less time was required to order stock and transfer data to the pharmacy inventory computer with the bar-code system than with the manual system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2757044

  11. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J.; Anuradha, R.; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R.; Senthileagappan, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure. PMID:26538876

  12. Using bar code technology to enhance classified document accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, P.J.; Wade, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a system of resources and procedures coordinated to improve a classified document inventorying process. The Bar Code Document Accountability System (BARDAS) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of improving the management and reporting timeliness of secret document inventories by the accountable custodians. The paper discusses the reasons for the development method, the extensive error-checking, the degree of user-friendliness, and the use of bar code technology in accomplishing these goals. Finally, the reactions of users to the system and future plans for enhancement are discussed.

  13. Enabling Handicapped Nonreaders to Independently Obtain Information: Initial Development of an Inexpensive Bar Code Reader System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBiervliet, Alan

    A project to develop and evaluate a bar code reader system as a self-directed information and instructional aid for handicapped nonreaders is described. The bar code technology involves passing a light sensitive pen or laser over a printed code with bars which correspond to coded numbers. A system would consist of a portable device which could…

  14. 19 CFR 142.45 - Use of bar code by entry filer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of bar code by entry filer. 142.45 Section 142... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.45 Use of bar code by entry filer. (a... with instructions from the port director, shall preprint invoices with the C-4 Code in bar code...

  15. 19 CFR 142.45 - Use of bar code by entry filer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of bar code by entry filer. 142.45 Section 142... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.45 Use of bar code by entry filer. (a... with instructions from the port director, shall preprint invoices with the C-4 Code in bar code...

  16. 19 CFR 142.45 - Use of bar code by entry filer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of bar code by entry filer. 142.45 Section 142... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.45 Use of bar code by entry filer. (a... with instructions from the port director, shall preprint invoices with the C-4 Code in bar code...

  17. 19 CFR 142.45 - Use of bar code by entry filer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Use of bar code by entry filer. 142.45 Section 142... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.45 Use of bar code by entry filer. (a... with instructions from the port director, shall preprint invoices with the C-4 Code in bar code...

  18. 19 CFR 142.45 - Use of bar code by entry filer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of bar code by entry filer. 142.45 Section 142... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.45 Use of bar code by entry filer. (a... with instructions from the port director, shall preprint invoices with the C-4 Code in bar code...

  19. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  20. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Edwards, A. L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available.

  1. MOEM scan engine for bar code reading and factory automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, M. Edward; Park, Sangtae; Melendes, Robert; Wang, A.; Andrews, Angus P.; Garcia-Nunez, Dawn S.; Jinar, Dan; Richardson, Patti D.; Studer, J.; Chen, J. K.; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.; Moranski, Jeffrey A.

    1998-03-01

    Rockwell is in the state of technology transfer to manufacturing of a micro-opto-electro-mechanical scan engine with superior scanning performance for bar code reading and factory automation. The scan engine consists of three main components: actuator, mirrors, and control electronics. The first two components are fabricated on a silicon cantilever beam while the control electronics are presently hybrid. The actuator comprises of a bimorph layer covered with two metal layers. The mirror has a large area (several mm2) and it is micromachined with a surface flatness better than (lambda) /2. Actuator scan-angles greater than 22 degree(s) with high repeatability in performance are achieved. The scan engine was integrated with an existing Rockwell commercial bar code reader/decoder and successfully proven to read a two-character code 39 bar code. The system was capable of decoding the 13-mil label at 360 scans per second with a 100% successful read performance. Environmental testing of the device indicates that the scanner can operate at elevated temperatures up to 70 degree(s)C with minor fluctuations in frequency and scan angle. The scanner has also gone through a lifetime cycle test and it has survived more than 8 billion cycles during a period of 18 months. To increase the yield and the performance level of the device, theoretical study as well as dynamic simulation by finite elements modeling have been investigated and will be reported separately.

  2. Automatic differentiation of the TACO2D finite element code using ADIFOR

    SciTech Connect

    Carle, A.; Fagan, M.

    1996-04-01

    The need for sensitivities in particular applications is becoming increasingly important in problems such as optimal design or control. In this study, the authors use ADIFOR to generate derivative code for TACO2D, a finite element heat transfer code. The study of TACO2D indicates that ADIFOR-generated derivatives yield accurate derivatives at a fraction of the time requirements of finite difference approximations, and space requirements proportional to the number of variables. The primary focus on TACO2D was for the design of chemical vapor deposition reactors.

  3. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

  4. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    PubMed

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management. PMID:25144560

  5. Bar-code technology applied to drug-use evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zarowitz, B J; Petitta, A; Mlynarek, M; Touchette, M; Peters, M; Long, P; Patel, R

    1993-05-01

    Bar-code technology was used to determine: (1) patterns in histamine H2-receptor antagonist use and (2) the occurrence of adverse drug effects and drug interactions associated with the use of these agents in critically ill patients. Patients at Henry Ford Hospital (Detroit) receiving histamine H2-receptor antagonists over a two-month period were evaluated. Clinical information was collected in the intensive care units by using a bar-code system. The data-capture menu was based on drug-use-evaluation criteria for H2-receptor antagonists. Data collected in the scanning wands were uploaded into a computer database and were analyzed at the end of the study. Data were collected for 207 patients. Cimetidine was the predominant H2-receptor antagonist used, and the predominant indication was stress-ulcer prophylaxis. Dosing trends followed accepted guidelines for cimetidine dosage adjustment in renal and hepatic failure. Two drug interactions and six adverse drug reactions occurred. Pharmacists made 92 recommendations to the medical staff regarding modification in therapy, involving 32% of the patients. Data collection required an average of 10 minutes per day each for three pharmacists. H2-receptor antagonist use patterns were evaluated in intensive care units through the application of bar-code technology. The speed and efficiency of this automated tool facilitated collection of a large amount of data. PMID:8099468

  6. Bar Coding MS(2) Spectra for Metabolite Identification.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Jonathan L; Cho, Kevin; Mahieu, Nathaniel G; Nikolskiy, Igor; Llufrio, Elizabeth M; Johnson, Stephen L; Patti, Gary J

    2016-03-01

    Metabolite identifications are most frequently achieved in untargeted metabolomics by matching precursor mass and full, high-resolution MS(2) spectra to metabolite databases and standards. Here we considered an alternative approach for establishing metabolite identifications that does not rely on full, high-resolution MS(2) spectra. First, we select mass-to-charge regions containing the most informative metabolite fragments and designate them as bins. We then translate each metabolite fragmentation pattern into a binary code by assigning 1's to bins containing fragments and 0's to bins without fragments. With 20 bins, this binary-code system is capable of distinguishing 96% of the compounds in the METLIN MS(2) library. A major advantage of the approach is that it extends untargeted metabolomics to low-resolution triple quadrupole (QqQ) instruments, which are typically less expensive and more robust than other types of mass spectrometers. We demonstrate a method of acquiring MS(2) data in which the third quadrupole of a QqQ instrument cycles over 20 wide isolation windows (coinciding with the location and width of our bins) for each precursor mass selected by the first quadrupole. Operating the QqQ instrument in this mode yields diagnostic bar codes for each precursor mass that can be matched to the bar codes of metabolite standards. Furthermore, our data suggest that using low-resolution bar codes enables QqQ instruments to make MS(2)-based identifications in untargeted metabolomics with a specificity and sensitivity that is competitive to high-resolution time-of-flight technologies. PMID:26837423

  7. PiCode: A New Picture-Embedding 2D Barcode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changsheng; Huang, Wenjian; Zhou, Baojian; Liu, Chenchen; Mow, Wai Ho

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, 2D barcodes have been widely used as an interface to connect potential customers and advertisement contents. However, the appearance of a conventional 2D barcode pattern is often too obtrusive for integrating into an aesthetically designed advertisement. Besides, no human readable information is provided before the barcode is successfully decoded. This paper proposes a new picture-embedding 2D barcode, called PiCode, which mitigates these two limitations by equipping a scannable 2D barcode with a picturesque appearance. PiCode is designed with careful considerations on both the perceptual quality of the embedded image and the decoding robustness of the encoded message. Comparisons with the existing beautified 2D barcodes show that PiCode achieves one of the best perceptual qualities for the embedded image, and maintains a better tradeoff between image quality and decoding robustness in various application conditions. PiCode has been implemented in the MATLAB on a PC and some key building blocks have also been ported to Android and iOS platforms. Its practicality for real-world applications has been successfully demonstrated. PMID:27249833

  8. Speckle noise in laser bar-code-scanner systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Daoqi; Stern, Miklos; Katz, Joseph

    1996-07-01

    We present a theoretical model and its experimental verification for speckle-induced noise in laser-based bar-code-scanner systems. We measured the dependence of the signal-to-speckle-noise ratio on distance, spot size, and detector size. Analyses of the power spectra of both the speckle noise and of the measured surface profiles of different substrates suggest that the paper surface granularity can be approximated by a white Gaussian noise process, thus confirming the assumption of the theoretical model.

  9. 2D MIMO Network Coding with Inter-Route Interference Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Gia Khanh; Sakaguchi, Kei; Ono, Fumie; Araki, Kiyomichi

    Infrastructure wireless mesh network has been attracting much attention due to the wide range of its application such as public wireless access, sensor network, etc. In recent years, researchers have shown that significant network throughput gain can be achieved by employing network coding in a wireless environment. For further improvement of network throughput in one dimensional (1D) topology, Ono et al. proposed to use multiple antenna technique combined with network coding. In this paper, being inspired by MIMO network coding in 1D topology, the authors establish a novel MIMO network coding algorithm for a 2D topology consisting of two crossing routes. In this algorithm, multiple network coded flows are spatially multiplexed. Owing to the efficient usage of radio resource of network coding and co-channel interference cancellation ability of MIMO, the proposed algorithm shows an 8-fold gain in network capacity compared to conventional methods in the best-case scenario.

  10. Snapshot 2D tomography via coded aperture x-ray scatter imaging

    PubMed Central

    MacCabe, Kenneth P.; Holmgren, Andrew D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Brady, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a fan beam coded aperture x-ray scatter imaging system which acquires a tomographic image from each snapshot. This technique exploits cylindrical symmetry of the scattering cross section to avoid the scanning motion typically required by projection tomography. We use a coded aperture with a harmonic dependence to determine range, and a shift code to determine cross-range. Here we use a forward-scatter configuration to image 2D objects and use serial exposures to acquire tomographic video of motion within a plane. Our reconstruction algorithm also estimates the angular dependence of the scattered radiance, a step toward materials imaging and identification. PMID:23842254

  11. Field depth extension of 2D barcode scanner based on wavefront coding and projection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingyu; Ye, Zi; Zhang, Wenzi; Huang, Weiwei; Yu, Feihong

    2008-03-01

    Wavefront coding (WFC) used in 2D barcode scanners can extend the depth of field into a great extent with simpler structure compared to the autofocus microscope system. With a cubic phase mask (CPM) employed in the STOP, blurred images will be obtained in charge coupled device (CCD), which can be restored by digital filters. Direct methods are used widely in real-time restoration with good computational efficiency but with details smoothed. Here, the results of direct method are firstly filtered by hard-threshold function. The positions of the steps can be detected by simple differential operators. With the positions corrected by projection algorithm, the exact barcode information is restored. A wavefront coding system with 7mm effective focal length and 6 F-number is designed as an example. Although with the different magnification, images of different object distances can be restored by one point spread function (PSF) with 200mm object distance. A QR code (Quickly Response Code) of 31mm X 27mm is used as a target object. The simulation results showed that the sharp imaging objective distance is from 80mm to 355mm. The 2D barcode scanner with wavefront coding extends field depth with simple structure, low cost and large manufacture tolerance. This combination of the direct filter and projection algorithm proposed here could get the exact 2D barcode information with good computational efficiency.

  12. Effects Of Substrate Scattering On Bar-Code Scanning Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkan, Eric; Sklar, David

    1983-04-01

    When a beam of light strikes a piece of paper or similar substrate, a portion of its energy penetrates into the bulk and, due to multiple scattering, may re-emerge at some distance from the point of entry. We refer to this phenomenon as substrate scattering. In this paper we describe a general model for scattering substrates and, using linear systems theory, we investigate its implications for bar-code scanning. We show that the effects of substrate scattering can be represented as a modified reflectance distribution associated with the original printed reflectance pattern. This effective distribution is shown to be independent of the details of scanning system configuration. We show that under a broad range of conditions substrate scattering will decrease modulation and will cause scanners to overestimate barwidths. A specific diffusion model of the scattering process is developed, providing a family of functions which can be used in empirical studies. We conclude that the scattering distributions will not even be approximately Gaussian. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with this conclusion and inconsistent with a Gaussian model. Further experimental results are presented which show that, for typical substrates, depth of modulation may be decreased by 20 percent or more and perceived bar-width increases will be on the order of one mil.

  13. System Design Considerations In Bar-Code Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkan, Eric; Swartz, Jerome

    1984-08-01

    The unified transfer function approach to the design of laser barcode scanner signal acquisition hardware is considered. The treatment of seemingly disparate system areas such as the optical train, the scanning spot, the electrical filter circuits, the effects of noise, and printing errors is presented using linear systems theory. Such important issues as determination of depth of modulation, filter specification, tolerancing of optical components, and optimi-zation of system performance in the presence of noise are discussed. The concept of effective spot size to allow for impact of optical system and analog processing circuitry upon depth of modulation is introduced. Considerations are limited primarily to Gaussian spot profiles, but also apply to more general cases. Attention is paid to realistic bar-code symbol models and to implications with respect to printing tolerances.

  14. Wall surface temperature calculation in the SolEdge2D-EIRENE transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, J.; Pégourié, B.; Bucalossi, J.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Gaspar, J.; Grisolia, C.; Hodille, E.; Missirlian, M.; Serre, E.; Tamain, P.

    2016-02-01

    A thermal wall model is developed for the SolEdge2D-EIRENE edge transport code for calculating the surface temperature of the actively-cooled vessel components in interaction with the plasma. This is a first step towards a self-consistent evaluation of the recycling of particles, which depends on the wall surface temperature. The proposed thermal model is built to match both steady-state temperature and time constant of actively-cooled plasma facing components. A benchmark between this model and the Finite Element Modelling code CAST3M is performed in the case of an ITER-like monoblock. An example of application is presented for a SolEdge2D-EIRENE simulation of a medium-power discharge in the WEST tokamak, showing the steady-state wall temperature distribution and the temperature cycling due to an imposed Edge Localised Mode-like event.

  15. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  16. CAS2D- NONROTATING BLADE-TO-BLADE, STEADY, POTENTIAL TRANSONIC CASCADE FLOW ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact, full-potential-equation model for the steady, irrotational, homoentropic, and homoenergetic flow of a compressible, inviscid fluid through a two-dimensional planar cascade together with its appropriate boundary conditions has been derived. The CAS2D computer program numerically solves an artificially time-dependent form of the actual full-potential-equation, providing a nonrotating blade-to-blade, steady, potential transonic cascade flow analysis code. Comparisons of results with test data and theoretical solutions indicate very good agreement. In CAS2D, the governing equation is discretized by using type-dependent, rotated finite differencing and the finite area technique. The flow field is discretized by providing a boundary-fitted, nonuniform computational mesh. This mesh is generated by using a sequence of conformal mapping, nonorthogonal coordinate stretching, and local, isoparametric, bilinear mapping functions. The discretized form of the full-potential equation is solved iteratively by using successive line over relaxation. Possible isentropic shocks are captured by the explicit addition of an artificial viscosity in a conservative form. In addition, a four-level, consecutive, mesh refinement feature makes CAS2D a reliable and fast algorithm for the analysis of transonic, two-dimensional cascade flows. The results from CAS2D are not directly applicable to three-dimensional, potential, rotating flows through a cascade of blades because CAS2D does not consider the effects of the Coriolis force that would be present in the three-dimensional case. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 200K of 8 bit bytes. The CAS2D program was developed in 1980.

  17. 76 FR 12847 - Change of Address; Requests for Exemption From the Bar Code Label Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... From the Bar Code Label Requirements AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule...)(2) to read as follows: Sec. 201.25 Bar code label requirements. * * * * * (d) * * * (2) Requests for... (requests involving a drug product) or to the Office of Compliance and Biologics Quality (HFM-600),...

  18. Coding in 2D: Using Intentional Dispersity to Enhance the Information Capacity of Sequence-Coded Polymer Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Laure, Chloé; Karamessini, Denise; Milenkovic, Olgica; Charles, Laurence; Lutz, Jean-François

    2016-08-26

    A 2D approach was studied for the design of polymer-based molecular barcodes. Uniform oligo(alkoxyamine amide)s, containing a monomer-coded binary message, were synthesized by orthogonal solid-phase chemistry. Sets of oligomers with different chain-lengths were prepared. The physical mixture of these uniform oligomers leads to an intentional dispersity (1st dimension fingerprint), which is measured by electrospray mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the monomer sequence of each component of the mass distribution can be analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (2nd dimension sequencing). By summing the sequence information of all components, a binary message can be read. A 4-bytes extended ASCII-coded message was written on a set of six uniform oligomers. Alternatively, a 3-bytes sequence was written on a set of five oligomers. In both cases, the coded binary information was recovered. PMID:27484303

  19. Multipacting Simulation Study for 56 MHz Quarter Wave Resonator using 2D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Naik,D.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-01-02

    A beam excited 56 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Niobium Quarter Wave Resonator (QWR) has been proposed to enhance RHIC beam luminosity and bunching. Being a RF cavity, multipacting is expected; therefore an extensive study was carried out with the Multipac 2.1 2D simulation code. The study revealed that multipacting occurs in various bands up to peak surface electric field 50 kV/m and is concentrated mostly above the beam gap and on the outer conductor. To suppress multipacting, a ripple structure was introduced to the outer conductor and the phenomenon was successfully eliminated from the cavity.

  20. Automated design of coupled RF cavities using 2-D and 3-D codes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Peter; Christiansen, D. W.; Greninger, P. T.; Spalek, G.

    2001-01-01

    Coupled RF cavities in the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project have been designed using a procedure in which a 2-D code (CCT) searches for a design that meets frequency and coupling requirements, while a 3-D code (HFSS) is used to obtain empirical factors used by CCT to characterize the coupling slot between cavities. Using assumed values of the empirical factors, CCT runs the Superfish code iteratively to solve for a trial cavity design that has a specified frequency and coupling. The frequency shifts and the coupling constant k of the slot are modeled in CCT using a perturbation theory, the results of which are adjusted using the empirical factors. Given a trial design, HFSS is run using periodic boundary conditions to obtain a mode spectrum. The mode spectrum is processed using the DISPER code to obtain values of the coupling and the frequencies with slots. These results are used to calculate a new set of empirical factors, which are fed back into CCT for another design iteration. Cold models have been fabricated and tested to validate the codes, and results will be presented.

  1. Assessment of the 2D MOC solver in MPACT: Michigan parallel characteristics transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, B.; Kochunas, B.; Downar, T.

    2013-07-01

    MPACT (Michigan Parallel Characteristics Transport Code) is a new reactor analysis tool being developed by researchers at the University of Michigan as an advanced pin-resolved transport capability within VERA (Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis). VERA is the end-user reactor simulation tool being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The MPACT development project is itself unique for the way it is changing how students perform research to achieve the instructional and research goals of an academic institution, while providing immediate value to the industry. One of the major computational pieces in MPACT is the 2D MOC solver. It is critical that the 2D MOC solver provide an efficient, accurate, and robust solution over a broad range of reactor operating conditions. The C5G7 benchmark is first used to test the accuracy of the method with a fixed set of cross-sections. The VERA Core Physics Progression Problems are then used to compare the accuracy of both the 2D transport solver and also the cross-section treatments. (authors)

  2. Multiplexed Detection of Cytokines Based on Dual Bar-Code Strategy and Single-Molecule Counting.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Dai, Shuang; Wang, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines play important roles in the immune system and have been regarded as biomarkers. While single cytokine is not specific and accurate enough to meet the strict diagnosis in practice, in this work, we constructed a multiplexed detection method for cytokines based on dual bar-code strategy and single-molecule counting. Taking interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as model analytes, first, the magnetic nanobead was functionalized with the second antibody and primary bar-code strands, forming a magnetic nanoprobe. Then, through the specific reaction of the second antibody and the antigen that fixed by the primary antibody, sandwich-type immunocomplex was formed on the substrate. Next, the primary bar-code strands as amplification units triggered multibranched hybridization chain reaction (mHCR), producing nicked double-stranded polymers with multiple branched arms, which were served as secondary bar-code strands. Finally, the secondary bar-code strands hybridized with the multimolecule labeled fluorescence probes, generating enhanced fluorescence signals. The numbers of fluorescence dots were counted one by one for quantification with epi-fluorescence microscope. By integrating the primary and secondary bar-code-based amplification strategy and the multimolecule labeled fluorescence probes, this method displayed an excellent sensitivity with the detection limits were both 5 fM. Unlike the typical bar-code assay that the bar-code strands should be released and identified on a microarray, this method is more direct. Moreover, because of the selective immune reaction and the dual bar-code mechanism, the resulting method could detect the two targets simultaneously. Multiple analysis in human serum was also performed, suggesting that our strategy was reliable and had a great potential application in early clinical diagnosis. PMID:26721199

  3. Vision-based reading system for color-coded bar codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Erhard; Schroeder, Axel

    1996-02-01

    Barcode systems are used to mark commodities, articles and products with price and article numbers. The advantage of the barcode systems is the safe and rapid availability of the information about the product. The size of the barcode depends on the used barcode system and the resolution of the barcode scanner. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the information content and the length of the barcode. To increase the information content, new 2D-barcode systems like CodaBlock or PDF-417 are introduced. In this paper we present a different way to increase the information content of a barcode and we would like to introduce the color coded barcode. The new color coded barcode is created by offset printing of the three colored barcodes, each barcode with different information. Therefore, three times more information content can be accommodated in the area of a black printed barcode. This kind of color coding is usable in case of the standard 1D- and 2D-barcodes. We developed two reading devices for the color coded barcodes. First, there is a vision based system, consisting of a standard color camera and a PC-based color frame grabber. Omnidirectional barcode decoding is possible with this reading device. Second, a bi-directional handscanner was developed. Both systems use a color separation process to separate the color image of the barcodes into three independent grayscale images. In the case of the handscanner the image consists of one line only. After the color separation the three grayscale barcodes can be decoded with standard image processing methods. In principle, the color coded barcode can be used everywhere instead of the standard barcode. Typical applications with the color coded barcodes are found in the medicine technique, stock running and identification of electronic modules.

  4. Efficient Bar-Code Watermark System to Protectagricultural Products Information Andcopyright

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lin; Wen, Xiaoming

    In order to protect agricultural product information and copyright, this paper proposes an efficient bar-code watermark system with digital signature. The proposed system adopts digital signature to prevent a buyer from unauthorized copies and to prevent a seller from forged unauthorized copies. The proposed system also encodes the signature with bar-code and embeds the bar-code image into the original image. As long as the similarity of watermark extracts from the damaged image over a threshold, the signature can be fully recovered. It is a novel idea to bring the bar-code concept into watermark system to protect agricultural product information and copyright. Detailed simulation results show that the proposed system gets much better results than that with error correcting code scheme, and prove that the proposed system can protect agricultural product information and copyright effectively.

  5. A new magnetic bar code system based on a magnetic anisotropy detection (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasada, I.; Watanabe, N.

    1996-04-01

    Magnetic bar codes can be used in unclean environments, where widely used optical bar code systems cannot be applied. Readout system for magnetic bar codes can also be made much simpler than optical ones. A new magnetic bar code system is proposed, in which binary information is coded in the sign of tilted angles of magnetic strips from a given standard direction. This scheme is unique compared to the conventional optical bar code, where width or space of the parallel pattern carries information, or an already reported magnetic bar code, where cross sectional shapes of pattern engraved in a ferromagnetic body carries information. Each of the magnetic strips brings about magnetic anisotropy due to its shape effect, hence angular dependent permeability in the proximity of the strip. The sign of the tilted angle of each magnetic strip is detected inductively through the angular dependent permeability by using a magnetic pickup head with a pair of cross-coupled figure-eight coils, where the sign of mutual inductance between the primary and the secondary figure-eight coil has one to one relationship to the sign of the tilted angle. Because the detection of the tilted angle is independent of scanning speed, variation in the scanning speed of the readout head does not affect the performance. In our preliminary study, the proposed magnetic bar code system was examined using pickup head consisting of a pair of cross-coupled 10-turn figure-eight coils which was embedded in a rectangular ferrite rod with cross-shape groove on the top surface of 6.5×3 mm dimension. The head was made thinner in the scanning direction to allow dense alignment of the pattern. Two kinds of pattern were made: the one was by aligning short amorphous wires (5 mm in length and 120 μm in diameter) on the plastic film and the other by using a thin (10 μm in thickness) copper film with tilted slits backed by an amorphous ribbon. These samples of magnetic bar code patterns were scanned with lift-off of

  6. A high-speed 12-layer two-dimensional bar code detection system with wideband photodetection amplifier and balanced raster scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaumi, Hiroo; Ajiki, Hiroshi

    1998-12-01

    A high-speed 12-layer 2D bar-code detection system (BCDS) consisting of a photodetection amplifier with an amplification-type current-voltage converter and a balanced raster scanner combined with the complementary light emission drive method for laser diodes, has been developed in order to provide both a high effective scanning speed and multi-layer bar-code detection. This BCDS performs 1,250 scan/s, which is two and a half times the scanning speed of a conventional bar-code detection system. A new theoretical modulation model that gives an accurate model for laser scanning beam traces obtained by the balanced raster scanner is proposed. This model allows an optimum BCDS to be designed easily.

  7. A simple and inexpensive bar-coding technique for denture identification

    PubMed Central

    Nalawade, Sonali N; Lagdive, Sanjay B; Gangadhar, SA; Bhandari, Aruna J

    2011-01-01

    A number of commercial methods for identifying dentures are available. They can be either invasive or noninvasive techniques. The less sophisticated procedures include simple engraving with bur, and more sophisticated procedures use labels or chips. Bar coding system is a way of transferring data to the computer and huge data can be stored as a record. Bar coding can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be used in individual identification. PMID:22408329

  8. Study of nurse workarounds in a hospital using bar code medication administration system.

    PubMed

    Rack, Laurie L; Dudjak, Linda A; Wolf, Gail A

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed registered nurse workarounds in an academic medical center using bar code medication administration technology. Nurse focus groups and a survey were used to determine the frequency and potential causes of workarounds. More than half of the nurses surveyed indicated that they administered medications without scanning the patient or medications during the last shift worked. Benefits of this study include considerations when implementing bar code medication administration technology that may minimize the development of these workarounds in practice. PMID:22202186

  9. Speckle revisited: analysis of speckle noise in bar-code scanning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, Emanuel; Kresic-Juric, Sasa; Bergstein, Leonard

    2001-06-01

    Laser beams used for bar-code scanning exhibit speckle noise generated by the roughness of the surface on which bar-codes are printed. Statistical properties of a photodetector signal that integrates a time-varying speckle pattern falling on its aperture are analyzed in detail. We derive simple closed form expressions for the auto-correlation function and power spectral density of the detector current for general form scanning beams with arbitrary field distributions. Theoretical calculations are illustrated by numerical simulations.

  10. A simple and inexpensive bar-coding technique for denture identification.

    PubMed

    Nalawade, Sonali N; Lagdive, Sanjay B; Gangadhar, Sa; Bhandari, Aruna J

    2011-07-01

    A number of commercial methods for identifying dentures are available. They can be either invasive or noninvasive techniques. The less sophisticated procedures include simple engraving with bur, and more sophisticated procedures use labels or chips. Bar coding system is a way of transferring data to the computer and huge data can be stored as a record. Bar coding can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be used in individual identification. PMID:22408329

  11. Modelling 2001 lahars at Popocatépetl volcano using FLO2D numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2013-12-01

    Popocatépetl volcano is located on the central part of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. It is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico and endanger more than 25 million people that lives in its surroundings. In the last months, the renewal of its volcanic activity put into alert scientific community. One of the possible scenarios is the 2001 explosive activity, which was characterized by a 8 km eruptive column and the subsequent formation of pumice flows up to 4 km from the crater. Lahars were generated few hours after, remobilizing the new deposits towards NE flank of the volcano, along Huiloac Gorge, almost reaching Santiago Xalitzintla town (Capra et al., 2004). The occurrence of a similar scenario makes very important to reproduce this event to delimitate accurately lahar hazard zones. In this work, 2001 lahar deposit is modeled using FLO2D numerical code. Geophone data is used to reconstruct initial hydrograph and sediment concentration. Sensitivity study of most important parameters used by this code like Manning, and α and β coefficients was conducted in order to achieve a good simulation. Results obtained were compared with field data and demonstrated a good agreement in thickness and flow distribution. A comparison with previously published data with laharZ program (Muñoz-Salinas, 2009) is also made. Additionally, lahars with fluctuating sediment concentrations but with similar volume are simulated to observe the influence of the rheological behavior on lahar distribution.

  12. Embedded morphological dilation coding for 2D and 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, Fabio; Signoroni, Alberto; Leonardi, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    Current wavelet-based image coders obtain high performance thanks to the identification and the exploitation of the statistical properties of natural images in the transformed domain. Zerotree-based algorithms, as Embedded Zerotree Wavelets (EZW) and Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (SPIHT), offer high Rate-Distortion (RD) coding performance and low computational complexity by exploiting statistical dependencies among insignificant coefficients on hierarchical subband structures. Another possible approach tries to predict the clusters of significant coefficients by means of some form of morphological dilation. An example of a morphology-based coder is the Significance-Linked Connected Component Analysis (SLCCA) that has shown performance which are comparable to the zerotree-based coders but is not embedded. A new embedded bit-plane coder is proposed here based on morphological dilation of significant coefficients and context based arithmetic coding. The algorithm is able to exploit both intra-band and inter-band statistical dependencies among wavelet significant coefficients. Moreover, the same approach is used both for two and three-dimensional wavelet-based image compression. Finally we the algorithms are tested on some 2D images and on a medical volume, by comparing the RD results to those obtained with the state-of-the-art wavelet-based coders.

  13. Machine readable identification systems: An overview. [Bar code and other labeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.J.; Cantor, S.

    1987-09-01

    The application of automated identification of an item by the use of machine readable methods is improving the accuracy and speed of data capture. Bar codes, optical character recognition, magnetic strips, and magnetic-ink recognition are all current machine readable methods which are used for data collection. Bar code data collection is the most used technology for real time inventory control, tracking, and point of sale applications. Magnetic strip coding is used for highly compact data identification on ID cards and on tags. Optical character recognition is generally used today to capture documents for computer storage and recall. Magnetic-ink character recognition, though used widely in banking, has limited applications elsewhere. Bar code methods are currently experiencing a faster rate of growth than the other technologies. Emphasis of this paper is on bar coding because of its popularity. The fundamentals of bar coding are discussed and labeling and scanning techniques are presented. New, automatic data-collection techniques are being developed, utilizing microcircuits and compact-disk memory media. The greatly increased memory capacity of these systems will likely lead to identification in terms of definitive characteristics of the item.

  14. Icarus: A 2-D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) Code for Multi-Processor Computers

    SciTech Connect

    BARTEL, TIMOTHY J.; PLIMPTON, STEVEN J.; GALLIS, MICHAIL A.

    2001-10-01

    Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird[11.1] and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modeled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modeled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates or in a manner similar to continuum modeling. Surface chemistry is modeled with surface reaction probabilities; an optional site density, energy dependent, coverage model is included. Electrons are modeled by either a local charge neutrality assumption or as discrete simulational particles. Ion chemistry is modeled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electro-static fields can either be: externally input, a Langmuir-Tonks model or from a Green's Function (Boundary Element) based Poison Solver. Icarus has been used for subsonic to hypersonic, chemically reacting, and plasma flows. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, post-processing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. All of the software packages are written in standard Fortran.

  15. Scanning micro-mirrors: from bar-code scanning to spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, F.; Grueger, H.; Heberer, A.; Sandner, T.; Wolter, A.; Schenk, H.

    2005-08-01

    Micro Opto Electro Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) reach more and more importance in technical applications. They are smaller than conventional devices, less expensive when fabricated in higher numbers and offer new options concerning reliability and measuring methods. Resonant movable micro-mirrors produced as single crystalline chips with CMOS-compatible technologies provide a broad field of applications. In this paper, we will present different micro-mirrors, which are developed by the Fraunhofer IPMS in Dresden, Germany. They have different layouts and are thus suitable for several applications. Fabricated 1D-mirrors with mechanical angles of +/- 16° can be used for laser deflection in bar-code-scanners, 2D-mirrors with different sizes and frequencies are suitable for imaging, displaying etc. Furthermore processes to apply diffractive structures on the micro-mirror surface were developed, showing an increased efficiency in the first diffraction order. Thus a micro-spectrometer has been built up, working in a wavelength range of 900-2500 nm. Due to the Czerny-Turner set-up, only one fast single InGaAs-photodiode is required.

  16. Differential Sensitivity Theory applied to the MESA2D code for multi-material problems

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Harstad, E.N.

    1996-05-01

    The technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is extended to the multi-component system of equations solved by the MESA2D hydrocode. DST uses adjoint techniques to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculation result of interest (response R) and {alpha}{sub i} is a calculation input (parameter {alpha}{sub i}), then {partial_derivative}R/{partial_derivative}{alpha}{sub i} is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem {ital all} n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only {ital two} calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics (ACM) code. Previous papers have described application of the technique to one-dimensional, single-material problems. This work presents the derivation and solution of the additional adjoint equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for two-dimensional, multi-component problems. As an example, results for a multi-material flyer plate impact problem featuring an oblique impact are given. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Differential Sensitivity Theory applied to the MESA2D code for multi-material problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, R. J.; Maudlin, P. J.; Harstad, E. N.

    1996-05-01

    The technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is extended to the multi-component system of equations solved by the MESA2D hydrocode. DST uses adjoint techniques to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculation result of interest (response R) and αi is a calculation input (parameter αi), then ∂R/∂αi is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem all n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only two calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics (ACM) code. Previous papers have described application of the technique to one-dimensional, single-material problems. This work presents the derivation and solution of the additional adjoint equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for two-dimensional, multi-component problems. As an example, results for a multi-material flyer plate impact problem featuring an oblique impact are given.

  18. Differential sensitivity theory applied to the MESA2D code for multi-material problems

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Harstad, E.N.

