Science.gov

Sample records for 2d electron gases

  1. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  2. Oxide 2D electron gases as a route for high carrier densities on (001) Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kornblum, Lior; Jin, Eric N.; Kumah, Divine P.; Walker, Fred J.; Ernst, Alexis T.; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2015-05-18

    Two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) formed at the interfaces of oxide heterostructures draw considerable interest owing to their unique physics and potential applications. Growing such heterostructures on conventional semiconductors has the potential to integrate their functionality with semiconductor device technology. We demonstrate 2DEGs on a conventional semiconductor by growing GdTiO{sub 3}-SrTiO{sub 3} on silicon. Structural analysis confirms the epitaxial growth of heterostructures with abrupt interfaces and a high degree of crystallinity. Transport measurements show the conduction to be an interface effect, ∼9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} electrons per interface. Good agreement is demonstrated between the electronic behavior of structures grown on Si and on an oxide substrate, validating the robustness of this approach to bridge between lab-scale samples to a scalable, technologically relevant materials system.

  3. Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke; Upadhya, Prashanth C.; Morales, Eugenia T.; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Lin, Yong

    2009-09-01

    The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

  4. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  5. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  6. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  7. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  8. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  9. Electron clusters in inert gases.

    PubMed

    Nazin, S; Shikin, V

    2008-10-17

    This Letter addresses the counterintuitive behavior of electrons injected into dense cryogenic media with negative scattering length L. Instead of strongly reduced mobility at all but the lowest densities due to the polaronic effect involving the formation of density enhancement clusters (expected in the theory with a simple gas-electron interaction successfully applied earlier to electrons in helium where L>0) which should substantially decrease the electron mobility, an opposite picture is observed: with increasing |L| (the trend taking place for inert gases with the growth of atomic number) and the gas density, the electrons remain practically free. An explanation of this behavior is provided based on consistent accounting for the nonlinearity of the electron interaction with the gaseous medium in the gas atom number density.

  10. The global smooth symmetric solution to 2-D full compressible Euler system of Chaplygin gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Bingbing; Witt, Ingo; Yin, Huicheng

    2015-01-01

    For one dimensional or multidimensional compressible Euler system of polytropic gases, it is well known that the smooth solution will generally develop singularities in finite time. However, for three dimensional Chaplygin gases, due to the crucial role of "null condition" in the potential equation which is derived by the irrotational and isentropic flow, P. Godin in [9] has proved the global existence of a smooth 3-D spherically symmetric flow with variable entropy when the initial data are of small smooth perturbations with compact supports to a constant state. It is noted that there are some clear differences for the global solution or blowup problems between 2-D and 3-D hyperbolic equations or systems. In this paper, we will focus on the global symmetric solution problem of 2-D full compressible Euler system of Chaplygin gases. Through carrying out involved analysis and finding an appropriate weight we can derive some uniform weighted energy estimates on the small symmetric solution to 2-D compressible Euler system of Chaplygin gases and further establish the global existence of the smooth solution by the continuous induction method.

  11. Arrayed van der Waals Vertical Heterostructures Based on 2D GaSe Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiang; Tang, Lei; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Yanwen; Wang, Weiyi; Zou, Yichao; Liu, Cong; Guo, Nan; Zou, Jin; Zhou, Peng; Hu, Weida; Xiu, Faxian

    2015-05-13

    Vertically stacking two-dimensional (2D) materials can enable the design of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices and realize complex functionality. However, the fabrication of such artificial heterostructures on a wafer scale with an atomically sharp interface poses an unprecedented challenge. Here, we demonstrate a convenient and controllable approach for the production of wafer-scale 2D GaSe thin films by molecular beam epitaxy. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction oscillations and Raman spectroscopy reveal a layer-by-layer van der Waals epitaxial growth mode. Highly efficient photodetector arrays were fabricated, based on few-layer GaSe on Si. These photodiodes show steady rectifying characteristics and a high external quantum efficiency of 23.6%. The resultant photoresponse is super-fast and robust, with a response time of 60 μs. Importantly, the device shows no sign of degradation after 1 million cycles of operation. We also carried out numerical simulations to understand the underlying device working principles. Our study establishes a new approach to produce controllable, robust, and large-area 2D heterostructures and presents a crucial step for further practical applications.

  12. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  13. Splashing transients of 2D plasmons launched by swift electrons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao; Kaminer, Ido; Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Zhen; Buljan, Hrvoje; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Baile

    2017-01-01

    Launching of plasmons by swift electrons has long been used in electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) to investigate the plasmonic properties of ultrathin, or two-dimensional (2D), electron systems. However, the question of how a swift electron generates plasmons in space and time has never been answered. We address this issue by calculating and demonstrating the spatial-temporal dynamics of 2D plasmon generation in graphene. We predict a jet-like rise of excessive charge concentration that delays the generation of 2D plasmons in EELS, exhibiting an analog to the hydrodynamic Rayleigh jet in a splashing phenomenon before the launching of ripples. The photon radiation, analogous to the splashing sound, accompanies the plasmon emission and can be understood as being shaken off by the Rayleigh jet–like charge concentration. Considering this newly revealed process, we argue that previous estimates on the yields of graphene plasmons in EELS need to be reevaluated. PMID:28138546

  14. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  15. Development of 2-D-MAX-DOAS and retrievals of trace gases and aerosols optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan

    Air pollution is a major problem worldwide that adversely a_ects human health, impacts ecosystems and climate. In the atmosphere, there are hundreds of important compounds participating in complex atmospheric reactions linked to air quality and climate. Aerosols are relevant because they modify the radiation balance, a_ect clouds, and thus Earth albedo. The amount of aerosol is often characterized by the vertical integral through the entire height of the atmosphere of the logarithm fraction of incident light that is extinguished called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). The AOD at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is 0.19 (multi annual global mean), and that over oceans is 0.13. About 43 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions, sample spatial scales that resemble satellite ground-pixels and atmospheric models, and help integrate remote sensing and in-situ observations to obtain optical closure on the effects of aerosols and trace gases in our changing environment. In this work, I present the recent development of the University of Colorado two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure the azimuth and altitude distribution of trace gases and aerosol optical properties simultaneously with a single instrument. The instrument measures solar scattered light from any direction in the sky, including direct sun light in the hyperspectral domain. In Chapter 2, I describe the capabilities of 2-D measurements in the context of retrievals of azimuth distributions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), and glyoxal (CHOCHO), which are precursors for tropospheric O3 and aerosols. The measurements were carried out during the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) campaign in Mainz, Germany and show the ability to bridge spatial scales to

  16. Two-Dimensional Plasmonics in Massive and Massless Electron Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hosang

    Plasmonic waves in solid-state are caused by collective oscillation of mobile charges inside or at the surface of conductors. In particular, surface plasmonic waves propagating at the skin of metals have recently attracted interest, as they reduce the wavelength of electromagnetic waves coupled to them by up to ˜10 times, allowing one to create miniaturized wave devices at optical frequencies. In contrast, plasmonic waves on two-dimensional (2D) conductors appear at much lower infrared and THz-GHz frequencies, near or in the electronics regime, and can achieve far stronger wavelength reduction factor reaching well above 100. In this thesis, we study the unique machinery of 2D plasmonic waves behind this ultra-subwavelength confinement and explore how it can be used to create various interesting devices. To this end, we first develop a physically intuitive theoretical formulation of 2D plasmonic waves, whose two main components---the Coulomb restoration force and inertia of the collectively oscillating charges---are combined into a transmission-line-like model. We then use this formulation to create various ultra-subwavelength 2D plasmonic devices. For the 2D conductor, we first choose GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure---a 2D electron gas consisting of massive (m* > 0) electrons---demonstrating plasmonic bandgap crystals, interferometers, and negatively refracting metamaterials. We then examine a 2D plasmonic device based on graphene, a 2D electron gas consisting of effectively massless (m* = 0) electrons. We theoretically show and experimentally demonstrate that the massless electrons in graphene can surprisingly exhibit a collective mass when subjected to a collective excitation, providing the inertia that is essential for the propagation of 2D plasmonic waves. Lastly, we theoretically investigate the thermal current fluctuation behaviors in massive and massless electron gases. While seemingly unrelated on first sight, we show that the thermal current fluctuation is

  17. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  18. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  19. Optimizing sparse sampling for 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeding, Sebastian; Klimovich, Nikita; Brixner, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    We present a new data acquisition concept using optimized non-uniform sampling and compressed sensing reconstruction in order to substantially decrease the acquisition times in action-based multidimensional electronic spectroscopy. For this we acquire a regularly sampled reference data set at a fixed population time and use a genetic algorithm to optimize a reduced non-uniform sampling pattern. We then apply the optimal sampling for data acquisition at all other population times. Furthermore, we show how to transform two-dimensional (2D) spectra into a joint 4D time-frequency von Neumann representation. This leads to increased sparsity compared to the Fourier domain and to improved reconstruction. We demonstrate this approach by recovering transient dynamics in the 2D spectrum of a cresyl violet sample using just 25% of the originally sampled data points.

  20. Femtosecond Dynamics of Electrons in 2-D Dissipative Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Charles

    2000-03-01

    Transitions between weakly coupled initial and final states can be treated with a lowest order perturbation theory in the electronic coupling which yields the well-known golden rule in this non-adiabatic limit. In strongly interacting systems, one often resorts to semiclassical treatments, such as the Landau-Zener formula for the transition probability in the adiabatic limit. Recent electron transfer theory by Stuchebrukhov and Song treats the two limit on equal footing by summing over all perturbation orders in electronic coupling[1]. Here we present the application of this theory to model the dynamics of electron self-trapping in 2-D at the n-heptane/Ag(111) and anthracene/Ag(111) interface. Our results revealed an intermediate electronic coupling for the self-trapping process at the n-heptane/Ag(111) interface which can mainly be described by a non-adiabatic process. Results for electron self-trapping at the anthracene/Ag(111) interface revealed a stronger electronic coupling which requires the summing of higher perturbation orders. [1] A.A. Stuchebrukhov and X. song, J. Chem. Phys. 101, 9354, 1994. [2] N.-H. Ge,C.M. Wong, R.L. Lingle, Jr., J.D. McNeill, K.J. Gaffney, and C.B. Harris, Science 279, 202, 1998.

  1. Experimental studies of spin-imbalanced Fermi gases in 2D geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John

    We study the thermodynamics of a quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas, which is not quite two-dimensional (2D), but far from three dimensional (3D). This system offers opportunities to test predictions that cross interdisciplinary boundaries, such as enhanced superfluid transition temperatures in spin-imbalanced quasi-2D superconductors, and provides important benchmarks for calculations of the phase diagrams. In the experiments, an ultra-cold Fermi gas is confined in an infrared CO2 laser standing-wave, which produces periodic pancake-shaped potential wells, separated by 5.3 μm. To study the thermodynamics, we load an ultra-cold mixture of N1 = 800 spin 1/2 -up and N2 2D-BCS theory, but can be fit by a 2D-polaron gas model, where each atom is surrounded by a cloud of particle-hole pairs of the opposite spin. However, this model fails to predict a transition to a spin-balanced central region as N2/N1is increased. Supported by the physics divisions of ARO, AFOSR, and NSF and by the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE.

  2. Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Condensation Phenomena in Tuneable 3D and 2D Bose Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    equilibrium and non-equilibrium many-body phenomena, trapping ultracold atomic gases in different geometries including both 3 and 2 spatial dimensions...box trap we created the world’s first atomic BEC in a quasi-uniform potential. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Bose gas, ultracold, condensation, equilibrium... atom trap, Bose-Einstein condensate 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 3 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  3. Tunneling Between 2D Electrons and Holes in an In-plane Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Mendez, E. E.; Magno, R.; Bennett, B. R.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the vertical transport properties of GaSb/AlSb/InAs/AlSb/GaSb (system A) and InAs/AlSb/GaSb/AlSb/InAs (system B) heterostructures in a magnetic field (B<20T) parallel to the interfaces. In these systems, electrons and holes accumulate in the InAs and GaSb regions, respectively, and tunneling between the two gases gives rise to a current-voltage (I-V) characteristic that exhibits negative differential conductance even at T=300K. In both cases, the zero-bias, low-T (1.7K) magnetoconductance showed the signature of tunneling between 2D gases with different carrier densities even though in system A, the holes are barely confined. In contrast, the dependence of the I-V characteristics on magnetic field was quite different. In system A, the observed shift of the peak voltage with field is explained by simple ground-state dispersion curves for electrons and holes. However, this picture cannot explain the appearance (above 5.5T) and field dependence of a secondary peak in system B, or of additional, weaker field-induced features. Their origin may lie in the complexities of highly confined hole states in the central GaSb quantum well.

  4. Creation of quantum-degenerate gases of ytterbium in a compact 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap setup

    SciTech Connect

    Doerscher, Soeren; Thobe, Alexander; Hundt, Bastian; Kochanke, Andre; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Windpassinger, Patrick; Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-04-15

    We report on the first experimental setup based on a 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap (MOT) scheme to create both Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases of several ytterbium isotopes. Our setup does not require a Zeeman slower and offers the flexibility to simultaneously produce ultracold samples of other atomic species. Furthermore, the extraordinary optical access favors future experiments in optical lattices. A 2D-MOT on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition captures ytterbium directly from a dispenser of atoms and loads a 3D-MOT on the narrow {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination transition. Subsequently, atoms are transferred to a crossed optical dipole trap and cooled evaporatively to quantum degeneracy.

  5. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  6. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-31

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  7. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  8. FFLO Superfluids in 2D Spin-Orbit Coupled Fermi Gases

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhen; Gong, Ming; Zhang, Yichao; Zou, Xubo; Zhang, Chuanwei; Guo, Guangcan

    2014-01-01

    We show that the combination of spin-orbit coupling and in-plane Zeeman field in a two-dimensional degenerate Fermi gas can lead to a larger parameter region for Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phases than that using spin-imbalanced Fermi gases. The resulting FFLO superfluids are also more stable due to the enhanced energy difference between FFLO and conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) excited states. We clarify the crucial role of the symmetry of Fermi surface on the formation of finite momentum pairing. The phase diagram for FFLO superfluids is obtained in the BCS-BEC crossover region and possible experimental observations of FFLO phases are discussed. PMID:25288379

  9. Suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kazazis, D.; Bourhis, E.; Gierak, J.; Gennser, U.; Bourgeois, O.; Antoni, T.

    2013-12-04

    We report on the fabrication of fully suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases in III-V heterostructures. Low temperature transport measurements verify that the properties of the suspended gases are only slightly degraded with respect to the non-suspended gases. Focused ion beam technology is used to pattern suspended nanostructures with minimum damage from the ion beam, due to the small width of the suspended membrane.

  10. Calculation of 2D electronic band structure using matrix mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelich, R. L.; Marsiglio, F.

    2016-12-01

    We extend previous work, applying elementary matrix mechanics to one-dimensional periodic arrays (to generate energy bands), to two-dimensional arrays. We generate band structures for the square-lattice "2D Kronig-Penney model" (square wells), the "muffin-tin" potential (circular wells), and Gaussian wells. We then apply the method to periodic arrays of more than one atomic site in a unit cell, specifically to the case of materials with hexagonal lattices like graphene. These straightforward extensions of undergraduate-level calculations allow students to readily determine band structures of current research interest.

  11. Electron-Phonon Scattering in Atomically Thin 2D Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi; Wu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Tong; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Huang, Libai

    2016-11-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomically thin perovskites with strongly bound excitons are highly promising for optoelectronic applications. However, the nature of nonradiative processes that limit the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency remains elusive. Here, we present time-resolved and temperature-dependent PL studies to systematically address the intrinsic exciton relaxation pathways in layered (C4H9NH3)2(CH3NH3)n-1PbnI3n+1 (n = 1, 2, 3) structures. Our results show that scatterings via deformation potential by acoustic and homopolar optical phonons are the main scattering mechanisms for excitons in ultrathin single exfoliated flakes, exhibiting a T(γ) (γ = 1.3 to 1.9) temperature dependence for scattering rates. We attribute the absence of polar optical phonon and defect scattering to efficient screening of Coulomb potential, similar to what has been observed in 3D perovskites. These results establish an understanding of the origins of nonradiative pathways and provide guidelines for optimizing PL efficiencies of atomically thin 2D perovskites.

  12. Uniform electron gases. I. Electrons on a ring.

    PubMed

    Loos, Pierre-François; Gill, Peter M W

    2013-04-28

    We introduce a new paradigm for one-dimensional uniform electron gases (UEGs). In this model, n electrons are confined to a ring and interact via a bare Coulomb operator. We use Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory to show that, in the high-density regime, the ground-state reduced (i.e., per electron) energy can be expanded as ε(r(s),n)=ε0(n)r(s)(-2)+ε1(n)r(s)(-1)+ε2(n)+ε3(n)r(s+)⋯ , where r(s) is the Seitz radius. We use strong-coupling perturbation theory and show that, in the low-density regime, the reduced energy can be expanded as ε(r(s),n)=η0(n)r(s)(-1)+η1(n)r(s)(-3/2)+η2(n)r(s)(-2)+⋯ . We report explicit expressions for ε0(n), ε1(n), ε2(n), ε3(n), η0(n), and η1(n) and derive the thermodynamic (large-n) limits of each of these. Finally, we perform numerical studies of UEGs with n = 2, 3, [ellipsis (horizontal)], 10, using Hylleraas-type and quantum Monte Carlo methods, and combine these with the perturbative results to obtain a picture of the behavior of the new model over the full range of n and r(s) values.

  13. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  14. Electron energy-distribution functions in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchford, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculation of the electron energy distribution functions in the regime of drift tube experiments is discussed. The discussion is limited to constant applied fields and values of E/N (ratio of electric field strength to neutral density) low enough that electron growth due to ionization can be neglected. (GHT)

  15. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  16. Electron Impact Ionization of the Rare Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Birgit

    2008-10-01

    Detailed information about the electron impact ionization process can be obtained from fully differential cross section measurements, in which the ionized electron is detected in coincidence with the outgoing scattered projectile electron. Incident and outgoing electron momenta are completely determined in these measurements. A considerable body of experimental and theoretical data exists for H and He targets, and the level of agreement between theory and experiment for these simple atoms is exceptional. However, there are still significant discrepancies between theory and experiment in the case of ionization of more complex atomic targets such as the heavier rare gas atoms. In this talk I will present recent measurements and theoretical predictions of fully differential cross sections for ionization of a range of rare gas targets: He, Ne, Ar and Xe. The talk will concentrate primarily on experiments which have been performed by two experimental groups, our group in Australia [1-3] and that of Lahmam-Bennani [3-5] in France. The experimental conditions span two different kinematic regimes, one with intermediate incident electron energy and low ejected electron energy, and the other with higher incident electron energy, and ejected electron energies which correspond to large energy transfer in the collision process. All experiments have been performed in a coplanar asymmetric configuration in which the scattered electron is detected at a small forward scattering angle. The experimental apparatus used in Australia is of quite different design to that in France, and I will present the results of an experiment in which the two groups have collaborated to produce data under identical kinematic conditions and for the same targets, using these two very different experimental approaches. This comprehensive set of experimental data has provided an interesting challenge to theory, and I will discuss the state of play with regard to the alignment between curent state

  17. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  18. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Jr., Carlos M.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  19. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M., Jr.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  20. Unconventional dc Transport in Rashba Electron Gases.

    PubMed

    Brosco, Valentina; Benfatto, Lara; Cappelluti, Emmanuele; Grimaldi, Claudio

    2016-04-22

    We discuss the transport properties of a disordered two-dimensional electron gas with strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We show that in the high-density regime where the Fermi energy overcomes the energy associated with spin-orbit coupling, dc transport is accurately described by a standard Drude's law, due to a nontrivial compensation between the suppression of backscattering and the relativistic correction to the quasiparticle velocity. On the contrary, when the system enters the opposite dominant spin-orbit regime, Drude's paradigm breaks down and the dc conductivity becomes strongly sensitive to the spin-orbit coupling strength, providing a suitable tool to test the entanglement between spin and charge degrees of freedom in these systems.

  1. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  2. Numerical simulations of runaway electron generation in pressurized gases

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of the generation of runaway electrons in pressurized nitrogen and helium gases are presented. It was shown that runaway electrons generation occurs in two stages. In the first stage, runaway electrons are composed of the electrons emitted by the cathode and produced in gas ionization in the vicinity of the cathode. This stage is terminated with the formation of the virtual cathode, which becomes the primary source of runaway electrons in the second stage. Also, it was shown that runaway electrons current is limited by both the shielding of the field emission by the space charge of the emitted electrons and the formation of a virtual cathode. In addition, the influence of the initial conditions, such as voltage rise time and amplitude, gas pressure, and the type of gas, on the processes that accompany runaway electrons generation is presented.

  3. One-dimensional Electron Gases at Oxide Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanwei; Zhong, Zhicheng; Shafer, P.; Liu, Xiaoran; Kareev, M.; Middey, S.; Meyers, D.; Arenholz, E.; Chakhalian, Jak

    Emergence of two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG) at the oxide interfaces of two dissimilar insulators is a remarkable manifestation of interface engineering. With continuously reduced dimensionality, it arises an interesting question: could one-dimensional electron gases (1DEG) be designed at oxide interfaces? So far there is no report on this. Here, we report on the formation of 1DEG at the carefully engineered titanate heterostructures. Combined resonant soft X-ray linear dichroism with electrical transport and the first-principles calculations have confirmed the formation of 1DEG driven by the interfacial symmetry breaking. Our findings provide a route to engineer new electronic and magnetic states. This work was supported by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, DODARO, DOE, and the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport in strongly attaching gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, Zoran; Miric, Jasmina; Simonovic, Ilija; Bosnjakovic, Danko; Dujko, Sasa

    2016-09-01

    Extensive loss of electrons in strongly attaching gases imposes significant difficulties in Monte Carlo simulations at low electric field strengths. In order to compensate for such losses, some kind of rescaling procedures must be used. In this work, we discuss two rescaling procedures for Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport in strongly attaching gases: (1) discrete rescaling, and (2) continuous rescaling. The discrete rescaling procedure is based on duplication of electrons randomly chosen from the remaining swarm at certain discrete time steps. The continuous rescaling procedure employs a dynamically defined fictitious ionization process with the constant collision frequency chosen to be equal to the attachment collision frequency. These procedures should not in any way modify the distribution function. Monte Carlo calculations of transport coefficients for electrons in SF6 and CF3I are performed in a wide range of electric field strengths. However, special emphasis is placed upon the analysis of transport phenomena in the limit of lower electric fields where the transport properties are strongly affected by electron attachment. Two important phenomena arise: (1) the reduction of the mean energy with increasing E/N for electrons in SF6, and (2) the occurrence of negative differential conductivity in the bulk drift velocity of electrons in both SF6 and CF3I.

  6. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  7. Transverse instability of electron plasma waves study via direct 2 +2D Vlasov simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silantyev, Denis; Lushnikov, Pavel; Rose, Harvey

    2016-10-01

    Transverse instability can be viewed as initial stage of electron plasma waves (EPWs) filamentation. We performed direct 2 +2D Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless plasma to systematically study the growth rates of oblique modes of finite-amplitude EPW depending on its amplitude, wavenumber, angle of the oblique mode wavevector relative to the EPW's wavevector and the configuration of the trapped electrons in the EPW. Simulation results are compared to the predictions of theoretical models.

  8. Exchange functionals based on finite uniform electron gases.

    PubMed

    Loos, Pierre-François

    2017-03-21

    We show how one can construct a simple exchange functional by extending the well-know local-density approximation (LDA) to finite uniform electron gases. This new generalized local-density approximation functional uses only two quantities: the electron density ρ and the curvature of the Fermi hole α. This alternative "rung 2" functional can be easily coupled with generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) functionals to form a new family of "rung 3" meta-GGA (MGGA) functionals that we have named factorizable MGGAs. Comparisons are made with various LDA, GGA, and MGGA functionals for atoms and molecules.

  9. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  10. Surface effects on electronic transport of 2D chalcogenide thin films and nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yeonwoong; Shen, Jie; Cha, Judy J

    2014-01-01

    The renewed interest in two-dimensional materials, particularly transition metal dichalcogenides, has been explosive, evident in a number of review and perspective articles on the topic. Our ability to synthesize and study these 2D materials down to a single layer and to stack them to form van der Waals heterostructures opens up a wide range of possibilities from fundamental studies of nanoscale effects to future electronic and optoelectronic applications. Bottom-up and top-down synthesis and basic electronic properties of 2D chalcogenide materials have been covered in great detail elsewhere. Here, we bring attention to more subtle effects: how the environmental, surface, and crystal defects modify the electronic band structure and transport properties of 2D chalcogenide nanomaterials. Surface effects such as surface oxidation and substrate influence may dominate the overall transport properties, particularly in single layer chalcogenide devices. Thus, understanding such effects is critical for successful applications based on these materials. In this review, we discuss two classes of chalcogenides - Bi-based and Mo-based chalcogenides. The first are topological insulators with unique surface electronic properties and the second are promising for flexible optoelectronic applications as well as hydrogen evolution catalytic reactions.

  11. Spin relaxations in 2D electron gas determined by the memory in the carrier dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Eugene; Glazov, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    The effects of long memory, in carrier dynamics in a magnetic field, on spin polarization evolution in 2D electron gas are investigated qualitatively and quantitatively. As examples we consider (i) systems with random Rashba-type SO coupling and (ii) quantum wells with rigid short-range scatterers (antidotes) and regular Dresselhaus SO coupling. In both cases the spin dynamics is strongly non-Markovian. In the system with the random SO coupling the time dependence of the spin polarization shows Gaussian rather than exponential behavior with the cusps corresponding to the electron revolutions. The relaxation speeds up with the increase of the magnetic field. In the system with antidotes scattering, the spin polarization shows a long-tail behavior with the relaxation rate determined by inelastic electron-phonon and electron-electron collisions and demonstrates unusual field dependence.

  12. Design of transparent conductors and periodic two-dimensional electron gases without doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuwen; Zhang, Lijun; Zunger, Alex; Perkins, John; Materials by Design Team; John D. Perkins Collaboration

    The functionality of transparency plus conductivity plays an important role in renewable energy and information technologies, including applications such as solar cells, touch-screen sensors, and flat panel display. However, materials with such seemingly contraindicated properties are difficult to come by. The traditional strategy for designing bulk transparent conductors (TCs) starts from a wide-gap insulator and finds ways to make it conductive by extensive doping. We propose a different strategy for TC design--starting with a metallic conductor and designing transparency by control of intrinsic interband transitions and intraband plasmonic frequency. We identified specific design principles for prototypical intrinsic TC classes and searched computationally for materials that satisfy them. The electron gases in the 3D intrinsic TCs demonstrate intriguing properties, such as periodic 2D electron gas regions with very high carrier density. We will discuss a more extended search of these functionalities, in parallel with stability and growability calculations

  13. The relative abundances of resolved l2CH2D2 and 13CH3D and mechanisms controlling isotopic bond ordering in abiotic and biotic methane gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. D.; Kohl, I. E.; Lollar, B. Sherwood; Etiope, G.; Rumble, D.; Li (李姝宁), S.; Haghnegahdar, M. A.; Schauble, E. A.; McCain, K. A.; Foustoukos, D. I.; Sutclife, C.; Warr, O.; Ballentine, C. J.; Onstott, T. C.; Hosgormez, H.; Neubeck, A.; Marques, J. M.; Pérez-Rodríguez, I.; Rowe, A. R.; LaRowe, D. E.; Magnabosco, C.; Yeung, L. Y.; Ash, J. L.; Bryndzia, L. T.

    2017-04-01

    We report measurements of resolved 12CH2D2 and 13CH3D at natural abundances in a variety of methane gases produced naturally and in the laboratory. The ability to resolve 12CH2D2 from 13CH3D provides unprecedented insights into the origin and evolution of CH4. The results identify conditions under which either isotopic bond order disequilibrium or equilibrium are expected. Where equilibrium obtains, concordant Δ12CH2D2 and Δ13CH3D temperatures can be used reliably for thermometry. We find that concordant temperatures do not always match previous hypotheses based on indirect estimates of temperature of formation nor temperatures derived from CH4/H2 D/H exchange, underscoring the importance of reliable thermometry based on the CH4 molecules themselves. Where Δ12CH2D2 and Δ13CH3D values are inconsistent with thermodynamic equilibrium, temperatures of formation derived from these species are spurious. In such situations, while formation temperatures are unavailable, disequilibrium isotopologue ratios nonetheless provide novel information about the formation mechanism of the gas and the presence or absence of multiple sources or sinks. In particular, disequilibrium isotopologue ratios may provide the means for differentiating between methane produced by abiotic synthesis vs. biological processes. Deficits in 12CH2D2 compared with equilibrium values in CH4 gas made by surface-catalyzed abiotic reactions are so large as to point towards a quantum tunneling origin. Tunneling also accounts for the more moderate depletions in 13CH3D that accompany the low 12CH2D2 abundances produced by abiotic reactions. The tunneling signature may prove to be an important tracer of abiotic methane formation, especially where it is preserved by dissolution of gas in cool hydrothermal systems (e.g., Mars). Isotopologue signatures of abiotic methane production can be erased by infiltration of microbial communities, and Δ12CH2D2 values are a key tracer of microbial recycling.

