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Sample records for 2d distributed feedback

  1. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  2. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  3. Distributed feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Andrews, J. T.; Evans, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A ridge waveguide distributed feedback laser was developed in InGaAsP. These devices have demonstrated CW output powers over 7 mW with threshold currents as low as 60 mA at 25 C. Measurements of the frequency response of these devices show a 3 dB bandwidth of about 2 GHz, which may be limited by the mount. The best devices have a single mode spectra over the entire temperature range tested with a side mode suppression of about 20 dB in both CW and pulsed modes. The design of this device, including detailed modeling of the ridge guide structure, effective index calculations, and a discussion of the grating configuration are presented. Also, the fabrication of the devices is presented in some detail, especially the fabrication of and subsequent growth over the grating. In addition, a high frequency fiber pigtailed package was designed and tested, which is a suitable prototype for a commercial package.

  4. Simulation of 2D Fields of Raindrop Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berne, A.; Schleiss, M.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2008-12-01

    The raindrop size distribution (DSD hereafter) is of primary importance for quantitative applications of weather radar measurements. The radar reflectivity~Z (directly measured by radar) is related to the power backscattered by the ensemble of hydrometeors within the radar sampling volume. However, the rain rate~R (the flux of water to the surface) is the variable of interest for many applications (hydrology, weather forecasting, air traffic for example). Usually, radar reflectivity is converted into rain rate using a power law such as Z=aRb. The coefficients a and b of the Z-R relationship depend on the DSD. The variability of the DSD in space and time has to be taken into account to improve radar rain rate estimates. Therefore, the ability to generate a large number of 2D fields of DSD which are statistically homogeneous provides a very useful simulation framework that nicely complements experimental approaches based on DSD data, in order to investigate radar beam propagation through rain as well as radar retrieval techniques. The proposed approach is based on geostatistics for structural analysis and stochastic simulation. First, the DSD is assumed to follow a gamma distribution. Hence a 2D field of DSDs can be adequately described as a 2D field of a multivariate random function consisting of the three DSD parameters. Such fields are simulated by combining a Gaussian anamorphosis and a multivariate Gaussian random field simulation algorithm. Using the (cross-)variogram models fitted on data guaranties that the spatial structure of the simulated fields is consistent with the observed one. To assess its validity, the proposed method is applied to data collected during intense Mediterranean rainfall. As only time series are available, Taylor's hypothesis is assumed to convert time series in 1D range profile. Moreover, DSD fields are assumed to be isotropic so that the 1D structure can be used to simulate 2D fields. A large number of 2D fields of DSD parameters are

  5. Velocity distributions for 2D inelastic granular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracle, Dylan J.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Moon, Sung Joon; Rericha, Erin; Swift, J. B.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2002-11-01

    A previous study of a vertically vibrated 2D granular gas found a time-averaged horizontal velocity distribution function of the form P(v) exp(-C|v|^3/2) for the entire velocity range(F. Rouyer and N. Menon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85), 3676 (2000).. We examine the dependence of the velocity distribution function on phase in the cycle, height above the plate and air pressure in the container. We use 1.6 mm stainless steel balls confined to a vertical plane by a container 32σ tall, 48σ wide, and 1.15σ thick, where σ is the particle diameter. The container oscillates with peak acceleration 20g and frequency 50 Hz. We observe that a shock forms at collision of the plate with the layer and propagates through the layer, heating the grains. The shock rapidly decays over a distance of approximately 8σ above the plate; above this height the granular temperature and density are essentially independent of phase in the cycle. In this steady-state region, we compare the observed functional form of the velocity distribution to molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Integrated packaging of 2D MOEMS mirrors with optical position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, M.; Lenzhofer, M.; Kremer, M. P.; Tortschanoff, A.

    2015-02-01

    Many applications of MOEMS microscanners rely on accurate position feedback. For MOEMS devices which do not have intrinsic on-chip feedback, position information can be provided with optical methods, most simply by using a reflection from the backside of a MOEMS scanner. By measuring the intensity distribution of the reflected beam across a quadrant diode, one can precisely detect the mirror's deflection angles. Previously, we have presented a position sensing device, applicable to arbitrary trajectories, which is based on the measurement of the position of the reflected laser beam with a quadrant diode. In this work, we present a novel setup, which comprises the optical position feedback functionality integrated into the device package itself. The new device's System-in-Package (SiP) design is based on a flip-folded 2.5D PCB layout and fully assembled as small as 9.2×7×4 mm³ in total. The device consists of four layers, which supply the MOEMS mirror, a spacer to provide the required optical path length, the quadrant photo-diode and a laser diode to serve as the light source. In addition to describing the mechanical setup of the novel device, we will present first experimental results and optical simulation studies. Accurate position feedback is the basis for closed-loop control of the MOEMS devices, which is crucial for some applications as image projection for example. Position feedback and the possibility of closed-loop control will significantly improve the performance of these devices.

  7. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part II: Feedback between composition and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, V.; Greathouse, T. K.; Cavalié, T.; Dobrijevic, M.; Hersant, F.

    2016-03-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. The atmospheric thermal structure is controlled and regulated by the amount of hydrocarbons in the stratosphere, which act as absorbers and coolants from the UV to the far-IR spectral range, and this structure has an influence on the amount of hydrocarbons. We study here the feedback between the chemical composition and the thermal structure by coupling a latitudinal and seasonal photochemical model with a radiative seasonal model. Our results show that the seasonal temperature peak in the higher stratosphere, associated with the seasonal increase of insolation, is shifted earlier than the maximum insolation peak. This shift is increased with increasing latitudes and is caused by the low amount of stratospheric coolants in the spring season. At 80° in both hemispheres, the temperature peak at 10-2 mbar is seen to occur half a season (3-4 Earth years) earlier than was previously predicted by radiative seasonal models that assumed spatially and temporally uniform distribution of coolants. This shift progressively decreases with increasing pressure, up to around the 0.5 mbar pressure level where it vanishes. On the opposite, the thermal field has a small feedback on the abundance distributions. Accounting for that feedback modifies the predicted equator-to-pole temperature gradient. The meridional gradients of temperature at the mbar pressure levels are better reproduced when this feedback is accounted for. At lower pressure levels, Saturn's stratospheric thermal structure seems to depart from pure radiative seasonal equilibrium as previously suggested by Guerlet et al. (2014). Although the agreement with the absolute value of the stratospheric temperature observed by Cassini is moderate, it is a mandatory step toward a fully coupled GCM-photochemical model.

  8. Distributed feedback imprinted electrospun fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Persano, Luana; Camposeo, Andrea; Del Carro, Pompilio; Fasano, Vito; Moffa, Maria; Manco, Rita; D'Agostino, Stefania; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-10-01

    Imprinted, distributed feedback lasers are demonstrated on individual, active electrospun polymer nanofibers. In addition to advantages related to miniaturization, optical confinement and grating nanopatterning lead to a significant threshold reduction compared to conventional thin-film lasers. The possibility of imprinting arbitrary photonic crystal geometries on electrospun lasing nanofibers opens new opportunities for realizing optical circuits and chips.

  9. Risk-taking behavior: dopamine D2/D3 receptors, feedback, and frontolimbic activity.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Milky; Ghahremani, Dara G; Morales, Angelica M; Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Morgan, Andrew T; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making involves frontolimbic and dopaminergic brain regions, but how prior choice outcomes, dopamine neurotransmission, and frontostriatal activity are integrated to affect choices is unclear. We tested 60 healthy volunteers using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In the BART, participants can pump virtual balloons to increase potential monetary reward or cash out to receive accumulated reward; each pump presents greater risk and potential reward (represented by the pump number). In a separate session, we measured striatal D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding potential (BPND) with positron emission tomography in 13 of the participants. Losses were followed by fewer risky choices than wins; and during risk-taking after loss, amygdala and hippocampal activation exhibited greater modulation by pump number than after a cash-out event. Striatal D2/D3 BPND was positively related to the modulation of ventral striatal activation when participants decided to cash out and negatively to the number of pumps in the subsequent trial; but negatively related to the modulation of prefrontal cortical activation by pump number when participants took risk, and to overall earnings. These findings provide in vivo evidence for a potential mechanism by which dopaminergic neurotransmission may modulate risk-taking behavior through an interactive system of frontal and striatal activity. PMID:23966584

  10. Distribution of CYP2D6 alleles and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Genro, Júlia P; Sortica, Vinicius A; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D J; dos Santos, Andrea K Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Hutz, Mara H

    2014-01-01

    The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  11. Distribution of CYP2D6 alleles and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Genro, Júlia P; Sortica, Vinicius A; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D J; dos Santos, Andrea K Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Hutz, Mara H

    2014-01-01

    The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions.

  12. Distribution of CYP2D6 Alleles and Phenotypes in the Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D. J.; dos Santos, Ândrea K. Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  13. Use of marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) for accelerated 2D MRI relaxometry and diffusometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamini, Dan; Basser, Peter J.

    2016-10-01

    Measuring multidimensional (e.g., 2D) relaxation spectra in NMR and MRI clinical applications is a holy grail of the porous media and biomedical MR communities. The main bottleneck is the inversion of Fredholm integrals of the first kind, an ill-conditioned problem requiring large amounts of data to stabilize a solution. We suggest a novel experimental design and processing framework to accelerate and improve the reconstruction of such 2D spectra that uses a priori information from the 1D projections of spectra, or marginal distributions. These 1D marginal distributions provide powerful constraints when 2D spectra are reconstructed, and their estimation requires an order of magnitude less data than a conventional 2D approach. This marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is demonstrated here with a polyvinylpyrrolidone-water phantom that has 3 distinct peaks in the 2D D-T1 space. The stability, sensitivity to experimental parameters, and accuracy of this new approach are compared with conventional methods by serially subsampling the full data set. While the conventional, unconstrained approach performed poorly, the new method had proven to be highly accurate and robust, only requiring a fraction of the data. Additionally, synthetic T1 -T2 data are presented to explore the effects of noise on the estimations, and the performance of the proposed method with a smooth and realistic 2D spectrum. The proposed framework is quite general and can also be used with a variety of 2D MRI experiments (D-T2,T1 -T2, D -D, etc.), making these potentially feasible for preclinical and even clinical applications for the first time.

  14. Use of marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) for accelerated 2D MRI relaxometry and diffusometry.

    PubMed

    Benjamini, Dan; Basser, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    Measuring multidimensional (e.g., 2D) relaxation spectra in NMR and MRI clinical applications is a holy grail of the porous media and biomedical MR communities. The main bottleneck is the inversion of Fredholm integrals of the first kind, an ill-conditioned problem requiring large amounts of data to stabilize a solution. We suggest a novel experimental design and processing framework to accelerate and improve the reconstruction of such 2D spectra that uses a priori information from the 1D projections of spectra, or marginal distributions. These 1D marginal distributions provide powerful constraints when 2D spectra are reconstructed, and their estimation requires an order of magnitude less data than a conventional 2D approach. This marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is demonstrated here with a polyvinylpyrrolidone-water phantom that has 3 distinct peaks in the 2D D-T1 space. The stability, sensitivity to experimental parameters, and accuracy of this new approach are compared with conventional methods by serially subsampling the full data set. While the conventional, unconstrained approach performed poorly, the new method had proven to be highly accurate and robust, only requiring a fraction of the data. Additionally, synthetic T1-T2 data are presented to explore the effects of noise on the estimations, and the performance of the proposed method with a smooth and realistic 2D spectrum. The proposed framework is quite general and can also be used with a variety of 2D MRI experiments (D-T2,T1-T2,D-D, etc.), making these potentially feasible for preclinical and even clinical applications for the first time. PMID:27543810

  15. CYP2D6 allele distribution in Macedonians, Albanians and Romanies in the Republic of Macedonia

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanovska, M; Dimishkovska, M; Maleva Kostovska, I; Noveski, P; Sukarova Stefanovska, E

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is an enzyme of great importance for the metabolism of clinically used drugs. More than 100 variants of the CYP2D6 gene have been identified so far. The aim of this study was to investigate the allele distribution of CYP2D6 gene variants in 100 individuals of each of the Macedonian, Albanian and Romany population, by genotyping using long range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a multiplex single base extension method. The most frequent variants and almost equally distributed in the three groups were the fully functional alleles *1 and *2. The most common non functional allele in all groups was *4 that was found in 22.5% of the Albanians. The most common allele with decreased activity was *41 which was found in 23.0% of the Romany ethnic group, in 11.0% of the Macedonians and in 10.5% of the Albanians. Seven percent of the Albanians, 6.0% of the Romani and 4.0% of the Macedonians were poor metabolizers, while 5.0% of the Macedonians, 1.0% of Albanians and 1.0% of the Romanies were ultrarapid metabolizers. We concluded that the CYP2D6 gene locus is highly heterogeneous in these groups and that the prevalence of the CYP2D6 allele variants and genotypes in the Republic of Macedonia is in accordance with that of other European populations.

  16. Electronically tunable aperiodic distributed feedback terahertz lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, O. P.; Chakraborty, S.; Khairuzzaman, Md.; Folland, T.; Gholinia, A.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    Focussed ion beam milling can be used to introduce aperiodic distributed feedback (ADFB) gratings into fully packaged, operational terahertz (THZ) quantum cascade lasers to achieve electronically controlled, discretely tunable laser emission. These aperiodic gratings—designed using computer-generated hologram techniques—consist of multiple slits in the surface plasmon waveguide, distributed along the length of the laser cavity. Tuning behaviour and output power in ADFB lasers operating around 2.9 THz are investigated with a variety of slit dimensions and grating scales. Mode selectivity and grating losses are found to be strongly dependent on milling depth into the upper waveguide layers, dramatically increasing as the metallic layers are penetrated, then rising more slowly with deeper milling into the laser active region. Grating scale and placement along the laser cavity length are also shown to influence mode selection.

  17. A statistical approach to estimate the 3D size distribution of spheres from 2D size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kong, M.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; James, C.; Basu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Size distribution of rigidly embedded spheres in a groundmass is usually determined from measurements of the radii of the two-dimensional (2D) circular cross sections of the spheres in random flat planes of a sample, such as in thin sections or polished slabs. Several methods have been devised to find a simple factor to convert the mean of such 2D size distributions to the actual 3D mean size of the spheres without a consensus. We derive an entirely theoretical solution based on well-established probability laws and not constrained by limitations of absolute size, which indicates that the ratio of the means of measured 2D and estimated 3D grain size distribution should be r/4 (=.785). Actual 2D size distribution of the radii of submicron sized, pure Fe0 globules in lunar agglutinitic glass, determined from backscattered electron images, is tested to fit the gamma size distribution model better than the log-normal model. Numerical analysis of 2D size distributions of Fe0 globules in 9 lunar soils shows that the average mean of 2D/3D ratio is 0.84, which is very close to the theoretical value. These results converge with the ratio 0.8 that Hughes (1978) determined for millimeter-sized chondrules from empirical measurements. We recommend that a factor of 1.273 (reciprocal of 0.785) be used to convert the determined 2D mean size (radius or diameter) of a population of spheres to estimate their actual 3D size. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  18. Tunable optofluidic distributed feedback dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Zhaoyu; Emery, Teresa; Scherer, Axel; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrated a continuously tunable optofluidic distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser on a monolithic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer chip. The optical feedback was provided by a phase-shifted higher order Bragg grating embedded in the liquid core of a single mode buried channel waveguide. We achieved nearly 60nm continuously tunable output by mechanically varying the grating period with two dye molecules Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and Rhodamine 101 (Rh101). Single-mode operation was obtained with <0.1nm linewidth. Because of the higher order grating, a single laser, when operated with different dye solutions, can provide tunable output covering from near UV to near IR spectral region. The low pump threshold (< 1uJ) makes it possible to use a single high energy pulsed laser to pump hundreds of such lasers on a chip. An integrated array of five DFB dye lasers with different lasing wavelengths was also demonstrated. Such laser arrays make it possible to build highly parallel optical sensors on a chip. The laser chip is fully compatible with PDMS based soft microfluidics.

  19. Simulation of 2D Brain's Potential Distribution Based on Two Electrodes ECVT Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirait, S. H.; Edison, R. E.; Baidillah, M. R.; Taruno, W. P.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to simulate the potential distribution of 2D brain geometry based on two electrodes ECVT. ECVT (electrical capacitance tomography) is a tomography modality which produces dielectric distribution image of a subject from several capacitance electrodes measurements. This study begins by producing the geometry of 2D brain based on MRI image and then setting the boundary conditions on the boundaries of the geometry. The values of boundary conditions follow the potential values used in two electrodes brain ECVT, and for this reason the first boundary is set to 20 volt and 2.5 MHz signal and another boundary is set to ground. Poisson equation is implemented as the governing equation in the 2D brain geometry and finite element method is used to solve the equation. Simulated Hodgkin-Huxley action potential is applied as disturbance potential in the geometry. We divide this study into two which comprises simulation without disturbance potential and simulation with disturbance potential. From this study, each of time dependent potential distributions from non-disturbance and disturbance potential of the 2D brain geometry has been generated.

  20. Single mode optofluidic distributed feedback dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Zhaoyu; Emery, Teresa; Scherer, Axel; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-01-01

    Single frequency lasing from organic dye solutions on a monolithic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer chip is demonstrated. The laser cavity consists of a single mode liquid core/PDMS cladding channel waveguide and a phase shifted 15th order distributed feedback (DFB) structure. A 1mM solution of Rhodamine 6G in a methanol and ethylene glycol mixture was used as the gain medium. Using 6 nanosecond 532nm Nd:YAG laser pulses as the pump light, we achieved threshold pump fluence of ~0.8mJ/cm2 and single-mode operation at pump levels up to ten times the threshold. This microfabricated dye laser provides a compact and inexpensive coherent light source for microfluidics and integrated optics covering from near UV to near IR spectral region.

  1. On Barnes Beta Distributions and Applications to the Maximum Distribution of the 2D Gaussian Free Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    A new family of Barnes beta distributions on (0, ∞) is introduced and its infinite divisibility, moment determinacy, scaling, and factorization properties are established. The Morris integral probability distribution is constructed from Barnes beta distributions of types (1, 0) and (2, 2), and its moment determinacy and involution invariance properties are established. For application, the maximum distributions of the 2D gaussian free field on the unit interval and circle with a non-random logarithmic potential are conjecturally related to the critical Selberg and Morris integral probability distributions, respectively, and expressed in terms of sums of Barnes beta distributions of types (1, 0) and (2, 2).

  2. Catalog of velocity distributions around a reconnection site in 2D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Lukas; Bourdin, Philippe-A.; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.; Nakamura, Rumi; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The velocity distribution of electrons and ions are known to be a marker for regions where magnetic reconnection develops. Past theoretical and computational works demonstrated that non-gyrotropic and anisotropic distributions depending on particle meandering motions and accelerations are seen around the reconnection point. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is expected to resolve such kinetic scale reconnection regions. We present a catalog of velocity distribution functions that can give hints on the location within the current sheet relative to the reconnection point, which is sometimes unclear from pure spacecraft observations. We use 2D PIC simulations of anti-parallel magnetic reconnection to obtain velocity distributions at different locations, like in the center of the reconnection site, the ion and electron diffusion regions, or the reconnection inflow and outflow regions. With sufficiently large number of particles we resolve the distribution functions also in rather small regions. Such catalog may be compared with future MMS observations of the Earth's magnetotail.

  3. Relaxation of ferroelectric states in 2D distributions of quantum dots: EELS simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, C. M.; Meza-Montes, L.; Moctezuma, R. E.; Carrillo, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    The relaxation time of collective electronic states in a 2D distribution of quantum dots is investigated theoretically by simulating EELS experiments. From the numerical calculation of the probability of energy loss of an electron beam, traveling parallel to the distribution, it is possible to estimate the damping time of ferroelectric-like states. We generate this collective response of the distribution by introducing a mean field interaction among the quantum dots, and then, the model is extended incorporating effects of long-range correlations through a Bragg-Williams approximation. The behavior of the dielectric function, the energy loss function, and the relaxation time of ferroelectric-like states is then investigated as a function of the temperature of the distribution and the damping constant of the electronic states in the single quantum dots. The robustness of the trends and tendencies of our results indicate that this scheme of analysis can guide experimentalists to develop tailored quantum dots distributions for specific applications.

  4. Highly efficient Raman distributed feedback fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jindan; Alam, Shaif-ul; Ibsen, Morten

    2012-02-27

    We demonstrate highly efficient Raman distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers for the first time with up to 1.6 W of continuous wave (CW) output power. The DFB Bragg gratings are written directly into two types of commercially available passive germano-silica fibres. Two lasers of 30 cm length are pumped with up to 15 W of CW power at 1068 nm. The threshold power is ~2 W for a Raman-DFB (R-DFB) laser written in standard low-NA fibre, and only ~1 W for a laser written in a high-NA fibre, both of which oscillate in a narrow linewidth of <0.01 nm at ~1117 nm and ~1109 nm, respectively. The slope efficiencies are ~74% and ~93% with respect to absorbed pump power in the low-NA fibre and high-NA fibre respectively. Such high conversion efficiency suggests that very little energy is lost in the form of heat through inefficient energy transfer. Our results are supported by numerical simulations, and furthermore open up for the possibility of having narrow linewidth all-fibre laser sources in wavelength bands not traditionally covered by rare-earth doped silica fibres. Simulations also imply that this technology has the potential to produce even shorter R-DFB laser devices at the centimetre-level and with mW-level thresholds, if Bragg gratings formed in fibre materials with higher intrinsic Raman gain coefficient than silica are used. These materials include for example tellurite or chalcogenide glasses. Using glasses like these would also open up the possibility of having narrow linewidth fibre sources with DFB laser oscillating much further into the IR than what currently is possible with rare-earth doped silica glasses. PMID:22418313

  5. Highly efficient Raman distributed feedback fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jindan; Alam, Shaif-ul; Ibsen, Morten

    2012-02-27

    We demonstrate highly efficient Raman distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers for the first time with up to 1.6 W of continuous wave (CW) output power. The DFB Bragg gratings are written directly into two types of commercially available passive germano-silica fibres. Two lasers of 30 cm length are pumped with up to 15 W of CW power at 1068 nm. The threshold power is ~2 W for a Raman-DFB (R-DFB) laser written in standard low-NA fibre, and only ~1 W for a laser written in a high-NA fibre, both of which oscillate in a narrow linewidth of <0.01 nm at ~1117 nm and ~1109 nm, respectively. The slope efficiencies are ~74% and ~93% with respect to absorbed pump power in the low-NA fibre and high-NA fibre respectively. Such high conversion efficiency suggests that very little energy is lost in the form of heat through inefficient energy transfer. Our results are supported by numerical simulations, and furthermore open up for the possibility of having narrow linewidth all-fibre laser sources in wavelength bands not traditionally covered by rare-earth doped silica fibres. Simulations also imply that this technology has the potential to produce even shorter R-DFB laser devices at the centimetre-level and with mW-level thresholds, if Bragg gratings formed in fibre materials with higher intrinsic Raman gain coefficient than silica are used. These materials include for example tellurite or chalcogenide glasses. Using glasses like these would also open up the possibility of having narrow linewidth fibre sources with DFB laser oscillating much further into the IR than what currently is possible with rare-earth doped silica glasses.

  6. Calibration of an acoustic system for measuring 2-D temperature distribution around hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Chen, Ying

    2013-04-01

    One of the fundamental purposes of quantitative acoustic surveys of seafloor hydrothermal vents is to measure their 2-D temperature distributions. Knowing the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances between the underwater transducers in an acoustic tomography system is fundamental to the overall accuracy of the temperature reconstruction. However, commercial transducer sources typically do not supply the needed data. Here we present a novel calibration algorithm to automatically determine the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances. The possible system latency error and the resulting temperature error are derived and analyzed. We have also developed the experimental setup for calibration. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed calibration method, an experimental study was performed on acoustic imaging of underwater temperature fields in Lake Qiezishan, located at Longling County, Yunnan Province, China. Using the calibrated data, the reconstructed temperature distributions closely resemble the actual distributions measured with thermocouples, thus confirming the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  7. NKG2D-dependent cytotoxicity is controlled by ligand distribution in the target cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Emily; Brzostowski, Joseph A.; Long, Eric O.; Gross, Catharina C.

    2013-01-01

    While the importance of membrane microdomains in receptor-mediated activation of lymphocytes has been established, much less is known about the role of receptor ligand distribution on APC and target cells. Detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) domains, into which glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins partition, are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. ULBP1 is a GPI-linked ligand for natural cytotoxicity receptor NKG2D. To investigate how ULBP1 distribution on target cells affects NKG2D-dependent NK cell activation, we fused the extracellular domain of ULBP1 to the transmembrane domain of CD45. Introduction of this transmembrane domain eliminated the association of ULBP1 with the DRM fraction and caused a significant reduction of cytotoxicity and degranulation by NK cells. Clustering and lateral diffusion of ULBP1 was not affected by changes in the membrane anchor. These results show that the partitioning of receptor ligands in discrete membrane domains of target cells is an important determinant of NK cell activation. PMID:21464092

  8. Robust design of feedback feed-forward iterative learning control based on 2D system theory for linear uncertain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifu; Hu, Yueming; Li, Di

    2016-08-01

    For a class of linear discrete-time uncertain systems, a feedback feed-forward iterative learning control (ILC) scheme is proposed, which is comprised of an iterative learning controller and two current iteration feedback controllers. The iterative learning controller is used to improve the performance along the iteration direction and the feedback controllers are used to improve the performance along the time direction. First of all, the uncertain feedback feed-forward ILC system is presented by an uncertain two-dimensional Roesser model system. Then, two robust control schemes are proposed. One can ensure that the feedback feed-forward ILC system is bounded-input bounded-output stable along time direction, and the other can ensure that the feedback feed-forward ILC system is asymptotically stable along time direction. Both schemes can guarantee the system is robust monotonically convergent along the iteration direction. Third, the robust convergent sufficient conditions are given, which contains a linear matrix inequality (LMI). Moreover, the LMI can be used to determine the gain matrix of the feedback feed-forward iterative learning controller. Finally, the simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  9. Probability distribution of the index in gauge theory on 2d non-commutative geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hajime; Nishimura, Jun; Susaki, Yoshiaki

    2007-10-01

    We investigate the effects of non-commutative geometry on the topological aspects of gauge theory using a non-perturbative formulation based on the twisted reduced model. The configuration space is decomposed into topological sectors labeled by the index ν of the overlap Dirac operator satisfying the Ginsparg-Wilson relation. We study the probability distribution of ν by Monte Carlo simulation of the U(1) gauge theory on 2d non-commutative space with periodic boundary conditions. In general the distribution is asymmetric under ν mapsto -ν, reflecting the parity violation due to non-commutative geometry. In the continuum and infinite-volume limits, however, the distribution turns out to be dominated by the topologically trivial sector. This conclusion is consistent with the instanton calculus in the continuum theory. However, it is in striking contrast to the known results in the commutative case obtained from lattice simulation, where the distribution is Gaussian in a finite volume, but the width diverges in the infinite-volume limit. We also calculate the average action in each topological sector, and provide deeper understanding of the observed phenomenon.

  10. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, Mark; CGG Persoon, Lucas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors. The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation

  11. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors.The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation fields

  12. 2D-photochemical modeling of Saturn’s stratosphere: hydrocarbon and water distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Vincent; Cavalié, Thibault; Hersant, Franck; Dobrijevic, Michel; Greathouse, Thomas; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Hartogh, Paul; Cassidy, Timothy; Spiga, Aymeric; Guerlet, Sandrine; Sylvestre, Melody

    2014-11-01

    Saturn’s axial tilt of 27° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. The seasonal forcing over Saturn’s 30 years period influences the production/loss of the major atmospheric absorbers and coolants through photochemistry, and influences therefore Saturn’s stratospheric temperatures. We have developed a 2D time-dependent photochemical model of Saturn’s atmosphere [Hue et al., in prep.], coupled to a radiative-climate model [Greathouse et al., 2008] to study seasonal effects on its atmospheric composition. Cassini spacecraft has revealed that the distribution of hydrocarbons in Saturn’s stratosphere [Guerlet et al., 2009] differs from pure photochemical predictions, i.e. without meridional transport [Moses et al., 2005]. Differences between the observed distribution of hydrocarbons and 2D-photochemical predictions are likely to be an indicator of dynamical forcing.Disentangling the origin of water in the stratosphere of this planet has been a long-term issue. Due to Saturn’s cold tropopause trap, which acts as a transport barrier, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) [Feuchtgruber et al., 1997] has an external origin. Three external sources have been identified: (i) permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles, (ii) local sources form planetary environments (rings, satellites), (iii) large cometary impacts, similar to Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter. Previous observations of Saturn with Herschel’s Hsso program [Hartogh et al., 2009] led to the detection of a water torus around Saturn [Hartogh et al., 2011], fed by Enceladus’ geysers. A substantial fraction of this torus is predicted to be a local source of water for Saturn’s and its satellites, as it will spread in this system [Cassidy et al., 2010]. Using the new 2D-photochemical model, we test here the validity of Enceladus’ torus as the source of Saturn’s stratospheric water.References : Hue et al., in prep. Greathouse et al., 2008. AGU Fall Meeting

  13. Distributed and coupled 2D electro-thermal model of power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ghania; Lefebvre, Stéphane; Joubert, Pierre-Yves; Bouarroudj-Berkani, Mounira; Labrousse, Denis; Rostaing, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The development of power electronics in the field of transportations (automotive, aeronautics) requires the use of power semiconductor devices providing protection and diagnostic functions. In the case of series protections power semiconductor devices which provide protection may operate in shortcircuit and act as a current limiting device. This mode of operations is very constraining due to the large dissipation of power. In these particular conditions of operation, electro-thermal models of power semiconductor devices are of key importance in order to optimize their thermal design and increase their reliability. The development of such an electro-thermal model for power MOSFET transistors based on the coupling between two computation softwares (Matlab and Cast3M) is described in this paper. The 2D electro-thermal model is able to predict (i) the temperature distribution on chip surface well as in the volume under short-circuit operations, (ii) the effect of the temperature on the distribution of the current flowing within the die and (iii) the effects of the ageing of the metallization layer on the current density and the temperature. In this paper, the electrical and thermal models are described as well as the implemented coupling scheme.

  14. Carbonate platform-margins and reefs distribution using 2-D seismic analysis, Central Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzali, Makrem; Troudi, Habib; Ben Boubaker, Kamel; Ouali, Jamel

    2014-12-01

    The seismic characterization of sedimentary facies in a carbonate platform, comprising different types of reefs constructions, is based using two-dimensional (2-D) seismic and borehole data. Reefs of the Aptian Serdj carbonates are shown as mounds of strong chaotic amplitudes that have a high-amplitude continuous reflection at the top. They are sealed by Albian marl and claystone deposits characterized by mid- to low-amplitude, parallel and discontinuous to weak reflections. These buildups were restricted to the outer platform margin of Central Tunisia. Sea level oscillations associated with master fault rejuvenation governed the growth, the distribution and development of these reefs. Their distribution is largely controlled by deep-seated fault-related folds and the topography of underlying structures, representing local domal uplifts. Falls of sea level led to subaerial exposure and the development of a karstified denudation of the carbonate platform. Subsequently, reefs were partially or totally destroyed and then overlain, during the Albian, by marls and claystones of the Fahdene Formation. Their study indicates that reef buildups have important oil and gas exploration potential, not only onshore, but also in offshore, Central Tunisia.

  15. 2D He+ pickup ion velocity distribution functions: STEREO PLASTIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, C.; Berger, L.; Taut, A.; Peleikis, T.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Context. He+ pickup ions are either born from the ionization of interstellar neutral helium inside our heliosphere, the so-called interstellar pickup ions, or through the interaction of solar wind ions with small dust particles, the so-called inner source of pickup ions. Until now, most observations of pickup ions were limited to reduced 1D velocity spectra, which are insufficient to study certain characteristics of the He+ velocity distribution function (VDF). Aims: It is generally assumed that rapid pitch-angle scattering of freshly created pickup ions quickly leads to a fully isotropic He+ VDF. In light of recent observations, this assumption has found to be oversimplified and needs to be reinvestigated. Methods: Using He+ pickup ion data from the PLASTIC instrument on board the STEREO A spacecraft, we reconstruct a reduced form of the He+ VDF in two dimensions. This allows us to study relative changes of the 2D He+ VDF as a function of the configuration of the heliospheric magnetic field. Results: Our observations show that the He+ VDF is highly anisotropic and even indicates that, at least for certain configurations of B, it is not fully gyrotropic. Our results further suggest, that the observed velocity and pitch angle of He+ depends strongly on the local solar magnetic field vector, B, the ecliptic longitude, λ, the solar wind speed, vsw, and the global distribution of B. Conclusions: We found two distinct signatures that systematically change as a function of the alignment of B: (1) a ring beam distribution that is most pronounced at wsw> 0.5 and likely attributed to interstellar He+; (2) a beam signature aligned parallel to B that is most pronounced at wsw < 0.5 and attributed to inner-source He+. The strong anisotropy and the aforementioned dependencies of the He+ VDF also imply that observations of 1D velocity spectra of He+ pickup ions are potentially deceiving.

  16. Quantitative Verification of Dynamic Wedge Dose Distribution Using a 2D Ionization Chamber Array.

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Tarek; Farhat, Leila; Mtibaa, Anis; Besbes, Mounir; Daoud, Jamel

    2015-10-01

    The accuracy of two calculation algorithms of the Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system (TPS)--the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and pencil-beam convolution (PBC)--in modeling the enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) was investigated. Measurements were carried out for 6 and 18 MV photon beams using a 2D ionization chamber array. Accuracy of the TPS was evaluated using a gamma index analysis with the following acceptance criteria for dose differences (DD) and distance to agreement (DTA): 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm. The TPS models the dose distribution accurately except for 20×20 cm(2) field size, 60 (°) and 45 (°) wedge angles using PBC at 6 MV photon energy. For these latter fields, the pass rate and the mean value of gamma were less than 90% and more than 0.5, respectively at the (3%/3 mm) acceptance criteria. In addition, an accuracy level of (2%/2 mm) was achieved using AAA with better agreement for 18 MV photon energy.

  17. 2D mapping of LA-ICPMS trace element distributions using R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittner, Martin; Müller, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    A new add-on package (LAICPMS) for the R language for statistical computing is presented, which greatly facilitates data reduction and visualisation (single tracks and 2D element maps) of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) data. The package determines many input parameters automatically and is easy to use. We present major and trace element distribution maps of natural calcite samples, processed using LAICPMS. Data processing from raw data to presented graphics takes only a few minutes. The empirical cumulative density function (ECDF) is used for optimised colour coding of the maps rather than linear or logarithmic scale, making a maximum of element-specific detail visible. For preprocessing, several different smoothing algorithms were evaluated and can be chosen by the user; for the presented data, a simple running median/running average was chosen. Typical data analysis is performed via short, easy-to-understand script files, and results can be used for further analyses within R. Owing to other R add-on packages utilised, the results can be output either numerically or as high-quality graphics in a wide range of file formats. Inheriting from its host environment R, the package is open-source software and freely available for all major computer platforms.

  18. Drop size distribution comparisons between Parsivel and 2-D video disdrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurai, M.; Petersen, W. A.; Tokay, A.; Schultz, C.; Gatlin, P.

    2011-05-01

    Measurements from a 2-D video disdrometer (2DVD) have been used for drop size distribution (DSD) comparisons with co-located Parsivel measurements in Huntsville, Alabama. The comparisons were made in terms of the mass-weighted mean diameter, Dm, the standard deviation of the mass-spectrum, σm, and the rainfall rate, R, all based on 1-min DSD from the two instruments. Time series comparisons show close agreement in all three parameters for cases where R was less than 20 mm h-1. In four cases, discrepancies in all three parameters were seen for "heavy" events, with the Parsivel showing higher Dm, σm and R, when R reached high values (particularly above 30 mm h-1). Possible causes for the discrepancies include the presence of a small percentage of non-fully melted hydrometers, with higher than expected fall velocity and with very different axis ratios as compared with rain, indicating small hail or ice pellets or graupel. We also present here Parsivel-to-Parsivel comparisons as well as comparisons between two 2DVD instruments, namely a low-profile unit and the latest generation, "compact unit" which was installed at the same site in November 2009. The comparisons are included to assess the variability between the same types of instrument. Correlation coefficients and the fractional standard errors are compared.

  19. Reflectivity variation in asymmetric random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, N. H. Z.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Tamchek, N.; Mahamd Adikan, F. R.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates and discusses the effect of reflectivity on the intracavity power development and spectral profile of a 41.1 km asymmetric (half-opened cavity) random distributed feedback fiber laser with different pumping schemes. The laser cavity is confined by a fiber Bragg grating and the Rayleigh feedback amplified by Raman scattering effect that serves as virtual random distributed mirrors. The laser performance was observed by integrating a variety of power couplers while employing forward and backward pumping schemes. Forward pumping exhibits greater susceptibility to reflectivity variation compared to backward pumping. Meanwhile, higher reflectivity produced better threshold conditions but at the expense of lower saturation power. A power-saturated laser also manifested a broader spectrum than a laser conducted outside the saturation regime. These research findings will be beneficial in understanding the role of reflectivity and pumping configurations in enhancing asymmetric random distributed feedback fiber laser.

  20. Single-Mode, Distributed Feedback Interband Cascade Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frez, Clifford F. (Inventor); Borgentun, Carl E. (Inventor); Briggs, Ryan M. (Inventor); Bagheri, Mahmood (Inventor); Forouhar, Siamak (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Single-mode, distributed feedback interband cascade lasers (ICLs) using distributed-feedback gratings (e.g., lateral Bragg gratings) and methods of fabricating such ICLs are provided. The ICLs incorporate distributed-feedback gratings that are formed above the laser active region and adjacent the ridge waveguide (RWG) of the ICL. The ICLs may incorporate a double-ridge system comprising an optical confinement structure (e.g., a RWG) disposed above the laser active region that comprises the first ridge of the double ridge system, a DFB grating (e.g., lateral Bragg grating) disposed above the laser active region and adjacent the optical confinement structure, and an electric confinement structure that passes at least partially through the laser active region and that defines the boundary of the second ridge comprises and the termination of the DFB grating.

  1. Extreme Floods and Probability Estimates for Dams: A 2D Distributed Model and Paleoflood Data Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Estimates of extreme floods and probabilities are needed in dam safety risk analysis. A multidisciplinary approach was developed to estimate extreme floods that integrated four main elements: radar hydrometeorology, stochastic storm transposition, paleoflood data, and 2d distributed rainfall-runoff modeling. The research focused on developing and applying a two-dimensional, distributed model to simulate extreme floods on the 12,000 km2 Arkansas River above Pueblo, Colorado with return periods up to 10,000 years. The four objectives were to: (1) develop a two-dimensional model suitable for large watersheds (area greater than 2,500 km2); (2) calibrate and validate the model to the June 1921 and May 1894 floods on the Arkansas River; (3) develop a flood frequency curve with the model using the stochastic storm transposition technique; and (4) conduct a sensitivity analysis for initial soil saturation, storm duration and area, and compare the flood frequency curve with gage and paleoflood data. The Two-dimensional Runoff, Erosion and EXport (TREX) model was developed as part of this research. Basin-average rainfall depths and probabilities were estimated using DAD data and stochastic storm transposition with elliptical storms for input to TREX. From these extreme rainstorms, the TREX model was used to estimate a flood frequency curve for this large watershed. Model-generated peak flows were as large as 90,000 to 282,000 ft3/s at Pueblo for 100- to 10,000-year return periods, respectively. Model-generated frequency curves were generally comparable to peak flow and paleoflood data-based frequency curves after radar-based storm location and area limits were applied. The model provides a unique physically-based method for determining flood frequency curves under varied scenarios of antecedent moisture conditions, space and time variability of rainfall and watershed characteristics, and storm center locations.

  2. Multi-wavelength narrow linewidth fiber laser based on distributed feedback fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jingsheng; Qi, Haifeng; Song, Zhiqiang; Guo, Jian; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2016-09-01

    A narrow linewidth laser configuration based on distributed feedback fiber lasers (DFB-FL) with eight wavelengths in the international telecommunication union (ITU) grid is presented and realized. In this laser configuration, eight phase-shifted gratings in series are bidirectionally pumped by two 980-nm laser diodes (LDs). The final laser output with over 10-mW power for each wavelength can be obtained, and the maximum power difference within eight wavelengths is 1.2 dB. The laser configuration with multiple wavelengths and uniform power outputs can be very useful in large scaled optical fiber hydrophone fields.

  3. Spatial Correlation of Rain Drop Size Distribution from Polarimetric Radar and 2D-Video Disdrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurai, Merhala; Bringi, Viswanathan; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matt; Petersen, Walter Arthur; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial correlations of two of the main rain drop-size distribution (DSD) parameters - namely the median-volume diameter (Do) and the normalized intercept parameter (Nw) - as well as rainfall rate (R) are determined from polarimetric radar measurements, with added information from 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) data. Two cases have been considered, (i) a widespread, long-duration rain event in Huntsville, Alabama, and (ii) an event with localized intense rain-cells within a convection line which occurred during the MC3E campaign. For the first case, data from a C-band polarimetric radar (ARMOR) were utilized, with two 2DVDs acting as ground-truth , both being located at the same site 15 km from the radar. The radar was operated in a special near-dwelling mode over the 2DVDs. In the second case, data from an S-band polarimetric radar (NPOL) data were utilized, with at least five 2DVDs located between 20 and 30 km from the radar. In both rain event cases, comparisons of Do, log10(Nw) and R were made between radar derived estimates and 2DVD-based measurements, and were found to be in good agreement, and in both cases, the radar data were subsequently used to determine the spatial correlations For the first case, the spatial decorrelation distance was found to be smallest for R (4.5 km), and largest fo Do (8.2 km). For log10(Nw) it was 7.2 km (Fig. 1). For the second case, the corresponding decorrelation distances were somewhat smaller but had a directional dependence. In Fig. 2, we show an example of Do comparisons between NPOL based estimates and 1-minute DSD based estimates from one of the five 2DVDs.