    1995-09-01

    The technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is extended to the multi-component system of equations solved by the MESA2D hydrocode. DST uses adjoint techniques to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculation result of interest (response R) and {alpha}{sub i} is a calculation input (parameter {alpha}{sub i}), then {partial_derivative}R/{partial_derivative}{alpha}{sub i} is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem all n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only two calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics (ACM) code. Previous papers have described application of the technique to one-dimensional, single-material problems. This work presents the derivation and solution of the additional adjoint equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for two-dimensional, multi-component problems. As an example, results for a multi-material flyer plate impact problem featuring an oblique impact are given.

  19. Scanning for safety: an integrated approach to improved bar-code medication administration.

    PubMed

    Early, Cynde; Riha, Chris; Martin, Jennifer; Lowdon, Karen W; Harvey, Ellen M

    2011-03-01

    This is a review of lessons learned in the postimplementation evaluation of a bar-code medication administration technology implemented at a major tertiary-care hospital in 2001. In 2006, with a bar-code medication administration scan compliance rate of 82%, a near-miss sentinel event prompted review of this technology as part of an institutional recommitment to a "culture of safety." Multifaceted problems with bar-code medication administration created an environment of circumventing safeguards as demonstrated by an increase in manual overrides to ensure timely medication administration. A multiprofessional team composed of nursing, pharmacy, human resources, quality, and technical services formalized. Each step in the bar-code medication administration process was reviewed. Technology, process, and educational solutions were identified and implemented systematically. Overall compliance with bar-code medication administration rose from 82% to 97%, which resulted in a calculated cost avoidance of more than $2.8 million during this time frame of the project. PMID:21099677

  20. Integrating bar-code devices with computerized MC and A systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.K.; Boor, M.G.; Hurford, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    Over the past seven years, Los Alamos National Laboratory developed several generations of computerized nuclear materials control and accountability (MC and A) systems for tracking and reporting the storage, movement, and management of nuclear materials at domestic and international facilities. During the same period, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was involved with automated data acquisition (ADA) equipment, including installation of numerous bar-code scanning stations at various facilities to serve as input devices to computerized systems. Bar-code readers, as well as other ADA devices, reduce input errors, provide faster input, and allow the capture of data in remote areas where workstations do not exist. Los Alamos National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory teamed together to implement the integration of bar-code hardware technology with computerized MC and A systems. With the expertise of both sites, the two technologies were successfully merged with little difficulty. Bar-code input is now available with several functions of the MC and A systems: material movements within material balance areas (MBAs), material movements between MBAs, and physical inventory verification. This paper describes the various components required for the integration of these MC and A systems with the installed bar-code reader devices and the future directions for these technologies.

  1. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    Simulation of radiation hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions is developed, having in mind, in particular, target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement energy (IFE) and the interpretation of related experiments. Intense radiation pulses by laser or particle beams heat high-Z target configurations of different geometries and lead to a regime which is optically thick in some regions and optically thin in others. A diffusion description is inadequate in this situation. A new numerical code has been developed which describes hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions (cylindrical R-Z geometry) and radiation transport along rays in three dimensions with the 4 π solid angle discretized in direction. Matter moves on a non-structured mesh composed of trilateral and quadrilateral elements. Radiation flux of a given direction enters on two (one) sides of a triangle and leaves on the opposite side(s) in proportion to the viewing angles depending on the geometry. This scheme allows to propagate sharply edged beams without ray tracing, though at the price of some lateral diffusion. The algorithm treats correctly both the optically thin and optically thick regimes. A symmetric semi-implicit (SSI) method is used to guarantee numerical stability. Program summaryProgram title: MULTI2D Catalogue identifier: AECV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 151 098 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 889 622 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC (32 bits architecture) Operating system: Linux/Unix RAM: 2 Mbytes Word size: 32 bits Classification: 19.7 External routines: X-window standard library (libX11.so) and corresponding heading files (X11/*.h) are

  2. A novel 2D wavelength-time chaos code in optical CDMA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Xin, Xiangjun; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Lijia; Yu, Chongxiu; Meng, Nan; Wang, Houtian

    2012-11-01

    Two-dimensional wavelength-time chaos code is proposed and constructed for a synchronous optical code division multiple access system. The access performance is compared between one-dimensional chaos code, WDM/chaos code and the proposed code. Comparison shows that two-dimensional wavelength-time chaos code possesses larger capacity, better spectral efficiency and bit-error ratio than WDM/chaos combinations and one-dimensional chaos code.

  3. Process to generate a synthetic diagnostic for microwave imaging reflectometry with the full-wave code FWR2D.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Domier, C W; Kramer, G; Luhmann, N C; Muscatello, C M; Shi, L; Tobias, B J; Valeo, E

    2014-11-01

    A synthetic microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) diagnostic employing the full-wave reflectometer code (FWR2D) has been developed and is currently being used to guide the design of real systems, such as the one recently installed on DIII-D. The FWR2D code utilizes real plasma profiles as input, and it is combined with optical simulation tools for synthetic diagnostic signal generation. A detailed discussion of FWR2D and the process to generate the synthetic signal are presented in this paper. The synthetic signal is also compared to a prescribed density fluctuation spectrum to quantify the imaging quality. An example is presented with H-mode-like plasma profiles derived from a DIII-D discharge, where the MIR focal is located in the pedestal region. It is shown that MIR is suitable for diagnosing fluctuations with poloidal wavenumber up to 2.0 cm(-1) and fluctuation amplitudes less than 5%. PMID:25430276

  4. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Brantley

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  5. Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.G.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-09-01

    Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a two-dimensional, two fluid code developed at MIT for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, momentum and energy exchange rate models, and a cell-to-cell radial heat conduction mechanism which was calibrated by simulation of Westinghouse Blanket Heat Transfer Test Program Runs 544 and 545. Finally, a direct method of pressure field solution was implemented into a direct method of pressure field solution was implemented into NATOF-2D, replacing the iterative technique previously available, and resulted in substantially reduced computational costs.

  6. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  7. 77 FR 49818 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Bar Code Label...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... (69 FR 9120), we issued regulations that required human drug product and biological product labels to... collection burden resulting from the final rule, as calculated in table 1 of the final rule (69 FR at 9149... Collection; Comment Request; Bar Code Label Requirement for Human Drug and Biological Products AGENCY:...

  8. 76 FR 66235 - Bar Code Technologies for Drugs and Biological Products; Retrospective Review Under Executive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Rule) that would require certain human drug product labels and biological product labels to have a...: Bar Code Label Requirements (Question 12 Update)'' (75 FR 54347 September 2010; Docket No. FDA-2010-D...'' (76 FR 3821). One of the provisions in the new Executive order is the affirmation of...

  9. Sound Synthesis and Bar-Code Technology to Develop Learning Environments for Blind Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An interactive, computerized sound machine was designed, incorporating bar-code technology in the user interface. The system was used in a classroom of nine blind elementary level children to teach sound awareness, logic, metalinguistics, and technological literacy and was found to have pedagogical relevance. (Author/JDD)

  10. Implementation of 2D domain decomposition in the UCAN gyrokinetic PIC code for non-diffusive transport studies in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboeuf, Jean-Noel; Decyk, Viktor; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul

    2012-03-01

    The massively parallel, nonlinear, 3D, toroidal, electrostatic, gyrokinetic, PIC, Cartesian geometry UCAN code, with particle ions and adiabatic electrons, has been successfully exercised to identify non-diffusive transport characteristics in DIII-D-like tokamak discharges. The limitation in applying UCAN to larger scale discharges is the 1D domain decomposition in the toroidal (or z-) direction for massively parallel implementation using MPI which has restricted the calculations to a few hundred ion Larmor radii per minor radius. To exceed these sizes, we have implemented 2D domain decomposition in UCAN with the addition of the y-direction to the processor mix. This has been facilitated by use of relevant components in the 2D domain decomposed PLIB2 library of field and particle management routines developed for UCLA's UPIC framework of conventional PIC codes. The gyro-averaging in gyrokinetic codes has necessitated the use of replicated arrays for efficient charge accumulation and particle push. The 2D domain-decomposed UCAN2 code reproduces the original 1D domain results within roundoff. Production calculations at large system sizes have been performed with UCAN2 on 131072 processors of the Cray XE6 at NERSC.

  11. Investigating the evolution of gravel bar at river confluence during flood events using a 2D many-fraction river morphodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Wu, F.; Ecohydraulics Lab.

    2010-12-01

    The knowledge of river morphology is fundamental and useful information for engineering and habitat restoration purposes. Many interesting phenomena such as armoring and downstream fining significantly affect the quality of riverine habitats. These phenomena could be even more devastating when they occur during the extreme flood events. Therefore, the development of meso-scale bedforms during flood events and the change in their sediment composition have become important topics of study. However, the complex interactions between flood flow, nonuniform particles and sediment transport make these problems difficult to tackle. In this study, we develop a 2D (two-dimensional) many-fraction FE (finite element) morphodynamic model to investigate the evolution of gravel bar during flood events. The proposed model adopts the characteristic dissipative Galerkin (CDG) scheme such that the convection-dominated bar evolution can be computed without numerical instabilities. A two-year record of DEM (digital elevation model) is obtained by airborne Lidar at the confluence of the Xin-Dian River (Taiwan), which is used to verify the model results. The proposed model is further applied to determine the best operation scheme of the Feitsui reservoir for mitigating blockage of river confluence by the gravel bar and sustaining the bed composition favorable to the river biota.

  12. A 2-D orientation-adaptive prediction filter in lifting structures for image coding.

    PubMed

    Gerek, Omer N; Cetin, A Enis

    2006-01-01

    Lifting-style implementations of wavelets are widely used in image coders. A two-dimensional (2-D) edge adaptive lifting structure, which is similar to Daubechies 5/3 wavelet, is presented. The 2-D prediction filter predicts the value of the next polyphase component according to an edge orientation estimator of the image. Consequently, the prediction domain is allowed to rotate +/-45 degrees in regions with diagonal gradient. The gradient estimator is computationally inexpensive with additional costs of only six subtractions per lifting instruction, and no multiplications are required. PMID:16435541

  13. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    SciTech Connect

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes

  14. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; et al

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with anymore » transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes. However, the current strategies for TnSeq are

  15. 75 FR 54347 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Bar Code Label Requirements-Questions and Answers (Question 12...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... regulations require that certain human drug and biological product labels contain a bar code (Sec. 201.25 (21... Guidance (October 5, 2006, 71 FR 58739). In this guidance, FDA is proposing to amend our response to... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Bar Code Label...

  16. Challenges implementing bar-coded medication administration in the emergency room in comparison to medical surgical units.

    PubMed

    Glover, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    Bar-coded medication administration has been successfully implemented and utilized to decrease medication errors at a number of hospitals in recent years. The purpose of this article was to discuss the varying success in utilization of bar-coded medication administration on medical-surgical units and in the emergency department. Utilization reports were analyzed to better understand the challenges between the units. Many factors negatively impacted utilization in the emergency department, including the inability to use bar-coded medication administration for verbal orders or to document medications distributed by the prescribing providers, unique aspects of emergency department nursing workflow, additional steps to chart when using bar-coded medication administration, and alert fatigue. Hardware problems affected all users. Bar-coded medication administration in its current form is more suitable for use on medical-surgical floors than in the emergency department. New solutions should be developed for bar-coded medication administration in the emergency department, keeping in mind requirements to chart medications when there is no order in the system, document medications distributed by prescribing providers, adapt to unpredictable nursing workflow, minimize steps to chart with bar-coded medication administration, limit alerts to those that are clinically meaningful, and choose reliable hardware with adequate bar-code scanning capability. PMID:23321481

  17. Performance analysis of 2D asynchronous hard-limiting optical code-division multiple access system through atmospheric scattering channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yaqin; Zhong, Xin; Wu, Di; Zhang, Ye; Ren, Guanghui; Wu, Zhilu

    2013-09-01

    Optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA) systems usually allocate orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal codes to the active users. When transmitting through atmospheric scattering channel, the coding pulses are broadened and the orthogonality of the codes is worsened. In truly asynchronous case, namely both the chips and the bits are asynchronous among each active user, the pulse broadening affects the system performance a lot. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of a 2D asynchronous hard-limiting wireless OCDMA system through atmospheric scattering channel. The probability density function of multiple access interference in truly asynchronous case is given. The bit error rate decreases as the ratio of the chip period to the root mean square delay spread increases and the channel limits the bit rate to different levels when the chip period varies.

  18. Laser bar code applied in computer aided design of power fittings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohong; Yang, Fan

    2010-10-01

    A computer aided process planning system is developed based on laser bar code technology to automatize and standardize processing-paper making. The system sorts fittings by analyzing their types, structures, dimensions, materials, and technics characteristics, groups and encodes the fittings with similar technology characteristics base on the theory of Group Technology (GT). The system produces standard technology procedures using integrative-parts method and stores them into technics databases. To work out the technology procedure of fittings, the only thing for users need to do is to scan the bar code of fittings with a laser code reader. The system can produce process-paper using decision trees method and then print the process-cards automatically. The software has already been applied in some power stations and is praised by the users.

  19. Machine-vision-based bar code scanning for long-range applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, Larry E.; Pertl, Franz A.; Rosenecker, Charles; Rosenberry-Friend, Kimberly A.

    1998-10-01

    Bar code labeling of products has become almost universal in most industries. However, in the steel industry, problems with high temperatures, harsh physical environments and the large sizes of the products and material handling equipment have slowed implementation of bar code based systems in the hot end of the mill. Typical laser-based bar code scanners have maximum scan distances of only 15 feet or so. Longer distance models have been developed which require the use of retro reflective paper labels, but the labels must be very large, are expensive, and cannot stand the heat and physical abuse of the steel mill environment. Furthermore, it is often difficult to accurately point a hand held scanner at targets in bright sunlight or at long distances. An automated product tag reading system based on CCD cameras and computer image processing has been developed by West Virginia University, and demonstrated at the Weirton Steel Corporation. The system performs both the pointing and reading functions. A video camera is mounted on a pan/tilt head, and connected to a personal computer through a frame grabber board. The computer analyzes the images, and can identify product ID tags in a wide-angle scene. It controls the camera to point at each tag and zoom for a closeup picture. The closeups are analyzed and the program need both a barcode and the corresponding alphanumeric code on the tag. This paper describes the camera pointing and bar-code reading functions of the algorithm. A companion paper describes the OCR functions.

  20. Rapid Quantification of Mutant Fitness in Diverse Bacteria by Sequencing Randomly Bar-Coded Transposons

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative d-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. PMID:25968644

  1. Reliability of astrophysical jet simulations in 2D. On inter-code reliability and numerical convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, M.; Camenzind, M.

    2001-12-01

    In the present paper, we examine the convergence behavior and inter-code reliability of astrophysical jet simulations in axial symmetry. We consider both pure hydrodynamic jets and jets with a dynamically significant magnetic field. The setups were chosen to match the setups of two other publications, and recomputed with the MHD code NIRVANA. We show that NIRVANA and the two other codes give comparable, but not identical results. We explain the differences by the different application of artificial viscosity in the three codes and numerical details, which can be summarized in a resolution effect, in the case without magnetic field: NIRVANA turns out to be a fair code of medium efficiency. It needs approximately twice the resolution as the code by Lind (Lind et al. 1989) and half the resolution as the code by Kössl (Kössl & Müller 1988). We find that some global properties of a hydrodynamical jet simulation, like e.g. the bow shock velocity, converge at 100 points per beam radius (ppb) with NIRVANA. The situation is quite different after switching on the toroidal magnetic field: in this case, global properties converge even at 10 ppb. In both cases, details of the inner jet structure and especially the terminal shock region are still insufficiently resolved, even at our highest resolution of 70 ppb in the magnetized case and 400 ppb for the pure hydrodynamic jet. The magnetized jet even suffers from a fatal retreat of the Mach disk towards the inflow boundary, which indicates that this simulation does not converge, in the end. This is also in definite disagreement with earlier simulations, and challenges further studies of the problem with other codes. In the case of our highest resolution simulation, we can report two new features: first, small scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities are excited at the contact discontinuity next to the jet head. This slows down the development of the long wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and its turbulent cascade to smaller

  2. Preliminary investigation of acoustic bar codes for short-range underwater communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dennis F.

    2005-09-01

    In March 2005, underwater acoustic communications experiments were carried out from the DRDC Atlantic research vessel CFAV QUEST. A battery-operated BATS20 transmitter and a broadband barrel-stave flextensional transducer were used to broadcast noise containing acoustic bar code (ABC) information. The ABCs are silent frequency bands of fixed duration that resemble retail bar codes when viewed in a spectrogram. Two sites were selected for the experiments. The first was a shallow-water area west of the Berry Islands in the Bahamas, and the second was a deep-water site south of the Western Bank on the Scotian Shelf. Two receiver systems were deployed; autonomous, variable-buoyancy Stealth Buoys resting on the bottom at the shallow site, and drifting AN/SSQ-53F sonobuoys fitted with GPS at the deep site. Results from these experiments will be presented and future work will be discussed.

  3. Modeling And Simulation Of Bar Code Scanners Using Computer Aided Design Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellekson, Ron; Campbell, Scott

    1988-06-01

    Many optical systems have demanding requirements to package the system in a small 3 dimensional space. The use of computer graphic tools can be a tremendous aid to the designer in analyzing the optical problems created by smaller and less costly systems. The Spectra Physics grocery store bar code scanner employs an especially complex 3 dimensional scan pattern to read bar code labels. By using a specially written program which interfaces with a computer aided design system, we have simulated many of the functions of this complex optical system. In this paper we will illustrate how a recent version of the scanner has been designed. We will discuss the use of computer graphics in the design process including interactive tweaking of the scan pattern, analysis of collected light, analysis of the scan pattern density, and analysis of the manufacturing tolerances used to build the scanner.

  4. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (unspecified) 625 Lamprey, pacific 600 Lingcod 130 Lumpsucker 216 Pacific flatnose 260 Pacific hagfish 212 Pacific hake 112 Pacific lamprey 600 Pacific saury 220 Pacific tomcod 250 Poacher (Family Algonidae) 219... description Code Arctic char, anadromous 521 Dolly varden, anadromous 531 Eels or eel-like fish 210 Eel,...

  5. TOPAZ - a finite element heat conduction code for analyzing 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1984-03-01

    TOPAZ is a two-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat conduction analysis. This report provides a user's manual for TOPAZ and a description of the numerical algorithms used. Sample problems with analytical solutions are presented. TOPAZ has been implemented on the CRAY and VAX computers.

  6. ZEUS-2D: A radiation magnetohydrodynamics code for astrophysical flows in two space dimensions. I - The hydrodynamic algorithms and tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    A detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer is presented. Attention is given to the hydrodynamic (HD) algorithms which form the foundation for the more complex MHD and radiation HD algorithms. The effect of self-gravity on the flow dynamics is accounted for by an iterative solution of the sparse-banded matrix resulting from discretizing the Poisson equation in multidimensions. The results of an extensive series of HD test problems are presented. A detailed description of the MHD algorithms in ZEUS-2D is presented. A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-constrained transport method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  7. Radioactive Sediment Transport on Ogaki Dam Reservoir in Fukushima Evacuated Zone: Numerical Simulation Studies by 2-D River Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiro; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on March 2011 released significant quantities of radionuclides to atmosphere. The most significant nuclide is radioactive cesium isotopes. Therefore, the movement of the cesium is one of the critical issues for the environmental assessment. Since the cesium is strongly sorbed by soil particles, the cesium transport can be regarded as the sediment transport which is mainly brought about by the aquatic system such as a river and a lake. In this research, our target is the sediment transport on Ogaki dam reservoir which is located in about 16 km northwest from FDNPP. The reservoir is one of the principal irrigation dam reservoirs in Fukushima Prefecture and its upstream river basin was heavily contaminated by radioactivity. We simulate the sediment transport on the reservoir using 2-D river simulation code named Nays2D originally developed by Shimizu et al. (The latest version of Nays2D is available as a code included in iRIC (http://i-ric.org/en/), which is a river flow and riverbed variation analysis software package). In general, a 2-D simulation code requires a huge amount of calculation time. Therefore, we parallelize the code and execute it on a parallel computer. We examine the relationship between the behavior of the sediment transport and the height of the reservoir exit. The simulation result shows that almost all the sand that enter into the reservoir deposit close to the entrance of the reservoir for any height of the exit. The amounts of silt depositing within the reservoir slightly increase by raising the height of the exit. However, that of the clay dramatically increases. Especially, more than half of the clay deposits, if the exit is sufficiently high. These results demonstrate that the water level of the reservoir has a strong influence on the amount of the clay discharged from the reservoir. As a result, we conclude that the tuning of the water level has a possibility for controlling the

  8. A Molecular Bar-Coded DNA Repair Resource for Pooled Toxicogenomic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, John P.; Patil, Ashish; Zappala, Maria R.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Cunningham, Richard P.; Begley, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage from exogenous and endogenous sources can promote mutations and cell death. Fortunately, cells contain DNA repair and damage signalling pathways to reduce the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of DNA damage. The identification of specific DNA repair proteins and the coordination of DNA repair pathways after damage has been a central theme to the field of Genetic Toxicology and we have developed a tool for use in this area. We have produced 99 molecular bar-coded Escherichia coli gene-deletion mutants specific to DNA repair and damage signalling pathways, and each bar-coded mutant can be tracked in pooled format using bar-code specific microarrays. Our design adapted bar-codes developed for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gene Deletion Project, which allowed us to utilize an available microarray product for pooled gene-exposure studies. Microarray-based screens were used for en masse identification of individual mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). As expected, gene deletion mutants specific to direct, base excision, and recombinational DNA repair pathways were identified as MMS-sensitive in our pooled assay, thus validating our resource. We have demonstrated that molecular bar-codes designed for S. cerevisiae are transferable to E. coli, and that they can be used with pre-existing microarrays to perform competitive growth experiments. Further, when comparing microarray to traditional plate-based screens both over-lapping and distinct results were obtained, which is a novel technical finding, with discrepancies between the two approaches explained by differences in output measurements (DNA content verse cell mass). The microarray-based classification of Δtag and ΔdinG cells as depleted after MMS exposure, contrary to plate-based methods, led to the discovery that Δtag and ΔdinG cells show a filamentation phenotype after MMS exposure, thus accounting for the discrepancy. A novel biological finding is the observation that while ΔdinG cells

  9. 2-D Circulation Control Airfoil Benchmark Experiments Intended for CFD Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Allan, Brian G.; Lin, Johb C.

    2009-01-01

    A current NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project being conducted by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) personnel and NASA collaborators includes the development of Circulation Control (CC) blown airfoils to improve subsonic aircraft high-lift and cruise performance. The emphasis of this program is the development of CC active flow control concepts for both high-lift augmentation, drag control, and cruise efficiency. A collaboration in this project includes work by NASA research engineers, whereas CFD validation and flow physics experimental research are part of NASA s systematic approach to developing design and optimization tools for CC applications to fixed-wing aircraft. The design space for CESTOL type aircraft is focusing on geometries that depend on advanced flow control technologies that include Circulation Control aerodynamics. The ability to consistently predict advanced aircraft performance requires improvements in design tools to include these advanced concepts. Validation of these tools will be based on experimental methods applied to complex flows that go beyond conventional aircraft modeling techniques. This paper focuses on recent/ongoing benchmark high-lift experiments and CFD efforts intended to provide 2-D CFD validation data sets related to NASA s Cruise Efficient Short Take Off and Landing (CESTOL) study. Both the experimental data and related CFD predictions are discussed.

  10. The design of the CMOS wireless bar code scanner applying optical system based on ZigBee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuelin; Peng, Jian

    2008-03-01

    The traditional bar code scanner is influenced by the length of data line, but the farthest distance of the wireless bar code scanner of wireless communication is generally between 30m and 100m on the market. By rebuilding the traditional CCD optical bar code scanner, a CMOS code scanner is designed based on the ZigBee to meet the demands of market. The scan system consists of the CMOS image sensor and embedded chip S3C2401X, when the two dimensional bar code is read, the results show the inaccurate and wrong code bar, resulted from image defile, disturber, reads image condition badness, signal interference, unstable system voltage. So we put forward the method which uses the matrix evaluation and Read-Solomon arithmetic to solve them. In order to construct the whole wireless optics of bar code system and to ensure its ability of transmitting bar code image signals digitally with long distances, ZigBee is used to transmit data to the base station, and this module is designed based on image acquisition system, and at last the wireless transmitting/receiving CC2430 module circuit linking chart is established. And by transplanting the embedded RTOS system LINUX to the MCU, an applying wireless CMOS optics bar code scanner and multi-task system is constructed. Finally, performance of communication is tested by evaluation software Smart RF. In broad space, every ZIGBEE node can realize 50m transmission with high reliability. When adding more ZigBee nodes, the transmission distance can be several thousands of meters long.

  11. Efficient simulation of pitch angle collisions in a 2+2-D Eulerian Vlasov code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Jeff; Berger, R.; Brunner, S.; Tran, T.

    2014-10-01

    Here we discuss pitch angle scattering collisions in the context of the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. The collision operator is discretized using 4th order accurate conservative finite-differencing. The treatment of the Vlasov operator in phase-space uses an approach based on a minimally diffuse, fourth-order-accurate discretization (Banks and Hittinger, IEEE T. Plasma Sci. 39, 2198). The overall scheme is therefore discretely conservative and controls unphysical oscillations. Some details of the numerical scheme will be presented, and the implementation on modern highly concurrent parallel computers will be discussed. We will present results of collisional effects on linear and non-linear Landau damping of electron plasma waves (EPWs). In addition we will present initial results showing the effect of collisions on the evolution of EPWs in two space dimensions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LDRD program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061.

  12. 2D Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics Calculations with an Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Gianakon, T. A.; Lipnikov, K. N.; Nelson, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    Single fluid resistive MHD is useful for modeling Z-pinch configurations in cylindrical geometry. One such example is thin walled liners for shock physics or HEDP experiments driven by capacitor banks such as the LANL's PHELIX or Sandia-Z. MHD is also useful for modeling high-explosive-driven flux compression generators (FCGs) and their high-current switches. The resistive MHD in our arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) code operates in one and two dimensions in both Cartesian and cylindrical geometry. It is implemented as a time-step split operator, which consists of, ideal MHD connected to the explicit hydro momentum and energy equations and a second order mimetic discretization solver for implicit solution of the magnetic diffusion equation. In a staggered grid scheme, a single-component of cell-centered magnetic flux is conserved in the Lagrangian frame exactly, while magnetic forces are accumulated at the nodes. Total energy is conserved to round off. Total flux is conserved under the ALE relaxation and remap. The diffusion solver consistently computes Ohmic heating. Both Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions are available with coupling to external circuit models. Example calculations will be shown.

  13. A 2D forward and inverse code for streaming potential problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.

    2013-12-01

    The self-potential method corresponds to the passive measurement of the electrical field in response to the occurrence of natural sources of current in the ground. One of these sources corresponds to the streaming current associated with the flow of the groundwater. We can therefore apply the self- potential method to recover non-intrusively some information regarding the groundwater flow. We first solve the forward problem starting with the solution of the groundwater flow problem, then computing the source current density, and finally solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential. We use the finite-element method to solve the relevant partial differential equations. In order to reduce the number of (petrophysical) model parameters required to solve the forward problem, we introduced an effective charge density tensor of the pore water, which can be determined directly from the permeability tensor for neutral pore waters. The second aspect of our work concerns the inversion of the self-potential data using Tikhonov regularization with smoothness and weighting depth constraints. This approach accounts for the distribution of the electrical resistivity, which can be independently and approximately determined from electrical resistivity tomography. A numerical code, SP2DINV, has been implemented in Matlab to perform both the forward and inverse modeling. Three synthetic case studies are discussed.

  14. Validation and Comparison of 2D and 3D Codes for Nearshore Motion of Long Waves Using Benchmark Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velioǧlu, Deniz; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Tsunamis are huge waves with long wave periods and wave lengths that can cause great devastation and loss of life when they strike a coast. The interest in experimental and numerical modeling of tsunami propagation and inundation increased considerably after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. In this study, two numerical codes, FLOW 3D and NAMI DANCE, that analyze tsunami propagation and inundation patterns are considered. Flow 3D simulates linear and nonlinear propagating surface waves as well as long waves by solving three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (3D-NS) equations. NAMI DANCE uses finite difference computational method to solve 2D depth-averaged linear and nonlinear forms of shallow water equations (NSWE) in long wave problems, specifically tsunamis. In order to validate these two codes and analyze the differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations, two benchmark problems are applied. One benchmark problem investigates the runup of long waves over a complex 3D beach. The experimental setup is a 1:400 scale model of Monai Valley located on the west coast of Okushiri Island, Japan. Other benchmark problem is discussed in 2015 National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Annual meeting in Portland, USA. It is a field dataset, recording the Japan 2011 tsunami in Hilo Harbor, Hawaii. The computed water surface elevation and velocity data are compared with the measured data. The comparisons showed that both codes are in fairly good agreement with each other and benchmark data. The differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations are highlighted. All results are presented with discussions and comparisons. Acknowledgements: Partial support by Japan-Turkey Joint Research Project by JICA on earthquakes and tsunamis in Marmara Region (JICA SATREPS - MarDiM Project), 603839 ASTARTE Project of EU, UDAP-C-12-14 project of AFAD Turkey, 108Y227, 113M556 and 213M534 projects of TUBITAK Turkey, RAPSODI (CONCERT_Dis-021) of CONCERT

  15. Animal house stock control based on bar-coded cage labels.

    PubMed

    Wootton, R

    1985-10-01

    In an animal house serving the needs of a large research institute, a regular inventory of the animals in stock is a considerable help towards effective management of the facility. In particular, advising the licence-holders of what animals are being held in their name and reminding them of the costs involved is a valuable exercise. The introduction of a computerized system of stock control, based on bar-coded cage labels, is described. The system has proved economical to operate, accurate, and can be run by persons without computer expertise. PMID:4068665

  16. Effects of spherical aberration on the laser beam of a bar code scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong

    1998-08-01

    The modulation transfer function of bar code scanning is a useful tool for evaluating the performance of the scanning laser beam. Understanding the behavior of the scanning laser system near the end of its depth of focus is of particular interest because it may lead to the development of techniques that could effective extend the depth of focus. In the article the MTF at focus and the two extremes of the depth of focus are presented. The presence of spherical aberration in the scanning laser beam generally reduces the depth of focus. The effects of the spherical aberration to the MTF is presented and discussed.

  17. User's manual for DYNA2D: an explicit two-dimensional hydrodynamic finite-element code with interactive rezoning

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1982-02-01

    This revised report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane strain finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 4-node solid elements, and the equations-of motion are integrated by the central difference method. An interactive rezoner eliminates the need to terminate the calculation when the mesh becomes too distorted. Rather, the mesh can be rezoned and the calculation continued. The command structure for the rezoner is described and illustrated by an example.

  18. ZEUS-2D: A Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Flows in Two Space Dimensions. II. The Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithms and Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    In this, the second of a series of three papers, we continue a detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows in astrophysics including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) algorithms in ZEUS-2D. The recently developed constrained transport (CT) algorithm is implemented for the numerical evolution of the components of the magnetic field for MHD simulations. This formalism guarantees the numerically evolved field components will satisfy the divergence-free constraint at all times. We find, however, that the method used to compute the electromotive forces must be chosen carefully to propagate accurately all modes of MHD wave families (in particular shear Alfvén waves). A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-CT method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  19. DNA bar coding and pyrosequencing to identify rare HIV drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christian; Minkah, Nana; Leipzig, Jeremy; Wang, Gary; Arens, Max Q; Tebas, Pablo; Bushman, Frederic D

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-infected individuals with antiretroviral agents selects for drug-resistant mutants, resulting in frequent treatment failures. Although the major antiretroviral resistance mutations are routinely characterized by DNA sequencing, treatment failures are still common, probably in part because undetected rare resistance mutations facilitate viral escape. Here we combined DNA bar coding and massively parallel pyrosequencing to quantify rare drug resistance mutations. Using DNA bar coding, we were able to analyze seven viral populations in parallel, overall characterizing 118 093 sequence reads of average length 103 bp. Analysis of a control HIV mixture showed that resistance mutations present as 5% of the population could be readily detected without false positive calls. In three samples of multidrug-resistant HIV populations from patients, all the drug-resistant mutations called by conventional analysis were identified, as well as four additional low abundance drug resistance mutations, some of which would be expected to influence the response to antiretroviral therapy. Methods for sensitive characterization of HIV resistance alleles have been reported, but only the pyrosequencing method allows all the positions at risk for drug resistance mutations to be interrogated deeply for many HIV populations in a single experiment. PMID:17576693

  20. Verification and benchmarking of MAGNUM-2D: a finite element computer code for flow and heat transfer in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    The objective of this work is to assess prediction capabilities and features of the MAGNUM-2D computer code in relation to its intended use in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). This objective is accomplished through a code verification and benchmarking task. Results are documented which support correctness of prediction capabilities in areas of intended model application. 10 references, 43 figures, 11 tables.

  1. Ultrasensitive immunoassay of protein biomarker based on electrochemiluminescent quenching of quantum dots by hemin bio-bar-coded nanoparticle tags.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dajie; Wu, Jie; Yan, Feng; Deng, Shengyuan; Ju, Huangxian

    2011-07-01

    A hemin bio-bar-coded nanoparticle probe labeled antibody was designed by the assembly of antibody and alkylthiol-capped bar-code G-quadruplex DNA on gold nanoparticles and the interaction of hemin with the DNA to form a G-quadruplex/hemin bio-bar-code. An ultrasensitive immunoassay method was developed by combining the labeled antibody with an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunosensor for protein. The ECL immunosensor was constructed by a layer-by-layer modification of carbon nanotubes, CdS quantum dots (QDs), and capture antibody on a glassy carbon electrode. In air-saturated pH 8.0 PBS the immunosensor showed a carbon-nanotube-enhanced cathodic ECL emission of QDs. Upon the formation of immunocomplex, the ECL intensity decreased owing to the consumption of ECL coreactant in bio-bar-code electrocatalyzed reduction of dissolved oxygen. Using α-fetoprotein as model analyte, the quenched ECL could be used for immunoassay with a linear range of 0.01 pg mL(-1) to 1 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 1.0 fg mL(-1). The wide detection range and high sensitivity resulted from the enhanced ECL emission and highly efficient catalysis of the bio-bar-code. The immunosensor exhibited good stability and acceptable fabrication reproducibility and accuracy, showing great promise for clinical application. PMID:21599023

  2. High-speed two-dimensional bar-code detection system with time-sharing laser light emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaumi, Hiroo; Nagasawa, Chikao

    2000-12-01

    A novel twodimensional bar-code detection system with time-sharing light emission laser diodes is proposed. A bias current allowing the laser diode to improve the light output rise time is optimized to slightly below the threshold of the diode, so that channel cross-talk among three-layer bar-code signals caused by the bias light can be kept small and a high-speed pulse modulation drive operation can be achieved. A prototype system for a three-layer bar code has achieved an effective scanning speed two and nine tenths times that of conventional scanners. It is estimated from the detection range that the number of time-sharing light emission laser diodes can be increased to at least four, when the current detection amplifier with a bandwidth of 6.4 MHz is used.