  14. Investigating fold structures of 2D materials by quantitative transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zengming; Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-04-01

    We report an approach developed for deriving 3D structural information of 2D membrane folds based on the recently-established quantitative transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Systematic multislice simulations reveal that the membrane folding leads to sufficiently strong electron scattering which enables a precise determination of bending radius. The image contrast depends also on the folding angles of 2D materials due to the variation of projection potentials, which however exerts much smaller effect compared with the bending radii. DFT calculations show that folded edges are typically characteristic of (fractional) nanotubes with the same curvature retained after energy optimization. Owing to the exclusion of Stobbs factor issue, numerical simulations were directly used in comparison with the experimental measurements on an absolute contrast scale, which results in a successful determination of bending radius of folded monolayer MoS2 films. The method should be applicable to characterizing all 2D membranes with 3D folding features.

  15. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K. Sanpei, A. Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  16. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  17. Optical and Electronic Properties of 2D Graphitic Carbon-Nitride and Carbon Enriched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therrien, Joel; Li, Yancen; Schmidt, Daniel; Masaki, Michael; Syed, Abdulmannan

    The two-dimensional form of graphitic carbon-nitride (gCN) has been successfully synthesized using a simple CVD process. In it's pure form, the carbon to nitrogen ratio is 0.75. By adding a carbon bearing gas to the growth environment, the C/N ratio can be increased, ultimately reaching the pure carbon form: graphene. Unlike attempts at making a 2D alloy system out of BCN, the CN system does not suffer from phase segregation and thus forms a homogeneous alloy. The synthesis approach and electronic and optical properties will be presented for the pure gCN and a selection of alloy compositions.

  18. The separation of overlapping transitions in β-carotene with broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, Tessa R.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Graham, Matthew W.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy is applied to β-carotene, revealing new insight into the excited state dynamics of carotenoids by exploring the full energetic range encompassing the S0→S2 and S1→S1n transitions at 77 K. Multiple signals are observed in the regime associated with the proposed S∗ state and isolated through separate analysis of rephasing and nonrephasing contributions. Peaks in rephasing pathways display dynamic lineshapes characteristic of coupling to high energy vibrational modes, and simulation with a simple model supports their assignment to impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. A signal persisting beyond 10 ps in the nonrephasing spectra is still under investigation.

  19. Ferroelectricity, Antiferroelectricity and Ultrathin 2D Electron/Hole Gas in Multifunctional Monolayer MXene.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Anand; Mishra, Avanish; Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    2017-04-04

    Presence of ferroelectric polarization in 2D materials is extremely rare due to the effect of the surface depolarizing field. Here, we use first-principles calculations to show the largest out-of-plane polarization observed in a monolayer in functionalized MXenes (Sc2CO2). The switching of polarization in this new class of ferroelectric materials occurs through an previously unknown intermediate antiferroelectric structure thus establishing three states for applications in low-dimensional non-volatile memory. We show that the armchair domain-interface acts as an 1D metallic nanowire separating two insulating domains. In the case of the van-der-Waals bilayer we observe, interestingly, the presence of an ultrathin 2D electron/hole gas (2DEG) on the top/bottom layers, respectively, due to the redistrubution of charge carriers. The 2DEG is non-degenerate due to spin-orbit-coupling, thus paving the way for spin-orbitronic devices. The coexistence of ferroelectricity, antiferroelectricity, 2DEG and spin-orbit splitting in this system suggests that such 2D polar materials possess high potential for device application in a multitude of fields ranging from nanoelectronics to photovoltaics.

  20. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  1. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams.

  2. Insulating Behavior of Strongly Interacting 2D Electrons in Si MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiqi; Sarachik, M. P.; Kravchenko, S. V.

    Experiments on low disorder strongly-interacting 2D electron systems have shown that in the absence of a magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the resistivity changes from metallic-like to insulating behavior as the electron density ns is reduced below a critical density nc. It has been shown that a metal to insulator transition also occurs in these systems for fixed electron density ns at a critical (density-dependent) in-plane magnetic field which results in complete spin polarization of the electrons. Here we report measurements of the temperature dependence of the resistivity in a high mobility Si-MOSFET sample, where in one case the insulating state is reached by reducing the electron density in zero field, and in the other case it is reached by ''quenching'' the metallic behavior with an in-plane field of 5 T. We find that the resistivity of the insulating state behaves in very similar ways for both cases, exhibiting Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping regardless of the degree of polarization of the electron spins Work at CCNY is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1309008 and BSF Grant 2012210; for S. K. by NSF Grant DMR-1309337 and BSF Grant 2012210.

  3. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  4. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Pan, X M; Yang, Z J; Ma, X D; Zhu, Y L; Luhmann, N C; Domier, C W; Ruan, B W; Zhuang, G

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  5. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films.

    PubMed

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J; Lewis, Emily A; Lucci, Felicia R; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope (125)I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual (125)I atoms into (125)Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic (125)I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies.

  6. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J.; Lewis, Emily A.; Lucci, Felicia R.; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope 125I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual 125I atoms into 125Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic 125I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies.

  7. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  8. ICF target 2D modeling using Monte Carlo SNB electron thermal transport in DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet multigroup diffusion electron thermal transport method is adapted into a Monte Carlo (MC) transport method to better model angular and long mean free path non-local effects. The MC model was first implemented in the 1D LILAC code to verify consistency with the iSNB model. Implementation of the MC SNB model in the 2D DRACO code enables higher fidelity non-local thermal transport modeling in 2D implosions such as polar drive experiments on NIF. The final step is to optimize the MC model by hybridizing it with a MC version of the iSNB diffusion method. The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in intermediate mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions allowing for improved computational efficiency while maintaining accuracy. Work to date on the method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories and the Univ. of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  9. Investigation of fast particle driven instabilities by 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Lauber, Ph; Curran, D.; Boom, J. E.; Tobias, B. J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; Garcia Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Maraschek, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; da Graça, S.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-12-01

    Detailed measurements of the 2D mode structure of Alfvén instabilities in the current ramp-up phase of neutral beam heated discharges were performed on ASDEX Upgrade, using the electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic. This paper focuses on the observation of reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAEs) and bursting modes that, with the use of the information from ECEI, have been identified as beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs). Both RSAEs with first and second radial harmonic mode structures were observed. Calculations with the linear gyro-kinetic code LIGKA revealed that the ratio of the damping rates and the frequency difference between the first and second harmonic modes strongly depended on the shape of the q-profile. The bursting character of the BAE type modes, which were radially localized to rational q surfaces, was observed to sensitively depend on the plasma parameters, ranging from strongly bursting to almost steady state.

  10. 2D positive streamer modelling in NTP air under extreme pulse fronts. What about runaway electrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marode, E.; Dessante, Ph; Tardiveau, P.

    2016-12-01

    Using a 2D model, an attempt is made to understand the properties and aspects of a diffuse discharge, appearing in a positive point-to-plane gap submitted to very high voltage pulses. After presenting the model, comparisons between the computed low and high pulse heights of 10 kV and 50 kV, respectively, will be shown and analysed. A streamer ionising wave is still formed, but its role in ionising a region of low field is replaced by the role of providing a plasma within which the electrons will benefit from the presence of a high electrical field meant to induce strong electron collision activities. A comparison between the aspect of the computed and experimental discharge carried out in the same conditions at 50 kV will be presented, which seems to be in agreement with the diffuse aspect. Although the difference in order of magnitude of the speed of development and the height of the current must be underlined, similarities between the structures of both situations will, however, be recognised. A high probability of obtaining highly energetic electrons and runaways (RAEs) will also be derived following a simple approach.

  11. Electron-impact dissociative excitation and ionization of N2D+

    SciTech Connect

    FogleJr, Michael R; Bahati Musafiri, Eric; Bannister, Mark E; Deng, Shihu; Vane, C Randy; Thomas, R. D.; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    Absolute cross sections for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2}D{sub +} producing N{sub 2}{sub +}, ND{sub +}, and N{sub +} ion fragments were measured in the 5- to 100-eV range using a crossed electron-ion beams technique. In the 5- to 20-eV region, in which dissociative excitation (DE) is the principal contributing mechanism, N{sub 2}{sub +} production dominates. The N{sub 2}{sub +} + D dissociation channel shows a large resonant-like structure in the DE cross section, as observed previously in electron impact dissociation of triatomic dihydride species [ M. Fogle, E. M. Bahati, M. E. Bannister, S. H. M. Deng, C. R. Vane, R. D. Thomas and V. Zhaunerchyk Phys. Rev. A 82 042720 (2010)]. In the dissociative ionization (DI) region, 20- to 100-eV, N{sub 2}{sub +}, ND{sub +}, and N{sub +} ion fragment production are comparable. The observance of the ND{sub +} and N{sub +} ion fragments indicate breaking of the N - N bond along certain dissociation channels.

  12. Electron-impact dissociative excitation and ionization of N{sub 2}D{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Fogle, M.; Bahati, E. M.; Bannister, M. E.; Deng, S. H. M.; Vane, C. R.; Thomas, R. D.; Zhaunerchyk, V.

    2011-09-15

    Absolute cross sections for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2}D{sup +} producing N{sub 2}{sup +}, ND{sup +}, and N{sup +} ion fragments were measured in the 5- to 100-eV range using a crossed electron-ion beams technique. In the 5- to 20-eV region, in which dissociative excitation (DE) is the principal contributing mechanism, N{sub 2}{sup +} production dominates. The N{sub 2}{sup +} + D dissociation channel shows a large resonant-like structure in the DE cross section, as observed previously in electron impact dissociation of triatomic dihydride species [M. Fogle, E. M. Bahati, M. E. Bannister, S. H. M. Deng, C. R. Vane, R. D. Thomas, and V. Zhaunerchyk, Phys. Rev. A 82, 042720 (2010)]. In the dissociative ionization (DI) region, 20- to 100-eV, N{sub 2}{sup +}, ND{sup +}, and N{sup +} ion fragment production are comparable. The observance of the ND{sup +} and N{sup +} ion fragments indicate breaking of the N - N bond along certain dissociation channels.

  13. Third order transport coefficients for electrons and positrons in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujko, Sasa; Simonovic, Ilija; White, Ronald; Petrovic, Zoran

    2016-09-01

    Third order transport coefficients (the skewness tensor) of the electron and positron swarms, in atomic and molecular gases, are investigated. The knowledge of the skewness tensor is necessary for the conversion of the hydrodynamic transport coefficients to the arrival time and steady-state Townsend transport data as well as for the determination of the deviations of the spatial density profiles from an ideal Gaussian. In this work, we investigate the structure and symmetries along individual elements of the skewness tensor by the group projector method. Individual components of the skewness tensor are calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation technique and multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation. Results obtained by these two methods are in excellent agreement. We extend previous studies by considering the sensitivity of the skewness components to explicit and implicit effects of non-conservative collisions, post-ionization energy partitioning, and inelastic collisions. The errors of the two term approximation for solving the Boltzmann equation are highlighted. We also investigate the influence of a magnetic field on the skewness tensor in varying configurations of electric and magnetic fields. Among many interesting points, we have observed a strong correlation between the skewness and diffusion.

  14. Tunable electron heating induced giant magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Samaraweera, R. L.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    Electron-heating induced by a tunable, supplementary dc-current (Idc) helps to vary the observed magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system. The magnetoresistance at B = 0.3 T is shown to progressively change from positive to negative with increasing Idc, yielding negative giant-magnetoresistance at the lowest temperature and highest Idc. A two-term Drude model successfully fits the data at all Idc and T. The results indicate that carrier heating modifies a conductivity correction σ1, which undergoes sign reversal from positive to negative with increasing Idc, and this is responsible for the observed crossover from positive- to negative- magnetoresistance, respectively, at the highest B. PMID:27924953

  15. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    DOE PAGES

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; ...

    2016-02-24

    In this paper, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M'2M"C2 and M'2M"2C3 – where M' and M" are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, andmore » Ti. The M' atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M" atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M' atomic layers sandwich the middle M"–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. Finally, this finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.« less

  16. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yu; Voigt, Cooper A.; Kent, Paul R. C.; May, Steven J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-24

    In this paper, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M'2M"C2 and M'2M"2C3 – where M' and M" are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, and Ti. The M' atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M" atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M' atomic layers sandwich the middle M"–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. Finally, this finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in

  17. Strongly Metallic Electron and Hole 2D Transport in an Ambipolar Si-Vacuum Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Binhui; Yazdanpanah, M M; Kane, B E; Hwang, E H; Das Sarma, S

    2015-07-17

    We report experiment and theory on an ambipolar gate-controlled Si(111)-vacuum field effect transistor where we study electron and hole (low-temperature 2D) transport in the same device simply by changing the external gate voltage to tune the system from being a 2D electron system at positive gate voltage to a 2D hole system at negative gate voltage. The electron (hole) conductivity manifests strong (moderate) metallic temperature dependence with the conductivity decreasing by a factor of 8 (2) between 0.3 K and 4.2 K with the peak electron mobility (∼18  m2/V s) being roughly 20 times larger than the peak hole mobility (in the same sample). Our theory explains the data well using random phase approximation screening of background Coulomb disorder, establishing that the observed metallicity is a direct consequence of the strong temperature dependence of the effective screened disorder.

  18. Destabilization of 2D magnetic current sheets by resonance with bouncing electron - a new theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Gabriel; Louarn, Philippe; Tur, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons. The geometry is clearly 2D and uses Harris sheet profile. Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasi neutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. The present talk will focus on the main results of this theory. The electrostatic version of the model may be applied to the near-Earth environment (8-12 R_{E}) where beta is rather low. It is showed that inclusion of bouncing electron motion may enhance strongly the growth rate of the classical drift wave instability. This model could thus explain the generation of strong parallel electric fields in the ionosphere and the formation of aurora beads with wavelength of a few hundreds of km. In the electromagnetic version, it is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (B_{z} > 0.1 B _{lobes}) undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in B_{z}/B _{lobes}, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few

  19. Quantitative nanoscale visualization of heterogeneous electron transfer rates in 2D carbon nanotube networks

    PubMed Central

    Güell, Aleix G.; Ebejer, Neil; Snowden, Michael E.; McKelvey, Kim; Macpherson, Julie V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable interest for electrochemical, electrocatalytic, and sensing applications, yet there remains uncertainty concerning the intrinsic electrochemical (EC) activity. In this study, we use scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) to determine local heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) kinetics in a random 2D network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on an Si/SiO2 substrate. The high spatial resolution of SECCM, which employs a mobile nanoscale EC cell as a probe for imaging, enables us to sample the responses of individual portions of a wide range of SWNTs within this complex arrangement. Using two redox processes, the oxidation of ferrocenylmethyl trimethylammonium and the reduction of ruthenium (III) hexaamine, we have obtained conclusive evidence for the high intrinsic EC activity of the sidewalls of the large majority of SWNTs in networks. Moreover, we show that the ends of SWNTs and the points where two SWNTs cross do not show appreciably different HET kinetics relative to the sidewall. Using finite element method modeling, we deduce standard rate constants for the two redox couples and demonstrate that HET based solely on characteristic defects in the SWNT side wall is highly unlikely. This is further confirmed by the analysis of individual line profiles taken as the SECCM probe scans over an SWNT. More generally, the studies herein demonstrate SECCM to be a powerful and versatile method for activity mapping of complex electrode materials under conditions of high mass transport, where kinetic assignments can be made with confidence. PMID:22635266

  20. Compelling experimental evidence of a Dirac cone in the electronic structure of a 2D Silicon layer

    PubMed Central

    Sadeddine, Sana; Enriquez, Hanna; Bendounan, Azzedine; Kumar Das, Pranab; Vobornik, Ivana; Kara, Abdelkader; Mayne, Andrew J.; Sirotti, Fausto; Dujardin, Gérald; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene stem from its two-dimensional (2D) structure, with a linear dispersion of the electronic states at the corners of the Brillouin zone (BZ) forming a Dirac cone. Since then, other 2D materials have been suggested based on boron, silicon, germanium, phosphorus, tin, and metal di-chalcogenides. Here, we present an experimental investigation of a single silicon layer on Au(111) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (HR-ARPES), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The HR-ARPES data show compelling evidence that the silicon based 2D overlayer is responsible for the observed linear dispersed feature in the valence band, with a Fermi velocity of comparable to that of graphene. The STM images show extended and homogeneous domains, offering a viable route to the fabrication of silicene-based opto-electronic devices. PMID:28281666

  1. Compelling experimental evidence of a Dirac cone in the electronic structure of a 2D Silicon layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeddine, Sana; Enriquez, Hanna; Bendounan, Azzedine; Kumar Das, Pranab; Vobornik, Ivana; Kara, Abdelkader; Mayne, Andrew J.; Sirotti, Fausto; Dujardin, Gérald; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2017-03-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene stem from its two-dimensional (2D) structure, with a linear dispersion of the electronic states at the corners of the Brillouin zone (BZ) forming a Dirac cone. Since then, other 2D materials have been suggested based on boron, silicon, germanium, phosphorus, tin, and metal di-chalcogenides. Here, we present an experimental investigation of a single silicon layer on Au(111) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (HR-ARPES), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The HR-ARPES data show compelling evidence that the silicon based 2D overlayer is responsible for the observed linear dispersed feature in the valence band, with a Fermi velocity of comparable to that of graphene. The STM images show extended and homogeneous domains, offering a viable route to the fabrication of silicene-based opto-electronic devices.

  2. Conformation and electronic population transfer in membrane-supported self-assembled porphyrin dimers by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Widom, Julia R; Lott, Geoffrey A; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H

    2012-09-06

    Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) is applied to determine the conformation and femtosecond electronic population transfer in a dimer of magnesium meso tetraphenylporphyrin. The dimers are prepared by self-assembly of the monomer within the amphiphilic regions of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes. A theoretical framework to describe 2D FS experiments is presented, and a direct comparison is made between the observables of this measurement and those of 2D electronic spectroscopy (2D ES). The sensitivity of the method to varying dimer conformation is explored. A global multivariable fitting analysis of linear and 2D FS data indicates that the dimer adopts a "bent T-shaped" conformation. Moreover, the manifold of singly excited excitons undergoes rapid electronic dephasing and downhill population transfer on the time scale of ∼95 fs. The open conformation of the dimer suggests that its self-assembly is favored by an increase in entropy of the local membrane environment.

  3. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  4. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  5. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  6. Effects of in-plane magnetic field on the transport of 2D electron vortices in non-uniform plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Richardson, Andrew; Schumer, Joseph; Pulsed Power Team

    2015-11-01

    The formation of electron vortices in current-carrying plasmas is observed in 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the plasma-opening switch. In the presence of a background density gradient in Cartesian systems, vortices drift in the direction found by crossing the magnetic field with the background density gradient as a result of the Hall effect. However, most of the 2D simulations where electron vortices are seen and studied only allow for in-plane currents and thus only an out-of-plane magnetic field. Here we present results of numerical simulations of 2D, seeded electron vortices in an inhomogeneous background using the generalized 2D electron-magneto-hydrodynamic model that additionally allows for in-plane components of the magnetic field. By seeding vortices with a varying axial component of the velocity field, so that the vortex becomes a corkscrew, it is found that a pitch angle of around 20 degrees is sufficient to completely prevent the vortex from propagating due to the Hall effect for typical plasma parameters. This work is supported by the NRL Base Program.

  7. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-28

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ∼1000 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.

  8. Electronic structure of disordered CuPd alloys by positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Siegel, R.W.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.; Bansil, A.

    1988-01-01

    We report 2D-ACAR experiments and KKR CPA calculations on alpha-phase single-crystal Cu/sub 1-x/Pd/sub x/ in the range x less than or equal to 0.25. The flattening of the Fermi surface near (110) with increasing x predicted by theory is confirmed by our experimental results. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  9. High temperature electronic excitation and ionization rates in gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Frederick

    1991-01-01

    The relaxation times for electronic excitation due to electron bombardment of atoms was found to be quite short, so that electron kinetic temperature (T sub e) and the electron excitation temperature (T asterisk) should equilibrate quickly whenever electrons are present. However, once equilibrium has been achieved, further energy to the excited electronic states and to the kinetic energy of free electrons must be fed in by collisions with heavy particles that cause vibrational and electronic state transitions. The rate coefficients for excitation of electronic states produced by heavy particle collision have not been well known. However, a relatively simple semi-classical theory has been developed here which is analytic up to the final integration over a Boltzmann distribution of collision energies; this integral can then be evaluated numerically by quadrature. Once the rate coefficients have been determined, the relaxation of electronic excitation energy can be evaluated and compared with the relaxation rates of vibrational excitation. Then the relative importance of these two factors, electronic excitation and vibrational excitation by heavy particle collision, on the transfer of energy to free electron motion, can be assessed.

  10. Uniform electron gases. III. Low-density gases on three-dimensional spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Agboola, Davids; Knol, Anneke L.; Gill, Peter M. W. Loos, Pierre-François

    2015-08-28

    By combining variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and complete-basis-set limit Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations, we have obtained near-exact correlation energies for low-density same-spin electrons on a three-dimensional sphere (3-sphere), i.e., the surface of a four-dimensional ball. In the VMC calculations, we compare the efficacies of two types of one-electron basis functions for these strongly correlated systems and analyze the energy convergence with respect to the quality of the Jastrow factor. The HF calculations employ spherical Gaussian functions (SGFs) which are the curved-space analogs of Cartesian Gaussian functions. At low densities, the electrons become relatively localized into Wigner crystals, and the natural SGF centers are found by solving the Thomson problem (i.e., the minimum-energy arrangement of n point charges) on the 3-sphere for various values of n. We have found 11 special values of n whose Thomson sites are equivalent. Three of these are the vertices of four-dimensional Platonic solids — the hyper-tetrahedron (n = 5), the hyper-octahedron (n = 8), and the 24-cell (n = 24) — and a fourth is a highly symmetric structure (n = 13) which has not previously been reported. By calculating the harmonic frequencies of the electrons around their equilibrium positions, we also find the first-order vibrational corrections to the Thomson energy.

  11. Uniform electron gases. III. Low-density gases on three-dimensional spheres.

    PubMed

    Agboola, Davids; Knol, Anneke L; Gill, Peter M W; Loos, Pierre-François

    2015-08-28

    By combining variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and complete-basis-set limit Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations, we have obtained near-exact correlation energies for low-density same-spin electrons on a three-dimensional sphere (3-sphere), i.e., the surface of a four-dimensional ball. In the VMC calculations, we compare the efficacies of two types of one-electron basis functions for these strongly correlated systems and analyze the energy convergence with respect to the quality of the Jastrow factor. The HF calculations employ spherical Gaussian functions (SGFs) which are the curved-space analogs of Cartesian Gaussian functions. At low densities, the electrons become relatively localized into Wigner crystals, and the natural SGF centers are found by solving the Thomson problem (i.e., the minimum-energy arrangement of n point charges) on the 3-sphere for various values of n. We have found 11 special values of n whose Thomson sites are equivalent. Three of these are the vertices of four-dimensional Platonic solids - the hyper-tetrahedron (n = 5), the hyper-octahedron (n = 8), and the 24-cell (n = 24) - and a fourth is a highly symmetric structure (n = 13) which has not previously been reported. By calculating the harmonic frequencies of the electrons around their equilibrium positions, we also find the first-order vibrational corrections to the Thomson energy.

  12. Particle-in-a-box confinement of electron gases in and above the surface of self-organized Co nanowires at Au(111) step edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouteden, K.; Van Haesendonck, C.

    2012-04-01

    We report on confinement of the series of two-dimensional (2D) electron gases provided by image-potential states (ISs) above wire-like Co nanoparticles that are formed at Au(111) step edges upon Co atom deposition. Maps of the local density of states recorded by means of scanning tunneling microscopy reveal the formation of standing wave (SW) patterns at the Co nanowire surface caused by effective scattering at its boundaries. Due to the simple rectangular shape of the wire-like Co nanoparticles, SW patterns, which reflect the eigenfunctions of the particles, are unambiguously resolved. Quantitative comparison to the confinement of Co surface state electrons reveals that the IS electrons follow a similar particle-in-a-box type behavior. These findings open new perspectives for investigation of quantum size effects of 2D electron systems above nanostructured surfaces.

  13. Layer-by-Layer Assembled 2D Montmorillonite Dielectrics for Solution-Processed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Xiaolong; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Jariwala, Deep; Beck, Megan E; Huang, Wei; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-06

    Layer-by-layer assembled 2D montmorillonite nanosheets are shown to be high-performance, solution-processed dielectrics. These scalable and spatially uniform sub-10 nm thick dielectrics yield high areal capacitances of ≈600 nF cm(-2) and low leakage currents down to 6 × 10(-9) A cm(-2) that enable low voltage operation of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube and n-type indium gallium zinc oxide field-effect transistors.

  14. Intense Microsecond Electron Beam Interactions with Low-Pressure Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    Gilgenbach, J. E. Tucker, and C. L. Enloe, Laser and Particle Beams, 6 687 (1988). 4) "Undulation of a Magnetized Electron Beam by a Periodic Ion...Excitation by Relativistic Electrons: I. Collisions Cross Sections and Deposition Efficiencies", Laser and Particle Beams 8 493 (1990) 11) D.B...McGarrah and M.L. Brake, Argon Ion Excitation by Relativistic Electrons: II. Chemical Kinetics", Laser and Particle Beams 8 507 (1990) 9 T-PS/18/3//35709

  15. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements of reciprocal space structure of 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Guo, F-W; Lu, T-M; Wang, G-C

    2016-12-02

    Knowledge on the symmetry and perfection of a 2D material deposited or transferred to a surface is very important and valuable. We demonstrate a method to map the reciprocal space structure of 2D materials using reflection high energy diffraction (RHEED). RHEED from a 2D material gives rise to 'streaks' patterns. It is shown that from these streaks patterns at different azimuthal rotation angles that the reciprocal space intensity distribution can be constructed as a function of momentum transfer parallel to the surface. To illustrate the principle, we experimentally constructed the reciprocal space structure of a commercial graphene/SiO2/Si sample in which the graphene layer was transferred to the SiO2/Si substrate after it was deposited on a Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition. The result reveals a 12-fold symmetry of the graphene layer which is a result of two dominant orientation domains with 30° rotation relative to each other. We show that the graphene can serve as a template to grow other materials such as a SnS film that follows the symmetry of graphene.

  16. Solving structure in the CP29 light harvesting complex with polarization-phased 2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Naomi S.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2011-01-01

    The CP29 light harvesting complex from green plants is a pigment-protein complex believed to collect, conduct, and quench electronic excitation energy in photosynthesis. We have spectroscopically determined the relative angle between electronic transition dipole moments of its chlorophyll excitation energy transfer pairs in their local protein environments without relying on simulations or an X-ray crystal structure. To do so, we measure a basis set of polarized 2D electronic spectra and isolate their absorptive components on account of the tensor relation between the light polarization sequences used to obtain them. This broadly applicable advance further enhances the acuity of polarized 2D electronic spectroscopy and provides a general means to initiate or feed back on the structural modeling of electronically-coupled chromophores in condensed phase systems, tightening the inferred relations between the spatial and electronic landscapes of ultrafast energy flow. We also discuss the pigment composition of CP29 in the context of light harvesting, energy channeling, and photoprotection within photosystem II. PMID:21321222

  17. Beyond Graphene: Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Defective 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Humberto

    One of the challenges in the production of 2-D materials is the synthesis of defect free systems which can achieve the desired properties for novel applications. However, the reality so far indicates that we need to deal with defective systems and understand their main features in order to perform defect engineering in such a way that we can engineer a new material. In this talk I discuss first, the introduction of defects in a hierarchic way starting from 2-D graphene to form giant Schwarzites or graphene foams, which also can exhibit further defects, thus we can have several levels of defectiveness. In this context, it will be shown that giant Schwarzites, depending on their symmetry, can exhibit Dirac-Fermion behavior and further, possess protected topological states as shown by other authors. Regarding the mechanical properties of these systems, it is possible to tune the Poisson Ratio by the addition of defects, thus shedding light to the explanation of the almost zero Poisson ratios in experimentally obtained graphene foams. Second, the idea of Haeckelites, a planar sp2 graphene-like structure with heptagons and pentagons, can be extended to transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with square and octagonal-like defects, finding semi-metallic behaviors with Dirac-Fermions, and even topological insulating properties. National Science Foundation (EFRI-1433311).

  18. Photoinduced direct electron transfer from InSe to GaSe semiconductor nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haohua; Kelley, David F

    2006-01-01

    Direct electron transfer from InSe nanoparticles to GaSe nanoparticles in mixed solution-phase aggregates has been found to occur upon photoexcitation. Mixed aggregates exhibit a strong charge-transfer absorption band at an energy slightly higher than the InSe band gap. Photoexcitation of this band results in a polarized transient absorption spectrum and transient absorption kinetics characteristic of InSe valence-band holes and GaSe conduction-band electrons. The kinetics indicate that charge separation persists for at least several hundred picoseconds.