  4. An Emerging Model for Student Feedback: Electronic Distributed Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunk-Chavez, Beth; Arrigucci, Annette

    2012-01-01

    In this article we address several issues and challenges that the evaluation of writing presents individual instructors and composition programs as a whole. We present electronic distributed evaluation, or EDE, as an emerging model for feedback on student writing and describe how it was integrated into our program's course redesign. Because the…

  5. Multifractal and Singularity Maps of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbrera, Ramiro; Millán, Humberto; Martín-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Pérez Soto, Luis; Sanchez, Maria Elena; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    methods for mapping geochemical anomalies caused by buried sources and for predicting undiscovered mineral deposits in covered areas. Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 122, 55-70. Cumbrera, R., Ana M. Tarquis, Gabriel Gascó, Humberto Millán (2012) Fractal scaling of apparent soil moisture estimated from vertical planes of Vertisol pit images. Journal of Hydrology (452-453), 205-212. Martin Sotoca; J.J. Antonio Saa-Requejo, Juan Grau and Ana M. Tarquis (2016). Segmentation of singularity maps in the context of soil porosity. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 18, EGU2016-11402. Millán, H., Cumbrera, R. and Ana M. Tarquis (2016) Multifractal and Levy-stable statistics of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis. Applied Mathematical Modelling, 40(3), 2384-2395.

  6. High performance distributed feedback fiber laser sensor array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Li, Fang; Xu, Tuanwei; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yuliang

    2009-11-01

    Distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers have their unique properties useful for sensing applications. This paper presents a high performance distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser sensor array system. Four key techniques have been adopted to set up the system, including DFB fiber laser design and fabrication, interferometric wavelength shift demodulation, digital phase generated carrier (PGC) technique and dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM). Experimental results confirm that a high dynamic strain resolution of 305 fɛ/√Hz (@ 1 kHz) has been achieved by the proposed sensor array system. And the multiplexing of eight channel DFB fiber laser sensor array has been demonstrated. The proposed DFB fiber laser sensor array system is suitable for ultra-weak signal detection, and has potential applications in the field of petroleum seismic explorations, earthquake prediction, and security.

  7. Polymer thin-film distributed feedback tunable lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumarcher, Vincent; Rocha, Licinio; Denis, Christine; Fiorini, Céline; Nunzi, Jean-Michel; Sobel, Frank; Sahraoui, Bouchta; Gindre, Denis

    2000-07-01

    We report on measurements of laser emission from poly-methylmethacrylate and poly-vinyl carbazole polymer films doped with rhodamine-6G, DCM and coumarin laser dyes in an optically pumped distributed feedback scheme. We obtain tunability on a broad spectral range for all samples. We show the impact of waveguiding in the polymer film on reducing the laser threshold. We also show that the number of laser modes increases with the polymer film thickness, following the guided mode dispersion.

  8. Low frequency noise distributed-feedback ytterbium fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nikulin, M A; Babin, S A; Kablukov, S I; Dmitriev, Aleksandr K; Dychkov, Aleksandr S; Lugovoy, Aleksei A; Pecherskii, Yu Ya

    2009-10-31

    We report a single-frequency 1-W fibre laser source emitting at 1093 nm, composed of a distributed-feedback ytterbium fibre laser and fibre-optic amplifier. The laser frequency was stabilised by side-locking to a transmission peak of a Fabry - Perot interferometer, and the residual frequency noise spectrum of the laser was measured. Our results indicate that the laser linewidth can be narrowed down below 1 kHz. (lasers)

  9. Optimal angular dose distribution to acquire 3D and extra 2D images for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Gang, Won-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, JaeGu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal non-uniform angular dose distribution to improve the quality of the 3D reconstructed images and to acquire extra 2D projection images. In this analysis, 7 acquisition sets were generated by using four different values for the number of projections (11, 15, 21, and 29) and total angular range (±14°, ±17.5°, ±21°, and ±24.5° ). For all acquisition sets, the zero-degree projection was used as the 2D image that was close to that of standard conventional mammography (CM). Exposures used were 50, 100, 150, and 200 mR for the zero-degree projection, and the remaining dose was distributed over the remaining projection angles. To quantitatively evaluate image quality, we computed the CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and the ASF (artifact spread function) for the same radiation dose. The results indicate that, for microcalcifications, acquisition sets with approximately 4 times higher exposure on the zero-degree projection than the average exposure for the remaining projection angles yielded higher CNR values and were 3% higher than the uniform distribution. However, very high dose concentrations toward the zero-degree projection may reduce the quality of the reconstructed images due to increasing noise in the peripheral views. The zero-degree projection of the non-uniform dose distribution offers a 2D image similar to that of standard CM, but with a significantly lower radiation dose. Therefore, we need to evaluate the diagnostic potential of extra 2D projection image when diagnose breast cancer by using 3D images with non-uniform angular dose distributions.

  10. 2-D distribution of the ionised gas oxygen abundance in CALIFA spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, I.

    2016-06-01

    Spiral arms are distinctive features in disc galaxies where the star formation is enhanced. Whether their gaseous content is different to what found in the rest of the disc (inter-arm region) is still an unexplored matter of debate. In our study we try to shed some light to this question by analysing the full 2-D information provided by the CALIFA survey. With this purpose, oxygen abundance gradients are derived separately for star forming regions in the spiral arms and in the inter-arm area. A distinction between flocculent and grand design galaxies is also performed to look for differences in the origin of these two type of spiral galaxies.

  11. Evaluation of Hydrus-2D model for solute distribution in subsurface drip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Claudinei; Bizari, Douglas; Grecco, Katarina

    2015-04-01

    The competition for water use between agriculture, industry and population has become intense over the years, requiring a rational use of this resource for food production. The subsurface drip irrigation can help producers with the optimization of operating parameters such as frequency and duration of irrigation, flow, spacing and depth of the dripper installation. This information can be obtained by numerical simulations using mathematical models, thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the HYDRUS-2D model from experimental data to predict the size of the wet bulbs generated by emitters of different application rates (1.0 and 1.6 L h-1). The results showed that horizontal displacement (bulb diameter) remained the largest in all the bulbs, observed both in experimental trials and estimated by the model and the correlation between them was high, above 0.90 to below 16% error. We conclude that the HYDRUS-2D model can be used to estimate the dimensions of the wet bulb getting new information on the sizing of the irrigation system.

  12. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  13. An ESPRIT-Based Approach for 2-D Localization of Incoherently Distributed Sources in Massive MIMO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anzhong; Lv, Tiejun; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Shaoshi

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, an approach of estimating signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT) is proposed for two-dimensional (2-D) localization of incoherently distributed (ID) sources in large-scale/massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. The traditional ESPRIT-based methods are valid only for one-dimensional (1-D) localization of the ID sources. By contrast, in the proposed approach the signal subspace is constructed for estimating the nominal azimuth and elevation direction-of-arrivals and the angular spreads. The proposed estimator enjoys closed-form expressions and hence it bypasses the searching over the entire feasible field. Therefore, it imposes significantly lower computational complexity than the conventional 2-D estimation approaches. Our analysis shows that the estimation performance of the proposed approach improves when the large-scale/massive MIMO systems are employed. The approximate Cram\\'{e}r-Rao bound of the proposed estimator for the 2-D localization is also derived. Numerical results demonstrate that albeit the proposed estimation method is comparable with the traditional 2-D estimators in terms of performance, it benefits from a remarkably lower computational complexity.

  14. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  15. Calculation of Target-Specific Point Distribution for 2D Mobile Laser Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Cahalane, Conor; McElhinney, Conor P.; Lewis, Paul; McCarthy, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The current generation of Mobile Mapping Systems (MMSs) capture high density spatial data in a short time-frame. The quantity of data is difficult to predict as there is no concrete understanding of the point density that different scanner configurations and hardware settings will exhibit for objects at specific distances. Obtaining the required point density impacts survey time, processing time, data storage and is also the underlying limit of automated algorithms. This paper details a novel method for calculating point and profile information for terrestrial MMSs which are required for any point density calculation. Through application of algorithms utilising 3D surface normals and 2D geometric formulae, the theoretically optimal profile spacing and point spacing are calculated on targets. Both of these elements are a major factor in calculating point density on arbitrary objects, such as road signs, poles or buildings-all important features in asset management surveys. PMID:24871989

  16. An application of the distributed hydrologic model CASC2D to a tropical montane watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsik, Matt; Waylen, Peter

    2006-11-01

    SummaryIncreased stormflow in the Quebrada Estero watershed (2.5 km 2), in the northwestern Central Valley tectonic depression of Costa Rica, reportedly has caused flooding of the city of San Ramón in recent decades. Although scientifically untested, urban expansion was deemed the cause and remedial measures were recommended by the Programa de Investigación en Desarrollo Humano Sostenible (ProDUS). CASC2D, a physically-based, spatially explicit hydrologic model, was constructed and calibrated to a June 10th 2002 storm that delivered 110.5 mm of precipitation in 4.5 h visibly exceeded the bankfull stage (0.9 m) of the Quebrada flooding portions of San Ramón. The calibrated hydrograph showed a peak discharge 16.68% (2.5 m 3 s -1) higher, an above flood stage duration 20% shorter, and time to peak discharge 11 min later than the same observed discharge hydrograph characteristics. Simulations of changing land cover conditions from 1979 to 1999 showed an increase also in the peak discharge, above flood stage duration, and time to peak discharge. Analysis using a modified location quotient identified increased urbanization in lower portions of the watershed over the time period studied. These results suggest that increased urbanization in the Quebrada Estero watershed have increased flooding peaks, and durations above threshold, confirming the ProDUS report. These results and the CASC2D model offer an easy-to-use, pragmatic planning tool for policymakers in San Ramón to assess future development scenarios and their potential flooding impacts to San Ramón.

  17. Evolution of 2D Potts Model Grain Microstructures from an Initial Hillert Size Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, C.C.; Holm E.A.

    1998-10-19

    Grain growth experiments and simulations exhibit self-similar grain size distributions quite different from that derived via a mean field approach by Hillert [ 1]. To test whether this discrepancy is due to insufficient anneal times, two different two-dimensional grain structures with realistic topologies and Hillert grain size distributions are generated and subjected to grain growth via the Monte Carlo Potts Model (MCPM). In both cases, the observed self-similar grain size distributions deviate from the initial Hillert form and conform instead to that observed in MCPM grain growth simulations that start from a random microstructure. This suggests that the Hillert grain size distribution is not an attractor.

  18. Analytical source-target mapping method for the design of freeform mirrors generating prescribed 2D intensity distributions.

    PubMed

    Doskolovich, Leonid L; Bezus, Evgeni A; Moiseev, Mikhail A; Bykov, Dmitry A; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L

    2016-05-16

    A new source-target mapping for the design of mirrors generating prescribed 2D intensity distributions is proposed. The surface of the mirror implementing the obtained mapping is expressed in an analytical form. Presented simulation results demonstrate high performance of the proposed method. In the case of generation of rectangular and elliptical intensity distributions with angular dimensions from 80° x 20° to 40° x 20°, relative standard error does not exceed 8.5%. The method can be extended to the calculation of refractive optical elements.

  19. Lowering the lasing threshold of distributed feedback lasers with loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkov, V. Yu.; Zyablovsky, A. A.; Andrianov, E. S.; Pukhov, A. A.; Vinogradov, A. P.; Dorofeenko, A. V.; Lisyansky, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    We study laser generation in one-dimensional distributed feedback lasers with amplifying and lossy layers. We show that when the lasing frequency differs from the transition frequencies of the amplifying medium, loss induced lasing may occur due to the broadening of the resonator mode with increasing loss in the absorbing layers. This broadening leads to a shift in the lasing frequency towards the transition frequency. As a result, the cavity mode interaction with the amplifying medium is enhanced, and the lasing threshold is lowered.

  20. Sample Grating Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser Array.

    PubMed

    Yan, F L; Zhang, J C; Liu, C W; Zhuo, N; Liu, Fq; Zhai, S Q; Wang, Z G

    2015-12-01

    A sample grating distributed feedback quantum cascade laser array aim at broad tunability and enhanced side mode suppression ratios is presented. Utilizing a sample grating dependence on emission wavelength and epitaxial side down bonding technique, the array of laser ridges exhibited three separated single mode emissions centered at 4.760, 4.721, and 4.711 μm respectively, in continuous wave at room temperature. Side mode suppression ratios of >35 dB and continuous wave output powers of >10 mW per laser ridge were obtained.

  1. Origins, distribution and expression of the Duarte-2 (D2) allele of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Amanda E.; Sanders, Rebecca D.; Garza, Kerry R.; McGaha, Lee Anne; Bean, Lora J. H.; Coffee, Bradford W.; Thomas, James W.; Cutler, David J.; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    Duarte galactosemia is a mild to asymptomatic condition that results from partial impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Patients with Duarte galactosemia demonstrate reduced GALT activity and carry one profoundly impaired GALT allele (G) along with a second, partially impaired GALT allele (Duarte-2, D2). Molecular studies reveal at least five sequence changes on D2 alleles: a p.N314D missense substitution, three intronic base changes and a 4 bp deletion in the 5′ proximal sequence. The four non-coding sequence changes are unique to D2. The p.N314D substitution, however, is not; it is found together with a silent polymorphism, p.L218(TTA), on functionally normal Duarte-1 alleles (D1, also called Los Angeles or LA alleles). The HapMap database reveals that p.N314D is a common human variant, and cross-species comparisons implicate D314 as the ancestral allele. The p.N314D substitution is also functionally neutral in mammalian cell and yeast expression studies. In contrast, the 4 bp 5′ deletion characteristic of D2 alleles appears to be functionally impaired in reporter gene transfection studies. Here we present allele-specific qRT–PCR evidence that D2 alleles express less mRNA in vivo than their wild-type counterparts; the difference is small but statistically significant. Furthermore, we characterize the prevalence of the 4 bp deletion in GG, NN and DG populations; the deletion appears exclusive to D2 alleles. Combined, these data strongly implicate the 4 bp 5′ deletion as a causal mutation in Duarte galactosemia and suggest that direct tests for this deletion, as proposed here, could enhance or supplant current tests, which define D2 alleles on the basis of the presence and absence of linked coding sequence polymorphisms. PMID:19224951

  2. 2D tritium distribution on tungsten tiles used in JET ITER-like wall project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Y.; Widdowson, A.; Bekris, N.; Ayres, C.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S.; Ikonen, J.; Yumizuru, K.

    2015-08-01

    Post-mortem measurements of 2-dimensional tritium (T) distribution using an imaging plate (IP) technique were performed for tungsten (W) divertor tiles (W-coated CFC) used in JET-ITER like wall (ILW) project. The observed T distributions were clearly inhomogeneous, and there were band-like regions with high T concentrations that extended in the toroidal direction on tiles 1, 3, 4 and 6. The concentrations of T in the band-like regions were higher by an order of magnitude than the concentrations in other parts. The inhomogeneous T distributions were explained by non-uniform co-deposition with other elements such as beryllium. The concentrations of T on the outboard vertical tiles (tiles 7 and 8) were low and relatively uniform in comparison with other tiles.

  3. Intensifying the response of distributed optical fibre sensors using 2D and 3D image restoration

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Ramírez, Jaime A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Distributed optical fibre sensors possess the unique capability of measuring the spatial and temporal map of environmental quantities that can be of great interest for several field applications. Although existing methods for performance enhancement have enabled important progresses in the field, they do not take full advantage of all information present in the measured data, still giving room for substantial improvement over the state-of-the-art. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an approach for performance enhancement that exploits the high level of similitude and redundancy contained on the multidimensional information measured by distributed fibre sensors. Exploiting conventional image and video processing, an unprecedented boost in signal-to-noise ratio and measurement contrast is experimentally demonstrated. The method can be applied to any white-noise-limited distributed fibre sensor and can remarkably provide a 100-fold improvement in the sensor performance with no hardware modification. PMID:26927698

  4. Intensifying the response of distributed optical fibre sensors using 2D and 3D image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Ramírez, Jaime A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Distributed optical fibre sensors possess the unique capability of measuring the spatial and temporal map of environmental quantities that can be of great interest for several field applications. Although existing methods for performance enhancement have enabled important progresses in the field, they do not take full advantage of all information present in the measured data, still giving room for substantial improvement over the state-of-the-art. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an approach for performance enhancement that exploits the high level of similitude and redundancy contained on the multidimensional information measured by distributed fibre sensors. Exploiting conventional image and video processing, an unprecedented boost in signal-to-noise ratio and measurement contrast is experimentally demonstrated. The method can be applied to any white-noise-limited distributed fibre sensor and can remarkably provide a 100-fold improvement in the sensor performance with no hardware modification.

  5. Laterally Coupled Quantum-Dot Distributed-Feedback Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qui, Yueming; Gogna, Pawan; Muller, Richard; Maker, paul; Wilson, Daniel; Stintz, Andreas; Lester, Luke

    2003-01-01

    InAs quantum-dot lasers that feature distributed feedback and lateral evanescent- wave coupling have been demonstrated in operation at a wavelength of 1.3 m. These lasers are prototypes of optical-communication oscillators that are required to be capable of stable single-frequency, single-spatial-mode operation. A laser of this type (see figure) includes an active layer that comprises multiple stacks of InAs quantum dots embedded within InGaAs quantum wells. Distributed feedback is provided by gratings formed on both sides of a ridge by electron lithography and reactive-ion etching on the surfaces of an AlGaAs/GaAs waveguide. The lateral evanescent-wave coupling between the gratings and the wave propagating in the waveguide is strong enough to ensure operation at a single frequency, and the waveguide is thick enough to sustain a stable single spatial mode. In tests, the lasers were found to emit continuous-wave radiation at temperatures up to about 90 C. Side modes were found to be suppressed by more than 30 dB.

  6. Evolution of the contact distribution in sheared 2D granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberski, Jens; Shaebani, M. Reza; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2013-06-01

    We study the elastic response and the fabric evolution of sheared granular materials by looking at the underlying dynamics at the level of individual contacts. Unilateral interparticle interactions lead to opening and closing of contacts during quasi-static shear deformations, which anisotropically modify the fabric and affect the elastic response of the material. Additionally, the presence of non-affine motions leads to softening of the response. We numerically investigate the evolution of the contact orientation distribution of a two dimensional packing, during isotropic compression and bi-axial shear deformation processes. In the isotropic compression case, the normal overlap distribution can be well fitted by a Gaussian, and broadens with a width which linearly grows with the volumetric strain. This is in contrast to the (volume conserving) pure shear case, where the width remains approximately unaffected by the shear strain.

  7. New methods to estimate 2D water level distributions of dynamic rivers.

    PubMed

    Diem, Samuel; Renard, Philippe; Schirmer, Mario

    2013-01-01

    River restoration measures are becoming increasingly popular and are leading to dynamic river bed morphologies that in turn result in complex water level distributions in a river. Disconnected river branches, nonlinear longitudinal water level profiles and morphologically induced lateral water level gradients can evolve rapidly. The modeling of such river-groundwater systems is of high practical relevance in order to assess the impact of restoration measures on the exchange flux between a river and groundwater or on the residence times between a river and a pumping well. However, the model input includes a proper definition of the river boundary condition, which requires a detailed spatial and temporal river water level distribution. In this study, we present two new methods to estimate river water level distributions that are based directly on measured data. Comparing generated time series of water levels with those obtained by a hydraulic model as a reference, the new methods proved to offer an accurate and faster alternative with a simpler implementation.

  8. Influence of anthraquinone scaffold on E/Z isomer distribution of two thiosemicarbazone derivatives. 2D NMR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Violeta; Joksović, Milan D.; Marković, Svetlana; Jakovljević, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    A distribution of possible isomeric and tautomeric forms of two tautomerizable anthraquinone-thiosemicarbazones with pronounced cytotoxic potential was investigated using 2D NMR and DFT studies. Conformational analysis of the E and Z isomers of both thiosemicarbazones was performed to find out the most stable conformation for each molecule. It was found that superior stability of E-isomers results from ten-membered intramolecular hydrogen bond between thiosemicarbazone N2H and anthraquinone carbonyl group. This hydrogen bond is stronger than that between thiosemicarbazone N2H and ester oxygen, owing to the large partial negative charge on the anthraquinone oxygen.

  9. Distributed Computing Architecture for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing and 2 D FFTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce H.; Haghani, Shadan

    2006-01-01

    Image-based wavefront sensing (WFS) provides significant advantages over interferometric-based wavefi-ont sensors such as optical design simplicity and stability. However, the image-based approach is computational intensive, and therefore, specialized high-performance computing architectures are required in applications utilizing the image-based approach. The development and testing of these high-performance computing architectures are essential to such missions as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestial Planet Finder-Coronagraph (TPF-C and CorSpec), and Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT). The development of these specialized computing architectures require numerous two-dimensional Fourier Transforms, which necessitate an all-to-all communication when applied on a distributed computational architecture. Several solutions for distributed computing are presented with an emphasis on a 64 Node cluster of DSPs, multiple DSP FPGAs, and an application of low-diameter graph theory. Timing results and performance analysis will be presented. The solutions offered could be applied to other all-to-all communication and scientifically computationally complex problems.

  10. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  11. The cone penetration test and 2D imaging resistivity as tools to simulate the distribution of hydrocarbons in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Corona, M.; García, J. A.; Taller, G.; Polgár, D.; Bustos, E.; Plank, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of geophysical electrical surveys is to determine the subsurface resistivity distribution by making measurements on the ground surface. From these measurements, the true resistivity of the subsurface can be estimated. The ground resistivity is related to various geological parameters, such as the mineral and fluid content, porosity and degree of water saturation in the rock. Electrical resistivity surveys have been used for many decades in hydrogeological, mining and geotechnical investigations. More recently, they have been used for environmental surveys. To obtain a more accurate subsurface model than is possible with a simple 1-D model, a more complex model must be used. In a 2-D model, the resistivity values are allowed to vary in one horizontal direction (usually referred to as the x direction) but are assumed to be constant in the other horizontal (the y) direction. A more realistic model would be a fully 3-D model where the resistivity values are allowed to change in all three directions. In this research, a simulation of the cone penetration test and 2D imaging resistivity are used as tools to simulate the distribution of hydrocarbons in soil.

  12. Characterizing 3D grain size distributions from 2D sections in mylonites using a modified version of the Saltykov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Marco; Llana-Fúnez, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of creep behaviour in rocks requires knowledge of 3D grain size distributions (GSD) that result from dynamic recrystallization processes during deformation. The methods to estimate directly the 3D grain size distribution -serial sectioning, synchrotron or X-ray-based tomography- are expensive, time-consuming and, in most cases and at best, challenging. This means that in practice grain size distributions are mostly derived from 2D sections. Although there are a number of methods in the literature to derive the actual 3D grain size distributions from 2D sections, the most popular in highly deformed rocks is the so-called Saltykov method. It has though two major drawbacks: the method assumes no interaction between grains, which is not true in the case of recrystallised mylonites; and uses histograms to describe distributions, which limits the quantification of the GSD. The first aim of this contribution is to test whether the interaction between grains in mylonites, i.e. random grain packing, affects significantly the GSDs estimated by the Saltykov method. We test this using the random resampling technique in a large data set (n = 12298). The full data set is built from several parallel thin sections that cut a completely dynamically recrystallized quartz aggregate in a rock sample from a Variscan shear zone in NW Spain. The results proved that the Saltykov method is reliable as long as the number of grains is large (n > 1000). Assuming that a lognormal distribution is an optimal approximation for the GSD in a completely dynamically recrystallized rock, we introduce an additional step to the Saltykov method, which allows estimating a continuous probability distribution function of the 3D grain size population. The additional step takes the midpoints of the classes obtained by the Saltykov method and fits a lognormal distribution with a trust region using a non-linear least squares algorithm. The new protocol is named the two-step method. The

  13. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA. PMID:26661854

  14. Apparatus For Linewidth Reduction in Distributed Feedback or Distributed Bragg Reflector Semiconductor Lasers Using Vertical Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony L. (Inventor); Hendricks, Herbert D. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The linewidth of a distributed feedback semiconductor laser or a distributed Bragg reflector laser having one or more second order gratings is reduced by using an external cavity to couple the vertical emission back into the laser. This method and device prevent disturbance of the main laser beam, provide unobstructed access to laser emission for the formation of the external cavity, and do not require a very narrow heat sink. Any distributed Bragg reflector semiconductor laser or distributed feedback semiconductor laser that can produce a vertical emission through the epitaxial material and through a window in the top metallization can be used. The external cavity can be formed with an optical fiber or with a lens and a mirror or grating.

  15. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-01

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  16. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-11

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  17. Frequency doubling of Raman fiber lasers with random distributed feedback.

    PubMed

    Dontsova, E I; Kablukov, S I; Vatnik, I D; Babin, S A

    2016-04-01

    This Letter presents what we believe is the first experimental study of frequency doubling of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) with random distributed feedback (RDFB) in an MgO:PPLN crystal. We compared two laser configurations, each with a half-open cavity. The cavity contained either a broadband Sagnac mirror or a narrowband fiber Bragg grating (FBG). We found that spectral broadening in the studied configurations of the RDFB RFLs differed from that found in a conventional RFL with a linear cavity, as well as from each other. We also compared the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency for these three types of lasers. The highest SHG efficiency was obtained for the RDFB RFL with the FBG delivering >100  mW power at 654 nm. PMID:27192256

  18. Coupled ridge waveguide distributed feedback quantum cascade laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Jin-Chuan Yan, Fang-Liang; Liu, Feng-Qi Zhuo, Ning; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Jun-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2015-04-06

    A coupled ridge waveguide quantum cascade laser (QCL) array consisting of fifteen elements with parallel integration was presented. In-phase fundamental mode operation in each element is secured by both the index-guided nature of the ridge and delicate loss management by properly designed geometries of the ridges and interspaces. Single-lobe lateral far-field with a nearly diffraction limited beam pattern was obtained. By incorporating a one-dimensional buried distributed feedback grating, the in-phase-operating coupled ridge waveguide QCL design provides an efficient solution to obtaining high output power and stable single longitudinal mode emission. The simplicity of this structure and fabrication process makes this approach attractive to many practical applications.

  19. Fast 2D fluid-analytical simulation of ion energy distributions and electromagnetic effects in multi-frequency capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Graves, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    A fast 2D axisymmetric fluid-analytical plasma reactor model using the finite elements simulation tool COMSOL is interfaced with a 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) code to study ion energy distributions (IEDs) in multi-frequency capacitive argon discharges. A bulk fluid plasma model, which solves the time-dependent plasma fluid equations for the ion continuity and electron energy balance, is coupled with an analytical sheath model, which solves for the sheath parameters. The time-independent Helmholtz equation is used to solve for the fields and a gas flow model solves for the steady-state pressure, temperature and velocity of the neutrals. The results of the fluid-analytical model are used as inputs to a PIC simulation of the sheath region of the discharge to obtain the IEDs at the target electrode. Each 2D fluid-analytical-PIC simulation on a moderate 2.2 GHz CPU workstation with 8 GB of memory took about 15-20 min. The multi-frequency 2D fluid-analytical model was compared to 1D PIC simulations of a symmetric parallel-plate discharge, showing good agreement. We also conducted fluid-analytical simulations of a multi-frequency argon capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) with a typical asymmetric reactor geometry at 2/60/162 MHz. The low frequency 2 MHz power controlled the sheath width and sheath voltage while the high frequencies controlled the plasma production. A standing wave was observable at the highest frequency of 162 MHz. We noticed that adding 2 MHz power to a 60 MHz discharge or 162 MHz to a dual frequency 2 MHz/60 MHz discharge can enhance the plasma uniformity. We found that multiple frequencies were not only useful for controlling IEDs but also plasma uniformity in CCP reactors.

  20. Improvement of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from micro rain radar using 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, E.; Baldini, L.; Roberto, N.; Gatlin, P.; Tokay, A.

    2016-03-01

    A measurement scheme aimed at investigating precipitation properties based on collocated disdrometer and profiling instruments is used in many experimental campaigns. Raindrop size distribution (RSD) estimated by disdrometer is referred to the ground level; the collocated profiling instrument is supposed to provide complementary estimation at different heights of the precipitation column above the instruments. As part of the Special Observation Period 1 of the HyMeX (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) project, conducted between 5 September and 6 November 2012, a K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) were installed close to each other at a site in the historic center of Rome (Italy). The raindrop size distributions collected by 2D video disdrometer are considered to be fairly accurate within the typical sizes of drops. Vertical profiles of raindrop sizes up to 1085 m are estimated from the Doppler spectra measured by the micro rain radar with a height resolution of 35 m. Several issues related to vertical winds, attenuation correction, Doppler spectra aliasing, and range-Doppler ambiguity limit the performance of MRR in heavy precipitation or in convection, conditions that frequently occur in late summer or in autumn in Mediterranean regions. In this paper, MRR Doppler spectra are reprocessed, exploiting the 2DVD measurements at ground to estimate the effects of vertical winds at 105 m (the most reliable MRR lower height), in order to provide a better estimation of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from MRR spectra. Results show that the reprocessing procedure leads to a better agreement between the reflectivity computed at 105 m from the reprocessed MRR spectra and that obtained from the 2DVD data. Finally, vertical profiles of MRR-estimated RSDs and their relevant moments (namely median volume diameter and reflectivity) are presented and discussed in order to investigate the

  1. Dynamics for Linear Feedback Controlled Two-Dimensional Benard Equations with Distributed Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyung-Chun; Shin, Byeong Chun

    2001-07-01

    The long-time behavior of solutions for some feedback distributed control problems associated with the Benard equations is studied. Some linear feedback solutions for the Benard equations are constructed. Then we prove that these feedback solutions possess the decay (in time) properties.

  2. Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenstrom, Anna-Brita

    A study of feedback in conversational question-response exchanges focused on the questioner's feedback to the respondent. It examined three types of "followup" moves: the ordinary type revealing the questioner's attitude to the response and closing the exchange; the type signaling the questioner's reaction to the response and inviting further…

  3. Particle Size Distributions Obtained Through Unfolding 2D Sections: Towards Accurate Distributions of Nebular Solids in the Allende Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, P. A.; Simon, Justin I.; Ross, D. K.; Friedrich, J. M.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Size distributions of nebular solids in chondrites suggest an efficient sorting of these early forming objects within the protoplanetary disk. The effect of this sorting has been documented by investigations of modal abundances of CAIs (e.g., [1-4]) and chondrules (e.g., [5-8]). Evidence for aerodynamic sorting in the disk is largely qualitative, and needs to be carefully assessed. It may be a way of concentrating these materials into planetesimal-mass clumps, perhaps 100 fs of ka after they formed. A key parameter is size/density distributions of particles (i.e., chondrules, CAIs, and metal grains), and in particular, whether the radius-density product (rxp) is a better metric for defining the distribution than r alone [9]. There is no consensus between r versus rxp based models. Here we report our initial tests and preliminary results, which when expanded will be used to test the accuracy of current dynamical disk models.

  4. Modeling 3D soil and sediment distributions for assessing catchment structure and hydrological feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Thomas; Brück, Yasemine; Hinz, Christoph; Gerke, Horst H.

    2015-04-01

    Structural heterogeneity, namely the spatial distribution of soils and sediments (represented by mineral particles), characterizes catchment hydrological behavior. In natural catchments, local geology and the specific geomorphic processes determine the characteristics and spatial distribution of structures. In constructed catchments, structural features are determined primarily by the construction processes and the geological origin of the parent material. Objectives are scenarios of 3D catchment structures in form of complete 3D description of soil hydraulic properties generated from the knowledge of the formation processes. The constructed hydrological catchment 'Hühnerwasser' (Lower Lusatia, Brandenburg, Germany) was used for the calibration and validation of model results due to its well-known conditions. For the modelling of structural features, a structure generator was used to model i) quasi-deterministic sediment distributions using input data from a geological model of the parent material excavation site; ii) sediment distributions that are conditioned to measurement data from soil sampling; and iii) stochastic component sediment distributions. All three approaches allow a randomization within definable limits. Furthermore, the spoil cone / spoil ridge orientation, internal layering, surface compaction and internal spoil cone compaction were modified. These generated structural models were incorporated in a gridded 3D volume model constructed with the GOCAD software. For selected scenarios, the impact of structure variation was assessed by hydrological modelling with HYDRUS 2D/3D software. For that purpose, 3D distributions of soil hydraulic properties were estimated based on generated sediment properties using adapted pedotransfer functions. Results from the hydrological model were compared them to measured discharges from the catchment. The impact of structural feature variation on flow behaviour was analysed by comparing different simulation scenarios

  5. Characteristics research on self-amplified distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhiqiang; Qi, Haifeng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2014-09-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser with a ratio of the backward to forward output power of 1:100 was composed by a 45-mm-length asymmetrical phase-shifted fiber grating fabricated on the 50-mm erbium-doped photosensitive fiber. Forward output laser was amplified using a certain length of Nufern EDFL-980-Hp erbium-doped fiber to absorb the surplus pump power after the active phase-shifted fiber grating and get population inversion. By using OptiSystem software, the best fiber length of the EDFL to get the highest gain was simulated. In order to keep the amplified laser with the narrow line-width and low noise, a narrow-band light filter consisting of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the same Bragg wavelength as the laser and an optical circulator was used to filter the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise of the out-cavity erbium-doped fiber. The designed laser structure sufficiently utilized the pump power, and a DFB fiber laser with the 32.5-mW output power, 11.5-kHz line width, and -87-dB/Hz relative intensity noise (RIN) at 300 mW of 980 nm pump power was brought out.

  6. Characteristics research of self-amplified distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhiqiang; Qi, Haifeng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2013-09-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser with a ratio of backward to forward output power of 1:100 was composed by a 45mm length asymmetrical phase-shifted fiber grating fabricated on 50mm erbium-doped photosensitive fiber. Forward output laser was amplified using a certain length of Nufern EDFL980-Hp erbium-doped fiber to absorb surplus pump power after the active phase-shifted fiber grating and get population inversion. Using OptiSystem software, the best fiber length of the EDFL to get the highest gain was simulated. In order to keep the amplified laser with narrow line-width and low noise, a narrow-band light filter consisted of a FBG with the same Bragg wavelength as the laser and an optical circulator was used to filter the ASE noise of the out-cavity erbium-doped fiber. The designed laser structure sufficiently utilized the pump power, a DFB fiber laser of 32.5mW output power, 11.5 kHz line width, and -87dB/Hz relative intensity noise (RIN) at 300mW of 980 nm pump power was brought out.

  7. The 2D Distribution of Iron-rich Ejecta in the Remnant of SN 1885 in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Höflich, Peter A.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    2015-05-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet Fe i and Fe ii images of the remnant of Supernova 1885 (S And) which is observed in absorption against the bulge of the Andromeda galaxy, M31. We compare these Fe i and Fe ii absorption line images to previous HST absorption images of S And, of which the highest quality and theoretically cleanest is Ca ii H and K. Because the remnant is still in free expansion, these images provide a 2D look at the distribution of iron synthesized in this probable Type Ia explosion, thus providing insights and constraints for theoretical SN Ia models. The Fe i images show extended absorption offset to the east from the remnant’s center as defined by Ca ii images and is likely an ionization effect due to self-shielding. More significant is the remnant’s apparent Fe ii distribution which consists of four streams or plumes of Fe-rich material seen in absorption that extend from remnant center out to about 10,000 km s-1. This is in contrast to the remnant’s Ca ii absorption, which is concentrated in a clumpy, broken shell spanning velocities of 1000-5000 km s-1 but which extends out to 12,500 km s-1. The observed distributions of Ca- and Fe-rich ejecta in the SN 1885 remnant are consistent with delayed detonation white dwarf models. The largely spherical symmetry of the Ca-rich layer argues against a highly anisotropic explosion as might result from a violent merger of two white dwarfs. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract No. NAS5-26555.

  8. THE 2D DISTRIBUTION OF IRON-RICH EJECTA IN THE REMNANT OF SN 1885 IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, Robert A.; Höflich, Peter A.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    2015-05-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet Fe i and Fe ii images of the remnant of Supernova 1885 (S And) which is observed in absorption against the bulge of the Andromeda galaxy, M31. We compare these Fe i and Fe ii absorption line images to previous HST absorption images of S And, of which the highest quality and theoretically cleanest is Ca ii H and K. Because the remnant is still in free expansion, these images provide a 2D look at the distribution of iron synthesized in this probable Type Ia explosion, thus providing insights and constraints for theoretical SN Ia models. The Fe i images show extended absorption offset to the east from the remnant’s center as defined by Ca ii images and is likely an ionization effect due to self-shielding. More significant is the remnant’s apparent Fe ii distribution which consists of four streams or plumes of Fe-rich material seen in absorption that extend from remnant center out to about 10,000 km s{sup −1}. This is in contrast to the remnant’s Ca ii absorption, which is concentrated in a clumpy, broken shell spanning velocities of 1000–5000 km s{sup −1} but which extends out to 12,500 km s{sup −1}. The observed distributions of Ca- and Fe-rich ejecta in the SN 1885 remnant are consistent with delayed detonation white dwarf models. The largely spherical symmetry of the Ca-rich layer argues against a highly anisotropic explosion as might result from a violent merger of two white dwarfs.

  9. Raindrop axis ratios, fall velocities and size distribution over Sumatra from 2D-Video Disdrometer measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Randeu, Walter L.; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Schönhuber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution are important in broad list of applications. However, they are not frequently observed in the equatorial region. This paper elucidated the characteristics of raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution based on 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) data that have been collected in the equatorial Indonesia, particularly at Kototabang (hereafter called KT), west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). A comprehensive follow-up of the previous study on the natural variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) is presented. Precipitation was classified through 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation. The dependence of raindrop falling velocity and axis ratio on rainfall type was not clearly observed. Overall, measured raindrop fall velocities were in good agreement with Gunn-Kinzer's data. Raindrop axis ratio at KT was more spherical than that of artificial rain and equilibrium model, and close to the values reported in the turbulent high shear zone of surface layer which can be partially due to the effect of the instrument errors (e.g., location and container shape). Of some natural variations of DSD investigated, the dependence of DSD on rainfall rate and rainfall type as well as diurnal variation was clearly visible. A striking contrast between the stratiform and convective rains is that the size distributions from the stratiform (convective) rains tend to narrow (broaden) with increasing rainfall rates. For rainfall rate R < 10 mm/h, the size distribution of stratiform was broader than that of convective. On the other hand, at higher rainfall rate more large-sized drops were found in convective rain. During the convective rain, very large-sized drops were found mainly at the very start of rain event while for the stratiform they were found to be associated with a strong bright band. In diurnal basis, the DSDs in the morning hours were narrower than those in the evening which was

  10. VUV free electron laser with a distributed feedback cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Fujita, M.; Asakawa, M.

    1995-12-31

    Development of FEL to the VUV/x-ray regime is looked as one of the possible directions to its success. For eliminating the need for optical cavities, difficult to be built at that regime, we propose a VUV (50nm) SASE FEL. According to Pellegrini`s scaling law, for a 290MeV/200A e-beam passing through a 10.8m long and 2cm period wiggler, a high peak power 85.5MW and a high average brightness 2.44 X 10{sup +21} (photons/[mm{sup 2}.mrad{sup 2}.bw]) can be obtained. However, it requires {epsilon} n=2.3mm.mrad and {Delta}{gamma}/{gamma} = 0.15% about one order above the practical parameters we can realize. For enhancing the efficiency and decreasing the requirements on the e-beam quality and the wiggler length, we put forward a concept of VUV FEL with a distributed feedback cavity. In x-ray region, the natural periodicity of crystals provides strong Bragg coupling and it has been demonstrated as the parametric radiation. In vuv region, current intense research on superlattice can provide a periodical structure with a short period in 250 {Angstrom} order. High-performance vuv multilayer coatings on the inner-wall of the waveguide are used to guide the spontaneous emission and decrease the x-ray ohmic losses on the roundtrip passes. By this DFB cavity structure, it is expected to realize the lasing in a smaller size. Other practical methods such as the optical klystron for shortening the wiggler length and the tapper wiggler for enhancing the saturation power are also considered. The analytical considerations are based on the 1-D FEL equations and 1-D perturbation theory of dielectric waveguide.

  11. Anaerobic degradation of solid material: importance of initiation centers for methanogenesis, mixing intensity, and 2D distributed model.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, V A; Angelidaki, I

    2005-01-01

    Batch anaerobic codigestion of municipal household solid waste (MHSW) and digested manure in mesophilic conditions was carried out. The different waste-to-biomass ratios and intensity of mixing were studied theoretically and experimentally. The experiments showed that when organic loading was high, intensive mixing resulted in acidification and failure of the process, while low mixing intensity was crucial for successful digestion. However, when loading was low, mixing intensity had no significant effect on the process. We hypothesized that mixing was preventing establishment of methanogenic zones in the reactor space. The methanogenic zones are important to withstand inhibition due to development of acids formed during acidogenesis. The 2D distributed models of symmetrical cylinder reactor are presented based on the hypothesis of the necessity of a minimum size of methanogenic zones that can propagate and establish a good methanogenic environment. The model showed that at high organic loading rate spatial separation of the initial methanogenic centers from active acidogenic areas is the key factor for efficient conversion of solids to methane. The initial level of methanogenic biomass in the initiation centers is a critical factor for the survival of these centers. At low mixing, most of the initiation methanogenic centers survive and expand over the reactor volume. However, at vigorous mixing the initial methanogenic centers are reduced in size, averaged over the reactor volume, and finally dissipate. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, large irregular cocci of microorganisms were observed in the case with minimal mixing, while in the case with high stirring mainly dead cells were found. PMID:15540194

  12. Calibration of the 2D Hydrodynamic Model Floodos and Implications of Distributed Friction on Sediment Transport Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croissant, T.; Lague, D.; Davy, P.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical models of floodplain dynamics often use a simplified 1D description of flow hydraulics and sediment transport that cannot fully account for differential friction between vegetated banks and low friction in the main channel. Key parameters of such models are the friction coefficient and the description of the channel bathymetry which strongly influence predicted water depth and velocity, and therefore sediment transport capacity. In this study, we use a newly developed 2D hydrodynamic model, Floodos, whose efficiency is a major advantage for exploring channel morphodynamics from a flood event to millennial time scales. We evaluate the quality of Floodos predictions in the Whataroa river, New Zealand and assess the effect of a spatially distributed friction coefficient (SDFC) on long term sediment transport. Predictions from the model are compared to water depth data from a gauging station located on the Whataroa River in Southern Alps, New Zealand. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the 2.5 km long studied reach is derived from a 2010 LiDAR acquisition with 2 m resolution and an interpolated bathymetry. The several large floods experienced by this river during 2010 allow us to access water depth for a wide range of possible river discharges and to retrieve the scaling between these two parameters. The high resolution DEM used has a non-negligible part of submerged bathymetry that airborne LiDAR was not able to capture. Bathymetry can be reconstructed by interpolation methods that introduce several uncertainties concerning water depth predictions. We address these uncertainties inherent to the interpolation using a simplified channel with a geometry (slope and width) similar to the Whataroa river. We then explore the effect of a SDFC on velocity pattern, water depth and sediment transport capacity and discuss its relevance on long term predictions of sediment transport and channel morphodynamics.