  3. Speckle Noise in Bar-Code Scanning Systems -Power Spectral Density and SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, Emanuel; KrěIć-Juri, SǎA.; Bergstein, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Laser-based flying-spot scanners are strongly affected by speckle that is intrinsic to coherent illumination of diffusing targets. In such systems information is usually extracted by processing the derivative of a photodetector signal that results from collecting over the detector's aperture the scattered light of a laser beam scanning a bar code. Because the scattered light exhibits a time-varying speckle pattern, the signal is corrupted by speckle noise. In this paper we investigate the power spectral density and total noise power of such signals. We also analyze the influence of speckle noise on edge detection and derive estimates for a signal-to-noise ratio when a laser beam scans different sequences of edges. The theory is illustrated by applying the results to Gaussian scanning beams for which we derive closed form expressions.

  4. Modelling of ELM-averaged power exhaust on JET using the EDGE2D code with variable transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnev, G.; Fundamenski, W.; Corrigan, G.

    2007-06-01

    The scrape-off layer (SOL) of the JET tokamak has been modelled using a two-dimensional plasma/neutral code, EDGE2D/NIMBUS, with variable transport coefficients, chosen according to nine candidate theories for radial heat transport in the SOL. Comparison of the radial power width on the outer divertor plates, λq, predicted by modelling and measured experimentally in L-mode and ELM-averaged H-mode at JET is presented. Transport coefficients based on classical and neo-classical ion conduction are found to offer the best agreement with experimentally measured λq magnitude and scaling with target power, upstream density and toroidal field. These results reinforce the findings of an earlier study, based on a simplified model of the SOL (Chankin 1997 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 39 1059), and support the earlier estimate of the power width at the entrance of the outer divertor volume in ITER, λq ap 4 mm mapped to the outer mid-plane (Fundamenski et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 20).

  5. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  6. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  7. Identifying Objects via Encased X-Ray-Fluorescent Materials - the Bar Code Inside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Systems for identifying objects by means of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) of encased labeling elements have been developed. The XRF spectra of objects so labeled would be analogous to the external bar code labels now used to track objects in everyday commerce. In conjunction with computer-based tracking systems, databases, and labeling conventions, the XRF labels could be used in essentially the same manner as that of bar codes to track inventories and to record and process commercial transactions. In addition, as summarized briefly below, embedded XRF labels could be used to verify the authenticity of products, thereby helping to deter counterfeiting and fraud. A system, as described above, is called an encased core product identification and authentication system (ECPIAS). The ECPIAS concept is a modified version of that of a related recently initiated commercial development of handheld XRF spectral scanners that would identify alloys or detect labeling elements deposited on the surfaces of objects. In contrast, an ECPIAS would utilize labeling elements encased within the objects of interest. The basic ECPIAS concept is best illustrated by means of an example of one of several potential applications: labeling of cultured pearls by labeling the seed particles implanted in oysters to grow the pearls. Each pearl farmer would be assigned a unique mixture of labeling elements that could be distinguished from the corresponding mixtures of other farmers. The mixture would be either incorporated into or applied to the surfaces of the seed prior to implantation in the oyster. If necessary, the labeled seed would be further coated to make it nontoxic to the oyster. After implantation, the growth of layers of mother of pearl on the seed would encase the XRF labels, making these labels integral, permanent parts of the pearls that could not be removed without destroying the pearls themselves. The XRF labels would be read by use of XRF scanners, the spectral data outputs of which

  8. Numerical model of water flow and solute accumulation in vertisols using HYDRUS 2D/3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Tomáš; Dahan, Ofer; Turkeltub, Tuvia

    2015-04-01

    boundary to the wall of the crack (so that the solute can accumulate due to evaporation on the crack block wall, and infiltrating fresh water can push the solute further down) - in order to do so, HYDRUS 2D/3D code had to be modified by its developers. Unconventionally, the main fitting parameters were: parameter a and n in the soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The amount of infiltrated water (within a reasonable range), the infiltration function in the crack and the actual evaporation from the crack were also used as secondary fitting parameters. The model supports the previous findings that significant amount (~90%) of water from rain events must infiltrate through the crack. It was also noted that infiltration from the crack has to be increasing with depth and that the highest infiltration rate should be somewhere between 1-3m. This paper suggests a new way how to model vertisols in semi-arid regions. It also supports the previous findings about vertisols: especially, the utmost importance of soil cracks as preferential pathways for water and contaminants and soil cracks as deep evaporators.

  9. Improving Patient Safety by Identifying Side Effects from Introducing Bar Coding in Medication Administration

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Emily S.; Cook, Richard I.; Render, Marta L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. In addition to providing new capabilities, the introduction of technology in complex, sociotechnical systems, such as health care and aviation, can have unanticipated side effects on technical, social, and organizational dimensions. To identify potential accidents in the making, the authors looked for side effects from a natural experiment, the implementation of bar code medication administration (BCMA), a technology designed to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs). Design. Cross-sectional observational study of medication passes before (21 hours of observation of 7 nurses at 1 hospital) and after (60 hours of observation of 26 nurses at 3 hospitals) BCMA implementation. Measurements. Detailed, handwritten field notes of targeted ethnographic observations of in situ nurse–BCMA interactions were iteratively analyzed using process tracing and five conceptual frameworks. Results. Ethnographic observations distilled into 67 nurse–BCMA interactions were classified into 12 categories. We identified five negative side effects after BCMA implementation: (1) nurses confused by automated removal of medications by BCMA, (2) degraded coordination between nurses and physicians, (3) nurses dropping activities to reduce workload during busy periods, (4) increased prioritization of monitored activities during goal conflicts, and (5) decreased ability to deviate from routine sequences. Conclusion. These side effects might create new paths to ADEs. We recommend design revisions, modification of organizational policies, and “best practices” training that could potentially minimize or eliminate these side effects before they contribute to adverse outcomes. PMID:12223506

  10. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles determined with an Escherichia coli gene knockout collection: generating an antibiotic bar code.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anne; Tran, Lillian; Becket, Elinne; Lee, Kim; Chinn, Laney; Park, Eunice; Tran, Katherine; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2010-04-01

    We have defined a sensitivity profile for 22 antibiotics by extending previous work testing the entire KEIO collection of close to 4,000 single-gene knockouts in Escherichia coli for increased susceptibility to 1 of 14 different antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, rifampin [rifampicin], vancomycin, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, metronidazole, streptomycin, fusidic acid, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, erythromycin, and triclosan). We screened one or more subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic, generating more than 80,000 data points and allowing a reduction of the entire collection to a set of 283 strains that display significantly increased sensitivity to at least one of the antibiotics. We used this reduced set of strains to determine a profile for eight additional antibiotics (spectinomycin, cephradine, aztreonem, colistin, neomycin, enoxacin, tobramycin, and cefoxitin). The profiles for the 22 antibiotics represent a growing catalog of sensitivity fingerprints that can be separated into two components, multidrug-resistant mutants and those mutants that confer relatively specific sensitivity to the antibiotic or type of antibiotic tested. The latter group can be represented by a set of 20 to 60 strains that can be used for the rapid typing of antibiotics by generating a virtual bar code readout of the specific sensitivities. Taken together, these data reveal the complexity of intrinsic resistance and provide additional targets for the design of codrugs (or combinations of drugs) that potentiate existing antibiotics. PMID:20065048

  11. Thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatography with bar code quantitation of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, S; Lager, C; Laurell, T; Birnbaum, S

    1995-09-01

    A rapid thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatographic method for quantitation in serum of an acute phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), which can differentiate between viral and bacteria] infections, is described, where material and reagent costs are minimal. The analysis is based on the "sandwich" assay format using monoclonal antibodies directed against two sites of CRP. One of the antibodies is covalently bound to defined zones on a thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatography membrane, while the other antibody is covalently bound to deeply dyed blue latex particles. After incubation (CRP sample and latex particles), the CRP-latex immunocomplex is allowed to migrate along the immunoaffinity chromatography membrane. In the presence of antigen, a sandwich is formed between the CRP-latex immunocomplex and membrane-bound antibodies, which results in the appearance of blue lines on the membrane. Antibody immobilization on the TLC membrane is made with a redesigned piezoelectric-driven ink-jet printer. The time required for the analysis is less than 10 min. Quantitation is achieved either by counting the lines visually, with scanning reflectometry, or with a modified bar code reader. The limit of detection was estimated in the low femtomolar range using the naked eye as detector. PMID:8779423

  12. Overcoming barriers to the implementation of a pharmacy bar code scanning system for medication dispensing: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nanji, Karen C; Cina, Jennifer; Patel, Nirali; Churchill, William; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2009-01-01

    Technology has great potential to reduce medication errors in hospitals. This case report describes barriers to, and facilitators of, the implementation of a pharmacy bar code scanning system to reduce medication dispensing errors at a large academic medical center. Ten pharmacy staff were interviewed about their experiences during the implementation. Interview notes were iteratively reviewed to identify common themes. The authors identified three main barriers to pharmacy bar code scanning system implementation: process (training requirements and process flow issues), technology (hardware, software, and the role of vendors), and resistance (communication issues, changing roles, and negative perceptions about technology). The authors also identified strategies to overcome these barriers. Adequate training, continuous improvement, and adaptation of workflow to address one's own needs mitigated process barriers. Ongoing vendor involvement, acknowledgment of technology limitations, and attempts to address them were crucial in overcoming technology barriers. Staff resistance was addressed through clear communication, identifying champions, emphasizing new information provided by the system, and facilitating collaboration. PMID:19567797

  13. Chandra Reads the Cosmic Bar Code of Gas Around a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    An international team of astronomers has used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make an energy bar code of hot gas in the vicinity of a giant black hole. These measurements, the most precise of their kind ever made with an X-ray telescope, demonstrate the existence of a blanket of warm gas that is expanding rapidly away from the black hole. The team consists of Jelle Kaastra, Rolf Mewe and Albert Brinkman of Space Research Organization Netherlands (SRON) in Utrecht, Duane Liedahl of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., and Stefanie Komossa of Max Planck Institute in Garching, Germany. A report of their findings will be published in the March issue of the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. Kaastra and colleagues used the Low Energy Transmission Grating in conjunction with the High Resolution Camera to measure the number of X rays present at each energy. With this information they constructed an X-ray spectrum of the source. Their target was the central region, or nucleus of the galaxy NGC 5548, which they observed for 24 hours. This galaxy is one of a class of galaxies known to have unusually bright nuclei that are associated with gas flowing around and into giant black holes. This inflow produces an enormous outpouring of energy that blows some of the matter away from the black hole. Astronomers have used optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray telescopes in an effort to disentangle the complex nature of inflowing and outflowing gas at different distances from the black hole in NGC 5548. X-ray observations provide a ringside seat to the action around the black hole. By using the Low Energy Transmission Grating, the Dutch-US-German team concentrated on gas that forms a warm blanket that partially covers the innermost region where the highest energy X-rays are produced. As the high-energy X rays stream away from the vicinity of the black hole, they heat the blanketing gas to temperatures of a few million degrees, and the blanket absorbs some

  14. Modeling nurses' acceptance of bar coded medication administration technology at a pediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Roger L; Scanlon, Matthew C; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of nurses' acceptance of bar coded medication administration (BCMA). Design Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses (N=83) at an academic pediatric hospital that recently implemented BCMA. Methods Surveys assessed seven BCMA-related perceptions: ease of use; usefulness for the job; social influence from non-specific others to use BCMA; training; technical support; usefulness for patient care; and social influence from patients/families. An all possible subset regression procedure with five goodness-of-fit indicators was used to identify which set of perceptions best predicted BCMA acceptance (intention to use, satisfaction). Results Nurses reported a moderate perceived ease of use and low perceived usefulness of BCMA. Nurses perceived moderate-or-higher social influence to use BCMA and had moderately positive perceptions of BCMA-related training and technical support. Behavioral intention to use BCMA was high, but satisfaction was low. Behavioral intention to use was best predicted by perceived ease of use, perceived social influence from non-specific others, and perceived usefulness for patient care (56% of variance explained). Satisfaction was best predicted by perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness for patient care, and perceived social influence from patients/families (76% of variance explained). Discussion Variation in and low scores on ease of use and usefulness are concerning, especially as these variables often correlate with acceptance, as found in this study. Predicting acceptance benefited from using a broad set of perceptions and adapting variables to the healthcare context. Conclusion Success with BCMA and other technologies can benefit from assessing end-user acceptance and elucidating the factors promoting acceptance and use. PMID:22661559

  15. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise an d unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 2: Documentation for computer code CUP2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A two dimensional linear aeroacoustic theory for rotor/stator interaction with unsteady coupling was derived and explored in Volume 1 of this report. Computer program CUP2D has been written in FORTRAN embodying the theoretical equations. This volume (Volume 2) describes the structure of the code, installation and running, preparation of the input file, and interpretation of the output. A sample case is provided with printouts of the input and output. The source code is included with comments linking it closely to the theoretical equations in Volume 1.

  16. FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1983-08-01

    The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

  17. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  18. Construction and Analysis of a Novel 2-D Optical Orthogonal Codes Based on Modified One-coincidence Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jianhua; Wang, Yanfen; Wang, Ke; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Zhipeng; Yang, Shuwen

    2013-09-01

    A new two-dimensional OOC (optical orthogonal codes) named PC/MOCS is constructed, using PC (prime code) for time spreading and MOCS (modified one-coincidence sequence) for wavelength hopping. Compared with PC/PC, the number of wavelengths for PC/MOCS is not limited to a prime number. Compared with PC/OCS, the length of MOCS need not be expanded to the same length of PC. PC/MOCS can be constructed flexibly, and also can use available wavelengths effectively. Theoretical analysis shows that PC/MOCS can reduce the bit error rate (BER) of OCDMA system, and can support more users than PC/PC and PC/OCS.

  19. TRAC code assessment using data from SCTF Core-III, a large-scale 2D/3D facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Shire, P.R.; Harmony, S.C.; Rhee, G.

    1988-01-01

    Nine tests from the SCTF Core-III configuration have been analyzed using TRAC-PF1/MOD1. The objectives of these assessment activities were to obtain a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during the refill and reflood phases of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident, to determine the accuracy to which key parameters are calculated, and to identify deficiencies in key code correlations and models that provide closure for the differential equations defining thermal-hydraulic phenomena in pressurized water reactors. Overall, the agreement between calculated and measured values of peak cladding temperature is reasonable. In addition, TRAC adequately predicts many of the trends observed in both the integral effect and separate effect tests conducted in SCTF Core-III. The importance of assessment activities that consider potential contributors to discrepancies between the measured and calculated results arising from three sources are described as those related to (1) knowledge about the facility configuration and operation, (2) facility modeling for code input, and (3) deficiencies in code correlations and models. An example is provided. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. ZORNOC: a 1 1/2-D tokamak data analysis code for studying noncircular high beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zurro, B.; Wieland, R.M.; Murakami, M.; Swain, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    A new tokamak data analysis code, ZORNOC, was developed to study noncircular, high beta plasmas in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B). These plasmas exhibit significant flux surface shifts and elongation in both ohmically heated and beam-heated discharges. The MHD equilibrium flux surface geometry is determined by solving the Grad-Shafranov equation based on: (1) the shape of the outermost flux surface, deduced from the magnetic loop probes; (2) a pressure profile, deduced by means of Thomson scattering data (electrons), charge exchange data (ions), and a Fokker-Planck model (fast ions); and (3) a safety factor profile, determined from the experimental data using a simple model (Z/sub eff/ = const) that is self-consistently altered while the plasma equilibrium is iterated. For beam-heated discharches the beam deposition profile is determined by means of a Monte Carlo scheme and the slowing down of the fast ions by means of an analytical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. The code also carries out an electron power balance and calculates various confinement parameters. The code is described and examples of its operation are given.

  1. PM2D code simulation of electronic dynamics and electro-magnetic fields generation by ultra-short laser pulses interaction with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, I. A.; Lykov, V. A.

    1997-04-15

    The results of numerical simulation of fast electrons motion and generated electro-magnetic fields at the picosecond pulse laser interaction with flat target are presented. The calculations were performed with PM2D code, where relativistic equation of electron motion joint with Maxwell equations is solved by particle method in cells. The efficiency of fast electrons energy conversion to the transverse electromagnetic wave of picosecond duration can reach the value 10{sup -4} for the intensity of ultrashort laser pulse at the target 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Creating a Culture of Safety Around Bar-Code Medication Administration: An Evidence-Based Evaluation Framework.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kandace; Harrington, Linda; Matos, Pat; Turner, Barbara; Johnson, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Bar-code medication administration (BCMA) effectiveness is contingent upon compliance with best-practice protocols. We developed a 4-phased BCMA evaluation program to evaluate the degree of integration of current evidence into BCMA policies, procedures, and practices; identify barriers to best-practice BCMA use; and modify BCMA practice in concert with changes to the practice environment. This program provides an infrastructure for frontline nurses to partner with hospital leaders to continually evaluate and improve BCMA using a systematic process. PMID:26641468

  3. HT2DINV: A 2D forward and inverse code for steady-state and transient hydraulic tomography problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography is a technique used to characterize the spatial heterogeneities of storativity and transmissivity fields. The responses of an aquifer to a source of hydraulic stimulations are used to recover the features of the estimated fields using inverse techniques. We developed a 2D free source Matlab package for performing hydraulic tomography analysis in steady state and transient regimes. The package uses the finite elements method to solve the ground water flow equation for simple or complex geometries accounting for the anisotropy of the material properties. The inverse problem is based on implementing the geostatistical quasi-linear approach of Kitanidis combined with the adjoint-state method to compute the required sensitivity matrices. For undetermined inverse problems, the adjoint-state method provides a faster and more accurate approach for the evaluation of sensitivity matrices compared with the finite differences method. Our methodology is organized in a way that permits the end-user to activate parallel computing in order to reduce the computational burden. Three case studies are investigated demonstrating the robustness and efficiency of our approach for inverting hydraulic parameters.

  4. A New Cell-Centered Implicit Numerical Scheme for Ions in the 2-D Axisymmetric Code Hall2de

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez Ortega, Alejandro; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm in the Hall2De code to simulate the ion hydrodynamics in the acceleration channel and near plume regions of Hall-effect thrusters. This implementation constitutes an upgrade of the capabilities built in the Hall2De code. The equations of mass conservation and momentum for unmagnetized ions are solved using a conservative, finite-volume, cell-centered scheme on a magnetic-field-aligned grid. Major computational savings are achieved by making use of an implicit predictor/multi-corrector algorithm for time evolution. Inaccuracies in the prediction of the motion of low-energy ions in the near plume in hydrodynamics approaches are addressed by implementing a multi-fluid algorithm that tracks ions of different energies separately. A wide range of comparisons with measurements are performed to validate the new ion algorithms. Several numerical experiments with the location and value of the anomalous collision frequency are also presented. Differences in the plasma properties in the near-plume between the single fluid and multi-fluid approaches are discussed. We complete our validation by comparing predicted erosion rates at the channel walls of the thruster with measurements. Erosion rates predicted by the plasma properties obtained from simulations replicate accurately measured rates of erosion within the uncertainty range of the sputtering models employed.

  5. Color bar coding the BRCA1 gene on combed DNA: a useful strategy for detecting large gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Gad, S; Aurias, A; Puget, N; Mairal, A; Schurra, C; Montagna, M; Pages, S; Caux, V; Mazoyer, S; Bensimon, A; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D

    2001-05-01

    Genetic linkage data have shown that alterations of the BRCA1 gene are responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. BRCA1 germline mutations, however, are found less frequently than expected. Mutation detection strategies, which are generally based on the polymerase chain reaction, therefore focus on point and small gene alterations. These approaches do not allow for the detection of large gene rearrangements, which also can be involved in BRCA1 alterations. Indeed, a few of them, spread over the entire BRCA1 gene, have been detected recently by Southern blotting or transcript analysis. We have developed an alternative strategy allowing a panoramic view of the BRCA1 gene, based on dynamic molecular combing and the design of a full four-color bar code of the BRCA1 region. The strategy was tested with the study of four large BRCA1 rearrangements previously reported. In addition, when screening a series of 10 breast and ovarian cancer families negatively tested for point mutation in BRCA1/2, we found an unreported 17-kb BRCA1 duplication encompassing exons 3 to 8. The detection of rearrangements as small as 2 to 6 kb with respect to the normal size of the studied fragment is achieved when the BRCA1 region is divided into 10 fragments. In addition, as the BRCA1 bar code is a morphologic approach, the direct observation of complex and likely underreported rearrangements, such as inversions and insertions, becomes possible. PMID:11284038

  6. A MARS-based method for estimating regional 2-D ionospheric VTEC and receiver differential code bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Szu-Pyng; Chen, Yao-Chung; Ning, Fang-Shii

    2014-01-01

    The geometry-free linear combination of dual-frequency GNSS reference station ground observations are currently used to build the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) model of the ionosphere. As it is known, besides ionospheric delays, there are differential code bias (DCB) of satellite (SDCB) and receiver (RDCB) in the geometry-free observation equation. The SDCB can be obtained using the International GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers, but the RDCB for regional and local network receivers are not provided. Therefore, estimating the RDCB and VTEC model accurately and simultaneously is a critical factor investigated by researchers. This study uses Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) to estimate the VTEC approximate model and then substitutes this model in the observation equation to form the normal equation. The least squares method is used to solve the RDCB and VTEC model together. The research findings show that this method has good modeling effectiveness and the estimated RDCB has good reliability. The estimated VTEC model applied to GPS single-frequency precise point positioning has better positioning accuracy in comparison to the IGS global ionosphere map (GIM).

  7. Vlasov simulation of 2D Modulational Instability of Ion Acoustic Waves and Prospects for Modeling such instabilities in Laser Propagation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Richard; Chapman, T.; Banks, J. W.; Brunner, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of Ion Acoustic waves (IAWs) driven by an external traveling-wave potential, ϕ0 (x , t) , with frequency, ω, and wavenumber, k, obeying the kinetic dispersion relation. Both electrons and ions are treated kinetically. Simulations with ϕ0 (x , t) , localized transverse to the propagation direction, model IAWs driven in a laser speckle. The waves bow with a positive or negative curvature of the wave fronts that depends on the sign of the nonlinear frequency shift ΔωNL , which is in turn determined by the magnitude of ZTe /Ti where Z is the charge state and Te , i is the electron, ion temperature. These kinetic effects result can cause modulational and self-focusing instabilities that transfer wave energy to kinetic energy. Linear dispersion properties of IAWs are used in laser propagation codes that predict the amount of light reflected by stimulated Brillouin scattering. At high enough amplitudes, the linear dispersion is invalid and these kinetic effects should be incorporated. Including the spatial and time scales of these instabilities is computationally prohibitive. We report progress including kinetic models in laser propagation codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 15.

  8. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  9. Bar code hotel: diverse interactions of semi-autonomous entities under the partial control of multiple operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoberman, Perry

    1995-03-01

    In this paper I describe an interactive installation that was produced in 1994 as one of eight Art and Virtual Environments projects sponsored by the Banff Center for the Arts. The installation, Bar Code Hotel, makes use of a number of strategies to create a casual, social, multi-person interface. Among the goals was to investigate methods that would minimize any significant learning curve, allowing visitors to immediately interact with a virtual world in a meaningful way. By populating this virtual world with semi-independent entities that could be directed by participants even as these entities were interacting with each other, a rich and heterogeneous experience was produced in which a variety of relationships between human participants and virtual objects could be examined. The paper will describe some of the challenges of simultaneously processing multiple input sources affecting a virtual environment in which each object already has its own ongoing behavior.

  10. Icarus: A 2D direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for parallel computers. User`s manual - V.3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Plimpton, S.; Johannes, J.; Payne, J.

    1996-10-01

    Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modelled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modelled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates. Surface chemistry is modelled with surface reaction probabilities. The electron number density is either a fixed external generated field or determined using a local charge neutrality assumption. Ion chemistry is modelled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electrostatic fields can either be externally input or internally generated using a Langmuir-Tonks model. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, postprocessing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. The majority of the software packages are written in standard Fortran.

  11. Simulations of magnetic reconnection with Parsek2D-MLMD, a new Multi Level Multi Domain (MLMD) Implicit Moment Method (IMM) Particle in Cell (PIC) code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M.; Beck, A.; Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.

    2012-12-01

    The kinetic simulation of intrinsically multi scale processes such as magnetic reconnection events with realistic mass ratios is a daunting task for explicit Particle In Cell (PIC) codes, which require to use resolutions of the order of the electron Debye length even when simulating dramatically bigger domains. As an example, a simulation of reconnection in the magnetotail, with domain sizes of the order of 20 di x 10 di (˜ 7.2 106 m x 3.6 106 m, with di being the ion skin depth) and a resolution of λD,e= 687 m, with λD,e the electron Debye length, requires the astounding number of 10500 x 5240 cells. Higher grid spacings can be used if the simulation is performed with an implicit PIC code, which substitutes a much less strict accuracy constraint to the stability constraint of explicit PIC codes. The same reconnection problem as before can be simulated, with an implicit PIC code resolving the scale of interest of de /2 instead of the electron Debye length (de is the electron skin depth), with the much more manageable number of 1920 x 958 cells. However, an even smaller number of cells can be used if, instead of using the same, high resolution on the entire domain, the domain to simulate is divided into subdomains each resolved with a grid spacing related to the physical scale of interest in the specific subdomain. In the case of reconnection, the division which immediately springs to mind is between electron diffusion region, ion diffusion region and outer region, where resolutions respectively of the order of fractions of the electron skin depth, of the ion skin depth and bigger can be used. We present here a new Multi Level Multi Domain (MLMD) Implicit Moment Method (IMM) Particle In Cell (PIC) code, Parsek2D-MLMD, able to perform simulations of magnetic reconnection where the expensive high resolutions are used only when needed, while the rest of the domain is simulated with grid spacings chosen according to the local scales of interest. The major difference

  12. Use of bar code readers and programmable keypads to improve the speed and accuracy of manual data entry in the clinical microbiology laboratory: experience of two laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R; Coia, J E; Michie, J

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of the use of bar code readers and programmable keypads for entry of specimen details and results in two microbiology laboratories. METHODS: The solutions selected in each laboratory are described. The benefits resulting from the implementation were measured in two ways. The speed of data entry and error reduction were measured by observation. A questionnaire was completed by users of bar codes. RESULTS: There were savings in time and in reduced data entry errors. Average time to enter a report by keyboard was 21.1 s v 14.1 s for bar coded results entry. There were no observed errors with the bar code readers but 55 errors with keystroke entries. The laboratory staff of all grades found the system fast, easy to use, and less stressful than conventional keyboard entry. CONCLUSIONS: Indirect time savings should accrue from the observed reduction in incorrectly entered data. Any microbiology laboratory seeking to improve the accuracy and efficiency of data entry into their laboratory information systems should consider the adoption of this technology which can be readily interfaced to existing terminals. PMID:10343613

  13. Bio-bar-code dendrimer-like DNA as signal amplifier for cancerous cells assay using ruthenium nanoparticle-based ultrasensitive chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Hao, Shuangyuan; Li, Li; Zhang, Shusheng

    2010-09-01

    Bio-bar-code dendrimer-like DNA (bbc-DL-DNA) is employed as a label for the amplification assay of cancer cells in combination with the newly explored chemiluminescence (CL) system of luminol-H(2)O(2)-Ru(3+) and specificity of structure-switching aptamers selected by cell-based SELEX. PMID:20652188

  14. MARE2DEM: an open-source code for anisotropic inversion of controlled-source electromagnetic and magnetotelluric data using parallel adaptive 2D finite elements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, K.

    2013-12-01

    This work announces the public release of an open-source inversion code named MARE2DEM (Modeling with Adaptively Refined Elements for 2D Electromagnetics). Although initially designed for the rapid inversion of marine electromagnetic data, MARE2DEM now supports a wide variety of acquisition configurations for both offshore and onshore surveys that utilize electric and magnetic dipole transmitters or magnetotelluric plane waves. The model domain is flexibly parameterized using a grid of arbitrarily shaped polygonal regions, allowing for complicated structures such as topography or seismically imaged horizons to be easily assimilated. MARE2DEM efficiently solves the forward problem in parallel by dividing the input data parameters into smaller subsets using a parallel data decomposition algorithm. The data subsets are then solved in parallel using an automatic adaptive finite element method that iterative solves the forward problem on successively refined finite element meshes until a specified accuracy tolerance is met, thus freeing the end user from the burden of designing an accurate numerical modeling grid. Regularized non-linear inversion for isotropic or anisotropic conductivity is accomplished with a new implementation of Occam's method referred to as fast-Occam, which is able to minimize the objective function in much fewer forward evaluations than the required by the original method. This presentation will review the theoretical considerations behind MARE2DEM and use a few recent offshore EM data sets to demonstrate its capabilities and to showcase the software interface tools that streamline model building and data inversion.

  15. Bar codes and intrinsic-surface-roughness tag: Accurate and low-cost accountability for CFE. [Conventional force equipment (CFE)

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.; Palm, R.

    1990-01-01

    CFE poses a number of verification challenges that could be met in part by an accurate and low-cost means of aiding in accountability of treaty-limited equipment. Although the treaty as signed does not explicitly call for the use of tags, there is a provision for recording serial numbers'' and placing special marks'' on equipment subject to reduction. There are approximately 150,000 residual items to be tracked for CFE-I, about half for each alliance of state parties. These highly mobile items are subject to complex treaty limitations: deployment limits and zones, ceilings subceilings, holdings and allowances. There are controls and requirements for storage, conversion, and reduction. In addition, there are national security concerns regarding modernization and mobilization capability. As written into the treaty, a heavy reliance has been placed on human inspectors for CFE verification. Inspectors will mostly make visual observations and photographs as the means of monitoring compliance; these observations can be recorded by handwriting or keyed into a laptop computer. CFE is now less a treaty between two alliances than a treaty among 22 state parties, with inspection data an reports to be shared with each party in the official languages designated by CSCE. One of the potential roles for bar-coded tags would be to provide a universal, exchangable, computer-compatible language for tracking TLE. 10 figs.

  16. Automation and adaptation: Nurses' problem-solving behavior following the implementation of bar coded medication administration technology.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Rivera-Rodriguez, A Joy; Faye, Héléne; Scanlon, Matthew C; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2013-08-01

    The most common change facing nurses today is new technology, particularly bar coded medication administration technology (BCMA). However, there is a dearth of knowledge on how BCMA alters nursing work. This study investigated how BCMA technology affected nursing work, particularly nurses' operational problem-solving behavior. Cognitive systems engineering observations and interviews were conducted after the implementation of BCMA in three nursing units of a freestanding pediatric hospital. Problem-solving behavior, associated problems, and goals, were specifically defined and extracted from observed episodes of care. Three broad themes regarding BCMA's impact on problem solving were identified. First, BCMA allowed nurses to invent new problem-solving behavior to deal with pre-existing problems. Second, BCMA made it difficult or impossible to apply some problem-solving behaviors that were commonly used pre-BCMA, often requiring nurses to use potentially risky workarounds to achieve their goals. Third, BCMA created new problems that nurses were either able to solve using familiar or novel problem-solving behaviors, or unable to solve effectively. Results from this study shed light on hidden hazards and suggest three critical design needs: (1) ecologically valid design; (2) anticipatory control; and (3) basic usability. Principled studies of the actual nature of clinicians' work, including problem solving, are necessary to uncover hidden hazards and to inform health information technology design and redesign. PMID:24443642

  17. Identification of internal transcribed spacer sequence motifs in truffles: a first step toward their DNA bar coding.

    PubMed

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-08-01

    This work presents DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat unit which are useful for the identification of five European and Asiatic truffles (Tuber magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. indicum, T. aestivum, and T. mesentericum). Truffles are edible mycorrhizal ascomycetes that show similar morphological characteristics but that have distinct organoleptic and economic values. A total of 36 out of 46 ITS1 or ITS2 sequence motifs have allowed an accurate in silico distinction of the five truffles to be made (i.e., by pattern matching and/or BLAST analysis on downloaded GenBank sequences and directly against GenBank databases). The motifs considered the intraspecific genetic variability of each species, including rare haplotypes, and assigned their respective species from either the ascocarps or ectomycorrhizas. The data indicate that short ITS1 or ITS2 motifs (< or = 50 bp in size) can be considered promising tools for truffle species identification. A dot blot hybridization analysis of T. magnatum and T. melanosporum compared with other close relatives or distant lineages allowed at least one highly specific motif to be identified for each species. These results were confirmed in a blind test which included new field isolates. The current work has provided a reliable new tool for a truffle oligonucleotide bar code and identification in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:17601808

  18. Antibiotic Sensitivity Profiles Determined with an Escherichia coli Gene Knockout Collection: Generating an Antibiotic Bar Code ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Anne; Tran, Lillian; Becket, Elinne; Lee, Kim; Chinn, Laney; Park, Eunice; Tran, Katherine; Miller, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    We have defined a sensitivity profile for 22 antibiotics by extending previous work testing the entire KEIO collection of close to 4,000 single-gene knockouts in Escherichia coli for increased susceptibility to 1 of 14 different antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, rifampin [rifampicin], vancomycin, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, metronidazole, streptomycin, fusidic acid, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, erythromycin, and triclosan). We screened one or more subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic, generating more than 80,000 data points and allowing a reduction of the entire collection to a set of 283 strains that display significantly increased sensitivity to at least one of the antibiotics. We used this reduced set of strains to determine a profile for eight additional antibiotics (spectinomycin, cephradine, aztreonem, colistin, neomycin, enoxacin, tobramycin, and cefoxitin). The profiles for the 22 antibiotics represent a growing catalog of sensitivity fingerprints that can be separated into two components, multidrug-resistant mutants and those mutants that confer relatively specific sensitivity to the antibiotic or type of antibiotic tested. The latter group can be represented by a set of 20 to 60 strains that can be used for the rapid typing of antibiotics by generating a virtual bar code readout of the specific sensitivities. Taken together, these data reveal the complexity of intrinsic resistance and provide additional targets for the design of codrugs (or combinations of drugs) that potentiate existing antibiotics. PMID:20065048

  19. Development of a Magnetic Electrochemical Bar Code Array for Point Mutation Detection in the H5N1 Neuraminidase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Krejcova, Ludmila; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Since its first official detection in the Guangdong province of China in 1996, the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of H5N1 subtype (HPAI H5N1) has reportedly been the cause of outbreaks in birds in more than 60 countries, 24 of which were European. The main issue is still to develop effective antiviral drugs. In this case, single point mutation in the neuraminidase gene, which causes resistance to antiviral drug and is, therefore, subjected to many studies including ours, was observed. In this study, we developed magnetic electrochemical bar code array for detection of single point mutations (mismatches in up to four nucleotides) in H5N1 neuraminidase gene. Paramagnetic particles Dynabeads® with covalently bound oligo (dT)25 were used as a tool for isolation of complementary H5N1 chains (H5N1 Zhejin, China and Aichi). For detection of H5N1 chains, oligonucleotide chains of lengths of 12 (+5 adenine) or 28 (+5 adenine) bp labeled with quantum dots (CdS, ZnS and/or PbS) were used. Individual probes hybridized to target molecules specifically with efficiency higher than 60%. The obtained signals identified mutations present in the sequence. Suggested experimental procedure allows obtaining further information from the redox signals of nucleic acids. Moreover, the used biosensor exhibits sequence specificity and low limits of detection of subnanogram quantities of target nucleic acids. PMID:23860384

  20. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  1. BAR-CODE BASED WEIGHT MEASUREMENT STATION FOR PHYSICAL INVENTORY TAKING OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE CONTAINERS AT THE MINING AND CHEMICAL COMBINE RADIOCHEMICAL REPROCESSING PLANT NEAR KRASNOYARSK, SIBERIA.