  19. Electron affinities for rare gases and some actinides from local-spin-density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Wrinn, M.C.; Whitehead, M.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The negative ions of the rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and some actinides (Pu, Am, Bk, Cf, and Es) have been calculated self-consistently by the generalized exchange local-spin-density-functional theory with self-interaction correction and correlation. The electron affinities were obtained as the differences between the statistical total energies of the negative ions and neutral atoms; the electron affinities were positive around several millirydbergs. Consequently, the negative ions are predicted stable for the rare gases and actinides.

  20. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  1. Breakdown and discharges in dense gases governed by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L.P.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of runaway electrons (REs) at high values of the ratio field intensity/gas number density {ital E}/{ital N} and {ital N} up to the Loshmidt number {ital N}{sub {ital L}}{approx_equal}2.7{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} is described. REs are shown to govern the breakdown and discharges at such condition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Electron capture and excitation in collisions of O+ ( 4S , 2D , 2P ) with H2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichl, Lukáš; Li, Yan; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Kimura, Mineo

    2004-06-01

    Using an electronic-state close-coupling method, we treated the electron capture and excitation processes of O+ ions both in ground state O+ ( 4S ) and metastable states O+* ( 2D ) and O+* ( 2P ) in collisions with the H2 molecule. In the ground-state projectile energy region considered (from 50 eV/amu to 10 keV/amu ), the experimental data vary by orders of magnitude: our results smoothly connect to the data by FleschNg, J. Chem. Phys.9419912372 and Xuet al., J. Phys. B2319901235 at low energy and agree with Phaneufet al., Phys. Rev. A171978534 in the high-energy region. The present values differ from Sieglaffet al., Phys. Rev. A5919993538 and Nuttet al., J. Phys. B121979L157, especially in the energy region below 1 keV/amu . We provide the first calculated state-resolved cross sections of electron capture and target-projectile electronic excitations for the O+ ( 4S , 2D , 2P )- H2 collision system.

  3. Ternary recombination of H3+, H2D+, HD2+, and D3+ with electrons in He/Ar/H2/D2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalosi, Abel; Dohnal, Petr; Plasil, Radek; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosik, Juraj

    2016-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the ternary recombination rate coefficients of H2D+ and HD2+ ions has been studied in the temperature range of 80-150 K at pressures from 500 to 1700 Pa in a stationary afterglow apparatus equipped with a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Neutral gas mixtures consisting of He/Ar/H2/D2 (with typical number densities 1017 /1014 /1014 /1014 cm-3) were employed to produce the desired ionic species and their fractional abundances were monitored as a function of helium pressure and the [D2]/[H2] ratio of the neutral gas. In addition, the translational and the rotational temperature and the ortho to para ratio were monitored for both H2D+ and HD2+ ions. A fairly strong pressure dependence of the effective recombination rate coefficient was observed for both ion species, leading to ternary recombination rate coefficients close to those previously found for (helium assisted) ternary recombination of H3+ and D3+. Work supported by: Czech Science Foundation projects GACR 14-14649P, GACR 15-15077S, GACR P209/12/0233, and by Charles University in Prague Project Nr. GAUK 692214.

  4. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kukk, E.; Wills, A.A.; Langer, B.; Bozek, J.D.; Berrah, N.

    2004-09-02

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions.

  5. Multi-field electron emission pattern of 2D emitter: Illustrated with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ma; Li, Zhibing

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of laser-assisted multi-field electron emission of two-dimensional emitters is investigated theoretically. The process is basically a cold field electron emission but having more controllable components: a uniform electric field controls the emission potential barrier, a magnetic field controls the quantum states of the emitter, while an optical field controls electron populations of specified quantum states. It provides a highly orientational vacuum electron line source whose divergence angle over the beam plane is inversely proportional to square root of the emitter height. Calculations are carried out for graphene with the armchair emission edge, as a concrete example. The rate equation incorporating the optical excitation, phonon scattering, and thermal relaxation is solved in the quasi-equilibrium approximation for electron population in the bands. The far-field emission patterns, that inherit the features of the Landau bands, are obtained. It is found that the optical field generates a characteristic structure at one wing of the emission pattern.

  6. Single crystal diamond boron 'delta doped' nanometric layers for 2D electronic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, James

    2016-10-01

    Use of diamond as a semiconductor material suffers from the high activation energy of all known impurity dopants (0.37 eV for Boron, 0.6 eV for Phosphorous). To achieve the simultaneous carrier concentration and mobility desired for devices operating at room temperature, growth of a nanometric thick `delta' layer doped to above the metal insulator transition adjacent to high mobility intrinsic material can provide a 2D high mobility conduction layer. Critical to obtaining the enhanced mobility of the carriers in the layer next to the `delta' doped layer is the abruptness of the doping interface. Single and multiple nanometer thick epitaxial layers of heavily boron `delta' doped diamond have been grown on high quality, intrinsic lab grown diamond single crystals. These layers were grown in a custom microwave plasma activated chemical vapor deposition reactor based on a rapid reactant switching technique. Characterization of the `delta' layers by various analytical techniques will be presented. Electrical measurements demonstrating enhanced hole mobility (100 to 800 cm2/V sec) as well as other electrical characterizations will be presented.

  7. Similarity criteria in vibrationally and electronically excited gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustova, E. V.; Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity criteria related to heat conduction and diffusion (Prandtl and Schmidt numbers) are studied in strongly non-equilibrium reacting flows on the basis of the Chapman-Enskog method. A one-temperature flow description is applied to study high-temperature gas mixtures with slow chemical reactions and excited rovibrational and electronic degrees of freedom of molecules and electronic states of atomic species. Essentially non-monotonic dependence of the Prandtl number on the mixture composition is emphasized; the Schmidt numbers vary weakly with temperature and decrease monotonically with increasing molecular molar fraction. For vibrationally non-equilibrium flows, we consider the detailed state-to-state model. In this case the Prandtl number is determined by translational and rotational energies; the Schmidt numbers are introduced for each vibrational state. The developed models are used to study Prandtl and Schmidt numbers in shock heated and supersonic expanding flows of N2/N and O2/O mixtures. Peculiar features of these similarity criteria in strongly non-equilibrium flows are discussed.

  8. Shubnikov-de Haas oscillation of KTaO3 based electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Ludi; Du, Renzhong; Li, Qi; Qi Li's Lab Team

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at transition metal oxide (TMO) surfaces and interfaces have attracted much attention due to their exotic properties such as superconductivity, and ferromagnetism. Recently, 5 d TMOs are hotly investigated due to their strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), an indispensable element for topolotical insulating states. Among them, KTaO3 not only hosts 2DEGs but also involves strong SOC. We have created KTaO3 based electron gases, with low temperature mobility as large as 8000cm2V-1s-1. Shubnikov de Haas oscillations in magnetoresistance have been observed at 1.8 K for field applied along various directions. Contributions from dxy and dxz / yz bands are both seen. These oscillation curves exhibit a field direction dependence with 4-fold symmetry, revealing the cubic symmetry of Fermi surface of KTaO3 based electon gases. Moreover, the intercept of oscillation indices is close to 0.5, a typical value for systems that involve strong SOC. Our results provide unique insights into the electronic structures of KTaO3 based electron gases via magnetotransport measurements.

  9. Electronic and structural properties of 3D, 2D and 1D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Filipe Joao

    In this work several applications of the ab initio pseudopotential density functional theory method are presented. With this method it is possible to calculate the electronic ground state properties of many systems like bulk solids, surfaces, nanotubes, and nanowires, and draw conclusions about the systems structural and electronic properties. With modifications of this approach excited states can also be treated. The first chapter of this thesis gives a brief description of the computational techniques employed. The second chapter describes results of calculations on the structural and electronic properties of carbon and germanium. We try to shed some light on a still poorly understood structural phase transition of graphite under pressure at low temperatures, which is different from the high temperature regime. Next, we study the phase transition path of germanium under pressure and predict the existence of a new phase. The following chapter explores the possibility of superconductivity in the graphite-like compound BC3 since there are many similarities between the electronic structure of this material and the 39 K superconductor MgB2. Subsequently, results of calculations on the adsorption of indium atoms on carbon nanotubes and graphite-like surfaces are presented. These studies explain some very interesting experimental results of In migration on nanotubes in an electrical potential. In the following chapters the electronic properties of very thin metallic MoSe nanowires are studied, and the different regimes of stability of metallic monatomic chains of Au, Al, Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru are investigated and compared. Chapter 7 addresses the possible polymerization of C60 molecules inside carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. Finally, the propagation of a light signal in a medium with gains and losses is investigated, and the possibility of a discontinuity in the index of refraction is discussed.

  10. A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

    2009-09-25

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

  11. Stability and electronic properties of SiGe-based 2D layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdagni, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Thakur, Anil; Pandey, Ravindra; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the in-plane hybrids consisting of siligene (SiGe), and its derivatives in both mono and bilayer forms are investigated within density functional theory. Among several pristine and hydrogenated configurations, the so-called chair conformation is energetically favorable for monolayers. On the other hand, the bilayer siligane (HSiGeH) prefers AB-stacked chair conformation and bilayer siligone (HSiGe) prefers AA-stacked buckled conformation. In SiGe, the Dirac-cone character is predicted to be retained. HSiGe is a magnetic semiconductor with a band gap of ˜0.6 eV. The electronic properties show tunability under mechanical strain and transverse electric field; (i) the energy gap opens up in the SiGe bilayer, (ii) a direct-to-indirect gap transition is predicted by the applied strain in the HSiGeH bilayer, and (iii) a semiconductor-to-metal transition is predicted for HSiGe and HSiGeH bilayers under the application of strain and electric field, thus suggesting SiGe and its derivatives to be a potential candidate for electronic devices at nanoscale.

  12. Parameters of Runaway Electron Beams at a Subnanosecond Breakdown of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor; Institute of High Current Electronics Collaboration; National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The generation of runaway electrons in gases at atmospheric pressure is a fundamental physical phenomenon. The aim of this work is to determine the main parameters of runaway electron beams at a subnanosecond breakdown of gases at atmospheric pressure from experiments performed with the highest currently achieved time resolution. Studies were performed with five experimental setups and three generators of nanosecond pulses with the duration of the voltage pulse front from 0.1 to 1 ns and the amplitude of the voltage pulse in the incident wave from 40 to 200 kV. It has been proven that the duration of the current pulse of the runaway electron beam detected behind the foil of the gas diode in air and other gases at atmospheric pressure was 100 ps. It has been shown that the use of a collimator with a hole with a diameter of 1 mm or smaller, short interelectrode gaps, and cathodes with a small area of a sharp edge makes it possible to separate a fraction of runaway electrons of the beam and to detect pulses with a FWHM of about 25 ps. The number of electrons detected behind the anode foil was correspond to a current amplitude of the runaway electron beam of 100 A. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation under the Grant Number 14-29-00052.

  13. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Ni, G. X.; Pan, C.; Fei, Z.; Cheng, B.; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  14. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B-Y; Ni, G X; Pan, C; Fei, Z; Cheng, B; Lau, C N; Bockrath, M; Basov, D N; Fogler, M M

    2016-08-19

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  15. Electron dose distributions in experimental phantoms: a comparison with 2D pencil beam calculations.

    PubMed

    Cygler, J; Battista, J J; Scrimger, J W; Mah, E; Antolak, J

    1987-09-01

    Dose distributions were measured and computed within inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with beams of electrons having initial energies of 10 and 18 MeV. The measurements were made with a small p-type silicon diode and the calculations were performed using the pencil beam algorithm developed originally at the M D Anderson Hospital (MDAH). This algorithm, which is available commercially on many radiotherapy planning computers, is based on the Fermi-Eyges theory of electron transport. The phantoms used in this work were composed of water into which two- and three-dimensional inhomogeneities of aluminum and air (embedded in wax) were introduced. This was done in order to simulate the small bones and the air cavities encountered clinically in radiation therapy of the chest wall or neck. Our intent was to test the adequacy of the two-dimensional implementation of the pencil beam approach. The agreement between measured and computed doses is very good for inhomogeneities which are essentially two-dimensional but discrepancies as large as 40% were observed for more complex three-dimensional inhomogeneities. We can only trace the discrepancies to the complex interplay of numerous approximations in the Fermi-Eyges theory of multiple scattering and its adaptation for practical computer-aided radiotherapy planning.

  16. Iterative Stable Alignment and Clustering of 2D Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengfan; Fang, Jia; Chittuluru, Johnathan; Asturias, Francisco J.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of homogeneous subsets of images in a macromolecular electron microscopy (EM) image data set is a critical step in single-particle analysis. The task is handled by iterative algorithms, whose performance is compromised by the compounded limitations of image alignment and K-means clustering. Here we describe an approach, iterative stable alignment and clustering (ISAC) that, relying on a new clustering method and on the concepts of stability and reproducibility, can extract validated, homogeneous subsets of images. ISAC requires only a small number of simple parameters and, with minimal human intervention, can eliminate bias from two-dimensional image clustering and maximize the quality of group averages that can be used for ab initio three-dimensional structural determination and analysis of macromolecular conformational variability. Repeated testing of the stability and reproducibility of a solution within ISAC eliminates heterogeneous or incorrect classes and introduces critical validation to the process of EM image clustering. PMID:22325773

  17. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  18. Quantum magnetotransport in 2D electron gas in InGaAs/InP heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podor, Balint; Savel'ev, I. G.; Kovacs, Gy.; Remenyi, G.; Gombos, G.; Kreshchuk, A. M.; Novikov, S. V.

    1997-08-01

    Quantum magnetotransport measurements were performed on liquid phase epitaxially grown In0.35Ga0.47As/InP heterostructures at 4.2 K temperature in magnetic fields up to 22 Tesla. Measurements in tilted magnetic field, in conjunction with the analysis of the derivatives with respect to the magnetic field of the magnetoresistance curves, allowed the resolution of spin-splitting of the Landau levels up to N equals 3. The spin-splitting energy ESPIN was deduced for the half-filled Landau levels 0ARDN, 1ARUP, 1ARDN, 2ARUP, and 2$ARDN. The magnetic field dependence of the spin-splitting energy was interpreted using a simple model based on the exchange interaction of the electrons in the spin-splitted Landau levels, incorporating the disorder induced broadening of the Landau levels.

  19. Electron radiation damage mechanisms in 2D MoSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, T.; Lehtinen, O.; Algara-Siller, G.; Kaiser, U.

    2017-01-01

    The contributions of different damage mechanisms in single-layer MoSe2 were studied by investigating different MoSe2/graphene heterostructures by the aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (AC-HRTEM) at 80 keV. The damage cross-sections were determined by direct counting of atoms in the AC-HRTEM images. The contributions of damage mechanisms such as knock-on damage or ionization effects were estimated by comparing the damage rates in different heterostructure configurations, similarly to what has been earlier done with MoS2. The behaviour of MoSe2 was found to be nearly identical to that of MoS2, which is an unexpected result, as the knock-on mechanism should be suppressed in MoSe2 due to the high mass of Se, as compared to S.

  20. The electronic structure and spin states of 2D graphene/VX2 (X = S, Se) heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Popov, Z I; Mikhaleva, N S; Visotin, M A; Kuzubov, A A; Entani, S; Naramoto, H; Sakai, S; Sorokin, P B; Avramov, P V

    2016-12-07

    The structural, magnetic and electronic properties of 2D VX2 (X = S, Se) monolayers and graphene/VX2 heterostructures were studied using a DFT+U approach. It was found that the stability of the 1T phases of VX2 monolayers is linked to strong electron correlation effects. The study of vertical junctions comprising of graphene and VX2 monolayers demonstrated that interlayer interactions lead to the formation of strong spin polarization of both graphene and VX2 fragments while preserving the linear dispersion of graphene-originated bands. It was found that the insertion of Mo atoms between the layers leads to n-doping of graphene with a selective transformation of graphene bands keeping the spin-down Dirac cone intact.

  1. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-08-01

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the "site-probe response." By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  2. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  3. Hartree-Fock Solutions of 2d Interacting Tight-Binding Electrons: Mott Properties and Room Temperature Superconductivity Indications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, A.; March, N. H.; Cabo-Bizet, A.

    2014-12-01

    Former results for a tight-binding (TB) model of CuO planes in La2CuO4 are reinterpreted here to underline their wider implications. It is noted that physical systems being appropriately described by the TB model can exhibit the main strongly correlated electron system (SCES) properties, when they are solved in the HF approximation, by also allowing crystal symmetry breaking effects and noncollinear spin orientations of the HF orbitals. It is argued how a simple 2D square lattice system of Coulomb interacting electrons can exhibit insulator gaps and pseudogap states, and quantum phase transitions as illustrated by the mentioned former works. A discussion is also presented here indicating the possibility of attaining room temperature superconductivity, by means of a surface coating with water molecules of cleaved planes of graphite, being orthogonal to its c-axis. The possibility that 2D arrays of quantum dots can give rise to the same effect is also proposed to consideration. The analysis also furnishes theoretical insight to solve the Mott-Slater debate, at least for the La2CuO4 and TMO band structures. The idea is to apply a properly noncollinear GW scheme to the electronic structure calculation of these materials. The fact is that the GW approach can be viewed as a HF procedure in which the screening polarization is also determined. This directly indicates the possibility of predicting the assumed dielectric constant in the previous works. Thus, the results seem to identify that the main correlation properties in these materials are determined by screening. Finally, the conclusions also seem to be of help for the description of the experimental observations of metal-insulator transitions and Mott properties in atoms trapped in planar photonic lattices.

  4. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: Electronic versus vibrational coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Plenio, M. B.; Almeida, J.; Huelga, S. F.

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  5. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: electronic versus vibrational coherence.

    PubMed

    Plenio, M B; Almeida, J; Huelga, S F

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  6. Statistics of electron avalanches and bursts in low pressure gases below the breakdown voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Donko, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Avalanches in different types of dynamical systems have been subject of recent interest. Avalanches building up in gases play an important role in radiation detectors and in the breakdown process of gas discharges. We have used computer simulation to study statistical properties of electron avalanches and bursts (sequences of avalanches) in a gas subjected to a homogeneous electric field. Helium was used as buffer gas, but we believe that our results are more general. The bursts were initiated by injecting low energy electrons into the gas. We applied Monte Carlo procedure to trace the trajectories of electrons. The elementary processes considered in the model were anisotropic elastic scattering of electrons from He atoms, electron impact excitation and ionization of He atoms. The electrons were traced until the are reached the perfectly absorbing anode.

  7. High-Power Subnanosecond Beams of Runaway Electrons Generated in Dense Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.

    2005-01-01

    New understanding of the mechanism of runaway electrons beam generation in gases is presented. It is shown that the Townsend mechanism of avalanche electron multiplication is valid even for strong electric fields when the electron ionization friction on the gas may be neglected. A non-local criterion for runaway electron generation is proposed. This criterion results in the universal two-valued dependence of critical voltage Ucr on pd for a certain gas (p is pressure, d is interelectrode distance). This dependence subdivides a plane (U, pd) onto an area of efficient electron multiplication and an area where the electrons leave the gas gap without multiplication. On the basis of this dependence analogs of Paschen's curves are constructed, which contain an additional new upper branch. This brunch demarcates the area of discharge and the e-beam area. Electron beams of subnanosecond pulse duration and amplitudes of hundreds of amperes have been created at atmospheric pressure in various gases. It is shown that the beam of the runaway electrons is formed at an instant when the plasma of the discharge gap approaches the anode. In this case a basic pulse of the electron beam is formed according to the non-local criterion of runaway electron generation. A volume nanosecond discharge with high specific excitation power in the absence of gap preionization by an additional external source has been realized. The role of discharge gap preionization by the fast electrons, emitted from the plasma non-uniformities on the cathode, as well as propagation of an electron multiplication wave from cathode to anode in a dense gas are considered.

  8. Consistent calculation of the stopping power for slow ions in two-dimensional electron gases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, You-Nian |; Ma, Teng-Gai

    1997-03-01

    Within the framework of quantum scattering theory, we present a consistent calculation of the stopping power for slow protons and antiprotons moving in two-dimensional electron gases. The Friedel sum rule is used to determine the screening constant in the scattering potential. For the stopping power our results are compared with that of the random-phase approximation dielectric theory and that predicted by the linear Thomas-Fermi potential. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. A Stochastic Hill Climbing Approach for Simultaneous 2D Alignment and Clustering of Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Bonnet, Frederic; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2016-06-07

    A critical step in the analysis of novel cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle datasets is the identification of homogeneous subsets of images. Methods for solving this problem are important for data quality assessment, ab initio 3D reconstruction, and analysis of population diversity due to the heterogeneous nature of macromolecules. Here we formulate a stochastic algorithm for identification of homogeneous subsets of images. The purpose of the method is to generate improved 2D class averages that can be used to produce a reliable 3D starting model in a rapid and unbiased fashion. We show that our method overcomes inherent limitations of widely used clustering approaches and proceed to test the approach on six publicly available experimental cryo-EM datasets. We conclude that, in each instance, ab initio 3D reconstructions of quality suitable for initialization of high-resolution refinement are produced from the cluster centers.

  10. Structural, electronic transport and optical properties of functionalized quasi-2D TiC2 from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.; Madjet, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Using the first-principles density functional theory, we study the effect of surface functionalization on the structural and optoelectronic properties of recently proposed quasi-two-dimensional material TiC2 [T. Zhao, S. Zhang, Y. Guo, Q. Wang, Nanoscale 8 (2016) 233]. Hydrogenated, fluorinated, oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces are considered. Significant changes in the lattice parameters and partial charge distributions are found due to the surface termination. Direct contribution of the adatoms to the system density of states near the Fermi level is obtained, which has a major impact on the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, surface termination results in larger absorption in the visible range of the spectrum. The electronic transport is also affected by the surface functionalization: the current in the system can be reduced by an order of magnitude. These findings indicate the importance of the effects of surface passivation on optoelectronic properties of this quasi-2D material.

  11. Electronic absorption spectra of C60+ -L (L = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, H2, D2, N2) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Mathias; Campbell, Ewen Kyle; Rice, Corey Allen; Maier, John Paul

    2017-02-01

    Electronic spectra in the near infrared of C60+ with He, Ne, Ar, Kr, H2, D2 and N2 attached have been recorded below 10 K in a cryogenic radio frequency ion trap. Additional absorption bands are observed compared to the spectrum of C60+ -He. In the case of C60+ -N2, the strongest one of these shifts to lower energies by 21.3 cm-1 compared to the origin band of C60+ -He at 10378.5 cm-1. The pattern in the spectrum is dependent on the attached ligand. The gas-phase observations on C60+ -Ne allow a rationalization of the relative intensities of the absorptions of C60+ in a neon matrix.

  12. Photogalvanic effects originating from the violation of the Einstein relation in a 2D electron gas in high Landau levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    This talk will present a quantum kinetic theory [1] of the microwave-induced photocurrent and photovoltage magnetooscillations emerging in a spatially nonuniform 2D electron system in the absence of external dc driving [2]. It will show that in an irradiated sample the Landau quantization leads to violation of the Einstein relation between the dc conductivity and diffusion coefficient. Then, in the presence of a built-in electric field in a sample, the microwave illumination causes photo-galvanic signals which oscillate as a function of magnetic field as observed in the experiment. The discussed effects should also play an essential role for the transport in the zero resistance states where the system breaks into current domains and peculiarities of the transport properties of the inhomogeneous system become of central importance.[1] I. A. Dmitriev, S. I. Dorozhkin, and A. D. Mirlin, ``Theory of microwave-induced photocurrent and photovoltage magneto-oscillations in a spatially nonuniform two-dimensional electron gas '', Phys. Rev. B 80, 125418 (2009).[2] S. I. Dorozhkin, I. V. Pechenezhskiy, L. N. Pfeiffer, K. W. West, V. Umansky, K. von Klitzing, and J. H. Smet, ``Photocurrent and Photovoltage Oscillations in the Two-Dimensional Electron System: Enhancement and Suppression of Built-In Electric Fields'', Phys. Rev.Lett. 102, 036602 (2009).

  13. Transient terahertz spectroscopy of excitons and unbound carriers in quasi two-dimensional electron-hole gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Hagele, D.; Carnahan, M. A.; Chemla, D. S.

    2008-09-11

    We report a comprehensive experimental study and detailed model analysis of the terahertz (THz) dielectric response and density kinetics of excitons and unbound electron-hole pairs in GaAs quantum wells. A compact expression is given, in absolute units, for the complex-valued THz dielectric function of intra-excitonic transitions between the 1s and higher-energy exciton and continuum levels. It closely describes the THz spectra of resonantly generated excitons. Exciton ionization and formation are further explored, where the THz response exhibits both intra-excitonic and Drude features. Utilizing a two-component dielectric function, we derive the underlying exciton and unbound pair densities. In the ionized state, excellent agreement is found with the Saha thermodynamic equilibrium, which provides experimental verification of the two-component analysis and density scaling. During exciton formation, in turn, the pair kinetics is quantitatively described by a Saha equilibrium that follows the carrier cooling dynamics. The THz-derived kinetics is, moreover, consistent with time-resolved luminescence measured for comparison. Our study establishes a basis for tracking pair densities via transient THz spectroscopy of photoexcited quasi-2D electron-hole gases.

  14. State-specific transport properties of partially ionized flows of electronically excited atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-03-01

    State-to-state approach for theoretical study of transport properties in atomic gases with excited electronic degrees of freedom of both neutral and ionized species is developed. The dependence of atomic radius on the electronic configuration of excited atoms is taken into account in the transport algorithm. Different cutoff criteria for increasing atomic radius are discussed and the limits of applicability for these criteria are evaluated. The validity of a Slater-like model for the calculation of state-resolved transport coefficients in neutral and ionized atomic gases is shown. For ionized flows, a method of evaluation for effective cross-sections of resonant charge-transfer collisions is suggested. Accurate kinetic theory algorithms for modelling the state-specific transport properties are applied for the prediction of transport coefficients in shock heated flows. Based on the numerical observations, different distributions over electronic states behind the shock front are considered. For the Boltzmann-like distributions at temperatures greater than 14,000 K, an important effect of electronic excitation on the partial thermal conductivity and viscosity coefficients is found for both neutral and ionized atomic gases: increasing radius of excited atoms causes a strong decrease in these transport coefficients. Similarly, the presence of electronically excited states with increased atomic radii leads to reduced diffusion coefficients. Nevertheless the overall impact of increasing effective cross-sections on the transport properties just behind the shock front under hypersonic reentry conditions is found to be minor since the populations of high-lying electronic energy levels behind the shock waves are low.

  15. Mechanism of organophosphates (nerve gases and pesticides) and antidotes: electron transfer and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2003-12-01

    Evidence indicates that nerve gas toxins operate in ways in addition to inhibition of acetylcholine esterase. Alternative bioactivities are discussed with focus on electron transfer. The main class, including pralidoxime (2-PAM), incorporates conjugated iminium and oxime moieties that are electron affinic. Various physiological properties of iminium and oxime species are reviewed. The organophosphates encompass both nerve gases and insecticides, possessing similar properties, but different activities. Toxic manifestations are apparently due, in part, to oxidative stress. Alkylation of DNA takes place which may lead to generation of reactive oxygen species. Structure-activity relationships are examined, including reduction potentials and the captodative effect.

  16. Validity of Eucken formula and Stokes’ viscosity relation in high-temperature electronically excited gases

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.; Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2014-12-09

    In the present work we evaluate the accuracy of the Eucken formula and Stokes’ viscosity relation in high temperature non-equilibrium air species with electronic excitation. The thermal conductivity coefficient calculated using the exact kinetic theory methods is compared with that obtained applying approximate formulas in the temperature range 200–20000 K. A modification of the Eucken formula providing a good agreement with exact calculations is proposed. It is shown that the Stokes viscosity relation is not valid in electronically excited monoatomic gases at temperatures higher than 2000 K.

  17. Electron Scattering Processes from Plasma Processing Gases: CF3I, C3F8 and C4F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Mineo

    2000-10-01

    Brief review of the current level of understanding of electron scattering processes from plasma processing gases such as CF3I, C3F8 and C4F8 will be presented. Experimental as well as theoretical studies for these gases have been carried out last a few years by several groups, and although the amount of cross-section data is still far from sufficient, we are able to establish the data set for some processes in these gases. I will briefly discuss possible next-generation processing gases.

  18. 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1) surface: atomic arrangement and electronic band structure.