  13. Separating stratiform and convective rain types based on the drop size distribution characteristics using 2D video disdrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurai, M.; Gatlin, P. N.; Bringi, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    A technique for separating stratiform and convective rain types using the characteristics of two of the main drop size distribution (DSD) parameters is presented. The method was originally developed based on observations from dual-frequency profiler and dual-polarization radar observations in Darwin, Australia. In this paper, we will present the testing of the method using data from 2D video disdrometers (2DVD) from two very different locations, namely, Ontario, Canada, and Huntsville, Alabama, USA. One-minute DSDs from 2DVD are used as input to a gamma-fitting procedure and our separation technique uses the fitted values of log10(NW) and D0 (where NW is the scaling parameter and D0 is the median volume diameter) and an "index" to quantify where the points lie in the log10(NW) versus D0 domain. For the Ontario location, the output of the classification is compared with simultaneous observations from a collocated, vertically pointing, X-band Doppler radar. A "bright-band" detection algorithm is used to classify each height profile as either stratiform or convective, depending on whether or not a clearly defined melting layer is present at an expected height. If present, the maximum reflectivity within the melting layer and the corresponding height are determined. Similar testing is carried out for two events in Huntsville and compared with observations from a collocated UHF profiler (with Doppler capability). Additional case studies are required, but these results indicate our separation technique seems to be applicable to many different locations and climatologies based on previously published data.

  14. Distributing Leadership for Sustainable Peer Feedback on Tertiary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingrove, Dallas; Clarke, Angela; Chester, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A growing evidence-based literature supports the value of peer feedback as a positive professional learning activity that enhances confidence, builds collegial relationships and supports reflective practice. Less clear is how best to embed such programs in university practices. This paper describes a leadership approach developed to support the…

  15. Estimation of raindrop drop size distribution vertical profile from simultaneous micro rain radar and 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, Elisa; Baldini, Luca; Roberto, Nicoletta; Montopoli, Mario; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Gatlin, Patrick; Tokay, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Experimental field campaigns of rain precipitation usually require the coexistence of several ground and satellite based observations in order to guarantee a more complete analysis of the collected case studies at the various spatial and temporal scales of interest. In the framework of the Ground Validation programme of the NASAA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, several climate regions of the Earth have been interested by various field campaigns involving experimental setup which include one or more ground based disdrometers and profilers. In such situation a typical implementation of the measurement scheme consists of a pair of K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) installed close each other. Since 2DVD estimates are referred to the ground level, the co-located MRR is supposed to provide complementary vertical profiles of drop size distribution (DSD) measurements. However, if not properly processed MRR and 2DVD raw data can lead to erroneous interpretations of the underlying microphysics. In this work, we investigate some typical issues occurring when dealing with MRR and 2DVD observations proposing techniques to ensure the adequate data quality required in typical field validation campaigns. More in detail, MRR is an affordable continuous wave frequency-modulated radar (CWFM) typically used at vertical incidence. In the MMR configuration used, DSD profiles are estimated from Doppler spectra determined by drops falling at different velocities and at different heights from 1000 meters almost up to the ground level with a vertical resolution of 35 meters and time resolution up to 10 seconds. The importance of the microphysical measurements from MRR are related to the effects of the vertical gradients of rain precipitation at the sub-resolution scale of the measurements based remote sensing instruments such as those provided by the dual frequency radar of GPM as well as by ground based weather radars

  16. Frequency distribution of the amide-I vibration sorted by residues in Amyloid fibrils revealed by 2D-IR measurements and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Cyril; Zhuang, Wei; Kim, Yung Sam; Axelsen, Paul H.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    The infrared optical response of Amyloid Fibrils Aβ1–40 is investigated. Simulations of two models corresponding to different protonation states are compared with experiment. The simulations reveal that vibrational frequency distributions inside the fibrils are dominated by sidechain fluctuations. We further confirm earlier suggestions based on 2D-IR measurements that water molecules can be trapped inside the fibrils. PMID:22338639

  17. 2D Size Distribution of Chondrules and Chondritic Fragments of an Ordinary Chondrite from Lut Desert (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkhorsandi, H.; Mirnejad, H.

    2014-09-01

    2D size measurement of chondrules and chondiritic fragments of a meteorite from Lut desert of Iran is conducted. Chondrules exhibit a size range of 55-1800 µm (average 437 µm). Chondiritic fragments show a size range of 46-1220 µm (average 261 µm).

  18. An influence of solar activity on latitudinal distribution of atmospheric ozone and temperature in 2-D radiative-photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyominov, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of the 2-D radiative-photochemical model of the ozone layer at heights 0 to 60 km in the Northern Hemisphere there are revealed and analyzed in detail the characteristic features of the season-altitude-latitude variations of ozone and temperature due to changes of the solar flux during the 11 year cycle, electron and proton precipitations.

  19. Random bit generation at tunable rates using a chaotic semiconductor laser under distributed feedback.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Zhou; Li, Song-Sui; Zhuang, Jun-Ping; Chan, Sze-Chun

    2015-09-01

    A semiconductor laser with distributed feedback from a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is investigated for random bit generation (RBG). The feedback perturbs the laser to emit chaotically with the intensity being sampled periodically. The samples are then converted into random bits by a simple postprocessing of self-differencing and selecting bits. Unlike a conventional mirror that provides localized feedback, the FBG provides distributed feedback which effectively suppresses the information of the round-trip feedback delay time. Randomness is ensured even when the sampling period is commensurate with the feedback delay between the laser and the grating. Consequently, in RBG, the FBG feedback enables continuous tuning of the output bit rate, reduces the minimum sampling period, and increases the number of bits selected per sample. RBG is experimentally investigated at a sampling period continuously tunable from over 16 ns down to 50 ps, while the feedback delay is fixed at 7.7 ns. By selecting 5 least-significant bits per sample, output bit rates from 0.3 to 100 Gbps are achieved with randomness examined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology test suite.

  20. Study of the longitudinal distribution of power generated in a random distributed feedback Raman fibre laser with unidirectional pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Churkin, D V; El-Taher, A E; Vatnik, I D; Babin, Sergei A

    2012-09-30

    The longitudinal distribution of the Stokes-component power in a Raman fibre laser with a random distributed feedback and unidirectional pumping is measured. The fibre parameters (linear loss and Rayleigh backscattering coefficient) are calculated based on the distributions obtained. A numerical model is developed to describe the lasing power distribution. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  1. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nathan H.; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J.; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement.

  2. FBG feedback's effects on distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser's polarization modes' beat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunbo; Yu, Kuanglu; Lao, Yiqin; Cheng, Linghao; Wu, Chongqing; Zhao, Yao; Shang, Chao

    2015-09-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber optic laser has recently been extensively explored as a powerful sensor for various measurands, thanks to its high sensitivity, excellent signal-to-noise ratio, and inherent electronic magnetic immunity. The phase noise and linewidth of the laser's beat note limits this sensor's performances. We report in this letter, our recent experiments on noise reduction employing optical feedback from an external FBG. We also investigated the sensitivity reduction of the DBR sensor after feedback is introduced.

  3. Longevity of duct tape in residential air distribution systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D joints

    SciTech Connect

    Abushakra, Bass

    2002-05-30

    The aging tests conducted so far showed that duct tape tends to degrade in its performance as the joint it is applied to requires a geometrical description of a higher number of space dimensions (1-D, 2-D, 3-D). One-dimensional joints are the easiest to seal with duct tape, and thus the least to experience failure. Two-dimensional joints, such as the flexible duct core-to-collar joints tested in this study, are less likely to fail than three-dimensional collar-to-plenum joints, as the shrinkage could have a positive effect in tightening the joint. Three-dimensional joints are the toughest to seal and the most likely to experience failure. The 2-D flexible duct core-to-collar joints passed the six-month period of the aging test in terms of leakage, but with the exception of the foil-butyl tape, showed degradation in terms hardening, brittleness, partial peeling, shrinkage, wrinkling, delamination of the tape layers, flaking, cracking, bubbling, oozing and discoloration. The baking test results showed that the failure in the duct tape joints could be attributed to the type of combination of the duct tape and the material it is applied to, as the duct tape behaves differently with different substrates. Overall, the foil-butyl tape (Tape 4) had the best results, while the film tape (Tape 3) showed the most deterioration. The conventional duct tapes tested (Tape 1 and Tape 2) were between these two extremes, with Tape 2 performing better than Tape 1. Lastly, we found that plastic straps became discolored and brittle during the tests, and a couple of straps broke completely. Therefore, we recommend that clamping the duct-taped flexible core-to-collar joints should be done with metallic adjustable straps.

  4. Distribution of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 Polymorphisms Associated with Poor Metabolizer Phenotype in Five Amerindian Groups and Western Mestizos from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Flores, Joel; Torres-Reyes, Luis A.; Martínez-Cortés, Gabriela; Rubi-Castellanos, Rodrigo; Sosa-Macías, Martha; Muñoz-Valle, José F.; González-González, César; Ramírez, Angélica; Román, Raquel; Méndez, José L.; Barrera, Andrés; Torres, Alfredo; Medina, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Background: The distribution of polymorphisms in the CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genes allows inferring the potential risk for specific adverse drug reactions and lack of therapeutic effects in humans. This variability shows differences among human populations. The aim of this study was to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to a poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype in nonpreviously studied Amerindian groups and Mestizos (general admixed population) from Mexico. Methods: We detected by SNaPshot® different polymorphisms located in CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *6, *7, and *8) and CYP2C19 (*2, *3, *4 and *5) in western Mestizos (n=145) and five Amerindian groups from Mexico: Tarahumaras from the North (n=88); Purépechas from the Center (n=101); and Tojolabales (n=68), Tzotziles (n=88), and Tzeltales (n=20) from the Southeast. Genotypes were observed by capillary electrophoresis. The genetic relationships among these populations were estimated based on these genes. Results and Discussion: The wild-type allele (*1) of both genes was predominant in the Mexican populations studied. The most widely observed alleles were CYP2C19*2 (range, 0%–31%) and CYP2D6*4 (range, 1.2%–7.3%), whereas CYP2D6*3 was exclusively detected in Mestizos. Conversely, CYP2C19*4 and *5, as well as CYP2D6*3, *6, *7, and *8, were not observed in the majority of the Mexican populations. The Tarahumaras presented a high frequency of the allele CYP2C19*2 (31%) and of homozygotes *2/*2 (10.7%), which represent a high frequency of potentially PM phenotypes in this Amerindian group. The genetic distances showed high differentiation of Tarahumaras (principally for CYP2C19 gene). In general, a relative proximity was observed between most of the Amerindian, Mexican-Mestizo, and Latin-American populations. Conclusion: In general, the wild-type allele (*1) predominates in Mexican populations, outlining a relatively homogeneous distribution for CYP2C19 and CYP2D6. The exception is the Tarahumara group that displays a

  5. Method and Apparatus for Linewidth Reduction in Distributed Feedback or Distributed Bragg Reflector Semiconductor Lasers using Vertical Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony L. (Inventor); Hendricks, Herbert D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The linewidth of a distributed feedback semiconductor laser or a distributed Bragg reflector laser having one or more second order gratings is reduced by using an external cavity to couple the vertical emission back into the laser. This method and device prevent disturbance of the main laser beam. provide unobstructed access to laser emission for the formation of the external cavity. and do not require a very narrow heat sink. Any distributed Bragg reflector semiconductor laser or distributed feedback semiconductor laser that can produce a vertical emission through the epitaxial material and through a window in the top metallization can be used. The external cavity can be formed with an optical fiber or with a lens and a mirror of grating.

  6. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 1: Retrieval of 3-D distributions of NO2 and azimuth-dependent OVOC ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Koenig, T.; Sinreich, R.; Thomson, D.; Volkamer, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present an innovative instrument telescope and describe a retrieval method to probe three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of atmospheric trace gases that are relevant to air pollution and tropospheric chemistry. The University of Colorado (CU) two-dimensional (2-D) multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), oxygen dimer (O2-O2, or O4), and water vapor (H2O); nitrous acid (HONO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and iodine monoxide (IO) are among other gases that can in principle be measured. Information about aerosols is derived through coupling with a radiative transfer model (RTM). The 2-D telescope has three modes of operation: mode 1 measures solar scattered photons from any pair of elevation angle (-20° < EA < +90° or zenith; zero is to the horizon) and azimuth angle (-180° < AA < +180°; zero being north); mode 2 measures any set of azimuth angles (AAs) at constant elevation angle (EA) (almucantar scans); and mode 3 tracks the direct solar beam via a separate view port. Vertical profiles of trace gases are measured and used to estimate mixing layer height (MLH). Horizontal distributions are then derived using MLH and parameterization of RTM (Sinreich et al., 2013). NO2 is evaluated at different wavelengths (350, 450, and 560 nm), exploiting the fact that the effective path length varies systematically with wavelength. The area probed is constrained by O4 observations at nearby wavelengths and has a diurnal mean effective radius of 7.0 to 25 km around the instrument location; i.e., up to 1960 km2 can be sampled with high time resolution. The instrument was deployed as part of the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany, from 7 June to 6 July 2013. We present first measurements (modes 1 and 2 only) and describe a four-step retrieval to derive (a) boundary layer vertical profiles and MLH of NO2; (b

  7. Distribution of Feedback among Teacher and Students in Online Collaborative Learning in Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Cesar; Rochera, Maria Jose; de Gispert, Ines; Diaz-Barriga, Frida

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the characteristics and distribution of the feedback provided by the participants (a teacher and her students) in an activity organized inside a collaborative online learning environment. We analyse 853 submissions made by two groups of graduate students and their teacher (N1 = 629 & N2 = 224) involved in the collaborative…

  8. Method of making a nonplanar buried-heterostructure distributed-feedback laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, G.J.; Logan, R.A.; Temkin, H.; Wilt, D.P.

    1987-10-27

    This patent describes a method for making a distributed feedback laser. The method comprises forming a buried heterostructure on a substrate by sequential deposition of layers including an active layer and a cladding layer. The method comprises producing a grating structure on a nonplanar surface of the cladding layer.

  9. Fault-tolerant quantum computation and communication on a distributed 2D array of small local systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Imoto, N.; Koashi, M.

    2014-12-04

    We propose a scheme for distributed quantum computation with small local systems connected via noisy quantum channels. We show that the proposed scheme tolerates errors with probabilities ∼30% and ∼ 0.1% in quantum channels and local operations, respectively, both of which are improved substantially compared to the previous works.

  10. The reaction of Hg(6 3P1)+H2, D2, and HD: Product rotational and vibrational distributions; isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bras, N.; Jeannet, J. C.; Perrin, D.

    1987-07-01

    The initial vibrational and rotational state distributions of HgH and HgD products of Hg(6 3P1)+H2, D2, and HD have been determined. No isotope effect was observed for the vibrationless molecules or for HgH(v=1) but this effect appears for vibrationally excited HgD. The relative yields of the various reactions are reported for each vibrational level. In the reaction with HD, HgD is preferentially produced: [HgD]/[HgH]≂6.7.

  11. Distributed feedback terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers with dual periodicity gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, F.; Zanotto, S.; Pitanti, A.; Vitiello, M. S.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Tredicucci, A.

    2015-01-05

    We have developed terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers that exploit a double-periodicity distributed feedback grating to control the emission frequency and the output beam direction independently. The spatial refractive index modulation of the gratings necessary to provide optical feedback at a fixed frequency, and simultaneously, a far-field emission pattern centered at controlled angles, was designed through use of an appropriate wavevector scattering model. Single mode terahertz (THz) emission at angles tuned by design between 0° and 50° was realized, leading to an original phase-matching approach for highly collimated THz quantum cascade lasers.

  12. 3 dimensional distributions of NO2, CHOCHO, and HCHO measured by the University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS during MAD-CAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Sinreich, Roman; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    We present results of 2 dimensional Multi Axis-DOAS (2D-MAX-DOAS) measurements to infer 3-dimensional measurements of trace gases by characterizing boundary layer vertical profiles and near surface azimuth horizontal distribution of NO2 (14 angles covering 360°). We combine the established optimal estimation inversion with a new parameterization approach; the first method to derive NO2 tropospheric vertical profiles and boundary layer height and the second one to retrieve the azimuth horizontal distribution of near surface NO2 mixing ratios, both at multiple wavelengths (350 nm, 450 nm, and 560 nm). This was conducted for three cloud-free days in the framework of the intensive Multi Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany 2013. By retrieving NO2 at multiple wavelengths range-resolved distributions of NO2 are derived using an 'Onion-peeling' approach, i.e., exploiting the fact that the optical path lengths at different wavelengths probe different horizontal air masses. We also measure glyoxal (CHOCHO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) distributions, and present to our knowledge the first 3-dimesional trace-gas distribution measurements of CHOCHO by a ground-based instrument. We expand the 2D-MAX-DOAS capabilities to calculate azimuth ratios of HCHO-to-NO2 (RFN) and CHOCHO-to-NO2 (RGN) to pinpoint volatile organic compound (VOC) oxidation chemistry and CHOCHO-to-HCHO (RGF) ratios as an indicator of biogenic and/or anthropogenic VOC emissions. The results of RFN correlate well with RGN and we identify azimuth variations that indicate gradients in the VOC/NOx chemistry that leads to O3 and secondary aerosol production. While there is a clear diurnal pattern in the RFN and RGN, no such variations are observed in the RGF, which shows rather constant values below 0.04 throughout the day, consistent with previous measurements, and indicative of urban air masses.

  13. NLSE-based model of a random distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Sergey V.; Churkin, Dmitry V.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we propose a NLSE-based model of power and spectral properties of the random distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser. The model is based on coupled set of non-linear Schrödinger equations for pump and Stokes waves with the distributed feedback due to Rayleigh scattering. The model considers random backscattering via its average strength, i.e. we assume that the feedback is incoherent. In addition, this allows us to speed up simulations sufficiently (up to several orders of magnitude). We found that the model of the incoherent feedback predicts the smooth and narrow (comparing with the gain spectral profile) generation spectrum in the random DFB fiber laser. The model allows one to optimize the random laser generation spectrum width varying the dispersion and nonlinearity values: we found, that the high dispersion and low nonlinearity results in narrower spectrum that could be interpreted as four-wave mixing between different spectral components in the quasi-mode-less spectrum of the random laser under study could play an important role in the spectrum formation. Note that the physical mechanism of the random DFB fiber laser formation and broadening is not identified yet. We investigate temporal and statistical properties of the random DFB fiber laser dynamics. Interestingly, we found that the intensity statistics is not Gaussian. The intensity auto-correlation function also reveals that correlations do exist. The possibility to optimize the system parameters to enhance the observed intrinsic spectral correlations to further potentially achieved pulsed (mode-locked) operation of the mode-less random distributed feedback fiber laser is discussed.

  14. Phase-shifted distributed feedback laser with linearly chirped grating fabricated by reconstruction equivalent chirp technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianyan; Lu, Linlin; Li, Simin; Guo, Renjia; Shi, Yuechun; Chen, Xiangfei

    2014-09-01

    The phase-shifted distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor laser with linearly chirped grating based on reconstruction equivalent chirp (REC) technique is theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The asymmetric property of the lasing spectrum is analyzed according to the normalized threshold gain, and the different spectra from each facet of the laser are compared. Due to the low cost and fabrication flexibility, REC technique provides a promising way for the future practical applications of DFB lasers with chirped gratings.

  15. Electrically tunable terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on a two-sections interdigitated distributed feedback cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Turčinková, Dana; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme; Amanti, Maria Ines

    2015-03-30

    The continuous electrical tuning of a single-mode terahertz quantum cascade laser operating at a frequency of 3 THz is demonstrated. The devices are based on a two-section interdigitated third-order distributed feedback cavity. The lasers can be tuned of about 4 GHz at a constant optical output power of 0.7 mW with a good far-field pattern.

  16. Multimode distributed feedback laser emission in a dye-doped optically pumped polymer thin-film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, F.; Gindre, D.; Nunzi, J.-M.; Denis, C.; Dumarcher, V.; Fiorini-Debuisschert, C.; Kretsch, K. P.; Rocha, L.

    2004-11-01

    We report on particular features of thin film distributed feedback (DFB) lasers. Devices are optically pumped using a Lloyd-mirror interferometer. For a given DFB grating period, the number of lasing modes is film thickness dependent. Spectral content of the devices is analysed using planar waveguide theory. An excellent agreement between the theoretical transverse electric mode structure and the laser emission spectrum is found.

  17. Distributed feedback laser action from polymeric waveguides doped with oligo phenylene vinylene model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretsch, Kevin P.; Blau, Werner J.; Dumarcher, Vincent; Rocha, Licinio; Fiorini, Celine; Nunzi, Jean-Michel; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Tillmann, Hartwig; Hörhold, Hans-Heinrich

    2000-04-01

    We report lasing studies of poly(styrene) waveguides doped with amino- and cyano-substituted oligo phenylene vinylene (distyryl benzene) model compounds under picosecond excitation. Optical feedback is provided by distributed Bragg gratings formed in the film by interference patterns in the pump beam. We demonstrate broad tunability of laser emission in these materials and simultaneous lasing at two wavelengths separated by 23 nm. Tuning ranges of the model compounds are compared with previous experiments.

  18. Phase control by coating in 1. 5. mu. m distributed feedback lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Itaya, Y.; Ikegami, T.; Motosugi, G.; Wakita, K.

    1985-06-01

    The dependence of performances on facet phase in distributed feedback lasers was studied by changing SiN film thickness on the cleaved facet. The phase relative to the corrugation could be determined with the measurement of oscillating wavelength shift in a device with and without antireflection coating on the facets. Using the facet phase measured, we could adjust the film thickness so as to reduce the threshold current and to stabilize single longitudinal mode operation which oscillated at the Bragg wavelength.

  19. Impact of stratospheric aircraft on calculations of nitric acid trihydrate cloud surface area densities using NMC temperatures and 2D model constituent distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, David B.; Douglass, Anne R.

    1994-01-01

    A parameterization of NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) clouds is developed for use in 2D models of the stratosphere. The parameterization uses model distributions of HNO3 and H2O to determine critical temperatures for NAT formation as a function of latitude and pressure. National Meteorological Center temperature fields are then used to determine monthly temperature frequency distributions, also as a function of latitude and pressure. The fractions of these distributions which fall below the critical temperatures for NAT formation are then used to determine the NAT cloud surface area density for each location in the model grid. By specifying heterogeneous reaction rates as functions of the surface area density, it is then possible to assess the effects of the NAT clouds on model constituent distributions. We also consider the increase in the NAT cloud formation in the presence of a fleet of stratospheric aircraft. The stratospheric aircraft NO(x) and H2O perturbations result in increased HNO3 as well as H2O. This increases the probability of NAT formation substantially, especially if it is assumed that the aircraft perturbations are confined to a corridor region.

  20. All-Fiber Configuration Laser Self-Mixing Doppler Velocimeter Based on Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Wang, Dehui; Xiang, Rong; Zhou, Junfeng; Ma, Yangcheng; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Huanqin; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel velocimeter based on laser self-mixing Doppler technology has been developed for speed measurement. The laser employed in our experiment is a distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser, which is an all-fiber structure using only one Fiber Bragg Grating to realize optical feedback and wavelength selection. Self-mixing interference for optical velocity sensing is experimentally investigated in this novel system, and the experimental results show that the Doppler frequency is linearly proportional to the velocity of a moving target, which agrees with the theoretical analysis commendably. In our experimental system, the velocity measurement can be achieved in the range of 3.58 mm/s-2216 mm/s with a relative error under one percent, demonstrating that our novel all-fiber configuration velocimeter can implement wide-range velocity measurements with high accuracy. PMID:27472342

  1. Rapid and broad wavelength sweeping of standard telecommunication distributed feedback laser diode.

    PubMed

    Njegovec, Matej; Donlagic, Denis

    2013-06-01

    This Letter presents a method for the fast and broad wavelength sweeping of a standard setup of a diode's active region and its immediate vicinity, which contain the diode's optical feedback system. The selective and rapid heating of the active region is possible due to the confinement of the voltage drop to the active diode's region that has submicrometer thickness. Using the presented method and an off-the-shelf telecommunication distributed feedback laser diode, we demonstrate wavelength sweeps in excess of 10 nm that were completed in about 200 ns, while generating average optical power in excess of 50 mW. In spite of high-amplitude current-drive pulses, 6000 h continuous operation of the diode within such an operational regime did not show any significant degradation of the diode's performance.

  2. All-Fiber Configuration Laser Self-Mixing Doppler Velocimeter Based on Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuang; Wang, Dehui; Xiang, Rong; Zhou, Junfeng; Ma, Yangcheng; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Huanqin; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel velocimeter based on laser self-mixing Doppler technology has been developed for speed measurement. The laser employed in our experiment is a distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser, which is an all-fiber structure using only one Fiber Bragg Grating to realize optical feedback and wavelength selection. Self-mixing interference for optical velocity sensing is experimentally investigated in this novel system, and the experimental results show that the Doppler frequency is linearly proportional to the velocity of a moving target, which agrees with the theoretical analysis commendably. In our experimental system, the velocity measurement can be achieved in the range of 3.58 mm/s–2216 mm/s with a relative error under one percent, demonstrating that our novel all-fiber configuration velocimeter can implement wide-range velocity measurements with high accuracy. PMID:27472342

  3. All-Fiber Configuration Laser Self-Mixing Doppler Velocimeter Based on Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Wang, Dehui; Xiang, Rong; Zhou, Junfeng; Ma, Yangcheng; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Huanqin; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2016-07-27

    In this paper, a novel velocimeter based on laser self-mixing Doppler technology has been developed for speed measurement. The laser employed in our experiment is a distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser, which is an all-fiber structure using only one Fiber Bragg Grating to realize optical feedback and wavelength selection. Self-mixing interference for optical velocity sensing is experimentally investigated in this novel system, and the experimental results show that the Doppler frequency is linearly proportional to the velocity of a moving target, which agrees with the theoretical analysis commendably. In our experimental system, the velocity measurement can be achieved in the range of 3.58 mm/s-2216 mm/s with a relative error under one percent, demonstrating that our novel all-fiber configuration velocimeter can implement wide-range velocity measurements with high accuracy.

  4. Influence of anisotropic grain boundary properties on the evolution of grain boundary character distribution during grain growth—a 2D level set study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Håkan

    2014-12-01

    The present study elaborates on a 2D level set model of polycrystal microstructures that was recently established by adding the influence of anisotropic grain boundary energy and mobility on microstructure evolution. The new model is used to trace the evolution of grain boundary character distribution during grain growth. The employed level set formulation conveniently allows the grain boundary characteristics to be quantified in terms of coincidence site lattice (CSL) type per unit of grain boundary length, providing a measure of the distribution of such boundaries. In the model, both the mobility and energy of the grain boundaries are allowed to vary with misorientation. In addition, the influence of initial polycrystal texture is studied by comparing results obtained from a polycrystal with random initial texture against results from a polycrystal that initially has a cube texture. It is shown that the proposed level set formulation can readily incorporate anisotropic grain boundary properties and the simulation results further show that anisotropic grain boundary properties only have a minor influence on the evolution of CSL boundary distribution during grain growth. As anisotropic boundary properties are considered, the most prominent changes in the CSL distributions are an increase of general low-angle Σ1 boundaries as well as a more stable presence of Σ3 boundaries. The observations also hold for the case of an initially cube-textured polycrystal. The presence of this kind of texture has little influence over the evolution of the CSL distribution. Taking into consideration the anisotropy of grain boundary properties, grain growth alone does not seem to be sufficient to promote any significantly increased overall presence of CSL boundaries.

  5. Distributed mechanical feedback in arthropods and robots simplifies control of rapid running on challenging terrain.

    PubMed

    Spagna, J C; Goldman, D I; Lin, P-C; Koditschek, D E; Full, R J

    2007-03-01

    Terrestrial arthropods negotiate demanding terrain more effectively than any search-and-rescue robot. Slow, precise stepping using distributed neural feedback is one strategy for dealing with challenging terrain. Alternatively, arthropods could simplify control on demanding surfaces by rapid running that uses kinetic energy to bridge gaps between footholds. We demonstrate that this is achieved using distributed mechanical feedback, resulting from passive contacts along legs positioned by pre-programmed trajectories favorable to their attachment mechanisms. We used wire-mesh experimental surfaces to determine how a decrease in foothold probability affects speed and stability. Spiders and insects attained high running speeds on simulated terrain with 90% of the surface contact area removed. Cockroaches maintained high speeds even with their tarsi ablated, by generating horizontally oriented leg trajectories. Spiders with more vertically directed leg placement used leg spines, which resulted in more effective distributed contact by interlocking with asperities during leg extension, but collapsing during flexion, preventing entanglement. Ghost crabs, which naturally lack leg spines, showed increased mobility on wire mesh after the addition of artificial, collapsible spines. A bioinspired robot, RHex, was redesigned to maximize effective distributed leg contact, by changing leg orientation and adding directional spines. These changes improved RHex's agility on challenging surfaces without adding sensors or changing the control system.

  6. Positive and Negative Feedbacks and Free-Scale Pattern Distribution in Rural-Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alados, Concepción L.; Errea, Paz; Gartzia, Maite; Saiz, Hugo; Escós, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Depopulation of rural areas is a widespread phenomenon that has occurred in most industrialized countries, and has contributed significantly to a reduction in the productivity of agro-ecological resources. In this study, we identified the main trends in the dynamics of rural populations in the Central Pyrenees in the 20th C and early 21st C, and used density independent and density dependent models and identified the main factors that have influenced the dynamics. In addition, we investigated the change in the power law distribution of population size in those periods. Populations exhibited density-dependent positive feedback between 1960 and 2010, and a long-term positive correlation between agricultural activity and population size, which has resulted in a free-scale population distribution that has been disrupted by the collapse of the traditional agricultural society and by emigration to the industrialized cities. We concluded that complex socio-ecological systems that have strong feedback mechanisms can contribute to disruptive population collapses, which can be identified by changes in the pattern of population distribution. PMID:25474704

  7. Amplified spontaneous emission and distributed feedback lasing from a conjugated compound in various polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Naoto; Kawahira, Tetsuya; Sakai, Wataru

    2003-09-01

    This letter presents amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and distributed feedback (DFB) lasing of the conjugated compound, 1,4-bis[2-[4-[N,N-di(p-tolyl)amino]phenyl] vinyl]benzene, in various polymer matrices of poly(methylmethacrylate), poly(styrene) (PS), poly(vinyl butyral), poly(N-vinyl carbazole), and poly(methyl phenylsilane). Effective and large ASE intensity, lowest threshold, and maximum optical gain were measured in the PS matrix. Sharp DFB lasing with full width at half-maximum=0.6 nm was measured at 490 nm. The lasing wavelength of 490 nm was fitted well by the theoretically calculated value of 491 nm.

  8. Methods and evaluation of frequency aging in distributed-feedback laser diodes for rubidium atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Matthey, Renaud; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    Distributed-feedback laser diodes emitting at 780 nm have been evaluated, with respect to the aging of the injection current required for reaching the rubidium D2 resonance line. Results obtained for lasers operating in air and in vacuum for 9 months are reported. When operated at constant temperature, the laser current required for emission at the wavelength of the desired atomic resonance is found to decrease by 50 to 80 μA per month. The impact of this result on the lifetime and long-term performances of laser-pumped rubidium atomic clocks is discussed.

  9. Switching of lasing wavelength in a sol-gel laser with dynamic distributed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Balenko, V G; Trufanov, A N; Umanskii, B A; Dolotov, S M; Petukhov, V A

    2011-09-30

    A scheme of switching the lasing wavelength of active centres in a sol-gel matrix excited by external laser radiation is proposed. A distributed feedback is formed during pumping by using a right-angle prism due to the interference of the direct and reflected pump beams. The lasing wavelength is determined by the period of the interference pattern, which depends on the convergence angle of interfering beams. Control is performed by a liquid-crystal cell, which changes the pump radiation polarisation, and a birefringent prism. As a result, the convergence angle of interfering beams changes, leading to a change in the interference pattern period and the excited radiation wavelength.

  10. Sensitive absorption spectroscopy with a room-temperature distributed-feedback quantum-cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Namjou, K; Cai, S; Whittaker, E A; Faist, J; Gmachl, C; Capasso, F; Sivco, D L; Cho, A Y

    1998-02-01

    We report what we believe are the first spectroscopic measurements to be made with a room-temperature quantum-cascade distributed-feedback laser. Using wavelength modulation spectroscopy, we detected N(2)O and CH(4) in the chemical fingerprint wavelength range near 8microm . The noise equivalent absorbance for our measurement was 5 parts in 10(5), limited by excess amplitude modulation on the laser output, which corresponds to a 1-Hz bandwidth detection limit of 250 parts N(2)O in 10(9) parts N(2) in a 1-m path length.

  11. Distributed-feedback Terahertz Quantum-cascade Lasers with Laterally Corrugated Metal Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2005-01-01

    We report the demonstration of distributed-feedback terahertz quantum-cascade lasers based on a first-order grating fabricated via a lateral corrugation in a double-sided metal ridge waveguide. The phase of the facet reflection was precisely set by lithographically defined facets by dry etching. Single-mode emission was observed at low to moderate injection currents, although multimode emission was observed far beyond threshold owing to spatial hole burning. Finite-element simulations were used to calculate the modal and threshold characteristics for these devices, with results in good agreement with experiments.

  12. Two-dimensional colloid-based photonic crystals for distributed feedback polymer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mafouana, Rodrigue; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Hirlimann, Charles; Estournes, Claude; Dorkenoo, Kokou D.

    2004-11-08

    We report on a process to design highly ordered monolayers of two-dimensional photonic crystals, made of silica nanoparticules, that can be used for the development of organic optical devices. We have used a photopolymerization process to incorporate a dye gain medium into the nanoparticle layers in order to achieve a laser cavity. The high spatial coherence of the deposits allows for single-mode laser emission in the plane of the layer when the light excitation is perpendicular to the plane. Such periodic films should help in reducing the number of layers needed for future electrically pumped distributed feedback lasers.

  13. Multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyang; Dong, Xinyong; Jiang, Meng; Yu, Xia; Shum, Ping

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback via a 20-km-long single-mode fiber together with a Sagnac loop mirror. The number of channels can be modulated from 2 to 8 at room temperature when the pump power is changed from 30 to 180 mW, indicating that wavelength competition caused by homogenous gain broadening of erbium-doped fiber is significantly suppressed. Other advantages of the laser include low cost, low-threshold pump power and simple fabrication.

  14. Stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable distributed feedback laser for interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xuefeng; Zhou, Xinlei; Yu, Qingxu

    2016-02-01

    We describe a stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable Distributed Feedback (DFB) laser for quadrature demodulation of interferometric sensors. By introducing automatic lock quadrature point and wavelength periodically tuning compensation into an interferometric system, the operation point of interferometric system is stabilized when the system suffers various environmental perturbations. To demonstrate the feasibility of this stabilizing operation point technique, experiments have been performed using a tunable-DFB-laser as light source to interrogate an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric vibration sensor and a diaphragm-based acoustic sensor. Experimental results show that good tracing of Q-point was effectively realized.

  15. Method and apparatus for the operation of a distributed feedback laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, K.Y

    1989-05-30

    This patent describes an optical apparatus of the type including a distributed feedback semiconductor laser having a stop band in which laser oscillations are inhibited and beyond which laser oscillations can occur, the laser having controllable excitation biasing for two axially distinct portions of a path along which oscillations occur in the laser. The apparatus being characterized by means periodically varying the excitation biasing of one of the portions with respect to the excitation biasing of the other of the portions for controllably switching the laser oscillations across the stop band.

  16. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; García-Muñoz, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Tardini, G.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function f(v‖, v⊥). To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) light from the plasma centre in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of f(v‖, v⊥) agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated f(v‖, v⊥) are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of f(v‖, v⊥) at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we can measure spectra in up to seven views simultaneously in the next ASDEX Upgrade campaign which would further improve measurements of f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion.

  17. Single-frequency Yb-doped fiber laser with distributed feedback based on a random FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullina, S. R.; Vlasov, A. A.; Lobach, I. A.; Belai, O. V.; Shapiro, D. A.; Babin, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Single-frequency operation of a 1.03 μm fiber laser with random distributed feedback (RDFB) is demonstrated. The laser cavity is based on a 4 cm long fiber Bragg grating (FBG) consisting of 10 homogeneous subgratings with random phase and amplitude of refractive index modulation inscribed in a polarization maintaining (PM) Yb-doped fiber. Such RDFB laser generates single longitudinal mode with output power up to 25 mW, which is 3.5 times higher than that for a DFB laser based on regular π-shifted FBG of the same length in the same fiber. The single-frequency linewidth is measured to be  <100 kHz in both cases. The observed difference of the DFB and RDFB lasers is confirmed by numerical simulation showing different longitudinal distribution of intra-cavity radiation in these cases, analogous to those in the experiment.

  18. Gain recovery dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers with distributed feedback grating under assist light injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Cui; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Huilong; Zhang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The gain recovery dynamic characteristics of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with distributed feedback (DFB) grating are theoretically investigated. The interaction of the grating structure and the assist light is used to accelerate the gain recovery process in the SOA. The effects of the assist light that is injected into the SOA with DFB structure on the gain recovery dynamics, the steady-state carrier density, and field intensity distributions are analyzed, respectively. Results show that the recovery time in the DFB SOA is successfully reduced by injecting relatively high power assist light, whose wavelength is set at the gain region. Finally, under assist light injection, the effects of DFB grating on the gain recovery process are also discussed. It is shown that the gain recovery in the SOA with DFB grating is faster than that in the SOA without DFB grating. In addition, the coupling factor in the DFB grating structure can be optimized to shorten the gain recovery time.

  19. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H; Liu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  20. Microstrip-antenna-coupled distributed feedback terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Tsung-Yu; Cai, Xiaowei; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2013-12-01

    By introducing coupled microstrip antennas on THz Distributed Feedback (DFB) Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), the radiation efficiency of each feedback aperture is greatly enhanced. Single mode emission ~3 THz from a 31-period antenna-coupled third-order DFB laser yields ~4 times improvement in output power comparing with a corrugated thirdorder device fabricated on the same gain medium. This 31-period device has ~15×25° beam divergence and 4 mW pulsed power (4%) at 10 K with maximum lasing temperature (Tmax) at 134 K (pulsed). When phase matching condition is met, emissions from 81 apertures (4-mm long) are coherently combined to form a narrow beam with 12.5° divergence. Further experiment demonstrated the new device at 4 THz (25-period, ~18 μm×1-mm long. The 4 THz device reaches >8 mW pulsed power (10%) at 12 K with Tmax 109 K (pulsed) and >77 K (cw). The slope efficiency is 450 mW/A with 0.57% wall-plug. It is worth pointing out although the antennas would be excited differently, similar enhancement in out-coupling efficiency can also be observed in second-order surface-emitting THz DFB lasers. Begin the abstract two lines below author names and addresses.

  1. Working characteristics of external distributed feedback polymer lasers with varying waveguiding structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Shen, Su; Pu, Donglin; Wei, Guojun; Ye, Yan; Peng, Changsi; Chen, Linsen

    2015-12-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of second-order external distributed feedback (DFB) lasers based on blue-emitting polymer poly (9, 9-dioctyl-fluorene) (PFO). The relief grating prepared in the photo-resist layer on top of the gain medium was directly employed as the resonator. The effect of various structural parameters including the thickness of the active film, the thickness of the residue layer, and the depth of the relief grating on performance of these polymer lasers was investigated. An analytical approach based on the slab waveguiding theory and the Bragg condition was developed to accurately determine the lasing wavelength. We found that laser threshold increases monotonously as the thickness of the residue layer increases. The presence of the residue layer between the relief grating and the organic semiconductor layer weakens the strength of light coupling between the two layers, leading to a decreased gain for the specific lasing mode. The lowest laser threshold level of 80 μJ cm-2 was obtained when the thickness of the gain medium was around 250 nm, indicating an optimum balance between light feedback provided by the grating and optical amplification in the organic semiconductor. Our results not only provide insights into working mechanisms of external DFB polymer lasers, but also design rules for fabricating them.

  2. Distributed Compressive CSIT Estimation and Feedback for FDD Multi-User Massive MIMO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xiongbin; Lau, Vincent K. N.