    SciTech Connect

    SUDA,S.

    1999-09-20

    This paper describes the technical tasks being implemented to computerize the physical inventory taking (PIT) at the Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Khimichesky Kombinat, GKhK) radiochemical plant under the US/Russian cooperative nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) program. Under the MPC and A program, Lab-to-Lab task agreements with GKhK were negotiated that involved computerized equipment for item verification and confirmatory measurement of the Pu containers. Tasks under Phase I cover the work for demonstrating the plan and procedures for carrying out the comparison of the Pu container identification on the container with the computerized inventory records. In addition to the records validation, the verification procedures include the application of bar codes and bar coded TIDs to the Pu containers. Phase II involves the verification of the Pu content. A plan and procedures are being written for carrying out confirmatory measurements on the Pu containers.

  2. STEALTH - a Lagrange explicit finite-difference code for solid, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 8A: STEALTH/WHAMSE - a 2-D fluid-structure interaction code. Computer code manual

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.B.

    1984-10-01

    STEALTH is a family of computer codes that can be used to calculate a variety of physical processes in which the dynamic behavior of a continuum is involved. The version of STEALTH described in this volume is designed for calculations of fluid-structure interaction. This version of the program consists of a hydrodynamic version of STEALTH which has been coupled to a finite-element code, WHAMSE. STEALTH computes the transient response of the fluid continuum, while WHAMSE computes the transient response of shell and beam structures under external fluid loadings. The coupling between STEALTH and WHAMSE is performed during each cycle or step of a calculation. Separate calculations of fluid response and structural response are avoided, thereby giving a more accurate model of the dynamic coupling between fluid and structure. This volume provides the theoretical background, the finite-difference equations, the finite-element equations, a discussion of several sample problems, a listing of the input decks for the sample problems, a programmer's manual and a description of the input records for the STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program.

  3. The use of FLO2D numerical code in lahar hazard evaluation at Popocatépetl volcano: a 2001-lahar scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2014-07-01

    Lahar modelling represents an excellent tool to design hazard maps. It allows the definition of potential inundation zones for different lahar magnitude scenarios and sediment concentrations. Here we present the results obtained for the 2001 syneruptive lahar at Popocatépetl volcano, based on simulations performed with FLO2D software. An accurate delineation of this event is needed since it is one of the possible scenarios considered during a volcanic crisis. One of the main issues for lahar simulation using FLO2D is the calibration of the input hydrograph and rheologic flow properties. Here we verified that geophone data can be properly calibrated by means of peak discharge calculations obtained by superelevation method. Simulation results clearly show the influence of concentration and rheologic properties on lahar depth and distribution. Modifying rheologic properties during lahar simulation strongly affect lahar distribution. More viscous lahars have a more restricted aerial distribution, thicker depths, and resulting velocities are noticeable smaller. FLO2D proved to be a very successful tool to delimitate lahar inundation zones as well as to generate different lahar scenarios not only related to lahar volume or magnitude but also to take into account different sediment concentrations and rheologies widely documented to influence lahar prone areas.

  4. The use of FLO2D numerical code in lahar hazard evaluation at Popocatépetl volcano: a 2001 lahar scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2014-12-01

    Lahar modeling represents an excellent tool for designing hazard maps. It allows the definition of potential inundation zones for different lahar magnitude scenarios and sediment concentrations. Here, we present the results obtained for the 2001 syneruptive lahar at Popocatépetl volcano, based on simulations performed with FLO2D software. An accurate delineation of this event is needed, since it is one of the possible scenarios considered if magmatic activity increases its magnitude. One of the main issues for lahar simulation using FLO2D is the calibration of the input hydrograph and rheological flow properties. Here, we verified that geophone data can be properly calibrated by means of peak discharge calculations obtained by the superelevation method. Digital elevation model resolution also resulted as an important factor in defining the reliability of the simulated flows. Simulation results clearly show the influence of sediment concentrations and rheological properties on lahar depth and distribution. Modifying rheological properties during lahar simulation strongly affects lahar distribution. More viscous lahars have a more restricted aerial distribution and thicker depths, and resulting velocities are noticeably smaller. FLO2D proved to be a very successful tool for delimitating lahar inundation zones as well as generating different lahar scenarios not only related to lahar volume or magnitude, but also taking into account different sediment concentrations and rheologies widely documented as influencing lahar-prone areas.

  5. Temporal and spatial trends in prey composition of wahoo Acanthocybium solandri: a diet analysis from the central North Pacific Ocean using visual and DNA bar-coding techniques.

    PubMed

    Oyafuso, Z S; Toonen, R J; Franklin, E C

    2016-04-01

    A diet analysis was conducted on 444 wahoo Acanthocybium solandri caught in the central North Pacific Ocean longline fishery and a nearshore troll fishery surrounding the Hawaiian Islands from June to December 2014. In addition to traditional observational methods of stomach contents, a DNA bar-coding approach was integrated into the analysis by sequencing the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) region of the mtDNA genome to taxonomically identify individual prey items that could not be classified visually to species. For nearshore-caught A. solandri, juvenile pre-settlement reef fish species from various families dominated the prey composition during the summer months, followed primarily by Carangidae in autumn months. Gempylidae, Echeneidae and Scombridae were dominant prey taxa from the offshore fishery. Molidae was a common prey family found in stomachs collected north-east of the Hawaiian Archipelago while tetraodontiform reef fishes, known to have extended pelagic stages, were prominent prey items south-west of the Hawaiian Islands. The diet composition of A. solandri was indicative of an adaptive feeder and thus revealed dominant geographic and seasonal abundances of certain taxa from various ecosystems in the marine environment. The addition of molecular bar-coding to the traditional visual method of prey identifications allowed for a more comprehensive range of the prey field of A. solandri to be identified and should be used as a standard component in future diet studies. PMID:27059148

  6. Aptamer-conjugated bio-bar-code Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles as amplification station for electrochemiluminescence detection of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Bi, Sai; Jia, Xiaoqiang; He, Peng

    2014-07-21

    An electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assay has been developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of tumor cells based on cell-SELEX aptamer-target cell interactions through a cascaded amplification process by using bio-bar-code Au-Fe3O4 as amplification station. Firstly, bio-bar-code toehold-aptamer/DNA primer/Au-Fe3O4 (TA/DP/Au-Fe3O4) nanoconjugates are fabricated with a ratio of 1:10 to efficiently avoid cross-linking reaction and recognize target cells, which are immobilized on the substrate by hybridizing aptamer to capture probe with 18-mer. Through strand displacement reaction (SDR), the TA/DP/Au-Fe3O4 composites further act as the amplification station to initiate rolling circle amplification (RCA). As a result, on the surface of TA/DP/Au-Fe3O4, a large number of Ru(bpy)2(dcbpy)NHS-labeled probes hybridize to RCA products, which are easily trapped by magnetic electrode to perform the magnetic particle-based ECL platform. Under isothermal conditions, this powerful amplification strategy permits detection of Ramos cells as low as 16 cells with an excellent selectivity. Moreover, analysis of Ramos cells in complex samples and whole blood samples further show the great potential of this ultrasensitive approach in clinical application involving cancer cells-related biological processes. PMID:25000857

  7. Ruggedness of 2D code printed on grain tracers for implementing a prospective grain traceability system to the bulk grain delivery system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food-grade tracers were printed with two-dimensional Data Matrix (DM) barcode so that they could carry simulated identifying information about grain as part of a prospective traceability system. The key factor in evaluating the tracers was their ability to be read with a code scanner after being rem...

  8. Scaling in the 2D SU(3) × SU(3) spin model as a test of a new coding method for SU(3) matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, B.; Sommer, R.

    1985-02-01

    We present a Monte Carlo measurement of the magnetic susceptibility in the SU(3) × SU(3) spin model in two dimensions. Asymptotic scaling is verified on a 20 × 20 lattice. This laboratory is then used to test a new method for coding SU(3) variables in one (60 bit)- word of computer memory. In this approach, real numbers are truncated to fit into a 5-bit representation.

  9. Adapting hierarchical bidirectional inter prediction on a GPU-based platform for 2D and 3D H.264 video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Rafael; Martínez, José Luis; Cock, Jan De; Fernández-Escribano, Gerardo; Pieters, Bart; Sánchez, José L.; Claver, José M.; de Walle, Rik Van

    2013-12-01

    The H.264/AVC video coding standard introduces some improved tools in order to increase compression efficiency. Moreover, the multi-view extension of H.264/AVC, called H.264/MVC, adopts many of them. Among the new features, variable block-size motion estimation is one which contributes to high coding efficiency. Furthermore, it defines a different prediction structure that includes hierarchical bidirectional pictures, outperforming traditional Group of Pictures patterns in both scenarios: single-view and multi-view. However, these video coding techniques have high computational complexity. Several techniques have been proposed in the literature over the last few years which are aimed at accelerating the inter prediction process, but there are no works focusing on bidirectional prediction or hierarchical prediction. In this article, with the emergence of many-core processors or accelerators, a step forward is taken towards an implementation of an H.264/AVC and H.264/MVC inter prediction algorithm on a graphics processing unit. The results show a negligible rate distortion drop with a time reduction of up to 98% for the complete H.264/AVC encoder.

  10. Applications of the computer codes FLUX2D and PHI3D for the electromagnetic analysis of compressed magnetic field generators and power flow channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, M.L.; Oona, H.; Martinez, A.R.; Salon, S.; Wendling, P.; Krahenbuhl, L.; Nicolas, A.; Nicolas, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present herein the results of three electromagnetic field problems for compressed magnetic field generators and their associated power flow channels. The first problem is the computation of the transient magnetic field in a two-dimensional model of helical generator during loading. The second problem is the three-dimensional eddy current patterns in a section of an armature beneath a bifurcation point of a helical winding. Our third problem is the calculation of the three-dimensional electrostatic fields in a region known as the post-hole convolute in which a rod connects the inner and outer walls of a system of three concentric cylinders through a hole in the middle cylinder. While analytic solutions exist for many electromagnetic field problems in cases of special and ideal geometries, the solutions of these and similar problems for the proper analysis and design of compressed magnetic field generators and their related hardware require computer simulations. In earlier studies, computer models have been proposed, several based on research oriented hydrocodes to which uncoupled or partially coupled Maxwell's equations solvers are added. Although the hydrocode models address the problem of moving, deformable conductors, they are not useful for electromagnetic analysis, nor can they be considered design tools. For our studies, we take advantage of the commercial, electromagnetic computer-aided design software packages FLUX2D nd PHI3D that were developed for motor manufacturers and utilities industries. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  11. The Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) : LST, Linear and Nonlinear PSE for 2-D, Axisymmetric, and Infinite Swept Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2003-01-01

    During the past two decades, our understanding of laminar-turbulent transition flow physics has advanced significantly owing to, in a large part, the NASA program support such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), High-speed Civil Transport (HSCT), and Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST). Experimental, theoretical, as well as computational efforts on various issues such as receptivity and linear and nonlinear evolution of instability waves take part in broadening our knowledge base for this intricate flow phenomenon. Despite all these advances, transition prediction remains a nontrivial task for engineers due to the lack of a widely available, robust, and efficient prediction tool. The design and development of the LASTRAC code is aimed at providing one such engineering tool that is easy to use and yet capable of dealing with a broad range of transition related issues. LASTRAC was written from scratch based on the state-of-the-art numerical methods for stability analysis and modem software technologies. At low fidelity, it allows users to perform linear stability analysis and N-factor transition correlation for a broad range of flow regimes and configurations by using either the linear stability theory (LST) or linear parabolized stability equations (LPSE) method. At high fidelity, users may use nonlinear PSE to track finite-amplitude disturbances until the skin friction rise. Coupled with the built-in receptivity model that is currently under development, the nonlinear PSE method offers a synergistic approach to predict transition onset for a given disturbance environment based on first principles. This paper describes the governing equations, numerical methods, code development, and case studies for the current release of LASTRAC. Practical applications of LASTRAC are demonstrated for linear stability calculations, N-factor transition correlation, non-linear breakdown simulations, and controls of stationary crossflow instability in supersonic swept wing boundary

  12. Application of DNA bar codes for screening of industrially important fungi: the haplotype of Trichoderma harzianum sensu stricto indicates superior chitinase formation.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Viviana; Seidl, Verena; Szakacs, George; Komoń-Zelazowska, Monika; Kubicek, Christian P; Druzhinina, Irina S

    2007-11-01

    Selection of suitable strains for biotechnological purposes is frequently a random process supported by high-throughput methods. Using chitinase production by Hypocrea lixii/Trichoderma harzianum as a model, we tested whether fungal strains with superior enzyme formation may be diagnosed by DNA bar codes. We analyzed sequences of two phylogenetic marker loci, internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 of the rRNA-encoding gene cluster and the large intron of the elongation factor 1-alpha gene, tef1, from 50 isolates of H. lixii/T. harzianum, which were also tested to determine their ability to produce chitinases in solid-state fermentation (SSF). Statistically supported superior chitinase production was obtained for strains carrying one of the observed ITS1 and ITS2 and tef1 alleles corresponding to an allele of T. harzianum type strain CBS 226.95. A tef1-based DNA bar code tool, TrichoCHIT, for rapid identification of these strains was developed. The geographic origin of the strains was irrelevant for chitinase production. The improved chitinase production by strains containing this haplotype was not due to better growth on N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine or glucosamine. Isoenzyme electrophoresis showed that neither the isoenzyme profile of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidases or the endochitinases nor the intensity of staining of individual chitinase bands correlated with total chitinase in the culture filtrate. The superior chitinase producers did not exhibit similarly increased cellulase formation. Biolog Phenotype MicroArray analysis identified lack of N-acetyl-beta-D-mannosamine utilization as a specific trait of strains with the chitinase-overproducing haplotype. This observation was used to develop a plate screening assay for rapid microbiological identification of the strains. The data illustrate that desired industrial properties may be an attribute of certain populations within a species, and screening procedures should thus include a balanced mixture of all

  13. A novel photoelectrochemical sensor based on photocathode of PbS quantum dots utilizing catalase mimetics of bio-bar-coded platinum nanoparticles/G-quadruplex/hemin for signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Liu, Kang-Li; Shu, Jun-Xian; Gu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Dong, Yu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun

    2015-07-15

    Photocathode based on p-type PbS quantum dots (QDs) combing a novel signal amplification strategy utilizing catalase (CAT) mimetics was designed and utilized for sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection of DNA. The bio-bar-coded Pt nanoparticles (NPs)/G-quadruplex/hemin exhibited high CAT-like activity following the Michaelis-Menten model for decomposing H2O2 to water and oxygen, whose activity even slightly exceeded that of natural CAT. The bio-bar-code as a catalytic label was conjugated onto the surface of PbS QDs modified electrodes through the formed sandwich-type structure due to DNA hybridization. Oxygen in situ generated by the CAT mimetics of the bio-bar-code of Pt NPs/G-quadruplex/hemin acted as an efficient electron acceptor of illuminated PbS QDs, promoting charge separation and enhancing cathodic photocurrent. Under optimal conditions, the developed PEC biosensor for target DNA exhibited a dynamic range of 0.2pmol/L to 1.0nmol/L with a low detection limit of 0.08pmol/L. The high sensitivity of the method was resulted from the sensitive response of PbS QDs to oxygen and the highly efficient CAT-like catalytic activity of the bio-bar-coded Pt NPs/G-quadruplex/hemin. PMID:25723768

  14. Bar-coded pyrosequencing reveals shared bacterial community properties along the temperature gradients of two alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Miller, Scott R; Strong, Aaron L; Jones, Kenneth L; Ungerer, Mark C

    2009-07-01

    An understanding of how communities are organized is a fundamental goal of ecology but one which has historically been elusive for microbial systems. We used a bar-coded pyrosequencing approach targeting the V3 region of the bacterial small-subunit rRNA gene to address the factors that structure communities along the thermal gradients of two alkaline hot springs in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. The filtered data set included a total of nearly 34,000 sequences from 39 environmental samples. Each was assigned to one of 391 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified by their unique V3 sequence signatures. Although the two hot springs differed in their OTU compositions, community resemblance and diversity changed with strikingly similar dynamics along the two outflow channels. Two lines of evidence suggest that these community properties are controlled primarily by environmental temperature. First, community resemblance decayed exponentially with increasing differences in temperature between samples but was only weakly correlated with physical distance. Second, diversity decreased with increasing temperature at the same rate along both gradients but was uncorrelated with other measured environmental variables. This study also provides novel insights into the nature of the ecological interactions among important taxa in these communities. A strong negative association was observed between cyanobacteria and the Chloroflexi, which together accounted for approximately 70% of the sequences sampled. This pattern contradicts the longstanding hypothesis that coadapted lineages of these bacteria maintain tightly cooccurring distributions along these gradients as a result of a producer-consumer relationship. We propose that they instead compete for some limiting resource(s). PMID:19429553

  15. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  16. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  17. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  18. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  19. Barred beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Kroon, Aart

    2002-11-01

    Seven different bar types are distinguished to provide a framework for comparing morphodynamic studies conducted in different areas. Five types occur in semiprotected or open coast settings, of which two are intertidal and three are subtidal. Two types occur in highly protected settings. The occurrence of a certain bar type is generally determined by the wave energy and tidal range, although the nearshore slope may also be a differentiating boundary condition. The theory behind the generation, evolution and decay of bars has evolved most for the subtidal bars in the semiprotected and open coast settings, for which three types of competing mechanisms have been formulated (breakpoint, infragravity waves, self-organisational). Most research has focused on these processes on the time scale of storm events and post-storm recovery. However, to understand the longer-term behavior of bar systems, knowledge of the role of relaxation time and morphologic feedback is needed as well. At present, such knowledge is very limited. We think it can best be obtained from the analysis of long time series of morphology and forcing conditions, rather than from intensive field experiments. In case of a feedback-dominated response (self-organisational), we expect to find no correlation between the time series of external forcing and the morphologic response. In case of a relaxation time-dominated response, we do expect to find such a correlation, albeit filtered. This discussion is illustrated by a case study of the Dutch coast.

  20. NUBOW-2D Inelastic

    2002-01-31

    This program solves the two-dimensional mechanical equilbrium configuration of a core restraint system, which is subjected to radial temperature and flux gradients, on a time increment basis. At each time increment, the code calculates the irradiation creep and swelling strains for each duct from user-specified creep and swelling correlations. Using the calculated thermal bowing, inelastic bowing and the duct dilation, the corresponding equilibrium forces, beam deflections, total beam displacements, and structural reactivity changes are calculated.

  1. QR Codes 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; LaFrance, Jason; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional scannable code, similar in function to a traditional bar code that one might find on a product at the supermarket. The main difference between the two is that, while a traditional bar code can hold a maximum of only 20 digits, a QR code can hold up to 7,089 characters, so it can contain much more…

  2. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  3. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  4. TACO (2D AND 3D). Taco

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1983-03-01

    A set of finite element codes for the solution of nonlinear, two-dimensional (TACO2D) and three-dimensional (TACO3D) heat transfer problems. Performs linear and nonlinear analyses of both transient and steady state heat transfer problems. Has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties. Materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, radiation, and internal heat generation.

  5. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  6. ARL Explosive Blast Bar Gauge Response Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Gerrit; Boyle, Vincent; Benjamin, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Simulations allow us to optimize the design of a bar gauge. The incident blast wave imparts a wave that travels down the metal bar. Strain gauges positioned along the bar measure the strain produced by the bar wave, allowing determination of pressure and impulse at the bar face. The measured pressure history depends on the arrangement of the bar gauge. If a large metal plate surrounds the bar face, a reflected blast pressure is measured. If a metal fixture that forms a nozzle surrounds the bar face, the initial pressure will be the same as above. In time, release waves emanating from the nozzle edge will decrease the pressure at the bar face. The bar diameter and size of strain gauges control the time response or gauge bandwidth. CTH hydrocode simulations allow optimization of bar gauge features for various size explosive charges. The simulations predicted the response of the metal plate arrangement to a blast from a spherical composition C4 charge. The simulations predicted the proper metal plate diameter for a reflected pressure measurement. Other simulations compared the response of the bar gauge for both configurations (nozzle or plate surround) when subjected to the same blast loading. Pressure histories from simulations were compared to those from experiment and those predicted by the CONWEP blast code. The initial experimental and CONWEP pressures were in reasonable agreement.

  7. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  8. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  9. Bar dimensions and bar shapes in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuven, Jasper; Kleinhans, Maarten; Weisscher, Steven; van der Vegt, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Estuaries cause fascinating patterns of dynamic channels and shoals. Intertidal sandbars are valuable habitats, whilst channels provide access to harbors. We still lack a full explanation and classification scheme for the shapes and dimensions of bar patterns in natural estuaries, in contrast with bars in rivers. Analytical physics-based models suggest that bar length in estuaries increases with flow velocity, tidal excursion length or estuary width, depending on which model. However, these hypotheses were never validated for lack of data and experiments. We present a large dataset and determine the controls on bar shape and dimensions in estuaries, spanning bar lengths from centimeters (experiments) to 10s of kilometers length. First, we visually identified and classified 190 bars, measured their dimensions (width, length, height) and local braiding index. Data on estuarine geometry and tidal characteristics were obtained from governmental databases and literature on case studies. We found that many complex bars can be seen as simple elongated bars partly cut by mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels. Data analysis shows that bar dimensions scale with estuary dimensions, in particular estuary width. Breaking up the complex bars in simple bars greatly reduced scatter. Analytical bar theory overpredicts bar dimensions by an order of magnitude in case of small estuarine systems. Likewise, braiding index depends on local width-to-depth ratio, as was previously found for river systems. Our results suggest that estuary dimensions determine the order of magnitude of bar dimensions, while tidal characteristics modify this. We will continue to model bars numerically and experimentally. Our dataset on tidal bars enables future studies on the sedimentary architecture of geologically complex tidal deposits and enables studying effects of man-induced perturbations such as dredging and dumping on bar and channel patterns and habitats.

  10. Defragged Binary I Ching Genetic Code Chromosomes Compared to Nirenberg’s and Transformed into Rotating 2D Circles and Squares and into a 3D 100% Symmetrical Tetrahedron Coupled to a Functional One to Discern Start From Non-Start Methionines through a Stella Octangula

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chavez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Background Three binary representations of the genetic code according to the ancient I Ching of Fu-Xi will be presented, depending on their defragging capabilities by pairing based on three biochemical properties of the nucleic acids: H-bonds, Purine/Pyrimidine rings, and the Keto-enol/Amino-imino tautomerism, yielding the last pair a 32/32 single-strand self-annealed genetic code and I Ching tables. Methods Our working tool is the ancient binary I Ching's resulting genetic code chromosomes defragged by vertical and by horizontal pairing, reverse engineered into non-binaries of 2D rotating 4×4×4 circles and 8×8 squares and into one 3D 100% symmetrical 16×4 tetrahedron coupled to a functional tetrahedron with apical signaling and central hydrophobicity (codon formula: 4[1(1)+1(3)+1(4)+4(2)]; 5:5, 6:6 in man) forming a stella octangula, and compared to Nirenberg's 16×4 codon table (1965) pairing the first two nucleotides of the 64 codons in axis y. Results One horizontal and one vertical defragging had the start Met at the center. Two, both horizontal and vertical pairings produced two pairs of 2×8×4 genetic code chromosomes naturally arranged (M and I), rearranged by semi-introversion of central purines or pyrimidines (M' and I') and by clustering hydrophobic amino acids; their quasi-identity was disrupted by amino acids with odd codons (Met and Tyr pairing to Ile and TGA Stop); in all instances, the 64-grid 90° rotational ability was restored. Conclusions We defragged three I Ching representations of the genetic code while emphasizing Nirenberg's historical finding. The synthetic genetic code chromosomes obtained reflect the protective strategy of enzymes with a similar function, having both humans and mammals a biased G-C dominance of three H-bonds in the third nucleotide of their most used codons per amino acid, as seen in one chromosome of the i, M and M' genetic codes, while a two H-bond A-T dominance was found in their complementary chromosome, as seen

  11. Adaptive entropy coded subband coding of images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Modestino, J W

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe a design approach, called 2-D entropy-constrained subband coding (ECSBC), based upon recently developed 2-D entropy-constrained vector quantization (ECVQ) schemes. The output indexes of the embedded quantizers are further compressed by use of noiseless entropy coding schemes, such as Huffman or arithmetic codes, resulting in variable-rate outputs. Depending upon the specific configurations of the ECVQ and the ECPVQ over the subbands, many different types of SBC schemes can be derived within the generic 2-D ECSBC framework. Among these, the authors concentrate on three representative types of 2-D ECSBC schemes and provide relative performance evaluations. They also describe an adaptive buffer instrumented version of 2-D ECSBC, called 2-D ECSBC/AEC, for use with fixed-rate channels which completely eliminates buffer overflow/underflow problems. This adaptive scheme achieves performance quite close to the corresponding ideal 2-D ECSBC system. PMID:18296138

  12. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.-T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive in barred galaxies, especially in gaseous substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. To explore the effects of magnetic fields on the formation of the substructures as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center, we run two-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We use a modified version of the Athena code whose numerical magnetic diffusivity is shown to be of third order in space. In the bar regions, magnetic fields are compressed and abruptly bent around the dust-lane shocks. The associated magnetic stress not only reduces the peak density of the dust-lane shocks but also removes angular momentum further from the gas that is moving radially in. Nuclear rings that form at the location of centrifugal barrier rather than resonance with the bar are smaller and more radially distributed, and the mass flow rate to the galaxy center is correspondingly larger in models with stronger magnetic fields. Outside the bar regions, the bar potential and strong shear conspire to amplify the field strength near the corotation resonance. The amplified fields transport angular momentum outward, producing trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms are found to be unstable to a tearing-mode instability of magnetic reconnection. This produces numerous magnetic islands that eventually make the outer regions highly chaotic.

  14. Stacking up 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Graphene might be the most famous example, but there are other 2D materials and compounds too. Louise Mayor explains how these atomically thin sheets can be layered together to create flexible “van der Waals heterostructures”, which could lead to a range of novel applications.

  15. EM 2dV1.0.F

    2012-01-05

    Code is for a layered electric medium with 2d structure. Includes air-earth interface at node z=2.. The electric ex and ez fields are calculated on edges of elemental grid and magnetic field hy is calculated on the face of the elemental grid. The code allows for a layered earth with 2d structures. Solutions of coupled first order Maxwell's equations are solved in the two dimensional environment using a finite- difference scheme on a staggered spationamore » and temporal grid.« less

  16. Uncertainties in the deprojection of the observed bar properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yanfei; Shen, Juntai; Li, Zhao-Yu

    2014-08-10

    In observations, it is important to deproject the two fundamental quantities characterizing a bar, i.e., its length (a) and ellipticity (e), to face-on values before any careful analyses. However, systematic estimation on the uncertainties of the commonly used deprojection methods is still lacking. Simulated galaxies are well suited in this study. We project two simulated barred galaxies onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane with different bar orientations and disk inclination angles (i). Bar properties are measured and deprojected with the popular deprojection methods in the literature. Generally speaking, deprojection uncertainties increase with increasing i. All of the deprojection methods behave badly when i is larger than 60°, due to the vertical thickness of the bar. Thus, future statistical studies of barred galaxies should exclude galaxies more inclined than 60°. At moderate inclination angles (i ≤ 60°), 2D deprojection methods (analytical and image stretching), and Fourier-based methods (Fourier decomposition and bar-interbar contrast) perform reasonably well with uncertainties ∼10% in both the bar length and ellipticity, whereas the uncertainties of the one-dimensional (1D) analytical deprojection can be as high as 100% in certain extreme cases. We find that different bar measurement methods show systematic differences in the deprojection uncertainties. We further discuss the deprojection uncertainty factors with the emphasis on the most important one, i.e., the three-dimensional structure of the bar itself. We construct two triaxial toy bar models that can qualitatively reproduce the results of the 1D and 2D analytical deprojections; they confirm that the vertical thickness of the bar is the main source of uncertainties.

  17. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  18. An observer's view of simulated galaxies: disc-to-total ratios, bars and (pseudo-)bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannapieco, Cecilia; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Jonsson, Patrik; White, Simon D. M.

    2010-09-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of Milky Way-mass galaxies to study the relative importance of the main stellar components, i.e. discs, bulges and bars, at redshift zero. The main aim of this Letter is to understand if estimates of the structural parameters of these components determined from kinematics (as is usually done in simulations) agree well with those obtained using a photometric bulge/disc/bar decomposition (as done in observations). To perform such a comparison, we have produced synthetic observations of the simulation outputs with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SUNRISE and used the BUDDA code to make 2D photometric decompositions of the resulting images (in the i and g bands). We find that the kinematic disc-to-total (D/T) ratio estimates are systematically and significantly lower than the photometric ones. While the maximum D/T ratios obtained with the former method are of the order of 0.2, they are typically >0.4, and can be as high as 0.7, according to the latter. The photometric decomposition shows that many of the simulated galaxies have bars, with Bar/T ratios in the range 0.2-0.4, and that bulges have in all cases low Sérsic indices, resembling observed pseudo-bulges instead of classical ones. Simulated discs, bulges and bars generally have similar g - i colours, which are in the blue tail of the distribution of observed colours. This is not due to the presence of young stars, but rather due to low metallicities and poor gas content in the simulated galaxies, which makes dust extinction low. Photometric decompositions thus match the component ratios usually quoted for spiral galaxies better than kinematic decompositions, but the shift is insufficient to make the simulations consistent with observed late-type systems.

  19. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  20. RADMC: A 2-D Continuum Radiative Transfer Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullemond, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    RADMC is a 2-D Monte-Carlo code for dust continuum radiative transfer circumstellar disks and envelopes. It is based on the method of Bjorkman & Wood (ApJ 2001, 554, 615), but with several modifications to produce smoother results with fewer photon packages.

  1. Unitary matrix models and 2D quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dalley, S. . Joseph Henry Labs.); Johnson, C.V.; Morris, T.R. . Dept. of Physics); Watterstam, A. )

    1992-09-21

    In this paper the KdV and modified KdV integrable hierarchies are shown to be different descriptions of the same 2D gravitational system - open-closed string theory. Non-perturbative solutions of the multicritical unitary matrix models map to non-singular solutions of the renormalization group equation for the string susceptibility, [P, Q] = Q. The authors also demonstrate that the large-N solutions of unitary matrix integrals in external fields, studied by Gross and Newman, equal the non-singular pure closed-string solutions of [[bar P], Q] = Q.

  2. FPCAS2D user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    1994-12-01

    The FPCAS2D computer code has been developed for aeroelastic stability analysis of bladed disks such as those in fans, compressors, turbines, propellers, or propfans. The aerodynamic analysis used in this code is based on the unsteady two-dimensional full potential equation which is solved for a cascade of blades. The structural analysis is based on a two degree-of-freedom rigid typical section model for each blade. Detailed explanations of the aerodynamic analysis, the numerical algorithms, and the aeroelastic analysis are not given in this report. This guide can be used to assist in the preparation of the input data required by the FPCAS2D code. A complete description of the input data is provided in this report. In addition, four test cases, including inputs and outputs, are provided.

  3. A Local Reference For Bar Studies In The Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Sheth, Kartik; S4G Team

    2015-08-01

    Stellar bars are present in ~2/3 of nearby spirals and play a critical role in the evolution of their hosts. With the advent of large high-resolution imaging surveys, bar studies are being extended to distant galaxies. However, photometric studies of the distant universe are invariably subject to the effects of band-shifting, the progressive shift of the photometric band to bluer rest-frame wavelengths. In order to reliably characterize the intrinsic evolution of bars with redshift, safe from band-shifting effects, it is necessary to establish a local anchor of how bar properties vary with wavelength. We present a detailed multi-band study of bar properties from UV through mid-infrared for a sample of 16 large nearby barred galaxies. Based on ellipticity and position angle profiles resulting from fitting elliptical isophotes to the 2D light distribution of each galaxy, we find that both the bar length and the bar ellipticity increase at bluer wavebands. We attribute the increase in bar length to the frequent presence of prominent star forming knots at the end of bars: these regions are significantly brighter in bluer bands, resulting in the “artificial” lengthening of the bar. The increase in bar ellipticity, on the other hand, is driven by the bulge size: the bulge, composed primarily of old/red stars, is less prominent at bluer bands, allowing for thinner ellipses to be fit within the bar region. The resulting effect is that bars appear longer and thinner at bluer bands. Although we find that ~50% of the bars disappear in the UV, the results on bar ellipticity and length extend to those cases in which the bar is still visible in the UV. These results imply that careful correction for band-shifting effects is necessary for high-z studies to reliably gauge any intrinsic evolution of the bar properties with redshift. In the light of the ample space-based optical data now available, this study may be used as a reference to implement band-shifting corrections to

  4. The four bars problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauroy, Alexandre; Taslakian, Perouz; Langerman, Stefan; Jungers, Raphaël

    2016-09-01

    A four-bar linkage is a mechanism consisting of four rigid bars which are joined by their endpoints in a polygonal chain and which can rotate freely at the joints (or vertices). We assume that the linkage lies in the 2-dimensional plane so that one of the bars is held horizontally fixed. In this paper we consider the problem of reconfiguring a four-bar linkage using an operation called a pop. Given a four-bar linkage, a pop reflects a vertex across the line defined by its two adjacent vertices along the polygonal chain. Our main result shows that for certain conditions on the lengths of the bars, the neighborhood of any configuration that can be reached by smooth motion can also be reached by pops. The proof relies on the fact that pops are described by a map on the circle with an irrational number of rotation.