    PubMed

    Gruznev, D V; Bondarenko, L V; Tupchaya, A Y; Eremeev, S V; Mihalyuk, A N; Chou, J P; Wei, C M; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2017-01-25

    Structural transformations and evolution of the electron band structure in the (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) system have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The two 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1), [Formula: see text]-(Tl, Pb) and [Formula: see text]-(Tl, Pb), have been found and their composition, atomic arrangement and electron properties has been characterized. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compound is almost identical to the alike (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] system from the viewpoint of its atomic structure and electronic properties. They contain 1.0 ML of Tl atoms arranged into a honeycomb network of chained trimers and 1/3 ML of Pb atoms occupying the centers of the honeycomb units. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compound contains six Tl atoms and seven Pb atoms per [Formula: see text] unit cell (i.e.  ∼0.67 ML Tl and  ∼0.78 ML Pb). Its atomic structure can be visualized as consisting of Pb hexagons surrounded by Tl trimers. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] and (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compounds are metallic and their band structures contain spin-split surface-state bands. By analogy with the (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text], these (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) compounds are believed to be promising objects for prospective studies of superconductivity in one-atom-layer systems.

  19. 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1) surface: atomic arrangement and electronic band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruznev, D. V.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Eremeev, S. V.; Mihalyuk, A. N.; Chou, J. P.; Wei, C. M.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Structural transformations and evolution of the electron band structure in the (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) system have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The two 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1), \\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} -(Tl, Pb) and 3× 3 -(Tl, Pb), have been found and their composition, atomic arrangement and electron properties has been characterized. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} compound is almost identical to the alike (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} system from the viewpoint of its atomic structure and electronic properties. They contain 1.0 ML of Tl atoms arranged into a honeycomb network of chained trimers and 1/3 ML of Pb atoms occupying the centers of the honeycomb units. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)3× 3 compound contains six Tl atoms and seven Pb atoms per 3× 3 unit cell (i.e.  ˜0.67 ML Tl and  ˜0.78 ML Pb). Its atomic structure can be visualized as consisting of Pb hexagons surrounded by Tl trimers. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} and (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)3× 3 compounds are metallic and their band structures contain spin-split surface-state bands. By analogy with the (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} , these (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) compounds are believed to be promising objects for prospective studies of superconductivity in one-atom-layer systems.

  20. Electron attachment mass spectrometry as a diagnostics for electronegative gases and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, E.; Stoffels, W. W.; Tachibana, K.

    1998-01-01

    Electron attachment mass spectrometry (EAMS) has been developed to study mixtures of electronegative gases and plasmas. A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) has been used to detect negative ions, formed from sampled species by attachment of low energy electrons. Varying the electron energy allows to collect the attachment cross section of the considered species. EAMS appears to be a very powerful technique to study the chemistry of electronegative gases. Unlike ionization mass spectrometry, where cross sections are low at the threshold and rather flat over a broad range of electron energies, attachment resonances are sharp and distinct. Also very limited fragmentation of the parent negative ion occurs, so a given molecule yields only a few different negative ions. This facilitates identification of components in a gas mixture. It is particularly advantageous for detection of large, fragile molecules, which break up after ionization, but can be easily transformed into large negative ions. Moreover, sensitive detection of active species is possible due to their relatively high attachment cross sections. A particularly important application of EAMS is the determination of an effective attachment cross section in a plasma. Recording this cross section allows to decide on the actual negative ion formation mechanism in the plasma environment, where active products of plasma conversion can significantly alter the negative ion production channels and consequently the whole balance of charged particles. Examples of EAMS applications to fluorocarbon gases and low-pressure radio-frequency plasmas are discussed. In a CF4 discharge conversion of the parent gas into species like C2F6 and C3F8 is easily visualized. The dominant mechanism of negative ion formation in the plasma is electron attachment to these minority species and not to the parent gas. Also larger polymers are readily formed in fluorocarbon plasmas. In a C2F6 discharge molecules with up to ten carbon atoms (the

  1. A Static and Dynamic Investigation of Quantum Nonlinear Transport in Highly Dense and Mobile 2D Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Scott

    Heterostructures made of semiconductor materials may be one of most versatile environments for the study of the physics of electron transport in two dimensions. These systems are highly customizable and demonstrate a wide range of interesting physical phenomena. In response to both microwave radiation and DC excitations, strongly nonlinear transport that gives rise to non-equilibrium electron states has been reported and investigated. We have studied GaAs quantum wells with a high density of high mobility two-dimensional electrons placed in a quantizing magnetic field. This study presents the observation of several nonlinear transport mechanisms produced by the quantum nature of these materials. The quantum scattering rate, 1tau/q, is an important parameter in these systems, defining the width of the quantized energy levels. Traditional methods of extracting 1tau/q involve studying the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. We analyze the quantum positive magnetoresistance due to the cyclotron motion of electrons in a magnetic field. This method gives 1tau/q and has the additional benefit of providing access to the strength of electron-electron interactions, which is not possible by conventional techniques. The temperature dependence of the quantum scattering rate is found to be proportional to the square of the temperature and is in very good agreement with theory that considers electron-electron interactions in 2D systems. In quantum wells with a small scattering rate - which corresponds to well-defined Landau levels - quantum oscillations of nonlinear resistance that are independent of magnetic field strength have been observed. These oscillations are periodic in applied bias current and are connected to quantum oscillations of resistance at zero bias: either Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations for single subband systems or magnetointersubband oscillations for two subband systems. The bias-induced oscillations can be explained by a spatial variation of electron

  2. Bcs-Bose Crossover Picture for a 2d Electron Gas with a Finite-Range Attractive Interfermion Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Miguel A.; Sevilla, Francisco J.; Fortes, Mauricio; de Llano, Manuel

    2002-03-01

    Cooper pair formation is studied in a 2D electron gas interacting pairwise through a finite-range, separable interfermion potential in wavevector space V_ kk^' =-(v_0/L^2)g_kg_k^' , where L^2 is the system area, v0 >= 0 the interaction strength, g_k≡ (1+k^2/k_0^2)-1/2 with k0 the inverse interaction range. The interaction strength v0 is eliminated [1] in favor of the (positive) binding energy B2 of an electron pair in vacuum under the same interfermion interaction. For finite range, i.e., 1/k_0>0, we report numerical calculations of the gap, the critical temperature and the chemical potential as functions of B2 and 1/k_0. For k_0= ∞ or zero-range (viz., a delta potential well) we recover at T=0 the well-known Miyake [2] results. Finally, the gap-to-Tc ratio is exhibited as a function of B2 and compared with other calculations as well as with empirical values for cuprate superconductors. [1] S.K. Adhikari, M. Casas, A. Puente, A. Rigo, M. Fortes, M.A. Solís, M. de Llano, A.A. Valladares and O. Rojo, Phys. Rev. B 62, 8671 (2000). [2] K. Miyake, Prog. Theor. Phys. 69, 1794 (1983). We thank UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT # IN102198 and CONACyT # 27828E for partial support.

  3. Spin-Orbit Interaction in High-κ Dielectric Gated Rashba-2D Electron Gas and Mesoscopic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yanhua; Yuan, Zhuoquan; Stone, Kristjan; Du, Rui-Rui; Xu, Min; Ye, Peide

    2008-03-01

    There is increasing current interest in the quantum interference effect in mesoscopic devices fabricated on a Rashba-2D electron gas (2DEG), where the spin-orbit interaction parameters can be tuned by a potential gate. We explore ring structures that use a gate consisting of thin (5nm-50nm) high-κ dielectric Al2O3 or HfO2 layer and nano-patterned metals. The 2DEG is provided by lattice-matched In0.52Al0.48As/In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.52Al0.48As quantum wells that have a typical electron density n of 1.5x10^12/cm^2 and mobility μ>=2x10^4cm^2/Vs. The dielectric material was grown by atomic layer deposition. We will present the gate characteristics of Hall bars as well as magnetic transport data from gated mesoscopic rings. The work at Rice is funded by NSF DMR-0706634. Reference: M. Konig et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 076804 (2006); T. Bergsten et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 196803 (2006); B. Grbic et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 176803 (2007).

  4. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang; Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H.

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  5. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Miriam M; Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Qy band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240-270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet-singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  6. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(100) surface yield a 2D and not a 1D electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, R.; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Golden, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced nanowires do indeed host exotic, 1D (one-dimensional) metallic states. In light of this debate, we report here a thorough study of the electronic properties of high quality nanowires formed at the Au/Ge(100) surface. The high-resolution ARPES data show the low-lying Au-induced electronic states to possess a dispersion relation that depends on two orthogonal directions in k space. Comparison of the E (kx,ky) surface measured using high-resolution ARPES to tight-binding calculations yields hopping parameters in the two different directions that differ by approximately factor of two. Additionally, by pinpointing the Au-induced surface states in the first, second, and third surface Brillouin zones and analyzing their periodicity in k||, the nanowire propagation direction seen clearly in STM can be imported into the ARPES data. We find that the larger of the two hopping parameters corresponds, in fact, to the direction perpendicular to the nanowires (tperp). This proves that the Au-induced electron pockets possess a two-dimensional, closed Fermi surface, and this firmly places the Au/Ge(100) nanowire system outside potential hosts of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. We combine these ARPES data with scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of the spatially resolved electronic structure and find that the spatially straight—wirelike—conduction channels observed up to energies of order one electron volt below the Fermi level do not originate from the Au-induced states seen in the ARPES data. The former are rather more likely to be associated with bulk Ge states that are localized to the subsurface region. Despite our proof of the 2D (two-dimentional) nature of the Au

  7. Long- and short-lived electrons with anomalously high collision rates in laser-ionized gases.

    PubMed

    Kampfrath, Tobias; Gericke, Dirk O; Perfetti, Luca; Tegeder, Petra; Wolf, Martin; Frischkorn, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Ultrashort broadband terahertz pulses are applied to probe the electron dynamics of gaseous Ar and O2 following ionization by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The conductivity in the plasma center is extracted by a modified Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approach. It exhibits a nearly perfect Drude-like spectral shape and yields the temporal evolution of the free-electron density and collision rate. While the electron density in the Ar plasma remains nearly constant during the first 200ps after generation, it decays much faster in O2 due to dissociative recombination which is only possible in molecular plasmas. Adding a small amount of the electron scavenger SF6 to Ar reduces the electron lifetime in the plasma dramatically and allows us to determine the electron temperature to about 20,000K . Furthermore, anomalously high, metal-like electron collision rates of up to 25THz are found. Kinetic plasma theory substantially underestimates these rates pointing towards additional and more complex processes randomizing the total electronic momentum. Our results are relevant to both lightning control and generation of terahertz radiation by intense laser pulses in gases.

  8. Interpretation of calculated transverse and longitudinal diffusion for electrons in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, A. V.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2012-10-01

    Ratios of transverse DT and longitudinal DL diffusion coefficients to mobility μ and mean energies for electrons in gases are calculated for a wide range of E/N for He, Ar, Xe, H2, N2, and CO. These transport coefficients are determined from spatial-gradient expansion, two-term spherical harmonic theoryfootnotetextJ. H. Parker and J. J. Lowke, Phys. Rev. 181, 290 (1969).^,footnotetextG. J. M. Hagelaar (unpublished codes, 2012). and from Monte Carlo simulations.footnotetextIbid.^,footnotetextS. F. Biagi, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 421, 234 (1999). As predicted by simplified theoryfootnotetextParker, Lowke, Op. cit. applied to the heavier rare gases, e.g., Ar and Xe, the ratio DT/DL reaches 7 to 10 at mean electron energies for which the momentum transfer cross sections are rapidly rising functions of energy. Comparisons are made of simplifiedfootnotetextIbid. and detailed predictions of DL/DT values for N2 and CO at low electron energies where the effects of scattering by the quadrupole potential of N2 versus the dipole/quadrupole potential of CO are expected to be observed.

  9. Quantum point contacts on two-dimensional electron gases with a strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Sue; Pendaharkar, Mihir; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; McFadden, Anthony P.; Palmstrøm, Chris

    Studies of electrical transport in one-dimensional semiconductors in a presence of a strong spin-orbit interaction are crucial not only for exploring the emergent phenomena, such as topological superconductivity, but also for potential spintronic applications by controlling of the electron spins. We investigate the electrical transport properties of one-dimensional confinement defined by electrostatic potentials on large area two-dimensional electron gases of InAs and InSb, which have a strong spin-orbit coupling. The high-quality InAs and InSb quantum wells are grown on antimonide buffers by molecular beam epitaxy, and the gate-tunable regions are created using Al2O3 or HfO2 gate dielectrics by atomic layer deposition. We will discuss the modulation of spin-orbit coupling in the two-dimensional electron gases and the spin-orbit-induced spin splitting by the split-gate quantum point contacts. This work was supported by Microsoft Research.

  10. Runaway of electrons in dense gases and mechanism of generation of high-power subnanosecond beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachev, Alexey; Yakovlenko, Sergei

    2004-12-01

    New understanding of mechanism of the runaway electrons beam generation in gases is presented. It is shown that the Townsend mechanism of the avalanche electron multiplication is valid even for the strong electric fields when the electron ionization friction on gas may be neglected. A non-local criterion for a runaway electron generation is proposed. This criterion results in the universal two-valued dependence of critical voltage U cr on pd for a certain gas (p is a pressure, d is an interelectrode distance). This dependence subdivides a plane (U cr, pd) onto the area of the efficient electron multiplication and the area where the electrons leave the gas gap without multiplication. On the basis of this dependence analogs of Paschen's curves are constructed, which contain an additional new upper branch. This brunch demarcates the area of discharge and the area of e-beam. The mechanism of the formation of the recently created atomospheric pressure subnanosecond e-beams is discussed. It is shown that the beam of the runaway electrons is formed at an instant when the plasma of the discharge gap approaches to the runaway electrons is formed at an instant when the plasma of the discharge gap approaches to the anode. In this case a basic pulse of the electron beam is formed according to the non-local criterion of the runaway electrons generation. The role of the discharge gap preionization by the fast electrons, emitted from the plasma non-uniformities on the cathode, as well as a propagation of an electron multiplication wave from cathode to anode in a dense gas are considered.

  11. A 2D simulation study of Langmuir, whistler, and cyclotron maser instabilities induced by an electron ring-beam distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, L. C.; Omura, Y.

    2011-09-15

    We carried out a series of 2D simulations to study the beam instability and cyclotron maser instability (CMI) with the initial condition that a population of tenuous energetic electrons with a ring-beam distribution is present in a magnetized background plasma. In this paper, weakly relativistic cases are discussed with the ring-beam kinetic energy ranging from 25 to 100 keV. The beam component leads to the two-stream or beam instability at an earlier stage, and the beam mode is coupled with Langmuir or whistler mode, leading to excitation of beam-Langmuir or beam-whistler waves. When the beam velocity is large with a strong beam instability, the initial ring-beam distribution is diffused in the parallel direction rapidly. The diffused distribution may still support CMI to amplify the X1 mode (the fundamental X mode). On the contrary, when the beam velocity is small and the beam instability is weak, CMI can amplify the Z1 (the fundamental Z mode) effectively while the O1 (the fundamental O mode) and X2 (the second harmonic X mode) modes are very weak and the X1 mode is not excited. In this report, different cases with various parameters are presented and discussed for a comprehensive understanding of ring-beam instabilities.

  12. Temperature Distribution in Two-Dimensional Electron Gases under a Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Naomi; Endo, Akira; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hatano, Naomichi; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Shirasaki, Ryōen; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    2011-05-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases having an electrochemical potential gradient under a magnetic field are numerically examined using the finite-difference method. The temperature, voltage, electric current, and heat flux are calculated from transport equations describing thermoelectric and thermomagnetic effects, namely the Hall, Nernst, Ettingshausen, and Righi-Leduc effects. The results show that a magnetic field distorts equipotential lines and generates an uneven temperature distribution. In particular, a part of the system is found to become colder than the temperature of the heat baths. The cooling effect under a strong magnetic field is due primarily to the Ettingshausen and Hall effects.

  13. An improved classical mapping method for homogeneous electron gases at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-08-14

    We introduce a modified classical mapping method to predict the exchange-correlation free energy and the structure of homogeneous electron gases (HEG) at finite temperature. With the classical map temperature parameterized on the basis of the quantum Monte Carlo simulation data for the correlation energy and exact results at high and low temperature limits, the new theoretical procedure greatly improves the classical mapping method for correlating the energetic properties HEG over a broad range of thermodynamic conditions. Improvement can also be identified in predicting the long-range components of the spin-averaged pair correlation functions.

  14. Influence of electron-neutral elastic collisions on the instability of an ion-contaminated cylindrical electron cloud: 2D3V PIC-with-MCC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is a simulation based investigation of the effect of elastic collisions and effectively elastic-like excitation collisions between electrons and background neutrals on the dynamics of a cylindrically trapped electron cloud that also has an ion contaminant mixed in it. A cross section of the trapped non neutral cloud composed of electrons mixed uniformly with a fractional population of ions is loaded on a 2D PIC grid with the plasma in a state of unstable equilibrium due to differential rotation between the electron and the ion component. The electrons are also loaded with an axial velocity component, vz, that mimics their bouncing motion between the electrostatic end plugs of a Penning-Malmberg trap. This vz loading facilitates 3D elastic and excitation collisions of the electrons with background neutrals under a MCC scheme. In the present set of numerical experiments, the electrons do not ionize the neutrals. This helps in separating out only the effect of non-ionizing collisions of electrons on the dynamics of the cloud. Simulations reveal that these non-ionizing collisions indirectly influence the ensuing collisionless ion resonance instability of the contaminated electron cloud by a feedback process. The collisional relaxation reduces the average density of the electron cloud and thereby increases the fractional density of the ions mixed in it. The dynamically changing electron density and fractional density of ions feed back on the ongoing ion-resonance (two-stream) instability between the two components of the nonneutral cloud and produce deviations in the paths of progression of the instability that are uncorrelated at different background gas pressures. Effects of the collisions on the instability are evident from alteration in the growth rate and energetics of the instability caused by the presence of background neutrals as compared to a vacuum background. Further in order to understand if the non-ionizing collisions can independently be a cause

  15. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of the electron drift instability and associated anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system modeling the radial-azimuthal (r{--}θ ) plane for large radius thrusters. A magnetic field, {{B}}0, is aligned along the Oy axis (r direction), a constant applied electric field, {{E}}0, along the Oz axis (perpendicular to the simulation plane), and the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction is along the Ox axis (θ direction). Although electron transport can be well described by electron–neutral collisions for low plasma densities, at high densities (similar to those in typical HETs), a strong instability is observed that enhances the electron cross-field mobility; even in the absence of electron–neutral collisions. The instability generates high frequency (of the order of MHz) and short wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the azimuthal electric field and charged particle densities, and propagates in the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction with a velocity close to the ion sound speed. The correlation between the electric field and density fluctuations (which leads to an enhanced electron–ion friction force) is investigated and shown to be directly responsible for the increased electron transport. Results are compared with a recent kinetic theory, showing good agreement with the instability properties and electron transport.

  16. Electron-beam generation in a wide-aperture open gas discharge: A comparative study for different inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.

    2010-08-30

    In the present study, electron-beam generation by open discharges was examined. The study was performed at gas pressures up to 20 Torr, and covered all inert gases. At voltages up to 8 kV, electron-beam currents up to 1600 A with current density {approx}130 A/cm{sup 2} and a beam generation efficiency in excess of 93% were obtained. The production of electrons from cold cathode was concluded to be of photoemissive nature, enabling the production of high-intensity electron beams in any noble gas or in a mixture of a noble gas with molecular gases irrespective of cathode material.

  17. Simulation of nanosecond high voltage discharges in dense gases governed by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L.P.; Kutsyk, I.M.

    1995-12-31

    In the present communication results of the first attempt to simulate overall dynamics of high voltage discharge in dense gases at high overvoltages are presented. The model of energy group was adopted. On a large scale the population of free electrons was divided in three energy groups: low energy electrons, runaway electrons (REs) and electrons of intermediate energies. The conventional Lorentz approximation of electron distribution function is adequate to describe low energy electrons on the basis of the Boltzmann kinetic equation. A differential equation was deduced to simulate the evolution of low-energy electron number density. The upper boundary {epsilon}{sub max} of this energy domain was determined as the energy, where the approximation was violated. To pass from the differential description to discreet model it was convenient to introduce k{sub max} energy groups of smaller scale {triangle}{epsilon} << {epsilon}{sub max} and divide the space domain x {element_of} [0, d] on i{sub max} space zones {triangle}x{sub i}. Thus the overall description of low energy electron kinetics was reduced to a system of equations with [k{sub max}, i{sub max}] dimension. To simulate REs, beforehand an auxiliary calculations should have been carried out to determine a share of electrons {gamma} with the initial energy {epsilon}{sub max}, which in the course of some time t{sub r} achieved the runaway energy threshold {epsilon}{sub th}. This time was adopted 0.1 ns to be essentially less than a characteristic time of applied voltage pulse variation. Data on {gamma} as a function of E allowed to calculate a number of REs electrons in every space zone. It was assumed that at every time step the share 5 of low-energy electrons, obtained energy >{epsilon}{sub max}, instantiously achieved the threshold {epsilon}{sub th}, whereas the others returned back to low-energy domain.

  18. Electron transparent graphene windows for environmental scanning electron microscopy in liquids and dense gases.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Joshua D; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2012-12-21

    Due to its ultrahigh electron transmissivity in a wide electron energy range, molecular impermeability, high electrical conductivity and excellent mechanical stiffness, suspended graphene membranes appear to be a nearly ideal window material for in situ (in vivo) environmental electron microscopy of nano- and mesoscopic objects (including bio-medical samples) immersed in liquids and/or in dense gaseous media. In this paper, taking advantage of a small modification of the graphene transfer protocol onto metallic and SiN supporting orifices, reusable environmental cells with exchangeable graphene windows have been designed. Using colloidal gold nanoparticles (50 nm) dispersed in water as model objects for scanning electron microscopy in liquids as proof of concept, different conditions for imaging through the graphene membrane were tested. Limiting factors for electron microscopy in liquids, such as electron beam induced water radiolysis and damage of the graphene membrane at high electron doses, are discussed.

  19. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  20. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a ``background corrected`` experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  1. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a background corrected'' experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  2. Electron and hole dynamics in GaSe nanoparticles and GaSe-InSe nanoparticle heterojunctions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, David F.; Tu, Haohua; Mogyorosi, Karoly; Chen, Xiang-Bai

    2006-08-01

    Femtosecond polarized transient absorption results are obtained for InSe and GaSe nanoparticles. The results indicate that the transient absorption spectrum of large GaSe particles is dominated by a size-independent, z-polarized hole intraband transition. The small particle spectra exhibit the same z-polarized hole transition and a much more intense x,y-polarized absorption that is assigned to a charge transfer transition from the conduction band to particle surface (edge) states. The intensity of this transition depends on the momentum state (Γ or M) of the electron, and Γ to M electron momentum relaxation results in a 15 ps absorption decay. These results are used to interpret analogous results obtained for mixed GaSe-InSe nanoparticle aggregates, also in the solution phase. The static absorption spectrum of the mixed aggregates exhibits a strong interparticle charge transfer absorption band at an energy slightly higher than the InSe bandgap. Photoexcitation of this band results in a polarized transient absorption spectrum and transient absorption kinetics characteristic of InSe valence band holes and GaSe conduction band electrons. This result indicates that with small GaSe particles, direct InSe to GaSe electron transfer occurs upon photoexcitation.

  3. Thermoelectric and electrical transport in mesoscopic two-dimensional electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Vijay; Pepper, Michael; Ritchie, David A.

    2016-12-01

    We review some of our recent experimental studies on low-carrier concentration, mesoscopic two-dimensional electron gases (m2DEGs). The m2DEGs show a range of striking characteristics, including a complete avoidance of the strongly localised regime even when the electrical resistivity ρ > > h /e2, giant thermoelectric response, and an apparent decoupling of charge and thermoelectric transport. We analyse the results and demonstrate that these observations can be explained based on the assumption that the charge carriers retain phase coherence over the m2DEG dimensions. Intriguingly, this would imply phase coherence on lengthscales of up to 10 μm and temperature T up to 10 K, which is significantly greater than conventionally expected in GaAs-based 2DEGs. We critically assess this assumption and explore other possible explanations to the data. Such unprecedentedly large phase coherence lengths open up several possibilities in quantum information and computation schemes. xml:lang="fr"

  4. Imaginary time density-density correlations for two-dimensional electron gases at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, M.; Galli, D. E.; Moroni, S.; Vitali, E.

    2015-10-28

    We evaluate imaginary time density-density correlation functions for two-dimensional homogeneous electron gases of up to 42 particles in the continuum using the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method. We use periodic boundary conditions and up to 300 plane waves as basis set elements. We show that such methodology, once equipped with suitable numerical stabilization techniques necessary to deal with exponentials, products, and inversions of large matrices, gives access to the calculation of imaginary time correlation functions for medium-sized systems. We discuss the numerical stabilization techniques and the computational complexity of the methodology and we present the limitations related to the size of the systems on a quantitative basis. We perform the inverse Laplace transform of the obtained density-density correlation functions, assessing the ability of the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method to evaluate dynamical properties of medium-sized homogeneous fermion systems.

  5. High-throughput critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) measurement of two-dimensional (2D) structures using scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullam, Jennifer; Boye, Carol; Standaert, Theodorus; Gaudiello, John; Tomlinson, Derek; Xiao, Hong; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we tested a novel methodology of measuring critical dimension (CD) uniformity, or CDU, with electron beam (e-beam) hotspot inspection and measurement systems developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). The systems were used to take images of two-dimensional (2D) array patterns and measure CDU values in a custom designated fashion. Because this methodology combined imaging of scanning micro scope (SEM) and CD value averaging over a large array pattern of optical CD, or OCD, it can measure CDU of 2D arrays with high accuracy, high repeatability and high throughput.

  6. Electronic Transport Properties of New 2-D Materials GeH and NaSn2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Cultrara, Nicholas; Arguilla, Maxx; Goldberger, Joshua; Heremans, Joseph

    2-D materials potentially have superior thermoelectric properties compared to traditional 3-D materials due to their layered structure. Here we present electrical and thermoelectric transport properties of 2 types of 2-D materials, GeH and NaSn2As2. GeH is a graphane analog which is prepared using chemical exfoliation of CaGe2 crystals. Intrinsic GeH is proven to be a highly resistive material at room temperature. Resistance and Seebeck coefficient of Ga doped GeH are measured in a cryostat with a gating voltage varying from -100V to 100V. NaSn2As2 is another 2-D system, with Na atom embedded between nearly-2D Sn-As layers. Unlike GeH, NaSn2As2 is a metal based of Hall measurements, with p-type behavior, and with van der Pauw resistances on the order of 5m Ω/square. Thermoelectric transport properties of NaSn2As2 will be reported. This work is support by the NSF EFRI-2DARE project EFRI-1433467.

  7. Status and perspectives for the electron beam technology for flue gases treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Norman W.

    The electron-beam process is one of the most effective methods of removing SO 2 and NO x from industrial flue gases. This flue gas treatment consists of adding a small amount of ammonia to the flue gas and irradiating the gas by means of an electron beam, thereby causing reactions which convert the SO 2 and NO x to ammonium sulfate and ammonium sulfate-nitrate. These salts may the be collected from the flue gas by means of such conventional collectors as an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This process has numerous advantages over currently-used conventional processes as follows: (1) the process simultaneously removes SO 2 and NO x from flue gas at high efficiency levels; (2) it is a dry process which is easily controlled and has excellent load-following capability; (3) stack-gas reheat is not required; (4) the pollutants are converted into a saleable agricultural fertilizer; (5) the process has low capital and operating cost requirements. The history of the process is shown with a summary of the work that is presently underway. All of the current work is for the purpose of fine tuning the process for commercial usage. It is believed that with current testing and improvements, the process will be very competitive with existing processes and it will find its place in an environmental conscious world.

  8. Reversible Formation of 2D Electron Gas at the LaFeO3 /SrTiO3 Interface via Control of Oxygen Vacancies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfa; Han, Wei; Rice, Philip M; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G; Mohseni, Katayoon; Meyerheim, Holger L; Ostanin, Sergey; Maznichenko, Igor V; Mertig, Ingrid; Gross, Eberhard K U; Ernst, Arthur; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2017-03-01

    A conducting 2D electron gas (2DEG) is formed at the interface between epitaxial LaFeO3 layers >3 unit cells thick and the surface of SrTiO3 single crystals. The 2DEG is exquisitely sensitive to cation intermixing and oxygen nonstoichiometry. It is shown that the latter thus allows the controllable formation of the 2DEG via ionic liquid gating, thereby forming a nonvolatile switch.

  9. Destabilization of a cylindrically confined electron cloud by impact ionization of background neutrals: 2D3v PIC simulation with Monte-Carlo-collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we have investigated, through simulation, the process of destabilization of a cylindrically confined electron cloud due to the presence of a single species of neutral atoms, Ar in the background of the trap at a pressure relevant to experiments. The destabilization occurs because of a gradual accumulation of Ar+ in the cloud by the electron-impact ionization of the background neutrals. The trapped ions gradually collectively form a sizeable ion cloud which engages in a rotational two-stream instability (the ion resonance instability) with the electron cloud. The instability excites a growing fundamental diocotron mode on both components of the mixed non-neutral cloud. With the help of a set of numerical diagnostics, we have investigated the nonlinear evolution of the excited fundamental mode under the combined influence of two ongoing processes viz, (i) the changing electron and ion populations caused by electron impact ionization of the background Ar, and also by the radial loss of both charged species to the grounded trap wall at later stages and (ii) the elastic scattering of electrons and ions that make non-ionizing collisions with the background neutrals. The 2D collisionless dynamics of the instability has been simulated using a 2D Particle-in-Cell code operating on a Cartesian grid laid out on the cylindrical trap's cross-section, and the 3D ionizing and non-ionizing collisions between charged particles and background neutrals have been simulated using the technique of Monte-Carlo-Collisions.