    2014-06-01

    To fully utilize the spatial multiplexing gains or array gains of massive MIMO, the channel state information must be obtained at the transmitter side (CSIT). However, conventional CSIT estimation approaches are not suitable for FDD massive MIMO systems because of the overwhelming training and feedback overhead. In this paper, we consider multi-user massive MIMO systems and deploy the compressive sensing (CS) technique to reduce the training as well as the feedback overhead in the CSIT estimation. The multi-user massive MIMO systems exhibits a hidden joint sparsity structure in the user channel matrices due to the shared local scatterers in the physical propagation environment. As such, instead of naively applying the conventional CS to the CSIT estimation, we propose a distributed compressive CSIT estimation scheme so that the compressed measurements are observed at the users locally, while the CSIT recovery is performed at the base station jointly. A joint orthogonal matching pursuit recovery algorithm is proposed to perform the CSIT recovery, with the capability of exploiting the hidden joint sparsity in the user channel matrices. We analyze the obtained CSIT quality in terms of the normalized mean absolute error, and through the closed-form expressions, we obtain simple insights into how the joint channel sparsity can be exploited to improve the CSIT recovery performance.

  3. Surface emission from episide-down short distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Schartner, Stephan; Austerer, Maximilian; Schrenk, Werner; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Strasser, Gottfried

    2008-08-01

    Increased coupling is observed in distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers when placing a shallow second order grating between a continuous surface-plasmon layer and the active region. The combined effect of an air cladding and a metallic layer on the opposite sides of the waveguide increases the overlap with the grating region resulting in calculated coupling coefficients up to 100 cm(-1). The waveguide design was implemented by Au thermo-compression bonding after grating formation and subsequent backside processing of ridges with air claddings. Lasers as short as 176 microm show single-mode behavior with a side-mode-suppression-ratio of 20 dB and thresholds (10 kA/cm(2)) as well as output powers (> 150 mW) close to Fabry-Pérot device performances are reached for 360 microm long devices.

  4. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in ultra-long distributed feedback Bragg gratings in standard optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Loranger, Sébastien; Lambin-Iezzi, Victor; Wahbeh, Mamoun; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-04-15

    Distributed feedback (DFB) fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) are widely used as narrow-band filters and single-mode cavities for lasers. Recently, a nonlinear generation has been shown in 10-20 cm DFB gratings in a highly nonlinear fiber. First, we show in this Letter a novel fabrication technique of ultra-long DFBs in a standard fiber (SMF-28). Second, we demonstrate nonlinear generation in such gratings. A particular inscription technique was used to fabricate all-in-phase ultra-long FBG and to implement reproducible phase shift to form a DFB mode. We demonstrate stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) emission from this DFB mode and characterize the resulting laser. It seems that such a SBS based DFB laser stabilizes a pump's jittering and reduces its linewidth. PMID:27082348

  5. Diffused waveguiding capillary tube with distributed feedback for a gas laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    For use in a waveguide gas laser, a capillary tube of glass or ceramic has an inner surface defining a longitudinal capillary opening through which the laser gas flows. At least a portion of the inner surface is corrugated with corrugations or channels with a periodicity Lambda where Lambda = 1/2 Lambda, Lambda being the laser gas wavelength. The tube includes a diffused region extending outwardly from the opening. The diffused region of a depth d on the order of 1 Lambda to 3 Lambda acts as a waveguide for the waves, with the corrugations producing distributed feedback. The evanescent component of the waves traveling in the diffused region interact with the laser gas in the opening, gaining energy, and thereby amplifying the waves travelling in the diffused region, which exit the diffused region, surrounding the opening, as a beam of wavelength Lambda.

  6. Distributed feedback and random lasing in DCNP aggregates dispersed in a polymeric layer.

    PubMed

    Parafiniuk, Kacper; Sznitko, Lech; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report on the realization of random lasing (RL) and distributed feedback (DFB) lasing in a layer of luminescent 3-(1,1-dicyanoethenyl)-1-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole (DCNP) organic nonlinear optical dye that has been dispersed in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix. The RL phenomenon appears due to the presence of spontaneously formed micro- and nano-crystals of DCNP in the bulk of the PMMA during the sample preparation. DFB can be realized in an optical system by using degenerated two-wave mixing in the pumping beams. The period of the interference pattern can be easily changed by changing the intersection angle of the pumping beams, resulting in a real time, fully reversible method of DFB lasing emission tuning. Because of the two neighboring stimulated emission bands of DCNP, it is possible to tune the lasing wavelength over a long range of about 65 nm.

  7. Third-order photonic-crystal distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. C.; Liu, F. Q.; Wang, L. J.; Zhao, L. H.; Liu, W. F.; Liu, J. Q.; Li, L.; Wang, Z. G.

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate room-temperature operation of broad-area edge-emitting photonic-crystal distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers at λ ∼ 4.6 μm. The lasers use a weak-index perturbed third-order photonic-crystal lattice to control the optical mode in the wafer plane. Utilizing this coupling mechanism, the near-diffraction-limited beam quality with a far-field profile normal to the facet can be obtained. Single-mode operation with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 20 dB is achieved in the temperature range of 85-290 K. The single-facet output power is above 1 W for a 55 μm × 2.5 mm laser bar at 85 K in pulsed mode.

  8. High-resolution transversal load sensor using a random distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMiguel-Soto, V.; Leandro, D.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a new application of random distributed feedback lasers to fiber optic sensing has been presented. The particular properties of these lasers, such as the lack of longitudinal modes and high stability, have been exploited to monitor transversal load using a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG), obtaining a resolution of 1g and a sensitivity of 3.95GHz/Kg. Due to the PS-FBG birefringence and the load-interrelated transmission lines generated by the PS-FBG along the orthogonal polarization directions, the beating of the two emission lines generated in the laser can be monitored in the electrical domain. As a result, transversal load applied on the sensor can be measured.

  9. Optofluidic distributed feedback lasers with evanescent pumping: Reduced threshold and angular dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Markus; Whitworth, Guy L.; Schubert, Marcel; Dietrich, Christof P.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.; Turnbull, Graham A.; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate an evanescently pumped water-based optofluidic distributed feedback (DFB) laser with a record low pump threshold of ETH=520 n J . The low threshold results from an optimized mode shape, which is achieved by a low refractive index substrate, and from the use of a mixed-order DFB grating. Investigating the photonic band structure via angular dispersion analysis both above and below lasing threshold allows us to measure the refractive index of the liquid gain layer and to determine the device parameters such as the waveguide core layer thickness. We show that it is possible to tailor the divergence of the lasing emission by varying the number of second order grating periods used for outcoupling.

  10. Gain-coupled distributed feedback laser based on periodic surface anode canals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Jia, Peng; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Li; Chen, Hong; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Xing; Shan, Xiaonan; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2015-10-20

    A single-longitude-mode, broad-stripe, gain-coupled, distributed-feedback laser based on periodic surface anode canals (PSACs) is demonstrated. The PSACs, produced by i-line lithography, enhance the contrast of periodic current density in the active layer without introducing effective photon coupling; calculated grating κL is only 0.026. Power of 144.6 mW at 968.8 nm, with spectrum linewidth less than 0.04 nm on every uncoated cleavage facet, is obtained at a current of 1.2 A with a side-mode suppression ratio >29  dB. PMID:26560371

  11. Physically transient photonics: random versus distributed feedback lasing based on nanoimprinted DNA.

    PubMed

    Camposeo, Andrea; Del Carro, Pompilio; Persano, Luana; Cyprych, Konrad; Szukalski, Adam; Sznitko, Lech; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-10-28

    Room-temperature nanoimprinted, DNA-based distributed feedback (DFB) laser operation at 605 nm is reported. The laser is made of a pure DNA host matrix doped with gain dyes. At high excitation densities, the emission of the untextured dye-doped DNA films is characterized by a broad emission peak with an overall line width of 12 nm and superimposed narrow peaks, characteristic of random lasing. Moreover, direct patterning of the DNA films is demonstrated with a resolution down to 100 nm, enabling the realization of both surface-emitting and edge-emitting DFB lasers with a typical line width of <0.3 nm. The resulting emission is polarized, with a ratio between the TE- and TM-polarized intensities exceeding 30. In addition, the nanopatterned devices dissolve in water within less than 2 min. These results demonstrate the possibility of realizing various physically transient nanophotonics and laser architectures, including random lasing and nanoimprinted devices, based on natural biopolymers.

  12. Distributed-feedback interband cascade lasers with reduced contact duty cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, C. D.; Bewley, W. W.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Warren, M. V.; Vurgaftman, I.; Meyer, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the single-mode operation of mid-infrared distributed-feedback (DFB) interband cascade lasers (ICLs) with contacts that cover only a fraction of the top surface of the laser ridge. This reduces the optical loss from the metal for the GaSb-relevant device configuration in which the grating is fabricated in the top layer of the DFB laser. Continuous wave (cw) room-temperature operation in a single spectral mode is observed for contact duty cycles as small as 14% when the width of the contact is fixed at 10 μm. The reduced contact duty cycle results in a factor of 2 decrease in the threshold current. The highest slope efficiency is observed for a contact duty cycle of 33%, for which the cw single-mode output power is as high as 6.8 mW.

  13. Reconfigurable Optical Signal Processing Based on a Distributed Feedback Semiconductor Optical Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Deng, Ye; Tang, Jian; Sun, Shuqian; Yao, Jianping; Azaña, José; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-01-01

    All-optical signal processing has been considered a solution to overcome the bandwidth and speed limitations imposed by conventional electronic-based systems. Over the last few years, an impressive range of all-optical signal processors have been proposed, but few of them come with reconfigurability, a feature highly needed for practical signal processing applications. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an analog optical signal processor based on a phase-shifted distributed feedback semiconductor optical amplifier (DFB-SOA) and an optical filter. The proposed analog optical signal processor can be reconfigured to perform signal processing functions including ordinary differential equation solving and temporal intensity differentiation. The reconfigurability is achieved by controlling the injection currents. Our demonstration provitdes a simple and effective solution for all-optical signal processing and computing. PMID:26813252

  14. Influence of the UV-induced fiber loss on the distributed feedback fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Bai; Qiao, Qiquan; Chen, Jialing; Lin, Zunqi

    2003-06-01

    It was found that the output power of the distributed feedback fiber lasers would be improved after annealing or left unused for several days after the laser had been fabricated, and the output of the fundamental mode would not increase but be clamped while the ±1 order modes would be predominant with the enhancement of the coupling coefficient during the fabrication. The paper discussed the influence of UV-induced fiber loss on the fiber phase-shifted DFB lasers. Due to the gain saturation and fiber internal loss, which included the temperament loss and permanent loss, there was an optimum coupling coefficient for the DFB fiber lasers that the higher internal fiber loss corresponded to the lower optimum values of coupling coefficient.

  15. Blue surface-emitting distributed feedback lasers based on TPD-doped films.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Eva M; Villalvilla, Jose M; Boj, Pedro G; Quintana, Jose A; Postigo, Pablo A; Díaz-García, María A

    2010-01-20

    Single-mode second-order distributed feedback (DFB) lasers with low threshold, based on polystyrene films doped with 30 wt. % of the hole-transporting organic molecule N,N'-bis (3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) are reported. The laser emission wavelength was tuned between 415 and 427 nm by film thickness variation. The effectiveness of the DFB grating in improving the laser performance is evidenced by the observation of linewidths and laser thresholds lower than those of the amplified spontaneous emission characteristics shown by films without gratings. The use of holographic lithography as the technique for grating recording has allowed us to prepare large samples in a fast, versatile, and simple manner.

  16. Distributed feedback GaSb based laser diodes with buried grating

    SciTech Connect

    Gaimard, Q.; Cerutti, L.; Teissier, R.; Vicet, A.

    2014-04-21

    We report on the growth, fabrication, and experimental study of distributed feed-back antimonide diode lasers with buried grating. A second order index-coupled grating was defined by interferometric lithography on the top of the laser waveguide and dry etched by reactive ion etching. The grating was then buried thanks to an overgrowth of the top cladding layer using molecular beam epitaxy. The wafer was then processed using standard photolithography and wet etching into 15 μm-wide laser ridges. Single frequency laser emission at a wavelength of 2.2 μm was measured with a side mode suppression ratio of 34 dB, a maximum output power of 30 mW, and a total continuous tuning range of 6.5 nm.

  17. Monolithically integrated distributed feedback laser array wavelength-selectable light sources for WDM-PON application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Zhao, Jianyi; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Xiaodong; Cao, Mingde; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wen

    2015-01-01

    The monolithic integration of 1.5-μm four channels phase shift distributed feedback lasers array (DFB-LD array) with 4×1 multi-mode interference (MMI) optical combiner is demonstrated. A home developed process mainly consists of butt-joint regrowth (BJR) and simultaneous thermal and ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (STU-NIL) is implemented to fabricate gratings and integrated devices. The threshold currents of the lasers are less than 10 mA and the side mode suppression ratios (SMSR) are better than 40 dB for all channels. Quasi-continuous tuning is realized over 7.5 nm wavelength region with the 30 °C temperature variation. The results indicate that the integration device we proposed can be used in wavelength division multiplexing passive optical networks (WDM-PON).

  18. Efficient Third-Order Distributed Feedback Laser with Enhanced Beam Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor); Kao, Tsung-Yu (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A third-order distributed feedback laser has an active medium disposed on a substrate as a linear array of segments having a series of periodically spaced interstices therebetween and a first conductive layer disposed on a surface of the active medium on each of the segments and along a strip from each of the segments to a conductive electrical contact pad for application of current along a path including the active medium. Upon application of a current through the active medium, the active medium functions as an optical waveguide, and there is established an alternating electric field, at a THz frequency, both in the active medium and emerging from the interstices. Spacing of adjacent segments is approximately half of a wavelength of the THz frequency in free space or an odd integral multiple thereof, so that the linear array has a coherence length greater than the length of the linear array.

  19. Voltage tunable multiple quantum well distributed feedback filter with an electron beam written Schottky grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, O.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Singh, J.; Brock, T.

    1994-08-01

    A novel optoelectronic filter voltage-tunable characteristics has been developed and implemented in a multiquantum well waveguide device. By virtue of the quantum-confined Stark effect, the refractive index in quantum wells at the periphery of a guiding region can be given a periodicity in the guiding direction by application of a bias on an electron-beam patterned Schottky grating atop the guide. If the period of the Schottky grating and associated index profile satisfies the Bragg condition, as in a resonant distributed feedback structure, band-reject filtering results. Aftering the bias on the Schottky grating changes the refractive index in the wells, thereby providing tunability of the wavelength at which Bragg diffraction occurs.

  20. Reconfigurable Optical Signal Processing Based on a Distributed Feedback Semiconductor Optical Amplifier.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Deng, Ye; Tang, Jian; Sun, Shuqian; Yao, Jianping; Azaña, José; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-01-27

    All-optical signal processing has been considered a solution to overcome the bandwidth and speed limitations imposed by conventional electronic-based systems. Over the last few years, an impressive range of all-optical signal processors have been proposed, but few of them come with reconfigurability, a feature highly needed for practical signal processing applications. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an analog optical signal processor based on a phase-shifted distributed feedback semiconductor optical amplifier (DFB-SOA) and an optical filter. The proposed analog optical signal processor can be reconfigured to perform signal processing functions including ordinary differential equation solving and temporal intensity differentiation. The reconfigurability is achieved by controlling the injection currents. Our demonstration provitdes a simple and effective solution for all-optical signal processing and computing.

  1. Distributed feedback lasing from electrically tunable dye-doped polymer-liquid crystal transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhno, O. V.; Gritsai, Y.; Stumpe, J.

    2014-11-01

    In the present work we report low-threshold distributed feedback (DFB) lasing from electrically tunable holographic polymer-liquid crystal transmission gratings of POLIPHEM type doped with pyrromethene 567. Due to their uniform droplet-free micro-morphology, the POLIPHEM gratings possess high diffraction efficiency and excellent optical quality. Second-order lasing with a threshold of ~0.8 µJ/pulse and a bandwidth of ~1 nm was achieved under the excitation of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm. The laser emission wavelength was tuned from 572-625 nm by varying the grating period. Application of an electric field switches off or tunes the lasing intensity. An electrically-induced blue-shift of the output laser emission was observed.

  2. The Effects of Computerized Auditory Feedback on Electronic Article Surveillance Tag Placement in an Auto-Parts Distribution Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goomas, David T.

    2008-01-01

    In this report from the field, computerized auditory feedback was used to inform order selectors and order selector auditors in a distribution center to add an electronic article surveillance (EAS) adhesive tag. This was done by programming handheld computers to emit a loud beep for high-priced items upon scanning the item's bar-coded Universal…

  3. Business Activity Monitoring: Real-Time Group Goals and Feedback Using an Overhead Scoreboard in a Distribution Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goomas, David T.; Smith, Stuart M.; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Companies operating large industrial settings often find delivering timely and accurate feedback to employees to be one of the toughest challenges they face in implementing performance management programs. In this report, an overhead scoreboard at a retailer's distribution center informed teams of order selectors as to how many tasks were…

  4. Immediate Feedback on Accuracy and Performance: The Effects of Wireless Technology on Food Safety Tracking at a Distribution Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goomas, David T.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of wireless ring scanners, which provided immediate auditory and visual feedback, were evaluated to increase the performance and accuracy of order selectors at a meat distribution center. The scanners not only increased performance and accuracy compared to paper pick sheets, but were also instrumental in immediate and accurate data…

  5. Laterally Coupled Distributed-Feedback GaSb-Based Diode Lasers for Atmospheric Gas Detection at 2 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Ksendzov, Alexander; Franz, Kale J.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate single-mode laterally coupled distributed-feedback diode lasers at 2.05 microns employing low-loss etched gratings. Single-facet CW output exceeds 50 mW near room temperature with linewidth below 1 MHz over 10-ms observation times

  6. Feedback of forest distribution on the simulated climate of the metropolitan region of Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Juliane; Gálos, Borbála; Rechid, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Regional climate change projections show a changing climate in the metropolitan region of Hamburg for the end of the century: The temperature could increase and the precipitation in summer could decrease. To cope with the probably longer lasting and hotter summer conditions in Europe there are different possible adaptation measures in land management practice, e.g. forest conversion. That means the conversion of mostly coniferous forest monocultures to deciduous and mixed forests. Mixed forests are generally more adaptable in comparison to conifer forests. They ensure an increased groundwater recharge because of less canopy interception and reduced transpiration outside the growing season. An interesting question is how forest conversion would feedback to the regional climate under different climate conditions. To explore climate feedbacks, REMO (regional climate model at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg) is applied. To get a more realistic representation of the land surface, a current dataset from a digital basis landscape model of the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy is used instead of the standard representation of the land surface in REMO. In some areas of the metropolitan region of Hamburg the updated land surface increases the forest fraction. Additionally, all coniferous forest types are converted into broadleaf forest types to study the maximum impact on the simulated near surface climate. This set-up is used for a climate simulation with REMO, forced by ERA-INTERIM reanalysis data for the period of 1990-2008. Selected climate variables are analyzed and the associated processes are investigated: The different forest distributions affect particularly the evapotranspiration and thus the water- and energy cycle of the soil and the lower atmosphere. Especially, the effects in the very hot and dry year 2003 and in the wet year 2002 are analyzed. To study the impacts of the forest distributions under different climate conditions, a

  7. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  8. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  9. Mode switching in a multi-wavelength distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using an external micro-cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Sidler, Meinrad; Rauter, Patrick; Blanchard, Romain; Métivier, Pauline; Capasso, Federico; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Wang, Christine; Huang, Yong; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D.; Faist, Jérôme

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a multi-wavelength distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating in a lensless external micro-cavity and achieve switchable single-mode emission at three distinct wavelengths selected by the DFB grating, each with a side-mode suppression ratio larger than 30 dB. Discrete wavelength tuning is achieved by modulating the feedback experienced by each mode of the multi-wavelength DFB QCL, resulting from a variation of the external cavity length. This method also provides a post-fabrication control of the lasing modes to correct for fabrication inhomogeneities, in particular, related to the cleaved facets position.

  10. A GaAs-based self-aligned stripe distributed feedback laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, H.; Stevens, B. J.; Fry, P. W.; Babazadeh, N.; Ternent, G.; Childs, D. T.; Groom, K. M.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate operation of a GaAs-based self-aligned stripe (SAS) distributed feedback (DFB) laser. In this structure, a first order GaInP/GaAs index-coupled DFB grating is built within the p-doped AlGaAs layer between the active region and the n-doped GaInP opto-electronic confinement layer of a SAS laser structure. In this process no Al-containing layers are exposed to atmosphere prior to overgrowth. The use of AlGaAs cladding affords the luxury of full flexibility in upper cladding design, which proved necessary due to limitations imposed by the grating infill and overgrowth with the GaInP current block layer. Resultant devices exhibit single-mode lasing with high side-mode-suppression of >40 dB over the temperature range 20 °C-70 °C. The experimentally determined optical profile and grating confinement correlate well with those simulated using Fimmwave.

  11. Acoustic Emission Source Location Using a Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser Rosette

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE) source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ) DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location. PMID:24141266

  12. Optically pumped distributed feedback thin film waveguide lasers with multiwavelength and polarized emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Chen, F.; Li, R.; Dong, H.; Fan, J.; Zhang, L.; Shi, L.; Wong, K. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Zirconia titania organically modified silicate (ZrO2-TiO2-ORMOSIL) thin film waveguides of thickness from 0.4 to 7.0 μm were synthesized using low temperature sol-gel method. Narrow linewidth distributed feedback (DFB) lasing was demonstrated in rhodamine 6G-doped ZrO2-TiO2-ORMOSIL waveguides. Simultaneous tuning of multiple-output wavelengths was achieved in the dye-doped waveguides by varying the period of the gain modulation generated by a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. As many as eight separate output wavelengths were observed for a planar ZrO2-TiO2-ORMOSIL waveguide of thickness 7.0-μm. The output polarizations of the DFB waveguide lasers can be tuned by varying the polarization of the crossing pump beams. TE and TM optical waves belonging to the same propagation mode were generated by crossing two polarized pump beams, resulting in an effective double of the number of output wavelengths. Continuous tuning of the polarized laser outputs was also achieved by varying the crossing angle.

  13. Characterization of AlInGaN-based 405nm distributed feedback laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, S.; Tsukayama, K.; Yanamoto, T.; Kozaki, T.; Nagahama, S.; Mukai, T.

    2008-02-01

    The first-order AlInGaN 405 nm distributed feed-back (DFB) laser diodes were grown on the low dislocation freestanding GaN substrates by a metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. The first-order diffractive grating whose period was 80 nm was formed into an n-type cladding layer. The fine tooth shape grating was obtained by the EB lithography and the dry etching. No additional threading dislocation could be found at the regrowth interface. As a result, we succeeded in demonstrating the first-order AlInGaN based 405 nm DFB laser diodes under cw operation. The threshold current and the slope efficiency were 22 mA and 1.44 W/A under continuous wave operation at 25 °C, respectively. The single longitudinal mode emission was maintained up to an output power of 60 mW. The fundamental transverse mode operation with a single longitudinal mode was observed in the temperature range from 15 °C to 85 °C at an output power of 30 mW. The lifetime was estimated to be 4000 h by the lifetime test which was carried out under the condition of a constant output power of 30mW at 25 °C for 1000 h. The single longitudinal mode emission was maintained for the life tested DFB laser diodes.

  14. Modeling and analysis of distributed feedback quantum dot passively mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Javad; Ahmadi, Vahid; Yavari, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate numerically two proposed monolithic distributed feedback quantum dot passively mode-locked lasers (DFB-QDMLLs) with and without gratings in the saturable absorber (SA) section in order to enhance two important performances of QDMLLs for ultrahigh-bit-rate and single-mode applications. We find out that depending on the length of the grating, optical pulses with durations of about 3-8 ps at approximately 2nd and 4th harmonics of cavity round-trip frequencies can be generated by the proposed structures. We also compare the temporal and spectral behaviors of these structures under specified bias conditions and SA lengths. It is shown that DFB-QDMLLs have the ability to generate optical pulses with more peak power than grating-embedded saturable absorber (GESA-DFB-QDMLL) structures which generate shorter pulses with narrower spectral bandwidths. We also show that DFB-QDMLLs operate in a larger range of absorber voltages while the other structure is very sensitive to absorber voltage and operates well for middle ranges of this parameter.

  15. Detection of methyl mercaptan with a 3393-nm distributed feedback interband cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhui; Zhen, Weimeng; Zhang, Zheyuan; Li, Jinyi; Gao, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Attention has been focused recently on the harmful effects and malodor of methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), so it is desired to detect CH3SH in situ, sensitively, and selectively. We detected methyl mercaptan via tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) with a room-temperature distributed feedback interband cascade laser emitting around 3393 nm and a hollow waveguide gas cell with 5 m length. The fundamental characteristic fingerprint absorptions of CH3SH from 3260 to 3400 nm were examined, and the spectral line 3393.584 nm (corresponding to the ν 2 C-H symmetric stretch) was determined to be the optimum for CH3SH detection. The response characteristics of the TLAS system were established by implementing a set of CH3SH concentration gradient experiments with wavelength-scanned direct absorption spectroscopy. The results show that CH3SH TLAS spectra are in excellent agreement with spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory database; the TLAS response linearity is 0.987, and the detection limit is as low as 25 ppbv (parts per billion by volume, 10-9) with integrated time 1.84 s, corresponding to an absorbance of 1.34 × 10-4 (near the theoretical detection limit). Overall, the TLAS system is a robust method for CH3SH monitoring of industrial waste gas emissions.

  16. Highly stable solution processed metal-halide perovskite lasers on nanoimprinted distributed feedback structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Philipp; Stulz, Mareike; Kapp, Dorothee; Abzieher, Tobias; Paetzold, Ulrich W.; Quintilla, Aina; Howard, Ian A.; Kalt, Heinz; Lemmer, Uli

    2016-10-01

    We report on the performance and stability of distributed feedback lasers based on the solution-processed methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3). The CH3NH3PbI3 layers are processed via solution-casting in ambient atmosphere onto nanoimprinted second order Bragg gratings. This way, we achieve highly polarized surface-emitted lasing at room temperature with a linewidth of less than 0.2 nm and a laser threshold of 120 kW/cm2. The lasing is stable; no change in the laser emission within 15 h of pulsed excitation with a repetition rate of 1 kHz (corresponding to >5 × 107 pulses) is observed, exceeding the stability achieved for solution processed organic semiconductor lasers. Furthermore, adjustment of the grating period allowed the lasing wavelength to be varied over the entire bandwidth of the amplified spontaneous emission (between 781 and 794 nm). The fabrication process of nanoimprinting followed by solution-casting of the gain material demonstrates that stable CH3NH3PbI3 lasers are compatible with scalable production technologies and offers a route towards electrically pumped diode architectures.

  17. Output characteristics of organic distributed feedback lasers with varying grating heights

    SciTech Connect

    Döring, Sebastian Rabe, Torsten; Stumpe, Joachim

    2014-06-30

    In this study, we examine the influence of the corrugation height of surface relief gratings on the output characteristics of organic distributed feedback (DFB) lasers. A series of surface relief gratings with a constant corrugation period (410 nm) and variable corrugation heights ranging from 20 and 80 nm are fabricated by the illumination of a new developed photosensitive azobenzene containing material with an interference pattern. A blend of poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(1,4-benzo(2,1′,3)-thiadiazol)] and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] is used as organic laser active material which is deposited by spin-coating onto the grating array. The investigation of the laser output characteristics reveals an increase of the slope efficiency by a factor of 4 from 0.8% to 3.7% due to an increase of the grating height. The laser threshold decreases only slightly from 8.5 μJ/cm{sup 2} to 6.0 μJ/cm{sup 2} with increasing corrugation height. We interpret this as a result of the change of coupling between light mode and grating. The study helps to relate this to loss mechanisms of the DFB lasing process. This enables a further optimization of the DFB laser design.

  18. A high-order external distributed feedback polymer laser with low working threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Pu, Donglin; Yang, Xiaofei; Wei, Guojun; Fang, Zongbao; Zhou, Xiaohong; Qiao, Wen; Chen, Linsen

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report a high-order distributed feedback (DFB) polymer laser with low working threshold. Using the high-order grating increases the lithographic tolerances, providing coherent light sources that are more amenable to mass-manufacturing techniques, such as laser direct writing lithography and roll-to-roll processing. To enable high-order DFB lasing, an unconventional working configuration is designed in which the grating is situated on top of the uniform conjugated polymer film. In addition, a novel Forster energy transfer blend of two conjugated polymers is used as the gain medium. Upon pumping, the device emits lasing around 603.6 nm with a bandwidth of 0.5 nm. The threshold is around 20.5 μJ cm-2 (~2.56 kW cm-2), about to enter the regime of inexpensive LED pumping. A further increase in pump energy results in simultaneous oscillations at the 29th and 30th Bragg orders. Operating principles of the high-order DFB polymer laser, including spectral performance and threshold dependence on pump length, are investigated. This approach represents a step towards low-cost, even ‘disposable’ polymer lasers.

  19. Acoustic emission source location using a distributed feedback fiber laser rosette.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE) source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ) DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location. PMID:24141266

  20. Rf-modulation of mid-infrared distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Hinkov, Borislav; Hugi, Andreas; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2016-02-22

    We present the electrical and optical characterization and theoretical modeling of the transient behavior of regular 4.5-μm single-mode emitting distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). Low residual capacitance together with a high-frequency optimized three-terminal coplanar waveguide configuration leads to modulation frequencies up to 23.5 GHz (optical) and 26.5 GHz (electrical), respectively. A maximum 3-dB cut-off value of 6.6 GHz in a microwave rectification scheme is obtained, with a significant increase in electrical modulation bandwidth when increasing the DC-current for the entire current range of the devices. Optical measurements by means of FTIR-spectroscopy and a heterodyne beating experiment reveal the presence of a resonance peak, due to coupling of the lasing DFB- with its neighboring below-threshold Fabry-Pérot-(FP-)mode, when modulating around the cavity roundtrip frequency. This resonance is modeled by a 2-mode Maxwell-Bloch formalism. It enhances only one sideband and consequently leads to the first experimental observation of the single-sideband regime in such kind of devices.

  1. Surface-Emitting Distributed Feedback Terahertz Quantum-Cascade Lasers in Metal-Metal Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Williams, Benjamin S.; Qin, Qi; Lee, Alan W. M.; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2007-01-01

    Single-mode surface-emitting distributed feedback terahertz quantumcascade lasers operating around 2.9 THz are developed in metal-metal waveguides. A combination of techniques including precise control of phase of reflection at the facets, and u e of metal on the sidewalls to eliminate higher-order lateral modes allow robust single-mode operation over a range of approximately 0.35 THz. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern is obtained using a pi phase-shift in center of the second-order Bragg grating. A grating device operating at 2.93 THz lased up to 149 K in pulsed mode and a temperature tuning of 19 .7 GHz was observed from 5 K to 147 K. The same device lased up to 78 K in continuous-wave (cw) mode emitting more than 6 m W of cw power at 5 K. ln general, maximum temperature of pulsed operation for grating devices was within a few Kelvin of that of multi-mode Fabry-Perot ridge lasers

  2. A GaAs-based self-aligned stripe distributed feedback laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, H.; Stevens, B. J.; Fry, P. W.; Babazadeh, N.; Ternent, G.; Childs, D. T.; Groom, K. M.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate operation of a GaAs-based self-aligned stripe (SAS) distributed feedback (DFB) laser. In this structure, a first order GaInP/GaAs index-coupled DFB grating is built within the p-doped AlGaAs layer between the active region and the n-doped GaInP opto-electronic confinement layer of a SAS laser structure. In this process no Al-containing layers are exposed to atmosphere prior to overgrowth. The use of AlGaAs cladding affords the luxury of full flexibility in upper cladding design, which proved necessary due to limitations imposed by the grating infill and overgrowth with the GaInP current block layer. Resultant devices exhibit single-mode lasing with high side-mode-suppression of >40 dB over the temperature range 20 °C–70 °C. The experimentally determined optical profile and grating confinement correlate well with those simulated using Fimmwave.

  3. A high-order external distributed feedback polymer laser with low working threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Pu, Donglin; Yang, Xiaofei; Wei, Guojun; Fang, Zongbao; Zhou, Xiaohong; Qiao, Wen; Chen, Linsen

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report a high-order distributed feedback (DFB) polymer laser with low working threshold. Using the high-order grating increases the lithographic tolerances, providing coherent light sources that are more amenable to mass-manufacturing techniques, such as laser direct writing lithography and roll-to-roll processing. To enable high-order DFB lasing, an unconventional working configuration is designed in which the grating is situated on top of the uniform conjugated polymer film. In addition, a novel Forster energy transfer blend of two conjugated polymers is used as the gain medium. Upon pumping, the device emits lasing around 603.6 nm with a bandwidth of 0.5 nm. The threshold is around 20.5 μJ cm‑2 (~2.56 kW cm‑2), about to enter the regime of inexpensive LED pumping. A further increase in pump energy results in simultaneous oscillations at the 29th and 30th Bragg orders. Operating principles of the high-order DFB polymer laser, including spectral performance and threshold dependence on pump length, are investigated. This approach represents a step towards low-cost, even ‘disposable’ polymer lasers.

  4. AGN Feedback: Radio-Loudness Distribution and the Kinetic Luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Franca, Fabio; Melini, Gabriele; Fiore, Fabrizio

    We have studied the AGN radio emission from the largest existing compilation of hard X-ray selected samples, all observed in the 1.4 GHz band. A total of more than 1600 AGN have been used. For the first time, it was possible to almost completely measure the probability distribution function of the ratio between the radio and the X-ray luminosity RX , which has been function-ally fitted as dependent from the X-ray luminosity and redshift. These measures have allowed us to estimate the AGN kinetic luminosity function and its evo-lution. It results that, in agreement with previous estimates, the efficiency kin in converting the accreted mass energy into kinetic power (LK = kin mc2 ) is on average kin ˜5 × 10-3 . ˙ The derived value and evolution of the kinetic energy density is in qualitative agreement with some of the last generation galaxy evolution models, where radio mode AGN feedback is invoked to quench the star formation in galaxies and slow down the cooling flows in galaxy clusters.

  5. Fast BPM data distribution for global orbit feedback using commercial gigabit ethernet technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hulsart, R.; Cerniglia, P.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2011-03-28

    In order to correct beam perturbations in RHIC around 10Hz, a new fast data distribution network was required to deliver BPM position data at rates several orders of magnitude above the capability of the existing system. The urgency of the project limited the amount of custom hardware that could be developed, which dictated the use of as much commercially available equipment as possible. The selected architecture uses a custom hardware interface to the existing RHIC BPM electronics together with commercially available Gigabit Ethernet switches to distribute position data to devices located around the collider ring. Using the minimum Ethernet packet size and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based state machine logic instead of a software based driver, real-time and deterministic data delivery is possible using Ethernet. The method of adapting this protocol for low latency data delivery, bench testing of Ethernet hardware, and the logic to construct Ethernet packets using FPGA hardware will be discussed. A robust communications system using almost all commercial off-the-shelf equipment was developed in under a year which enabled retrofitting of the existing RHIC BPM system to provide 10 KHz data delivery for a global orbit feedback scheme using 72 BPMs. Total latencies from data acquisition at the BPMs to delivery at the controller modules, including very long transmission distances, were kept under 100 {micro}s, which provide very little phase error in correcting the 10 Hz oscillations. Leveraging off of the speed of Gigabit Ethernet and wide availability of Ethernet products enabled this solution to be fully implemented in a much shorter time and at lower cost than if a similar network was developed using a proprietary method.

  6. Distributions for negative-feedback-regulated stochastic gene expression: dimension reduction and numerical solution of the chemical master equation.

    PubMed

    Zeron, Eduardo S; Santillán, Moisés

    2010-05-21

    In this work we introduce a novel approach to study biochemical noise. It comprises a simplification of the master equation of complex reaction schemes (via an adiabatic approximation) and the numerical solution of the reduced master equation. The accuracy of this procedure is tested by comparing its results with analytic solutions (when available) and with Gillespie stochastic simulations. We further employ our approach to study the stochastic expression of a simple gene network, which is subject to negative feedback regulation at the transcriptional level. Special attention is paid to the influence of negative feedback on the amplitude of intrinsic noise, as well as on the relaxation rate of the system probability distribution function to the steady solution. Our results suggest the existence of an optimal feedback strength that maximizes this relaxation rate.

  7. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  8. Distributed feedback interband cascade lasers for applications in research and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeth, J.; von Edlinger, M.; Scheuermann, J.; Nähle, L.; Hildebrandt, L.; Fischer, M.; Weih, R.; Kamp, M.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of laser sources in gas sensing applications has been increasing continuously. Tunable Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TLAS) has proven to be a versatile tool in a variety of sectors including industry, health and security and modern environmental analysis. Especially the mid-infrared wavelength range is of great interest for high accuracy gas sensing applications, since many technologically and industrially relevant gas species have their strongest absorption features in the spectral region between 3 and 6 μm. These include, e. g., important hydrocarbons like methane or propane, as well as nitric oxide and formaldehyde. Interband cascade lasers (ICL) provide mono mode continuous wave (CW) operation above room temperature in this wavelength range. Application-grade complex coupled distributed feedback (DFB) laser devices based on the ICL concept are presented, using lateral metal gratings as wavelength selective elements. The fabricated devices operate at specific, technologically relevant, emission wavelengths in the spectral region from 3 to 6 μm. CW operation up to 80 °C and mono mode wavelength tuning ranges above 20 nm were achieved with low energy consumption. Application examples in industry and research are presented that demonstrate the high potential of DFB ICLs for the use in TLAS. E. g., formaldehyde gas sensor systems based on DFB ICL devices operating around 3.6 μm can provide realtime in-situ measurements with resolution limits in the low ppb range, even in dense background atmospheres. The low power consumption of ICL based devices makes them especially favorable for battery-powered or portable sensor applications.

  9. Surface-plasmon-enhanced lasing emission based on polymer distributed feedback laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dingke E-mail: shijianchen@gmail.com; Chen, Shijian E-mail: shijianchen@gmail.com; Huang, Yingzhou; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Ma, Dongge

    2015-01-14

    Optical losses associated with the metallic contacts necessary for charge injection are an obstacle to the development of electrically pumped organic lasers. In this work, we show that it is possible to overcome these losses by introducing surface plasmons (SPs) in a distributed feedback laser to enhance the lasing emission. We perform a detailed study of the SPs influence on the lasing emission. We experimentally show that enhanced lasing emission has been successfully achieved in the presence of a metal electrode. The laser emission is strongly dependent on the thickness of Ag layer. By optimizing the thickness of Ag layer, surface-plasmon-enhanced lasing emission has been achieved with much reduced thresholds and higher intensity. When the thickness of the Ag layer increases to 50 nm, the device exhibits ten-fold emission intensity and a fifth of excitation threshold comparing with Ag-free one. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) results show that large field intensity is built at the 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-i-propyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran:/poly(9-vinylcarbazole)Ag interface, which could lead to a strong coupling between lasing and SPs, and consequently a much enhanced laser emission at the photon energy of around 2.02 eV (615 nm). Our FDTD simulations gave an explanation of the effects of the SPs on lasing operation in the periodic structures. The use of SPs would lead to a new class of highly efficient solid-state laser sources and provide a new path to achieve electrically pumped organic lasers.

  10. Antarctic ozone decrease: Possible impact on the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of total ozone as simulated by a 2-D model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Rodriguez, Jose M.

    1988-01-01

    Satellite borne instruments, the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet spectrometer (SBUV), show that total column ozone has decreased by more than 5 percent in the neighborhood of 60 S at all seasons since 1979. This is considerably larger than the decrease calculated by 2-D models which take into account solar flux variation and increases of trace gas concentrations over the same period. The meteorological conditions (warmer temperature and the apparent lack of polar stratospheric clouds) at these latitudes do not seem to favor heterogeneous chemistry as the direct cause for the observed ozone reduction. A mechanism involving the seasonal transport of ozone-poor air mass from within the polar vortex to lower latitudes (the so-called dilution effect) is proposed as a possible explanation for the observed year-round ozone reduction in regions away from the vortex.

  11. Relationships of Obesity and Fat Distribution With atherothrombotic Risk Factors: Baseline Results From the Bypass angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BaRI 2D) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine B.; Lu, Jiang; Mooradian, Arshag D.; Krone, Ronald J.; Nesto, Richard W.; Porter, Marty H.; Rana, Jamal S.; Rogers, William J.; Sobel, Burton E.; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of obesity on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and established coronary artery disease (CAD) is controversial; whether BMI and/or waist circumference correlate with atherothrombotic risk factors in such patients is uncertain. We sought to evaluate whether higher BMI or waist circumference are associated with specific risk factors among 2,273 Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) study participants with T2DM and documented CAD (baseline data, mean age 62 years, 66% non-Hispanic white, 71% men). Multiple linear regression models were constructed after adjusting for sex, age, race/ ethnicity, US vs. non-US site, diabetes duration, exercise, smoking, alcohol, and relevant medication use. First-order partial correlations of BMI with risk factors after controlling for waist circumference and of waist circumference with risk factors after controlling for BMI were also evaluated. Ninety percent of the patients were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m2); 68% of men and 89% of women had high-risk waist circumference measures (≥102 and ≥88 cm, respectively). BMI and waist circumference, in separate models, explained significant variation in metabolic (insulin, lipids, blood pressure (BP)) and inflammatory/procoagulation (C-reactive protein, PAI-1 activity and antigen, and fibrinogen) risk factors. In partial correlation analyses BMI was independently associated with BP and inflammatory/procoagulation factors, waist circumference with lipids, and both BMI and waist circumference with insulin. We conclude that, in cross-sectional analyses, both BMI and waist circumference, independently, are associated with increased atherothrombotic risk in centrally obese cohorts such as the BARI 2D patients with T2DM and CAD. PMID:19875998

  12. Performance Analysis of Positive-feedback-based Active Anti-islanding Schemes for Inverter-Based Distributed Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Pengwei; Aponte, Erick E.; Nelson, J. Keith

    2010-06-14

    Recently proposed positive-feedback-based anti-islanding schemes (AI) are highly effective in preventing islanding without causing any degradation in power quality. This paper aims to analyze the performance of these schemes quantitatively in the context of the dynamic models of inverter-based distributed generators (DG). In this study, the characteristics of these active anti-islanding methods are discussed and design guidelines are derived.