  5. Experimental validation of equations for 2D DIC uncertainty quantification.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) equations have been derived for predicting matching uncertainty in two-dimensional image correlation a priori. These equations include terms that represent the image noise and image contrast. Researchers at the University of South Carolina have extended previous 1D work to calculate matching errors in 2D. These 2D equations have been coded into a Sandia National Laboratories UQ software package to predict the uncertainty for DIC images. This paper presents those equations and the resulting error surfaces for trial speckle images. Comparison of the UQ results with experimentally subpixel-shifted images is also discussed.

  6. Gas and Dust in the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab, H.; Compiègne, M.; Habart, E.; Abergel, A.

    2011-11-01

    We use the DustEM model coupled with a radiative transfer code to fit the Herschel and Spitzer emission of the Orion Bar. The thermal dust emission at the 250-μm peak position is well reproduced but we overestimate the stochastically heated grain emission. The dust model parameters are checked with the Meudon PDR code and are consistent with the spectroscopic data from the SPIRE FTS.

  7. 2D barcodes: a novel and simple method for denture identification.

    PubMed

    Sudheendra, Udyavara S; Sowmya, Kasetty; Vidhi, Mathur; Shreenivas, Kallianpur; Prathamesh, Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Several methods of denture marking have been described in the literature. However, most of them are expensive, time-consuming, and do not permit the incorporation of large amounts of information. We propose a novel and simple method incorporating 2D codes which has several advantages over the existing methods. A 2D code was generated in the dental office and inserted into a maxillary denture. The code was then read using software downloaded into a mobile phone giving access to the website containing details about the patient. The denture was also subjected to durability tests, which did not hamper the efficacy of the 2D code. 2D coding for dentures is a simple, less expensive method with the potential of storing a large amount of information that can be accessed on-site by the forensic investigator, thus allowing quick identification of the denture wearer. PMID:22971078

  8. 2D bifurcations and Newtonian properties of memristive Chua's circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalek, W.; Podhaisky, H.

    2016-01-01

    Two interesting properties of Chua's circuits are presented. First, two-parameter bifurcation diagrams of Chua's oscillatory circuits with memristors are presented. To obtain various 2D bifurcation images a substantial numerical effort, possibly with parallel computations, is needed. The numerical algorithm is described first and its numerical code for 2D bifurcation image creation is available for free downloading. Several color 2D images and the corresponding 1D greyscale bifurcation diagrams are included. Secondly, Chua's circuits are linked to Newton's law φ ''= F(t,φ,φ')/m with φ=\\text{flux} , constant m > 0, and the force term F(t,φ,φ') containing memory terms. Finally, the jounce scalar equations for Chua's circuits are also discussed.

  9. Bar-biting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bar biting is regarded as a stereotypic behavior in which the animal carries out repetitive mouthing and biting of the metal bars in its environmental enclosure. It is commonly seen in sows housed in close confinement, in barren environments, and with restricted access to food. However, it has also ...

  10. Computerized mega code recording.

    PubMed

    Burt, T W; Bock, H C

    1988-04-01

    A system has been developed to facilitate recording of advanced cardiac life support mega code testing scenarios. By scanning a paper "keyboard" using a bar code wand attached to a portable microcomputer, the person assigned to record the scenario can easily generate an accurate, complete, timed, and typewritten record of the given situations and the obtained responses. PMID:3354937

  11. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  12. Slow bars in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.

    2000-11-01

    Here we put forward some arguments in favour of the existence of slow bars. More then a half of spiral galaxies have in their central regions a bar - a structure in the form of triaxial ellipsoid. Historically two models of the bar were developed - those of the so called ``slow'' and ``fast'' bars. In both cases the bar is in some resonance with the galactic disc region near the bar ends - it is the corotation resonance for a fast bar and the inner Lindblad resonance for a slow bar. For the same angular velocity the fast bar would be larger then the slow bar. Alternatively, for the same size the fast bar would have much higher angular velocity, that being the reason for the terminology used. Up till now, the direct measurement of angular velocity of a bar has been an open problem. This is why all arguments on the nature of bar observed in some particular galaxy are inevitably indirect. Despite the fact that the model of slow bars was developed slightly earlier, the main part of attention was focused on the fast bars. Presently many researchers believe in the existence of the fast bars in real galaxies, while discussions on the existence of the slow bars continue so far. In this Letter we demonstrate that the bar detected in the grand design spiral galaxy NGC 157 is the slow bar.

  13. FRANC2D: A two-dimensional crack propagation simulator. Version 2.7: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawrzynek, Paul; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    FRANC 2D (FRacture ANalysis Code, 2 Dimensions) is a menu driven, interactive finite element computer code that performs fracture mechanics analyses of 2-D structures. The code has an automatic mesh generator for triangular and quadrilateral elements. FRANC2D calculates the stress intensity factor using linear elastic fracture mechanics and evaluates crack extension using several methods that may be selected by the user. The code features a mesh refinement and adaptive mesh generation capability that is automatically developed according to the predicted crack extension direction and length. The code also has unique features that permit the analysis of layered structure with load transfer through simulated mechanical fasteners or bonded joints. The code was written for UNIX workstations with X-windows graphics and may be executed on the following computers: DEC DecStation 3000 and 5000 series, IBM RS/6000 series, Hewlitt-Packard 9000/700 series, SUN Sparc stations, and most Silicon Graphics models.

  14. BOXER: Fine-flux Cross Section Condensation, 2D Few Group Diffusion and Transport Burnup Calculations

    2010-02-01

    Neutron transport, calculation of multiplication factor and neutron fluxes in 2-D configurations: cell calculations, 2-D diffusion and transport, and burnup. Preparation of a cross section library for the code BOXER from a basic library in ENDF/B format (ETOBOX).

  15. Changes in Smoking-Related Norms in Bars Resulting from California's Smoke-Free Workplace Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2012-01-01

    California's Smoke-Free Workplace Act--CA Labor Code Sec. 6404.5(a)--was extended to bars in 1998. This article analyzes changes in normative beliefs and behaviors related to bar smoking in the decade following the adoption of the Act. In a series of studies evaluating the smoke-free workplace law in bars, researchers conducted extensive…

  16. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  17. Mass modeling for bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1987-01-01

    Methods of modeling mass for bars are surveyed. A method for extending John Archer's concept of consistent mass beyond just translational inertia effects is included. Recommendations are given for various types of modeling situations.

  18. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  19. Symmetry detection of auxetic behaviour in 2D frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitschke, H.; Schröder-Turk, G. E.; Mecke, K.; Fowler, P. W.; Guest, S. D.

    2013-06-01

    A symmetry-extended Maxwell treatment of the net mobility of periodic bar-and-joint frameworks is used to derive a sufficient condition for auxetic behaviour of a 2D material. The type of auxetic behaviour that can be detected by symmetry has Poisson's ratio -1, with equal expansion/contraction in all directions, and is here termed equiauxetic. A framework may have a symmetry-detectable equiauxetic mechanism if it belongs to a plane group that includes rotational axes of order n = 6, 4, or 3. If the reducible representation for the net mobility contains mechanisms that preserve full rotational symmetry (A modes), these are equiauxetic. In addition, for n = 6, mechanisms that halve rotational symmetry (B modes) are also equiauxetic.

  20. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  1. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  2. Light field morphing using 2D features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Lin, Stephen; Lee, Seungyong; Guo, Baining; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-01-01

    We present a 2D feature-based technique for morphing 3D objects represented by light fields. Existing light field morphing methods require the user to specify corresponding 3D feature elements to guide morph computation. Since slight errors in 3D specification can lead to significant morphing artifacts, we propose a scheme based on 2D feature elements that is less sensitive to imprecise marking of features. First, 2D features are specified by the user in a number of key views in the source and target light fields. Then the two light fields are warped view by view as guided by the corresponding 2D features. Finally, the two warped light fields are blended together to yield the desired light field morph. Two key issues in light field morphing are feature specification and warping of light field rays. For feature specification, we introduce a user interface for delineating 2D features in key views of a light field, which are automatically interpolated to other views. For ray warping, we describe a 2D technique that accounts for visibility changes and present a comparison to the ideal morphing of light fields. Light field morphing based on 2D features makes it simple to incorporate previous image morphing techniques such as nonuniform blending, as well as to morph between an image and a light field. PMID:15631126

  3. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  4. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  5. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  6. Graphical representations of DNA as 2-D map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan

    2004-03-01

    We describe a modification of the compact representation of DNA sequences which transforms the sequence into a 2-D diagram in which the 'spots' have integer coordinates. As a result the accompanying numerical characterization of DNA is quite simple and straightforward. This is an important advantage, particularly when considering DNA sequences having thousands of nucleic bases. The approach starts with the compact representation of DNA based on zigzag spiral template used for placing 'spots' associated with binary codes of the nucleic acids and subsequent suppression of the underlying zigzag curve. As a result, a 2-D map is formed in which all 'spots' have integer coordinates. By using only distances between spots having the same x or the same y coordinate one can construct a 'map profile' using integer arithmetic. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin.

  7. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  8. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  9. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  10. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  11. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  12. Extended 2D generalized dilaton gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, R. O.

    2008-09-01

    We show that an anomaly-free description of matter in (1+1) dimensions requires a deformation of the 2D relativity principle, which introduces a non-trivial centre in the 2D Poincaré algebra. Then we work out the reduced phase space of the anomaly-free 2D relativistic particle, in order to show that it lives in a noncommutative 2D Minkowski space. Moreover, we build a Gaussian wave packet to show that a Planck length is well defined in two dimensions. In order to provide a gravitational interpretation for this noncommutativity, we propose to extend the usual 2D generalized dilaton gravity models by a specific Maxwell component, which guages the extra symmetry associated with the centre of the 2D Poincaré algebra. In addition, we show that this extension is a high energy correction to the unextended dilaton theories that can affect the topology of spacetime. Further, we couple a test particle to the general extended dilaton models with the purpose of showing that they predict a noncommutativity in curved spacetime, which is locally described by a Moyal star product in the low energy limit. We also conjecture a probable generalization of this result, which provides strong evidence that the noncommutativity is described by a certain star product which is not of the Moyal type at high energies. Finally, we prove that the extended dilaton theories can be formulated as Poisson Sigma models based on a nonlinear deformation of the extended Poincaré algebra.

  13. BARS/SSC/SPHINX

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W. )

    1993-06-06

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shock compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  14. BARS/SSC/SPHINX

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W. )

    1993-06-06

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shoch compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  15. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  16. Quantifying Therapeutic and Diagnostic Efficacy in 2D Microvascular Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Vickerman, Mary B.; Keith, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    VESGEN is a newly automated, user-interactive program that maps and quantifies the effects of vascular therapeutics and regulators on microvascular form and function. VESGEN analyzes two-dimensional, black and white vascular images by measuring important vessel morphology parameters. This software guides the user through each required step of the analysis process via a concise graphical user interface (GUI). Primary applications of the VESGEN code are 2D vascular images acquired as clinical diagnostic images of the human retina and as experimental studies of the effects of vascular regulators and therapeutics on vessel remodeling.

  17. Copper damage modeling with the tensile hopkinson bar and gas gun

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D. L.; Thissell, W. R.; Trujillo, C. P.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile damage nucleation in recovered copper tensile Hopkinson bar specimens has been modeled using the 2D EPIC code. The model has also been successfully applied to spallation gas gun data to greatly expand the pressure range. The split tensile Hopkinson pressure bar permits the creation of damage at fairly high strain rates (10{sup 4}/s) with large plastic strains (100%). Careful momentum trapping allows incipient damage states to be arrested and recovered for metallurgical examination. The use of notched samples allows the pressure - flow stress, or triaxiality, to be varied from 1/3 to about 1.2 to study the interplay of pressure and deviatoric stress. In this paper, we will concentrate on modeling the nucleation of ductile damage in pure copper (Hitachi). With the same material, we also study spallation in a gas gun experiment to obtain the nucleation stress under high pressure and small plastic strain. The goal of the modeling is to obtain a unified nucleation model suitable for both.

  18. Measurements of vertical bar Vcb vertical bar and vertical bar Vub vertical bar at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Rotondo, M.

    2005-10-12

    We report results from the BABAR Collaboration on the semileptonic B decays, highlighting the measurements of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vub and Vcb. We describe the techniques used to obtain the matrix element |Vcb| using the measurement of the inclusive B {yields} Xclv process and a large sample of exclusive B {yields} D*lv decays. The vertical bar Vub vertical bar matrix elements has been measured studying different kinematic variables of the B {yields} Xulv process, and also with the exclusive reconstruction of B {yields} {pi}({rho})lv decays.

  19. Active chatter control system for long-overhang boring bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Douglas R.; Golioto, Igor; Thompson, Norman B.

    1997-05-01

    Some machining processes, such as boring, have been historically limited by excessive bar vibration, often resulting in poor surface finish and reduced tool life. A unique boring bar system has been developed to suppress bar vibration, or chatter, during machining using active control technology. Metal cutting test programs have shown proven, repeatable performance on hard-to-cut, aircraft industry high-temperature nickel alloys as well as more easily cut carbon steels. Critical bar length-to-diameter (L/D) ratios, depths-of-cuts, feed rates and cutting speeds far exceed those attainable from the best available passively-damped boring bars. This industry-ready system consists of three principle subsystems: active clamp, instrumented bar, and control electronics. The active clamp is a lathe-mountable body capable of supporting bars of varying sizes and articulating them in orthogonal directions from the base of the bar shank. The instrumented bar consists of a steel shank, standard insert head and imbedded accelerometers. Wire harnesses from both the bar and clamp connect to control electronics comprised of highly-efficient switched- capacitor amplifiers that drive the piezoelectric actuators, sensor signal conditioning, a PC-based program manager and two 32-bit floating-point DSPs. The program manager code runs on the host PC and distributes system identification and control functions to the two DSPs. All real-time signal processing is based on the principles of adaptive filter minimization. For the described system, cutting performance has extended existing chatter thresholds (cutting parameter combinations) for nickel alloys by as much as 400% while maintaining precision surface finish on the machined part. Bar L/D ratios as high as 11 have enabled deep boring operations on nickel workpieces that otherwise could not be performed free of chatter.

  20. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  1. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  2. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  3. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  4. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  5. 2D-Crystal-Based Functional Inks.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bartolotta, Antonino; Coleman, Jonathan N; Backes, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to produce and process graphene, related 2D crystals, and heterostructures in the liquid phase makes them promising materials for an ever-growing class of applications as composite materials, sensors, in flexible optoelectronics, and energy storage and conversion. In particular, the ability to formulate functional inks with on-demand rheological and morphological properties, i.e., lateral size and thickness of the dispersed 2D crystals, is a step forward toward the development of industrial-scale, reliable, inexpensive printing/coating processes, a boost for the full exploitation of such nanomaterials. Here, the exfoliation strategies of graphite and other layered crystals are reviewed, along with the advances in the sorting of lateral size and thickness of the exfoliated sheets together with the formulation of functional inks and the current development of printing/coating processes of interest for the realization of 2D-crystal-based devices. PMID:27273554

  6. Dark Matter Trapping by Stellar Bars: The Shadow Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Michael S.; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the complex interactions between the stellar disc and the dark-matter halo during bar formation and evolution using N-body simulations with fine temporal resolution and optimally chosen spatial resolution. We find that the forming stellar bar traps dark matter in the vicinity of the stellar bar into bar-supporting orbits. We call this feature the shadow bar. The shadow bar modifies both the location and magnitude of the angular momentum transfer between the disc and dark matter halo and adds 10 per cent to the mass of the stellar bar over 4 Gyr. The shadow bar is potentially observable by its density and velocity signature in spheroid stars and by direct dark matter detection experiments. Numerical tests demonstrate that the shadow bar can diminish the rate of angular momentum transport from the bar to the dark matter halo by more than a factor of three over the rate predicted by dynamical friction with an untrapped dark halo, and thus provides a possible physical explanation for the observed prevalence of fast bars in nature.

  7. The 2D lingual appliance system.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) lingual bracket system represents a valuable treatment option for adult patients seeking a completely invisible orthodontic appliance. The ease of direct or simplified indirect bonding of 2D lingual brackets in combination with low friction mechanics makes it possible to achieve a good functional and aesthetic occlusion, even in the presence of a severe malocclusion. The use of a self-ligating bracket significantly reduces chair-side time for the orthodontist, and the low-profile bracket design greatly improves patient comfort. PMID:24005953

  8. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  9. Measurement of 2D birefringence distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Masato; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masahiro; Tachihara, Satoru

    1992-10-01

    A new measuring method of 2-D birefringence distribution has been developed. It has not been an easy job to get a birefringence distribution in an optical element with conventional ellipsometry because of its lack of scanning means. Finding an analogy between the rotating analyzer method in ellipsometry and the phase-shifting method in recently developed digital interferometry, we have applied the phase-shifting algorithm to ellipsometry, and have developed a new method that makes the measurement of 2-D birefringence distribution easy and possible. The system contains few moving parts, assuring reliability, and measures a large area of a sample at one time, making the measuring time very short.

  10. Breaking through the Bar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Katti

    2011-01-01

    Howard University School of Law had a problem, and school officials knew it. Over a 20-year period, 40 percent of its graduates who took the Maryland bar exam failed it on their first try. During the next 24 months--the time frame required to determine its "eventual pass rate"--almost 90 percent of the students did pass. What they did not know was…

  11. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  12. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits. PMID:26813882

  13. Baby universes in 2d quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Jain, Sanjay; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1993-06-01

    We investigate the fractal structure of 2d quantum gravity, both for pure gravity and for gravity coupled to multiple gaussian fields and for gravity coupled to Ising spins. The roughness of the surfaces is described in terms of baby universes and using numerical simulations we measure their distribution which is related to the string susceptibility exponent γstring.

  14. Structural Properties of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Gadotti, D. A.; Sheth, K.; Lee, M.; S4G Team

    2014-01-01

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We present that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down- bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We show that for galaxies with B/T > 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r_br/R_bar, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad Resonance (OLR) of the bar, and thus the OLR also moves outwards at the same rate as the bar grows. For galaxies with B/T < 0.1, r_br/R_bar, spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds. We quantifiy shapes of bar radial surface brightness profiles by measuring their Sersic indices and show that bars in higher B/T galaxies have flatter radial surface brightness profile than bulgeless galaxies do. In particular, bulgeless galaxies mostly have bars with steep profiles. We show that the normalized bar length is correlated with B/T, which is consistent with bars growing longer with time.

  15. Non-linear k-epsilon-v(sup 2)(bar) modeling with application to high-lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, F. S.; Durbin, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The k-epsilon-v(sup 2)(bar) model has been investigated to quantify its predictive performance on two high-lift configurations: 2D flow over a single-element aerofoil, involving closed-type separation; 3D flow over a prolate spheroid, involving open-type separation. A 'code-friendly' modification has been proposed which enhances the numerical stability, in particular, for explicit and uncoupled flow solvers. As a result of introducing Reynolds-number dependence into a coefficient of the s-equation, the skin-friction distribution for the by-pass transitional flow over a flat plate is better predicted. In order to improve deficiencies arising from the Boussinesq approximation, a nonlinear stress-strain constitutive relation was adopted, in which the only one free constant is calibrated on the basis of DNS data, and the Reynolds-stress anisotropy near the wall is fairly well represented.

  16. Doubled Color Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey

    Combining protection from noise and computational universality is one of the biggest challenges in the fault-tolerant quantum computing. Topological stabilizer codes such as the 2D surface code can tolerate a high level of noise but implementing logical gates, especially non-Clifford ones, requires a prohibitively large overhead due to the need of state distillation. In this talk I will describe a new family of 2D quantum error correcting codes that enable a transversal implementation of all logical gates required for the universal quantum computing. Transversal logical gates (TLG) are encoded operations that can be realized by applying some single-qubit rotation to each physical qubit. TLG are highly desirable since they introduce no overhead and do not spread errors. It has been known before that a quantum code can have only a finite number of TLGs which rules out computational universality. Our scheme circumvents this no-go result by combining TLGs of two different quantum codes using the gauge-fixing method pioneered by Paetznick and Reichardt. The first code, closely related to the 2D color code, enables a transversal implementation of all single-qubit Clifford gates such as the Hadamard gate and the π / 2 phase shift. The second code that we call a doubled color code provides a transversal T-gate, where T is the π / 4 phase shift. The Clifford+T gate set is known to be computationally universal. The two codes can be laid out on the honeycomb lattice with two qubits per site such that the code conversion requires parity measurements for six-qubit Pauli operators supported on faces of the lattice. I will also describe numerical simulations of logical Clifford+T circuits encoded by the distance-3 doubled color code. Based on a joint work with Andrew Cross.

  17. An F2D analysis of the Flow Instability Test (FIT) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-10-01

    The F2D code was used to analyze the Flow-Instability-Test (FIT) experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratories. A one-dimensional analysis of the experiment indicated that at the higher temperature levels the element should be unstable. The experimental data corroborated this theory. The two-dimensional simulation behaved in a manner that was very similar to the experimentally measured behavior. In conclusion, the FIT experimental analysis yields partial code validation of F2D, and it also validates the methodology that is used in analyzing thermal flow stability.

  18. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  19. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  20. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. IV. The Neutrino Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M ⊙, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, langErang, of \\bar{\

  1. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  2. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  3. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  4. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  5. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  6. 2dF mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Lankshear, Allan

    1998-07-01

    2dF is a multi-object instrument mounted at prime focus at the AAT capable of spectroscopic analysis of 400 objects in a single 2 degree field. It also prepares a second 2 degree 400 object field while the first field is being observed. At its heart is a high precision robotic positioner that places individual fiber end magnetic buttons on one of two field plates. The button gripper is carried on orthogonal gantries powered by linear synchronous motors and contains a TV camera which precisely locates backlit buttons to allow placement in user defined locations to 10 (mu) accuracy. Fiducial points on both plates can also be observed by the camera to allow repeated checks on positioning accuracy. Field plates rotate to follow apparent sky rotation. The spectrographs both analyze light from the 200 observing fibers each and back- illuminate the 400 fibers being re-positioned during the observing run. The 2dF fiber position and spectrograph system is a large and complex instrument located at the prime focus of the Anglo Australian Telescope. The mechanical design has departed somewhat from the earlier concepts of Gray et al, but still reflects the audacity of those first ideas. The positioner is capable of positioning 400 fibers on a field plate while another 400 fibers on another plate are observing at the focus of the telescope and feeding the twin spectrographs. When first proposed it must have seemed like ingenuity unfettered by caution. Yet now it works, and works wonderfully well. 2dF is a system which functions as the result of the combined and coordinated efforts of the astronomers, the mechanical designers and tradespeople, the electronic designers, the programmers, the support staff at the telescope, and the manufacturing subcontractors. The mechanical design of the 2dF positioner and spectrographs was carried out by the mechanical engineering staff of the AAO and the majority of the manufacture was carried out in the AAO workshops.

  7. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  8. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  9. Tomosynthesis imaging with 2D scanning trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Kedar; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-03-01

    Tomosynthesis imaging in chest radiography provides volumetric information with the potential for improved diagnostic value when compared to the standard AP or LAT projections. In this paper we explore the image quality benefits of 2D scanning trajectories when coupled with advanced image reconstruction approaches. It is intuitively clear that 2D trajectories provide projection data that is more complete in terms of Radon space filling, when compared with conventional tomosynthesis using a linearly scanned source. Incorporating this additional information for obtaining improved image quality is, however, not a straightforward problem. The typical tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms are based on direct inversion methods e.g. Filtered Backprojection (FBP) or iterative algorithms that are variants of the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART). The FBP approach is fast and provides high frequency details in the image but at the same time introduces streaking artifacts degrading the image quality. The iterative methods can reduce the image artifacts by using image priors but suffer from a slow convergence rate, thereby producing images lacking high frequency details. In this paper we propose using a fast converging optimal gradient iterative scheme that has advantages of both the FBP and iterative methods in that it produces images with high frequency details while reducing the image artifacts. We show that using favorable 2D scanning trajectories along with the proposed reconstruction method has the advantage of providing improved depth information for structures such as the spine and potentially producing images with more isotropic resolution.

  10. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells. PMID:25602462

  11. VAM2D: Variably saturated analysis model in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Huyakorn, P.S.; Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. )

    1991-10-01

    This report documents a two-dimensional finite element model, VAM2D, developed to simulate water flow and solute transport in variably saturated porous media. Both flow and transport simulation can be handled concurrently or sequentially. The formulation of the governing equations and the numerical procedures used in the code are presented. The flow equation is approximated using the Galerkin finite element method. Nonlinear soil moisture characteristics and atmospheric boundary conditions (e.g., infiltration, evaporation and seepage face), are treated using Picard and Newton-Raphson iterations. Hysteresis effects and anisotropy in the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity can be taken into account if needed. The contaminant transport simulation can account for advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear equilibrium sorption, and first-order degradation. Transport of a single component or a multi-component decay chain can be handled. The transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual method. Several test problems are presented to verify the code and demonstrate its utility. These problems range from simple one-dimensional to complex two-dimensional and axisymmetric problems. This document has been produced as a user's manual. It contains detailed information on the code structure along with instructions for input data preparation and sample input and printed output for selected test problems. Also included are instructions for job set up and restarting procedures. 44 refs., 54 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  13. Ladder supported ring bar circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An improved slow wave circuit especially useful in backward wave oscillators includes a slow wave circuit in a waveguide. The slow wave circuit is comprised of rings disposed between and attached to respective stubs. The stubs are attached to opposing sidewalls of the waveguide. To the end that opposed, interacting magnetic fields will be established to provide a very high coupling impedance for the slow wave structure, axially orientated bars are connected between rings in alternate spaces and adjacent to the attachment points of stubs. Similarly, axial bars are connected between rings in the spaces which do not include bars and at points adjacent to the attachment of bars.

  14. TOPAZ2D validation status report, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.

    1990-08-01

    Analytic solutions to two heat transfer problems were used to partially evaluate the performance TOPAZ, and LLNL finite element heat transfer code. The two benchmark analytic solutions were for: 2D steady state slab, with constant properties, constant uniform temperature boundary conditions on three sides, and constant temperature distribution according to a sine function on the fourth side; 1D transient non-linear, with temperature dependent conductivity and specific heat (varying such that the thermal diffusivity remained constant), constant heat flux on the front face and adiabatic conditions on the other face. The TOPAZ solution converged to the analytic solution in both the transient and the steady state problem. Consistent mass matrix type of analysis yielded best performance for the transient problem, in the late-time response; but notable unnatural anomalies were observed in the early-time temperature response at nodal locations near the front face. 5 refs., 22 figs.

  15. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, M.

    2011-09-23

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  16. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Mark L.

    2010-06-23

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  17. The Anatomy of High-Performance 2D Similarity Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Imran S.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2011-01-01

    Similarity measures based on the comparison of dense bit-vectors of two-dimensional chemical features are a dominant method in chemical informatics. For large-scale problems, including compound selection and machine learning, computing the intersection between two dense bit-vectors is the overwhelming bottleneck. We describe efficient implementations of this primitive, as well as example applications, using features of modern CPUs that allow 20-40x performance increases relative to typical code. Specifically, we describe fast methods for population count on modern x86 processors and cache-efficient matrix traversal and leader clustering algorithms that alleviate memory bandwidth bottlenecks in similarity matrix construction and clustering. The speed of our 2D comparison primitives is within a small factor of that obtained on GPUs, and does not require specialized hardware. PMID:21854053

  18. Mass loss in 2D rotating stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Lovekin, Caterine; Deupree, Bob

    2010-10-05

    Radiatively driven mass loss is an important factor in the evolution of massive stars . The mass loss rates depend on a number of stellar parameters, including the effective temperature and luminosity. Massive stars are also often rapidly rotating, which affects their structure and evolution. In sufficiently rapidly rotating stars, both the effective temperature and radius vary significantly as a function of latitude, and hence mass loss rates can vary appreciably between the poles and the equator. In this work, we discuss the addition of mass loss to a 2D stellar evolution code (ROTORC) and compare evolution sequences with and without mass loss. Preliminary results indicate that a full 2D calculation of mass loss using the local effective temperature and luminosity can significantly affect the distribution of mass loss in rotating main sequence stars. More mass is lost from the pole than predicted by 1D models, while less mass is lost at the equator. This change in the distribution of mass loss will affect the angular momentum loss, the surface temperature and luminosity, and even the interior structure of the star. After a single mass loss event, these effects are small, but can be expected to accumulate over the course of the main sequence evolution.

  19. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  20. Effects of Magnetic Fields on Bar Substructures in Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-03-01

    To study the effects of magnetic fields on the properties of bar substructures, we run two-dimensional, ideal MHD simulations of barred galaxies under the influence of a non-axisymmetric bar potential. In the bar regions, magnetic fields reduce density compression in the dust-lane shocks, while removing angular momentum further from the gas at the shocks. This evidently results in a smaller and more distributed ring, and a larger mass inflows rate to the galaxy center in models with stronger magnetic fields. In the outer regions, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates, amplifying magnetic fields near the corotation resonance. In the absence of spiral arms, the amplified fields naturally shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The reader is refereed to Kim & Stone (2012) for a detailed presentation of the simulation outcomes.

  1. GEO2D - Two-Dimensional Computer Model of a Ground Source Heat Pump System

    DOE Data Explorer

    James Menart

    2013-06-07

    This file contains a zipped file that contains many files required to run GEO2D. GEO2D is a computer code for simulating ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems in two-dimensions. GEO2D performs a detailed finite difference simulation of the heat transfer occurring within the working fluid, the tube wall, the grout, and the ground. Both horizontal and vertical wells can be simulated with this program, but it should be noted that the vertical wall is modeled as a single tube. This program also models the heat pump in conjunction with the heat transfer occurring. GEO2D simulates the heat pump and ground loop as a system. Many results are produced by GEO2D as a function of time and position, such as heat transfer rates, temperatures and heat pump performance. On top of this information from an economic comparison between the geothermal system simulated and a comparable air heat pump systems or a comparable gas, oil or propane heating systems with a vapor compression air conditioner. The version of GEO2D in the attached file has been coupled to the DOE heating and cooling load software called ENERGYPLUS. This is a great convenience for the user because heating and cooling loads are an input to GEO2D. GEO2D is a user friendly program that uses a graphical user interface for inputs and outputs. These make entering data simple and they produce many plotted results that are easy to understand. In order to run GEO2D access to MATLAB is required. If this program is not available on your computer you can download the program MCRInstaller.exe, the 64 bit version, from the MATLAB website or from this geothermal depository. This is a free download which will enable you to run GEO2D..

  2. Interparticle Attraction in 2D Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-03-01

    Complex (dusty) plasmas allow experimental studies of various physical processes occurring in classical liquids and solids by directly observing individual microparticles. A major problem is that the interaction between microparticles is generally not molecularlike. In this Letter, we propose how to achieve a molecularlike interaction potential in laboratory 2D complex plasmas. We argue that this principal aim can be achieved by using relatively small microparticles and properly adjusting discharge parameters. If experimentally confirmed, this will make it possible to employ complex plasmas as a model system with an interaction potential resembling that of conventional liquids.

  3. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  4. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  5. A scalable 2-D parallel sparse solver

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, S.C.; Mitra, S.

    1995-12-01

    Scalability beyond a small number of processors, typically 32 or less, is known to be a problem for existing parallel general sparse (PGS) direct solvers. This paper presents a parallel general sparse PGS direct solver for general sparse linear systems on distributed memory machines. The algorithm is based on the well-known sequential sparse algorithm Y12M. To achieve efficient parallelization, a 2-D scattered decomposition of the sparse matrix is used. The proposed algorithm is more scalable than existing parallel sparse direct solvers. Its scalability is evaluated on a 256 processor nCUBE2s machine using Boeing/Harwell benchmark matrices.

  6. 2D stepping drive for hyperspectral systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrödy, Csaba; Mehner, Hannes; Grewe, Adrian; Sinzinger, Stefan; Hoffmann, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of a compact 2D stepping microdrive for pinhole array positioning. The miniaturized solution enables a highly integrated compact hyperspectral imaging system. Based on the geometry of the pinhole array, an inch-worm drive with electrostatic actuators was designed resulting in a compact (1 cm2) positioning system featuring a step size of about 15 µm in a 170 µm displacement range. The high payload (20 mg) as required for the pinhole array and the compact system design exceed the known electrostatic inch-worm-based microdrives.

  7. Design of FBG En/decoders in Coherent 2-D Time-polarization OCDMA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Fen-fei; Yang, Ming

    2012-12-01

    A novel fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based en/decoder for the two-dimensional (2-D) time-spreading and polarization multiplexer optical coding is proposed. Compared with other 2-D en/decoders, the proposed en/decoding for an optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) system uses a single phase-encoded FBG and coherent en/decoding. Furthermore, combined with reconstruction-equivalent-chirp technology, such en/decoders can be realized with a conventional simple fabrication setup. Experimental results of such en/decoders and the corresponding system test at a data rate of 5 Gbit/s demonstrate that this kind of 2-D FBG-based en/decoders could improve the performances of OCDMA systems.

  8. ELRIS2D: A MATLAB Package for the 2D Inversion of DC Resistivity/IP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Irfan

    2016-04-01

    ELRIS2D is an open source code written in MATLAB for the two-dimensional inversion of direct current resistivity (DCR) and time domain induced polarization (IP) data. The user interface of the program is designed for functionality and ease of use. All available settings of the program can be reached from the main window. The subsurface is discretized using a hybrid mesh generated by the combination of structured and unstructured meshes, which reduces the computational cost of the whole inversion procedure. The inversion routine is based on the smoothness constrained least squares method. In order to verify the program, responses of two test models and field data sets were inverted. The models inverted from the synthetic data sets are consistent with the original test models in both DC resistivity and IP cases. A field data set acquired in an archaeological site is also used for the verification of outcomes of the program in comparison with the excavation results.

  9. Implementation of viscoelastic Hopkinson bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, R.; Cloete, T.; Govender, R.

    2012-08-01

    Knowledge of the properties of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates are important in furthering our understanding of their role during blast or impact events. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. Implementing polymeric Hopkinson bars requires characterization of the viscoelastic properties of the material used. In this paper, 30 mm diameter Polymethyl Methacrylate bars are used as Hopkinson pressure bars. This testing technique is applied to polymeric foam called Divinycell H80 and H200. Although there is a large body of of literature containing compressive data, this rarely deals with strain rates above 250s-1 which becomes increasingly important when looking at the design of composite structures where energy absorption during impact events is high on the list of priorities. Testing of polymeric foams at high strain rates allows for the development of better constitutive models.