  10. On the parameters of runaway electron beams and on electrons with an "anomalous" energy at a subnanosecond breakdown of gases at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. K.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.; Sorokin, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    The generation of runaway electron beams in gases at atmospheric pressure has been studied with a real picosecond accuracy. Their main parameters have been determined. It has been found that three groups of electrons can be separated at a subnanosecond voltage pulse in a runaway electron beam generated in air at atmospheric pressure. It has been proven that the duration of a beam pulse in air at atmospheric pressure behind an anode foil is ~100 ps.

  11. 2D Particle-In-Cell simulations of the electron-cyclotron instability and associated anomalous transport in Hall-Effect Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Péchereau, François; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the electron-cyclotron instability in Hall-Effect Thrusters (HETs) using a 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system where a magnetic field, B0, is aligned along the X-axis (radial direction, including absorbing walls), a constant electric field, E0, along the Z-axis (axial direction, perpendicular to simulation plane), and the E0xB0 direction along the Y-axis (O direction, with periodic boundaries). Although for low plasma densities classical electron-neutral collisions theory describes well electron transport, at sufficiently high densities (as measured in HETs) a strong instability can be observed that enhances the electron mobility, even in the absence of collisions. The instability generates high frequency ( MHz) and short wavelength ( mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and charged particle densities. We investigate the correlation between these fluctuations and their role with anomalous electron transport; complementing previous 1D simulations. Plasma is self-consistently heated by the instability, but since the latter does not reach saturation in an infinitely long 2D system, saturation is achieved through implementation of a finite axial length that models convection in E0 direction. With support of Safran Aircraft Engines.

  12. Controlled Vapor Phase Growth of Single Crystalline, Two-Dimensional GaSe Crystals with High Photoresponse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Idrobo, Juan C.; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Yoon, Mina; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Compared with their bulk counterparts, atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit new physical properties, and have the potential to enable next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, controlled synthesis of large uniform monolayer and multi-layer 2D crystals is still challenging. Here, we report the controlled synthesis of 2D GaSe crystals on SiO2/Si substrates using a vapor phase deposition method. For the first time, uniform, large (up to ~60 μm in lateral size), single-crystalline, triangular monolayer GaSe crystals were obtained and their structure and orientation were characterized from atomic scale to micrometer scale. The size, density, shape, thickness, and uniformity of the 2D GaSe crystals were shown to be controllable by growth duration, growth region, growth temperature, and argon carrier gas flow rate. The theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition and progressive confinement-induced bandgap shifts for 2D GaSe crystals. The 2D GaSe crystals show p-type semiconductor characteristics and high photoresponsivity (~1.7 A/W under white light illumination) comparable to exfoliated GaSe nanosheets. These 2D GaSe crystals are potentially useful for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and field-effect transistors. PMID:24975226

  13. Controlled Vapor Phase Growth of Single Crystalline, Two-Dimensional GaSe Crystals with High Photoresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Zhang, Huidong; Puretzky, Alexander A; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Yoon, Mina; Rouleau, Christopher M; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Compared with their bulk counterparts, atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit new physical properties, and have the potential to enable next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, controlled synthesis of large uniform monolayer and multi-layer 2D crystals is still challenging. Here, we report the controlled synthesis of 2D GaSe crystals on SiO2/Si substrates using a vapor phase deposition method. For the first time, uniform, large (up to ~60 m in lateral size), single-crystalline, triangular monolayer GaSe crystals were obtained and their atomic resolution structure were characterized. The size, density, shape, thickness, and uniformity of the 2D GaSe crystals were shown to be controllable by growth duration, growth region, growth temperature, and argon carrier gas flow rate. The theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition and progressive confinement-induced bandgap shifts for 2D GaSe crystals. The 2D GaSe crystals show p-type semiconductor characteristics and high photoresponsivity (~1.7 A/W under white light illumination) comparable to exfoliated GaSe nanosheets. These 2D GaSe crystals are potentially useful for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and field-effect transistors.

  14. Controlled vapor phase growth of single crystalline, two-dimensional GaSe crystals with high photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Puretzky, Alexander A; Idrobo, Juan C; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Yoon, Mina; Rouleau, Christopher M; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2014-06-30

    Compared with their bulk counterparts, atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit new physical properties, and have the potential to enable next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, controlled synthesis of large uniform monolayer and multi-layer 2D crystals is still challenging. Here, we report the controlled synthesis of 2D GaSe crystals on SiO2/Si substrates using a vapor phase deposition method. For the first time, uniform, large (up to ~60 μm in lateral size), single-crystalline, triangular monolayer GaSe crystals were obtained and their structure and orientation were characterized from atomic scale to micrometer scale. The size, density, shape, thickness, and uniformity of the 2D GaSe crystals were shown to be controllable by growth duration, growth region, growth temperature, and argon carrier gas flow rate. The theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition and progressive confinement-induced bandgap shifts for 2D GaSe crystals. The 2D GaSe crystals show p-type semiconductor characteristics and high photoresponsivity (~1.7 A/W under white light illumination) comparable to exfoliated GaSe nanosheets. These 2D GaSe crystals are potentially useful for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and field-effect transistors.

  15. Electron capture and excitation in collisions of O{sup +}({sup 4}S,{sup 2}D,{sup 2}P) with H{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pichl, Lukas; Li Yan; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Kimura, Mineo

    2004-06-01

    Using an electronic-state close-coupling method, we treated the electron capture and excitation processes of O{sup +} ions both in ground state O{sup +}({sup 4}S) and metastable states O{sup +*}({sup 2}D) and O{sup +*}({sup 2}P) in collisions with the H{sub 2} molecule. In the ground-state projectile energy region considered (from 50 eV/amu to 10 keV/amu), the experimental data vary by orders of magnitude: our results smoothly connect to the data by Flesch and Ng [J. Chem. Phys. 94, 2372 (1991)] and Xu et al. [J. Phys. B 23, 1235 (1990)] at low energy and agree with Phaneuf et al. [Phys. Rev. A 17, 534 (1978)] in the high-energy region. The present values differ from Sieglaff et al. [Phys. Rev. A 59, 3538 (1999)] and Nutt et al. [J. Phys. B 12, L157 (1979)], especially in the energy region below 1 keV/amu. We provide the first calculated state-resolved cross sections of electron capture and target-projectile electronic excitations for the O{sup +}({sup 4}S,{sup 2}D,{sup 2}P)-H{sub 2} collision system.

  16. Broadband 2D electronic spectrometer using white light and pulse shaping: noise and signal evaluation at 1 and 100 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Nicholas M; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Jones, Andrew C; Zanni, Martin T

    2017-04-03

    We have developed a broad bandwidth two-dimensional electronic spectrometer that operates shot-to-shot at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using an acousto-optic pulse shaper. It is called a two-dimensional white-light (2D-WL) spectrometer because the input is white-light supercontinuum. Methods for 100 kHz data collection are studied to understand how laser noise is incorporated into 2D spectra during measurement. At 100 kHz, shot-to-shot scanning of the delays and phases of the pulses in the pulse sequence produces a 2D spectrum 13-times faster and with the same signal-to-noise as using mechanical stages and a chopper. Comparing 100 to 1 kHz repetition rates, data acquisition time is decreased by a factor of 200, which is beyond the improvement expected by the repetition rates alone due to reduction in 1/f noise. These improvements arise because shot-to-shot readout and modulation of the pulse train at 100 kHz enables the electronic coherences to be measured faster than the decay in correlation between laser intensities. Using white light supercontinuum for the pump and probe pulses produces high signal-to-noise spectra on samples with optical densities <0.1 within a few minutes of averaging and an instrument response time of <46 fs thereby demonstrating that that simple broadband continuum sources, although weak, are sufficient to create high quality 2D spectra with >200 nm bandwidth.

  17. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-03-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance.

  18. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  19. Fast ion induced shearing of 2D Alfvén eigenmodes measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Tobias, B J; Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Heidbrink, W W; Luhmann, N C; Nazikian, R; Park, H K; Spong, D A; Van Zeeland, M A

    2011-02-18

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  20. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfvén Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B. J.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H. K.; Spong, D. A.; van Zeeland, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  1. Terahertz-Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations in High-Mobility 2D Electron Systems Under Bichromatic and Multichromatic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iñarrea, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the magnetotransport under terahertz radiation in high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems, focusing on irradiation by bichromatic and multichromatic terahertz sources. We observed strong modulation of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at sufficient terahertz radiation power. We determined that the origin of the modulation was the interference between the average distance advanced by the scattered electrons between irradiated Landau states and the available initial density of states at a certain magnetic field. In the case of multifrequency illumination, we found that with the appropriate frequencies, the irradiated magnetoresistance could reach an almost zero-resistance state regime even at moderate radiation power.

  2. Orbital dependent Rashba splitting and electron-phonon coupling of 2D Bi phase on Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiani, Pierluigi; Lisi, Simone; Betti, Maria Grazia; Ibrahimi, Amina Taleb; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Chiodo, Letizia

    2013-11-14

    A monolayer of bismuth deposited on the Cu(100) surface forms a highly ordered c(2×2) reconstructed phase. The low energy single particle excitations of the c(2×2) Bi/Cu(100) present Bi-induced states with a parabolic dispersion in the energy region close to the Fermi level, as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic state dispersion, the charge density localization, and the spin-orbit coupling have been investigated combining photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, unraveling a two-dimensional Bi phase with charge density well localized at the interface. The Bi-induced states present a Rashba splitting, when the charge density is strongly localized in the Bi plane. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the spectral density close to the Fermi level has been evaluated. Dispersive electronic states offer a large number of decay channels for transitions coupled to phonons and the strength of the electron-phonon coupling for the Bi/Cu(100) system is shown to be stronger than for Bi surfaces and to depend on the electronic state symmetry and localization.

  3. Pulsed electron beam propagation in gases under pressure of 6.6 kPa in drift tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Poloskov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of pulsed electron beam transport propagated in a drift tube filled with different gases (He, H2, N2, Ar, SF6, and CO2). The total pressure in the drift tube was 6.6 kPa. The experiments were carried out using a TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The electron beam was propagated in the drift tube composed of two sections equipped with reverse current shunts. Under a pressure of 6.6 kPa, the maximum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded when the beam was propagated in hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The minimum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded for sulfur hexafluoride. The visualization of the pulsed electron beam energy losses onto the walls of the drift chamber was carried out using radiation-sensitive film.

  4. Kinetic Phenomena in Transport of Electrons and Positrons in Gases caused by the Properties of Scattering Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marjanović, Srdan; Dujko, Saša; Banković, Ana; Šašić, Olivera; Bošnjaković, Danko; Stojanović, Vladimir; Malović, Gordana; Buckman, Stephen; Garcia, Gustavo; White, Ron; Sullivan, James; Brunger, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Collisions of electrons, atoms, molecules, photons and ions are the basic processes in plasmas and ionized gases in general. This is especially valid for low temperature collisional plasmas. Kinetic phenomena in transport are very sensitivitive to the shape of the cross sections and may at the same time affect the macroscopic applications. We will show how transport theory or simulation codes, phenomenology, kinetic phenomena and transport data may be used to improve our knowledge of the cross sections, our understanding of the plasma models, application of the swarm physics in ionized gases and similar applications to model and improve gas filled traps of positrons. Swarm techniques could also be a starting point in applying atomic and molecular data in models of electron or positron therapy/diagnostics in radiation related medicine.

  5. Engineering the electronic and magnetic properties of d(0) 2D dichalcogenide materials through vacancy doping and lattice strains.

    PubMed

    Ao, L; Pham, A; Xiao, H Y; Zu, X T; Li, S

    2016-03-14

    We have systematically investigated the effects of different vacancy defects in 2D d(0) materials SnS2 and ZrS2 using first principles calculations. The theoretical results show that the single cation vacancy and the vacancy complex like V-SnS6 can induce large magnetic moments (3-4 μB) in these single layer materials. Other defects, such as V-SnS3, V-S, V-ZrS3 and V-ZrS6, can result in n-type conductivity. In addition, the ab initio studies also reveal that the magnetic and conductive properties from the cation vacancy and the defect complex V-SnS6 can be modified using the compressive/tensile strain of the in-plane lattices. Specifically, the V-Zr doped ZrS2 monolayer can be tuned from a ferromagnetic semiconductor to a metallic/half-metallic material with decreasing/increasing magnetic moments depending on the external compressive/tensile strains. On the other hand, the semiconducting and magnetic properties of V-Sn doped SnS2 is preserved under different lattice compression and tension. For the defect complex like V-SnS6, only the lattice compression can tune the magnetic moments in SnS2. As a result, by manipulating the fabrication parameters, the magnetic and conductive properties of SnS2 and ZrS2 can be tuned without the need for chemical doping.

  6. 2D 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benndorf, Christopher; Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP7 was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published 31P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the 31P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP7 decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP7 as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s2 lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF.

  7. Controlling quantum-beating signals in 2D electronic spectra by packing synthetic heterodimers on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Griffin, Graham B.; Zhang, Alice; Zhai, Feng; Williams, Nicholas E.; Jordan, Richard F.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2017-02-01

    In multidimensional spectroscopy, dynamics of coherences between excited states report on the interactions between electronic states and their environment. The prolonged coherence lifetimes revealed through beating signals in the spectra of some systems may result from vibronic coupling between nearly degenerate excited states, and recent observations confirm the existence of such coupling in both model systems and photosynthetic complexes. Understanding the origin of beating signals in the spectra of photosynthetic complexes has been given considerable attention; however, strategies to generate them in artificial systems that would allow us to test the hypotheses in detail are still lacking. Here we demonstrate control over the presence of quantum-beating signals by packing structurally flexible synthetic heterodimers on single-walled carbon nanotubes, and thereby restrict the motions of chromophores. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, we find that both limiting the relative rotation of chromophores and tuning the energy difference between the two electronic transitions in the dimer to match a vibrational mode of the lower-energy monomer are necessary to enhance the observed quantum-beating signals.

  8. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Morgan, Sarah E; Kehoe, Tom B; Wilson, Mark W B; Chin, Alex W; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  9. Assessment of a 2D electronic portal imaging devices-based dosimetry algorithm for pretreatment and in-vivo midplane dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Jomehzadeh, Ali; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Amouheidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is a method for the dosimetric verification of radiotherapy plans, both pretreatment and in vivo. The aim of this study is to test a 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm for dose verification of some plans inside a homogenous and anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo as well. Materials and Methods: Dose distributions were reconstructed from EPID images using a 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm inside a homogenous slab phantom for a simple 10 × 10 cm2 box technique, 3D conformal (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate plans inside an anthropomorphic (Alderson) phantom and in the patients (one fraction in vivo) for 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck and lung). Results: The planned and EPID dose difference at the isocenter, on an average, was 1.7% for pretreatment verification and less than 3% for all in vivo plans, except for head-and-neck, which was 3.6%. The mean γ values for a seven-field prostate IMRT plan delivered to the Alderson phantom varied from 0.28 to 0.65. For 3D conformal plans applied for the Alderson phantom, all γ1% values were within the tolerance level for all plans and in both anteroposterior and posteroanterior (AP-PA) beams. Conclusion: The 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm provides an accurate method to verify the dose of a simple 10 × 10 cm2 field, in two dimensions, inside a homogenous slab phantom and an IMRT prostate plan, as well as in 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung plans) applied using an anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo. However, further investigation to improve the 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm for a head-and-neck case, is necessary. PMID:28028511

  10. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  11. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals.

    PubMed

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  12. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  13. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  14. Non-linear transport in microwave-irradiated 2D electron systems at the cyclotron resonance subharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Hatke, Anthony; Zudov, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2009-03-01

    We study microwave photoresistivity oscillations in a high mobility two-dimensional electron system subject to strong dc electric fields. We find [1] that near the second subharmonic of the cyclotron resonance the frequency of the resistivity oscillations with dc electric field is twice the frequency of the oscillations at the cyclotron resonance, its harmonics, or in the absence of microwave radiation. This observation is discussed in terms of the microwave-induced sidebands in the density of states and the interplay between different scattering processes in the separated Landau level regime. [1] A. T. Hatke, H.-S. Chiang, M. A. Zudov, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. accepted for publication.

  15. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  16. Electron momentum distribution and singlet-singlet annihilation in the organic anthracene molecular crystals using positron 2D-ACAR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Sellaiyan; Sivaji, Krishnan; Arulchakkaravarthi, Arjunan; Sankar, Sambasivam

    2014-08-14

    We present the mapping of electron momentum distribution (EMD) in a single crystal of anthracene by two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained on the basis of the crystallographic features of the material. The EMD spectra provide information about the positron states and their behavior and also about the hindrance of the positronium (Ps) formation in this material. The EMD has exhibited evidence for the absence of free volume defects. The characteristic EMD features regarding the delocalized electronic states are explained. Further, scintillation characteristics such as fluorescence and time-correlated single photon counting have also been studied. The emission peaks are attributed to vibrational bands of fluorescence emission from the singlet excitons and lifetime components are observed to be due to singlet fission and the singlet-singlet excitons annihilation.

  17. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J.; Batson, Philip E.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ~-0.1 V and ~50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  18. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  19. Sub-excitation electron interactions in rare gases: I, Evidence for the time evolution of the sub-excitation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.; Sauer, M.C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The production of the '2p' electronic excited states of the rare gases neon, argon, krypton and xenon has been studied using picosecond pulse radiolysis techniques. At pressures below about 5 torr, the emission from these excited states shows a pressure dependent growth-decay pattern. Kinetic analysis of the growth-decay curves reveal formation rate constants which are all greater than 10/sup 12/M/sup /minus/1/sec/sup /minus/1/. These observations preclude atom-atom collisional processes and support an excitation mechanism involving collisional energy loss from electrons. It is thus concluded that the secondary electron spectrum in pure rare gases at pressures below a few torr takes a few nanoseconds to degrade to energies below that of the lowest excited state. This time scale therefore (by definition) corresponds to the time needed to form subexcitation electrons. In 1 atmosphere of rare gas the time taken would be of the order of 20--30 picoseconds. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Crystal and electronic characterization of Nd{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}BO{sub 2+d} semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkendir, Osman Murat

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Crystal and electronic structure properties of Nd{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}BO{sub 2+d} structure were investigated. • New crystal structures for Nd–Ti complexes are determined. • Distortions in the crystal structure were observed as a result of Boron shortage. • Prominent change in electronic properties of the samples with the increasing Nd amount. - Abstract: Neodymium substituted TiBO{sub 3} samples were investigated according to their crystal, electric and electronic properties. Studies were conducted by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technique for the samples with different substitutions in the preparation processes. To achieve better crystal structure results during the study, XRD pattern results were supported by extended-XAFS (EXAFS) analysis. The electronic structure analysis were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) measurements at the room temperatures. Due to the substituted Nd atoms, prominent changes in crystal structure, new crystal geometries for Nd-Ti complexes, phase transitions in the crystals structure were detected according to the increasing Nd substitutions in the samples. In the entire stages of the substitutions, Nd atoms were observed as governing the whole phenomena due to their dominant characteristics in Ti geometries. Besides, electrical resistivity decay was determined in the materials with the increasing amount of Nd substitution.

  1. Momentum-resolved view of mixed 2D and nonbulklike 3D electronic structure of the surface state on SrTiO3 (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, N. C.; Salluzzo, M.; Razzoli, E.; Mansson, M.; Krempasky, J.; Matt, C. E.; Schmitt, T.; Shi, M.; Mesot, J.; Patthey, L.; Radovic, M.

    2014-03-01

    The recent discovery of a metallic surface state on SrTiO3 may open a route to simplified low-dimensional oxide-based conductors, as well as give new insights into interfacial phenomena in heterostructures such as LaAlO3/SrTiO3. Our recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study demonstrates that not only quasi-2D but also non-bulklike 3D Fermi surface components make up the surface state. Like their more 2D counterparts, the size and character of the 3D components are fixed with respect to a broad range of sample preparations. As seen in previous studies, the surface state can be ``prepared'' by photon irradiation under UHV conditions. An extremely high fraction of the surface valence states are affected by this process, especially in relation to the stability of oxygen core level intensity during the same exposure, which points to a key role of electronic/structural changes that spread over the surface as the metal emerges.

  2. 76 FR 59542 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Changes to Provisions for Electronics Manufacturing To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Electronics Manufacturing To Provide Flexibility AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final... Electronics Manufacturing portion of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule for the ``largest'' semiconductor... facilities Electronics Manufacturing 334111 Microcomputer manufacturing facilities. 334413...

  3. 76 FR 36472 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases; Changes to Provisions for Electronics Manufacturing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Electronics Manufacturing (Subpart I) To Provide Flexibility AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... the Electronics Manufacturing portion (Subpart I) of the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule for... Electronics Manufacturing......... 334111 Microcomputer manufacturing facilities. 334413...

  4. Giant piezoresistance of p-type nano-thick silicon induced by interface electron trapping instead of 2D quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Li, Xinxin

    2011-01-07

    The p-type silicon giant piezoresistive coefficient is measured in top-down fabricated nano-thickness single-crystalline-silicon strain-gauge resistors with a macro-cantilever bending experiment. For relatively thicker samples, the variation of piezoresistive coefficient in terms of silicon thickness obeys the reported 2D quantum confinement effect. For ultra-thin samples, however, the variation deviates from the quantum-effect prediction but increases the value by at least one order of magnitude (compared to the conventional piezoresistance of bulk silicon) and the value can change its sign (e.g. from positive to negative). A stress-enhanced Si/SiO(2) interface electron-trapping effect model is proposed to explain the 'abnormal' giant piezoresistance that should be originated from the carrier-concentration change effect instead of the conventional equivalent mobility change effect for bulk silicon piezoresistors. An interface state modification experiment gives preliminary proof of our analysis.

  5. Studies of scattering mechanisms in gate tunable InAs/(Al,Ga)Sb two dimensional electron gases

    SciTech Connect

    Shojaei, B.; McFadden, A.; Schultz, B. D.; Shabani, J.; Palmstrøm, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    A study of scattering mechanisms in gate tunable two dimensional electron gases confined to InAs/(Al,Ga)Sb heterostructures with varying interface roughness and dislocation density is presented. By integrating an insulated gate structure the evolution of the low temperature electron mobility and single-particle lifetime was determined for a previously unexplored density regime, 10{sup 11}–10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}, in this system. Existing theoretical models were used to analyze the density dependence of the electron mobility and single particle lifetime in InAs quantum wells. Scattering was found to be dominated by charged dislocations and interface roughness. It was demonstrated that the growth of InAs quantum wells on nearly lattice matched GaSb substrate results in fewer dislocations, lower interface roughness, and improved low temperature transport properties compared to growth on lattice mismatched GaAs substrates.

  6. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  7. Automated screening of 2D crystallization trials using transmission electron microscopy: a high-throughput tool-chain for sample preparation and microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Nicolas; Hermann, Gilles; Caujolle-Bert, Daniel; Karathanou, Argyro; Erne-Brand, Françoise; Buessler, Jean-Luc; Daum, Pamela; Plitzko, Juergen M; Chami, Mohamed; Mueller, Urs; Kihl, Hubert; Urban, Jean-Philippe; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2011-02-01

    We have built and extensively tested a tool-chain to prepare and screen two-dimensional crystals of membrane proteins by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature. This automated process is an extension of a new procedure described recently that allows membrane protein 2D crystallization in parallel (Iacovache et al., 2010). The system includes a gantry robot that transfers and prepares the crystalline solutions on grids suitable for TEM analysis and an entirely automated microscope that can analyze 96 grids at once without human interference. The operation of the system at the user level is solely controlled within the MATLAB environment: the commands to perform sample handling (loading/unloading in the microscope), microscope steering (magnification, focus, image acquisition, etc.) as well as automatic crystal detection have been implemented. Different types of thin samples can efficiently be screened provided that the particular detection algorithm is adapted to the specific task. Hence, operating time can be shared between multiple users. This is a major step towards the integration of transmission electron microscopy into a high throughput work-flow.

  8. Characterization of the growth of 2D protein crystals on a lipid monolayer by ellipsometry and rigidity measurements coupled to electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Vénien-Bryan, C; Lenne, P F; Zakri, C; Renault, A; Brisson, A; Legrand, J F; Berge, B

    1998-01-01

    We present here some sensitive optical and mechanical experiments for monitoring the process of formation and growth of two-dimensional (2D) crystals of proteins on a lipid monolayer at an air-water interface. The adsorption of proteins on the lipid monolayer was monitored by ellipsometry measurements. An instrument was developed to measure the shear elastic constant (in plane rigidity) of the monolayer. These experiments have been done using cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and annexin V as model proteins interacting with a monosialoganglioside (GM1) and dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), respectively. Electron microscopy observations of the protein-lipid layer transferred to grids were systematically used as a control. We found a good correlation between the measured in-plane rigidity of the monolayer and the presence of large crystalline domains observed by electron microscopy grids. Our interpretation of these data is that the crystallization process of proteins on a lipid monolayer passes through at least three successive stages: 1) molecular recognition between protein and lipid-ligand, i.e., adsorption of the protein on the lipid layer; 2) nucleation and growth of crystalline patches whose percolation is detected by the appearance of a non-zero in-plane rigidity; and 3) annealing of the layer producing a slower increase of the lateral or in-plane rigidity. PMID:9591688

  9. Biofiltration of composting gases using different municipal solid waste-pruning residue composts: monitoring by using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    López, R; Cabeza, I O; Giráldez, I; Díaz, M J

    2011-09-01

    The concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the composting of kitchen waste and pruning residues, and the abatement of VOCs by different compost biofilters was studied. VOCs removal efficiencies greater than 90% were obtained using composts of municipal solid waste (MSW) or MSW-pruning residue as biofilter material. An electronic nose identified qualitative differences among the biofilter output gases at very low concentrations of VOCs. These differences were related to compost constituents, compost particle size (2-7 or 7-20mm), and a combination of both factors. The total concentration of VOCs determined by a photoionization analyser and inferred from electronic nose data sets were correlated over an ample range of concentrations of VOCs, showing that these techniques could be specially adapted for the monitoring of these processes.

  10. Scanning drift tube measurements of electron transport parameters in different gases: argon, synthetic air, methane and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolov, I.; Vass, M.; Donkó, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of transport coefficients of electrons in a scanning drift tube apparatus are reported for different gases: argon, synthetic air, methane and deuterium. The experimental system allows the spatio-temporal development of the electron swarms (‘swarm maps’) to be recorded and this information, when compared with the profiles predicted by theory, makes it possible to determine the ‘time-of-flight’ transport coefficients: the bulk drift velocity, the longitudinal diffusion coefficient and the effective ionization coefficient, in a well-defined way. From these data, the effective Townsend ionization coefficient is determined as well. The swarm maps provide, additionally, direct, unambiguous information about the hydrodynamic/non-hydrodynamic regimes of the swarms, aiding the selection of the proper regions applicable for the determination of the transport coefficients.

  11. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; McKeown Walker, S.; Tamai, A.; Wang, Y.; Ristic, Z.; Bruno, F. Y.; de la Torre, A.; Riccò, S.; Plumb, N. C.; Shi, M.; Hlawenka, P.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Varykhalov, A.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; King, P. D. C.; Meevasana, W.; Diebold, U.; Mesot, J.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Radovic, M.; Baumberger, F.

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  12. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; Wang, Y; Ristic, Z; Bruno, F Y; de la Torre, A; Riccò, S; Plumb, N C; Shi, M; Hlawenka, P; Sánchez-Barriga, J; Varykhalov, A; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Diebold, U; Mesot, J; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Radovic, M; Baumberger, F

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  13. Doping dependence of electronic and mechanical properties of GaSe1-xTex and Ga1-xInxSe from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Zs.; Mahanti, S. D.; Mandal, Krishna C.; Fernelius, N. C.

    2010-10-01

    The electronic and mechanical properties of the hexagonal, layered GaSe doped with Te and In have been studied using first-principles pseudopotential method within density-functional theory. The calculated elastic constants of the end compounds GaSe and InSe compare well with the available experimental and theoretical values. As we go from GaSe to InSe, the elastic constants C13 , C33 , and C44 increase while C11 and C12 decrease, suggesting that the crystal becomes stiffer in the direction perpendicular to the atomic layers and the softer in the direction parallel to the layers, as more substitutional In is incorporated in GaSe. The electronic structure and the formation energies of several defects and simple defect complexes are discussed and the calculated charge transition levels are compared to available experimental data. We demonstrate that In doping may play an important role in the observed enhancement in the structural properties of GaSe. Depending on the Fermi energy, In can either substitute for Ga (InGa) or occupy an interstitial position as a triply charged defect (Ini3+) . While the substitutional In does not change significantly the electronic and mechanical properties of the host, we find that the shear stiffness of GaSe is considerably increased when In is incorporated as charged interstitial impurity.