  13. Generation of intense 10-ps, 193-nm pulses using simple distributed feedback dye lasers and an ArF(*) amplifier.

    PubMed

    Hatten, D L; Cui, Y; Iii, W T; Mikes, T; Goldhar, J

    1992-11-20

    A pair of holographic distributed feedback dye lasers is used to generate 10-ps pulses at two selected wavelengths that are mixed in a BBO crystal to produce a pulse ~ 10 ps in duration at 193 nm. This seed pulse is subsequently amplified in an ArF(*) excimer laser to an energy of 10-15 mJ with <40 microJ in amplified spontaneous emission. The pulses are nearly transform limited and diffraction limited.

  14. Net Metering and Market Feedback Loops: Exploring the Impact of Retail Rate Design on Distributed PV Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naïm R.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Mills, Andrew

    2015-01-13

    The substantial increase in deployment of customer-sited solar photovoltaics (PV) in the United States has been driven by a combination of steeply declining costs, financing innovations, and supportive policies. Among those supportive policies is net metering, which in most states effectively allows customers to receive compensation for distributed PV generation at the full retail electricity price. The current design of retail electricity rates and the presence of net metering have elicited concerns that the possible under-recovery of fixed utility costs from PV system owners may lead to a feedback loop of increasing retail prices that accelerate PV adoption and further rate increases. However, a separate and opposing feedback loop could offset this effect: increased PV deployment may lead to a shift in the timing of peak-period electricity prices that could reduce the bill savings received under net metering where time-varying retail electricity rates are used, thereby dampening further PV adoption. In this paper, we examine the impacts of these two competing feedback dynamics on U.S. distributed PV deployment through 2050 for both residential and commercial customers, across states. Our results indicate that, at the aggregate national level, the two feedback effects nearly offset one another and therefore produce a modest net effect, although their magnitude and direction vary by customer segment and by state. We also model aggregate PV deployment trends under various rate designs and net-metering rules, accounting for feedback dynamics. Our results demonstrate that future adoption of distributed PV is highly sensitive to retail rate structures. Whereas flat, time-invariant rates with net metering lead to higher aggregate national deployment levels than the current mix of rate structures (+5% in 2050), rate structures with higher monthly fixed customer charges or PV compensation at levels lower than the full retail rate can dramatically erode aggregate customer

  15. Infrared image processing devoted to thermal non-contact characterization-Applications to Non-Destructive Evaluation, Microfluidics and 2D source term distribution for multispectral tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batsale, Jean-Christophe; Pradere, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    The cost of IR cameras is more and more decreasing. Beyond the preliminary calibration step and the global instrumentation, the infrared image processing is then one of the key step for achieving in very broad domains. Generally the IR images are coming from the transient temperature field related to the emission of a black surface in response to an external or internal heating (active IR thermography). The first applications were devoted to the so called thermal Non-Destructive Evaluation methods by considering a thin sample and 1D transient heat diffusion through the sample (transverse diffusion). With simplified assumptions related to the transverse diffusion, the in-plane diffusion and transport phenomena can be also considered. A general equation can be applied in order to balance the heat transfer at the pixel scale or between groups of pixels in order to estimate several fields of thermophysical properties (heterogeneous field of in-plane diffusivity, flow distributions, source terms). There is a lot of possible strategies to process the space and time distributed big amount of data (previous integral transformation of the images, compression, elimination of the non useful areas...), generally based on the necessity to analyse the derivative versus space and time of the temperature field. Several illustrative examples related to the Non-Destructive Evaluation of heterogeneous solids, the thermal characterization of chemical reactions in microfluidic channels and the design of systems for multispectral tomography, will be presented.

  16. Distributed feedback lasing from a composite poly(phenylene vinylene)-nanoparticle one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Puzzo, Daniel P; Scotognella, Francesco; Zavelani-Rossi, Margherita; Sebastian, Maria; Lough, Alan J; Manners, Ian; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Tubino, Riccardo; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticle one-dimensional photonic crystals exhibit intense, broadband reflectivity coupled with a unique mesoporosity. The latter property allows for infiltration of the one-dimensional photonic crystal with functional materials, such as emitting polymers, which in turn can lead to the fabrication of composites whereby the emitter's emission can be modulated by the photon density of states of the photonic crystal. We exploit this interaction in order to produce efficient distributed feedback lasing from a composite poly(phenylene vinylene)-infiltrated nanoparticle one-dimensional photonic crystal.

  17. Frequency noise of free-running 4.6 μm distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tombez, L; Di Francesco, J; Schilt, S; Di Domenico, G; Faist, J; Thomann, P; Hofstetter, D

    2011-08-15

    The frequency noise properties of commercial distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers emitting in the 4.6 μm range and operated in cw mode near room temperature (277 K) are presented. The measured frequency noise power spectral density reveals a flicker noise dropping down to the very low level of <100 Hz(2)/Hz at 10 MHz Fourier frequency and is globally a factor of 100 lower than data recently reported for a similar laser operated at cryogenic temperature. This makes our laser a good candidate for the realization of a mid-IR ultranarrow linewidth reference. PMID:21847176

  18. Nanoimprinted polymer lasers with threshold below 100 W/cm2 using mixed-order distributed feedback resonators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Tsiminis, Georgios; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Skabara, Peter J; Samuel, Ifor D W; Turnbull, Graham A

    2013-06-17

    Organic semiconductor lasers were fabricated by UV-nanoimprint lithography with thresholds as low as 57 W/cm(2) under 4 ns pulsed operation. The nanoimprinted lasers employed mixed-order distributed feedback resonators, with second-order gratings surrounded by first-order gratings, combined with a light-emitting conjugated polymer. They were pumped by InGaN LEDs to produce green-emitting lasers, with thresholds of 208 W/cm(2) (102 nJ/pulse). These hybrid lasers incorporate a scalable UV-nanoimprint lithography process, compatible with high-performance LEDs, therefore we have demonstrated a coherent, compact, low-cost light source.

  19. Statistical characteristics of raindrop size distributions observed in East China during the Asian summer monsoon season using 2-D video disdrometer and Micro Rain Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Long; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Guifu; Xue, Ming; Zhou, Bowen; Liu, Su; Chen, Xingchao

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) and vertical structures of rainfall during the Asian summer monsoon season in East China are studied using measurements from a ground-based two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD) and a vertically pointing Micro Rain Radar (MRR). Based on rainfall intensity and vertical structure of radar reflectivity, the observed rainfall is classified into convective, stratiform, and shallow precipitation types. Among them, shallow precipitation has previously been ignored or treated as outliers due to limitations in traditional surface measurements. Using advanced instruments of 2DVD and MRR, the characteristics of shallow precipitation are quantified. Furthermore, summer rainfall in the study region is found to consist mainly of stratiform rain in terms of frequency of occurrence but is dominated by convective rain in terms of accumulated rainfall amount. Further separation of the summer season into time periods before, during, and after the Meiyu season reveals that intrasummer variation of DSDs is mainly due to changes in percentage occurrence of the three precipitation types, while the characteristics of each type remain largely unchanged throughout the summer. Overall, higher raindrop concentrations and smaller diameters are found compared to monsoon precipitation at other locations in Asia. Higher local aerosol concentration is speculated to be the cause. Finally, rainfall estimation relationships using polarimetric radar measurements are derived and discussed. These new relationships agree well with rain gauge measurements and are more accurate than traditional relations, especially at high and low rain rates.

  20. Feedback shift register sequences versus uniformly distributed random sequences for correlation chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaljurand, M.; Valentin, J. R.; Shao, M.

    1996-01-01

    Two alternative input sequences are commonly employed in correlation chromatography (CC). They are sequences derived according to the algorithm of the feedback shift register (i.e., pseudo random binary sequences (PRBS)) and sequences derived by using the uniform random binary sequences (URBS). These two sequences are compared. By applying the "cleaning" data processing technique to the correlograms that result from these sequences, we show that when the PRBS is used the S/N of the correlogram is much higher than the one resulting from using URBS.

  1. Multigroup 3-Dimensional Neutron Diffusion Nodal Code System with Thermohydraulic Feedbacks.

    1994-02-07

    Version 01 GNOMER is a program which solves the multigroup neutron diffusion equation on coarse mesh in 1D, 2D, and 3D Cartesian geometry. The program is designed to calculate the global core power distributions (with thermohydraulic feedbacks) as well as power distributions and homogenized cross sections over a fuel assembly.

  2. Regimes of external optical feedback in 5.6 μm distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jumpertz, L.; Carras, M.; Schires, K.; Grillot, F.

    2014-09-29

    External optical feedback is studied experimentally in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. These structures exhibit a dynamical response close to that observed in interband lasers, with threshold reduction and optical power enhancement when increasing the feedback ratio. The study of the optical spectrum proves that the laser undergoes five distinct regimes depending on the phase and amplitude of the reinjected field. These regimes are mapped in the plane of external cavity length and feedback strength, revealing unstable behavior only for a very narrow range of operation, making quantum cascade lasers much more stable than their interband counterparts.

  3. Flat acoustic sources with frequency response correction based on feedback and feed-forward distributed control.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an acoustic source with a small thickness and high bending stiffness. The high bending stiffness is obtained with a sandwich structure in which the face of the sandwich structure internal to the source is perforated to increase the acoustic compliance, thereby leading to increased electroacoustic conversion efficiency. Multiple actuators are used to drive the moving component of the acoustic source. Control of the acoustic resonances and structural resonances is required to obtain an even frequency response. The use of collocated decentralized feedback control based on velocity sensing was found to be ineffective for controlling these resonances due to the destabilizing asymmetric modes caused by the coupling of the internal acoustic cavity and the rigid body vibration of the moving component. Resonances can be controlled by a set of independent combinations of symmetric driving patterns with corresponding velocity feedback controllers such that the fundamental mass-air resonance is effectively controlled, as is the lowest bending mode of the moving component. Finally, a compensation scheme for low frequencies is used which enables a flat frequency response in the range of 30 Hz to 1 kHz with deviations smaller than 3 dB.

  4. Distributed task-specific processing of somatosensory feedback for voluntary motor control

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Mohsen; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Pruszynski, J Andrew; Scott, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Corrective responses to limb disturbances are surprisingly complex, but the neural basis of these goal-directed responses is poorly understood. Here we show that somatosensory feedback is transmitted to many sensory and motor cortical regions within 25 ms of a mechanical disturbance applied to the monkey’s arm. When limb feedback was salient to an ongoing motor action (task engagement), neurons in parietal area 5 immediately (~25 ms) increased their response to limb disturbances, whereas neurons in other regions did not alter their response until 15 to 40 ms later. In contrast, initiation of a motor action elicited by a limb disturbance (target selection) altered neural responses in primary motor cortex ~65 ms after the limb disturbance, and then in dorsal premotor cortex, with no effect in parietal regions until 150 ms post-perturbation. Our findings highlight broad parietofrontal circuits that provide the neural substrate for goal-directed corrections, an essential aspect of highly skilled motor behaviors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13141.001 PMID:27077949

  5. Positive feedback produces broad distributions in maximum activation attained within a narrow time window in stochastic biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2013-03-01

    Stochastic fluctuations in biochemical reactions can regulate single cell decision processes. Using exact solutions and semi-analytical methods we calculate distributions of the maximum value (N) of species concentrations (Pmax (N)) and the time (t) taken to reach the maximum value (Pmax (t)) in minimal models of stochastic chemical reactions commonly found in cell signaling systems. We find, the presence of positive feedback interactions make Pmax (N) more spread out with a higher ``peakedness'' in Pmax (t) . Thus positive feedback interactions may help single cells to respond sensitively to a stimulus when cell decision processes require upregulation of activated forms of key proteins to a threshold number within a time window. Moreover, unlike other models of strongly correlated random variables such as Brownian walks or fluctuating interfaces, the extreme value distributions for the chemical reactions display multiscaling behavior emphasizing the presence of many time scales in cell signaling kinetics. This work was funded by the Research Institute at the Nationwide Children's Hospital and a grant (1R56AI090115-01A1) from the NIH.

  6. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  7. Far-wing excitation study of the reactions in the Hg-H2 collisional quasimolecules. II. Rovibrational distributions of HgH, HgD (X 2Sigma + ) formed from Hg-H2, D2, HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, K.; Takahashi, T.; Chiba, H.; Saito, K.; Nakamura, T.; Okunishi, M.; Ueda, K.; Sato, Y.

    1996-11-01

    We have applied the laser-pump/probe and double-beam absorption/dispersion approaches to the far wings of the Hg 3P1-1S0 resonance line broadened by collisions with H2, D2, and HD. Absolute reduced absorption coefficients of the Hg-D2 quasimolecules have been determined as a function of the wave-number shift Δ from the resonance-line center both in the red and blue wings. The nascent rotational distributions have been determined for the v=0 and 1 levels of HgH (X 2Σ+) and the v=0 level of HgD (X 2Σ+) formed from the Hg*(3P1)-H2, D2, and HD collisional-quasimolecular states à and B˜ attained by the red- and blue-wing excitation, respectively. Both of the intermediate states à and B˜ give quite similar rotational distributions peaking around N≂18 for HgH and N≂25 for HgD insensitive to the excitation-wave-number shift Δ. However, a small difference is found: the red-wing excitation gives larger populations in the low-N levels than the blue-wing one. The departing atom isotope effect is observed in these low-N populations of HgD from Hg-D2 and Hg-HD. The absolute ratio of the nascent yields of v=1 to 0 has been measured to be 0.3, being nearly constant against Δ in both the red and blue wings. These observations indicate that HgH is formed predominantly from a bent H-Hg-H configuration on both the pathways via the à and B˜ states. The different type of transition state, however, may be encountered on the pathways producing the minor components in the low-N levels.

  8. Distributed feedback fiber laser for sub-nanostrain-resolution static strain measurement by use of swept beat-frequency demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2015-07-01

    Fiber laser has the advantages of ultra-narrow linewidth, low phase and intensity noise, which is beneficial for ultra-high-resolution strain sensing. This paper presents a novel demodulation technique for sub-nanostrain-resolution static strain measurement based on two distributed feedback fiber lasers (DFB FLs). A commercial PZT-tunable laser is used to interrogate the DFB FLs and get the periodic frequency-difference characteristics (two linear chrip signals) by swept beat-frequency principle. Two polarization controllers are used for adjusting the polarization direction of DFB FLs. And one of the two DFB FLs is used for temperature compensation and eliminating the frequency shift influence of the commercial laser. Static strain is demodulated by calculating the difference of the direct current (DC) components of the two swept beat-frequency signals. A static-strain resolution of 0.88 nɛ is obtained in the laboratory test.

  9. Method and apparatus for generating coherent radiation in the ultra-violet region and above by use of distributed feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Helium in the superfluid state emits copious amounts of radiation in the ultraviolet region when excited by an electron stream. Conventional laser action using mirrors is impossible in superfluid helium because there are no mirrors that will reflect VUV radiation. By utilizing the distributed feedback method, the superfluid helium can be made to lase. By setting up a standing wave in superfluid helium that has a wavelength equal to, or harmonically related to, half the wavelength of the photon radiation chosen to be emitted as laser radiation by the superfluid helium, the need for end mirrors to produce reflection of the laser radiation is eliminated and reflection occurs instead at the wavefronts of the standing wave. The photons leave the superfluid helium at right angles to the standing wave as coherent radiation having a very high intensity. The standing wave established in the superfluid helium may be an acoustical standing wave, a thermal standing wave (second sound), or an electric standing wave.

  10. Wavelength tuning and thermal dynamics of continuous-wave mid-infrared distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombez, Lionel; Cappelli, Francesco; Schilt, Stéphane; Di Domenico, Gianni; Bartalini, Saverio; Hofstetter, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    We report on the wavelength tuning dynamics in continuous-wave distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). The wavelength tuning response for direct current modulation of two mid-IR QCLs from different suppliers was measured from 10 Hz up to several MHz using ro-vibrational molecular resonances as frequency-to-intensity converters. Unlike the output intensity, which can be modulated up to several gigahertz, the frequency-modulation bandwidth was found to be on the order of 200 kHz, limited by the laser thermal dynamics. A non-negligible roll-off and a significant phase shift are observed above a few hundred hertz already and explained by a thermal model.

  11. [Mid-infrared distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic detection of trace methane gas].

    PubMed

    Tan, Song; Liu, Wan-feng; Wang, Li-jun; Zhang, Jin-chuan; Li, Lu; Liu, Jun-qi; Liu, Feng-qi; Wang, Zhan-guo

    2012-05-01

    There have been considerable interests in methane detection based on infrared absorption spectroscopy for industrial and environment monitoring. The authors report on the realization of photoacoustic detection of methane (CH4) using mid-infrared distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL). The absorption line at 1316.83 cm(-1) was selected for CH4 detection, which can be reached by the self-manufactured DFB-QCL source operating in pulsed mode near 7.6 microm at room-temperature. The CH4 gas is filled to a Helmholtz resonant photoacoustic cell, which was equipped with a commercial electret microphone. The DFB-QCL was operated at 234 Hz with an 80 mW optical peak power. A detection limit of 189 parts per billion in volume was derived when the signal-to-noise ratio equaled 1. PMID:22827065

  12. Hydrogen peroxide detection with quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy using a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Jiang, Wenzhe; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Patimisco, Pietro; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Zah, Chung-en; Xie, Feng; Hughes, Lawrence C.; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2014-01-01

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor system was developed for the sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using its absorption transitions in the v6 fundamental band at ˜7.73 μm. The recent availability of distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers provides convenient access to a strong H2O2 absorption line located at 1295.55 cm-1. Sensor calibration was performed by means of a water bubbler that generated titrated average H2O2 vapor concentrations. A minimum detection limit of 12 parts per billion (ppb) corresponding to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 4.6 × 10-9 cm-1W/Hz1/2 was achieved with an averaging time of 100 s.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide detection with quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy using a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Wei Jiang, Wenzhe; Tittel, Frank K.; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Griffin, Robert J.; Patimisco, Pietro; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Zah, Chung-en; Xie, Feng; Hughes, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-27

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor system was developed for the sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) using its absorption transitions in the v{sub 6} fundamental band at ∼7.73 μm. The recent availability of distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers provides convenient access to a strong H{sub 2}O{sub 2} absorption line located at 1295.55 cm{sup −1}. Sensor calibration was performed by means of a water bubbler that generated titrated average H{sub 2}O{sub 2} vapor concentrations. A minimum detection limit of 12 parts per billion (ppb) corresponding to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 4.6 × 10{sup −9} cm{sup −1}W/Hz{sup 1/2} was achieved with an averaging time of 100 s.

  14. [Mid-infrared distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic detection of trace methane gas].

    PubMed

    Tan, Song; Liu, Wan-feng; Wang, Li-jun; Zhang, Jin-chuan; Li, Lu; Liu, Jun-qi; Liu, Feng-qi; Wang, Zhan-guo

    2012-05-01

    There have been considerable interests in methane detection based on infrared absorption spectroscopy for industrial and environment monitoring. The authors report on the realization of photoacoustic detection of methane (CH4) using mid-infrared distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL). The absorption line at 1316.83 cm(-1) was selected for CH4 detection, which can be reached by the self-manufactured DFB-QCL source operating in pulsed mode near 7.6 microm at room-temperature. The CH4 gas is filled to a Helmholtz resonant photoacoustic cell, which was equipped with a commercial electret microphone. The DFB-QCL was operated at 234 Hz with an 80 mW optical peak power. A detection limit of 189 parts per billion in volume was derived when the signal-to-noise ratio equaled 1.

  15. Trace-gas detection in ambient air with a thermoelectrically cooled, pulsed quantum-cascade distributed feedback laser.

    PubMed

    Kosterev, A A; Tittel, F K; Gmachl, C; Capasso, F; Sivco, D L; Baillargeon, J N; Hutchinson, A L; Cho, A Y

    2000-12-20

    A pulsed quantum-cascade distributed feedback laser operating at near room temperature was used for sensitive high-resolution IR absorption spectroscopy of ambient air at a wavelength of approximately 8 microm. Near-transform-limited laser pulses were obtained owing to short (approximately 5-ns) current pulse excitation and optimized electrical coupling. Fast and slow computer-controlled frequency scanning techniques were implemented and characterized. Fast computer-controlled laser wavelength switching was used to acquire second-derivative absorption spectra. The minimum detectable absorption was found to be 3 x 10(-4) with 10(5) laser pulses (20-kHz repetition rate), and 1.7 x 10(-4) for 5 x 10(5) pulses, based on the standard deviation of the linear regression analysis.

  16. Fabrication-tolerant 1310 nm laterally-coupled distributed feedback lasers with high side mode suppression ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, R.; Dridi, K.; Benhsaien, A.; Schriemer, H.; Hinzer, K.; Hall, T.

    2010-11-10

    A laterally-coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) laser was designed and fabricated using stepper lithography. Such DFB lasers eliminate the need of the commonly required re-growth steps in a conventional DFB laser fabrication process. With LC-DFB lasers, the grating can be lithographically patterned out of the ridge waveguide. High order gratings can enhance the lithographic tolerance for lower resolution patterning, yielding lasers more amenable to mass-manufacturing. 1310 nm InGaAsP/InP LC-DFB laser with third-order gratings was fabricated using i-line 5x stepper lithography. Excellent side mode suppression ratio over 52 dB has been measured with a single mode lasing around 1310 nm.

  17. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  18. Fine structures in the broadened line of distributed feedback lasers under high-speed direct modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikuni, Y.; Matsuoka, T.; Motosugi, G.; Yamanaka, N.

    1984-10-15

    Precise observation of the single longitudinal mode spectrum for distributed feeedback lasers revealed fine structures when the spectrum was broadened by high-speed modulation. A dynamic simulation can explain reasonably the above behavior if the model takes into account the carrier density modulation enhanced by the relaxation oscillation. In this letter, experimental results where both modulation depth and speed were varied are described along with a calculated result.

  19. Robust stabilisation of 2D state-delayed stochastic systems with randomly occurring uncertainties and nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhaoxia; Xiang, Zhengrong; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2014-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the state feedback control problem for a class of two-dimensional (2D) discrete-time stochastic systems with time-delays, randomly occurring uncertainties and nonlinearities. Both the sector-like nonlinearities and the norm-bounded uncertainties enter into the system in random ways, and such randomly occurring uncertainties and nonlinearities obey certain mutually uncorrelated Bernoulli random binary distribution laws. Sufficient computationally tractable linear matrix inequality-based conditions are established for the 2D nonlinear stochastic time-delay systems to be asymptotically stable in the mean-square sense, and then the explicit expression of the desired controller gains is derived. An illustrative example is provided to show the usefulness and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  1. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  2. Soil Surface Organic Layers in Alaska's Arctic Foothills: Development, Distribution and Microclimatic Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, C. A.; Mann, D. H.; Verbyla, D.; Valentine, D.; Kunz, M. L.; Heiser, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accumulated organic matter at the ground surface plays an important role in arctic ecosystems. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) influence temperature, moisture, and chemistry in the underlying mineral soil and, on a global basis, comprise enormous stores of labile carbon. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is prerequisite to modeling the responses of arctic ecosystem processes to climate changes. Here, we ask three questions regarding SSOLs in the Arctic Foothills in northern Alaska: 1) What environmental factors control their spatial distribution? 2) How long do they take to form? 3) What is the relationship between SSOL thickness and mineral soil temperature through the growing season? The best topographically-controlled predictors of SSOL thickness and spatial distribution are duration of sunlight during the growing-season, upslope drainage area, slope gradient, and elevation. SSOLs begin to form within several decades following disturbance but require 500-700 years to reach equilibrium states. Once formed, mature SSOLs lower peak growing-season temperature and mean annual temperature in the underlying mineral horizon by 8° and 3° C respectively, which reduces available growing degree days within the upper mineral soil by nearly 80%. How ongoing climate change in northern Alaska will affect the region's SSOLs is an open and potentially crucial question.

  3. The effects of baryon physics, black holes and active galactic nucleus feedback on the mass distribution in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Teyssier, Romain; Moore, Ben; Wentz, Tina

    2012-06-01

    The spatial distribution of matter in clusters of galaxies is mainly determined by the dominant dark matter component; however, physical processes involving baryonic matter are able to modify it significantly. We analyse a set of 500 pc resolution cosmological simulations of a cluster of galaxies with mass comparable to Virgo, performed with the AMR code RAMSES. We compare the mass density profiles of the dark, stellar and gaseous matter components of the cluster that result from different assumptions for the subgrid baryonic physics and galaxy formation processes. First, the prediction of a gravity-only N-body simulation is compared to that of a hydrodynamical simulation with standard galaxy formation recipes, and then all results are compared to a hydrodynamical simulation which includes thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We find the usual effects of overcooling and adiabatic contraction in the run with standard galaxy formation physics, but very different results are found when implementing SMBHs and AGN feedback. Star formation is strongly quenched, producing lower stellar densities throughout the cluster, and much less cold gas is available for star formation at low redshifts. At redshift z= 0 we find a flat density core of radius 10 kpc in both the dark and stellar matter density profiles. We speculate on the possible formation mechanisms able to produce such cores and we conclude that they can be produced through the coupling of different processes: (I) dynamical friction from the decay of black hole orbits during galaxy mergers; (II) AGN-driven gas outflows producing fluctuations of the gravitational potential causing the removal of collisionless matter from the central region of the cluster; (III) adiabatic expansion in response to the slow expulsion of gas from the central region of the cluster during the quiescent mode of AGN activity.

  4. Tools for Computing the AGN Feedback: Radio-loudness Distribution and the Kinetic Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Franca, F.; Melini, G.; Fiore, F.

    2010-07-01

    We studied the active galactic nucleus (AGN) radio emission from a compilation of hard X-ray-selected samples, all observed in the 1.4 GHz band. A total of more than 1600 AGNs with 2-10 keV de-absorbed luminosities higher than 1042 erg s-1 cm-2 were used. For a sub-sample of about fifty z <~ 0.1 AGNs, it was possible to reach ~80% of radio detections and therefore, for the first time, it was possible to almost completely measure the probability distribution function of the ratio between the radio and the X-ray luminosity RX = log(L 1.4/LX ), where L 1.4/LX = νL ν(1.4 GHz)/LX (2-10 keV). The probability distribution function of RX was functionally fitted as dependent on the X-ray luminosity and redshift, P(RX |LX , z). It roughly spans over six decades (-7< RX <-1) and does not show any sign of bi-modality. The result is that the probability of finding large values of the RX ratio increases with decreasing X-ray luminosities and (possibly) with increasing redshift. No statistically significant difference was found between the radio properties of the X-ray absorbed (N H>1022 cm-2) and un-absorbed AGNs. Measurement of the probability distribution function of RX allowed us to compute the kinetic luminosity function and the kinetic energy density which, at variance with that assumed in many galaxy evolution models, is observed to decrease by about a factor of 5 at redshift below 0.5. About half of the kinetic energy density results in being produced by the more radio quiet (RX <-4) AGNs. In agreement with previous estimates, the AGN efficiency epsilonkin in converting the accreted mass energy into kinetic power (L_K=ɛ_kin\\dot{m} c^2) is, on average, epsilonkin ~= 5 × 10-3. The data suggest a possible increase of epsilonkin at low redshifts.

  5. Narrow linewidth laterally coupled 1.55 μm AlGaInAs/InP distributed feedback lasers integrated with a curved tapered semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lianping; Haji, Mohsin; Akbar, Jehan; Marsh, John H

    2012-11-01

    We present a laterally coupled 1.55 μm AlGaInAs/InP distributed feedback laser monolithically integrated with a curved tapered optical amplifier, providing an output power of 210 mW with single transverse and longitudinal mode operation exhibiting a record low linewidth of 64 kHz. PMID:23114351

  6. Narrow-linewidth Q-switched random distributed feedback fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangming; Ye, Jun; Xiao, Hu; Leng, Jinyong; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Hanwei; Zhou, Pu

    2016-08-22

    A narrow-linewidth Q-switched random fiber laser (RFL) based on a half-opened cavity, which is realized by narrow-linewidth fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a section of 3 km passive fiber, has been proposed and experimentally investigated. The narrow-linewidth lasing is generated by the spectral filtering of three FBGs with linewidth of 1.21 nm, 0.56 nm, and 0.12 nm, respectively. The Q switching of the distributed cavity is achieved by placing an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) between the FBG and the passive fiber. The maximal output powers of the narrow-linewidth RFLs with the three different FBGs are 0.54 W, 0.27 W, and 0.08 W, respectively. Furthermore, the repetition rates of the output pulses are 500 kHz, and the pulse durations are about 500 ns. The corresponding pulse energies are about 1.08 μJ, 0.54 μJ, and 0.16 μJ, accordingly. The linewidth of FBG can influence the output characteristics in full scale. The narrower the FBG, the higher the pump threshold; the lower the output power at the same pump level, the more serious the linewidth broadening; and thus the higher the proportion of the CW-ground exists in the output pulse trains. Thanks to the assistance of the band-pass filter (BPF), the proportion of the CW-ground of narrow-linewidth Q-switched RFL under the relative high-pump-low-output condition can be reduced effectively. The experimental results indicate that it is challenging to demonstrate a narrow-linewidth Q-switched RFL with high quality output. But further power scaling and linewidth narrowing is possible in the case of operating parameters, optimization efforts, and a more powerful pump source. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of narrow-linewidth generation in a Q-switched RFL. PMID:27557200

  7. Study of a distributed feedback diode laser based hygrometer combined Herriot-gas cell and waterless optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yubin; Chang, Jun; Lian, Jie; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A distributed feedback diode laser (DFB-DL) based hygrometer combined with a long-path-length Herriot gas cell and waterless optical components was proposed and investigated. The main function of this sensor was to simultaneously improve the measurement reliability and resolution. A comparison test between a 10-cm normal transmission-type gas cell and a 3-m Herriot gas cell was carried out to demonstrate the improvement. Reliability improvement was achieved by influence suppression of water vapor inside optical components (WVOC) through combined action of the Herriot gas cell and waterless optical components. The influence of WVOC was suppressed from 726 ppmv to 25 ppmv using the Herriot gas cell. Moreover, combined with waterless optical components, the influence of WVOC was further suppressed to no more than 4 ppmv. Resolution improvement from 11.7 ppmv to 0.32 ppmv was achieved mainly due to the application of the long-path-length Herriot gas cell. The results show that the proposed sensor has a good performance and considerable potential application in gas sensing, especially when probed gas possibly permeates into optical components.

  8. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy. PMID:25121863

  9. Active vibration mitigation of distributed parameter, smart-type structures using Pseudo-Feedback Optimal Control (PFOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, W. N.; Robertshaw, H. H.; Pierpont, D.; Wynn, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A new, near-optimal feedback control technique is introduced that is shown to provide excellent vibration attenuation for those distributed parameter systems that are often encountered in the areas of aeroservoelasticity and large space systems. The technique relies on a novel solution methodology for the classical optimal control problem. Specifically, the quadratic regulator control problem for a flexible vibrating structure is first cast in a weak functional form that admits an approximate solution. The necessary conditions (first-order) are then solved via a time finite-element method. The procedure produces a low dimensional, algebraic parameterization of the optimal control problem that provides a rigorous basis for a discrete controller with a first-order like hold output. Simulation has shown that the algorithm can successfully control a wide variety of plant forms including multi-input/multi-output systems and systems exhibiting significant nonlinearities. In order to firmly establish the efficacy of the algorithm, a laboratory control experiment was implemented to provide planar (bending) vibration attenuation of a highly flexible beam (with a first clamped-free mode of approximately 0.5 Hz).

  10. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy.

  11. Diode-Pumped Organo-Lead Halide Perovskite Lasing in a Metal-Clad Distributed Feedback Resonator.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yufei; Kerner, Ross A; Grede, Alex J; Brigeman, Alyssa N; Rand, Barry P; Giebink, Noel C

    2016-07-13

    Organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite semiconductors have recently reignited the prospect of a tunable, solution-processed diode laser, which has the potential to impact a wide range of optoelectronic applications. Here, we demonstrate a metal-clad, second-order distributed feedback methylammonium lead iodide perovskite laser that marks a significant step toward this goal. Optically pumping this device with an InGaN diode laser at low temperature, we achieve lasing above a threshold pump intensity of 5 kW/cm(2) for durations up to ∼25 ns at repetition rates exceeding 2 MHz. We show that the lasing duration is not limited by thermal runaway and propose instead that lasing ceases under continuous pumping due to a photoinduced structural change in the perovskite that reduces the gain on a submicrosecond time scale. Our results indicate that the architecture demonstrated here could provide the foundation for electrically pumped lasing with a threshold current density Jth < 5 kA/cm(2) under sub-20 ns pulsed drive. PMID:27331618

  12. Emission regimes in a distributed feedback tapered master-oscillator power-amplifier at 1.5 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilera, M.; G. Tijero, J. M.; Consoli, A.; Aguilera, S.; Adamiec, P.; Esquivias, Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    Integrated master-oscillator power amplifiers driven under steady-state injection conditions are known to show a complex dynamics resulting in a variety of emission regimes. We present experimental results on the emission characteristics of a 1.5 μm distributed feedback tapered master-oscillator power-amplifier in a wide range of steady-state injection conditions, showing different dynamic behaviors. The study combines the optical and radio-frequency spectra recorded under different levels of injected current into the master oscillator and the power amplifier sections. Under low injection current of the master oscillator the correlation between the optical and radio-frequency spectral maps allows to identify operation regimes in which the device emission arises from either the master oscillator mode or from the compound cavity modes allowed by the residual reflectance of the amplifier front facet. The quasi-periodic occurrence of these emission regimes as a function of the amplifier current is interpreted in terms of a thermally tuned competition between the modes of the master oscillator and the compound cavity modes. Under high injection current of the master oscillator, two different regimes alternate quasi-periodically as a function of the injected current in the power amplifier: a stable regime with a single mode emission at the master oscillator frequency, and an unstable and complex self-pulsating regime showing strong peaks in the radio-frequency spectra as well as multiple frequencies in the optical spectra.

  13. Diode-Pumped Organo-Lead Halide Perovskite Lasing in a Metal-Clad Distributed Feedback Resonator.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yufei; Kerner, Ross A; Grede, Alex J; Brigeman, Alyssa N; Rand, Barry P; Giebink, Noel C

    2016-07-13

    Organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite semiconductors have recently reignited the prospect of a tunable, solution-processed diode laser, which has the potential to impact a wide range of optoelectronic applications. Here, we demonstrate a metal-clad, second-order distributed feedback methylammonium lead iodide perovskite laser that marks a significant step toward this goal. Optically pumping this device with an InGaN diode laser at low temperature, we achieve lasing above a threshold pump intensity of 5 kW/cm(2) for durations up to ∼25 ns at repetition rates exceeding 2 MHz. We show that the lasing duration is not limited by thermal runaway and propose instead that lasing ceases under continuous pumping due to a photoinduced structural change in the perovskite that reduces the gain on a submicrosecond time scale. Our results indicate that the architecture demonstrated here could provide the foundation for electrically pumped lasing with a threshold current density Jth < 5 kA/cm(2) under sub-20 ns pulsed drive.

  14. The effect of host star spectral energy distribution and ice-albedo feedback on the climate of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Shields, Aomawa L; Meadows, Victoria S; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-08-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO(2) (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO(2) in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global ice

  15. The effect of host star spectral energy distribution and ice-albedo feedback on the climate of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Shields, Aomawa L; Meadows, Victoria S; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-08-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO(2) (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO(2) in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global ice

  16. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  17. Numerical simulation of a novel all-optical flip-flop based on a chirped nonlinear distributed feedback semiconductor laser structure using GPGPU computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoweil, H.

    2015-05-01

    A novel all-optical flip-flop based on a chirped nonlinear distributed feedback laser structure is proposed. The flip-flop does not require a holding beam. The optical gain is provided by a current injection into an active layer. The nonlinear wave-guiding layer consists of a chirped phase shifted grating accompanied with a negative nonlinear refractive index coefficient that increases in magnitude along the wave-guide. In the 'OFF' state, the chirped grating does not provide the required optical feedback to start lasing. An optical pulse switches the device 'ON' by reducing the chirp due to the negative nonlinear refractive index coefficient. The reduced chirp grating provides enough feedback to sustain a laser mode. The device is switched 'OFF' by cross gain modulation. GPGPU computing allows for long simulation time of multiple SET-RESET operations. The 'ON/OFF' transitions delays are in nanoseconds time scale.

  18. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  19. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  20. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  1. Probing the conformation and 2D-distribution of pyrene-terminated redox-labeled poly(ethylene glycol) chains end-adsorbed on HOPG using cyclic voltammetry and atomic force electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe; Taofifenua, Cécilia

    2014-03-14

    The present paper aims at illustrating how end-attachment of water-soluble flexible chains bearing a terminal functional group onto graphene-like surfaces has to be carefully tuned to ensure the proper positioning of the functional moiety with respect to the anchoring surface. The model experimental system considered here consists of a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains, bearing an adsorbing pyrene foot and a ferrocene (Fc) redox functional head, self-assembled onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Cyclic voltammetry is used to accurately measure the chain coverage and gain insights into the microenvironment experienced by the Fc heads. Molecule-touching atomic force electrochemical microscopy (Mt/AFM-SECM) is used to simultaneously probe the chain conformation and the position of the Fc heads within the layer, and also to map the 2D-distribution of the chains over the surface. This multiscale electrochemical approach allows us to show that whereas Fc-PEG-pyrene readily self-assembles to form extremely homogeneous layers, the strongly hydrophobic nature of graphite planes results in a complex coverage-dependent structure of the PEG layer due to the interaction of the ferrocene label with the HOPG surface. It is shown that, even though pyrene is known to adsorb particularly strongly onto HOPG, the more weakly adsorbing terminal ferrocene can also act as the chain anchoring moiety especially at low coverage. However we show that beyond a critical coverage value the Fc-PEG-pyrene chains adopt an ideal "foot-on" end-attached conformation allowing the Fc head to explore a volume away from the surface solely limited by the PEG chain elasticity.

  2. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  3. Analysis of dual-mode lasing characteristics in a 1310-nm optically injected quantum dot distributed feedback laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, R.; Olinger, J.; Hurtado, A.; Grillot, F.; Kovanis, V.; Lester, L. F.

    2015-03-01

    Recent work has shown the Quantum Dot (QD) material system to be well-suited to support dual-mode lasing. In particular, optical injection from a master laser (ML) into the residual Fabry-Perot (FP) modes of a 1310 nm Quantum Dot Distributed Feedback (QD-DFB) laser has been recently demonstrated to offer a highly reliable platform for stable dual-mode lasing operation. External controls on the ML, such as operating temperature and bias current, can be used to precisely adjust the spacing between the two lasing modes. This tunability of modeseparation is very promising for a range of applications requiring the generation of microwave, millimeter wave and terahertz signals. Considering the versatility and utility of such a scheme, it is imperative to acquire a deeper understanding of the factors that influence the dual-mode lasing process, in order to optimize performance. Toward this end, this paper seeks to further our understanding of the optically-injected dual-mode lasing mechanism. For fixed values of optical power injected into each FP residual mode and wavelength detuning, the dual-mode lasing characteristics are analyzed with regard to important system parameters such as the position and the intensity of the injected residual mode (relative to the Bragg and the other residual FP modes of the device) for two similarly-fabricated QD-DFBs. Results indicate that for dual mode lasing spaced less than 5 nm apart, the relative intensity of the injected FP mode and intracavity noise levels are critical factors in determining dual mode lasing behavior. Insight into the dual-mode lasing characteristics could provide an important design guideline for the master and QD-DFB slave laser cavities.

  4. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The Effect of Host Star Spectral Energy Distribution and Ice-Albedo Feedback on the Climate of Extrasolar Planets

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Victoria S.; Bitz, Cecilia M.; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.; Joshi, Manoj M.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO2 (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO2 in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global

  6. Supervisor Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Marilyn J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of supervisor feedback in contributing to learning counseling skills. Counselor trainees (N=64) were assigned to supervisor feedback, no supervisor feedback, or control groups for three training sessions. Results indicated counseling skills were learned best by students with no supervisor feedback but self and peer…

  7. Shaping volumetric light distribution through turbid media using real-time three-dimensional opto-acoustic feedback.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, X Luís; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-02-15

    Focusing light through turbid media represents a highly fascinating challenge in modern biophotonics. The unique capability of opto-acoustics for high-resolution imaging of light absorption contrast in deep tissues can provide a natural and efficient feedback to control light delivery in a scattering medium. While the basic feasibility of using opto-acoustic readings as a feedback mechanism for wavefront shaping has been recently reported, the suggested approaches may require long acquisition times, making them challenging to be translated into realistic tissue environments. In an attempt to significantly accelerate dynamic wavefront shaping capabilities, we present here a feedback-based approach using real-time three-dimensional opto-acoustic imaging assisted with genetic-algorithm-based optimization. The new technique offers robust performance in the presence of noisy measurements and can simultaneously control the scattered wave field in an entire volumetric region. PMID:25680120

  8. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  9. Arrayed narrow linewidth erbium-doped waveguide-distributed feedback lasers on an ultra-low-loss silicon-nitride platform.

    PubMed

    Belt, Michael; Huffman, Taran; Davenport, Michael L; Li, Wenzao; Barton, Jonathon S; Blumenthal, Daniel J

    2013-11-15

    We demonstrate an array of erbium-doped waveguide-distributed feedback lasers on an ultra-low-loss Si(3)N(4) platform. Sidewall gratings providing the lasing feedback are defined in the silicon-nitride layer using 248 nm stepper lithography, while the gain is provided by a reactive co-sputtered erbium-doped aluminum-oxide layer. We observe lasing output over a 12 nm wavelength range (1531-1543 nm) from the array of five separate lasers. Output powers of 8 μW and lasing linewidths of 501 kHz are obtained. Single-mode operation is confirmed, with side-mode suppression ratios over 35 dB for all designs.