  10. GASEOUS STRUCTURES IN BARRED GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF THE BAR STRENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Yonghwi

    2012-10-10

    Using hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the physical properties of gaseous substructures in barred galaxies and their relationships with the bar strength. The gaseous medium is assumed to be isothermal and unmagnetized. The bar potential is modeled as a Ferrers prolate with index n. To explore situations with differing bar strength, we vary the bar mass f{sub bar} relative to the spheroidal component as well as its aspect ratio R. We derive expressions as functions of f{sub bar} and R for the bar strength Q{sub b} and the radius r(Q{sub b} ) where the maximum bar torque occurs. When applied to observations, these expressions suggest that bars in real galaxies are most likely to have f{sub bar} {approx} 0.25-0.50 and n {approx}< 1. Dust lanes approximately follow one of the x{sub 1}-orbits and tend to be straighter under a stronger and more elongated bar, but are insensitive to the presence of self-gravity. A nuclear ring of a conventional x{sub 2} type forms only when the bar is not so massive or elongated. The radius of an x{sub 2}-type ring is generally smaller than the inner Lindblad resonance, decreases systematically with increasing Q{sub b} , and is slightly larger when self-gravity is included. This is evidence that the ring position is not determined by the resonance, but instead by the amount of angular momentum loss at dust-lane shocks. Nuclear spirals exist only when the ring is of the x{sub 2} type and is sufficiently large in size. Unlike the other features, nuclear spirals are transient in that they start out being tightly wound and weak, and then, due to the nonlinear effect, unwind and become stronger until they turn into shocks, with an unwinding rate that is higher for larger Q{sub b} . The mass inflow rate to the galaxy center is found to be less than 0.01 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for models with Q{sub b} {approx}< 0.2, while becoming larger than 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} when Q{sub b} {approx}> 0.2 and self-gravity is included.

  11. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  12. Photocurrent spectroscopy of 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    Confocal photocurrent measurements provide a powerful means of studying many aspects of the optoelectronic and electrical properties of a 2D device or material. At a diffraction-limited point they can provide a detailed absorption spectrum, and they can probe local symmetry, ultrafast relaxation rates and processes, electron-electron interaction strengths, and transport coefficients. We illustrate this with several examples, once being the photo-Nernst effect. In gapless 2D materials, such as graphene, in a perpendicular magnetic field a photocurrent antisymmetric in the field is generated near to the free edges, with opposite sign at opposite edges. Its origin is the transverse thermoelectric current associated with the laser-induced electron temperature gradient. This effect provides an unambiguous demonstration of the Shockley-Ramo nature of long-range photocurrent generation in gapless materials. It also provides a means of investigating quasiparticle properties. For example, in the case of graphene on hBN, it can be used to probe the Lifshitz transition that occurs due to the minibands formed by the Moire superlattice. We also observe and discuss photocurrent generated in other semimetallic (WTe2) and semiconducting (WSe2) monolayers. Work supported by DoE BES and NSF EFRI grants.

  13. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  14. Galaxy Zoo: CANDELS barred discs and bar fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, B. D.; Melvin, Thomas; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Willett, Kyle W.; Keel, William C.; Smethurst, R. J.; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Rutkowski, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Bell, Eric F.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Almaini, Omar; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fortson, Lucy; Hartley, William; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Mortlock, Alice; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Ownsworth, Jamie; Bamford, Steven; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, N. A.; Grützbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Häußler, Boris; Jek, Kian J.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lucas, Ray A.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-12-01

    The formation of bars in disc galaxies is a tracer of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in discs decreases from the local Universe to z ˜ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature discs should be extremely rare. Here, we report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disc galaxies at z ˜ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. From within a sample of 876 disc galaxies identified by visual classification in Galaxy Zoo, we identify 123 barred galaxies. Selecting a subsample within the same region of the evolving galaxy luminosity function (brighter than L*), we find that the bar fraction across the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 2 ( f_{bar} = 10.7^{+6.3}_{-3.5} per cent after correcting for incompleteness) does not significantly evolve. We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disc galaxies have evolved over the last 11 billion years.

  15. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  16. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  17. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  18. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  19. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  20. Mach number validation of a new zonal CFD method (ZAP2D) for airfoil simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strash, Daniel J.; Summa, Michael; Yoo, Sungyul

    1991-01-01

    A closed-loop overlapped velocity coupling procedure has been utilized to combine a two-dimensional potential-flow panel code and a Navier-Stokes code. The fully coupled two-zone code (ZAP2D) has been used to compute the flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.84 near the two-dimensional airfoil C(lmax) point for a Reynolds number of 3 million. For these cases, the grid domain size can be reduced to 3 chord lengths with less than 3-percent loss in accuracy for freestream Mach numbers through 0.8. Earlier validation work with ZAP2D has demonstrated a reduction in the required Navier-Stokes computation time by a factor of 4 for subsonic Mach numbers. For this more challenging condition of high lift and Mach number, the saving in CPU time is reduced to a factor of 2.

  1. The mouse ruby-eye 2(d) (ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) ) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-09-01

    The novel mutation named ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) , characterized by light-colored coats and ruby-eyes, prohibits differentiation of melanocytes by inhibiting tyrosinase (Tyr) activity, expression of Tyr, Tyr-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), Tyrp2, and Kit. However, it is not known whether the ru2(d) allele affects pheomelanin synthesis in recessive yellow (e/Mc1r(e) ) or in pheomelanic stage in agouti (A) mice. In this study, effects of the ru2(d) allele on pheomelanin synthesis were investigated by chemical analysis of melanin present in dorsal hairs of 5-week-old mice from F2 generation between C57BL/10JHir (B10)-co-isogenic ruby-eye 2(d) and B10-congenic recessive yellow or agouti. Eumelanin content was decreased in ruby-eye 2(d) and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice, whereas pheomelanin content in ruby-eye 2(d) recessive yellow and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice did not differ from the corresponding Ru2(d) /- mice, suggesting that the ru2(d) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis. PMID:23672590

  2. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  3. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  4. 2D Quantum Mechanical Study of Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density-gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. Surprisingly, the self-consistent potential profile shows lower injection barrier in the channel in quantum case. These results are qualitatively consistent with ID Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  5. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  6. Swinging around the high bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiley, M. J.; Yeadon, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    The motion of a gymnast around the high bar is modelled first as swinging around a rigid rod then more accurately when the rod is considered to be elastic. How the gymnast should best move his hips is also considered.

  7. Triple bar, high efficiency mechanical sealer

    DOEpatents

    Pak, Donald J.; Hawkins, Samantha A.; Young, John E.

    2013-03-19

    A clamp with a bottom clamp bar that has a planar upper surface is provided. The clamp may also include a top clamp bar connected to the bottom clamp bar, and a pressure distribution bar between the top clamp bar and the bottom clamp bar. The pressure distribution bar may have a planar lower surface in facing relation to the upper surface of the bottom clamp bar. An object is capable of being disposed in a clamping region between the upper surface and the lower surface. The width of the planar lower surface may be less than the width of the upper surface within the clamping region. Also, the pressure distribution bar may be capable of being urged away from the top clamp bar and towards the bottom clamp bar.

  8. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  9. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  10. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  11. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  12. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse. PMID:26988702

  13. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  14. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  15. Parallel map analysis on 2-D grids

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.; Comiskey, J.; Minser, K.

    1993-12-31

    In landscape ecology, computer modeling is used to assess habitat fragmentation and its ecological iMPLications. Specifically, maps (2-D grids) of habitat clusters must be analyzed to determine number, sizes and geometry of clusters. Models prior to this study relied upon sequential Fortran-77 programs which limited the sizes of maps and densities of clusters which could be analyzed. In this paper, we present more efficient computer models which can exploit recursion or parallelism. Significant improvements over the original Fortran-77 programs have been achieved using both recursive and nonrecursive C implementations on a variety of workstations such as the Sun Sparc 2, IBM RS/6000-350, and HP 9000-750. Parallel implementations on a 4096-processor MasPar MP-1 and a 32-processor CM-5 are also studied. Preliminary experiments suggest that speed improvements for the parallel model on the MasPar MP-1 (written in MPL) and on the CM-5 (written in C using CMMD) can be as much as 39 and 34 times faster, respectively, than the most efficient sequential C program on a Sun Sparc 2 for a 512 map. An important goal in this research effort is to produce a scalable map analysis algorithm for the identification and characterization of clusters for relatively large maps on massively-parallel computers.

  16. 2D Turbulence with Complicated Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullet, G.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the consequences of lateral viscous boundary layers on the 2D turbulence that arises in domains with complicated boundaries (headlands, bays etc). The study is carried out numerically with LES. The numerics are carefully designed to ensure all global conservation laws, proper boundary conditions and a minimal range of dissipation scales. The turbulence dramatically differs from the classical bi-periodic case. Boundary layer separations lead to creation of many small vortices and act as a continuing energy source exciting the inverse cascade of energy throughout the domain. The detachments are very intermittent in time. In free decay, the final state depends on the effective numerical resolution: laminar with a single dominant vortex for low Re and turbulent with many vortices for large enough Re. After very long time, the turbulent end-state exhibits a striking tendency for the emergence of shielded vortices which then interact almost elastically. In the forced case, the boundary layers allow the turbulence to reach a statistical steady state without any artificial hypo-viscosity or other large-scale dissipation. Implications are discussed for the oceanic mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence.

  17. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  18. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  19. 2-D wavelet with position controlled resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Andrzej; Puzio, Leszek

    2005-09-01

    Wavelet transformation localizes all irregularities in the scene. It is most effective in the case when intensities in the scene have no sharp details. It is the case often present in a medical imaging. To identify the shape one has to extract it from the scene as typical irregularity. When the scene does not contain sharp changes then common differential filters are not efficient tool for a shape extraction. The new 2-D wavelet for such task has been proposed. Described wavelet transform is axially symmetric and has varied scale in dependence on the distance from the centre of the wavelet symmetry. The analytical form of the wavelet has been presented as well as its application for details extraction in the scene. Most important feature of the wavelet transform is that it gives a multi-scale transformation, and if zoom is on the wavelet selectivity varies proportionally to the zoom step. As a result, the extracted shape does not change during zoom operation. What is more the wavelet selectivity can be fit to the local intensity gradient properly to obtain best extraction of the irregularities.

  20. Cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 gene polymorphism and lung cancer susceptibility in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Legrand-Andréoletti, M; Stücker, I; Marez, D; Galais, P; Cosme, J; Sabbagh, N; Spire, C; Cenée, S; Lafitte, J J; Beaune, P; Broly, F

    1998-02-01

    Many studies have been performed in an attempt to establish a link between the polymorphism of the cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 gene and the incidence of lung cancer. Nevertheless, whether or not this genetic polymorphism has a role in the development of the disease remains unclear. Recently, new advances in our knowledge of the CYP2D6 gene and its locus (CYP2D) have been achieved. In particular, CYP2D6 was found to be highly polymorphic and multiple novel mutations and allelic variants of the gene have been identified. In addition, a number of CYP2D rearrangements, including those with amplification of the gene, have been demonstrated. Taking this new information into account, we have reconsidered the potential influence of CYP2D6 polymorphism in lung cancer susceptibility by performing a comparative analysis of the overall mutational spectrum of CYP2D6 and of the rearrangements of CYP2D in 249 patients with lung cancer and in 265 control individuals matched on age, sex, hospital and residence area. For this purpose, a strategy based on SSCP analysis of the entire coding sequence of CYP2D6 and on RFLP analysis of the gene locus was carried out in DNA samples from each individual. Forty mutations occurring in various combinations on 42 alleles of the gene and 82 different genotypes were identified. No significant difference in the distribution of the mutations, alleles or genotypes was observed between the two groups, except a particular genotype (CYP2D6*1A/*2), which was more common in the sub-group of moderate smokers (< 30 pack-years) suffering from small cell carcinoma (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.9). When the phenotype was predicted according to genotype, only a trend toward a higher frequency of ultrarapid metabolizers in patients was obtained. In spite of a complete analysis of the CYP2D6 gene and its locus, this case-control study provides elements against an influence of the CYP2D6 polymorphism on lung cancer susceptibility. PMID:9511176

  1. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Nuclear Rings in Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Shen, Juntai; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-08-01

    Dust lanes, nuclear rings, and nuclear spirals are typical gas structures in the inner region of barred galaxies. Their shapes and properties are linked to the physical parameters of the host galaxy. We use high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations to study 2D gas flows in simple barred galaxy models. The nuclear rings formed in our simulations can be divided into two groups: one group is nearly round and the other is highly elongated. We find that roundish rings may not form when the bar pattern speed is too high or the bulge central density is too low. We also study the periodic orbits in our galaxy models, and find that the concept of inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) may be generalized by the extent of x2 orbits. All roundish nuclear rings in our simulations settle in the range of x2 orbits (or ILRs). However, knowing the resonances is insufficient to pin down the exact location of these nuclear rings. We suggest that the backbone of round nuclear rings is the x2 orbital family, i.e. round nuclear rings are allowed only in the radial range of x2 orbits. A round nuclear ring forms exactly at the radius where the residual angular momentum of infalling gas balances the centrifugal force, which can be described by a parameter f_ring measured from the rotation curve. We find an empirical relation between the bar parameters and f_ring, and apply it to measure bar pattern speed in a sample of barred galaxies with nuclear rings.

  2. BAR FORMATION FROM GALAXY FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Meagan; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sinha, Manodeep E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Recently, both simulations and observations have revealed that flybys—fast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halos—are surprisingly common, nearing/comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar with bars forming in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities ≳ 0.5, sizes on the order of the host disk's scale length, and persist to the end of our simulations, ∼5 Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with interactions than previously thought.

  3. Maximal dismounts from high bar.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Michael J; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2005-11-01

    In men's artistic gymnastics the triple straight somersault dismount from the high bar has yet to be performed in competition. The present study used a simulation model of a gymnast and the high bar apparatus (J. Appl. Biomech. 19(2003a) 119) to determine whether a gymnast could produce the required angular momentum and flight to complete a triple straight somersault dismount. Optimisations were carried out to maximise the margin for error in timing the bar release for a given number of straight somersaults in flight. The amount of rotation potential (number of straight somersaults) the model could produce whilst maintaining a realistic margin for error was determined. A simulation model of aerial movement (J. Biomech.23 (1990) 85) was used to find what would be possible with this amount of rotation potential. The model was able to produce sufficient angular momentum and time in the air to complete a triple straight somersault dismount. The margin for error when releasing the bar using the optimum technique was 28 ms, which is small when compared with the mean margin for error determined for high bar finalists at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games (55 ms). Although the triple straight somersault dismount is theoretically possible, it would require close to maximum effort and precise timing of the release from the bar. However, when the model was required to have a realistic margin for error, it was able to produce sufficient angular momentum for a double twisting triple somersault dismount. PMID:16154409

  4. Bar Formation from Galaxy Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lang, Meagan; Sinha, Manodeep

    2016-05-01

    Both simulations and observations reveal that flybys—fast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halos—are surprisingly common, comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar; bars form in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities >0.5, sizes on the order of the scale length of the disk, and persist to the end of our simulations, ~5 Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with flyby interactions than previously thought.

  5. The BaBar Software Architecture and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Cosmo, Gabriele

    2003-04-28

    The BaBar experiment has in place since 1995 a software release system (SRT Software Release Tools) based on CVS (Concurrent Version System) which is in common for all the software developed for the experiment, online or offline, simulation or reconstruction. A software release is a snapshot of all BaBar code (online, offline, utilities, scripts, makefiles, etc.). This set of code is tested to work together, and is indexed by a release number (e.g., 6.8.2) so a user can refer to a particular release and get reproducible results. A release will involve particular versions of packages. A package generally consists of a set of code for a particular task, together with a GNU makefile, scripts and documentation. All BaBar software is maintained in AFS (Andrew File System) directories, so the code is accessible worldwide within the Collaboration. The combination SRT, CVS, AFS, has demonstrated to be a valid, powerful and efficient way of organizing the software infrastructure of a modern HEP experiment with collaborating Institutes distributed worldwide, both in a development and production phase.

  6. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  7. Evidence for polymorphism in the cytochrome P450 2D50 gene in horses.

    PubMed

    Corado, C R; McKemie, D S; Young, A; Knych, H K

    2016-06-01

    Metabolism is an essential factor in the clearance of many drugs and as such plays a major role in the establishment of dosage regimens and withdrawal times. CYP2D6, the human orthologue to equine CYP2D50, is a drug-metabolizing enzyme that is highly polymorphic in humans leading to widely differing levels of metabolic activity. As CYP2D6 is highly polymorphic, in this study it was hypothesized that the gene coding for the equine orthologue, CYP2D50, may also be prone to polymorphism. Blood samples were collected from 150 horses, the CYP2D50 gene was cloned and sequenced; and full-length sequences were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions, or insertions. Pharmacokinetic data were collected from a subset of horses following the administration of a single oral dose of tramadol and probit analysis used to calculate metabolic ratios. Prior to drug administration, the ability of recombinant CYP2D50 to metabolize tramadol to O-desmethyltramadol was confirmed. Sequencing of CYP2D50 identified 126 exonic SNPs, with 31 of those appearing in multiple horses. Oral administration of tramadol to a subset of these horses revealed variable metabolic ratios (tramadol: O-desmethyltramadol) in individual horses and separation into three metabolic groups. While a limited number of horses of primarily a single breed were studied, the variability in tramadol metabolism to O-desmethyltramadol between horses and preliminary evidence of what appears to be poor, extensive, and ultra-rapid metabolizers supports further study of the potential for genetic polymorphisms in the CYP2D50 gene in horses. PMID:26441153

  8. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  9. On 2D graphical representation of DNA sequence of nondegeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yusen; Liao, Bo; Ding, Kequan

    2005-08-01

    Some two-dimensional (2D) graphical representations of DNA sequences have been given by Gates, Nandy, Leong and Mogenthaler, Randić, and Liao et al., which give visual characterizations of DNA sequences. In this Letter, we introduce a nondegeneracy 2D graphical representation of DNA sequence, which is different from Randić's novel 2D representation and Liao's 2D representation. We also present the nondegeneracy forms corresponding to the representations of Gates, Nandy, Leong and Mogenthaler.

  10. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  11. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  12. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  13. Ultrasonic 2D matrix PVDF transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptchelintsev, A.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2000-05-01

    During the past decade a substantial amount of work has been done in the area of ultrasonic imaging technology using 2D arrays. The main problems arising for the two-dimensional matrix transducers at megahertz frequencies are small size and huge count of the elements, high electrical impedance, low sensitivity, bad SNR and slower data acquisition rate. The major technological difficulty remains the high density of the interconnect. To solve these problems numerous approaches have been suggested. In the present work, a 24×24 elements (24 transmit+24 receive) matrix and a switching board were developed. The transducer consists of two 52 μm PVDF layers each representing a linear array of 24 elements placed one on the top of the other. Electrodes in these two layers are perpendicular and form the grid of 0.5×0.5 mm pitch. The layers are bonded together with the ground electrode being monolithic and located between the layers. The matrix is backed from the rear surface with an epoxy composition. During the emission, a linear element from the emitting layer generates a longitudinal wave pulse propagating inside the test object. Reflected pulses are picked-up by the receiving layer. During one transmit-receive cycle one transmit element and one receive element are selected by corresponding multiplexers. These crossed elements emulate a small element formed by their intersection. The present design presents the following advantages: minimizes number of active channels and density of the interconnect; reduces the electrical impedance of the element improving electrical matching; enables the transmit-receive mode; due to the efficient backing provides bandwidth and good time resolution; and, significantly reduces the electronics complexity. The matrix can not be used for the beam steering and focusing. Owing to this impossibility of focusing, the penetration depth is limited as well by the diffraction phenomena.

  14. Low energy [bar p] physics at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, S.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The charmonium formation experiment is the only low energy [bar p] experiment at FNAL. This paper describes the performance of the Fermilab [bar p] Accumulator during fixed target run for the experiment and the planned upgrades. We also discuss the proposal for the direct CP violation search in [bar p] + p [yields] [bar [Lambda

  15. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  16. Gravitational Wave Signals from 2D and 3D Core Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Marronetti, Pedro; Bruenn, Stephen; Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John

    2016-03-01

    We study two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) using our first-principles CCSN simulations performed with the neutrino hydrodynamics code CHIMERA. The following physics is included: Newtonian hydrodynamics with a nuclear equation of state capable of describing matter in both NSE and non-NSE, MGFLD neutrino transport with realistic neutrino interactions, an effective GR gravitational potential, and a nuclear reaction network. Both our 2D and 3D models achieve explosion, which in turn enables us to determine their complete gravitational wave signals. In this talk, we present them, and we analyze the similarities and differences between the 2D and 3D signals.

  17. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Nuclear Rings in Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Shen, Juntai; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-06-01

    Dust lanes, nuclear rings, and nuclear spirals are typical gas structures in the inner region of barred galaxies. Their shapes and properties are linked to the physical parameters of the host galaxy. We use high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations to study 2D gas flows in simple barred galaxy models. The nuclear rings formed in our simulations can be divided into two groups: one group is nearly round and the other is highly elongated. We find that roundish rings may not form when the bar pattern speed is too high or the bulge central density is too low. We also study the periodic orbits in our galaxy models, and find that the concept of inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) may be generalized by the extent of {x}2 orbits. All roundish nuclear rings in our simulations settle in the range of {x}2 orbits (or ILRs). However, knowing the resonances is insufficient to pin down the exact location of these nuclear rings. We suggest that the backbone of round nuclear rings is the {x}2 orbital family, i.e., round nuclear rings are allowed only in the radial range of {x}2 orbits. A round nuclear ring forms exactly at the radius where the residual angular momentum of infalling gas balances the centrifugal force, which can be described by a parameter {f}{ring} measured from the rotation curve. The gravitational torque on gas in high pattern speed models is larger, leading to a smaller ring size than in the low pattern speed models. Our result may have important implications for using nuclear rings to measure the parameters of real barred galaxies with 2D gas kinematics.

  18. /bar p/p collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1989-03-01

    This note encompasses a set of six lectures given at the summer school held at Campos Do Jordao in January of 1989 near Sao Paulo, Brazil. The intent of the lectures was to describe the physics of /bar p/p at CERN and Fermilab. Particular attention has been paid to making a self contained presentation to a prospective audience of graduate students. Since large Monte Carlo codes might not be available to all members of this audience, great reliance was placed on ''back of the envelope estimates.'' Emphasis was also placed on experimental data rather than theoretical speculation, since predictions for, for example, supersymmetric particle production are easily obtained by transcription of formulae already obtained. 9 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  20. Discovery, Characterization, and Functional Study of a Novel MEF2D CAG Repeat in Duck (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yushi; Wang, Jiwen; Liu, Hehe; Zhang, Rongping; Zhang, Tao; Gan, Xiang; Huang, Huilan; Chen, Da; Li, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Myocyte enhancer transcription factor 2D (MEF2D) is an important transcription factor for promoting the growth and development of muscle. CAG repeats have been found in the coding sequence (CDS) of avian MEF2D; however, their functions remain unknown and require further investigation. Here, we examined the characteristics and functional role of MEF2D CAG repeat in duck. The full-length CDS of duck MEF2D was cloned for the first time, and a novel CAG repeat was identified and located in exon 9. Sequence analysis indicated that the protein domains of duck MEF2D are highly conserved relative to other vertebrates, whereas MEF2D CAG repeats with variable repeat numbers are specific to avian species. Furthermore, sequencing has revealed polymorphisms in MEF2D CAG repeat at both DNA and mRNA levels. Four MEF2D CAG repeat genotypes and 10 MEF2D cDNA variants with different CAG repeat numbers were detected in two duck populations. A t-test showed that the expanded CAG repeat generated significantly longer transcription products (p < 0.05). Association analysis demonstrated positive correlations between the expansion of the CAG repeat and five muscle-related traits. By using protein structure prediction, we suggested that the polymorphisms of the CAG repeat affect protein structures within protein domains. Taken together, these findings reveal that duck MEF2D CAG repeat is a potential functional element with polymorphisms and may cause differences in MEF2D function between duck and other vertebrate species. PMID:27064738

  1. Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Dougherty, G M; Santiago, J G

    2005-06-24

    We have developed methods for flow control, electric field alignment, and readout of colloidal Nanobarcodes{copyright}. Our flow-based detection scheme leverages microfluidics and alternate current (AC) electric fields to align and image particles in a well-defined image plane. Using analytical models of the particle rotation in electric fields we can optimize the field strength and frequency necessary to align the particles. This detection platform alleviates loss of information in solution-based assays due to particle clumping during detection.

  2. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  3. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  4. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A.; Gomez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-06-01

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling.

  5. Nonlinear Heat Transfer 2d Structure

    1987-09-01

    DOT-BPMD is a general-purpose, finite-element, heat-transfer program used to predict thermal environments. The code considers linear and nonlinear transient or steady-state heat conduction in two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric representations of structures. Capabilities are provided for modeling anisotropic heterogeneous materials with temperature-dependent thermal properties and time-dependent temperature, heat flux, convection and radiation boundary conditions, together with time-dependent internal heat generation. DOT-BPMD may be used in the evaluation of steady-state geothermal gradients as well as in themore » transient heat conduction analysis of repository and waste package subsystems. Strengths of DOT-BPMD include its ability to account for a wide range of possible boundary conditions, nonlinear material properties, and its efficient equation solution algorithm. Limitations include the lack of a three-dimensional analysis capability, no radiative or convective internal heat transfer, and the need to maintain a constant time-step in each program execution.« less

  6. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  7. Fast 2D flood modelling using GPU technology - recent applications and new developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, Amanda; Lamb, Rob; Waller, Simon; Dunning, Paul

    2010-05-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest amongst scientists and engineers in exploiting the potential of commodity graphics hardware for desktop parallel computing. The Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) that are used in PC graphics cards have now evolved into powerful parallel co-processors that can be used to accelerate the numerical codes used for floodplain inundation modelling. We report in this paper on experience over the past two years in developing and applying two dimensional (2D) flood inundation models using GPUs to achieve significant practical performance benefits. Starting with a solution scheme for the 2D diffusion wave approximation to the 2D Shallow Water Equations (SWEs), we have demonstrated the capability to reduce model run times in ‘real-world' applications using GPU hardware and programming techniques. We then present results from a GPU-based 2D finite volume SWE solver. A series of numerical test cases demonstrate that the model produces outputs that are accurate and consistent with reference results published elsewhere. In comparisons conducted for a real world test case, the GPU-based SWE model was over 100 times faster than the CPU version. We conclude with some discussion of practical experience in using the GPU technology for flood mapping applications, and for research projects investigating use of Monte Carlo simulation methods for the analysis of uncertainty in 2D flood modelling.

  8. Universal precision sine bar attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Franklin D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to an attachment for a sine bar which can be used to perform measurements during lathe operations or other types of machining operations. The attachment can be used for setting precision angles on vises, dividing heads, rotary tables and angle plates. It can also be used in the inspection of machined parts, when close tolerances are required, and in the layout of precision hardware. The novelty of the invention is believed to reside in a specific versatile sine bar attachment for measuring a variety of angles on a number of different types of equipment.

  9. BARS/SSC/SPHINX. BARS Bibliographic Data Retrieval System

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.

    1993-06-06

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shock compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  10. BARS/SSC/SPHINX. BARS Bibliographic Data Retrieval System

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.

    1993-05-01

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shock compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  11. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  12. Differential CYP 2D6 Metabolism Alters Primaquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Brittney M. J.; Xie, Lisa H.; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T.; Bandara Herath, H. M. T.; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N. P.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity. PMID:25645856

  13. 2D to 3D to 2D Dimensionality Crossovers in Thin BSCCO Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    With increasing temperature the superfluid fraction in very thin BSCCO films undergoes a series of dimensionality crossovers. At low temperatures the strong anisotropy causes the thermal excitations to be 2D pancake-antipancake pairs in uncoupled layers. At higher temperatures where the c-axis correlation length becomes larger than a layer there is a crossover to 3D vortex loops. These are initially elliptical, but as the 3D Tc is approached they become more circular as the anisotropy scales away, as modeled by Shenoy and Chattopadhyay [1]. Close to Tc when the correlation length becomes comparable to the film thickness there is a further crossover to a 2D Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, with a drop of the superfluid fraction to zero at T_KT which can be of the order of 1 K below T_c. Good agreement with this model is found for experiments on thin BSCCO 2212 films [2]. 1. S. R. Shenoy and B. Chattopadhyay, Phys. Rev. B 51, 9129 (1995). 2. K. Osborn et al., cond-mat/0204417.

  14. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  15. Clinical coding. Code breakers.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Steve

    2005-02-24

    --The advent of payment by results has seen the role of the clinical coder pushed to the fore in England. --Examinations for a clinical coding qualification began in 1999. In 2004, approximately 200 people took the qualification. --Trusts are attracting people to the role by offering training from scratch or through modern apprenticeships. PMID:15768716

  16. Swinging around the High Bar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiley, M. J.; Yeadon, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Models the motion of a gymnast around the high bar first as swinging around a rigid rod, then more accurately when the rod is considered to be elastic. Also considers how the gymnast should best move his hips. (Author/ASK)

  17. Fast Acceleration of 2D Wave Propagation Simulations Using Modern Computational Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Lifan; Cavazos, John; Huang, Howie H.; Kay, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in modern computational accelerators like Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and coprocessors provide great opportunities for making scientific applications run faster than ever before. However, efficient parallelization of scientific code using new programming tools like CUDA requires a high level of expertise that is not available to many scientists. This, plus the fact that parallelized code is usually not portable to different architectures, creates major challenges for exploiting the full capabilities of modern computational accelerators. In this work, we sought to overcome these challenges by studying how to achieve both automated parallelization using OpenACC and enhanced portability using OpenCL. We applied our parallelization schemes using GPUs as well as Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessor to reduce the run time of wave propagation simulations. We used a well-established 2D cardiac action potential model as a specific case-study. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to study auto-parallelization of 2D cardiac wave propagation simulations using OpenACC. Our results identify several approaches that provide substantial speedups. The OpenACC-generated GPU code achieved more than speedup above the sequential implementation and required the addition of only a few OpenACC pragmas to the code. An OpenCL implementation provided speedups on GPUs of at least faster than the sequential implementation and faster than a parallelized OpenMP implementation. An implementation of OpenMP on Intel MIC coprocessor provided speedups of with only a few code changes to the sequential implementation. We highlight that OpenACC provides an automatic, efficient, and portable approach to achieve parallelization of 2D cardiac wave simulations on GPUs. Our approach of using OpenACC, OpenCL, and OpenMP to parallelize this particular model on modern computational accelerators should be applicable to other computational models of wave propagation in

  18. Differential Cytochrome P450 2D Metabolism Alters Tafenoquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Chau; Xie, Lisa H.; Potter, Brittney M. J.; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Nanayakkara, N. P. Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.; Smith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D metabolism is required for the liver-stage antimalarial efficacy of the 8-aminoquinoline molecule tafenoquine in mice. This could be problematic for Plasmodium vivax radical cure, as the human CYP 2D ortholog (2D6) is highly polymorphic. Diminished CYP 2D6 enzyme activity, as in the poor-metabolizer phenotype, could compromise radical curative efficacy in humans. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism for tafenoquine liver-stage efficacy, the exact role that CYP 2D metabolism plays in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of tafenoquine and other 8-aminoquinoline molecules has not been extensively studied. In this study, a series of tafenoquine pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with different CYP 2D metabolism statuses, including wild-type (WT) (reflecting extensive metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) and CYPmouse 2D knockout (KO) (reflecting poor metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single 20-mg/kg of body weight dose of tafenoquine differed between the strains; however, the differences were less striking than previous results obtained for primaquine in the same model. Additionally, the presence of a 5,6-ortho-quinone tafenoquine metabolite was examined in both mouse strains. The 5,6-ortho-quinone species of tafenoquine was observed, and concentrations of the metabolite were highest in the WT extensive-metabolizer phenotype. Altogether, this study indicates that CYP 2D metabolism in mice affects tafenoquine pharmacokinetics and could have implications for human tafenoquine pharmacokinetics in polymorphic CYP 2D6 human populations. PMID:25870069

  19. Microlensing by the galactic bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Spergel, David N.; Rich, R. Michael

    1995-01-01

    We compute the optical depth and duration distribution of microlensing events towrd Baade's window in a model composed of a Galactic disk and a bar. The bar model is a self-consistent dynamical model built out of individual orbits that has been populated to be consistent with the COBE maps of the Galaxy and kinematic observations of the Galactic bulge. We find that most of the lenses are in the bulge with a line-of-sight distance 6.25 kpc (adopting R(sub 0) = 8 kpc). The microlensing optical depth of a 2 x 10(exp 10) solar mass bar plus a truncated disk is (2.2 +/- 0.45) x 10(exp -6), consistent with the large optical depth (3.2 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp -6) found by Udalski et al. (1994). This model optical depth is enhanced over the predictions of axisymmetric models by Kiraga & Paczynski (1994) by slightly more than a factor of 2, since the bar is elongated along the line of sight. The large Einstein radius and small transverse velocity dispersion also predict a longer event duration in the self-consistent bar model than in the Kiraga-Paczynski model. The event rate and duration distribution also depend on the lower mass cutoff of the lens mass function. With a 0.1 solar mass cutoff, five to seven events (depending on the contribution of disk lenses) with a logarithmic mean duration of 20 days are expected for the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) according to our model, while Udalski et al. (1994) observed nine events with durations from 8 to 62 days. On the other hand, if most of the lenses are brown dwarfs, our model predicts too many short-duration events. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test finds only 7% probability for the model with 0.01 solar mass cutoff to be consistent with current data.

  20. Installed Transonic 2D Nozzle Nacelle Boattail Drag Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Michael B.; Peavey, Charles C.

    1999-01-01

    The Transonic Nozzle Boattail Drag Study was initiated in 1995 to develop an understanding of how external nozzle transonic aerodynamics effect airplane performance and how strongly those effects are dependent on nozzle configuration (2D vs. axisymmetric). MDC analyzed the axisymmetric nozzle. Boeing subcontracted Northrop-Grumman to analyze the 2D nozzle. AU participants analyzed the AGARD nozzle as a check-out and validation case. Once the codes were checked out and the gridding resolution necessary for modeling the separated flow in this region determined, the analysis moved to the installed wing/body/nacelle/diverter cases. The boat tail drag validation case was the AGARD B.4 rectangular nozzle. This test case offered both test data and previous CFD analyses for comparison. Results were obtained for test cases B.4.1 (M=0.6) and B.4.2 (M=0.938) and compared very well with the experimental data. Once the validation was complete a CFD grid was constructed for the full Ref. H configuration (wing/body/nacelle/diverter) using a combination of patched and overlapped (Chimera) grids. This was done to ensure that the grid topologies and density would be adequate for the full model. The use of overlapped grids allowed the same grids from the full configuration model to be used for the wing/body alone cases, thus eliminating the risk of grid differences affecting the determination of the installation effects. Once the full configuration model was run and deemed to be suitable the nacelle/diverter grids were removed and the wing/body analysis performed. Reference H wing/body results were completed for M=0.9 (a=0.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0), M=1.1 (a=4.0 and 6.0) and M=2.4 (a=0.0, 2.0, 4.4, 6.0 and 8.0). Comparisons of the M=0.9 and M=2.4 cases were made with available wind tunnel data and overall comparisons were good. The axi-inlet/2D nozzle nacelle was analyzed isolated. The isolated nacelle data coupled with the wing/body result enabled the interference effects of the

  1. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  2. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Corey L.; Yarberry, Victor; Jorgensen, Craig

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats, are also provided in the library.