  14. Engineering two-dimensional electron gases at the (001) and (101) surfaces of TiO2 anatase using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Bertran, F.; Gabay, M.; Rozenberg, M. J.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Le Fèvre, P.

    2015-07-01

    We report the existence of metallic two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at the (001) and (101) surfaces of bulk-insulating TiO2 anatase due to local chemical doping by oxygen vacancies in the near-surface region. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we find that the electronic structure at both surfaces is composed of two occupied subbands of dx y orbital character. While the Fermi surface observed at the (001) termination is isotropic, the 2DEG at the (101) termination is anisotropic and shows a charge carrier density three times larger than at the (001) surface. Moreover, we demonstrate that intense UV synchrotron radiation can alter the electronic structure and stoichiometry of the surface up to the complete disappearance of the 2DEG. These results open a route for the nanoengineering of confined electronic states, the control of their metallic or insulating nature, and the tailoring of their microscopic symmetry, using UV illumination at different surfaces of anatase.

  15. An unambiguous identification of 2D electron gas features in the photoluminescence spectrum of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Sharma, T. K.

    2016-07-01

    A fast and non-destructive method for probing the true signatures of 2D electron gas (2DEG) states in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is presented. Two broad features superimposed with interference oscillations are observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The two features are identified as the ground and excited 2DEG states which are confirmed by comparing the PL spectra of as-grown and top barrier layer etched samples. Broad PL features disappear at a certain temperature along with the associated interference oscillations. Furthermore, the two broad PL features depicts specific temperature and excitation intensity dependencies which make them easily distinguishable from the bandedge excitonic or defect related PL features. The presence of strong interference oscillations associated with the 2DEG PL features is explained by considering the localized generation of PL signal at the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Finally, a large value of the polarization induced electric field of ~1.01 MV cm-1 is reported from PL measurements for AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures. It became possible only when the true identification of 2DEG features was made possible by the proposed method.

  16. Acentric 2-D Ensembles of D-br-A Electron-Transfer Chromophores via Vectorial Orientation within Amphiphilic n-Helix Bundle Peptides for Photovoltaic Device Applications

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jaseung; Park, Jaehong; Tronin, Andrey; Zhang, Ruili; Krishnan, Venkata; Strzalka, Joseph; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Fry, H. Christopher; Therien, Michael J.; Blasie, J. Kent

    2012-01-01

    We show that simply designed amphiphilic 4-helix bundle peptides can be utilized to vectorially-orient a linearly-extended Donor-bridge-Acceptor (D-br-A) electron transfer (ET) chromophore within its core. The bundle’s interior is shown to provide a unique solvation environment for the D-br-A assembly not accessible in conventional solvents, and thereby control the magnitudes of both light-induced ET and thermal charge recombination rate constants. The amphiphilicity of the bundle’s exterior was employed to vectorially-orient the peptide-chromophore complex at a liquid-gas interface, and its ends tailored for subsequent covalent attachment to an inorganic surface, via a “directed assembly” approach. Structural data, combined with evaluation of the excited state dynamics exhibited by these peptide-chromophore complexes, demonstrates that densely-packed, acentrically ordered 2-D monolayer ensembles of such complexes at high in-plane chromophore densities approaching 1/200Å2 offer unique potential as active layers in binary heterojucntion photovoltaic devices. PMID:22242787

  17. Interaction of Intense Lasers and Relativistic Electron Beams with Solids, Gases and Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    DYNAMICS IN NEURAL NETWORKS 14 IX. WORKSHOP ON IONOSPHERIC HEATING 16 X. DESIGN AND TESTING OF A CO-AXIAL WIGGLER 18 MAGNET FOR FREE ELECTRON LASERS (FELS) V...relativistic electrons, and esti- mating of a net reduction in the heating rate of the atmosphere. b. since the reduction of ozone concentration changes the...and recognizing spatiotemporal patterns by means of network activation patterns will be explored. 15 IX. WORKSHOP ON IONOSPHERIC HEATING Contact: K

  18. Response analysis of electron attachment rates to C3F8 and SF6 in buffer gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Dominik A.; Franck, Christian M.

    2013-11-01

    Electron swarm methods are applied for investigating the effects of small amounts (⩽1.5%) of a strongly electronegative sample gas in the buffer gases Ar, N2 or CO2. A pulsed Townsend method, a Monte Carlo swarm method, and a solution of the Boltzmann equation are used to determine the effective ionization rate constants of the gas mixtures. The sensitivity of the effective ionization rate constant to changes of the mixing ratio is evaluated. Our methods are benchmarked with the analysis of Ar-SF6 and N2-SF6 mixtures, and subsequently used for the analysis of gas mixtures containing C3F8. The results based on the recommended C3F8 cross sections are shown to be inconsistent with the experimental data for N2-C3F8 and CO2-C3F8 mixtures.

  19. Study of the electron kinetic processes in laser-induced breakdown of electronegative gases over an extended wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Omar, M. M.

    2001-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of laser-induced breakdown of electronegative gases is presented. The formulations are based on an electron cascade model previously developed by Evans and Gamal (J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 13 (1980) 1447-1458). This model solves numerically the time-dependent Boltzmann equation simultaneously with a set of rate equations describing the population density of the formed excited states. It includes the possible kinds of interactions between electrons, molecules and photons. Calculations are carried out under the experimental conditions of Davis et al. (Appl. Optics 30 (1991) 4358-4364) where molecular oxygen over a pressure range of 20-760 Torr is irradiated with the first four harmonics of a Nd : YAG laser source at wavelengths 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm of pulse duration 8.5, 7.5, 6.5 and 5.5 ns, respectively, and peak irradiance varies between 3.6×10 10 and 3.7×10 11 W/cm 2. Computations revealed that the dependence of threshold irradiance on gas pressure is in quite close agreement with those measured by Davis et al. (1991) for the four laser wavelengths considered in this analysis. It is also shown that at laser wavelengths 532 and 266 nm oxygen breakdown is mainly governed by the combined effect of two and three-body attachment loss processes, while for the wavelengths 335and 1064 nm, the three-body attachment process dominates. In addition, calculation of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters, viz, electron density, ionization rate and electron mean energy predicted the importance of the photoionization of excited states as the main electron generation process over the short wavelength range.

  20. A multi-term solution of the space–time Boltzmann equation for electrons in gases and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, G. J.; Tattersall, W. J.; Cocks, D. G.; McEachran, R. P.; White, R. D.

    2017-02-01

    In this study we have developed a full multi-term space–time solution of Boltzmann’s equation for electron transport in gases and liquids. A Green’s function formalism is used that enables flexible adaptation to various experimental systems. The spatio-temporal evolution of electrons in liquids in the non-hydrodynamic regime is benchmarked for a model Percus–Yevick (PY) liquid against an independent Monte Carlo simulation, and then applied to liquid argon. The temporal evolution of Franck–Hertz oscillations in configuration and energy space are observed for the model liquid with large differences apparent when compared to the dilute gas case, for both the velocity distribution function components and the transport quantities. The packing density in the PY liquid is shown to influence both the magnitude and wavelength of Franck–Hertz oscillations of the steady-state Townsend (SST) simulation. Transport properties are calculated from the non-hydrodynamic theory in the long time limit under SST conditions which are benchmarked against hydrodynamic transport coefficients. Finally, the spatio-temporal relaxation of low-energy electrons in liquid argon was investigated, with striking differences evident in the spatio-temporal development of the velocity distribution function components between the uncorrelated gas and true liquid approximations, due largely to the presence of a Ramsauer minimum in the former and not in the latter.

  1. Surface modification of aluminum by runaway electron preionized diffuse discharges in different gases at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, Mikhail V.; Shulepov, Mikhail A.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of an examination of aluminum samples exposed to runaway electron preionized diffuse discharges in air, nitrogen, and argon at atmospheric pressure. The changes in the chemical composition, structure, and hardness of the aluminum surface layers caused by the action of the discharge were investigated. It has been found that the oxygen and carbon concentrations in the surface layers depend on the number of discharge pulses and on the chemical composition of the working gas. The goal of the study was to find possible uses of runaway electron preionized diffuse discharges in research and industry.

  2. 76 FR 56009 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Technical Revisions to the Electronics Manufacturing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ...This action proposes technical revisions to the electronics manufacturing and the petroleum and natural gas systems source categories of the greenhouse gas reporting rule. Proposed changes include providing clarification on existing requirements, increasing flexibility for certain calculation methods, amending data reporting requirements clarifying terms and definitions, and technical......

  3. Experiments on the Photoelectric Effect and on the Diffusion of Electrons in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for investigating the behavior of photoelectrons in a uniform magnetic field in either a vacuum or a low-pressure gas. Presents data and discusses some basic features of the photoelectric effect and the diffusion of free electrons in a gas. (GA)

  4. Determination of space-time resolved electron temperature in nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in various noble gases and discharge tube constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Slaveeva, S. I.; Chernogorova, T. P.

    2016-03-01

    Using our results obtained by the analytical solution of the steady-state heat conduction equation for electrons and deriving a new thermal conductivity, 2D (r, t) numerical solution of nonstationary heat conduction, an equation for electrons is found for nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium for two different pressures and in neon.

  5. Photoinduced field-assisted electron emission from dielectric-coated electrodes into gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josepson, R.; Laan, M.; Aarik, J.; Kasikov, A.

    2008-07-01

    A photoinduced non-self-sustained discharge in a point-plane gap at near-atmospheric pressures in nitrogen and nitrogen-oxygen mixture was studied. Molybdenum and platinum points were coated with thin layers of MgO and TiO2 of different thicknesses. Static current-voltage characteristics were recorded at different intensities of triggering light, layer thickness and gas pressure. The common regularities of current-voltage characteristics were independent of the electrode/coating combinations used. The studies showed that the field-assisted two-step model of emission describes the experimental findings. The electron emission is controlled by Schottky and Fowler-Nordheim mechanisms at the metal-dielectric interface and by a recombination of positive ions with 'hot' and free electrons near the dielectric-gas interface.

  6. Reversible tuning of two-dimensional electron gases in oxide heterostructures by chemical surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Campbell, N.; Ryu, S.; Chang, W.; Irwin, J.; Lindemann, S.; Mahanthappa, M. K.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    Reversible control over the electrical properties of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in oxide heterostructures is a key capability enabling practical applications. Herein, we report an efficient method to reversibly tune the charge carrier density of the 2DEG by surface modification. We demonstrate both increasing and decreasing the carrier density of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 2DEG interface via application of functional phosphonic acids with molecular dipoles pointing either toward or away from the interface, respectively. In addition, in the case of the enhanced 2DEG, we recovered the initial conduction properties by exposing the samples to a basic solution. The tuning processes were highly reversible over repetitive cycles. These results reveal that the surface modification is an efficient way to tune the carrier density of 2DEG in oxide heterostructures. This simple chemical approach offers a vast range of fabrication possibilities in versatile electronic device applications.

  7. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases: Electron Collisions - Experiment, Theory, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules represent one of the very early topics of quantum mechanics. In spite of the field's maturity, a number of recent developments in detector technology (e.g., the ``reaction microscope'' or the ``magnetic-angle changer'') and the rapid increase in computational resources have resulted in significant progress in the measurement, understanding, and theoretical/computational description of few-body Coulomb problems. Close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists worldwide continue to produce high-quality benchmark data, which allow for thoroughly testing and further developing a variety of theoretical approaches. As a result, it has now become possible to reliably calculate the vast amount of atomic data needed for detailed modelling of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres, the interpretation of astrophysical data, optimizing the energy transport in reactive plasmas, and many other topics - including light-driven processes, in which electrons are produced by continuous or short-pulse ultra-intense electromagnetic radiation. I will highlight some of the recent developments that have had a major impact on the field. This will be followed by showcasing examples, in which accurate electron collision data enabled applications in fields beyond traditional AMO physics. Finally, open problems and challenges for the future will be outlined. I am very grateful for fruitful scientific collaborations with many colleagues, and the long-term financial support by the NSF through the Theoretical AMO and Computational Physics programs, as well as supercomputer resources through TeraGrid and XSEDE.

  8. Discharge stratification in noble gases as convergence of electron phase trajectories to attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu.; Valin, S.; Pelyukhova, E.; Nekuchaev, V.; Sigeneger, F.

    2016-12-01

    A new dynamic method to analyse resonance effects in glow discharges is proposed as a supplement to fluid and kinetic approaches for the investigation of discharge stratification. The method is applicable to striations, which are caused by the nonlocal electron behaviour at lower pressure and current. It is based on the analysis of the electron phase trajectories in spatially periodic fields. Being quite intuitive and easier than the solution of the Boltzmann equation, this method gives a quantitative description of the main effects arising from the kinetic analysis, for example, the appearance of attractors of the phase trajectories. The dynamic theory eliminates the main difficulty of the kinetic theory associated with the large relaxation length of the electron energy distribution function in periodic fields and describes the integer and rational resonances that correspond to S-, P- and R-striations. As a result, the stratification of the discharge can be interpreted as the excitation of one of the spatial resonator modes of the positive column.

  9. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, J; Norman, P; Aksela, H; Agren, H

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of ∼4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  10. Understanding and engineering two-dimensional electron gases in complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjaalie, Lars Gunnar Tangen

    The next generation of electronic devices faces the challenge of adequately containing and controlling extremely high charge densities within structures of nanometer dimensions. Atomic-scale transistors must be thin and be able to control extremely high charge densities (>10e13/cm. 2). Silicon devicestypically have two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) densities around 10e12/cm. 2.Nitride-based devices can sustain densities an order of magnitude higher. The "complex oxides" have recently emerged as an attractive materials system to support these developments. The demonstration of a 2DEG at the SrTiO 3/LaAlO3 interface has triggered an avalanche of research, including the unprecedentedly high density of 3x10e14/cm. 2 at SrTiO3/GdTiO3and SrTiO3/SmTiO3 interfaces. Metal-insulator (Mott) transitions that are inherent to some of these complex oxides could offer even greater prospects for enhanced functionality or novel device concepts. The materials and heterostructures that have been explored to date are clearly only a small subset of the vast number of materials combinations that could lead to interesting phenomena. In this work we use first-principles methods to build greater understanding of the interface phenomena, so that searches can be better informed and more focused. We also develop a set of criteria that the materials and their heterostructures should satisfy to develop a high-performance 2DEG-based device. We focus in particular on the band alignment, calculating it for a variety of different potential materials. Next, we study GdTiO3/SrTiO3/GdTiO3 heterostructures in depth, where each interface contributes excess electrons into the SrTiO3. We calculate the 2DEG formation for a superlattice containing six layers of SrTiO3, and compare with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy results. Together, the experimental and theoretical results conclusively show that the 2DEG results from the interface itself, and does not originate from a secondary source such as

  11. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  12. Boltzmann magnetotransport in two dimensional electron gases in the presence of parallel magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisz, Jeffrey Maurice

    This thesis is a theoretical examination of zero temperature electronic transport in the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) contained at the interfaces of GaAs/ Al/it xGa1-[/it x]As heterostructures. The transport calculations have been performed in the semi-classical limit (i.e., neglecting Landau level quantization) using a multi-subband Boltzmann equation. The standard transport equations have been reformulated in order to deal with the anisotropic electronic structures found in the 2DEGs in the presence of a parallel magnetic field. In addition, a realistic model of impurity scattering has been utilized, with a simple extension of the RPA-based screening potential that accounts for the effects of the magnetic field. As a first application, the transport behaviour of a conventional heterojunction is examined. Distinct anisotropies in the energy structures are found, along with very anisotropic scattering rates and lifetimes. These translate into complex parallel field transport phenomena, which are in most cases similar to those found experimentally. In addition, the occurrence of a transverse magnetoresistance dip is fully quantified and excellent agreement with experiment is obtained. We next perform similar transport calculations for single and double quantum well models. In this situation, virtual crossings of the Fermi contours are possible, and significant anisotropies are found in the scattering rates and lifetimes. Magnetically induced resistance resonances (attributable to these crossings) are observed, in qualitative agreement with experiment. The resistance resonance effect has also been probed using external gating voltages, and the relationship between the symmetrized condition and the observed resonance has been explained. Calculations of the transverse magnetoresistance have suggested a method to experimentally determine the exact gated symmetrization point. Finally, the effects of a parallel magnetic field on the gated resonance condition have

  13. A Calculation Technique for Transverse Evolution of Electron Swarms in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Hirotake; Sakai, Yosuke

    1998-10-01

    A simulation technique for observing the time-dependent electron swarm evolution in transverse direction was developed based on a propagator method (H.Sugawara et al.) 1998 J.Phys.D: Appl.Phys. 31 319-27. Under an electric field applied in x direction, the temporal variation of the nth-order spatial moments of electrons with respect to y direction, m_y,n(v,t)=int_r y^nf(r,v,t) dr (n>=0), were calculated in order to derive the higher order transverse diffusion coefficients D_T, D_T4, D_T6, \\cdots. The calculations were performed using a series of moment equations described in velocity space; (partial/partial t)m_y,n=-a_x(partial/partial v_x)m_y,n +nv_ym_y,n-1+(partial/partial t)_collm_y,n, in which m_y,n can be expanded as m_y,n(v,θ,φ,t)=sum_k=0^nw_n,k(v,θ,t)\\cos^kφ. When the spatial and velocity distributions of initial electrons are azimuthally symmetric around x and vx axes respectively, w_n,k=0 for n and k with different parities, thus, D_Tn can be derived from a simultaneous calculation of w_0,0, w_1,1, w_2,0, w_2,2, w_3,1, w_3,3, \\cdots, w_n,n. The calculation result of D_Tn in SF6 and CCl_2F2 agreed well with that by a Monte Carlo simulation.

  14. Functional two-dimensional electronic gases at interfaces of oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong

    2011-12-01

    A quasi-two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in oxide heterostructures such as LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has unique properties that are promising for applications in all-oxide electronic devices. In this dissertation, we focus on understanding and predicting novel properties of the 2DEG by performing first-principles electronic calculations within the frame work of density-functional theory (DFT). The investigation is made upon adding new functionalities in oxide heterostructures, such as ferroelectric polarization, epitaxial strain, and spin polarization that can be employed to control 2DEG properties. Based on first-principles calculations the effects of different polarization magnitudes and alignments in all-oxide heterostructures incorporating different ferroelectric constituents, such as KNbO3/ATiO3 (A = Sr, Ba, Pb), are investigated. It is found that screening charge at the interface that counteracts the depolarizing electric field in the ferroelectric material significantly changes the free electron density of 2DEG at the interface. Using this mechanism, nonvolatile metal-insulating transition can be achieved at the interface by switching the ferroelectric spontaneous polarization. Growing on different substrates, LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures experience different epitaxial strains. Our first-principles calculations reveal that compressive epitaxial strain introduces a polarization in SrTiO3 pointing away from the interface, which is consistent with the experimental observations. This polarization strongly affects the 2DEG carrier density through a polarization charge formed at the interface. Our theoretical investigation finds that the critical thickness to form a 2DEG at the interface of the heterostructure increases with the compressive strain, while the saturated carrier density decreases which is consistent with the experimental results. Adding a spin degree of freedom to 2DEG may be interesting for the application of 2DEGs in a spintronic device. We explore a La

  15. Exact exact-exchange potential of two- and one-dimensional electron gases beyond the asymptotic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Vladimir U.

    2016-05-01

    The exchange-correlation potential experienced by an electron in the free space adjacent to a solid surface or to a low-dimensional system defines the fundamental image states and is generally important in surface and nanoscience. Here we determine the potential near the two- and one-dimensional electron gases (EG), doing this analytically at the level of the exact exchange of the density-functional theory (DFT). We find that, at r⊥≫kF-1 , where r⊥ is the distance from the EG and kF is the Fermi radius, the potential obeys the already known asymptotic -e2/r⊥ , while at r⊥≲kF-1 , but still in vacuum, qualitative and quantitative deviations of the exchange potential from the asymptotic law occur. The playground of the excitations to the low-lying image states falls into the latter regime, causing significant departure from the Rydberg series. In general, our analytical exchange potentials establish benchmarks for numerical approaches in the low-dimensional science, where DFT is by far the most common tool.

  16. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  17. Drag coupling between Al thin films and two-dimensional electron gases near the superconducting transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, L. A.; Lewis, K. M.; Kurdak, C.; Ghosh, S.; Krishna, S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2003-03-01

    We studied the coupling between vortices in a superconducting film and electrons in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). We measured structures consisting of a thin Al film evaporated on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure containing a 2DEG patterned in a 1mmx4μm Hall bar structure. This structure allowed us to vary the carrier density of the 2DEG in situ, by applying a voltage with respect to the Al. We looked for evidence of interaction by passing a current through the Al film and measuring the drag voltage induced in the 2DEG, near the superconducting transition temperature. Al films with sheet resistances of 20 Ω and 1 k Ω, located 650 Åand 1000 Åabove the 2DEG, respectively, were measured. The initial results indicate no drag resistance measured down to the 10nV range with 10nA-250 μA drive currents, for various 2DEG carrier densities. The opposite configuration was also measured, and showed no drag voltage. The theoretical implications of these results will be discussed. *current address: Center for High Technology Materials, Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept., Albuquerque, NM, 87106

  18. On the electronic and magnetic properties of nanostructures, solids and cold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Jay Deep

    In this work we calculate the properties of several condensed matter systems using a combination of empirical model Hamiltonian approaches and methods from computational condensed matter physics such as density functional theory and numerical solutions of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equations. This work has been organized into 7 chapters as follows. (1) In the first chapter we motivate the discussion for the rest of the thesis and discuss the theoretical ideas that underly the work. (2) In the second chapter we discuss the approaches and approximations such as density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory that have been used in this research to make the many-electron problem a tractable one. (3) In the third chapter we discuss the application of density functional theory calculations to the analysis of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images of boron nitride nanotubes. It is found experimentally and confirmed theoretically that the electric field of the STM can be used to lower the gap of the nanotube in a controllable fashion and also the modify the shape of the electronic states on the nanotube. (4) In the fourth chapter we extend the idea of modifying electronic properties of boron nitride nanotubes with an STM and apply the principle to carbon nanotube bundles. In this study a combination of density functional theory and model Hamiltonian calculations is used to derive a theoretical prediction where the application of an electric field through an STM can drive a transition of a nanotube bundle from a semiconductor to an excitonic system where the ground state is populated with a density of excitons that is tunable by the electric field strength. (5) In the fifth chapter we discuss another class of nanosystems, and focus on molecules on metallic substrates. These systems have been the subject of a large number of studies because of their technological relevance to solar-cells and molecular electronic devices. In this chapter we develop a

  19. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  20. Spin-orbit-coupled two-electron Fermi gases of ytterbium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; He, Chengdong; Zhang, Shanchao; Hajiyev, Elnur; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate all-optical implementation of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in a two-electron Fermi gas of 173Yb atoms by coupling two hyperfine ground states with a narrow optical transition. Due to the SU (N ) symmetry of the S10 ground-state manifold which is insensitive to external magnetic fields, an optical ac Stark effect is applied to split the ground spin states, which exhibits a high stability compared with experiments on alkali-metal and lanthanide atoms, and separate out an effective spin-1/2 subspace from other hyperfine levels for the realization of SOC. The dephasing spin dynamics when a momentum-dependent spin-orbit gap is suddenly opened and the asymmetric momentum distribution of the spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas are observed as a hallmark of SOC. The realization of all-optical SOC for ytterbium fermions should offer a route to a long-lived spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas and greatly expand our capability of studying spin-orbit physics with alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxy of 2D-layered gallium selenide on GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Hee; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; O'Hara, Dante J.; Brenner, Mark R.; Johnson, Jared M.; Jamison, John S.; Myers, Roberto C.; Kawakami, Roland K.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Rajan, Siddharth

    2017-03-01

    Large area epitaxy of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials with high material quality is a crucial step in realizing novel device applications based on 2D materials. In this work, we report high-quality, crystalline, large-area gallium selenide (GaSe) films grown on bulk substrates such as c-plane sapphire and gallium nitride (GaN) using a valved cracker source for Se. (002)-Oriented GaSe with random in-plane orientation of domains was grown on sapphire and GaN substrates at a substrate temperature of 350-450 °C with complete surface coverage. Higher growth temperature (575 °C) resulted in the formation of single-crystalline ɛ-GaSe triangular domains with six-fold symmetry confirmed by in-situ reflection high electron energy diffraction and off-axis x-ray diffraction. A two-step growth method involving high temperature nucleation of single crystalline domains and low temperature growth to enhance coalescence was adopted to obtain continuous (002)-oriented GaSe with an epitaxial relationship with the substrate. While six-fold symmetry was maintained in the two step growth, β-GaSe phase was observed in addition to the dominant ɛ-GaSe in cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy images. This work demonstrates the potential of growing high quality 2D-layered materials using molecular beam epitaxy and can be extended to the growth of other transition metal chalcogenides.

  2. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  3. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  4. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A.; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases. PMID:26318383

  5. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases.

  6. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  7. Modeling the uniform transport in thin film SOI MOSFETs with a Monte-Carlo simulator for the 2D electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Luca; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Esseni, David; Selmi, Luca

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we present simulations of some of the most relevant transport properties of the inversion layer of ultra-thin film SOI devices with a self-consistent Monte-Carlo transport code for a confined electron gas. We show that size induced quantization not only decreases the low-field mobility (as experimentally found in [Uchida K, Koga J, Ohba R, Numata T, Takagi S. Experimental eidences of quantum-mechanical effects on low-field mobility, gate-channel capacitance and threshold voltage of ultrathin body SOI MOSFETs, IEEE IEDM Tech Dig 2001;633-6; Esseni D, Mastrapasqua M, Celler GK, Fiegna C, Selmi L, Sangiorgi E. Low field electron and hole mobility of SOI transistors fabricated on ultra-thin silicon films for deep sub-micron technology application. IEEE Trans Electron Dev 2001;48(12):2842-50; Esseni D, Mastrapasqua M, Celler GK, Fiegna C, Selmi L, Sangiorgi E, An experimental study of mobility enhancement in ultra-thin SOI transistors operated in double-gate mode, IEEE Trans Electron Dev 2003;50(3):802-8. [1-3

  8. Phase diagram of electronic systems with quadratic Fermi nodes in 2 <d <4 : 2 +ɛ expansion, 4 -ɛ expansion, and functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Lukas; Herbut, Igor F.

    2017-02-01

    Several materials in the regime of strong spin-orbit interaction such as HgTe, the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7 , and the half-Heusler compound LaPtBi, as well as various systems related to these three prototype materials, are believed to host a quadratic band touching point at the Fermi level. Recently, it has been proposed that such a three-dimensional gapless state is unstable to a Mott-insulating ground state at low temperatures when the number of band touching points N at the Fermi level is smaller than a certain critical number Nc. We further substantiate and quantify this scenario by various approaches. Using ɛ expansion near two spatial dimensions, we show that Nc=64 /(25 ɛ2) +O (1 /ɛ ) and demonstrate that the instability for N 2 <d <4 . Directly in d =3 we therewith find Nc=1.86 , and thus again above the physical N =1 . All these results are consistent with the prediction that the interacting ground state of pure, unstrained HgTe, and possibly also Pr2Ir2O7 , is a strong topological insulator with a dynamically generated gap—a topological Mott insulator.

  9. A novel 2D and 3D method for automated insulin granule measurement and its application in assessing accepted preparation methods for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantell, J.; Nam, D.; Bull, D.; Achim, A.; Verkade, P.

    2014-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy images of insulin-producing beta cells in the islets of Langerhans contain many complex structures, making it difficult to accurately segment insulin granules. Furthermore the appearance of the granules and surrounding halo and limiting membrane can vary enormously depending on the methods used for sample preparation. An automated method has been developed using active contours to segment the insulin core initially and then expand to segment the halos [1]. The method has been validated against manual measurements and also yields higher accuracy than other automated methods [2]. It has then been extended to three dimensions to analyse a tomographic reconstruction from a thick section of the same material. The final step has been to produce a GUI and use the automated process to compare a number of different electron microscopy preparation protocols including chemical fixation (where many of halos are often distended) and to explore the many subtleties of high pressure freezing (where the halos are often minimal, [3]).