  10. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  11. QUENCH2D. Two-Dimensional IHCP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, A.; Beck, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    QUENCH2D* is developed for the solution of general, non-linear, two-dimensional inverse heat transfer problems. This program provides estimates for the surface heat flux distribution and/or heat transfer coefficient as a function of time and space by using transient temperature measurements at appropriate interior points inside the quenched body. Two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric geometries such as turnbine disks and blades, clutch packs, and many other problems can be analyzed using QUENCH2D*.

  12. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor for ethylene detection with a 3.32 μm distributed feedback laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Ba, T.; Triki, M.; Desbrosses, G.; Vicet, A.

    2015-02-01

    An antimonide distributed feedback quantum wells diode laser operating at 3.32 μm at near room temperature in the continuous wave regime has been used to perform ethylene detection based on quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy. An absorption line centered at 3007.52 cm-1 was investigated and a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (1σ) of 3.09 10-7 cm-1 W Hz-1/2 was obtained. The linearity and the stability of the detection have been evaluated. Biological samples' respiration has been measured to validate the feasibility of the detection setup in an agronomic environment, especially on ripening apples.

  13. Elimination of light scattering from grating irregularities by using a quantum well grating in index or gain-coupled distributed feedback lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, S. N. G.; Tsang, W. T.; Choa, F. S.; Logan, R. A.; Flynn, E. J.; Coblentz, D. L.

    1993-10-01

    Grating irregularities in distributed feedback (DFB) laser structures form strong light scattering centers during lasing operation. The existence of such scattering centers may possibly affect the laser reliability. We report an elimination of the light scattering centers in index or gain-coupled DFB lasers using a quantum well (QW) grating under the active laser stripe. The improved grating quality is a result of an inherent uniformity of the QW grating amplitude determined by a precharacterized QW structure as well as an improved crystalline perfection of the overgrown InP instead of a quaternary waveguide layer in a regular substrate grating structure.

  14. Enhancement of the static extinction ratio by using a dual-section distributed feedback laser integrated with an electro-absorption modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Jongseong; Sung, Hyuk-Kee

    2016-09-01

    We report on the enhancement of the static extinction ratio by using a dual-section distributed feedback laser diode integrated with an electro-absorption modulator. A directly- modulated dual-section laser can provide improved modulation performance under a low bias level ( i.e., below the threshold level) compared with a standard directly-modulated laser. By combining the extinction ratio from a dual-section laser with that from an electro-absorption modulator section, a total extinction ratio of 49.6. dB are successfully achieved.

  15. 2 {mu}m laterally coupled distributed-feedback GaSb-based metamorphic laser grown on a GaAs substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Apiratikul, P.; He, L.; Richardson, C. J. K.

    2013-06-10

    We report a type-I GaSb-based laterally coupled distributed-feedback (DFB) laser grown on a GaAs substrate operating continuous wave at room temperature. The laser structure was designed to operate near a wavelength of 2 {mu}m and was grown metamorphically with solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The device was fabricated using a 6th-order deep etch grating structure as part of the sidewalls of the narrow ridge waveguide. The DFB laser emits total output power of up to 40 mW in a single longitudinal mode operation at a heat-sink temperature of 20 Degree-Sign C.

  16. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  17. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  18. High-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser cladding-pumped with a random distributed feedback fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Du, Xueyuan; Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Hanwei; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Zejin

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a high-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser operating at 2153 nm with the output power exceeding 18 W and the slope efficiency of 25.5%. A random distributed feedback fiber laser with the center wavelength of 1173 nm was employed as pump source of Tm-doped fiber laser for the first time. No amplified spontaneous emissions or parasitic oscillations were observed when the maximum output power reached, which indicates that employing 1173 nm random distributed feedback fiber laser as pump laser is a feasible and promising scheme to achieve high-power emission of long-wavelength Tm-doped fiber laser. The output power of this Tm-doped fiber laser could be further improved by optimizing the length of active fiber, reflectivity of FBGs, increasing optical efficiency of pump laser and using better temperature management. We also compared the operation of 2153 nm Tm-doped fiber lasers pumped with 793 nm laser diodes, and the maximum output powers were limited to ~2 W by strong amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic oscillation in the range of 1900-2000 nm. PMID:27416893

  19. High-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser cladding-pumped with a random distributed feedback fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Du, Xueyuan; Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Hanwei; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Zejin

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a high-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser operating at 2153 nm with the output power exceeding 18 W and the slope efficiency of 25.5%. A random distributed feedback fiber laser with the center wavelength of 1173 nm was employed as pump source of Tm-doped fiber laser for the first time. No amplified spontaneous emissions or parasitic oscillations were observed when the maximum output power reached, which indicates that employing 1173 nm random distributed feedback fiber laser as pump laser is a feasible and promising scheme to achieve high-power emission of long-wavelength Tm-doped fiber laser. The output power of this Tm-doped fiber laser could be further improved by optimizing the length of active fiber, reflectivity of FBGs, increasing optical efficiency of pump laser and using better temperature management. We also compared the operation of 2153 nm Tm-doped fiber lasers pumped with 793 nm laser diodes, and the maximum output powers were limited to ~2 W by strong amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic oscillation in the range of 1900–2000 nm. PMID:27416893

  20. High-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser cladding-pumped with a random distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Du, Xueyuan; Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Hanwei; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Zejin

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrated a high-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser operating at 2153 nm with the output power exceeding 18 W and the slope efficiency of 25.5%. A random distributed feedback fiber laser with the center wavelength of 1173 nm was employed as pump source of Tm-doped fiber laser for the first time. No amplified spontaneous emissions or parasitic oscillations were observed when the maximum output power reached, which indicates that employing 1173 nm random distributed feedback fiber laser as pump laser is a feasible and promising scheme to achieve high-power emission of long-wavelength Tm-doped fiber laser. The output power of this Tm-doped fiber laser could be further improved by optimizing the length of active fiber, reflectivity of FBGs, increasing optical efficiency of pump laser and using better temperature management. We also compared the operation of 2153 nm Tm-doped fiber lasers pumped with 793 nm laser diodes, and the maximum output powers were limited to ~2 W by strong amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic oscillation in the range of 1900–2000 nm.

  1. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  2. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  3. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  4. Analysis of gain distribution in cladding-pumped thulium-doped fiber laser and optical feedback inhibition problem in fiber-bulk laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, En-Cai; Liu, Qiang; Hu, Zhen-Yue; Gong, Ma-Li

    2015-10-01

    The steady-state gain distribution in cladding pumped thulium-doped fiber laser (TDFL) is analytically and numerically solved based on the rate equations including loss coefficients and cross relaxation effect. With the gain curve, a problem, which is named optical feedback inhibition (OFI) and always occurs in tandem TDFL-Ho:YAG laser system, is analyzed quantitatively. The actual characteristics of output spectra and power basically prove the conclusion of theoretical analysis. Then a simple mirror-deflected L-shaped cavity is employed to restrain the external feedback and simplify the structure of fiber-bulk Ho:YAG laser. Finally, 25 W of 2097-nm laser power and 51.2% of optical-to-optical conversion efficiency are obtained, and the beam quality factor is less than 1.43 obtained by knife-edge method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61275146), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110066), and the Special Program of the Co-construction with Beijing Municipal Government of China (Grant No. 20121000302).

  5. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  6. First demonstration of single-mode distributed feedback type-I GaSb cascade diode laser emitting near 2.9 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradet, Mathieu; Hosoda, Takashi; Frez, Clifford; Shterengas, Leon; Sander, Stanley; Forouhar, Siamak; Belenky, Gregory

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate GaSb-based laterally-coupled distributed-feedback type-I cascade diode lasers emitting near 2.9 μm as potential sources for OH measurements. The laser heterostructures consist of two GaInAsSb quantum well stages in series separated by GaSb/AlSb/InAs tunnel junction and InAs/AlSb electron injectors. Single-mode emission is generated using second order lateral Bragg grating etched alongside narrow ridge waveguides. The lasers were fabricated into 2-mm-long devices, solder-mounted epi-up on copper submounts, and operate at room temperature. With an anti-reflection coating at the emission facet, the lasers exhibit a typical current threshold of 110 mA at 20 °C and emit more than 14 mW of output power. The Bragg wavelength temperature tuning rate was 0.29 nm/°C.

  7. Experimental study of a symmetrically-pumped distributed feed-back Erbium-doped fiber laser with a tunable phase shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmenkov, Yu O.; Kir'yanov, A. V.; Pérez-Millán, P.; Cruz, J. L.; Andrés, M. V.

    2008-05-01

    We report an experimental study of a symmetrically-pumped distributed feed-back (DFB) Erbium-doped fiber laser (EFL) with a tunable phase shift induced in the center of the laser cavity. The tunable phase shift is produced using a magnetostrictive transducer. We demonstrate that lasing is observed in our experimental arrangement at any value of the phase shift that is owing to a noticeable birefringence induced by the latter. The laser wavelength is shown to periodically change with increasing pump power due to the fiber heating, which stems from the Stokes loss, the excited state absorption and Auger up-conversion in Erbium, and high thermal expansion coefficient of the magnetostrictive transducer.

  8. Using Two-Dimensional Distributed Feedback for Synchronization of Radiation from Two Parallel-Sheet Electron Beams in a Free-Electron Maser.

    PubMed

    Arzhannikov, A V; Ginzburg, N S; Kalinin, P V; Kuznetsov, S A; Malkin, A M; Peskov, N Yu; Sergeev, A S; Sinitsky, S L; Stepanov, V D; Thumm, M; Zaslavsky, V Yu

    2016-09-01

    A spatially extended planar 75 GHz free-electron maser with a hybrid two-mirror resonator consisting of two-dimensional upstream and traditional one-dimensional downstream Bragg reflectors and driven by two parallel-sheet electron beams 0.8  MeV/1  kA has been elaborated. For the highly oversized interaction space (cross section 45×2.5 vacuum wavelengths), the two-dimensional distributed feedback allowed realization of stable narrow-band generation that includes synchronization of emission from both electron beams. As a result, spatially coherent radiation with the output power of 30-50 MW and a pulse duration of ∼100  ns was obtained in each channel. PMID:27661696

  9. CW Performance of an InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs Laterally-Coupled Distributed Feedback (LC-DFB) Ridge Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. D.; Forouhar, S.; Keo, S.; Lang, R. J.; Hunsperger, R. G.; Tiberio, R. C.; Chapman, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    Single-mode distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes typically require a two-step epitaxial growth or use of a corrugated substrate. We demonstrate InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs DFB lasers fabricated from a single epitaxial growth using lateral evanescent coupling of the optical field to a surface grating etehed along the sides of the ridge. A CW threshold current of 25 mA and external quantum efficiency of 0.48 mW/mA per facet were measured for a 1 mm cavity length device with anti-reflection coated facets. Single-mode output powers as high as 11 mW per facet at 935 nm wavelength were attained. A coupling coefficient of at least 5.8/cm was calculated from the subthreshold spectrum taking into account the 2% residual facet reflectivity.

  10. 15 Gb/s index-coupled distributed-feedback lasers based on 1.3 μm InGaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Stubenrauch, M. Stracke, G.; Arsenijević, D.; Bimberg, D.; Strittmatter, A.

    2014-07-07

    The static properties and large-signal modulation capabilities of directly modulated p-doped quantum-dot distributed-feedback lasers are presented. Based on pure index gratings the devices exhibit a side-mode-suppression ratio of 58 dB and optical output powers up to 34 mW. Assisted by a broad gain spectrum, which is typical for quantum-dot material, emission wavelengths from 1290 nm to 1310 nm are covered by the transversal and longitudinal single-mode lasers fabricated from the same single wafer. Thus, these lasers are ideal devices for on-chip wavelength division multiplexing within the original-band according to the IEEE802.3ba standard. 10 Gb/s data transmission across 30 km of single mode fiber is demonstrated. The maximum error-free data rate is found to be 15 Gb/s.

  11. Frequency locking and monitoring based on Bi-directional terahertz radiation of a 3rd-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    van Marrewijk, N.; Mirzaei, B.; Hayton, D.; Gao, J. R.; Kao, T. Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, we have performed frequency locking of a dual, forward reverse emitting third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 3.5 THz. By using both directions of THz emission in combination with two gas cells and two power detectors, we can for the first time perform frequency stabilization, while monitor the frequency locking quality independently. We also characterize how the use of a less sensitive pyroelectric detector can influence the quality of frequency locking, illustrating experimentally that the sensitivity of the detectors is crucial. Using both directions of terahertz (THz) radiation has a particular advantage for the application of a QCL as a local oscillator, where radiation from one side can be used for frequency/phase stabilization, leaving the other side to be fully utilized as a local oscillator to pump a mixer.

  12. Frequency locking and monitoring based on Bi-directional terahertz radiation of a 3rd-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser

    DOE PAGES

    van Marrewijk, N.; Mirzaei, B.; Hayton, D.; Gao, J. R.; Kao, T. Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, we have performed frequency locking of a dual, forward reverse emitting third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 3.5 THz. By using both directions of THz emission in combination with two gas cells and two power detectors, we can for the first time perform frequency stabilization, while monitor the frequency locking quality independently. We also characterize how the use of a less sensitive pyroelectric detector can influence the quality of frequency locking, illustrating experimentally that the sensitivity of the detectors is crucial. Using both directions of terahertz (THz) radiation has a particular advantage for the applicationmore » of a QCL as a local oscillator, where radiation from one side can be used for frequency/phase stabilization, leaving the other side to be fully utilized as a local oscillator to pump a mixer.« less

  13. Influence of ZnO nanoparticles on Coumarin-503 and Coumarin-540 dye mixture for energy transfer distributed feedback dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, G. V.; Basheer Ahamed, M.

    2016-07-01

    Using organic dyes Coumarin-503 (C503) and Coumarin-540 (C540) as donor and acceptor dyes, respectively, and Nd-YAG as pumping source (355 nm), an energy transfer-distributed feedback dye laser (ETDFDL) was constructed and its characteristics studied. Theoretical studies such as critical transfer radius (Ro), critical concentration (Co), and half quenching concentration (C1/2) were carried out using the absorption and fluorescence spectra of donor and acceptor dyes. On varying the input pump energy to the nanoparticle-incorporated ETDFDL and keeping the acceptor and donor dye concentrations constant, the lasing output obtained was found to be higher than that without the use of nanoparticles. This enhancement was due to the size, shape, and coupling between nanoparticles with the dye mixture. Tunability in the range of 435-553 nm was obtained for both donor (C503) and acceptor (C540) DFDL as a function of the angle of interfering beams of the pump laser.

  14. Using Two-Dimensional Distributed Feedback for Synchronization of Radiation from Two Parallel-Sheet Electron Beams in a Free-Electron Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Kalinin, P. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Malkin, A. M.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Sinitsky, S. L.; Stepanov, V. D.; Thumm, M.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    A spatially extended planar 75 GHz free-electron maser with a hybrid two-mirror resonator consisting of two-dimensional upstream and traditional one-dimensional downstream Bragg reflectors and driven by two parallel-sheet electron beams 0.8 MeV /1 kA has been elaborated. For the highly oversized interaction space (cross section 45 ×2.5 vacuum wavelengths), the two-dimensional distributed feedback allowed realization of stable narrow-band generation that includes synchronization of emission from both electron beams. As a result, spatially coherent radiation with the output power of 30-50 MW and a pulse duration of ˜100 ns was obtained in each channel.

  15. High-temperature, continuous-wave operation of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers with metal-metal waveguides and third-order distributed feedback.

    PubMed

    Wienold, M; Röben, B; Schrottke, L; Sharma, R; Tahraoui, A; Biermann, K; Grahn, H T

    2014-02-10

    Currently, different competing waveguide and resonator concepts exist for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (THz QCLs). We examine the continuous-wave (cw) performance of THz QCLs with single-plasmon (SP) and metal-metal (MM) waveguides fabricated from the same wafer. While SP QCLs are superior in terms of output power, the maximum operating temperature for MM QCLs is typically much higher. For SP QCLs, we observed cw operation up to 73 K as compared to 129 K for narrow (≤ 15 μm) MM QCLs. In the latter case, single-mode operation and a narrow beam profile were achieved by applying third-order distributed-feedback gratings and contact pads which are optically insulated from the intended resonators. We present a quantitative analytic model for the beam profile, which is based on experimentally accessible parameters.

  16. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor for ethylene detection with a 3.32 μm distributed feedback laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Ba, T.; Triki, M.; Vicet, A.; Desbrosses, G.

    2015-02-15

    An antimonide distributed feedback quantum wells diode laser operating at 3.32 μm at near room temperature in the continuous wave regime has been used to perform ethylene detection based on quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy. An absorption line centered at 3007.52 cm{sup −1} was investigated and a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (1σ) of 3.09 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1} W Hz{sup −1/2} was obtained. The linearity and the stability of the detection have been evaluated. Biological samples’ respiration has been measured to validate the feasibility of the detection setup in an agronomic environment, especially on ripening apples.

  17. A 16-Channel Distributed-Feedback Laser Array with a Monolithic Integrated Arrayed Waveguide Grating Multiplexer for a Wavelength Division Multiplex-Passive Optical Network System Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Yi; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Xiao-Dong; Cao, Ming-De; Liu, Wen

    2014-07-01

    A 16-channel distributed-feedback (DFB) laser array with a monolithic integrated arrayed waveguide grating multiplexer for a wavelength division multiplex-passive optical network system is fabricated by using the butt-joint metal organic chemical vapor deposition technology and nanoimpirnt technology. The results show that the threshold current is about 20-30 mA at 25°C. The DFB laser side output power is about 16 mW with a 150 mA injection current. The lasing wavelength is from 1550 nm to 1575 nm covering a more than 25 nm range with 200 GHz channel space. A more than 55 dB sidemode suppression ratio is obtained.

  18. Intensity-Stabilized Fast-Scanned Direct Absorption Spectroscopy Instrumentation Based on a Distributed Feedback Laser with Detection Sensitivity down to 4 × 10−6

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Tan, Wei; Jia, Mengyuan; Hou, Jiajuan; Ma, Weiguang; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wu, Xuechun; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Axner, Ove; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    A novel, intensity-stabilized, fast-scanned, direct absorption spectroscopy (IS-FS-DAS) instrumentation, based on a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, is developed. A fiber-coupled polarization rotator and a fiber-coupled polarizer are used to stabilize the intensity of the laser, which significantly reduces its relative intensity noise (RIN). The influence of white noise is reduced by fast scanning over the spectral feature (at 1 kHz), followed by averaging. By combining these two noise-reducing techniques, it is demonstrated that direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) can be swiftly performed down to a limit of detection (LOD) (1σ) of 4 × 10−6, which opens up a number of new applications. PMID:27657082

  19. Free-running 9.1-microm distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser linewidth measurement by heterodyning with a C18O2 laser.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, D; Joly, L; Parpillon, V; Courtois, D; Bonetti, Y; Aellen, T; Beck, M; Faist, J; Hofstetter, D

    2003-05-01

    We report spectral linewidth measurements of a 9.1-microm distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL). The free-running QCL beam was mixed with a waveguide isotopic C18O2 laser onto a high-speed HgCdTe photomixer, and beat notes were recorded from a radio-frequency spectral analyzer. Beating was performed at two operating conditions, first near the QCL laser threshold (beating with the C18O2 R10 line) and then at a high injection current (beating with the C18O2 R8 line). Overall, beat note widths of 1.3-6.5 MHz were observed, which proves that a free-running QCL can have a short-term spectral width near 1 MHz.

  20. Frequency Locking and Monitoring Based on Bi-directional Terahertz Radiation of a 3rd-Order Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marrewijk, N.; Mirzaei, B.; Hayton, D.; Gao, J. R.; Kao, T. Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed frequency locking of a dual, forward reverse emitting third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 3.5 THz. By using both directions of THz emission in combination with two gas cells and two power detectors, we can for the first time perform frequency stabilization, while monitor the frequency locking quality independently. We also characterize how the use of a less sensitive pyroelectric detector can influence the quality of frequency locking, illustrating experimentally that the sensitivity of the detectors is crucial. Using both directions of terahertz (THz) radiation has a particular advantage for the application of a QCL as a local oscillator, where radiation from one side can be used for frequency/phase stabilization, leaving the other side to be fully utilized as a local oscillator to pump a mixer.

  1. Stable single-mode distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers at λ ∼ 4.25 μm with low power consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Jinchuan; Liu, Fengqi; Zhuo, Ning; Zhai, Shenqiang; Liu, Junqi; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-10-01

    Short-wavelength (4.25 μm) distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in continuous wave (cw) mode at room temperature with low power consumption was presented. Stable single-mode operation with a side-mode-suppression-ratio above 25 dB was maintained for the whole measured current and temperature range by enlarging gain difference and strong grating coupling. Because of the strong coupling, very low threshold current and power consumption were achieved. For a device of 9-μm-wide and 2-mm-long, the cw threshold current and power consumption at 293 K were as low as 126 mA and 1.45 W, respectively. All results above were from the device without using buried heterostructure geometry.

  2. Using Two-Dimensional Distributed Feedback for Synchronization of Radiation from Two Parallel-Sheet Electron Beams in a Free-Electron Maser.

    PubMed

    Arzhannikov, A V; Ginzburg, N S; Kalinin, P V; Kuznetsov, S A; Malkin, A M; Peskov, N Yu; Sergeev, A S; Sinitsky, S L; Stepanov, V D; Thumm, M; Zaslavsky, V Yu

    2016-09-01

    A spatially extended planar 75 GHz free-electron maser with a hybrid two-mirror resonator consisting of two-dimensional upstream and traditional one-dimensional downstream Bragg reflectors and driven by two parallel-sheet electron beams 0.8  MeV/1  kA has been elaborated. For the highly oversized interaction space (cross section 45×2.5 vacuum wavelengths), the two-dimensional distributed feedback allowed realization of stable narrow-band generation that includes synchronization of emission from both electron beams. As a result, spatially coherent radiation with the output power of 30-50 MW and a pulse duration of ∼100  ns was obtained in each channel.

  3. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  4. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  5. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  6. Controls on the evolving grain size distribution of ash in explosive eruptions and feedback in vent proximal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    The dispersal range of eruptive products and types of hazards they present is determined in large part by the volume and size fraction of particles that exit the volcanic vent and how this grain size distribution changes during transport. This talk will examine the physical processes that modify the grain size distribution of particles across a spectrum of energies due to eruptive processes from the conduit, multiphase interaction in the plume, and due to microscale aggregation of ash. The size distribution of volcanic particles has widely been interpreted to be associated with the initial fragmentation process, where particle size has been attributed to fragmentation style and efficiency. Here we evaluate the likelihood that pumice particles survive intact the high-energy environment of the volcanic conduit from the point of initial fragmentation to ejection into the atmosphere. We show that the probability of particles surviving intact is strongly controlled by the particles initial size and the depth of the fragmentation level, with large particles and deep fragmentation producing the most disruption events. The consequence of numerous high-energy collisions results in a more homogeneous, fine-grained mixture of particles leaving the volcanic vent for volcanoes with deep fragmentation levels. These fine particles are well coupled to the magmatic gases exiting the vent, can reduce their sound speed and influence the ability of the mixture to entrain ambient air, thus influencing eruptive style. After exiting the volcanic vent, ash is subject to a range of microphysical processes such adsorption of water and aggregation. After briefly reviewing recent experimental advances in ash microphysical phenomena we will illustrate how these processes can influence near vent dynamics by incorporating these microphysical experimental results into a high resolution Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian (EEL) model. We will particularly focus on the dual roles of aggregation and

  7. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  8. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  9. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  10. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  11. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  12. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  13. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  14. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  15. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion-relaxation data--2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition.

    PubMed

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T; Engelsen, Søren B

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T(2)-D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T(2)-D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T(2)-D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D=3 x 10(-12) m(2) s(-1) and T(2)=180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D=10(-9) m(2) s(-1), T(2)=10 ms and D=3 x 10(-13) m(2) s(-1), T(2)=13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  16. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion relaxation data—2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T2- D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T2- D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T2- D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D = 3 × 10 -12 m 2 s -1 and T2 = 180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D = 10 -9 m 2 s -1, T2 = 10 ms and D = 3 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1, T2 = 13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  17. Coress feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This issue of CORESS feedback highlights yet again the importance of checking medications before administration and of adequate handover. Documentation of important medical data including drug allergies, as failed to happen in the case described below, is vital. We are grateful to the clinicians who have provided the material for these reports. The online reporting form is on our website (www.coress.org.uk), which also includes all previous feedback reports. Published contributions will be acknowledged by a ‘Certificate of Contribution’, which may be included in the contributor’s record of continuing professional development.

  18. Implementation and application of a novel 2D magnetic twisting cytometry based on multi-pole electromagnet.

    PubMed

    Chen, La; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We implemented a novel 2D magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC) based on a previously reported multi-pole high permeability electromagnet, in which both the strength and direction of the twisting field can be controlled. Thanks to the high performance twisting electromagnet and the heterodyning technology, the measurement frequency has been extended to the 1 kHz range. In order to obtain high remanence of the ferromagnetic beads, a separate electromagnet with feedback control was adopted for the high magnetic field polarization. Our setup constitutes the first instrument which can be operated both in MTC mode and in magnetic tweezers (MT) mode. In this work, the mechanical properties of HL-1 cardiomyocytes were characterized in MTC mode. Both anisotropy and log-normal distribution of cell stiffness were observed, which agree with our previous results measured in MT mode. The response from these living cells at different frequencies can be fitted very well by the soft glassy rheology model. PMID:27370475

  19. Implementation and application of a novel 2D magnetic twisting cytometry based on multi-pole electromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, La; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We implemented a novel 2D magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC) based on a previously reported multi-pole high permeability electromagnet, in which both the strength and direction of the twisting field can be controlled. Thanks to the high performance twisting electromagnet and the heterodyning technology, the measurement frequency has been extended to the 1 kHz range. In order to obtain high remanence of the ferromagnetic beads, a separate electromagnet with feedback control was adopted for the high magnetic field polarization. Our setup constitutes the first instrument which can be operated both in MTC mode and in magnetic tweezers (MT) mode. In this work, the mechanical properties of HL-1 cardiomyocytes were characterized in MTC mode. Both anisotropy and log-normal distribution of cell stiffness were observed, which agree with our previous results measured in MT mode. The response from these living cells at different frequencies can be fitted very well by the soft glassy rheology model.

  20. Implementation and application of a novel 2D magnetic twisting cytometry based on multi-pole electromagnet.

    PubMed

    Chen, La; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We implemented a novel 2D magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC) based on a previously reported multi-pole high permeability electromagnet, in which both the strength and direction of the twisting field can be controlled. Thanks to the high performance twisting electromagnet and the heterodyning technology, the measurement frequency has been extended to the 1 kHz range. In order to obtain high remanence of the ferromagnetic beads, a separate electromagnet with feedback control was adopted for the high magnetic field polarization. Our setup constitutes the first instrument which can be operated both in MTC mode and in magnetic tweezers (MT) mode. In this work, the mechanical properties of HL-1 cardiomyocytes were characterized in MTC mode. Both anisotropy and log-normal distribution of cell stiffness were observed, which agree with our previous results measured in MT mode. The response from these living cells at different frequencies can be fitted very well by the soft glassy rheology model.

  1. Valley and electric photocurrents in 2D silicon and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, S. A.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Olbrich, P.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2013-12-04

    We show that the optical excitation of multi-valley systems leads to valley currents which depend on the light polarization. The net electric current, determined by the vector sum of single-valley contributions, vanishes for some peculiar distributions of carriers in the valley and momentum spaces forming a pure valley current. We report on the study of this phenomenon, both experimental and theoretical, for graphene and 2D electron channels on the silicon surface.

  2. Improving VERITAS sensitivity by fitting 2D Gaussian image parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jodi; VERITAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Our goal is to improve the acceptance and angular resolution of VERITAS by implementing a camera image-fitting algorithm. Elliptical image parameters are extracted from 2D Gaussian distribution fits using a χ2 minimization instead of the standard technique based on the principle moments of an island of pixels above threshold. We optimize the analysis cuts and then characterize the improvements using simulations. We find an improvement of 20% less observing time to reach 5-sigma for weak point sources.

  3. Mesoscale Modeling of Smoke Particles Distribution and Their Radiative Feedback over Northern Sub-Saharan African Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Y.; Wang, J.; Ichoku, C. M.; Ellison, L.

    2015-12-01

    Stretching from southern boundary of Sahara to the equator and expanding west to east from Atlantic Ocean coasts to the India Ocean coasts, the northern sub-Saharan African (NSSA) region has been subject to intense biomass burning. Comprised of savanna, shrub, tropical forest and a number of agricultural crops, the extensive fires burn belt covers central and south of NSSA during dry season (from October to March) contributes to one of the highest biomass burning rate per km2 in the world. Due to smoke particles' absorption effects of solar radiation, they can modify the surface and atmosphere temperature and thus change atmospheric stability, height of the boundary layer, regional atmospheric circulation, evaporation rate, cloud formation, and precipitation. Hence, smoke particles emitted from biomass burning over NSSA region has a significant influence to the air quality, weather and climate variability. In this study, the first version of this Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER.v1) emissions of several smoke constituents including light-absorbing organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) are applied to a state-of-science meteorology-chemistry model as NOAA Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem). We analyzed WRF-Chem simulations of surface and vertical distribution of various pollutants and their direct radiative effects in conjunction with satellite observation data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar data with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIPSO) to strengthen the importance of combining space measured emission products like FEER.v1 emission inventory with mesoscale model over intense biomass burning region, especially in area where ground-based air-quality and radiation-related observations are limited or absent.

  4. Potential role of CYP2D6 in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jie; Zhen, Yueying; Miksys, Sharon; Beyoğlu, Diren; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Yu, Aiming; Idle, Jeffrey R.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a pivotal enzyme responsible for a major human drug oxidation polymorphism in human populations. Distribution of CYP2D6 in brain and its role in serotonin metabolism suggest this CYP2D6 may have a function in central nervous system. To establish an efficient and accurate platform for the study of CYP2D6 in vivo, a transgenic human CYP2D6 (Tg-2D6) model was generated by transgenesis in wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) mice using a P1 phage artificial chromosome clone containing the complete human CYP2D locus, including CYP2D6 gene and 5’- and 3’- flanking sequences. Human CYP2D6 was expressed not only in the liver, but also in brain. The abundance of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in brain of Tg-2D6 is higher than in WT mice either basal levels or after harmaline induction. Metabolomics of brain homogenate and cerebrospinal fluid revealed a significant up-regulation of l-carnitine, acetyl-l-carnitine, pantothenic acid, dCDP, anandamide, N-acetylglucosaminylamine, and a down-regulation of stearoyl-l-carnitine in Tg-2D6 mice compared with WT mice. Anxiety tests indicate Tg-2D6 mice have a higher capability to adapt to anxiety. Overall, these findings indicate that the Tg-2D6 mouse model may serve as a valuable in vivo tool to determine CYP2D6-involved neurophysiological metabolism and function. PMID:23614566

  5. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  6. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  7. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  8. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  9. [High-Sensitive Carbon Dioxide Detection Using Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with a 2.0 μm Distributed Feedback Laser].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-li; Wu, Hong-peng; Shao, Jie; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Yin, Wang-bao; Jia, Suo-tang

    2015-08-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor is developed using quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) with a 2.0 μm distributed feedback diode laser. The detection is based on a 2f wavelength-modulation spectroscopy approach by dithering and scanning the laser current. The laser modulation depth is optimized at normal atmosphere pressure and room temperature. The influence of the H2O presence in the sample gas mixture on the CO2 sensor performance is also investigated. The results show that, with 1% CO2 concentration, the H2O in the concentration ranges of 0 to 0.2% has an effect on the CO2 signal amplitude and phase, and the largest amplitude difference is ~2.1 times. When the H2O concentration is over 0.2%, the CO2 signal amplitude is saturated and remains steady. Atmospheric CO2 concentration is well measured using the optimal sensor parameters. Benefiting from the strong absorption line intensity at 4989.97 cm(-1), a detection limit of 19 ppm (1σ, 300 ms averaging time) is achieved, which corresponds to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 4.71 × 10(-9) cm(-1) · W · Hz(-1/2). PMID:26672270

  10. Liquid-phase epitaxy grown PbSnTe distributed feedback laser diodes with broad continuous single-mode tuning range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, H.-H.; Fonstad, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    Distributed feedback (DFB) pulsed laser operation has been demonstrated in stripe geometry Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te double-heterostructures grown by liquid-phase epitaxy. The grating structure of 0.79 micron periodicity operates in first order near 12.8 microns and was fabricated prior to the liquid-phase epitaxial growth using holographic exposure techniques. These DFB lasers had moderate thresholds, 3.6 kA/sq cm, and the output power versus current curves exhibited a sharp turn-on free of kinks. Clean, single-mode emission spectra, continuously tunable over a range in excess of 20 per cm, centered about 780 per cm (12.8 microns), and at an average rate of 1.2 per cm-K from 9 to 26 K, were observed. While weaker modes could at times be seen in the spectrum, substantially single-mode operation was obtained over the entire operating range and to over 10 times threshold.

  11. Distributed feedback GaSb based laser diodes with buried grating: a new field of single-frequency sources from 2 to 3 µm for gas sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Gaimard, Quentin; Triki, Meriam; Nguyen-Ba, Tong; Cerutti, Laurent; Boissier, Guilhem; Teissier, Roland; Baranov, Alexei; Rouillard, Yves; Vicet, Aurore

    2015-07-27

    We report on the growth, fabrication, experimental study and application in an absorption gas setup of distributed feed-back antimonide diode lasers with buried grating. First, half laser structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb substrates and stopped at the top of the waveguide. A second order Bragg grating was then defined by interferometric lithography on the top of the structure and dry etched by Reactive Ion Etching. The grating was, afterwards, buried thanks to an epitaxial regrowth of the top cladding layer. Finally, the wafer was processed using standard photolithography and wet etched into 10 µm-wide laser ridges. A single frequency laser emission around 2.3 µm was recorded, a maximum output power of 25 mW and a total continuous tuning range reaching 4.2 nm at fixed temperature. A device has been used to detect methane gas and shows strong potential for gas spectroscopy. This process was also replicated for a target of 3 µm laser emission. These devices showed an output power of 2.5 mW and a SMSR of at least 23 dB, with a 2.5 nm continuous tuning range at fixed temperature. PMID:26367575

  12. Time-resolved spectral characterization of ring cavity surface emitting and ridge-type distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers by step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, Markus; Genner, Andreas; Schwarzer, Clemens; Mujagic, Elvis; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-02-10

    We present the time-resolved comparison of pulsed 2nd order ring cavity surface emitting (RCSE) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and pulsed 1st order ridge-type distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs using a step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Laser devices were part of QCL arrays and fabricated from the same laser material. Required grating periods were adjusted to account for the grating order. The step-scan technique provided a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm(-1) and a time resolution of 2 ns. As a result, it was possible to gain information about the tuning behavior and potential mode-hops of the investigated lasers. Different cavity-lengths were compared, including 0.9 mm and 3.2 mm long ridge-type and 0.97 mm (circumference) ring-type cavities. RCSE QCLs were found to have improved emission properties in terms of line-stability, tuning rate and maximum emission time compared to ridge-type lasers.

  13. 2-μm single longitudinal mode GaSb-based laterally coupled distributed feedback laser with regrowth-free shallow-etched gratings by interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Ao, Yang; Yu, Zhang; Yong-Ping, Liao; Jun-Liang, Xing; Si-Hang, Wei; Li-Chun, Zhang; Ying-Qiang, Xu; Hai-Qiao, Ni; Zhi-Chuan, Niu

    2016-02-01

    We report a type-I GaSb-based laterally coupled distributed-feedback (LC-DFB) laser with shallow-etched gratings operating a continuous wave at room temperature without re-growth process. Second-order Bragg gratings are fabricated alongside the ridge waveguide by interference lithography. Index-coupled LC-DFB laser with a cavity of 1500 μm achieves single longitudinal mode continuous-wave operation at 20 °C with side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) as high as 24 dB. The maximum single mode continuous-wave output power is about 10 mW at room temperature (uncoated facet). A low threshold current density of 230 A/cm2 is achieved with differential quantum efficiency estimated to be 93 mW/A. The laser shows a good wavelength stability against drive current and working temperature. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014CB643903 and 2013CB932904), the National Special Funds for the Development of Major Research Equipment and Instruments, China (Grant No. 2012YQ140005), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435012, 61274013, 61306088, and 61290303), and the Strategic Priority Research Program (B) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB01010200).

  14. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  15. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  16. COEVOLUTION BETWEEN SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND BULGES IS NOT VIA INTERNAL FEEDBACK REGULATION BUT BY RATIONED GAS SUPPLY DUE TO ANGULAR MOMENTUM DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2015-05-20

    We reason that without physical fine-tuning, neither the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) nor the stellar bulges can self-regulate or inter-regulate by driving away already fallen cold gas to produce the observed correlation between them. We suggest an alternative scenario where the observed mass ratios of the SMBHs to bulges reflect the angular momentum distribution of infallen gas such that the mass reaching the stable accretion disk is a small fraction of that reaching the bulge region, averaged over the cosmological timescales. We test this scenario using high-resolution, large-scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, without active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, assuming the angular momentum distribution of gas landing in the bulge region yields a Mestel disk that is supported by independent simulations resolving the Bondi radii of SMBHs. A mass ratio of 0.1%–0.3% between the very low angular momentum gas that free falls to the subparsec region to accrete to the SMBH and the overall star formation rate is found. This ratio is found to increase with increasing redshift to within a factor of ∼2, suggesting that the SMBH-to-bulge ratio is nearly redshift independent, with a modest increase with redshift, which is a testable prediction. Furthermore, the duty cycle of AGNs with high Eddington ratios is expected to increase significantly with redshift. Finally, while SMBHs and bulges are found to coevolve on ∼30–150 Myr timescales or longer, there is indication that on still smaller timescales, the SMBH accretion and star formation may be less correlated.

  17. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  18. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  19. Controlling the Dynamics of the 2-D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaoui, Nejib; Zribi, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of the two-dimensional (2-d) Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations with spatially periodic and temporally steady forcing f = (1/Re k3 sinky , 0) is analyzed. First, a system of nine-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is obtained by a truncation of the 2-d N-S equations for various values of k. We show that for k = 4 , the dynamics transforms from periodic solutions to chaotic attractors through a sequence of bifurcations including a period doubling scenarios. Then, a state feedback control is designed to drive the state of the system to any desired state.

  20. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  1. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  2. Experimental investigation on the high chip rate of 2D incoherent optical CDMA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guorui; Wang, Rong; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Zheng, Jilin; Zhu, Huatao; Wu, Weijiang

    2015-08-01

    An innovative approach to realise high chip rate in OCDMA transmission system is proposed and experimentally investigation, the high chip rate is achieved through a 2-D wavelength-hopping time-spreading en/decoder based on the supercontinuum light source. The source used in the experiment is generated by high nonlinear optical fiber (HNLF), Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) which output power is 26 dBm, and distributed feed-back laser diode which works in the gain switch state. The span and the flatness of the light source are 20 nm and 3 dB, respectively, after equalization of wavelength selective switch (WSS). The wavelength-hopping time-spreading coder can be changed 20 nm in the wavelength and 400 ps in the time, is consist of WSS and delay lines. Therefore, the experimental results show that the chip rate can achieve 500 Gchip/s, in the case of 2.5 Gbit/s, while keeping a bit error rate below forward error correction limit after 40 km transmission.

  3. Laser Absorption spectrometer instrument for tomographic 2D-measurement of climate gas emission from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    One of the most intricate effects in climate modelling is the role of permafrost thawing during the global warming process. Soil that has formerly never totally lost its ice cover now emits climate gases due to melting processes[1]. For a better prediction of climate development and possible feedback mechanisms, insights into physical procedures (like e.g. gas emission from underground reservoirs) are required[2]. Therefore, a long-term quantification of greenhouse gas concentrations (and further on fluxes) is necessary and the related structures that are responsible for emission need to be identified. In particular the spatial heterogeneity of soils caused by soil internal structures (e.g. soil composition changes or surface cracks) or by surface modifications (e.g. by plant growth) generate considerable complexities and difficulties for local measurements, for example with soil chambers. For such situations, which often cannot be avoided, a spatially resolved 2D-measurement to identify and quantify the gas emission from the structured soil would be needed, to better understand the influence of the soil sub-structures on the emission behavior. Thus we designed a spatially scanning laser absorption spectrometer setup to determine a 2D-gas concentration map in the soil-air boundary layer. The setup is designed to cover the surfaces in the range of square meters in a horizontal plane above the soil to be investigated. Existing field instruments for gas concentration or flux measurements are based on point-wise measurements, so structure identification is very tedious or even impossible. For this reason, we have developed a tomographic in-situ instrument based on TDLAS ('tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy') that delivers absolute gas concentration distributions of areas with 0.8m × 0.8m size, without any need for reference measurements with a calibration gas. It is a simple and robust device based on a combination of scanning mirrors and reflecting foils, so

  4. A 2D virtual reality system for visual goal-driven navigation in zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Jouary, Adrien; Haudrechy, Mathieu; Candelier, Raphaël; Sumbre, German

    2016-01-01

    Animals continuously rely on sensory feedback to adjust motor commands. In order to study the role of visual feedback in goal-driven navigation, we developed a 2D visual virtual reality system for zebrafish larvae. The visual feedback can be set to be similar to what the animal experiences in natural conditions. Alternatively, modification of the visual feedback can be used to study how the brain adapts to perturbations. For this purpose, we first generated a library of free-swimming behaviors from which we learned the relationship between the trajectory of the larva and the shape of its tail. Then, we used this technique to infer the intended displacements of head-fixed larvae, and updated the visual environment accordingly. Under these conditions, larvae were capable of aligning and swimming in the direction of a whole-field moving stimulus and produced the fine changes in orientation and position required to capture virtual prey. We demonstrate the sensitivity of larvae to visual feedback by updating the visual world in real-time or only at the end of the discrete swimming episodes. This visual feedback perturbation caused impaired performance of prey-capture behavior, suggesting that larvae rely on continuous visual feedback during swimming. PMID:27659496

  5. Boundary treatments for 2D elliptic mesh generation in complex geometries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a boundary treatment method for 2D elliptic mesh generation in complex geometries. Corresponding to Neumann- Dirichlet boundary conditions (sliding boundary conditions), the proposed method aims at achieving orthogonal and smooth nodal distribution along irregular boundaries. In ...