  3. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  4. In-situ Hydrogen Sorption 2D-ACAR Facility for the Study of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legerstee, W. J.; de Roode, J.; Anastasopol, A.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W. H.

    We developed a dedicated hydrogen sorption setup coupled to a positron 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation) setup employing a 22Na-source, which will enable to collect 2D-ACAR momentum distributions in-situ as a function of temperature, hydrogen pressure and hydrogen content. In parallel, a dedicated glovebox was constructed for handling air-sensitive metal and metal hydride samples, with a special entrance for the 2D-ACAR sample insert. The 2D-ACAR setup was tested in first measurements on a Pd0.75Ag0.25 foil and on a ball-milled MgH2 powder in both the hydrogen loaded and desorbed states. The hydrogen loaded Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx sample was kept under a 1 bar hydrogen pressure to prevent partial desorption during measurements at room temperature. The collected 2D-ACAR distributions of Pd0.75Ag0.25 and Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx showed similar features as observed in previous studies. The broadening of the ACAR distributions observed for the Mg to MgH2 metal-insulator transition was compared in a quantitative manner to ab-initio calculations reported in the literature.

  5. Resistivity inversion in 2-D anisotropic media: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, Timothy; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Greenhalgh, Mark; Marescot, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Many rocks and layered/fractured sequences have a clearly expressed electrical anisotropy although it is rare in practice to incorporate anisotropy into resistivity inversion. In this contribution, we present a series of 2.5-D synthetic inversion experiments for various electrode configurations and 2-D anisotropic models. We examine and compare the image reconstructions obtained using the correct anisotropic inversion code with those obtained using the false but widely used isotropic assumption. Superior reconstruction in terms of reduced data misfit, true anomaly shape and position, and anisotropic background parameters were obtained when the correct anisotropic assumption was employed for medium to high coefficients of anisotropy. However, for low coefficient values the isotropic assumption produced better-quality results. When an erroneous isotropic inversion is performed on medium to high level anisotropic data, the images are dominated by patterns of banded artefacts and high data misfits. Various pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole data sets were investigated and evaluated for the accuracy of the inversion result. The eigenvalue spectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix and the formal resolution matrix were also computed to determine the information content and goodness of the results. We also present a data selection strategy based on high sensitivity measurements which drastically reduces the number of data to be inverted but still produces comparable results to that of the comprehensive data set. Inversion was carried out using transversely isotropic model parameters described in two different co-ordinate frames for the conductivity tensor, namely Cartesian versus natural or eigenframe. The Cartesian frame provided a more stable inversion product. This can be simply explained from inspection of the eigenspectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix for the two model descriptions.

  6. Computer program BL2D for solving two-dimensional and axisymmetric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the formulation, validation, and user's manual for the computer program BL2D. The program is a fourth-order-accurate solution scheme for solving two-dimensional or axisymmetric boundary layers in speed regimes that range from low subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers. A basic implementation of the transition zone and turbulence modeling is also included. The code is a result of many improvements made to the program VGBLP, which is described in NASA TM-83207 (February 1982), and can effectively supersede it. The code BL2D is designed to be modular, user-friendly, and portable to any machine with a standard fortran77 compiler. The report contains the new formulation adopted and the details of its implementation. Five validation cases are presented. A detailed user's manual with the input format description and instructions for running the code is included. Adequate information is presented in the report to enable the user to modify or customize the code for specific applications.

  7. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  8. Adventures of a tidally induced bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łokas, E. L.; Athanassoula, E.; Debattista, V. P.; Valluri, M.; Pino, A. del; Semczuk, M.; Gajda, G.; Kowalczyk, K.

    2014-12-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the properties of a bar induced in a discy dwarf galaxy as a result of tidal interaction with the Milky Way. The bar forms at the first pericentre passage and survives until the end of the evolution at 10 Gyr. Fourier decomposition of the bar reveals that only even modes are significant and preserve a hierarchy so that the bar mode is always the strongest. They show a characteristic profile with a maximum, similar to simulated bars forming in isolated galaxies and observed bars in real galaxies. We adopt the maximum of the bar mode as a measure of the bar strength and we estimate the bar length by comparing the density profiles along the bar and perpendicular to it. The bar strength and the bar length decrease with time, mainly at pericentres, as a result of tidal torques acting at those times and not to secular evolution. The pattern speed of the bar varies significantly on a time-scale of 1 Gyr and is controlled by the orientation of the tidal torque from the Milky Way. The bar is never tidally locked, but we discover a hint of a 5/2 orbital resonance between the third and fourth pericentre passage. The speed of the bar decreases in the long run so that the bar changes from initially rather fast to slow in the later stages. The boxy/peanut shape is present for some time and its occurrence is preceded by a short period of buckling instability.

  9. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  10. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  11. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  12. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  13. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  14. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  15. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  16. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  17. Interaction Between Tropical Convection and its Embedding Environment: An Energetics Analysis of a 2-D Cloud Resolving Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.

    1999-01-01

    The phase relation between the perturbation kinetic energy (K') associated with the tropical convection and the horizontal-mean moist available potential energy (bar-P) associated with environmental conditions is investigated by an energetics analysis of a numerical experiment. This experiment is performed using a 2-D cloud resolving model forced by the TOGA-COARE derived vertical velocity. The imposed upward motion leads to a decrease of bar-P directly through the associated vertical advective cooling, and to an increase of K' directly through cloud related processes, feeding the convection. The maximum K' and its maximum growth rate lags and leads, respectively, the maximum imposed large-scale upward motion by about 1-2 hours, indicating that convection is phase locked with large-scale forcing. The dominant life cycle of the simulated convection is about 9 hours, whereas the time scales of the imposed large-scale forcing are longer than the diurnal cycle. In the convective events, maximum growth of K' leads maximum decay of the perturbation moist available potential energy (P') by about 3 hours through vertical heat transport by perturbation circulation, and perturbation cloud heating. Maximum decay of P' leads maximum decay of bar-P by about one hour through the perturbation radiative, processes, the horizontal-mean cloud heating, and the large-scale vertical advective cooling. Therefore, maximum gain of K' occurs about 4-5 hours before maximum decay of bar-P.

  18. 2-D Modeling of the Variability of the Solar Interior for Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, S.; Li, L. H.; Spada, F.; Ventura, P.

    2012-07-01

    To establish the possible influence of solar variability on climate, it is necessary to understand the luminosity changes induced by a variable dynamo magnetic field. To accomplish this, we have developed a 2D code of the structure and evolution of the solar interior (based on the 1D YREC code), that includes rotation, magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration, and turbulence, that can be run on very short time scales (down to 1 year), and that represents all global parameters (R, L, Teff) with a relative accuracy of 1 part per million, or better. This paper discusses the motivation for this work, the structure and the physical components of the code, and its application to interpret the results of the SODISM experiment on the PICARD satellite, and of the balloon-borne Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) experiment.

  19. An investigation of DTNS2D for use as an incompressible turbulence modelling test-bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper documents an investigation of a two dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes solver for use as a test-bed for turbulence modelling. DTNS2D is the code under consideration for use at the Center for Modelling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT). This code was created by Gorski at the David Taylor Research Center and incorporates the pseudo compressibility method. Two laminar benchmark flows are used to measure the performance and implementation of the method. The classical solution of the Blasius boundary layer is used for validating the flat plate flow, while experimental data is incorporated in the validation of backward facing step flow. Velocity profiles, convergence histories, and reattachment lengths are used to quantify these calculations. The organization and adaptability of the code are also examined in light of the role as a numerical test-bed.

  20. Evaluation of help model replacement codes

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Tad; Hang, Thong; Flach, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    This work evaluates the computer codes that are proposed to be used to predict percolation of water through the closure-cap and into the waste containment zone at the Department of Energy closure sites. This work compares the currently used water-balance code (HELP) with newly developed computer codes that use unsaturated flow (Richards’ equation). It provides a literature review of the HELP model and the proposed codes, which result in two recommended codes for further evaluation: HYDRUS-2D3D and VADOSE/W. This further evaluation involved performing actual simulations on a simple model and comparing the results of those simulations to those obtained with the HELP code and the field data. From the results of this work, we conclude that the new codes perform nearly the same, although moving forward, we recommend HYDRUS-2D3D.

  1. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  2. Unitary quantum lattice gas representation of 2D quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Soe, Min

    2011-05-01

    Quantum vortex structures and energy cascades are examined for two dimensional quantum turbulence (2D QT) using a special unitary evolution algorithm. The qubit lattice gas (QLG) algorithm, is employed to simulate the weakly-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) governed by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation. A parameter regime is uncovered in which, as in 3D QT, there is a very short Poincare recurrence time. This short recurrence time is destroyed as the nonlinear interaction energy is increased. Energy cascades for 2D QT are considered to examine whether 2D QT exhibits the inverse cascades of 2D classical turbulence. In the parameter regime considered, the spectra analysis reveals no such dual cascades---dual cascades being a hallmark of 2D classical turbulence.

  3. CYP2D6 polymorphism in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Peñas-Lledó, E M; Dorado, P; Agüera, Z; Gratacós, M; Estivill, X; Fernández-Aranda, F; Llerena, A

    2012-04-01

    CYP2D6 polymorphism is associated with variability in drug response, endogenous metabolism (that is, serotonin), personality, neurocognition and psychopathology. The relationship between CYP2D6 genetic polymorphism and the risk of eating disorders (ED) was analyzed in 267 patients with ED and in 285 controls. A difference in the CYP2D6 active allele distribution was found between these groups. Women carrying more than two active genes (ultrarapid metabolizers) (7.5 vs 4.6%) or two (67 vs 58.9%) active genes were more frequent among patients with ED, whereas those with one (20.6 vs 30.2%) or zero active genes (4.9 vs 6.3%) were more frequent among controls (P<0.05). Although further research is needed, present findings suggest an association between CYP2D6 and ED. CYP2D6 allele distribution in patients with ED seems related to increased enzyme activity. PMID:20877302

  4. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices. PMID:27471306

  5. Sensitivity and System Response of Pin Power Peaking in VVER-1000 Fuel Assembly Using TSUNAMI-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frybort, J.

    2014-04-01

    Pin power peaking in a VVER-1000 fuel assembly and its sensitivity and uncertainty was analyzed by TSUNAMI-2D code. Several types of fuel assemblies were considered. They differ in number and position of gadolinium fuel pins. The calculations were repeated for several fuel compositions obtained by fuel depletion calculation. The results are quantified sensitivity data, which can be used for enrichment profiling.

  6. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  7. Molecular Evolution of the CYP2D Subfamily in Primates: Purifying Selection on Substrate Recognition Sites without the Frequent or Long-Tract Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Yasukochi, Yoshiki; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 gene is a member of the CYP2D gene subfamily, along with the CYP2D7P and CYP2D8P pseudogenes. Although the CYP2D6 enzyme has been studied extensively because of its clinical importance, the evolution of the CYP2D subfamily has not yet been fully understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to reveal the evolutionary process of the human drug metabolic system. Here, we investigate molecular evolution of the CYP2D subfamily in primates by comparing 14 CYP2D sequences from humans to New World monkey genomes. Window analysis and statistical tests revealed that entire genomic sequences of paralogous genes were extensively homogenized by gene conversion during molecular evolution of CYP2D genes in primates. A neighbor-joining tree based on genomic sequences at the nonsubstrate recognition sites showed that CYP2D6 and CYP2D8 genes were clustered together due to gene conversion. In contrast, a phylogenetic tree using amino acid sequences at substrate recognition sites did not cluster the CYP2D6 and CYP2D8 genes, suggesting that the functional constraint on substrate specificity is one of the causes for purifying selection at the substrate recognition sites. Our results suggest that the CYP2D gene subfamily in primates has evolved to maintain the regioselectivity for a substrate hydroxylation activity between individual enzymes, even though extensive gene conversion has occurred across CYP2D coding sequences. PMID:25808902

  8. Galaxy Zoo: Observing secular evolution through bars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Edmond; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Melvin, Thomas; Bell, Eric F.; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A.; Willett, Kyle W.

    2013-12-20

    In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  9. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    SciTech Connect

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-18

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  10. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  11. Turbulent Convection: Is 2D a good proxy of 3D?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    Several authors have recently carried out 2D simulations of turbulent convection for both solar and massive stars. Fitting the 2D results with the MLT, they obtain that alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 specifically, 1.4 less than alpha(sub MLT) less than 1.8. The authors further suggest that this methodology could be used to calibrate the MLT used in stellar evolutionary codes. We suggest the opposite viewpoint: the 2D results show that MLT is internally inconsistent because the resulting alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 violates the MLT basic assumption that alpha(sub MLT) less than 1. When the 2D results are fitted with the CM model, alpha(sub CMT) less than 1, in accord with the basic tenet of the model. On the other hand, since both MLT and CM are local models, they should be replaced by the next generation of non-local, time dependent turbulence models which we discuss in some detail.

  12. Comparison of stress distribution between complete denture and implant-retained overdenture-2D FEA.

    PubMed

    Assunção, W G; Tabata, L F; Barão, V A R; Rocha, E P

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the stress distribution induced by posterior functional loads on conventional complete dentures and implant-retained overdentures with different attachment systems using a two-dimentional Finite Element Analysis (FEA-2D). Three models representative of edentulous mandible were constructed on AutoCAD software; Group A (control), a model of edentulous mandible supporting a complete denture; Group B, a model of edentulous mandible supporting an overdenture over two splinted implants connected with the bar-clip system; Group C, a model of edentulous mandible supporting an overdenture over two unsplinted implants with the O-ring system. Evaluation was conducted on Ansys software, with a vertical force of 100 N applied on the mandibular left first molar. When the stress was evaluated in supporting tissues, groups B (51.0 MPa) and C (52.6 MPa) demonstrated higher stress values than group A (10.1 MPa). Within the limits of this study, it may be concluded that the use of an attachment system increased stress values; furthermore, the use of splinted implants associated with the bar-clip attachment system favoured a lower stress distribution over the supporting tissue than the unsplinted implants with an O-ring abutment to retain the mandibular overdenture. PMID:18482352

  13. Stacked codes: Universal fault-tolerant quantum computation in a two-dimensional layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a class of three-dimensional color codes, which we call stacked codes, together with a fault-tolerant transformation that will map logical qubits encoded in two-dimensional (2D) color codes into stacked codes and back. The stacked code allows for the transversal implementation of a non-Clifford π /8 logical gate, which when combined with the logical Clifford gates that are transversal in the 2D color code give a gate set that is both fault-tolerant and universal without requiring nonstabilizer magic states. We then show that the layers forming the stacked code can be unfolded and arranged in a 2D layout. As only Clifford gates can be implemented transversally for 2D topological stabilizer codes, a nonlocal operation must be incorporated in order to allow for this transversal application of a non-Clifford gate. Our code achieves this operation through the transformation from a 2D color code to the unfolded stacked code induced by measuring only geometrically local stabilizers and gauge operators within the bulk of 2D color codes together with a nonlocal operator that has support on a one-dimensional boundary between such 2D codes. We believe that this proposed method to implement the nonlocal operation is a realistic one for 2D stabilizer layouts and would be beneficial in avoiding the large overheads caused by magic state distillation.

  14. DD-bar production and their interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yanrui; Oka, Makoto; Takizawa, Makoto; Liu Xiang

    2011-05-23

    We have explored the bound state problem and the scattering problem of the DD-bar pair in a meson exchange model. When considering their production in the e{sup +}e{sup -} process, we included the DD-bar rescattering effect. Although it is difficult to answer whether the S-wave DD-bar bound state exists or not from the binding energies and the phase shifts, one may get an upper limit of the binding energy from the production of the BB-bar, the bottom analog of DD-bar.

  15. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Athanassoula, L.; Masters, K.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Zoo, Galaxy

    2014-01-01

    In this talk, I use the Galaxy Zoo 2 dataset to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR), and inner galactic structure, i.e., the prominence of the bulge as parameterized by Sérsic index and central surface stellar mass density. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall bar fraction of 23.6 ± 0.4%, of which 1,154 barred galaxies also have bar length measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in disk galaxy evolution. I find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anti-correlated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. I find that the trends of bar likelihood with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR, i.e., in star-forming galaxies, bulges are more prominent in galaxies more likely to host bars, while in quiescent disk galaxies, bars are less frequent where there are prominent bulges. Our observations of bar length reveal a complex picture. In star-forming disks, longer bars are found where the bulges are more prominent, while in quiescent disks there is a maximum in the average bar length as a function of bulge prominence. I interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution which include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. I suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks; a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. I interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution, and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies, but are a critical evolutionary driver of their

  16. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples. PMID:27378648

  17. Changes in Smoking-Related Norms in Bars Resulting from California’s Smoke-Free Workplace Act*

    PubMed Central

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2013-01-01

    California’s Smoke-Free Workplace Act— CA Labor Code Sec. 6404.5(a)—was extended to bars in 1998. This paper analyzes changes in normative beliefs and behaviors related to bar smoking in the decade following the adoption of the Act. In a series of studies evaluating the smoke-free workplace law in bars, researchers conducted extensive observations and interviews with bar staff and patrons, health officials, and law enforcement personnel in three California counties. Smoking outside became a normal pause in the social environment and created a new type of bar socializing for outside smokers. Although some bar owners and staff reported initially resenting the responsibility to uphold the law, once norms regarding cigarettes and smoking began changing, bar workers experienced less conflict in upholding the law. Non-smoking behavior within bars also became the normative behavior for bar patrons. California’s Smoke-Free Workplace Act has both reflected and encouraged normative beliefs and behaviors related to smoking in bars. The findings indicate that such shifts are possible even in contexts where smoking behaviors and attitudes supporting smoking were deeply entrenched. Recommendations include attending to the synergistic effect of education and policy in effective tobacco control programs. PMID:23705511

  18. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  19. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  20. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, I.; Nordhaus, J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C-value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the bar, estimating that the bar pattern speed is Ωb/Ω0=1.87+/-0.04, where Ω0 is the local circular frequency, and the bar angle lies within 20deg<=φ0<=45deg. We find that the Galactic bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than ~2 km s-1 kpc-1 for the hot stars.

  1. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, Ivan; Nordhaus, J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic Bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the Bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test-particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C-value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic Bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the Bar, estimating that the Bar pattern speed is Omega_b/Omega_0=1.87\\pm0.04, where Omega_0 is the local circular frequency, and the Bar angle lies within 20Bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than 2 km/s/kpc for the hot stars.

  2. Steady, Nonrotating, Blade-to-Blade Potential Transonic Cascade Flow Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    CAS2D computer program numerically solves artifically time-dependent form of actual full potential equation, providing steady, nonrotating, bladeto-blade potential transonic cascade flow analysis code. CAS2D written in FORTRAN IV.

  3. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  4. 2-D Time-Dependent Fuel Element, Thermal Analysis Code System.

    2001-09-24

    Version 00 WREM-TOODEE2 is a two dimensional, time-dependent, fuel-element thermal analysis program. Its primary purpose is to evaluate fuel-element thermal response during post-LOCA refill and reflood in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). TOODEE2 calculations are carried out in a two-dimensional mesh region defined in slab or cylindrical geometry by orthogonal grid lines. Coordinates which form order pairs are labeled x-y in slab geometry, and those in cylindrical geometry are labeled r-z for the axisymmetric casemore » and r-theta for the polar case. Conduction and radiation are the only heat transfer mechanisms assumed within the boundaries of the mesh region. Convective and boiling heat transfer mechanisms are assumed at the boundaries. The program numerically solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, heat conduction equation within the mesh region. KEYWORDS: FUEL MANAGEMENT; HEAT TRANSFER; LOCA; PWR« less

  5. 2D virtual texture on 3D real object with coded structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinier, Thierry; Fofi, David; Salvi, Joaquim; Gorria, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Augmented reality is used to improve color segmentation on human body or on precious no touch artifacts. We propose a technique to project a synthesized texture on real object without contact. Our technique can be used in medical or archaeological application. By projecting a suitable set of light patterns onto the surface of a 3D real object and by capturing images with a camera, a large number of correspondences can be found and the 3D points can be reconstructed. We aim to determine these points of correspondence between cameras and projector from a scene without explicit points and normals. We then project an adjusted texture onto the real object surface. We propose a global and automatic method to virtually texture a 3D real object.

  6. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: Coonstripe 964 Humpy 963 Northern (pink) 961 Sidestripe 962 Spot 965 Snails 890 Urchin, green sea 893 Urchin, red sea 892 ...) 142 Rockfish, blue (GOA) 167 Rockfish, dark 173 Sardine, Pacific (pilchard) 170 Sea cucumber, red...

  7. Quantitative comparisons between experimentally measured 2-D carbon radiation and Monte Carlo impurity (MCI) code simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Leonard, A.W.; West, W.P.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Porter, G.D.

    1998-08-01

    Experimentally measured carbon line emissions and total radiated power distributions from the DIII-D divertor and Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) are compared to those calculated with the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) model. A UEDGE background plasma is used in MCI with the Roth and Garcia-Rosales (RG-R) chemical sputtering model and/or one of six physical sputtering models. While results from these simulations do not reproduce all of the features seen in the experimentally measured radiation patterns, the total radiated power calculated in MCI is in relatively good agreement with that measured by the DIII-D bolometric system when the Smith78 physical sputtering model is coupled to RG-R chemical sputtering in an unaltered UEDGE plasma. Alternatively, MCI simulations done with UEDGE background ion temperatures along the divertor target plates adjusted to better match those measured in the experiment resulted in three physical sputtering models which when coupled to the RG-R model gave a total radiated power that was within 10% of measured value.

  8. 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of SATURN imploding Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Springer, P.T.

    1995-11-06

    Z-pinch implosions driven by the SATURN device at Sandia National Laboratory are modeled with a 2D radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, showing strong growth of magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instability. Modeling of the linear and nonlinear development of MRT modes predicts growth of bubble-spike structures that increase the time span of stagnation and the resulting x-ray pulse width. Radiation is important in the pinch dynamics keeping the sheath relatively cool during the run-in and releasing most of the stagnation energy. The calculations give x-ray pulse widths and magnitudes in reasonable agreement with experiments, but predict a radiating region that is too dense and radially localized at stagnation. We also consider peaked initial density profiles with constant imploding sheath velocity that should reduce MRT instability and improve performance. 2D krypton simulations show an output x-ray power > 80 TW for the peaked profile.

  9. Spatially Resolved Synthetic Spectra from 2D Simulations of Stainless Steel Wire Array Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.

    2009-01-21

    A 2D radiation MHD model has been developed to investigate stainless steel wire array implosion experiments on the Z and refurbished Z machines. This model incorporates within the Mach2 MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE kinetics and ray trace based radiation transport. Such a method is necessary in order to account for opacity effects in conjunction with ionization kinetics of K-shell emitting plasmas. Here the model is used to investigate multi-dimensional effects of stainless steel wire implosions. In particular, we are developing techniques to produce non-LTE, axially and/or radially resolved synthetic spectra based upon snapshots of our 2D simulations. Comparisons between experimental spectra and these synthetic spectra will allow us to better determine the state of the experimental pinches.

  10. Analysis results from the Los Alamos 2D/3D program

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Cappiello, M.W.; Harmony, S.C.; Shire, P.R.; Siebe, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the 2D/3D program. Activities conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of 2D/3D program goals include analysis support of facility design, construction, and operation; provision of boundary and initial conditions for test-facility operations based on analysis of pressurized water reactors; performance of pretest and posttest predictions and analyses; and use of experimental results to validate and assess the single- and multi-dimensional, nonequilibrium features in the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). During fiscal year 1987, Los Alamos conducted analytical assessment activities using data from the Slab Core Test Facility, The Cylindrical Core Test Facility, and the Upper Plenum Test Facility. Finally, Los Alamos continued work to provide TRAC improvements. In this paper, Los Alamos activities during fiscal year 1987 will be summarized; several significant accomplishments will be described in more detail to illustrate the work activities at Los Alamos.

  11. Molecular Dynamics implementation of BN2D or 'Mercedes Benz' water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, Arturs; Bardik, Vitaliy; Pavlov, Evgen; Nerukh, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional 'Mercedes Benz' (MB) or BN2D water model (Naim, 1971) is implemented in Molecular Dynamics. It is known that the MB model can capture abnormal properties of real water (high heat capacity, minima of pressure and isothermal compressibility, negative thermal expansion coefficient) (Silverstein et al., 1998). In this work formulas for calculating the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties in microcanonical (NVE) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensembles for the model from Molecular Dynamics simulation are derived and verified against known Monte Carlo results. The convergence of the thermodynamic properties and the system's numerical stability are investigated. The results qualitatively reproduce the peculiarities of real water making the model a visually convenient tool that also requires less computational resources, thus allowing simulations of large (hydrodynamic scale) molecular systems. We provide the open source code written in C/C++ for the BN2D water model implementation using Molecular Dynamics.

  12. 2D/3D Program work summary report, [January 1988--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Damerell, P. S.; Simons, J. W.

    1993-06-01

    The 2D/3D Program was carried out by Germany, Japan and the United States to investigate the thermal-hydraulics of a PWR large-break LOCA. A contributory approach was utilized in which each country contributed significant effort to the program and all three countries shared the research results. Germany constructed and operated the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), and Japan constructed and operated the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) and the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF). The US contribution consisted of provision of advanced instrumentation to each of the three test facilities, and assessment of the TRAC computer code against the test results. Evaluations of the test results were carried out in all three countries. This report summarizes the 2D/3D Program in terms of the contributing efforts of the participants.

  13. BILL2D - A software package for classical two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanpää, J.; Luukko, P. J. J.; Räsänen, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present BILL2D, a modern and efficient C++ package for classical simulations of two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. BILL2D can be used for various billiard and diffusion problems with one or more charged particles with interactions, different external potentials, an external magnetic field, periodic and open boundaries, etc. The software package can also calculate many key quantities in complex systems such as Poincaré sections, survival probabilities, and diffusion coefficients. While aiming at a large class of applicable systems, the code also strives for ease-of-use, efficiency, and modularity for the implementation of additional features. The package comes along with a user guide, a developer's manual, and a documentation of the application program interface (API).

  14. A Neural-FEM tool for the 2-D magnetic hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Laudani, A.; Lozito, G. M.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new tool for the analysis of magnetic field problems considering 2-D magnetic hysteresis. In particular, this tool makes use of the Finite Element Method to solve the magnetic field problem in real device, and fruitfully exploits a neural network (NN) for the modeling of 2-D magnetic hysteresis of materials. The NS has as input the magnetic inductions components B at the k-th simulation step and returns as output the corresponding values of the magnetic field H corresponding to the input pattern. It is trained by vector measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. This input/output scheme is directly implemented in a FEM code employing the magnetic potential vector A formulation. Validations through measurements on a real device have been performed.

  15. Bars within bars - A mechanism for fuelling active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac; Frank, Juhan; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1989-01-01

    A mechanism, applicable to AGN and nuclear starburst galaxies in which there is accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SBH), is proposed which brings in gas from large to small scales by successive dynamical instabilities. On the large scale, a stellar bar sweeps the interstellar medium into a gaseous disk a few hundred pc in radius. Under certain conditions, this disk can become unstable again, allowing material to flow inwards until turbulent viscous processes control angular-momentum transport. This flow pattern may feed viscosity-driven accretion flows around an SBH or lead to the formation of an SBH if none was present initially.

  16. 2D constant-loss taper for mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horth, Alexandre; Kashyap, Raman; Quitoriano, Nathaniel J.

    2015-03-01

    Proposed in this manuscript is a novel taper geometry, the constant-loss taper (CLT). This geometry is derived with 1D slabs of silicon embedded in silicon dioxide using coupled-mode theory (CMT). The efficiency of the CLT is compared to both linear and parabolic tapers using CMT and 2D finite-difference time-domain simulations. It is shown that over a short 2D, 4.45 μm long taper the CLT's mode conversion efficiency is ~90% which is 10% and 18% more efficient than a 2D parabolic or linear taper, respectively.

  17. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  18. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  19. Materials for Flexible, Stretchable Electronics: Graphene and 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Choi, Kyoungjun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Yuna; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-07-01

    Recently, 2D materials have been intensively studied as emerging materials for future electronics, including flexible electronics, photonics, and electrochemical energy storage devices. Among representative 2D materials (such as graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides) that exhibit extraordinary properties, graphene stands out in the flexible electronics field due to its combination of high electron mobility, high thermal conductivity, high specific surface area, high optical transparency, excellent mechanical flexibility, and environmental stability. This review covers the synthesis, transfer, and characterization methods of graphene and 2D materials and graphene's application to flexible devices as well as comparison with other competing materials.

  20. A simple 2-D inundation model for incorporating flood damage in urban drainage planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, A.; Tsegaye, S.; Gersonius, B.; Vairavamoorthy, K.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper a new inundation model code is developed and coupled with Storm Water Management Model, SWMM, to relate spatial information associated with urban drainage systems as criteria for planning of storm water drainage networks. The prime objective is to achive a model code that is simple and fast enough to be consistently be used in planning stages of urban drainage projects. The formulation for the two-dimensional (2-D) surface flow model algorithms is based on the Navier Stokes equation in two dimensions. An Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) finite difference numerical scheme is applied to solve the governing equations. This numerical scheme is used to express the partial differential equations with time steps split into two halves. The model algorithm is written using C++ computer programming language. This 2-D surface flow model is then coupled with SWMM for simulation of both pipe flow component and surcharge induced inundation in urban areas. In addition, a damage calculation block is integrated within the inundation model code. The coupled model is shown to be capable of dealing with various flow conditions, as well as being able to simulate wetting and drying processes that will occur as the flood flows over an urban area. It has been applied under idealized and semi-hypothetical cases to determine detailed inundation zones, depths and velocities due to surcharged water on overland surface.

  1. Infinitesimal-area 2D radiative analysis using parametric surface representation, through NURBS

    SciTech Connect

    Daun, K.J.; Hollands, K.G.T.

    1999-07-01

    The use of form factors in the treatment of radiant enclosures requires that the radiosity and surface properties be treated as uniform over finite areas. This restriction can be relaxed by applying an infinitesimal-area analysis, where the radiant exchange is taken to be between infinitesimal areas, rather than finite areas. This paper presents a generic infinitesimal-area formulation that can be applied to two-dimensional enclosure problems. (Previous infinitesimal-area analyses have largely been restricted to specific, one-dimensional problems.) Specifically, the paper shows how the analytical expression for the kernel of the integral equation can be obtained without human intervention, once the enclosure surface has been defined parametrically. This can be accomplished by using a computer algebra package or by using NURBS algorithms, which are the industry standard for the geometrical representations used in CAD-CAM codes. Once the kernel has been obtained by this formalism, the 2D integral equation can be set up and solved numerically. The result is a single general-purpose infinitesimal-area analysis code that can proceed from surface specification to solution. The authors have implemented this 2D code and tested it on 1D problems, whose solutions have been given in the literature, obtaining agreement commensurate with the accuracy of the published solutions.

  2. Computation of neutron fluxes in clusters of fuel pins arranged in hexagonal assemblies (2D and 3D)

    SciTech Connect

    Prabha, H.; Marleau, G.

    2012-07-01

    For computations of fluxes, we have used Carvik's method of collision probabilities. This method requires tracking algorithms. An algorithm to compute tracks (in 2D and 3D) has been developed for seven hexagonal geometries with cluster of fuel pins. This has been implemented in the NXT module of the code DRAGON. The flux distribution in cluster of pins has been computed by using this code. For testing the results, they are compared when possible with the EXCELT module of the code DRAGON. Tracks are plotted in the NXT module by using MATLAB, these plots are also presented here. Results are presented with increasing number of lines to show the convergence of these results. We have numerically computed volumes, surface areas and the percentage errors in these computations. These results show that 2D results converge faster than 3D results. The accuracy on the computation of fluxes up to second decimal is achieved with fewer lines. (authors)

  3. A diffractive barcode using diffusion-dot lines to form intersected bright bars with different orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lih Yeh, Sheng; Lin, Shyh Tsong; Wu, Ming Wei

    2010-11-01

    Conventional barcodes can perform well for the data management of commercial products, but they cannot be used for anti-counterfeiting. Therefore, this paper will propose a new barcode with macro- and micro-anti-counterfeiting features. A barcode image for a conventional barcode is composed of parallel bars with different widths, whereas a barcode image for the new barcode is composed of intersected bars with different orientations. Codes for the proposed barcode are composed of bright bars along four possible orientations only. The proposed barcode pattern possesses many parallel diffusion-dot lines. Because diffusion-dot lines can diffract a laser beam to form different bright bar arrangements corresponding to different codes, the proposed barcode is called a 'diffractive barcode' here. There are brightness and length differences between the bars in a bright bar image and the differences are difficult to counterfeit, so the macrofeatures can be used for anti-counterfeiting. On the other hand, because the appearances of the diffusion dots are special and they cannot be reproduced, the microfeatures can be used for anti-counterfeiting. Moreover, both the encoding and decoding work of the diffractive barcode are easy.

  4. Recent developments in 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Late, Dattatray J.; Morgan, Hywel; Rout, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional layered inorganic nanomaterials (2D-LINs) have recently attracted huge interest because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties and potential technological applications. The properties of these layered materials can be tuned via both physical and chemical processes. Some 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials like MoS2, WS2 and SnS2 have been recently developed and employed in various applications, including new sensors because of their layer-dependent electrical properties. This article presents a comprehensive overview of recent developments in the application of 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials as sensors. Some of the salient features of 2D materials for different sensing applications are discussed, including gas sensing, electrochemical sensing, SERS and biosensing, SERS sensing and photodetection. The working principles of the sensors are also discussed together with examples.