  10. Temperature-driven disorder-order transitions in 2D copper-intercalated MoO3 revealed using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Bryan W.; Chung, Frank R.; Wang, Mengjing; LaGrange, Thomas; Koski, Kristie J.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate two different classes of disorder-order phase transitions in two-dimensional layered nanomaterial MoO3 intercalated with ˜9-15 atomic percent zero-valent copper using conventional in situ electron diffraction and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Heating to ˜325 °C on a time scale of minutes produces a superlattice consistent with the formation of a charge density wave stabilized by nanometer-scale ordering of the copper intercalant. Unlike conventional purely electronic charge-density-wave states which form, reform, and disappear on picosecond scales as the temperature is changed, once it forms the observed structure in Cu-MoO3 is stable indefinitely over a very large temperature range (30 °C to the decomposition temperature of 450 °C). Nanosecond-scale heating to ˜380-400 °C produced a completely different structure, replacing the disordered as-fabricated Cu-MoO3 with a much more crystallographically ordered metastable state that, according to a precession electron diffraction reconstruction, resembles the original MoO3 lattice apart from an asymmetric distortion that appears to expand parts of the van der Waals gaps to accommodate the copper intercalant. Control experiments in Cu-free material exhibited neither transformation, thus it appears the copper is a necessary part of the phase dynamics. This work shows how the combination of high-density metal atom intercalation and heat treatment over a wide range of time scales can produce nanomaterials of high crystalline quality in unique structural states that cannot be accessed through other methods.

  11. Study of dust particle charging in weakly ionized inert gases taking into account the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Dyatko, N. A.; Kostenko, A. S.

    2014-11-15

    The charging of dust particles in weakly ionized inert gases at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The conditions under which the gas is ionized by an external source, a beam of fast electrons, are considered. The electron energy distribution function in argon, krypton, and xenon has been calculated for three rates of gas ionization by fast electrons: 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14}, and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −1}. A model of dust particle charging with allowance for the nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function in the region of strong plasma quasi-neutrality violation around the dust particle is described. The nonlocality is taken into account in an approximation where the distribution function is a function of only the total electron energy. Comparative calculations of the dust particle charge with and without allowance for the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function have been performed. Allowance for the nonlocality is shown to lead to a noticeable increase in the dust particle charge due to the influence of the group of hot electrons from the tail of the distribution function. It has been established that the screening constant virtually coincides with the smallest screening constant determined according to the asymptotic theory of screening with the electron transport and recombination coefficients in an unperturbed plasma.

  12. Determination of the neutron electric formfactor in quasielastic collisions of polarized electrons with 3He and 2D. Collaboration A3 at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, H. G.; Annand, J. R. M.; Aulenbacher, K.; Becker, J.; Blume-Werry, J.; Dombo, Th.; Drescher, P.; Ducret, J. E.; Eyl, D.; Fischer, H.; Frey, A.; Grabmayr, P.; Hall, S.; Hartmann, P.; Hehl, T.; Heil, W.; Hoffmann, J.; Kellie, J. D.; Klein, F.; Leduc, M.; Meierhoff, M.; Möller, H.; Nachtigall, Ch.; Ostrick, M.; Otten, E. W.; Owens, R. O.; Plützer, S.; Reichert, E.; Rohe, D.; Schäfer, M.; Schearer, L. D.; Schmieden, H.; Steffens, K.; Surkau, R.; Walcher, Th.

    1995-07-01

    The determination of the neutron electric formfactor from quasielastic reactions 3H↘e(e↘,e'n) and D(e↘,e',n↘) respectively is one of the present goals of experiments with polarized electrons at the Mainz race track microtron MAMI. A GaAsP-photoelectron source is used at MAMI to get an 855 MeV electron beam spinpolarized to a degree of 35% at a current of 10 μA. Polarized 3He-nuclei are produced by optical pumping metastable 3He. Scattered electrons are detected in coincidence with the recoil neutrons, the transverse spinpolarization of the neutrons may be analyzed by neutron-proton scattering in a double wall plastic scintillator detector. A subset of the final detector set-up has been tested successfully now by investigating the polarization transfer to the proton in reactions H(e↘,e'p↘) and D(e↘,e'p↘) and to the neutron in D(e↘,e'n↘) at a 4-momentum transfer with -Q2=8fm-2. First data from the exclusive quasielastic collision 3H↘e(e↘,e'n) indicate a value of the neutron electric formfactor of GnE=0.035±0.015 at -Q2=8fm-2.

  13. Interlayer couplings, Moiré patterns, and 2D electronic superlattices in MoS2/WSe2 hetero-bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chendong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Ren, Xibiao; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Jin, Chuanhong; Chou, Mei-Yin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2017-01-01

    By using direct growth, we create a rotationally aligned MoS2/WSe2 hetero-bilayer as a designer van der Waals heterostructure. With rotational alignment, the lattice mismatch leads to a periodic variation of atomic registry between individual van der Waals layers, exhibiting a Moiré pattern with a well-defined periodicity. By combining scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and first-principles calculations, we investigate interlayer coupling as a function of atomic registry. We quantitatively determine the influence of interlayer coupling on the electronic structure of the hetero-bilayer at different critical points. We show that the direct gap semiconductor concept is retained in the bilayer although the valence and conduction band edges are located at different layers. We further show that the local bandgap is periodically modulated in the X-Y direction with an amplitude of ~0.15 eV, leading to the formation of a two-dimensional electronic superlattice. PMID:28070558

  14. Crystal symmetry and pressure effects on the valence band structure of γ -InSe and ɛ -GaSe: Transport measurements and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errandonea, D.; Segura, A.; Manjón, F. J.; Chevy, A.; Machado, E.; Tobias, G.; Ordejón, P.; Canadell, E.

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports on Hall effect and resistivity measurements under high pressure up to 3-4 GPa in p -type γ -indium selenide (InSe) (doped with As, Cd, or Zn) and ɛ -gallium selenide (GaSe) (doped with N or Sn). The pressure behavior of the hole concentration and mobility exhibits dramatic differences between the two layered compounds. While the hole concentration and mobility increase moderately and monotonously in ɛ -GaSe, a large increase of the hole concentration near 0.8 GPa and a large continuous increase of the hole mobility, which doubled its ambient pressure value by 3.2 GPa, is observed in γ -InSe. Electronic structure calculations show that the different pressure behavior of hole transport parameters can be accounted for by the evolution of the valence-band maximum in each material under compression. While the shape of the valence band maximum is virtually pressure-insensitive in ɛ -GaSe, it changes dramatically in γ -InSe, with the emergence of a ring-shaped subsidiary maximum that becomes the absolute valence-band maximum as pressure increases. These differences are shown to be a consequence of the presence or absence of a symmetry element (mirror plane perpendicular to the anisotropy axis) in the point group of each polytype ( D3h for the ɛ -polytype and C3v for the γ -polytype), resulting in different selection rules that affect the k⃗•p⃗ interaction between valence bands.

  15. Non-ionizing energy loss calculations for modeling electron-induced degradation of Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming; Xu, Jing; Huang, Jian-Wei

    2016-09-01

    The lowest energies which make Cu, In, Ga, and Se atoms composing Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) material displaced from their lattice sites are evaluated, respectively. The non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) for electron in CIGS material is calculated analytically using the Mott differential cross section. The relation of the introduction rate (k) of the recombination centers to NIEL is modified, then the values of k at different electron energies are calculated. Degradation modeling of CIGS thin-film solar cells irradiated with various-energy electrons is performed according to the characterization of solar cells and the recombination centers. The validity of the modeling approach is verified by comparison with the experimental data. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11547151).

  16. The use of high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy for refining the infrared optical constants of GaS, GaSe, and InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li-Ming; Thiry, P. A.; Degiovanni, A.; Conard, Th.; Leclerc, G.; Caudano, R.; Lambin, Ph.; Debever, J.-M.

    1994-06-01

    Cleaved surfaces of III-VI lamellar semiconducting compounds GaS, GaSe, and InSe have been studied by high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The infrared optical constants of the materials were retrieved by using the dielectric theory taking account of the resonance frequencies published from infrared reflectivity (IRS) data. The limitations of the HREELS and IRS measurements in the case of these materials are discussed in detail. However, it is shown that, by combining the informations from both spectroscopies, it is possible to refine some of the oscillator strengths of these materials.

  17. Spin Polarization of 2D Electrons in GaAs Quantum Wells at ν=1/2 from Gallium NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytag, N.; Horvatić, M.; Berthier, C.; Lévy, L.-P.; Melinte, S.; Bayot, V.; Shayegan, M.

    2000-03-01

    The spin polarization (\\cal P) of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in two GaAs/AlGaAs multiple-quantum-well heterostructures was probed by measurements of magnetic hyperfine shifts of gallium nuclei located in the quantum wells. The low temperature (50 mK <= T<= 10 K) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were observed using a standard spin-echo technique(S. Melinte et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. in press (cond-mat/9908098).. Here we report on the temperature and magnetic field-orientation dependence of \\cal P at Landau level filling factor ν =1/2. Our interpretation of the data relies on the concept of polarization mass (m_p) for composite fermions (CFs) introduced by Park and Jain(K. Park and J.K. Jain, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80), 4237 (1998).. The results in perpendicular magnetic fields (θ = 0) compare well to the simplest model for \\cal P, derived by assuming non-interacting CFs of mass m^*_p, carrying a spin, and with a g-factor the same as electrons. An unexpected behavior is observed when the 2DEG is tilted in the magnetic field; these θ neq 0 data do not agree with predictions by the non-interacting CF model by Park and Jain or the Hamiltonian model by Shankar(R. Shankar, cond-mat/9911288.).

  18. A quantum dynamical comparison of the electronic couplings derived from quantum electrodynamics and Förster theory: application to 2D molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, James E.; Jones, Garth A.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate under what circumstances Förster theory of electronic (resonance) energy transfer breaks down in molecular aggregates. This is achieved by simulating the dynamics of exciton diffusion, on the femtosecond timescale, in molecular aggregates using the Liouville-von Neumann equation of motion. Specifically the focus of this work is the investigation of both spatial and temporal deviations between exciton dynamics driven by electronic couplings calculated from Förster theory and those calculated from quantum electrodynamics. The quantum electrodynamics (QED) derived couplings contain medium- and far-zone terms that do not exist in Förster theory. The results of the simulations indicate that Förster coupling is valid when the dipole centres are within a few nanometres of one another. However, as the distance between the dipole centres increases from 2 nm to 10 nm, the intermediate- and far-zone coupling terms play non-negligible roles and Förster theory begins to break down. Interestingly, the simulations illustrate how contributions to the exciton dynamics from the intermediate- and far-zone coupling terms of QED are quickly washed-out by the near-zone mechanism of Förster theory for lattices comprising closely packed molecules. On the other hand, in the case of sparsely packed arrays, the exciton dynamics resulting from the different theories diverge within the 100 fs lifetime of the trajectories. These results could have implications for the application of spectroscopic ruler techniques as well as design principles relating to energy harvesting materials.

  19. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C. M. Krynski, Kamil; Streeter, Zachary; Findley, G. L.

    2015-12-14

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V{sub 0}(ρ) for H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V{sub 0}(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O{sub 2}) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V{sub 0}(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths.

  20. Electronic structure of the layer compounds GaSe and InSe in a tight-binding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, M. O.; Mauger, A.; Devos, I.

    2002-03-01

    The three-dimensional band structure of the III-VI layer compounds GaSe and InSe has been investigated in the tight-binding approach. The pseudo-Hamiltonian matrix elements in the sp3s* basis are fit in order to reproduce the nonlocal pseudopotential band structure, in the framework of constrained optimization techniques using the conjugate gradient method. The results are in good agreement with the optical and photoemission experimental data. The scaling laws appropriate to the covalent bonding are violated by a fraction of eV only, which suggests that the interlayer interactions are not solely of the van der Waals type.

  1. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  2. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  3. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms.

    PubMed

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Boothroyd, C; Pan, C-T; Gwilliam, R

    2016-06-07

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  4. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J.; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry

    2015-06-07

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S{sub 2} of the Spx towards the Q{sub x} state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Q{sub x} to Q{sub y} within the B890.

  5. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J.; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890.

  6. Greenhouse Gases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Found Solar Thermal Power Plants Solar Thermal Collectors Solar Energy and the Environment Secondary Sources Electricity The Science ... the earth’s atmosphere act as greenhouse gases. When sunlight strikes the earth’s surface, some of it radiates ...

  7. 76 FR 61293 - Extension of Public Comment Period: Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Technical Revisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... Gases: Technical Revisions to the Electronics Manufacturing and the Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems..., Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Technical Revisions to the Electronics Manufacturing and the... Gases: Technical Revisions to the Electronics Manufacturing and the Petroleum and Natural Gas...

  8. Exact e-e (exchange) correlations of 2-D quantum dots in magnetic field: Size extensive N = 3 , 4 , … , ‧ n ‧ -electron systems via multi-pole expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Priyanka; Sharma, Shivalika; Singh, Sunny; Kaur, Harsimran; Hazra, Ram Kuntal

    2017-04-01

    Inclusion of coulomb interaction emerges with the complexity of either convergence of integrals or separation of variables of Schrödinger equations. For an N-electron system, interaction terms grow by N(N-1)/2 factors. Therefore, 2-e system stands as fundamental basic unit for generalized N-e systems. For the first time, we have evaluated e-e correlations in very simple and absolutely terminating finite summed hypergeometric series for 2-D double carrier parabolic quantum dot in both zero and arbitrary non-zero magnetic field (symmetric gauge) and have appraised these integrals in variational methods. The competitive role among confinement strength, magnetic field, mass of the carrier and dielectric constant of the medium on energy level diagram, level-spacing statistics, heat capacities (Cv at 1 K) and magnetization (T ∼ (0-1)K) is studied on systems spanning over wide range of materials (GaAs,Ge,CdS,SiO2 and He, etc). We have also constructed an exact theory for generalized correlated N-e 2-D quantum dots via multi-pole expansion but for the sake of compactness of the article we refrain from data.

  9. Electron energy enhancement by frequency chirp of a radially polarized laser pulse during ionization of low-density gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Singh, Kunwar; Arya, Rashmi; Malik, Anil K.; Fisch, N. J.

    2016-11-01

    A scheme is proposed to enhance the energy of the electrons generated during the ionization of low-density krypton ions \\text{K}{{\\text{r}}32+} and argon ions \\text{A}{{\\text{r}}16+} by a radially polarized laser pulse using a negative frequency chirp. If a suitable frequency chirp is introduced then the energy of the electrons increases significantly and scattering decreases. The optimum value of the frequency chirp decreases with laser intensity and as well as spot size. The laser spot size also has an optimum value. The electron energy shows strong initial phase dependence. The scheme can be used to obtain quasi-monoenergetic collimated \\text{MeV}/\\text{GeV} electrons using the right choice of parameters. The chirped radially polarized laser pulse is more efficient than a chirped circularly polarized laser pulse to enhance energy and obtain quasi-monoenergetic electron beams.

  10. Mesospheric removal of very long-lived greenhouse gases SF6 and CFC-115 by metal reactions, Lyman-α photolysis, and electron attachment.

    PubMed

    Totterdill, Anna; Kovács, Tamás; Gómez Martín, Juan Carlos; Feng, Wuhu; Plane, John M C

    2015-03-12

    The fluorinated gases SF6 and C2F5Cl (CFC-115) are chemically inert with atmospheric lifetimes of many centuries which, combined with their strong absorption of IR radiation, results in unusually high global warming potentials. Very long lifetimes imply that mesospheric sinks could make important contributions to their atmospheric removal. In order to investigate this, the photolysis cross sections at the prominent solar Lyman-α emission line (121.6 nm), and the reaction kinetics of SF6 and CFC-115 with the neutral meteoric metal atoms Na, K, Mg, and Fe over large temperature ranges, were measured experimentally. The Na and K reactions exhibit significant non-Arrhenius behavior; quantum chemistry calculations of the potential energy surfaces for the SF6 reactions indicate that the Na and K reactions with SF6 are probably activated by vibrational excitation of the F-SF5 (v3) stretching mode. A limited set of kinetic measurements on Na + SF5CF3 are also presented. The atmospheric removal of these long-lived gases by a variety of processes is then evaluated. For SF6, the removal processes in decreasing order of importance are electron attachment, VUV photolysis, and reaction with K, Na, and H. For CFC-115, the removal processes in decreasing order of importance are reaction with O((1)D), VUV photolysis, and reaction with Na, K, and H.

  11. Two-dimensional electron gases at head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Fernández, Pablo; Íñiguez, Jorge; Junquera, Javier

    Symmetry breaking at ferroelectric domain walls gives rise to new physical properties, offering the opportunity to use the domain walls themselves as a functional separate object in a device. One example is the appearance of an enhanced conductivity at the boundaries between ferroelectric domains in oxides. A realistic first-principles simulation of the domains walls is limited to highly-symmetric cleanly-cut walls in order to keep the number of atoms in the simulation box small. Here we use a recently developed second-principles method that treats all the lattice degrees of freedom and the relevant electronic ones on the same foot with high accuracy at a modest computational cost. We apply it to the demading physical problem of head-to-head (HH) and tail-to-tail (TT) domain walls in ferroelectric PbTiO3 thin films. These interfaces present a large and unfavourable electrostatic energy due to the polarization-induced bound charge at the domain wall. An accurate simulation should capture eventual charge transfers between the walls, and the concomitant electron-lattice coupling. We show how the polarization discontinuity in HH and TT domain walls in PbTiO3 thin films can be effectively screened by the formation of two-dimensional electron gases of electrons and holes. Finantial support from MINECO Grant No. FIS2012-37549-C05-04.

  12. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  13. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  14. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  15. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  16. The helium atom in metallic electron gases: a comparative study based on screened Schrödinger Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, I.; Aldazabal, I.; Glasser, M. L.

    2012-05-01

    In the presence of an environment of mobile charges, the bound-state Schrödinger Hamiltonian for an embedded He atom differs from its vacuum form. The central problem of incorporating screening in the nucleus-bound-electron and bound-electron-bound-electron terms of this Hamiltonian is investigated here for the He ground state in a comparative manner by using two models, and the same product form of 1s-type parametric hydrogenic functions to perform exploratory variational calculations. Both models employ induced charge densities in the corresponding Poisson equations with a fixed point-like nucleus, but the underlying charge-density response of the host system is generated by differently chosen perturbations. These are the point-charge nucleus and the nucleus-bound-electron charge distribution as external perturbations. The repulsive bound-electron-bound-electron interaction in the Hamiltonian is modelled by a parametric Yukawa-type potential. Using the consistent variational results for the binding energies and wavefunctions, the charge-state-dependent stopping power of a metallic target for slowly moving He is briefly discussed.

  17. Generation of dual pulses of the runaway electron beam current during the subnanosecond breakdown of atomic and molecular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Sorokin, D. A.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    With a diaphragm placed behind the anode foil, dual runaway electron beams have been provided in helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, and air under a pressure of several torrs to several dozen torrs and a high-voltage pulse amplitude of about 250 kV. These beams consist of two pulses with commensurable amplitudes with a time interval between them of several dozen picoseconds to several hundred picoseconds. It has been shown that the breakdown of the interelectrode gap at pressures from several torrs to several dozen torrs may occur in different regimes and dual pulses of the electron beam current are registered when the initial current through the gap is below 1 kA. It has been found that a supershort avalanche electron beam that consists of one pulse is generated when the delay of breakdown equals several hundred picoseconds. It has been shown that, when the gas pressure reaches several hundred Torr, including atmospheric pressure, the runaway electrons are detected behind the foil after the termination of the supershort avalanche electron beam pulse.

  18. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  19. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  20. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  1. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  2. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  3. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  4. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  5. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  6. Long-Pulse Relativistic Electron Beam Generation and Propagation in Gases and in Ultraviolet Laser Ionized Channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, Robert Francis, Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Experiments on the propagation of relativistic electron beams (REB) in the ion-focus regime (IFR) are described. A novel feature of the experiments is the long -pulse nature of the electron beam from the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator (MELBA), a Marx generator with voltage compensation (1 MV, 10 kA, 1 microsecond). The REB is extracted from the diode through a 2.5 cm diameter aperture. A cold cathode is used. To reduce voltage droop from diode gap closure, anode-cathode spacings >7 cm are used. A 7.6 cm dia. cotton velvet cathode provides 300 A of injected current for 800 ns before a rapid increase in injected current, attributed to diode instability. Loss of REB transport accompanies this current increase. Conclusions drawn from the empirical diode study are: (1) successful generation of microsecond electron beams without magnetic insulation from cold cathodes requires diode spacing of ~10 cm, (2) cotton velvet gives improved beam quality over carbon fiber "brush" cathodes, (3) velvet cathodes have slower closure velocity of the cathode plasma. In the IFR regime partial neutralization of the space-charge of an REB by an ion background with the magnetic pinch force of the REB current achieves radial force balance. Experiments are performed in neutral gas, and in diethylaniline (DEA), preionized with a KrF laser. A pressure window for propagation is observed. For helium this window is 50-300 mtorr. The longest propagated pulse is 300 ns with a peak transported efficiency of 80%. In air the pressure window is 5-75 mtorr with similar efficiency. In DEA, fractional ionization of 0.004 has been achieved at a laser fluence of 10 mJ per square cm. To provide sufficient preionization for propagation, pressures where impact ionization is not negligible are required. A pressure window for propagation is again observed. For the current density and laser fluence in this experiment the pressure window is 0.2-2 mTorr. Within the pressure window instability, of the REB

  7. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  8. Design and Application of Variable Temperature Setup for Scanning Electron Microscopy in Gases and Liquids at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Asadi, Ahmed S; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jianbo; Potyrailo, Radislav A; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of nanoscale objects in dry and fully hydrated conditions at different temperatures is of critical importance in revealing details of their interactions with an ambient environment. Currently available WETSEM capsules are equipped with thin electron-transparent membranes and allow imaging of samples at atmospheric pressure, but do not provide temperature control over the sample. Here, we developed and tested a thermoelectric cooling/heating setup for WETSEM capsules to allow ambient pressure in situ SEM studies with a temperature range between -15 and 100°C in gaseous, liquid, and frozen conditions. The design of the setup also allows for correlation of the SEM with optical microscopy and spectroscopy. As a demonstration of the possibilities of the developed approach, we performed real-time in situ microscopy studies of water condensation on a surface of Morpho sulkowskyi butterfly wing scales. We observed that initial water nucleation takes place on top of the scale ridges. These results confirmed earlier discovery of a preexisting polarity gradient of the ridges of Morpho butterflies. Our developed thermoelectric cooling/heating setup for environmental capsules meets the diverse needs for in situ nanocharacterization in material science, catalysis, microelectronics, chemistry, and biology.

  9. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  10. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl{sub 4} and CF{sub 4}. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl{sub 4} and Ng-CF{sub 4} and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF{sub 4}, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl{sub 4}, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential

  11. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartocci, Alessio; Belpassi, Leonardo; Cappelletti, David; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl4 and CF4. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl4 and Ng-CF4 and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF4, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl4, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential suggested by the analysis of the

  12. Circular photogalvanic effect caused by the transitions between edge and 2D states in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron absorption and the edge photocurrent of a 2D topological insulator are studied for transitions between edge states to 2D states. The circular polarized light is found to produce the edge photocurrent, the direction of which is determined by light polarization and edge orientation. It is shown that the edge-state current is found to exceed the 2D current owing to the topological protection of the edge states.

  13. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Do, Dat T; Mahanti, Subhendra D; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-11-24

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed.

  14. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Do, Dat T.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed. PMID:26596907

  15. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Dat T.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-11-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed.

  16. Effects of pressure and temperature on the dielectric constant of GaS, GaSe, and InSe: Role of the electronic contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errandonea, D.; Segura, A.; Muñoz, V.; Chevy, A.

    1999-12-01

    In this work we report on direct measurements of the temperature and pressure dependences of the low-frequency dielectric constant along c axis (ɛ∥) of GaS, GaSe, and InSe. The temperature dependence of both the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indexes is also presented. A large increase of ɛ∥ under pressure has been observed. In the framework of a rigid ion model, the lattice contribution to ɛ∥ is shown to increase slightly under pressure, due to the change of the angle between the anion-cation bond and the layer plane. Consequently, the pressure behavior of ɛ∥ is proposed to arise from a large increase of the electronic contribution to ɛ∥. This fact is explained through a decrease of the Penn gap for polarization parallel to the c axis, whose energy and pressure coefficient are shown to scale with those of the indirect band gap in these compounds. A supplementary and reversible step increase of ɛ∥ is observed at 1.6 GPa in GaS, which is associated with a phase transition that has been already observed by other authors.

  17. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  18. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  19. Symmetry origins of the `caldera' valence band distortion in 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian; Physics Department Team

    The electronic structures of many two-dimensional van der Waals semiconductors exhibit various fascinating properties distinct from their three-dimensional bulk counterparts. Through an examination of their lattice symmetries, we identify several universal rules dictating their band dispersion in the monolayer limit, where in-plane mirror symmetry and quantum confinement play critical roles. Taking group-III metal monochalcogenides (such as GaSe) as an example, we reveal the origin of the unusual `caldera' shape of the valence band edge (otherwise inelegantly dubbed an `upside down Mexican hat'), which we show is surprisingly common among other 2D semiconductors (such as in phosphorene for k along its zigzag direction). Reference: arXiv:1508.06963

  20. Oscillations of Low-Field Magnetoresistivity of Two-Dimensional Electron Gases in Al0.22Ga0.78N/GaN Heterostructures in a Weak Localization Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kui; Tang, Ning; Duan, Jun-Xi; Lu, Fang-Chao; Liu, Yu-Chi; Shen, Bo; Zhou, Wen-Zheng; Lin, Tie; Sun, Lei; Yu, Guo-Lin; Chu, Jun-Hao

    2011-08-01

    Low-field magnetotransport properties of two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) are investigated in Al0.22Ga0.78N/GaN heterostructures. By means of a tilting magnetic field, unexpected oscillations of magnetoresistivity are observed in a weak localization region. Qualitative understanding based on Altshuler—Aronov—Spivak oscillations is proposed for the case of interface disorder in Al0.22Ga0.78N/GaN heterostructures.

  1. 75 FR 26904 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Notice of Data Availability; Default Emission Factors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 98 Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Notice of Data Availability; Default... of Greenhouse Gases: Additional Sources of Fluorinated GHGs (75 FR 18652) which included proposed methods for monitoring and reporting greenhouse gases (GHGs) from electronics manufacturing....

  2. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  3. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-09

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  4. Continuous high-yield production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on 2D and 3D substrates.

    PubMed

    Guzmán de Villoria, Roberto; Hart, A John; Wardle, Brian L

    2011-06-28

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) have certain advantages over bulk CNT powders and randomly oriented CNT mats for applications in flexible electronic devices, filtration membranes, biosensors and multifunctional aerospace materials. Here, a machine and a process to synthesize VACNTs in a continuous manner are presented showing uniform growth on 2D and 3D substrates, including alumina fibers, silicon wafer pieces, and stainless steel foils. Aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) are synthesized at substrate feed rates of up to 6.8 cm/min, and the CNTs reach up to 60 μm in length depending on residence time in the reactor. In addition to the aligned morphology indicative of high yield growth, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the CNTs are of comparable quality to CNTs grown via a similar batch process. A significant reduction in time, reaction products, gases, and energy is demonstrated relative to batch processing, paving the way for industrial production of VACNTs.

  5. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  6. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  7. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  8. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1986-08-26

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  9. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.

    1986-01-01

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  10. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    1986-01-01

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  11. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.

    1986-08-19

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  12. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence spectra of bilayer two-dimensional electron gases in LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} superlattices: coexistence of Auger recombination and single-carrier trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H. J. Harsan Ariando; Venkatesan, T.; Wang, S. J.

    2015-06-15

    We report emerging photoluminescence (PL) of bilayer two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG) in LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} (LAO/STO) systems. A strong blue PL emerges in bilayer-2DEGs in LAO/STO/LAO/STO which doesn’t show in LAO/STO. PL band in bilayer-2DEGs includes both nearly temperature independent Auger recombination and temperature dependent free electron trapping while it crossovers from Auger recombination to single carrier trapping in LAO/STO. The PL signal of free electron trapping appears at high temperatures and it is much stronger than Auger recombination in the conducting channel in bilayer 2DEGs. This observation shows that high mobility carriers dominate the carrier dynamics in bilayer-2DEGs in LAO/STO superlattices.

  13. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  14. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-07

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  15. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  16. Basic Studies of Gases for Fast Switches.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    measured the electron attachment and ionization coeffi- cients and electron drift velocities in 02, CH4, CF4, C2F6 , C3F8 , and n-C4Flo gases using a new...method of data analysis. The pressure depen- dence of the electron attachment coefficient in 02, C3F8 , and n-C4F10 and of the electron drift velocity...in C3F8 and n-C4F10 have been analyzed and explained. A paper describing this technique and the measurements we have performed in these gases has

  17. Annihilation in Gases and Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains most of the papers, both invited and contributed, that were presented at the Workshop of Annihilation in Gases and Galaxies. This was the fifth in a biennial series associated with the International Conference on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions. Subjects covered included the scattering and annihilation of positrons and positronium atoms in various media, including those of astrophysical interest. In addition, the topics of antimatter and dark matter were covered.