  6. Multi-electrode laterally coupled distributed feedback InGaAsP/InP lasers: a prescription for longitudinal mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhsaien, Abdessamad; Dridi, Kais; Zhang, Jessica; Hall, Trevor J.

    2013-10-01

    Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) enable photons as data carriers at a very high speed. PIC market opportunities call for reduced wafer dimensions, power consumption and cost as well as enhanced reliability. The PIC technology development must cater for the latter relentless traits. In particular, monolithic PICs are sought as they can integrate hundreds of components and functions onto a single chip. InGaAsP/InP laterally-coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) lasers stand as key enablers in the PIC technology thanks to the compelling advantages their embedded high-order surface-gratings have. The patterning of the spatial corrugation along the sidewalls of the LC-DFB ridge, has been established to make the epitaxial overgrowth unnecessary thereby reducing the cost and time of manufacturing, and ultimately increasing the yield. LC-DFBs boast a small footprint synonymous of enhanced monolithic integrate-ability. Nonetheless, LC-DFBs suffer from the adverse longitudinal spatial hole burning (LSHB) effects materialized by typically quite high threshold current levels. Indeed, the carrier density longitudinal gradient- responsible for modes contending for the available material gain in the cavity- may be alleviated somewhat by segmenting the LC-DFB electrode into two or three reasonably interspaced longitudinal sections. In this work we report on the realization and performance of various electrode partition configurations. At room temperature, the experimental characterization of many as-cleaved LC-DFB devices provides ample evidence of superior performance such as a narrow linewidth (less than 400 kHz), a wide wavelength tune-ability (over 4 nm) and a hop-free single mode emission (side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) exceeding 54dB).

  7. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  8. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  9. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  10. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  11. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  12. High-resolution mapping of quantum efficiency of silicon photodiode via optical-feedback laser microthermography

    SciTech Connect

    Cemine, Vernon Julius; Blanca, Carlo Mar; Saloma, Caesar

    2006-09-20

    We map the external quantum efficiency (QE) distribution of a silicon photodiode (PD) sample via a thermographic imaging technique based on optical-feedback laser confocal microscopy. An image pair consisting of the confocal reflectance image and the 2D photocurrent map is simultaneously acquired to delineate the following regions of interest on the sample: the substrate, the n-type region, the pn overlay, and the bonding pad. The 2D QE distribution is derived from the photocurrent map to quantify the optical performance of these sites. The thermal integrity of the sample is then evaluated by deriving the rate of change of QE with temperature T at each point on the silicon PD. These gradient maps function not only as stringent measures of local thermal QE activity but they also expose probable defect locations on the sample at high spatial resolution - a capability that is not feasible with existing bulk measurement techniques.

  13. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  14. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  15. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  16. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  17. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  18. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  19. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  20. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  1. Numerical solution of the chemical master equation uniqueness and stability of the stationary distribution for chemical networks, and mRNA bursting in a gene network with negative feedback regulation.

    PubMed

    Zeron, E S; Santillán, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a couple of algorithms to compute the stationary probability distribution for the chemical master equation (CME) of arbitrary chemical networks. We further find the conditions guaranteeing the algorithms' convergence and the unity and stability of the stationary distribution. Next, we employ these algorithms to study the mRNA and protein probability distributions in a gene regulatory network subject to negative feedback regulation. In particular, we analyze the influence of the promoter activation/deactivation speed on the shape of such distributions. We find that a reduction of the promoter activation/deactivation speed modifies the shape of those distributions in a way consistent with the phenomenon known as mRNA (or transcription) bursting.

  2. A novel adenoviral vector-mediated mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D (CMT2D).

    PubMed

    Seo, Ah Jung; Shin, Youn Ho; Lee, Seo Jin; Kim, Doyeun; Park, Byung Sun; Kim, Sunghoon; Choi, Kyu Ha; Jeong, Na Young; Park, Chan; Jang, Ji-Yeon; Huh, Youngbuhm; Jung, Junyang

    2014-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D is a hereditary axonal and glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)-associated neuropathy that is caused by a mutation in GARS. Here, we report a novel GARS-associated mouse neuropathy model using an adenoviral vector system that contains a neuronal-specific promoter. In this model, we found that wild-type GARS is distributed to peripheral axons, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cell bodies, central axon terminals, and motor neuron cell bodies. In contrast, GARS containing a G240R mutation was localized in DRG and motor neuron cell bodies, but not axonal regions, in vivo. Thus, our data suggest that the disease-causing G240R mutation may result in a distribution defect of GARS in peripheral nerves in vivo. Furthermore, a distributional defect may be associated with axonal degradation in GARS-associated neuropathies.

  3. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  4. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  5. A multifunctional automated system of 2D laser polarimetry of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotna, Natalia I.; Radchenko, Kostiantyn O.

    2014-09-01

    Multifunctional automated system of 2D laser polarimetry of biological tissues with enhanced functional capabilities is proposed. Two-layer optically thin (attenuation coefficient τ <= 0,1 ) biological structures, formed by "muscle tissue (MT) - the dermis of the skin (DS)" histological cryosections for the two physiological states (normal - dystrophy) were investigated. Complex of objective indexes which characterized by 2D polarization reproduced distributions under the following criteria: histograms of the distributions; statistical moments of the 1st - 4th order; autocorrelation functions; correlation moments; power spectra logarithmic dependencies of the distributions; fractal dimensions of the distributions; spectra moments are presented.

  6. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  7. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  8. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  9. Mass loss in 2D rotating stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Lovekin, Caterine; Deupree, Bob

    2010-10-05

    Radiatively driven mass loss is an important factor in the evolution of massive stars . The mass loss rates depend on a number of stellar parameters, including the effective temperature and luminosity. Massive stars are also often rapidly rotating, which affects their structure and evolution. In sufficiently rapidly rotating stars, both the effective temperature and radius vary significantly as a function of latitude, and hence mass loss rates can vary appreciably between the poles and the equator. In this work, we discuss the addition of mass loss to a 2D stellar evolution code (ROTORC) and compare evolution sequences with and without mass loss. Preliminary results indicate that a full 2D calculation of mass loss using the local effective temperature and luminosity can significantly affect the distribution of mass loss in rotating main sequence stars. More mass is lost from the pole than predicted by 1D models, while less mass is lost at the equator. This change in the distribution of mass loss will affect the angular momentum loss, the surface temperature and luminosity, and even the interior structure of the star. After a single mass loss event, these effects are small, but can be expected to accumulate over the course of the main sequence evolution.

  10. Co-axial Ka-band Free Electron Maser Using Two-dimensional Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, A. D. R.; Konoplev, I. V.; McGrane, P.; Cross, A. W.; He, W.; Whyte, C. G.; Ronald, K.; Thumm, M. K.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2006-01-03

    The first successful experimental studies of microwave radiation from a co-axial Free-Electron Maser (FEM) based on two-dimensional (2D) distributed feedback have been recently conducted. This paper contains a description of the experimental set-up and the results obtained. The high-power pulsed power supply and high-current accelerator (HCA) developed and used to drive the FEM are discussed. The results of the experimental study of the FEM operating in the Ka frequency band are presented and compared with theoretical predictions.

  11. Efficiency of feedbacks for suppression of transverse instabilities of bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Alexey

    2016-08-01

    Which gain and phase have to be set for a bunch-by-bunch transverse damper, and at which chromaticity is it better to stay? These questions are considered for three models: the two-particle model with possible quadrupole wake, the author's nested head-tail (NHT) model with the broadband impedance, and the NHT with the LHC impedance model. Details of 2D areas of stability in the chromaticity-intensity and chromaticity-gain planes and possibilities to use them are discussed. It is shown that resistive feedbacks may generate asymmetry of the tune shift distribution, which requires positively-shifted stability diagrams.

  12. Experimental identification of diffusive coupling using 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Song, Y-Q; Carneiro, G; Schwartz, L M; Johnson, D L

    2014-12-01

    Spin relaxation based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have been used extensively to determine pore size distributions in a variety of materials. This approach is based on the assumption that each pore is in the fast diffusion limit but that diffusion between pores can be neglected. However, in complex materials these assumptions may be violated and the relaxation time distribution is not easily interpreted. We present a 2D NMR technique and an associated data analysis that allow us to work directly with the time dependent experimental data without Laplace inversion to identify the signature of diffusive coupling between different pores. Measurements on microporous glass beads and numerical simulations are used to illustrate the technique. PMID:25526135

  13. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  14. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  15. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  16. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  17. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  18. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  19. Galaxy-scale AGN feedback - theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Umemura, M.; Sutherland, R. S.; Silk, J.

    2016-02-01

    Powerful relativistic jets in radio galaxies are capable of driving strong outflows but also inducing star-formation by pressure-triggering collapse of dense clouds. We review theoretical work on negative and positive active galactic nuclei feedback, discussing insights gained from recent hydrodynamical simulations of jet-driven feedback on galaxy scales that are applicable to compact radio sources. The simulations show that the efficiency of feedback and the relative importance of negative and positive feedback depend strongly on interstellar medium properties, especially the column depth and spatial distribution of clouds. Negative feedback is most effective if clouds are distributed spherically and individual clouds have small column depths, while positive feedback is most effective if clouds are predominantly in a disc-like configuration.

  20. CYP2D6*36 gene arrangements within the cyp2d6 locus: association of CYP2D6*36 with poor metabolizer status.

    PubMed

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Bradford, L Dianne; Alander, Sarah W; Leeder, J Steven

    2006-04-01

    Unexplained cases of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype discordance continue to be discovered. In previous studies, several African Americans with a poor metabolizer phenotype carried the reduced function CYP2D6*10 allele in combination with a nonfunctional allele. We pursued the possibility that these alleles harbor either a known sequence variation (i.e., CYP2D6*36 carrying a gene conversion in exon 9 along the CYP2D6*10-defining 100C>T single-nucleotide polymorphism) or novel sequences variation(s). Discordant cases were evaluated by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to test for gene rearrangement events, and a 6.6-kilobase pair PCR product encompassing the CYP2D6 gene was cloned and entirely sequenced. Thereafter, allele frequencies were determined in different study populations comprising whites, African Americans, and Asians. Analyses covering the CYP2D7 to 2D6 gene region established that CYP2D6*36 did not only exist as a gene duplication (CYP2D6*36x2) or in tandem with *10 (CYP2D6*36+*10), as previously reported, but also by itself. This "single" CYP2D6*36 allele was found in nine African Americans and one Asian, but was absent in the whites tested. Ultimately, the presence of CYP2D6*36 resolved genotype/phenotype discordance in three cases. We also discovered an exon 9 conversion-positive CYP2D6*4 gene in a duplication arrangement (CYP2D6*4Nx2) and a CYP2D6*4 allele lacking 100C>T (CYP2D6*4M) in two white subjects. The discovery of an allele that carries only one CYP2D6*36 gene copy provides unequivocal evidence that both CYP2D6*36 and *36x2 are associated with a poor metabolizer phenotype. Given a combined frequency of between 0.5 and 3% in African Americans and Asians, genotyping for CYP2D6*36 should improve the accuracy of genotype-based phenotype prediction in these populations.

  1. 2D tilting MEMS micro mirror integrating a piezoresistive sensor position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lani, S.; Bayat, D.; Despont, M.

    2015-02-01

    An integrated position sensor for a dual-axis electromagnetic tilting mirror is presented. This tilting mirror is composed of a silicon based mirror directly assembled on a silicon membrane supported by flexible beams. The position sensors are constituted by 4 Wheatstone bridges of piezoresistors which are fabricated by doping locally the flexible beams. A permanent magnet is attached to the membrane and the scanner is mounted above planar coils deposited on a ceramic substrate to achieve electromagnetic actuation. The performances of the piezoresistive sensors are evaluated by measuring the output signal of the piezoresistors as a function of the tilt of the mirror and the temperature. White light interferometry was performed for all measurement to measure the exact tilt angle. The minimum detectable angle with such sensors was 30µrad (around 13bits) in the range of the minimum resolution of the interferometer. The tilt reproducibility was 0.0186%, obtained by measuring the tilt after repeated actuations with a coil current of 50mA during 30 min and the stability over time was 0.05% in 1h without actuation. The maximum measured tilt angle was 6° (mechanical) limited by nonlinearity of the MEMS system.

  2. Adaptive and nonadaptive feedback control of global instabilities with application to a heated 2-D jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkewitz, Peter A.; Mingori, D. L.

    1992-04-01

    Close to the onset of self-excited fluid oscillations the generic complex Ginzburg-Landau is proposed as the lowest order model for the plant. Its linear part which provides the stability boundaries is derived from first principles for both doubly-infinite and semi-infinite flow domains. Concentrating on a single global mode, the model is further simplified to the Stuart-Landau equation. For this latter model, a methodology is developed for the design of single-input single-output controllers. The so designed controllers have been implemented on a self-excited, heated two-dimensional jet with one hot wire as sensor and an acoustic speaker as actuator, and are shown to be effective within their limitations in suppressing or enhancing limit-cycle oscillations. Finally, the effect of of a controller designed to suppress the most unstable global mode on other modes is investigated experimentally in the wake of a cylinder at low Reynolds number, where an encouraging semi-quantitative correspondence to the Ginzburg-Landau model is found.

  3. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  4. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  5. Local currents in a 2D topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaoqian; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y

    2015-12-23

    Symmetry protected edge states in 2D topological insulators are interesting both from the fundamental point of view as well as from the point of view of potential applications in nanoelectronics as perfectly conducting 1D channels and functional elements of circuits. Here using a simple tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism we explore local current distributions in a 2D topological insulator focusing on effects of non-magnetic impurities and vacancies as well as finite size effects. For an isolated edge state, we show that the local conductance decays into the bulk in an oscillatory fashion as explained by the complex band structure of the bulk topological insulator. We demonstrate that although the net conductance of the edge state is topologically protected, impurity scattering leads to intricate local current patterns. In the case of vacancies we observe vortex currents of certain chirality, originating from the scattering of current-carrying electrons into states localized at the edges of hollow regions. For finite size strips of a topological insulator we predict the formation of an oscillatory band gap in the spectrum of the edge states, the emergence of Friedel oscillations caused by an open channel for backscattering from an impurity and antiresonances in conductance when the Fermi energy matches the energy of the localized state created by an impurity. PMID:26610145

  6. Local currents in a 2D topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaoqian; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y

    2015-12-23

    Symmetry protected edge states in 2D topological insulators are interesting both from the fundamental point of view as well as from the point of view of potential applications in nanoelectronics as perfectly conducting 1D channels and functional elements of circuits. Here using a simple tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism we explore local current distributions in a 2D topological insulator focusing on effects of non-magnetic impurities and vacancies as well as finite size effects. For an isolated edge state, we show that the local conductance decays into the bulk in an oscillatory fashion as explained by the complex band structure of the bulk topological insulator. We demonstrate that although the net conductance of the edge state is topologically protected, impurity scattering leads to intricate local current patterns. In the case of vacancies we observe vortex currents of certain chirality, originating from the scattering of current-carrying electrons into states localized at the edges of hollow regions. For finite size strips of a topological insulator we predict the formation of an oscillatory band gap in the spectrum of the edge states, the emergence of Friedel oscillations caused by an open channel for backscattering from an impurity and antiresonances in conductance when the Fermi energy matches the energy of the localized state created by an impurity.

  7. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  8. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  9. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  10. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  11. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  12. Learning from graphically integrated 2D and 3D representations improves retention of neuroanatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaz, Farah

    group in retaining knowledge of difficult instances of sectional anatomy after the retention interval. The benefit of learning from an integrated 2D3D representation suggests that there are some spatial transformations which are better retained if they are learned through an explicit demonstration. Participants also showed evidence of continued learning on the tests of generalization with the help of cues and practice, even without feedback. This finding suggests that the computer-based learning programs used in this study were good tools for instruction of neuroanatomy.

  13. Student Engagement with Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jon; Shields, Cathy; Gardner, James; Hancock, Alysoun; Nutt, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This report considers Biological Sciences students' perceptions of feedback, compared with those of the University as a whole, this includes what forms of feedback were considered most useful and how feedback used. Compared with data from previous studies, Biological Sciences students gave much greater recognition to oral feedback, placing it on a…

  14. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  15. Chemical feedbacks in climate sensitivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietmüller, Simone; Ponater, Michael; Sausen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Interactively coupled climate chemistry models extend the number of feedback mechanisms in climate change simulations by allowing a variation of several radiatively actice chemical tracers that are prescribed in conventional climate models. Different perturbation experiments including chemical feedbacks were performed using the chemistry-climate model system EMAC coupled to the mixed layer ocean model MLO. The influence of the chemical feedbacks O3, CH4 and N2O on climate response and climate sensitivity is quantified for a series of CO2-perturbation simulations: Equilibrium climate sensitivity is dampened, if chemical feedbacks are included. In case of a CO2 doubling simulation chemical feedbacks decrease climate sensitivity by -3.6% and in case of a 4*CO2 simulation by -8.1%. Analysis of the chemical feedbacks reveals, that the negative feedback of ozone, mainly the feedback of stratospheric ozone, is responsible for this dampening. The radiative feedbacks of CH4 and N2O are negligible, mainly because the model system does not allow interactive emission feedbacks at the Earth's surface for these gases. The feedback of physical parameters is significantly modified by the presence of chemical feedbacks. In case of the CO2-perturbation experiments the negative stratospheric ozone feedback is accompanied by a negative stratospheric H2O feedback change of the same order of magnitude. So the dampening effect of the direct O3 radiative feedback is enhanced. A non-linearity in the damping is found with increasing CO2 concentrations. Reasons are the nonlinear feedbacks of ozone, temperature, and stratospheric water vapor. Additional 6*CO2 simulations with and without chemical feedbacks included show, that the presence of chemic feedbacks helps to prevent a runaway greenhouse effect, as the O3 distribution can react to the upward shift of the tropopause. Also experiments driven by anthropogenic NOx- and CO-emissions were performed, where chemically active trace gases act

  16. Enhancement of biomixing by swimming cells in 2D films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollub, Jerry; Kurtuldu, Huseyin; Guasto, Jeffrey; Johnson, Karl

    2011-11-01

    Fluid mixing in active suspensions of microorganisms is important to ecological phenomena and shows surprising statistical behavior. We investigate the mixing produced by swimming unicellular algal cells (Chlamydomonas) in quasi-2D films by tracking the motions of cells and of microscopic passive tracer particles advected by the fluid. The reduced spatial dimension of the system leads to long-range flows and a surprisingly strong dependence of tracer transport on the swimmer concentration. The mean square displacements are well described by a stochastic Langevin model, with an effective diffusion coefficient D growing as the 3/2 power of the swimmer concentration, due to the interaction of tracer particles with multiple swimmers. We also discuss the anomalous probability distributions of tracer displacements, which become Gaussian at high concentration, but show strong power-law tails at low concentration. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-0803153.

  17. TOPAZ2D validation status report, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.

    1990-08-01

    Analytic solutions to two heat transfer problems were used to partially evaluate the performance TOPAZ, and LLNL finite element heat transfer code. The two benchmark analytic solutions were for: 2D steady state slab, with constant properties, constant uniform temperature boundary conditions on three sides, and constant temperature distribution according to a sine function on the fourth side; 1D transient non-linear, with temperature dependent conductivity and specific heat (varying such that the thermal diffusivity remained constant), constant heat flux on the front face and adiabatic conditions on the other face. The TOPAZ solution converged to the analytic solution in both the transient and the steady state problem. Consistent mass matrix type of analysis yielded best performance for the transient problem, in the late-time response; but notable unnatural anomalies were observed in the early-time temperature response at nodal locations near the front face. 5 refs., 22 figs.

  18. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  19. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  20. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  1. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  2. Position control using 2D-to-2D feature correspondences in vision guided cell micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanliang; Han, Mingli; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2007-01-01

    Conventional camera calibration that utilizes the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the camera and the objects has certain limitations for micro-level cell operations due to the presence of hardware deviations and external disturbances during the experimental process, thereby invalidating the extrinsic parameters. This invalidation is often neglected in macro-world visual servoing and affects the visual image processing quality, causing deviation from the desired position in micro-level cell operations. To increase the success rate of vision guided biological micromanipulations, a novel algorithm monitoring the changing image pattern of the manipulators including the injection micropipette and cell holder is designed and implemented based on 2 dimensional (2D)-to 2D feature correspondences and can adjust the manipulator and perform position control simultaneously. When any deviation is found, the manipulator is retracted to the initial focusing plane before continuing the operation.

  3. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  4. 'Brukin2D': a 2D visualization and comparison tool for LC-MS data

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Zerefos, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Vlahou, Antonia; Baumann, Marc; Kossida, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) is a commonly used technique to resolve complex protein mixtures. Visualization of large data sets produced from LC-MS, namely the chromatogram and the mass spectra that correspond to its compounds is the focus of this work. Results The in-house developed 'Brukin2D' software, built in Matlab 7.4, which is presented here, uses the compound data that are exported from the Bruker 'DataAnalysis' program, and depicts the mean mass spectra of all the chromatogram compounds from one LC-MS run, in one 2D contour/density plot. Two contour plots from different chromatograph runs can then be viewed in the same window and automatically compared, in order to find their similarities and differences. The results of the comparison can be examined through detailed mass quantification tables, while chromatogram compound statistics are also calculated during the procedure. Conclusion 'Brukin2D' provides a user-friendly platform for quick, easy and integrated view of complex LC-MS data. The software is available at . PMID:19534737

  5. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) by methadone.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D; Otton, S V; Sproule, B A; Busto, U; Inaba, T; Kalow, W; Sellers, E M

    1993-01-01

    1. In microsomes prepared from three human livers, methadone competitively inhibited the O-demethylation of dextromethorphan, a marker substrate for CYP2D6. The apparent Ki value of methadone ranged from 2.5 to 5 microM. 2. Two hundred and fifty-two (252) white Caucasians, including 210 unrelated healthy volunteers and 42 opiate abusers undergoing treatment with methadone were phenotyped using dextromethorphan as the marker drug. Although the frequency of poor metabolizers was similar in both groups, the extensive metabolizers among the opiate abusers tended to have higher O-demethylation metabolic ratios and to excrete less of the dose as dextromethorphan metabolites than control extensive metabolizer subjects. These data suggest inhibition of CYP2D6 by methadone in vivo as well. 3. Because methadone is widely used in the treatment of opiate abuse, inhibition of CYP2D6 activity in these patients might contribute to exaggerated response or unexpected toxicity from drugs that are substrates of this enzyme. PMID:8448065

  6. Squeezing in a 2-D generalized oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castanos, Octavio; Lopez-Pena, Ramon; Manko, Vladimir I.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional generalized oscillator with time-dependent parameters is considered to study the two-mode squeezing phenomena. Specific choices of the parameters are used to determine the dispersion matrix and analytic expressions, in terms of standard hermite polynomials, of the wavefunctions and photon distributions.

  7. Global 2-D intercomparison of sectional and modal aerosol modules

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenstein, D K; Penner, J E; Herzog, M; Liu, Xiaohong

    2007-05-08

    We present an intercomparison of two aerosol modules, one sectional, one modal, in a global 2-D model in order to differentiate their behavior for tropospheric and stratospheric applications. We model only binary sulfuric acid-water aerosols in this study. Two versions of the sec-tional model and three versions of the modal model are used to test the sensitivity of background aerosol mass and size distribution to the number of bins or modes and to the pre-scribed width of the largest mode. We find modest sensitivity to the number of bins (40 vs 150) used in the sectional model. Aerosol mass is found to be reduced in a modal model if care is not taken in selecting the width of the largest lognormal mode, reflecting differences in sedimentation in the middle stratosphere. The size distributions calculated by the sec-tional model can be better matched by a modal model with four modes rather than three modes in most but not all sit-uations. A simulation of aerosol decay following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo shows that the representation of the size distribution can have a signflcant impact on model-calculated aerosol decay rates in the stratosphere. Between 1991 and 1995, aerosol mass and surface area density calcu-lated by two versions of the modal model adequately match results from the sectional model. Calculated effective radius for the same time period shows more intermodel variability.

  8. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity.

  9. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity. PMID:16486093

  10. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity.

  11. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  12. L-plastin is involved in NKG2D recruitment into lipid rafts and NKG2D-mediated NK cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Brdička, Tomáš; Hoøejši, Václav; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Membrane rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane that have multiple biological functions. The involvement of these structures in the biology of T cells, namely in signal transduction by the TCR, has been widely studied. However, the role of membrane rafts in immunoreceptor signaling in NK cells is less well known. We studied the distribution of the activating NKG2D receptor in lipid rafts by isolating DRMs in a sucrose density gradient or by raft fractionation by β-OG-selective solubility in the NKL cell line. We found that the NKG2D-DAP10 complex and pVav are recruited into rafts upon receptor stimulation. Qualitative proteomic analysis of these fractions showed that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in this process. In particular, we found that the actin-bundling protein L-plastin plays an important role in the clustering of NKG2D into lipid rafts. Moreover, coengagement of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A partially disrupted NKG2D recruitment into rafts. Furthermore, we demonstrated that L-plastin participates in NKG2D-mediated inhibition of NK cell chemotaxis.

  13. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  14. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  15. Nonlinear 2-D effects in the control of magnetic Islands by ECCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, Enzo; Borgogno, Dario; Comisso, Luca; Grasso, Daniela

    2014-02-12

    The stabilization of tearing magnetic islands by means of localized current driven by electron cyclotron waves, requires optimizing the efficiency of the injected helical current. The problem is conventionally addressed using 0-D model of the (generalized) Rutherford equation to find the dependence in terms of the island width, wave beam width and deposition scale length, as well as phase tracking requirements. The use of a 2-D reconnection model shows that both the early time response of a tearing unstable system to ECCD and important nonlinear processes lead to irreversible modifications on the 2-D configuration, where 'phase' and 'width' of an island cease to be observable and controllable state variables. In particular the occurrence of a phase instability and of multiple axis and current sheets, may be a serious impediment for feedback control schemes.

  16. Two-qubit parity meters in 3D and 2D circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicarlo, Leonardo

    2014-03-01

    Non-demolition measurements of multi-qubit observables and feedback control conditioned on their outcomes are essential for quantum error correction. We present two implementations of two-qubit parity meters in circuit QED. In 3D, we match the dispersive coupling of two qubits to a common cavity to encode parity in the transmission of an applied microwave pulse. In 2D, we first encode the parity of two data qubits in the computational state of an ancillary qubit using resonant interactions, and subsequently project the ancilla using a dedicated, dispersively-coupled resonator. A key advantage of this second scheme is the protection of data qubits from dephasing by measurement photons. First applications of these parity meters include probabilistic entanglement by measurement, and deterministic entanglement using digital feedback control. Current efforts target the implementation of measurement-based bit-flip error correction. Research funded by NWO, FOM, and the European projects SOLID and SCALEQIT.

  17. Feedback on Feedback--Does It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speicher, Oranna; Stollhans, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that providing assessment feedback through the medium of screencasts is favourably received by students and encourages deeper engagement with the feedback given by the language teacher (inter alia Abdous & Yoshimura, 2010; Brick & Holmes, 2008; Cann, 2007; Stannard, 2007). In this short paper we will report the…

  18. Supernova Feedback in Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Y.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-06-01

    The hierarchical model of galaxy formation is known to suffer from the ``over-cooling'' problem: the high efficiency of radiative cooling results in too much baryonic matter in a condensed phase (namely, cold gas or stars) when compared to observations. A solution proposed by many authors (see Springel & Hernquist 2003; Fujita et al. 2004; Rasera & Teyssier 2005) is feedback due to supernova (SN) driven winds or active galactic nuclei. Modeling SN feedback by direct injection of thermal energy usually turns out to be inefficient in galaxy-scale simulations, due to the quasi-instantaneous radiation of the SN energy. To avoid this effect, we have developed a new method to incorporate SN feedback in cosmological simulations: using temporary test particles, we reproduce explicitly a local Sedov blast wave solution in the gas distribution. We have performed several self-consistent runs of isolated Navarro, Frenk, & White (1996, hereafter NFW) halos with radiative cooling, star formation, SN feedback and metal enrichment using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES (Teyssier 2002). We have explored the influence of SN feedback on the formation and the evolution of galaxies with different masses. We have studied the efficiency of the resulting galactic winds, as a function of the mass of the parent halo.

  19. Steady propagation of Bingham plugs in 2D channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Parsa; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James

    2009-11-01

    The displacement of the yield-stress liquid plugs in channels and tubes occur in many biological systems and industrial processes. Among them is the propagation of mucus plugs in the respiratory tracts as may occur in asthma, cystic fibrosis, or emphysema. In this work the steady propagation of mucus plugs in a 2D channel is studied numerically, assuming that the mucus is a pure Bingham fluid. The governing equations are solved by a mixed-discontinuous finite element formulation and the free surface is resolved with the method of spines. The constitutive equation for a pure Bingham fluid is modeled by a regularization method. Fluid inertia is neglected, so the controlling parameters in a steady displacement are; the capillary number, Ca, Bingham number ,Bn, and the plug length. According to the numerical results, the yield stress behavior of the plug modifies the plug shape, the pattern of the streamlines and the distribution of stresses in the plug domain and along the walls in a significant way. The distribution along the walls is a major factor in studying cell injuries. This work is supported through the grant NIH HL84370.

  20. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  1. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  2. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  3. Chromaticity Feedback at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-05-23

    Chromaticity feedback during the ramp to high beam energies has been demonstrated in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this report we review the feedback design and measurement technique. Commissioning experiences including interaction with existing tune and coupling feedback are presented together with supporting experimental data.

  4. The Mythology of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcroft, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Much of the general education and discipline-specific literature on feedback suggests that it is a central and important element of student learning. This paper examines feedback from a social process perspective and suggests that feedback is best understood through an analysis of the interactions between academics and students. The paper argues…

  5. Preventing Feedback Fizzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is certainly about saying or writing helpful, learning-focused comments. But that is only part of it. What happens beforehand? What happens afterward? Feedback that is helpful and learning-focused fits into a context. Before a teacher gives feedback, students need to know the learning target so they have a purpose for using the feedback…

  6. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  7. Evaluation of 2D shallow-water model for spillway flow with a complex geometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the two-dimensional (2D) shallow water model is formulated based on several assumptions such as hydrostatic pressure distribution and vertical velocity is negligible, as a simple alternative to the complex 3D model, it has been used to compute water flows in which these assumptions may be ...

  8. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  9. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) (2dFGRS Team, 1998-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, M.; Dalton, G.; Maddox, S.; Sutherland, W.; Norberg, P.; Cole, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bridges, T.; Cannon, R.; Collins, C.; Couch, W.; Cross, N.; Deeley, K.; de Propris, R.; Driver, S. P.; Efstathiou, G.; Ellis, R. S.; Frenk, C. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Jackson, C.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, I.; Lumsden, S.; Madgwick, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Price, I.; Seaborne, M.; Taylor, K.

    2007-11-01

    The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is a major spectroscopic survey taking full advantage of the unique capabilities of the 2dF facility built by the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The 2dFGRS is integrated with the 2dF QSO survey (2QZ, Cat. VII/241). The 2dFGRS obtained spectra for 245591 objects, mainly galaxies, brighter than a nominal extinction-corrected magnitude limit of bJ=19.45. Reliable (quality>=3) redshifts were obtained for 221414 galaxies. The galaxies cover an area of approximately 1500 square degrees selected from the extended APM Galaxy Survey in three regions: a North Galactic Pole (NGP) strip, a South Galactic Pole (SGP) strip, and random fields scattered around the SGP strip. Redshifts are measured from spectra covering 3600-8000 Angstroms at a two-pixel resolution of 9.0 Angstrom and a median S/N of 13 per pixel. All redshift identifications are visually checked and assigned a quality parameter Q in the range 1-5; Q>=3 redshifts are 98.4% reliable and have an rms uncertainty of 85 km/s. The overall redshift completeness for Q>=3 redshifts is 91.8% but this varies with magnitude from 99% for the brightest galaxies to 90% for objects at the survey limit. The 2dFGRS data base is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/. (6 data files).

  11. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  12. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-01

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs. PMID:27537619

  13. CVMAC 2D Program: A method of converting 3D to 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Lown, J.

    1990-06-20

    This paper presents the user with a method of converting a three- dimensional wire frame model into a technical illustration, detail, or assembly drawing. By using the 2D Program, entities can be mapped from three-dimensional model space into two-dimensional model space, as if they are being traced. Selected entities to be mapped can include circles, arcs, lines, and points. This program prompts the user to digitize the view to be mapped, specify the layers in which the new two-dimensional entities will reside, and select the entities, either by digitizing or windowing. The new two-dimensional entities are displayed in a small view which the program creates in the lower left corner of the drawing. 9 figs.

  14. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  15. Development of a spectrometer using a continuous wave distributed feedback quantum cascade laser operating at room temperature for the simultaneous analysis of N2O and CH4 in the Earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Joly, Lilian; Robert, Claude; Parvitte, Bertrand; Catoire, Valery; Durry, Georges; Richard, Guy; Nicoullaud, Bernard; Zéninari, Virginie

    2008-03-20

    We report on the development and performance of a gas sensor based on a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser operating in continuous wave at room temperature for simultaneous measurement of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane (CH(4)) concentrations at ground level. The concentrations of the gases are determined by a long path infrared diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The long-term stability of the instrument is evaluated using the Allan variance technique. A preliminary evaluation of the instrument performance is realized by in situ measurements of N(2)O and CH(4) concentrations at ground level during 1 day. The sensor has also been applied to study the time response of N(2)O concentrations to a fertilizer addition in a soil sample and for the comparison between various types of soils.

  16. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  17. Extreme value statistics of 2D Gaussian free field: effect of finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Rosso, A.; Santachiara, R.

    2016-01-01

    We study minima statistics of the 2D Gaussian free field (GFF) on circles in the unit disk with Dirichlet boundary condition. Free energy distributions of the associated random energy models are exactly calculated in the high temperature phase, and shown to satisfy the duality property, which enables us to predict the minima distribution by assuming the freezing scenario. Numerical tests are provided. Related questions concerning the GFF on a sphere are also considered.

  18. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  19. Prediction feedback in intelligent traffic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuan-Fei; Ma, Xu; Wang, Guan-Wen; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2009-11-01

    The optimal information feedback has a significant effect on many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. In this paper, we studied dynamics of traffic flow with real-time information provided and the influence of a feedback strategy named prediction feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Our model incorporates the effects of adaptability into the cellular automaton models of traffic flow and simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other three information feedback strategies, i.e., vehicle number and flux.

  20. Topological evolutionary computing in the optimal design of 2D and 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burczynski, T.; Poteralski, A.; Szczepanik, M.

    2007-10-01

    An application of evolutionary algorithms and the finite-element method to the topology optimization of 2D structures (plane stress, bending plates, and shells) and 3D structures is described. The basis of the topological evolutionary optimization is the direct control of the density material distribution (or thickness for 2D structures) by the evolutionary algorithm. The structures are optimized for stress, mass, and compliance criteria. The numerical examples demonstrate that this method is an effective technique for solving problems in computer-aided optimal design.

  1. 2D ESR image reconstruction from 1D projections using the modulated field gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páli, T.; Sass, L.; Horvat, L. I.; Ebert, B.

    A method for the reconstruction of 2D ESR images from 1 D projections which is based on the modulated field gradient method has been explored. The 2D distribution of spin-labeled stearic acid in oriented and unoriented dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine multilayers on a flat quartz support was determined. Such samples are potentially useful for the determination of lipid lateral diffusion in oriented multilayers by monitoring the spreading of a sharp concentration profile in one or two dimensions. The limitations of the method are discussed and the improvements which are needed for dynamic measurements are outlined.

  2. High accuracy determination of the thermal properties of supported 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Judek, Jarosław; Gertych, Arkadiusz P; Świniarski, Michał; Łapińska, Anna; Dużyńska, Anna; Zdrojek, Mariusz

    2015-07-16

    We present a novel approach for the simultaneous determination of the thermal conductivity κ and the total interface conductance g of supported 2D materials by the enhanced opto-thermal method. We harness the property of the Gaussian laser beam that acts as a heat source, whose size can easily and precisely be controlled. The experimental data for multi-layer graphene and MoS2 flakes are supplemented using numerical simulations of the heat distribution in the Si/SiO2/2D material system. The procedure of κ and g extraction is tested in a statistical approach, demonstrating the high accuracy and repeatability of our method.

  3. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  4. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  5. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  6. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  7. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  8. Duality Between Spin Networks and the 2D Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Costantino, Francesco; Livine, Etera R.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to exhibit a deep relation between the partition function of the Ising model on a planar trivalent graph and the generating series of the spin network evaluations on the same graph. We provide respectively a fermionic and a bosonic Gaussian integral formulation for each of these functions and we show that they are the inverse of each other (up to some explicit constants) by exhibiting a supersymmetry relating the two formulations. We investigate three aspects and applications of this duality. First, we propose higher order supersymmetric theories that couple the geometry of the spin networks to the Ising model and for which supersymmetric localization still holds. Secondly, after interpreting the generating function of spin network evaluations as the projection of a coherent state of loop quantum gravity onto the flat connection state, we find the probability distribution induced by that coherent state on the edge spins and study its stationary phase approximation. It is found that the stationary points correspond to the critical values of the couplings of the 2D Ising model, at least for isoradial graphs. Third, we analyze the mapping of the correlations of the Ising model to spin network observables, and describe the phase transition on those observables on the hexagonal lattice. This opens the door to many new possibilities, especially for the study of the coarse-graining and continuum limit of spin networks in the context of quantum gravity.

  9. 2-D Chemical-Dynamical Modeling of Venus's Sulfur Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierson, Carver J.; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade a combination of ground based and Venus Express observations have been made of the concentration of sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere, both above [1, 2] and below the clouds [3, 4]. These observations put constraints on both the vertical and meridional variations of the major sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere.. It has also been observed that SO2 concentrations varies on both timescales of hours and years [1,4]. The spatial and temporal distribution of tracer species is owing to two possibilities: mutual chemical interaction and dynamical tracer transport.Previous Chemical modeling of Venus's middle atmosphere has only been explored in 1-D. We will present the first 2-D (altitude and latitude) chemical-dynamical model for Venus's middle atmosphere. The sulfur chemistry is based on of the 1D model of Zhang et al. 2012 [5]. We do model runs over multiple Venus decades testing two scenarios: first one with varying sulfur fluxes from below, and second with secular dynamical perturbations in the atmosphere [6]. By comparing to Venus Express and ground based observations, we put constraints on the dynamics of Venus's middle atmosphere.References: [1] Belyaev et al. Icarus 2012 [2] Marcq et al. Nature geoscience, 2013 [3] Marcq et al. JGR:Planets, 2008 [4] Arney et al. JGR:Planets, 2014 [5] Zhang et al. Icarus 2012 [6] Parish et al. Icarus 2012

  10. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  11. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  12. Application Of Metric Space Technique (mst) In 2-d And 3-d To Sdss Dr5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongfeng; Batuski, D. J.; Khalil, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Metric Space Technique (MST) is a 2-D analysis method using multiple measures for quantitative analysis of any type of structure in an `image'. All potential values of the measures for such distributions are thus coordinates in a multi-parameter space, and the analysis is based on considering a sample's measures (called `output functions'), and their distance from the origin, which corresponds to the measures of the observed SDSS sample, in this multi-parameter space. Applications of this method to thin (approximately 2-D) slices of SDSS DR5 have yielded a detailed comparison of numerical models (Berlind et al. 2006, Croton et al. 2005) against the SDSS galaxy 2-D distribution structure in multi-parameter space. We present those results, including discussion of the effects of transforming from physical space to redshift space on the statistics at different scales. We also extended this 2-D method into 3-D, and we present comparisons of the SDSS galaxy 3-D distribution versus the same numerical simulations.

  13. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter. PMID:25943116

  14. IGUANA: a high-performance 2D and 3D visualisation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alverson, G.; Eulisse, G.; Muzaffar, S.; Osborne, I.; Taylor, L.; Tuura, L. A.

    2004-11-01

    The IGUANA project has developed visualisation tools for multiple high-energy experiments. At the core of IGUANA is a generic, high-performance visualisation system based on OpenInventor and OpenGL. This paper describes the back-end and a feature-rich 3D visualisation system built on it, as well as a new 2D visualisation system that can automatically generate 2D views from 3D data, for example to produce R/Z or X/Y detector displays from existing 3D display with little effort. IGUANA has collaborated with the open-source gl2ps project to create a high-quality vector postscript output that can produce true vector graphics output from any OpenGL 2D or 3D display, complete with surface shading and culling of invisible surfaces. We describe how it works. We also describe how one can measure the memory and performance costs of various OpenInventor constructs and how to test scene graphs. We present good patterns to follow and bad patterns to avoid. We have added more advanced tools such as per-object clipping, slicing, lighting or animation, as well as multiple linked views with OpenInventor, and describe them in this paper. We give details on how to edit object appearance efficiently and easily, and even dynamically as a function of object properties, with instant visual feedback to the user.