  5. 2. D Street facade and rear (east) blank wall of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. D Street facade and rear (east) blank wall of parking garage. Farther east is 408 8th Street (National Art And Frame Company). - PMI Parking Garage, 403-407 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Collective excitations in 2D hard-disc fluid.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Adrian; Bryk, Taras; Trokhymchuk, Andrij

    2015-07-01

    Collective dynamics of a two-dimensional (2D) hard-disc fluid was studied by molecular dynamics simulations in the range of packing fractions that covers states up to the freezing. Some striking features concerning collective excitations in this system were observed. In particular, the short-wavelength shear waves while being absent at low packing fractions were observed in the range of high packing fractions, just before the freezing transition in a 2D hard-disc fluid. In contrast, the so-called "positive sound dispersion" typically observed in dense Lennard-Jones-like fluids, was not detected for the 2D hard-disc fluid. The ratio of specific heats in the 2D hard-disc fluid shows a monotonic increase with density approaching the freezing, resembling in this way the similar behavior in the vicinity of the Widom line in the case of supercritical fluids. PMID:25595625

  7. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices. PMID:26839956

  8. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  9. From weakly to strongly interacting 2D Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Paul; Fenech, Kristian; Lingham, Marcus; Peppler, Tyson; Hoinka, Sascha; Vale, Chris

    2014-05-01

    We study ultracold 2D Fermi gases of 6Li formed in a highly oblate trapping potential. The potential is generated by a cylindrically focused, blue detuned TEM01 mode laser beam. Weak magnetic field curvature provides highly harmonic confinement in the radial direction and we can readily produce single clouds with an aspect ratio of 230. Our experiments investigate the dimensional crossover from 3D to 2D for a two component Fermi gas in the Bose-Einstein Condensate to Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer crossover. Observation of an elbow in measurements of the cloud width vs. atom number is consistent with populating only the lowest transverse harmonic oscillator state for weak attractive interactions. This measurement is extended to the strongly interacting region using the broad Feshbach resonance at 832 G. We also report our progress towards measurement of the 2D equation of state for an interacting 2D Fermi gas via in-situ absorption imaging.

  10. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-11-01

    The unique properties of 2D materials, such as graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides, have been attracting much attention in the past decade. Now, metallically conductive and even superconducting transition metal carbides are entering the game.

  11. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevector aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of inertial ranged magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between perpendicular and parallel reduced power spectra which is expected for the 2D component but not for the slab component. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant (approximately 85 percent by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  12. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1996-07-20

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevectors aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of mid-inertial range magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between reduced magnetic power spectra in the two different directions perpendicular to the mean field. Such a difference is expected for 2D geometry but not for slab geometry. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant ({approx}85% by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  13. Efficient framework for deformable 2D-3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluck, Oliver; Aharon, Shmuel; Khamene, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Using 2D-3D registration it is possible to extract the body transformation between the coordinate systems of X-ray and volumetric CT images. Our initial motivation is the improvement of accuracy of external beam radiation therapy, an effective method for treating cancer, where CT data play a central role in radiation treatment planning. Rigid body transformation is used to compute the correct patient setup. The drawback of such approaches is that the rigidity assumption on the imaged object is not valid for most of the patient cases, mainly due to respiratory motion. In the present work, we address this limitation by proposing a flexible framework for deformable 2D-3D registration consisting of a learning phase incorporating 4D CT data sets and hardware accelerated free form DRR generation, 2D motion computation, and 2D-3D back projection.

  14. Computational Design of 2D materials for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Since the successful synthesis of graphene, tremendous efforts have been devoted to two-dimensional monolayers such as boron nitride (BN), silicene and MoS2. These 2D materials exhibit a large variety of physical and chemical properties with unprecedented applications. Here we report our recent studies of computational design of 2D materials for fuel cell applications which include hydrogen storage, CO2 capture, CO conversion and O2 reduction.

  15. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  16. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  17. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Bosma, A.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lintott, C.; Melvin, T.; Schawinski, K.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    Although often seen in galaxies, the role that bars play in galaxy evolution has been largely overlooked. Observations show that bars — stellar linear-shaped structures — have been present in galaxies since z ˜ 1, about 8 billion years ago, and that more and more galaxies are becoming barred with time. This trend has continued to the present, where about two-thirds of all disk galaxies are barred. Observations have also shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy, including morphology, star formation, chemical abundance gradients, and nuclear activity. These trends are consistent with the predicted effects of bars on galaxy evolution, i.e., secular evolution. Thus, observations and simulations indicate that bars are important drivers of galaxy evolution. But despite these evidence, bars are still commonly omitted in the lore of galaxy evolution. This proceeding briefly highlights work by Cheung et al. (2013), which tries to change this common omission by presenting the best evidence of bar-driven secular evolution yet. This work implies that bars are not stagnant structures within galaxies, but are instead, critical drivers of galaxy evolution.

  18. Molecular Gas, Dust, and Star Formation in the Barred Spiral NGC 5383

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Regan, Michael W.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Teuben, Peter J.

    2000-03-01

    We have mapped the barred spiral NGC 5383 using the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association millimeter-wave array for observations of CO (J=1-0), the Palomar 1.5 m telescope for Hα and optical broadband, and the Kitt Peak 1.3 m telescope for near-IR broadband. We compare the observed central gas and dust morphology to the predictions of recent hydrodynamic simulations calculated using the Piner, Stone, and Teuben code. In the nuclear region, our observations reveal three peaks lying along an S-shaped gas and dust distribution: two of these are at the inner end of offset bar dust lanes at the presumed location of the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR), and the other lies closer to the nucleus. In contrast, the model predicts a circumnuclear ring, not the observed S-shaped distribution; moreover, the predicted surface density contrast between the central gas accumulation and the bar dust lanes is an order of magnitude larger than observed. These discrepancies remain for all our simulations which produce offset bar dust lanes and indicate that the model is missing an essential process or component. A small nuclear bar might account for the discrepancy, but we rule this out using a Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS (near-IR camera and multiobject spectrometer) image: this reveals a nuclear trailing spiral, not a bar; we show that coarser resolution (i.e., ground-based images) can produce artifacts that resemble bars or rings. We conclude that the discrepancies in morphology and contrast are due to the omission of star formation from the model; this is supported by the observed high rate of central star formation (7 Msolar yr-1), a rate that can consume most of the accumulating gas. As is common in similar bars, the star formation rate in the bar between the bar ends and the central region is low (0.5 Msolar yr-1), despite the high gas column density in the bar dust lanes; this is generally attributed to shear and shocks. We note a tendency for the H II regions to be associated

  19. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  20. Speech coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersho, Allen

    1990-05-01

    Recent advances in algorithms and techniques for speech coding now permit high quality voice reproduction at remarkably low bit rates. The advent of powerful single-ship signal processors has made it cost effective to implement these new and sophisticated speech coding algorithms for many important applications in voice communication and storage. Some of the main ideas underlying the algorithms of major interest today are reviewed. The concept of removing redundancy by linear prediction is reviewed, first in the context of predictive quantization or DPCM. Then linear predictive coding, adaptive predictive coding, and vector quantization are discussed. The concepts of excitation coding via analysis-by-synthesis, vector sum excitation codebooks, and adaptive postfiltering are explained. The main idea of vector excitation coding (VXC) or code excited linear prediction (CELP) are presented. Finally low-delay VXC coding and phonetic segmentation for VXC are described.

  1. A secularly evolved model for the Milky Way bar and bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2015-03-01

    Bars are strong drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Bars themselves can evolve secularly through angular momentum transport, producing different boxy/peanut and X-shaped bulges. Our Milky Way is an example of a barred galaxy with a boxy bulge. We present a self-consistent N-body simulation of a barred galaxy which matches remarkably well the structure of the inner Milky Way deduced from star counts. In particular, features taken as signatures of a second ``long bar`` can be explained by the interaction between the bar and the spiral arms of the galaxy (Martinez-Valpuesta & Gerhard 2011). Furthermore the structural change in the bulge inside l = 4° measured recently from VVV data can be explained by the high-density near-axisymmetric part of the inner boxy bulge (Gerhard & Martinez-Valpuesta 2012). We also compare this model with kinematic data from recent spectroscopic surveys. We use a modified version of the NMAGIC code (de Lorenzi et al. 2007) to study the properties of the Milky Way bar, obtaining an upper limit for the pattern speed of ~ 42 km/sec/kpc. See Fig. 1 for a comparison of one of our best models with BRAVA data (Kunder et al. 2012).

  2. A new two dimensional spectral/spatial multi-diagonal code for noncoherent optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhim, Rasim Azeez; Fadhil, Hilal Adnan; Aljunid, S. A.; Razalli, Mohamad Shahrazel

    2014-10-01

    A new two dimensional codes family, namely two dimensional multi-diagonal (2D-MD) codes, is proposed for spectral/spatial non-coherent OCDMA systems based on the one dimensional MD code. Since the MD code has the property of zero cross correlation, the proposed 2D-MD code also has this property. So that, the multi-access interference (MAI) is fully eliminated and the phase induced intensity noise (PIIN) is suppressed with the proposed code. Code performance is analyzed in terms of bit error rate (BER) while considering the effect of shot noise, PIIN, and thermal noise. The performance of the proposed code is compared with the related MD, modified quadratic congruence (MQC), two dimensional perfect difference (2D-PD) and two dimensional diluted perfect difference (2D-DPD) codes. The analytical and the simulation results reveal that the proposed 2D-MD code outperforms the other codes. Moreover, a large number of simultaneous users can be accommodated at low BER and high data rate.

  3. Two-Dimensional Aperture Coding for Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Zachary E.; Chen, Evan X.; Amsden, Jason J.; Wolter, Scott D.; Danell, Ryan M.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Gehm, Michael E.; Brady, David J.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2015-02-01

    In mass spectrometer design, there has been a historic belief that there exists a fundamental trade-off between instrument size, throughput, and resolution. When miniaturizing a traditional system, performance loss in either resolution or throughput would be expected. However, in optical spectroscopy, both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) aperture coding have been used for many years to break a similar trade-off. To provide a viable path to miniaturization for harsh environment field applications, we are investigating similar concepts in sector mass spectrometry. Recently, we demonstrated the viability of 1D aperture coding and here we provide a first investigation of 2D coding. In coded optical spectroscopy, 2D coding is preferred because of increased measurement diversity for improved conditioning and robustness of the result. To investigate its viability in mass spectrometry, analytes of argon, acetone, and ethanol were detected using a custom 90-degree magnetic sector mass spectrometer incorporating 2D coded apertures. We developed a mathematical forward model and reconstruction algorithm to successfully reconstruct the mass spectra from the 2D spatially coded ion positions. This 2D coding enabled a 3.5× throughput increase with minimal decrease in resolution. Several challenges were overcome in the mass spectrometer design to enable this coding, including the need for large uniform ion flux, a wide gap magnetic sector that maintains field uniformity, and a high resolution 2D detection system for ion imaging. Furthermore, micro-fabricated 2D coded apertures incorporating support structures were developed to provide a viable design that allowed ion transmission through the open elements of the code.

  4. Two-dimensional aperture coding for magnetic sector mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Zachary E; Chen, Evan X; Amsden, Jason J; Wolter, Scott D; Danell, Ryan M; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Gehm, Michael E; Brady, David J; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2015-02-01

    In mass spectrometer design, there has been a historic belief that there exists a fundamental trade-off between instrument size, throughput, and resolution. When miniaturizing a traditional system, performance loss in either resolution or throughput would be expected. However, in optical spectroscopy, both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) aperture coding have been used for many years to break a similar trade-off. To provide a viable path to miniaturization for harsh environment field applications, we are investigating similar concepts in sector mass spectrometry. Recently, we demonstrated the viability of 1D aperture coding and here we provide a first investigation of 2D coding. In coded optical spectroscopy, 2D coding is preferred because of increased measurement diversity for improved conditioning and robustness of the result. To investigate its viability in mass spectrometry, analytes of argon, acetone, and ethanol were detected using a custom 90-degree magnetic sector mass spectrometer incorporating 2D coded apertures. We developed a mathematical forward model and reconstruction algorithm to successfully reconstruct the mass spectra from the 2D spatially coded ion positions. This 2D coding enabled a 3.5× throughput increase with minimal decrease in resolution. Several challenges were overcome in the mass spectrometer design to enable this coding, including the need for large uniform ion flux, a wide gap magnetic sector that maintains field uniformity, and a high resolution 2D detection system for ion imaging. Furthermore, micro-fabricated 2D coded apertures incorporating support structures were developed to provide a viable design that allowed ion transmission through the open elements of the code. PMID:25510933

  5. ON THE FRACTION OF BARRED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Preethi B.; Abraham, Roberto G. E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.c

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the stellar masses of strongly barred spiral galaxies. Our analysis is based on a sample of {approx}14,000 visually classified nearby galaxies given by Nair and Abraham. The fraction of barred spiral galaxies is found to be a strong function of stellar mass and star formation history, with a minimum near the characteristic mass at which bimodality is seen in the stellar populations of galaxies. We also find that bar fractions are very sensitive to the central concentration of galaxies below the transition mass but not above it. This suggests that whatever process is causing the creation of the red and blue sequences is either influencing, or being influenced by, structural changes which manifest themselves in the absence of bars. As a consequence of strong bar fractions being sensitive to the mass range probed, our analysis helps resolve discrepant results on the reported evolution of bar fractions with redshift.

  6. Physical and numerical investigations of channel bar response to hydrograph form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, M.; Yager, E.; Yarnell, S. M.; Merritt, D.

    2013-12-01

    Physical and numerical modeling of river channel morphology often consider the influence of a single discharge or a series of individual discharges assumed to be in normal, steady conditions. However, the rate of change between these discharges may also affect channel morphology. Rapid flooding has been linked to poorly sorted, less armored beds compared to more gradual floods, but the influence on morphology is rarely considered. In addition, installation of vegetation is common in restoration projects though it is not always clear how this will impact morphological features such as bars. Here we present results from a set of flume experiments and 2D modeling designed to investigate the influence of hydrograph shape and vegetation on the morphology of a forced bar in sand-bed channel. Flume experiments were conducted in the Outdoor Stream Lab at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, Minneapolis, MN. We ran three falling limb only hydrographs with different recession rates (10, 30, and 70%). Minimum discharge, total volumetric water discharge, and estimated sediment transport capacity were held within 10% between runs. The ratio of sediment supply to estimated transport capacity was also held constant at all times. The 10% run peaked at 150 L/s, while the 30% and 70% runs peaked at 284 L/s. The 30 and 70% runs were repeated with vegetation (Juncus and Carex) that mimicked vegetation established at approximately bankful height. Similar initial conditions for all runs were established by running the flume to equilibrium at constant flow and feed rates. Detailed bar topography/bathymetry data were collected before, during, and following each run. Bar morphology at the conclusion of recession hydrographs indicated that bar development declines as recession rate increases. Both with and without vegetation, the faster recessions resulted in bar morphology that was less distinct. This observation is supported by bar-top widths and areas that both declined as recession rate

  7. Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, Fabrizio; Hamkins, Jon; Dolinar, Sam; Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews uplink coding. The purpose and goals of the briefing are (1) Show a plan for using uplink coding and describe benefits (2) Define possible solutions and their applicability to different types of uplink, including emergency uplink (3) Concur with our conclusions so we can embark on a plan to use proposed uplink system (4) Identify the need for the development of appropriate technology and infusion in the DSN (5) Gain advocacy to implement uplink coding in flight projects Action Item EMB04-1-14 -- Show a plan for using uplink coding, including showing where it is useful or not (include discussion of emergency uplink coding).

  8. DO BARS DRIVE SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES?

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Knapen, Johan H.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Puerari, Ivanio; Block, David L. E-mail: jhk@iac.es E-mail: hsalo@sun3.oulu.fi E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu E-mail: David.Block@wits.ac.za

    2009-05-15

    We present deep near-infrared K{sub s} -band Anglo-Australian Telescope Infrared Imager and Spectrograph observations of a selected sample of nearby barred spiral galaxies, including some with the strongest known bars. The sample covers a range of Hubble types from SB0{sup -} to SBc. The goal is to determine if the torque strengths of the spirals correlate with those of the bars, which might be expected if the bars actually drive the spirals as has been predicted by theoretical studies. This issue has implications for interpreting bar and spiral fractions at high redshift. Analysis of previous samples suggested that such a correlation exists in the near-infrared, where effects of extinction and star formation are less important. However, the earlier samples had only a few excessively strong bars. Our new sample largely confirms our previous studies, but still any correlation is relatively weak. We find two galaxies, NGC 7513 and UGC 10862, where there is only a weak spiral in the presence of a very strong bar. We suggest that some spirals probably are driven by their bars at the same pattern speed, but that this may be only when the bar is growing or if there is abundant gas and dissipation.

  9. Basic physics of xylophone and marimba bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suits, B. H.

    2001-07-01

    The frequency-dependent wave velocity and nonsinusoidal spatial dependence found for transverse waves in finite vibrating bars stands in stark contrast to the solutions to the one-dimensional wave equation, for example for the idealized vibrating string. The difference is particularly important when the resulting vibrations are used to produce music. Here, the appropriate approximate equations for transverse vibrations on a uniform bar are developed and compared to measurements using wooden bars. The results are extended using a simple finite element model to provide a means to predict normal mode behavior in nonuniform wooden bars such as those used for xylophones, marimbas, and related musical instruments.

  10. Kosaki-Longo index and classification of charges in 2D quantum spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaijkens, Pieter

    2013-08-01

    We consider charge superselection sectors of two-dimensional quantum spin models corresponding to cone localisable charges, and prove that the number of equivalence classes of such charges is bounded by the Kosaki-Longo index of an inclusion of certain observable algebras. To demonstrate the power of this result we apply the theory to the toric code on a 2D infinite lattice. For this model we can compute the index of this inclusion, and conclude that there are four distinct irreducible charges in this model, in accordance with the analysis of the toric code model on compact surfaces. We also give a sufficient criterion for the non-degeneracy of the charge sectors, in the sense that Verlinde's matrix S is invertible.

  11. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Holland, C.

    2012-10-15

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s}{approx} 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  12. Secular evolution in action: unravelling the nature of bars and bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Marja Kristin; Falcon Barroso, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Studies of galactic bulges in relation with bars have provided powerful constraints on their formation and evolution. While spectroscopic measurements in 2D have mainly focused on the interstellar component, two dimensional studies of the stellar counterpart have only become possible with the advent of integral-field spectroscopic surveys. Here we present new results from the BaLROG project (Bars in Low Redshift Optical galaxies), using the integral field spectrograph SAURON. Our 2D maps, combining several SAURON pointings per galaxy, extend beyond corotation and allow us to probe radial dependencies within and past the bar. We develop a new method to measure bar strength based on radial and tangential velocities derived from our kinematic maps and find a good agreement with the torque found via the photometry of Spitzer images. A comparison with N-body simulations using the two distinct torque measurements shows that early-type bars might originate from distinct dark matter (DM) halos. This results in higher DM fractions within the bar region for later types (>50% DM). We also compute line-strength indices to derive SSP-equivalent ages and metallicities and find enhanced iron features likely associated to bar-driven resonances.To complement this stellar population study we observed three bulges using the high resolution gratings (R=7000) of the WiFeS IFU. The large wavelength coverage along with the high spectral resolution allow the use of full spectral fitting methods to extract the bulges' star formation histories. We find that at least 50% of the stellar mass already existed 12 Gyrs ago, more than currently predicted by simulations. A younger component (age between ˜1 to ˜8 Gyrs) is also prominent and its present day distribution seems to be affected much more strongly by morphological structures, especially bars, than the older one.In this talk, we link the observed bulge properties to diverse formation scenarios taking into account results from

  13. PREDICTIONS FOR $B \\to \\tau \\bar{\\mu} + \\mu \\bar{\\tau}$

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubaa, Dris; Datta, Alakabha; Duraisamy, Murugeswaran; Khalil, Shaaban

    2013-12-01

    The observation of B -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ } at present experiments would be a clear sign of new physics. In this paper, we calculate this process in an extended Higgs sector framework where the decay is mediated by the exchange of spin zero particle with flavor changing neutral current couplings. If we identify the scalar with the newly discovered state at LHC with a mass 125 GeV then we find that, after imposing all experimental constraints, the BR(Bs -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) can be as high as 10-6 and BR (Bd -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) can be as high as 10-7. We also calculate this process in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and find the BR(Bs ->τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) is typically of the order 10-8.

  14. Growth and Characterization of Silicon at the 2D Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannix, Andrew; Kiraly, Brian; Hersam, Mark; Guisinger, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Because bulk silicon has dominated the development of microelectronics over the past 50 years, the recent interest in two-dimensional (2D) materials (e.g., graphene, MoS2, phosphorene, etc.) naturally raises questions regarding the growth and properties of silicon at the 2D limit. Utilizing atomic-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we have investigated the 2D limits of silicon growth on Ag(111). In agreement with previous reports of sp2-bonded silicene phases, we observe the temperature-dependent evolution of ordered 2D phases. However, we attribute these to apparent Ag-Si surface alloys. At sufficiently high silicon coverage, we observe the precipitation of crystalline, sp3-bonded Si(111) domains. These domains are capped with a √3 honeycomb phase that is indistinguishable from the silver-induced √3 honeycomb-chained-trimer reconstruction on bulk Si(111). Further ex-situcharacterization with Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that these sheets are ultrathin sheets of bulk-like, (111) oriented, sp3 silicon. Even at the 2D limit, scanning tunneling spectroscopy shows that these silicon nanosheets exhibit semiconducting electronic characteristics.

  15. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future. PMID:27506268

  16. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  17. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  18. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  19. Phosphorene: A New High-Mobility 2D Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Neal, Adam; Zhu, Zhen; Tomanek, David; Ye, Peide

    2014-03-01

    The rise of 2D crystals has opened various possibilities for future electrical and optical applications. MoS2 n-type transistors are showing great potential in ultra-scaled and low-power electronics. Here, we introduce phosphorene, a name we coined for 2D few-layer black phosphorus, a new 2D material with layered structure. We perform ab initio band structure calculations and show that the fundamental band gap depends sensitively on the number of layers. We observe transport behavior, which shows a mobility variation in the 2D plane. High on-current of 194 mA/mm, high hole mobility up to 286 cm2/V .s and on/off ratio up to 104 was achieved with phosphorene transistors at room temperature. Schottky barrier height at the metal/phosphorene interface was also measured as a function of temperature. We demonstrate a CMOS inverter with combination to MoS2 NMOS transistors, which shows great potential for semiconducting 2D crystals in future electronic, optoelectronic and flexible electronic devices.

  20. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  1. Wavelet characterization of 2D turbulence and intermittency in magnetized electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2016-06-01

    A study of the free relaxation of turbulence in a two-dimensional (2D) flow is presented, with a focus on the role of the initial vorticity conditions. Exploiting a well-known analogy with 2D inviscid incompressible fluids, the system investigated here is a magnetized pure electron plasma. The dynamics of this system are simulated by means of a 2D particle-in-cell code, starting from different spiral density (vorticity) distributions. A wavelet multiresolution analysis is adopted, which allows the coherent and incoherent parts of the flow to be separated. Comparison of the turbulent evolution in the different cases is based on the investigation of the time evolution of statistical properties, including the probability distribution functions and structure functions of the vorticity increments. It is also based on an analysis of the enstrophy evolution and its spectrum for the two components. In particular, while the statistical features assess the degree of flow intermittency, spectral analysis allows us not only to estimate the time required to reach a state of fully developed turbulence, but also estimate its dependence on the thickness of the initial spiral density distribution, accurately tracking the dynamics of both the coherent structures and the turbulent background. The results are compared with those relevant to annular initial vorticity distributions (Chen et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 495810511).

  2. Taylor impact of glass bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Natalie; Bourne, Neil; Field, John

    1997-07-01

    Brar and Bless pioneeered the use of plate impact upon bars as a technique for investigating the 1D stress loading of glass. We wish to extend this technique by applying VISAR and embedded stress gauge measurements to a symmetrical version of the test. In this configuration two rods impact one upon the other in a symmetrical version of the Taylor test geometry in which the impact is perfectly rigid in the centre of mass frame. Previous work in the laboratory has characterised the three glass types (float, borosilicate and a high density lead glass). These experiments will identify the 1D stress failure mechanisms from high-speed photography and the stress and particle velocity histories will be interpreted in the light of these results. The differences in response of the three glasses will be highlighted.

  3. Gas flow in barred potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sormani, Mattia C.; Binney, James; Magorrian, John

    2015-05-01

    We use a Cartesian grid to simulate the flow of gas in a barred Galactic potential and investigate the effects of varying the sound speed in the gas and the resolution of the grid. For all sound speeds and resolutions, streamlines closely follow closed orbits at large and small radii. At intermediate radii shocks arise and the streamlines shift between two families of closed orbits. The point at which the shocks appear and the streamlines shift between orbit families depends strongly on sound speed and resolution. For sufficiently large values of these two parameters, the transfer happens at the cusped orbit as hypothesized by Binney et al. over two decades ago. For sufficiently high resolutions, the flow downstream of the shocks becomes unsteady. If this unsteadiness is physical, as appears to be the case, it provides a promising explanation for the asymmetry in the observed distribution of CO.

  4. Quasielastic hyperon production in {{\\bar{\

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafi Alam, M.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Chauhan, S.; Singh, S. K.

    2015-05-01

    We have studied quasielastic charged current hyperon production induced by {{\\bar{ν }}μ } from a free nucleon and the nucleons bound inside the nucleus. The calculations are performed for several nuclear targets, for example 12C, 40Ar, 56Fe and 208Pb, which are currently being used in various oscillation experiments using accelerator neutrinos. The inputs are the hyperon-nucleon transition form factors determined from neutrino-nucleon scattering as well as from semileptonic decays of neutron and hyperons, using SU(3) symmetry. The calculations for the nuclear targets are done using the local density approximation. The nuclear medium effects due to the Fermi motion and Pauli blocking, and the final state interaction effects due to hyperon-nucleon scattering have been taken into account.

  5. Bars Triggered By Galaxy Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lang, Meagan; Sinha, Manodeep

    2015-05-01

    Galaxy mergers drive galaxy evolution and are a key mechanism by which galaxies grow and transform. Unlike galaxy mergers where two galaxies combine into one remnant, galaxy flybys occur when two independent galaxy halos interpenetrate but detach at a later time; these one-time events are surprisingly common and can even out-number galaxy mergers at low redshift for massive halos. Although these interactions are transient and occur far outside the galaxy disk, flybys can still drive a rapid and large pertubations within both the intruder and victim halos. We explored how flyby encounters can transform each galaxy using a suite of N-body simulations. We present results from three co-planar flybys between disk galaxies, demonstrating that flybys can both trigger strong bar formation and can spin-up dark matter halos.

  6. 2D materials for photon conversion and nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.

    2015-09-01

    The field of two-dimensional (2D) materials has the potential to enable unique applications across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. While 2D-layered materials hold promise for next-generation photon-conversion intrinsic limitations and challenges exist that shall be overcome. Here we discuss the intrinsic limitations as well as application opportunities of this new class of materials, and is sponsored by the NSF program Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program, which links to the President's Materials Genome Initiative. We present general material-related details for photon conversion, and show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling MoS2/graphene/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for solar absorption up to 90%.

  7. Perception-based reversible watermarking for 2D vector maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Chaoguang; Cao, Liujuan; Li, Xiang

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an effective and reversible watermarking approach for digital copyright protection of 2D-vector maps. To ensure that the embedded watermark is insensitive for human perception, we only select the noise non-sensitive regions for watermark embedding by estimating vertex density within each polyline. To ensure the exact recovery of original 2D-vector map after watermark extraction, we introduce a new reversible watermarking scheme based on reversible high-frequency wavelet coefficients modification. Within the former-selected non-sensitive regions, our watermarking operates on the lower-order vertex coordinate decimals with integer wavelet transform. Such operation further reduces the visual distortion caused by watermark embedding. We have validated the effectiveness of our scheme on our real-world city river/building 2D-vector maps. We give extensive experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art methods, including embedding capability, invisibility, and robustness over watermark attacking.

  8. Graphene based 2D-materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniselvam, Thangavelu; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-09-01

    Ever-increasing energy demands and the depletion of fossil fuels are compelling humanity toward the development of suitable electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices to attain a more sustainable society with adequate renewable energy and zero environmental pollution. In this regard, supercapacitors are being contemplated as potential energy storage devices to afford cleaner, environmentally friendly energy. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, including 2D graphene and its inorganic analogues (transition metal double layer hydroxides, chalcogenides, etc), as potential electrodes for the development of supercapacitors with high electrochemical performance. This review provides an overview of the recent progress in using these graphene-based 2D materials as potential electrodes for supercapacitors. In addition, future research trends including notable challenges and opportunities are also discussed.

  9. Simultaneous 2D Strain Sensing Using Polymer Planar Bragg Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of the PPBG strongly depends on the angle between the optical waveguide into which the grating is inscribed and the direction along which the mechanical load is applied. Additionally, a 2D PPBG fabricated by writing two Bragg gratings angularly displaced from each other into a single polymer platelet is bonded to a stainless steel plate. The two reflected wavelengths exhibit different sensitivities while tested toward tensile and compressive strain. These characteristics make 2D PPBG suitable for measuring multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. PMID:25686313

  10. Simultaneous 2D strain sensing using polymer planar Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of the PPBG strongly depends on the angle between the optical waveguide into which the grating is inscribed and the direction along which the mechanical load is applied. Additionally, a 2D PPBG fabricated by writing two Bragg gratings angularly displaced from each other into a single polymer platelet is bonded to a stainless steel plate. The two reflected wavelengths exhibit different sensitivities while tested toward tensile and compressive strain. These characteristics make 2D PPBG suitable for measuring multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. PMID:25686313

  11. Focusing surface wave imaging with flexible 2D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Fu, Junqiang; Li, Zhe; Xu, Chunguang; Xiao, Dingguo; Wang, Shaohan

    2016-04-01

    Curved surface is widely exist in key parts of energy and power equipment, such as, turbine blade cylinder block and so on. Cycling loading and harsh working condition of enable fatigue cracks appear on the surface. The crack should be found in time to avoid catastrophic damage to the equipment. A flexible 2D array transducer was developed. 2D Phased Array focusing method (2DPA), Mode-Spatial Double Phased focusing method (MSDPF) and the imaging method using the flexible 2D array probe are studied. Experiments using these focusing and imaging method are carried out. Surface crack image is obtained with both 2DPA and MSDPF focusing method. It have been proved that MSDPF can be more adaptable for curved surface and more calculate efficient than 2DPA.

  12. Microscale 2D separation systems for proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Liu, Ke; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Microscale 2D separation systems have been implemented in capillaries and microfabricated channels. They offer advantages of faster analysis, higher separation efficiency and less sample consumption than the conventional methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC) in a column and slab gel electrophoresis. In this article, we review their recent advancement, focusing on three types of platforms, including 2D capillary electrophoresis (CE), CE coupling with capillary LC, and microfluidic devices. A variety of CE and LC modes have been employed to construct 2D separation systems via sophistically designed interfaces. Coupling of different separation modes has also been realized in a number of microfluidic devices. These separation systems have been applied for the proteomic analysis of various biological samples, ranging from a single cell to tumor tissues. PMID:22462786

  13. Too Much Bar and Not Enough Mitzvah? A Proposed Research Agenda on Bar/Bat Mitzvah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Jewish educators are understandably interested in research on how bar/bat mitzvah affect Jewish education or research on what Jewish schools have done to avoid the distortions of a focus on bar/bat mitzvah. Research might also focus on the somewhat different and more ambitious topic of the role that bar/bat mitzvah play in contemporary Jewish…

  14. Real-time 2-D temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2010-01-01

    We have previously introduced methods for noninvasive estimation of temperature change using diagnostic ultrasound. The basic principle was validated both in vitro and in vivo by several groups worldwide. Some limitations remain, however, that have prevented these methods from being adopted in monitoring and guidance of minimally invasive thermal therapies, e.g., RF ablation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). In this letter, we present first results from a real-time system for 2-D imaging of temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound. The front end of the system is a commercially available scanner equipped with a research interface, which allows the control of imaging sequence and access to the RF data in real time. A high-frame-rate 2-D RF acquisition mode, M2D, is used to capture the transients of tissue motion/deformations in response to pulsed HIFU. The M2D RF data is streamlined to the back end of the system, where a 2-D temperature imaging algorithm based on speckle tracking is implemented on a graphics processing unit. The real-time images of temperature change are computed on the same spatial and temporal grid of the M2D RF data, i.e., no decimation. Verification of the algorithm was performed by monitoring localized HIFU-induced heating of a tissue-mimicking elastography phantom. These results clearly demonstrate the repeatability and sensitivity of the algorithm. Furthermore, we present in vitro results demonstrating the possible use of this algorithm for imaging changes in tissue parameters due to HIFU-induced lesions. These results clearly demonstrate the value of the real-time data streaming and processing in monitoring, and guidance of minimally invasive thermotherapy. PMID:19884075

  15. Accelerating numerical modeling of wave propagation through 2-D anisotropic materials using OpenCL.

    PubMed

    Molero, Miguel; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2013-03-01

    We present an implementation of the numerical modeling of elastic waves propagation, in 2D anisotropic materials, using the new parallel computing devices (PCDs). Our study is aimed both to model laboratory experiments and explore the capabilities of the emerging PCDs by discussing performance issues. In the experiments a sample plate of an anisotropic material placed inside a water tank is rotated and, for every angle of rotation it is subjected to an ultrasonic wave (produced by a large source transducer) that propagates in the water and through the material producing some reflection and transmission signals that are recording by a "point-like" receiver. This experiment is numerically modeled by running a finite difference code covering a set of angles θ∈[-50°, 50°], and recorded the signals for the transmission and reflection results. Transversely anisotropic and weakly orthorhombic materials are considered. We accelerated the computation using an open-source toolkit called PyOpenCL, which lets one to easily access the OpenCL parallel computation API's from the high-level programming environment of Python. A speedup factor over 19 using the GPU is obtained when compared with the execution of the same program in parallel using a CPU multi-core (in this case we use the 4-cores that has the CPU). The performance for different graphic cards and operating systems is included together with the full 2-D finite difference code with PyOpenCL. PMID:23290584

  16. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.; Vronsky, Tomas; Gaudern, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils.

  17. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of 2D ceramic matrix composites in aeroconvective environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R.; Love, Wendell L.; Balter-Peterson, Aliza

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of a novel ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) material system for use in the aeroconvective-heating environments encountered by the nose caps and wing leading edges of such aerospace vehicles as the Space Shuttle, during orbit-insertion and reentry from LEO. These CMCs are composed of an SiC matrix that is reinforced with Nicalon, Nextel, or carbon refractory fibers in a 2D architecture. The test program conducted for the 2D CMCs gave attention to their subsurface oxidation.

  19. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  20. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658