  15. Nonlinear 2D-IR spectroscopy as a tool to study peptide dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The structure of bio-macromolecules (peptides, proteins, enzymes and DNA) crucially defines their function and it is the enormous progress in structure-sensitive methods (NMR, x-ray) which has lead to an extremely detailed microscopic understanding of reactions in biological systems. Our knowledge on the dynamics of these structures, which presumably is as important for the function as the structure itself, is essentially based on computer simulations with essentially no or very indirect experimental feedback. Nonlinear 2D vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) on the amide I mode of small globular peptides has been demonstrated recently and a detailed relationship between the static 3D structure and the strength of cross peaks has been established (in analogy to COSY in 2D-NMR spectroscopy). An extension of this technique allows to observe equilibrium fluctuations of model helices by incorporating an additional population period (i.e. 'mixing time'), giving rise to spectral diffusion of the diagonal peaks and incoherent population transfer between excitonic states (the latter being equivalent to the nuclear Overhauser effect, NOESY). In contrast to spin transitions, however, the processes are not in the 'motional narrowing limit' (i. e. τ_c>=T_2) so that the timescales of protein fluctuation can be measured directly on a picosecond timescale and in a site specific manner.

  16. Propagator-resolved 2D exchange in porous media in the inhomogeneous magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Burcaw, Lauren M; Hunter, Mark W; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-08-01

    We present a propagator-resolved 2D exchange spectroscopy technique for observing fluid motion in a porous medium. The susceptibility difference between the matrix and the fluid is exploited to produce an inhomogeneous internal magnetic field, causing the Larmor frequency to change as molecules migrate. We test our method using a randomly packed monodisperse 100 microm diameter glass bead matrix saturated with distilled water. Building upon previous 2D exchange spectroscopy work we add a displacement dimension which allows us to obtain 2D exchange spectra that are defined by both mixing time and spatial displacement rather than by mixing time alone. We also simulate our system using a Monte Carlo process in a random nonpenetrating monodisperse bead pack, finding good agreement with experiment. A simple analytic model is used to interpret the NMR data in terms of a characteristic length scale over which molecules must diffuse to sample the inhomogeneous field distribution. PMID:20554230

  17. Pareto joint inversion of 2D magnetotelluric and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Katarzyna; Bogacz, Adrian; Kozubal, Adam; Danek, Tomasz; Wojdyła, Marek

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution, the first results of the "Innovative technology of petrophysical parameters estimation of geological media using joint inversion algorithms" project were described. At this stage of the development, Pareto joint inversion scheme for 2D MT and gravity data was used. Additionally, seismic data were provided to set some constrains for the inversion. Sharp Boundary Interface(SBI) approach and description model with set of polygons were used to limit the dimensionality of the solution space. The main engine was based on modified Particle Swarm Optimization(PSO). This algorithm was properly adapted to handle two or more target function at once. Additional algorithm was used to eliminate non- realistic solution proposals. Because PSO is a method of stochastic global optimization, it requires a lot of proposals to be evaluated to find a single Pareto solution and then compose a Pareto front. To optimize this stage parallel computing was used for both inversion engine and 2D MT forward solver. There are many advantages of proposed solution of joint inversion problems. First of all, Pareto scheme eliminates cumbersome rescaling of the target functions, that can highly affect the final solution. Secondly, the whole set of solution is created in one optimization run, providing a choice of the final solution. This choice can be based off qualitative data, that are usually very hard to be incorporated into the regular inversion schema. SBI parameterisation not only limits the problem of dimensionality, but also makes constraining of the solution easier. At this stage of work, decision to test the approach using MT and gravity data was made, because this combination is often used in practice. It is important to mention, that the general solution is not limited to this two methods and it is flexible enough to be used with more than two sources of data. Presented results were obtained for synthetic models, imitating real geological conditions, where

  18. Investigating the Effects of Multimodal Feedback through Tracking State in Pen-Based Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Minghui; Ren, Xiangshi

    2011-01-01

    A tracking state increases the bandwidth of pen-based interfaces. However, this state is difficult to detect with default visual feedback. This paper reports on two experiments that are designed to evaluate multimodal feedback for pointing tasks (both 1D and 2D) in tracking state. In 1D pointing experiments, results show that there is a…

  19. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  20. MagicPlate-512: A 2D silicon detector array for quality assurance of stereotactic motion adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Petasecca, M. Newall, M. K.; Aldosari, A. H.; Fuduli, I.; Espinoza, A. A.; Porumb, C. S.; Guatelli, S.; Metcalfe, P.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Booth, J. T.; Colvill, E.; Duncan, M.; Cammarano, D.; Carolan, M.; Oborn, B.; Perevertaylo, V.; Keall, P. J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spatial and temporal resolutions are two of the most important features for quality assurance instrumentation of motion adaptive radiotherapy modalities. The goal of this work is to characterize the performance of the 2D high spatial resolution monolithic silicon diode array named “MagicPlate-512” for quality assurance of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) combined with a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking technique for motion compensation. Methods: MagicPlate-512 is used in combination with the movable platform HexaMotion and a research version of radiofrequency tracking system Calypso driving MLC tracking software. The authors reconstruct 2D dose distributions of small field square beams in three modalities: in static conditions, mimicking the temporal movement pattern of a lung tumor and tracking the moving target while the MLC compensates almost instantaneously for the tumor displacement. Use of Calypso in combination with MagicPlate-512 requires a proper radiofrequency interference shielding. Impact of the shielding on dosimetry has been simulated by GEANT4 and verified experimentally. Temporal and spatial resolutions of the dosimetry system allow also for accurate verification of segments of complex stereotactic radiotherapy plans with identification of the instant and location where a certain dose is delivered. This feature allows for retrospective temporal reconstruction of the delivery process and easy identification of error in the tracking or the multileaf collimator driving systems. A sliding MLC wedge combined with the lung motion pattern has been measured. The ability of the MagicPlate-512 (MP512) in 2D dose mapping in all three modes of operation was benchmarked by EBT3 film. Results: Full width at half maximum and penumbra of the moving and stationary dose profiles measured by EBT3 film and MagicPlate-512 confirm that motion has a significant impact on the dose distribution. Motion

  1. Dynamic Linkages Between the Transition Zone & Surface Plate Motions in 2D Models of Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Descending subducted slabs affect both plate tectonics at the surface and overall mantle flow (e.g. Conrad and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2002). For time-dependent numerical models, the potential evolution of these slabs, ranging from immediate penetration into the lower mantle to prior buckling and stagnation, are affected by parameters such as the plate age, the viscosity jump into the lower mantle, the presence of phase transitions, trench motion and the chosen governing equation approximation (e.g. Billen and Hirth, 2007). Similarly, the overall deviatoric stress within the slab, especially where modified by the phase transitions, may explain the uneven distribution of deep earthquakes with depth (e.g. Bina, 1997). Better understanding of these processes may arise from a more realistic 2-D model that is fully-dynamic, with an overriding plate, freely-moving trench, compositionally-layered slab and seven major phase transitions, in addition to using the compressible (TALA) form of the governing equations. Though the thermodynamic parameters of certain phase transitions may be uncertain, this study aims to test the latest data and encourage further mineralogical research. We will present fully-dynamic models, which explore the importance of the phase transitions, especially those that have been previously excluded such as the wadsleyite to ringwoodite and the pyroxene and garnet phase transitions. These phase transitions, coupled with the modeled compositionally distinct crust, harzburgite, and pyrolite lithosphere layers, may produce new large-scale dynamic behavior not seen in past numerical models, as well as stress variations within the slab related to deep slab seismicity. Feedback from the compositionally complex slab to the dynamic trench may provide further insight on the mechanics of slab stagnation and behavior in the upper and lower mantle. Billen, M. I., and G. Hirth, Rheologic controls on slab dynamics, Geochemistry, Geophysics and Geosystems, 8 (Q08012

  2. 2D noise propagation in 3D object position determination from a single-perspective projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habets, Damiaan F.; Pollmann, Steven; Holdsworth, David W.

    2002-05-01

    Image guidance during endovascular intervention is predominantly provided by two-dimensional (2D) digital radiographic systems used for vessel visualization and localization of clips and coils. This paper describes the propagation of 2D noise in the determination of three-dimensional (3D) object position from a single perspective view. In our system, a view is obtained by a digital fluoroscopic x-ray system, corrected for XRII distortions (+/- 0.035mm) and mechanical C-arm shifts (+/- 0.080mm). The tracked object contains high-contrast markers with known relative spacing, allowing for identification and centroid calculation. A least-square projection-Procrustes analysis of the 2D perspective projection is used to determine the 3D position of the object. The effect of uncertainty in 2D marker position on the precision of the 3D object localization using simulations and phantoms was investigated and a nearly linear relationship was found; however, the slope of this relationship is not unity. The slope found indicates a significant amplification of error due to the least-square solution, which is not equally distributed among the 3 major axes. In order to obtain a 3D localization error of less than +/- 1mm, the 2D localization precision must be better than +/- 0.2mm for each marker.

  3. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  4. Practical Algorithm For Computing The 2-D Arithmetic Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Choi, Y. Y.; Yu, Xiaoli

    1989-05-01

    Recently, Tufts and Sadasiv [10] exposed a method for computing the coefficients of a Fourier series of a periodic function using the Mobius inversion of series. They called this method of analysis the Arithmetic Fourier Transform(AFT). The advantage of the AFT over the FN 1' is that this method of Fourier analysis needs only addition operations except for multiplications by scale factors at one stage of the computation. The disadvantage of the AFT as they expressed it originally is that it could be used effectively only to compute finite Fourier coefficients of a real even function. To remedy this the AFT developed in [10] is extended in [11] to compute the Fourier coefficients of both the even and odd components of a periodic function. In this paper, the improved AFT [11] is extended to a two-dimensional(2-D) Arithmetic Fourier Transform for calculating the Fourier Transform of two-dimensional discrete signals. This new algorithm is based on both the number-theoretic method of Mobius inversion of double series and the complex conjugate property of Fourier coefficients. The advantage of this algorithm over the conventional 2-D FFT is that the corner-turning problem needed in a conventional 2-D Discrete Fourier Transform(DFT) can be avoided. Therefore, this new 2-D algorithm is readily suitable for VLSI implementation as a parallel architecture. Comparing the operations of 2-D AFT of a MxM 2-D data array with the conventional 2-D FFT, the number of multiplications is significantly reduced from (2log2M)M2 to (9/4)M2. Hence, this new algorithm is faster than the FFT algorithm. Finally, two simulation results of this new 2-D AFT algorithm for 2-D artificial and real images are given in this paper.

  5. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    PubMed

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  6. Development of a 5-DOF force feedback laparoscopic interface for simulation and telesurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ur, Ela; Salisbury, J. Kenneth, Jr.

    2000-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery reduces recovery time and risk of complications over conventional methods for abdominal procedures, making it particularly suited to battlefield medicine. However, laparoscopy challenges the surgeon to work under many limitations: motion is reflected about the trocar; access inside the body is restricted; visual feedback is generally only 2D; and haptic, or touch, information is reduced. As such, the importance of training for developing sensitivity to the existing haptic cues becomes apparent, and the problem arises of how to distribute the services of relatively few highly trained surgeons to widespread battlefield locations. A force- feedback haptic interface can play a critical role in both of these functions, providing realistic or enhanced sensations to a laparoscopy simulator or a telesurgery system. The work described here was directed at continuing the work of earlier force-feedback systems, which provide up to the first three degrees of freedom (DOF) in laparoscopy (pitch, yaw, and insertion relative to the trocar), toward creating a complete and high-fidelity haptic interface. Careful requirements analysis using data from surgeon interviews, operating room observations, and task analyses, was the basis for specifying the technical attributes and configuration of the new system. The resulting interface offers the surgeon real laparoscopic tools with force feedback to all five degrees of freedom in laparoscopy, using a lifelike torso in which trocar location is easily changed. A light and compact 2-DOF device was developed to supplement one of the available 3-DOF devices, providing the additional forces in tool rotation and gripper feedback. Next year, the system will be integrated into a software stimulation currently in development at the Center for Minimally Invasive Therapy (CIMIT).

  7. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  8. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  9. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  10. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  11. Dynamic unfolding of multilayers: 2D numerical approach and application to turbidites in SW Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechmann, S. M.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Burg, J.-P.; Marques, F. O.

    2010-10-01

    Numerical algorithms for two-dimensional (2D) ductile multilayer folding are used (1) to unfold synthetically generated multilayer folds and natural multilayer folds in turbidites on the SW coast of Portugal and (2) to test how 2D ductile multilayer folding may generate collapsed hinges. A series of dynamic retro-deformation experiments with different viscosity ratios, rheological flow laws, boundary conditions and initial geometries were able to restore digitized, natural multilayer folds to flat layers, except one particular collapsed hinge with closed limbs (i.e. no matrix material left between limbs). Consistently, 2D forward simulations of ductile multilayer folding produced always omega-shaped hinges with matrix material remaining stuffed between limbs. These numerical results suggested that 2D reverse ductile unfolding cannot retro-deform the fully closed, collapsed hinge. Having observed that one limb of this collapsed fold is ruptured, with a measured gap of about 4.9 m, additional calculations were made with implementation of this amount of stretching. Results were not more satisfactory. Since omega-shaped folds exist in other places in the field area, we concluded that in this specific case shales were likely squeezed out from the hinge in the third dimension, parallel to the fold axis. Dynamic retro-deformations indicate that the effective viscosity ratio between inter-layered quartzwackes and shales was between 25 and 100 during folding. They further point out where 3D flow and possibly fracturing were effective during folding. This work demonstrates the constructive feedback between numerical tests and field data and that dynamic retro-deformation offers rheological constraints that geometric retro-deformation of geological sections cannot provide.

  12. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient Gint can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T2 in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of Gint2D and T2 by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between Gint and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz 1H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint2D-T2 maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity.

  13. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient G(int) can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T(2) in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of G(int)(2)D and T(2) by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between G(int) and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz (1)H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint(2)D-T(2) maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity. PMID:25723135

  14. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  15. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  16. 2D hexagonal quaternion Fourier transform in color image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel concept of the quaternion discrete Fourier transform on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, which we call the two-dimensional hexagonal quaternion discrete Fourier transform (2-D HQDFT). The concept of the right-side 2D HQDFT is described and the left-side 2-D HQDFT is similarly considered. To calculate the transform, the image on the hexagonal lattice is described in the tensor representation when the image is presented by a set of 1-D signals, or splitting-signals which can be separately processed in the frequency domain. The 2-D HQDFT can be calculated by a set of 1-D quaternion discrete Fourier transforms (QDFT) of the splitting-signals.

  17. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  18. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  19. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices. PMID:26839956

  20. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  1. Orbital Single Particle Tracking on a commercial confocal microscope using piezoelectric stage feedback

    PubMed Central

    Lanzanò, Luca; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Single Particle Tracking (SPT) is a technique used to locate fluorescent particles with nanometer precision. In the orbital tracking method the position of a particle is obtained analyzing the distribution of intensity along a circular orbit scanned around the particle. In combination with an active feedback this method allows tracking of particles in 2D and 3D with millisecond temporal resolution. Here we describe a SPT setup based on a feedback approach implemented with minimal modification of a commercially available confocal laser scanning microscope, the Zeiss LSM 510, in combination with an external piezoelectric stage scanner. The commercial microscope offers the advantage of a user-friendly software interface and pre-calibrated hardware components. The use of an external piezo-scanner allows the addition of feedback into the system but also represents a limitation in terms of its mechanical response. We describe in detail this implementation of the orbital tracking method and discuss advantages and limitations. As an example of application to live cell experiments we perform the 3D tracking of acidic vesicles in live polarized epithelial cells. PMID:25419461

  2. Designing 2D arrays for SHM of planar structures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring structural integrity of large planar structures that aims at detecting and localizing impact or damage at any point of the structure requires normally a relatively dense network of uniformly distributed ultrasonic sensors. 2-D ultrasonic phased arrays, due to their beam-steering capability and all azimuth angle coverage are a very promising tool for structural health monitoring (SHM) of plate-like structures using Lamb waves (LW). Linear phased arrays that have been proposed for that purpose, produce mirrored image characterized by azimuth dependent resolution, which prevents unequivocal damage localization. 2D arrays do not have this drawback and they are even capable of mode selectivity when generating and receiving LWs. Performance of 2D arrays depends on their topology as well as the number of elements (transducers) used and their spacing in terms of wavelength. In this paper we propose a consistent methodology for three-step: theoretical, numerical and experimental investigation of a diversity of 2D array topologies in SHM applications. In the first step, the theoretical evaluation is performed using frequency-dependent structure transfer function (STF). STF that defines linear propagation of different LWs modes through the dispersive medium enables theoretical investigation of the particular array performance for a predefined tone-burst excitation signal. A dedicated software tool has been developed for the numerical evaluation of 2D array directional characteristics (beampattern) in a specific structure. The simulations are performed using local interaction simulation approach (LISA), implemented using NVIDIA CUDA graphical computation unit (GPU), which enables time-efficient 3D simulations of LWs propagation. Beampatterns of a 2D array can be to some extend evaluated analytically and using numerical simulations; in most cases, however, they require experimental verification. Using scanning laser vibrometer is proposed for that purpose, in a setup

  3. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    PubMed

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-μL), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown

  4. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  5. Anisotropic 2D Materials for Tunable Hyperbolic Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Nemilentsau, Andrei; Low, Tony; Hanson, George

    2016-02-12

    Motivated by the recent emergence of a new class of anisotropic 2D materials, we examine their electromagnetic modes and demonstrate that a broad class of the materials can host highly directional hyperbolic plasmons. Their propagation direction can be manipulated on the spot by gate doping, enabling hyperbolic beam reflection, refraction, and bending. The realization of these natural 2D hyperbolic media opens up a new avenue in dynamic control of hyperbolic plasmons not possible in the 3D version.

  6. A simultaneous 2D/3D autostereo workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Dennis; McGinnis, Bradley; Talandis, Jonas; Leigh, Jason; Peterka, Tom; Knoll, Aaron; Sumer, Aslihan; Papka, Michael; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel immersive workstation environment that scientists can use for 3D data exploration and as their everyday 2D computer monitor. Our implementation is based on an autostereoscopic dynamic parallax barrier 2D/3D display, interactive input devices, and a software infrastructure that allows client/server software modules to couple the workstation to scientists' visualization applications. This paper describes the hardware construction and calibration, software components, and a demonstration of our system in nanoscale materials science exploration.

  7. Wavelet characterization of 2D turbulence and intermittency in magnetized electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2016-06-01

    A study of the free relaxation of turbulence in a two-dimensional (2D) flow is presented, with a focus on the role of the initial vorticity conditions. Exploiting a well-known analogy with 2D inviscid incompressible fluids, the system investigated here is a magnetized pure electron plasma. The dynamics of this system are simulated by means of a 2D particle-in-cell code, starting from different spiral density (vorticity) distributions. A wavelet multiresolution analysis is adopted, which allows the coherent and incoherent parts of the flow to be separated. Comparison of the turbulent evolution in the different cases is based on the investigation of the time evolution of statistical properties, including the probability distribution functions and structure functions of the vorticity increments. It is also based on an analysis of the enstrophy evolution and its spectrum for the two components. In particular, while the statistical features assess the degree of flow intermittency, spectral analysis allows us not only to estimate the time required to reach a state of fully developed turbulence, but also estimate its dependence on the thickness of the initial spiral density distribution, accurately tracking the dynamics of both the coherent structures and the turbulent background. The results are compared with those relevant to annular initial vorticity distributions (Chen et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 495810511).

  8. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Cascading rainfall uncertainties into 2D inundation impact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvignet, Maxime; de Almeida, Gustavo; Champion, Adrian; Garcia Pintado, Javier; Neal, Jeff; Freer, Jim; Cloke, Hannah; Odoni, Nick; Coxon, Gemma; Bates, Paul; Mason, David

    2013-04-01

    Existing precipitation products show differences in their spatial and temporal distribution and several studies have presented how these differences influence the ability to predict hydrological responses. However, an atmospheric-hydrologic-hydraulic uncertainty cascade is seldom explored and how, importantly, input uncertainties propagate through this cascade is still poorly understood. Such a project requires a combination of modelling capabilities, runoff generation predictions based on those rainfall forecasts, and hydraulic flood wave propagation based on the runoff predictions. Accounting for uncertainty in each component is important in decision making for issuing flood warnings, monitoring or planning. We suggest a better understanding of uncertainties in inundation impact modelling must consider these differences in rainfall products. This will improve our understanding of the input uncertainties on our predictive capability. In this paper, we propose to address this issue by i) exploring the effects of errors in rainfall on inundation predictive capacity within an uncertainty framework, i.e. testing inundation uncertainty against different comparable meteorological conditions (i.e. using different rainfall products). Our method cascades rainfall uncertainties into a lumped hydrologic model (FUSE) within the GLUE uncertainty framework. The resultant prediction uncertainties in discharge provide uncertain boundary conditions, which are cascaded into a simplified shallow water 2D hydraulic model (LISFLOOD-FP). Rainfall data captured by three different measurement techniques - rain gauges, gridded data and numerical weather predictions (NWP) models are used to assess the combined input data and model parameter uncertainty. The study is performed in the Severn catchment over the period between June and July 2007, where a series of rainfall events causing record floods in the study area). Changes in flood area extent are compared and the uncertainty envelope is

  10. INVITED ARTICLE: Towards dense, realistic granular media in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luding, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The development of an applicable theory for granular matter—with both qualitative and quantitative value—is a challenging prospect, given the multitude of states, phases and (industrial) situations it has to cover. Given the general balance equations for mass, momentum and energy, the limiting case of dilute and almost elastic granular gases, where kinetic theory works perfectly well, is the starting point. In most systems, low density co-exists with very high density, where the latter is an open problem for kinetic theory. Furthermore, many additional nonlinear phenomena and material properties are important in realistic granular media, involving, e.g.: (i) multi-particle interactions and elasticity (ii) strong dissipation, (iii) friction, (iv) long-range forces and wet contacts, (v) wide particle size distributions and (vi) various particle shapes. Note that, while some of these issues are more relevant for high density, others are important for both low and high densities; some of them can be dealt with by means of kinetic theory, some cannot. This paper is a review of recent progress towards more realistic models for dense granular media in 2D, even though most of the observations, conclusions and corrections given are qualitatively true also in 3D. Starting from an elastic, frictionless and monodisperse hard sphere gas, the (continuum) balance equations of mass, momentum and energy are given. The equation of state, the (Navier-Stokes level) transport coefficients and the energy-density dissipation rate are considered. Several corrections are applied to those constitutive material laws—one by one—in order to account for the realistic physical effects and properties listed above.

  11. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  12. The Power of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John; Timperley, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement, but this impact can be either positive or negative. Its power is frequently mentioned in articles about learning and teaching, but surprisingly few recent studies have systematically investigated its meaning. This article provides a conceptual analysis of feedback and…

  13. Four perspectives on climate feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldl, N.; Roe, G. H.

    2013-08-01

    The spatial pattern of climate feedbacks depends on how the feedbacks are defined. We employ an idealized aquaplanet simulation with radiative kernels diagnosed for the precise model setup and characterize the meridional structure of feedbacks under four different definitions: local feedbacks, global feedbacks, nondimensional feedback factors, and relative humidity feedbacks. First, the spatial pattern of the reference response (i.e., the Planck feedback) is found to vary with definition, largely as a consequence of polar-amplified warming, which affects other high-latitude feedbacks as well. Second, locally defined feedbacks allow for decomposition of the surface temperature response as a function of feedbacks, forcing, and heat transport. Third, different insights into the dynamical and thermodynamical underpinnings of the subtropical moisture response are gained by comparing different versions of humidity feedbacks. Thus, alternative approaches to the conventional, global definition of feedbacks offer several advantages for understanding patterns of warming and, ultimately, regional climate predictability.

  14. Designing Genetic Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andreas W K; Dolan, James A; Kelly, Ciarán L; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-08-01

    By incorporating feedback around systems we wish to manipulate, it is possible to improve their performance and robustness properties to meet pre-specified design objectives. For decades control engineers have been successfully implementing feedback controllers for complex mechanical and electrical systems such as aircraft and sports cars. Natural biological systems use feedback extensively for regulation and adaptation but apart from the most basic designs, there is no systematic framework for designing feedback controllers in Synthetic Biology. In this paper we describe how classical approaches from linear control theory can be used to close the loop. This includes the design of genetic circuits using feedback control and the presentation of a biological phase lag controller. PMID:26390502

  15. R2d2 Drives Selfish Sweeps in the House Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Didion, John P.; Morgan, Andrew P.; Yadgary, Liran; Bell, Timothy A.; McMullan, Rachel C.; Ortiz de Solorzano, Lydia; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Bult, Carol J.; Campbell, Karl J.; Castiglia, Riccardo; Ching, Yung-Hao; Chunco, Amanda J.; Crowley, James J.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Förster, Daniel W.; French, John E.; Gabriel, Sofia I.; Gatti, Daniel M.; Garland, Theodore; Giagia-Athanasopoulou, Eva B.; Giménez, Mabel D.; Grize, Sofia A.; Gündüz, İslam; Holmes, Andrew; Hauffe, Heidi C.; Herman, Jeremy S.; Holt, James M.; Hua, Kunjie; Jolley, Wesley J.; Lindholm, Anna K.; López-Fuster, María J.; Mitsainas, George; da Luz Mathias, Maria; McMillan, Leonard; Ramalhinho, Maria da Graça Morgado; Rehermann, Barbara; Rosshart, Stephan P.; Searle, Jeremy B.; Shiao, Meng-Shin; Solano, Emanuela; Svenson, Karen L.; Thomas-Laemont, Patricia; Threadgill, David W.; Ventura, Jacint; Weinstock, George M.; Pomp, Daniel; Churchill, Gary A.; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    A selective sweep is the result of strong positive selection driving newly occurring or standing genetic variants to fixation, and can dramatically alter the pattern and distribution of allelic diversity in a population. Population-level sequencing data have enabled discoveries of selective sweeps associated with genes involved in recent adaptations in many species. In contrast, much debate but little evidence addresses whether “selfish” genes are capable of fixation—thereby leaving signatures identical to classical selective sweeps—despite being neutral or deleterious to organismal fitness. We previously described R2d2, a large copy-number variant that causes nonrandom segregation of mouse Chromosome 2 in females due to meiotic drive. Here we show population-genetic data consistent with a selfish sweep driven by alleles of R2d2 with high copy number (R2d2HC) in natural populations. We replicate this finding in multiple closed breeding populations from six outbred backgrounds segregating for R2d2 alleles. We find that R2d2HC rapidly increases in frequency, and in most cases becomes fixed in significantly fewer generations than can be explained by genetic drift. R2d2HC is also associated with significantly reduced litter sizes in heterozygous mothers, making it a true selfish allele. Our data provide direct evidence of populations actively undergoing selfish sweeps, and demonstrate that meiotic drive can rapidly alter the genomic landscape in favor of mutations with neutral or even negative effects on overall Darwinian fitness. Further study will reveal the incidence of selfish sweeps, and will elucidate the relative contributions of selfish genes, adaptation and genetic drift to evolution. PMID:26882987

  16. R2d2 Drives Selfish Sweeps in the House Mouse.

    PubMed

    Didion, John P; Morgan, Andrew P; Yadgary, Liran; Bell, Timothy A; McMullan, Rachel C; Ortiz de Solorzano, Lydia; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Bult, Carol J; Campbell, Karl J; Castiglia, Riccardo; Ching, Yung-Hao; Chunco, Amanda J; Crowley, James J; Chesler, Elissa J; Förster, Daniel W; French, John E; Gabriel, Sofia I; Gatti, Daniel M; Garland, Theodore; Giagia-Athanasopoulou, Eva B; Giménez, Mabel D; Grize, Sofia A; Gündüz, İslam; Holmes, Andrew; Hauffe, Heidi C; Herman, Jeremy S; Holt, James M; Hua, Kunjie; Jolley, Wesley J; Lindholm, Anna K; López-Fuster, María J; Mitsainas, George; da Luz Mathias, Maria; McMillan, Leonard; Ramalhinho, Maria da Graça Morgado; Rehermann, Barbara; Rosshart, Stephan P; Searle, Jeremy B; Shiao, Meng-Shin; Solano, Emanuela; Svenson, Karen L; Thomas-Laemont, Patricia; Threadgill, David W; Ventura, Jacint; Weinstock, George M; Pomp, Daniel; Churchill, Gary A; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    A selective sweep is the result of strong positive selection driving newly occurring or standing genetic variants to fixation, and can dramatically alter the pattern and distribution of allelic diversity in a population. Population-level sequencing data have enabled discoveries of selective sweeps associated with genes involved in recent adaptations in many species. In contrast, much debate but little evidence addresses whether "selfish" genes are capable of fixation-thereby leaving signatures identical to classical selective sweeps-despite being neutral or deleterious to organismal fitness. We previously described R2d2, a large copy-number variant that causes nonrandom segregation of mouse Chromosome 2 in females due to meiotic drive. Here we show population-genetic data consistent with a selfish sweep driven by alleles of R2d2 with high copy number (R2d2(HC)) in natural populations. We replicate this finding in multiple closed breeding populations from six outbred backgrounds segregating for R2d2 alleles. We find that R2d2(HC) rapidly increases in frequency, and in most cases becomes fixed in significantly fewer generations than can be explained by genetic drift. R2d2(HC) is also associated with significantly reduced litter sizes in heterozygous mothers, making it a true selfish allele. Our data provide direct evidence of populations actively undergoing selfish sweeps, and demonstrate that meiotic drive can rapidly alter the genomic landscape in favor of mutations with neutral or even negative effects on overall Darwinian fitness. Further study will reveal the incidence of selfish sweeps, and will elucidate the relative contributions of selfish genes, adaptation and genetic drift to evolution.

  17. R2d2 Drives Selfish Sweeps in the House Mouse.

    PubMed

    Didion, John P; Morgan, Andrew P; Yadgary, Liran; Bell, Timothy A; McMullan, Rachel C; Ortiz de Solorzano, Lydia; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Bult, Carol J; Campbell, Karl J; Castiglia, Riccardo; Ching, Yung-Hao; Chunco, Amanda J; Crowley, James J; Chesler, Elissa J; Förster, Daniel W; French, John E; Gabriel, Sofia I; Gatti, Daniel M; Garland, Theodore; Giagia-Athanasopoulou, Eva B; Giménez, Mabel D; Grize, Sofia A; Gündüz, İslam; Holmes, Andrew; Hauffe, Heidi C; Herman, Jeremy S; Holt, James M; Hua, Kunjie; Jolley, Wesley J; Lindholm, Anna K; López-Fuster, María J; Mitsainas, George; da Luz Mathias, Maria; McMillan, Leonard; Ramalhinho, Maria da Graça Morgado; Rehermann, Barbara; Rosshart, Stephan P; Searle, Jeremy B; Shiao, Meng-Shin; Solano, Emanuela; Svenson, Karen L; Thomas-Laemont, Patricia; Threadgill, David W; Ventura, Jacint; Weinstock, George M; Pomp, Daniel; Churchill, Gary A; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    A selective sweep is the result of strong positive selection driving newly occurring or standing genetic variants to fixation, and can dramatically alter the pattern and distribution of allelic diversity in a population. Population-level sequencing data have enabled discoveries of selective sweeps associated with genes involved in recent adaptations in many species. In contrast, much debate but little evidence addresses whether "selfish" genes are capable of fixation-thereby leaving signatures identical to classical selective sweeps-despite being neutral or deleterious to organismal fitness. We previously described R2d2, a large copy-number variant that causes nonrandom segregation of mouse Chromosome 2 in females due to meiotic drive. Here we show population-genetic data consistent with a selfish sweep driven by alleles of R2d2 with high copy number (R2d2(HC)) in natural populations. We replicate this finding in multiple closed breeding populations from six outbred backgrounds segregating for R2d2 alleles. We find that R2d2(HC) rapidly increases in frequency, and in most cases becomes fixed in significantly fewer generations than can be explained by genetic drift. R2d2(HC) is also associated with significantly reduced litter sizes in heterozygous mothers, making it a true selfish allele. Our data provide direct evidence of populations actively undergoing selfish sweeps, and demonstrate that meiotic drive can rapidly alter the genomic landscape in favor of mutations with neutral or even negative effects on overall Darwinian fitness. Further study will reveal the incidence of selfish sweeps, and will elucidate the relative contributions of selfish genes, adaptation and genetic drift to evolution. PMID:26882987

  18. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  19. Use of the 'Precessions' process for prepolishing and correcting 2D & 2(1/2)D form.

    PubMed

    Walker, David D; Freeman, Richard; Morton, Roger; McCavana, Gerry; Beaucamp, Anthony

    2006-11-27

    The Precessions process polishes complex surfaces from the ground state preserving the ground-in form, and subsequently rectifies measured form errors. Our first paper introduced the technology and focused on the novel tooling. In this paper we describe the unique CNC machine tools and how they operate in polishing and correcting form. Experimental results demonstrate both the '2D' and '2(1/2)D' form-correction modes, as applied to aspheres with rotationally-symmetric target-form.

  20. Closed-loop, non-linear feedback control simulations of beam-driven field-reversed configurations (FRCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, N.; Onofri, M.; Barnes, D.; Romero, J.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The C-2U device has recently demonstrated sustainment of an advanced, beam-driven FRC over time scales longer than the characteristic times for confinement, fast ion slow-down, and wall current decay. In anticipation of further advances in plasma lifetime, we are developing feedback control techniques for major FRC parameters and resistive instabilities. The LamyRidge code solves the time-dependent extended MHD equations in axisymmetric geometry. In the Q2D code, LamyRidge is combined with a 3-D kinetic code that tracks fast ions and runs in parallel with LamyRidge. Periodically, the background fields in the kinetic code are updated from the MHD simulation and the averaged fast particle distribution is integrated into the fluid equations. Recently, we have added the capability to run Q2D simulations as subordinate processes in Simulink, giving us the ability to run non-linear, closed-loop simulations using control algorithms developed in Simulink. The same Simulink models can be exported to real-time targets (CPU or FPGA) to perform feedback control in experiments. We present closed-loop simulations of beam-driven FRCs under magnetically-actuated feedback control. Results for positionally unstable FRCs are compared with the predictions of a linearized rigid-plasma model. Plasmas predicted to be passively stabilized by the linear model are found to exhibit Alfvenic growth in several cases. Feedback gains predicted to be stabilizing in the linear model are generally found to be insufficient in non-linear simulations, and vice versa. Control of separatrix geometry is demonstrated.

  1. Free-standing silicene obtained by cooling from 2D liquid Si: structure and thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoang, Vo; Thi Cam Mi, Huynh

    2014-12-01

    The structure and various thermodynamic properties of free-standing silicene have been studied by computer simulation. Models are obtained by cooling from buckling two-dimensional (2D) liquid Si via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential. The temperature dependence of total energy, heat capacity, mean ring size and mean coordination number shows that silicenization of 2D liquid Si exhibits a first-order-like behavior. The evolution of radial distribution function upon cooling from the melt also shows that solidification occurs in the system. The final configuration of silicene is analyzed via coordination, bond-angle, interatomic distance and ring distributions or distribution of buckling in the system. 2D visualization of atomic configurations clearly demonstrated that silicene obtained ‘naturally’ by cooling from the melt exhibits various structural previously unreported behaviors. We find the formation of polycrystalline silicene with clear grain boundaries containing various defects including various vacancies, Stone-Wales defects or skew rings and multimembered rings unlike those proposed in the literature. However, atoms in the obtained silicene are mostly involved in six-fold rings, forming a buckling honeycomb structure like that found in practice. We find that buckling is not unique for all atoms in the models although the majority of atoms reveal buckling of the most stable low-buckling silicene found in the literature. The buckling distribution is broad and symmetric. Our comprehensive MD simulation of a relatively large silicene model containing 104 atoms and obtained ‘naturally’ by cooling from the melt provides original insights into the structure and thermodynamics of this important 2D material.

  2. 2D Representation of Transcriptomes by t-SNE Exposes Relatedness between Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2016-01-01

    The GTEx Consortium reported that hierarchical clustering of RNA profiles from 25 unique tissue types among 1641 individuals accurately distinguished the tissue types, but a multidimensional scaling failed to generate a 2D projection of the data that separates tissue-subtypes. In this study we show that a projection by t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding is in line with the cluster analysis which allows a more detailed examination and visualization of human tissue relationships. PMID:26906061

  3. Takes Electric or Magnetic field data through Inversion process a 2D Distributon

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory

    2008-05-01

    Program images 2D distributions in electrical conductivity for geophysical applications. The program can treat surface based and cross well measurement geometries, including inductive and grounded source antennas in the quasi-static limit. The algorithm using Krylov iterative methods to solve for the predicted data and model sensitivities. The model update is achieved using a Gauss-newton optimization process for stability. A new line search capability is now included in the algorithm to insure global convergence of the inversion iteration.

  4. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  5. Dynamics of the Direct Vortex Cascade in 2D Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary; Forrester, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The growth and decay of the direct vortex cascade in 2D quantum turbulence is studied for different rates of injection of vortex pairs of a given separation (the stirring scale), with the system in contact with a heat bath at low temperature. At low injection rates the vortices have no effect on the superfluidity, and the distribution of pair separations spreads out until reaching the steady-state distribution of the direct cascade, where pairs annihilate at the same rate they are injected. This cascade has a k- 3 energy spectrum, the same spectrum as the direct enstrophy cascade in 2D classical turbulence. On switching off the injection, the pair distribution first decays starting from the initial stirring scale, with the total vortex density decreasing linearly in time. As pairs at smaller scales decay, the vortex density then falls off as a power law, the same power law found in recent exact solutions of quenched 2D superfluids. At high injection rates the large density of vortices drives the superfluid density to zero at long length scales, and the growth and decay of the cascade is found to be much slower for this case. Work supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Grant DMR 0906467.

  6. Strategies for effective feedback.

    PubMed

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  7. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future.

  8. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  9. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  10. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  11. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  12. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  13. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future. PMID:27506268

  14. Feedback in distance education.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, D

    1988-01-01

    Some tips, strategies, and techniques are presented for incorporating learner feedback into distance education courses. The most common form of learner feedback is immediate Knowledge of Response (KR). This general term can be delineated further as either Knowledge of Correct Response (KCR) or Knowledge of Incorrect Response (KIR). KCR is most useful for learning tasks that require a high level of automatic response such as vocabulary development and naming chemical structures. It also can be used for higher levels of learning. KIR occurs when the learner makes a response and knows only whether the response was correct or incorrect. If the learner was incorrect, the correct answer is not provided. Distant learners, as well as learners in a typical classroom, benefit from positive feedback, e.g., a few words written on the side of an assignment or a short note of encouragement. Personalized feedback tells students if they are performing satisfactorily and, if provided early in a course, can help reduce student attrition. If immediate feedback after an examination cannot be provided, every effort should be made to score and return the test as soon as possible before the student is expected to begin study on subsequent lessons. If this is not possible, a test review sheet could be mailed back upon receipt of the examination. Microcomputers are devices that can provide rapid and useful feedback, yet many methods that do not rely on computers can provide feedback. These include practice tests, small group exercises, and checklist response sheets. In addition to formally providing feedback after an assignment or examination, it is possible to use the principles of feedback by embedding questions and answers in text, audio, or video materials.

  15. Almost but not quite 2D, Non-linear Bayesian Inversion of CSEM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Key, K.; Bodin, T.

    2013-12-01

    The geophysical inverse problem can be elegantly stated in a Bayesian framework where a probability distribution can be viewed as a statement of information regarding a random variable. After all, the goal of geophysical inversion is to provide information on the random variables of interest - physical properties of the earth's subsurface. However, though it may be simple to postulate, a practical difficulty of fully non-linear Bayesian inversion is the computer time required to adequately sample the model space and extract the information we seek. As a consequence, in geophysical problems where evaluation of a full 2D/3D forward model is computationally expensive, such as marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) mapping of the resistivity of seafloor oil and gas reservoirs, Bayesian studies have largely been conducted with 1D forward models. While the 1D approximation is indeed appropriate for exploration targets with planar geometry and geological stratification, it only provides a limited, site-specific idea of uncertainty in resistivity with depth. In this work, we extend our fully non-linear 1D Bayesian inversion to a 2D model framework, without requiring the usual regularization of model resistivities in the horizontal or vertical directions used to stabilize quasi-2D inversions. In our approach, we use the reversible jump Markov-chain Monte-Carlo (RJ-MCMC) or trans-dimensional method and parameterize the subsurface in a 2D plane with Voronoi cells. The method is trans-dimensional in that the number of cells required to parameterize the subsurface is variable, and the cells dynamically move around and multiply or combine as demanded by the data being inverted. This approach allows us to expand our uncertainty analysis of resistivity at depth to more than a single site location, allowing for interactions between model resistivities at different horizontal locations along a traverse over an exploration target. While the model is parameterized in 2D, we

  16. Global Feedback Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Serrano, Lawrence Doolittle

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as the ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.

  17. Global Feedback Simulator

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as themore » ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.« less

  18. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  19. Transient 2D IR spectroscopy of charge injection in dye-sensitized nanocrystalline thin films.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E; Paoprasert, Peerasak; Franking, Ryan A; Hamers, Robert J; Gopalan, Padma; Zanni, Martin T

    2009-12-23

    We use nonlinear 2D IR spectroscopy to study TiO(2) nanocrystalline thin films sensitized with a Re dye. We find that the free electron signal, which often obscures the vibrational features in the transient absorption spectrum, is not observed in the 2D IR spectra. Its absence allows the vibrational features of the dye to be much better resolved than with the typical IR absorption probe. We observe multiple absorption bands but no cross peaks in the 2D IR spectra, which indicates that the dyes have at least three conformations. Furthermore, by using a pulse sequence in which we initiate electron transfer in the middle of the infrared pulse train, we are able to assign the excited state features by correlating them to the ground state vibrational modes and determine that the three conformations have different time scales and cross sections for electron injection. 2D IR spectroscopy is proving to be very useful in disentangling overlapping structural distributions in biological and chemical physics processes. These experiments demonstrate that nonlinear infrared probes are also a powerful new tool for studying charge transfer at interfaces.

  20. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Hamed, Ali M.; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of the developing and developed flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching flume. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The flow was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40000, based on the bulk velocity and the flume half height. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels, particularly for which shows about 30% reduction. The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and the rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D wall. POD analysis was also performed to further understand distinctive features of the flow structures due to surface topography.