  18. 2D-3D transition of gold cluster anions resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Mikael P.; Lechtken, Anne; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M.; Furche, Filipp

    2008-05-01

    Small gold cluster anions Aun- are known for their unusual two-dimensional (2D) structures, giving rise to properties very different from those of bulk gold. Previous experiments and calculations disagree about the number of gold atoms nc where the transition to 3D structures occurs. We combine trapped ion electron diffraction and state of the art electronic structure calculations to resolve this puzzle and establish nc=12 . It is shown that theoretical studies using traditional generalized gradient functionals are heavily biased towards 2D structures. For a correct prediction of the 2D-3D crossover point it is crucial to use density functionals yielding accurate jellium surface energies, such as the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functional or the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional modified for solids (PBEsol). Further, spin-orbit effects have to be included, and large, flexible basis sets employed. This combined theoretical-experimental approach is promising for larger gold and other metal clusters.

  19. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  20. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  1. Trends in source gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.; Fraser, P. J.; Albritton, D.; Cicerone, R. J.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Legrand, M.; Makide, Y.; Rowland, F. S.; Steele, L. P.; Zander, R.

    1989-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that, by their breakdown, introduce into the stratosphere halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen compounds that are important in stratospheric ozone destruction. Given here is an update of the existing concentration time series for chlorocarbons, nitrous oxide, and methane. Also reviewed is information on halogen containing species and the use of these data for establishing trends. Also reviewed is evidence on trends in trace gases that influence tropospheric chemistry and thus the tropospheric lifetimes of source gases, such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen oxides. Much of the information is given in tabular form.

  2. Towards functional assembly of 3D and 2D nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.; Wang, Kai; Ievlev, Anton V.; Muckley, Eric S.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-09-01

    Functional assemblies of materials can be realized by tuning the work function and band gap of nanomaterials by rational material selection and design. Here we demonstrate the structural assembly of 2D and 3D nanomaterials and show that layering a 2D material monolayer on a 3D metal oxide leads to substantial alteration of both the surface potential and optical properties of the 3D material. A 40 nm thick film of polycrystalline NiO was produced by room temperature rf-sputtering, resulting in a 3D nanoparticle assembly. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown 10-30 μm WS2 flakes (2D material) were placed on the NiO surface using a PDMS stamp transfer technique. The 2D/3D WS2/NiO assembly was characterized using confocal micro Raman spectroscopy to evaluate the vibrational properties and using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to evaluate the surface potential. Raman maps of the 2D/3D assembly show spatial non-uniformity of the A1g mode ( 418 cm-1) and the disorder-enhanced longitudinal acoustic mode, 2LA(M) ( 350 cm-1), suggesting that the WS2 exists in a strained condition on when transferred onto 3D polycrystalline NiO. KPFM measurements show that single layer WS2 on SiO2 has a surface potential 75 mV lower than that of SiO2, whereas the surface potential of WS2 on NiO is 15 mV higher than NiO, indicating that WS2 could act as electron donor or acceptor depending on the 3D material it is interfaced with. Thus 2D and 3D materials can be organized into functional assemblies with electron flow controlled by the WS2 either as the electron donor or acceptor.

  3. Closed-shell and open-shell 2D nanographenes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhe; Wu, Jishan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a series of two-dimensional (2D) expanded arene networks, also known as nanographenes, with either closed-shell or open-shell electronic structure in the ground state. These systems are further categorized into three classes on a basis of different edge structures: those with zigzag edges only, those with armchair edges only, and those possessing both. Distinctive physical properties of these 2D aromatic systems are closely related to their structural characteristics and provide great potential for them as materials for different applications.

  4. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  5. Optoelectronics of supported and suspended 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotin, Kirill

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional semiconductors, materials such monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are characterized by strong spin-orbit and electron-electron interactions. However, both electronic and optoelectronic properties of these materials are dominated by disorder-related scattering. In this talk, we investigate approaches to reduce scattering and explore physical phenomena arising in intrinsic 2D semiconductors. First, we discuss fabrication of pristine suspended monolayer MoS2 and use photocurrent spectroscopy measurements to study excitons in this material. We observe band-edge and van Hove singularity excitons and estimate their binding energies. Furthermore, we study dissociation of these excitons and uncover the mechanism of their contribution to photoresponse of MoS2. Second, we study strain-induced modification of bandstructures of 2D semiconductors. With increasing strain, we find large and controllable band gap reduction of both single- and bi-layer MoS2. We also detect experimental signatures consistent with strain-induced transition from direct to indirect band gap in monolayer MoS2. Finally, we fabricate heterostructures of dissimilar 2D semiconductors and study their photoresponse. For closely spaced 2D semiconductors we detect charge transfer, while for separation larger than 10nm we observe Forster-like energy transfer between excitations in different layers.

  6. Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Hybrid Exciton Formation in 2D/0D Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Wang, Kai; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Ivanov, Ilia; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kai; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-18

    We report that photoinduced interfacial charge transfer is at the heart of many applications, including photovoltaics, photocatalysis, and photodetection. With the emergence of a new class of semiconductors such as monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs), charge transfer at the 2D/2D heterojunctions attracted several efforts due to the remarkable optical and electrical properties of 2D-TMDs. Unfortunately, in 2D/2D heterojunctions, for a given combination of two materials, the relative energy band alignment and the charge transfer efficiency are locked. Due to their large variety and broad size tunability, semiconductor quantum dots (0D-QDs) interfaced with 2D-TMDs may become an attractive heterostructure for optoelectronic applications. Here, we incorporate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal the sub-45 fs charge transfer at a 2D/0D heterostructure composed of tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) and a single layer of cadmium selenide (CdSe)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) core/shell 0D-QDs. Furthermore, ultrafast dynamics and steady-state measurements suggested that following electron transfer from the 2D to the 0D, hybrid excitons (HXs), wherein the electron resides in the 0D and hole resides in the 2D-TMD monolayer, are formed with a binding energy on the order of ~140 meV, which is several times lower than that of tightly bound excitons in 2D-TMDs.

  7. Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Hybrid Exciton Formation in 2D/0D Heterostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Wang, Kai; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; ...

    2016-10-18

    We report that photoinduced interfacial charge transfer is at the heart of many applications, including photovoltaics, photocatalysis, and photodetection. With the emergence of a new class of semiconductors such as monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs), charge transfer at the 2D/2D heterojunctions attracted several efforts due to the remarkable optical and electrical properties of 2D-TMDs. Unfortunately, in 2D/2D heterojunctions, for a given combination of two materials, the relative energy band alignment and the charge transfer efficiency are locked. Due to their large variety and broad size tunability, semiconductor quantum dots (0D-QDs) interfaced with 2D-TMDs may become an attractive heterostructure formore » optoelectronic applications. Here, we incorporate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal the sub-45 fs charge transfer at a 2D/0D heterostructure composed of tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) and a single layer of cadmium selenide (CdSe)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) core/shell 0D-QDs. Furthermore, ultrafast dynamics and steady-state measurements suggested that following electron transfer from the 2D to the 0D, hybrid excitons (HXs), wherein the electron resides in the 0D and hole resides in the 2D-TMD monolayer, are formed with a binding energy on the order of ~140 meV, which is several times lower than that of tightly bound excitons in 2D-TMDs.« less

  8. Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Hybrid Exciton Formation in 2D/0D Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Wang, Kai; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Puretzky, Alexander A; Ivanov, Ilia; Rouleau, Christopher M; Xiao, Kai; Sumpter, Bobby G; Geohegan, David B

    2016-11-09

    Photoinduced interfacial charge transfer is at the heart of many applications, including photovoltaics, photocatalysis, and photodetection. With the emergence of a new class of semiconductors, i.e., monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs), charge transfer at the 2D/2D heterojunctions has attracted several efforts due to the remarkable optical and electrical properties of 2D-TMDs. Unfortunately, in 2D/2D heterojunctions, for a given combination of two materials, the relative energy band alignment and the charge-transfer efficiency are locked. Due to their large variety and broad size tunability, semiconductor quantum dots (0D-QDs) interfaced with 2D-TMDs may become an attractive heterostructure for optoelectronic applications. Here, we incorporate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal the sub-45 fs charge transfer at a 2D/0D heterostructure composed of tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) and a single layer of cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide core/shell 0D-QDs. Furthermore, ultrafast dynamics and steady-state measurements suggested that, following electron transfer from the 2D to the 0D, hybrid excitons, wherein the electron resides in the 0D and the hole resides in the 2D-TMD monolayer, are formed with a binding energy on the order of ∼140 meV, which is several times lower than that of tightly bound excitons in 2D-TMDs.

  9. Band-structure engineering in conjugated 2D polymers.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico

    2016-10-26

    Conjugated polymers find widespread application in (opto)electronic devices, sensing, and as catalysts. Their common one-dimensional structure can be extended into the second dimension to create conjugated planar sheets of covalently linked molecules. Extending π-conjugation into the second dimension unlocks a new class of semiconductive polymers which as a consequence of their unique electronic properties can find usability in numerous applications. In this article the theoretical band structures of a set of conjugated 2D polymers are compared and information on the important characteristics band gap and valence/conduction band dispersion is extracted. The great variance in these characteristics within the investigated set suggests 2D polymers as exciting materials in which band-structure engineering can be used to tailor sheet-like organic materials with desired electronic properties.

  10. Booming Development of Group IV-VI Semiconductors: Fresh Blood of 2D Family.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Gan, Lin; Li, Huiqiao; Xiong, Jie; Zhai, Tianyou

    2016-12-01

    As an important component of 2D layered materials (2DLMs), the 2D group IV metal chalcogenides (GIVMCs) have drawn much attention recently due to their earth-abundant, low-cost, and environmentally friendly characteristics, thus catering well to the sustainable electronics and optoelectronics applications. In this instructive review, the booming research advancements of 2D GIVMCs in the last few years have been presented. First, the unique crystal and electronic structures are introduced, suggesting novel physical properties. Then the various methods adopted for synthesis of 2D GIVMCs are summarized such as mechanical exfoliation, solvothermal method, and vapor deposition. Furthermore, the review focuses on the applications in field effect transistors and photodetectors based on 2D GIVMCs, and extends to flexible devices. Additionally, the 2D GIVMCs based ternary alloys and heterostructures have also been presented, as well as the applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Finally, the conclusion and outlook have also been presented in the end of the review.

  11. Rapid-scan coherent 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Draeger, Simon; Roeding, Sebastian; Brixner, Tobias

    2017-02-20

    We developed pulse-shaper-assisted coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in liquids using fluorescence detection. A customized pulse shaper facilitates shot-to-shot modulation at 1 kHz and is employed for rapid scanning over all time delays. A full 2D spectrum with 15 × 15 pixels is obtained in approximately 6 s of measurement time (plus further averaging if needed). Coherent information is extracted from the incoherent fluorescence signal via 27-step phase cycling. We exemplify the technique on cresyl violet in ethanol and recover literature-known oscillations as a function of population time. Signal-to-noise behavior is analyzed as a function of the amount of averaging. Rapid scanning provides a 2D spectrum with a root-mean-square error of < 0.05 after 1 min of measurement time.

  12. Optoelectronics based on 2D TMDs and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Nengjie; Yang, Yujue; Li, Jingbo

    2017-03-01

    2D materials including graphene and TMDs have proven interesting physical properties and promising optoelectronic applications. We reviewed the growth, characterization and optoelectronics based on 2D TMDs and their heterostructures, and demonstrated their unique and high quality of performances. For example, we observed the large mobility, fast response and high photo-responsivity in MoS2, WS2 and WSe2 phototransistors, as well as the novel performances in vdW heterostructures such as the strong interlayer coupling, am-bipolar and rectifying behaviour, and the obvious photovoltaic effect. It is being possible that 2D family materials could play an increasingly important role in the future nano- and opto-electronics, more even than traditional semiconductors such as silicon.

  13. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  14. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  15. Spectroscopic ellipsometry thin film and first-principles calculations of electronic and linear optical properties of [(C9H19NH3)2PbI2Br2] 2D perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, H.; Hlil, E. K.; Abid, Y.

    2017-03-01

    In this study we report results of first-principles density functional calculations using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method as implemented in the WIEN2K code. We employed the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy to calculate electronic and linear optical properties of the (C9H19NH3)2PbI2Br2 compound. The linear optical properties, namely, the real ε1 (ω) and imaginary ε2 (ω) parts of dielectric function, the refractive index n (ω) and the extinction coefficient k (ω) are calculated and compared with experimental spectroscopic ellipsometry spectra. The reflectivity R (ω) and electron energy loss function L (ω) are calculated too. Our calculations performed for band structure and density of states show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum are located at Γ point resulting in a direct band gap of about (Γv -Γc) of 2.42 eV in good agreement with the experimental data. The investigated compound has a large uniaxial anisotropy of the dielectric function of about 0.0739 and a negative birefringence at zero energy Δn (0) =-0.11.

  16. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-07

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs.

  17. Limit of the electrostatic doping in two-dimensional electron gases of LaXO3(X = Al, Ti)/SrTiO3

    PubMed Central

    Biscaras, J.; Hurand, S.; Feuillet-Palma, C.; Rastogi, A.; Budhani, R. C.; Reyren, N.; Lesne, E.; Lesueur, J.; Bergeal, N.

    2014-01-01

    In LaTiO3/SrTiO3 and LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures, the bending of the SrTiO3 conduction band at the interface forms a quantum well that contains a superconducting two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG). Its carrier density and electronic properties, such as superconductivity and Rashba spin-orbit coupling can be controlled by electrostatic gating. In this article we show that the Fermi energy lies intrinsically near the top of the quantum well. Beyond a filling threshold, electrons added by electrostatic gating escape from the well, hence limiting the possibility to reach a highly-doped regime. This leads to an irreversible doping regime where all the electronic properties of the 2-DEG, such as its resistivity and its superconducting transition temperature, saturate. The escape mechanism can be described by the simple analytical model we propose. PMID:25346028

  18. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Fearn, Jamie M; Brownson, Dale A C; Smith, Graham C; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E

    2016-08-21

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm(-2) modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR.

  19. Graphene band structure and its 2D Raman mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narula, Rohit; Reich, Stephanie

    2014-08-01

    High-precision simulations are used to generate the 2D Raman mode of graphene under a range of screening conditions and laser energies EL. We reproduce the decreasing trend of the 2D mode FWHM vs EL and the nearly linearly increasing dispersion ∂ω2D/∂EL seen experimentally in freestanding (unscreened) graphene, and propose relations between these experimentally accessible quantities and the local, two-dimensional gradients |∇ | of the electronic and TO phonon bands. In light of state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations that acutely treat the long-range e-e interactions of isolated graphene and its experimentally observed 2D Raman mode, our calculations determine a 40% greater slope of the TO phonons about K than given by explicit phonon measurements performed in graphite or GW phonon calculations in graphene. We also deduce the variation of the broadening energy γ [EL] for freestanding graphene and find a nominal value γ ˜140 meV, showing a gradually increasing trend for the range of frequencies available experimentally.

  20. Photochemistry of biogenic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere is examined, emphasizing the composition and photochemistry and chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere. The reactions of oxygen, ozone, and hydroxyl are reviewed and the fate of the biogenic gases ammonia, methane, reduced sulfur species, reduced halogen species, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are described. A list is given of the concentration and sources of the various gases.

  1. Long-lived magnetoexcitons in 2D-fermion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, L. V.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Gorbunov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper addresses the experimental technique that, when applied to a 2D-electron system in the integer quantum Hall regime with filling factor ν = 2 (the Hall insulating state), allows resonant excitation of magnetoexcitons, their detection, control of an ensemble of long-lived triplet excitons and investigation of their radiationless decay related to exciton spin relaxation into the ground state. The technique proposed enables independent control of photoexcited electrons and Fermi-holes using photoinduced resonance reflection spectra as well as estimate with a reasonable degree of accuracy the resulting density of photoinduced electron-hole pairs bound into magnetoexcitons. The mere existence of triplet excitons was directly established by inelastic light scattering spectra which were analyzed to determine the value of singlet-triplet exciton splitting. It was found that the lifetimes of triplet excitons conditioned by electron spin relaxation in highly perfect GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with highly mobile 2D electrons are extremely long exceeding 100 μs at T < 1 K. The paper presents a qualitative explanation of the long-spin relaxation lifetimes which are unprecedented for translation-invariant 2D systems. This enabled us to create sufficiently high concentrations of triplet magnetoexcitons, electrically neutral excitations following Bose-Einstein statistics, in a Fermi electron system and investigate their collective properties. At sufficiently high densities of triplet magnetoexcitons and low temperatures, T < 1 K, the degenerate magnetofermionic system exhibits condensation of the triplet magnetoexcitons into a qualitatively new collective state with unusual properties which occurs in the space of generalized moments (magnetic translation vectors). The occurrence of a condensed phase is accompanied with a significant decrease in the viscosity of the photoexcited system, which is responsible for electron spin transport at macroscopic distances, as well

  2. Hard and Soft Physics with 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEuen, Paul

    With their remarkable structural, thermal, mechanical, optical, chemical, and electronic properties, 2D materials are truly special. For example, a graphene sheet can be made into a high-performance transistor, but it is also the ultimate realization of a thin mechanical sheet. Such sheets, first studied in detail by August Föppl over a hundred years ago, are notoriously complex, since they can bend, buckle, and crumple in a variety of ways. In this talk, I will discuss a number of experiments to probe these unusual materials, from the effects of ripples on the mechanical properties of a graphene sheet, to folding with atomically thin bimorphs, to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene solitons. Finally, I discuss how the Japanese paper art of kirigami (kiru = `to cut', kami = `paper') applied to 2D materials offers a route to mechanical metamaterials and the construction of nanoscale machines.

  3. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Fearn, Jamie M.; Brownson, Dale A. C.; Smith, Graham C.; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E.

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm-2 modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR.Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets

  4. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  5. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  6. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  7. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  8. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  9. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  10. Effect of Sr-doping of LaMnO3 spacer on modulation-doped two-dimensional electron gases at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Gan, Y. L.; Christensen, D. V.; Zhang, Y.; Pryds, N.

    2017-03-01

    Modulation-doped oxide two-dimensional electron gas formed at the LaMnO3 (LMO) buffered disorderd-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (d-LAO/LMO/STO) heterointerface provides new opportunities for electronics as well as quantum physics. Herein, we studied the dependence of Sr-doping of La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO, x = 0, 1/8, 1/3, ½, and 1) spacer on the transport properties of d-LAO/LSMO/STO in order to determine the effects of the filling of Mn eg subbands as well as the LSMO polarity on the modulation-doping. Upon increasing the LSMO film thickness from 1 unit cell (uc) to 2 uc, a sharp metal to insulator transition of interface conduction was observed, independent of x. The resultant electron mobility is higher than 1900 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 2 K, which increases upon decreasing x. The sheet carrier density, on the other hand, is in the range of 6.9 × 1012˜1.8 × 1013 cm-2 (0.01 ˜ 0.03 e/uc) and is largely independent on x for all the metallic d-LAO/LSMO (1 uc)/STO interfaces. These results are consistent with the charge transfer induced modulation doping scheme and clarify that the polarity of the buffer layer plays a trivial role on the modulation doping. The negligible tunability of the carrier density could result from the reduction of LSMO during the deposition of disordered LAO or that the energy levels of Mn 3d electrons at the interface of LSMO/STO are hardly varied even when changing the LSMO composition from LMO to SrMnO3.

  11. Optical diagnostics of streamer discharges in atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimek, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reviews optical diagnostic methods and approaches applied to study the fundamentals of streamer discharges, considering the peculiarities of streamers developing in atmospheric gases at high (1 bar) as well as low (<10 mbar) pressures. A critical discussion is devoted to the cross-sections for electron-impact excitation/ionization/dissociation processes and corresponding rate constants in relation to methods used to probe streamer properties. The most important spectrometric signatures of radiative transitions of diatomic as well as atomic species are discussed on the basis of their synthetic models with a brief guide on how to simulate the most important emissions. Basic differences between UV-vis-NIR spectra produced by electron-impact and various heavy-particle energy-transfer processes during streamer evolution are presented and possible strategies based on 2D projections of cylindrically symmetric streamers to determine radial distributions of excited species within the streamer channel are discussed. The use of emission techniques to obtain the rotational temperatures and vibrational distributions of excited states of diatomics and laser-induced fluorescence techniques to probe the vibrational manifold of the lowest triplet metastable state of the nitrogen molecule is addressed.

  12. Collective modes in cold paramagnetic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, T L; Rubin, P L

    2014-02-28

    We have obtained a condition for the emergence of spin waves in paramagnetic gases Re >> ImÂ, which is fulfilled only at temperatures of the order of 1 μK. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. Low-Resistance 2D/2D Ohmic Contacts: A Universal Approach to High-Performance WSe2, MoS2, and MoSe2 Transistors.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsun-Jen; Chamlagain, Bhim; Koehler, Michael; Perera, Meeghage Madusanka; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David; Tománek, David; Zhou, Zhixian

    2016-03-09

    We report a new strategy for fabricating 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts for a variety of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) using van der Waals assembly of substitutionally doped TMDs as drain/source contacts and TMDs with no intentional doping as channel materials. We demonstrate that few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors (FETs) with 2D/2D contacts exhibit low contact resistances of ∼0.3 kΩ μm, high on/off ratios up to >10(9), and high drive currents exceeding 320 μA μm(-1). These favorable characteristics are combined with a two-terminal field-effect hole mobility μFE ≈ 2 × 10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature, which increases to >2 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at cryogenic temperatures. We observe a similar performance also in MoS2 and MoSe2 FETs with 2D/2D drain and source contacts. The 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts presented here represent a new device paradigm that overcomes a significant bottleneck in the performance of TMDs and a wide variety of other 2D materials as the channel materials in postsilicon electronics.

  14. Low-resistance 2D/2D ohmic contacts: A universal approach to high-performance WSe2, MoS2, and MoSe2 transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Chuang, Hsun -Jen; Chamlagain, Bhim; Koehler, Michael; ...

    2016-02-04

    Here, we report a new strategy for fabricating 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts for a variety of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) using van der Waals assembly of substitutionally doped TMDs as drain/source contacts and TMDs with no intentional doping as channel materials. We demonstrate that few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors (FETs) with 2D/2D contacts exhibit low contact resistances of ~0.3 kΩ μm, high on/off ratios up to >109, and high drive currents exceeding 320 μA μm–1. These favorable characteristics are combined with a two-terminal field-effect hole mobility μFE ≈ 2 × 102 cm2 V–1 s–1 at room temperature, which increases to >2more » × 103 cm2 V–1 s–1 at cryogenic temperatures. We observe a similar performance also in MoS2 and MoSe2 FETs with 2D/2D drain and source contacts. The 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts presented here represent a new device paradigm that overcomes a significant bottleneck in the performance of TMDs and a wide variety of other 2D materials as the channel materials in postsilicon electronics.« less

  15. Light Scattering from Two Dimensional Electron Gases -- Gallium-Arsenide - ALUMINUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)ARSENIDE Superlattices in High Magnetic Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Zu-Jean

    1981-11-01

    Electronic transitions of 2 DEG in modulation doped semiconductor superlattices have been studied by resonant inelastic light scattering in strong magnetic field perpendicular to the two dimensional planes. Both the intersubband transition and unexpected cyclotron resonance have been observed in magnetic fields up to 19 Tesla for carrier concentration between 2.2 x 10('11)/cm('2) and 6.5 x 10('11)/cm('2). At modest magnetic field, B < 12 Tesla: The single particle intersubband excitation (E(,10)) and collective intersubband excitations (E(,-) and E(,+)) depend upon layer thickness and carrier concentration but are field independent. The energies of (DELTA)l = 1 and (DELTA)l = 2 inter-Landau level transitions ((H/2PI)(omega)(,c) and 2(H/2PI)(omega)(,c)) are linear in magnetic field, and yields an electron effective mass m* = (0.068 (+OR -) 0.003) m(,0), which is slightly higher than the accepted effective mass of the conduction band of GaAs 0.065 m(,0). In addition, collective cyclotron resonance ((H/2PI)(OMEGA)(,c)) was also observed. (OMEGA)(,c) is found greater than (omega)(,c), and (OMEGA)(,c)-(omega)(,c) is a function of magnetic field and carrier concentration. (OMEGA)(,c) is interpreted as the mixture of cyclotron resonance and plasma excitations. At higher fields, B < 19 Tesla: cyclotron resonance energy and cyclotron mass deviate from linear behavior by about 10%. E(,10) decreases while E(,-) increases in the quantum limit. The modest field spectra require a new theory, while the anomalous behavior of the high field spectra may require interpretation invoking electron ordering.

  16. Thermopower enhancement by fractional layer control in 2D oxide superlattices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Seok; Ohta, Hiromichi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-10-22

    Precise tuning of the 2D carrier density by using fractional δ-doping of d electrons improves the thermoelectric properties of oxide heterostructures. This promising result can be attributed to the anisotropic band structure in the 2D system, indicating that δ-doped oxide superlattices are good candidates for advanced thermoelectrics.

  17. Electronic properties of GaSe, InSe, GaS and GaTe layered semiconductors: charge neutrality level and interface barrier heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudnyi, V. N.; Sarkisov, S. Yu; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been applied to study the structural and electronic properties of layered ɛ-GaSe, γ-InSe, β-GaS and GaTe compounds. The optimized lattice parameters have been obtained using vdW-DF2-C09 exchange-correlation functional, which is able to describe dispersion forces and produces interlayer distances in close agreement with experiments. Based on the calculated electronic band structures, the energy position of the charge neutrality level (CNL) in the III-VI semiconductors has been estimated for the first time. The room-temperature values of CNL are found to be 0.80 eV, 1.02 eV, 0.72 eV and 0.77 eV for ɛ-GaSe, β-GaS, GaTe and γ-InSe, respectively. The persistent p-type conductivity of the intentionally undoped ɛ-GaSe, β-GaS and GaTe and n-type conductivity of γ-InSe crystals are discussed and explained using the concept of CNL. We also estimated the barrier heights for a number of metal/semiconductor and semiconductor/semiconductor interfaces assuming partial Fermi level pinning at the CNL. A reasonable agreement between our calculations and the available experimental data has been obtained.

  18. Strongly correlated Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2016-10-01

    The strongly interacting Bose gas is one of the most fundamental paradigms of quantum many-body physics and the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations. We review recent progress on strongly correlated Bose gases, starting with a description of beyond mean-field corrections. We show that the Efimov effect leads to non universal phenomena and to a metastability of the low temperature Bose gas through three-body recombination to deeply bound molecular states. We outline differences and similarities with ultracold Fermi gases, discuss recent experiments on the unitary Bose gas, and finally present a few perspectives for future research.

  19. 2D-2D tunneling field-effect transistors using WSe2/SnSe2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tania; Tosun, Mahmut; Hettick, Mark; Ahn, Geun Ho; Hu, Chenming; Javey, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials present a versatile platform for developing steep transistors due to their uniform thickness and sharp band edges. We demonstrate 2D-2D tunneling in a WSe2/SnSe2 van der Waals vertical heterojunction device, where WSe2 is used as the gate controlled p-layer and SnSe2 is the degenerately n-type layer. The van der Waals gap facilitates the regulation of band alignment at the heterojunction, without the necessity of a tunneling barrier. ZrO2 is used as the gate dielectric, allowing the scaling of gate oxide to improve device subthreshold swing. Efficient gate control and clean interfaces yield a subthreshold swing of ˜100 mV/dec for >2 decades of drain current at room temperature, hitherto unobserved in 2D-2D tunneling devices. The subthreshold swing is independent of temperature, which is a clear signature of band-to-band tunneling at the heterojunction. A maximum switching ratio ION/IOFF of 107 is obtained. Negative differential resistance in the forward bias characteristics is observed at 77 K. This work bodes well for the possibilities of two-dimensional materials for the realization of energy-efficient future-generation electronics.

  20. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Determination of the intensities of electric fields in gases and plasmas by the CARS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, O. A.; Kupryanova, E. B.; Ochkin, Vladimir N.; Savinov, Sergei Yu; Tskhai, Sergei N.

    1995-03-01

    A nonlinear optical method for nonperturbing local measurements of the intensity of electric fields in gaseous and plasma molecular media is proposed. It is based on the generation of coherent infrared radiation as a result of biharmonic laser pumping in a static electric field. Investigations are reported of the dependences of the intensity of infrared radiation, emitted by molecular hydrogen at the frequency of the Raman-active vibrational—rotational transition Q(1) (υ = 0, J = 1 → υ = 1, J = 1) in the ground electronic state X1Σg+ (λ = 2.4 μm), on the electric field and gas pressure. The weakest electric field which can be detected at a molecular hydrogen pressure of 1 bar is 20 V cm-1. The capabilities of the method are illustrated by local electric field measurements in a corona discharge.

  1. Modification of subsurface structure in TiC-(Ni-Cr) cermet composite under pulsed electron-beam irradiation of samples in plasmas of light and heavy inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, K. V.; Baohai, Yu; Zhengkun, Li; Hua, Xu Yun; Lisheng, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Experiments with metal ceramic alloys with various ceramic content proved that the performance degree of pulsed electron-ion-plasma irradiation as a technology of creating a surface layer multilevel structural phase condition, where particles are measured within a nano dimensional diapason, depends on ionization energy degree as well as on plasma-supporting gas atomic weight. When ionization energy falls parallel to plasma-supporting gas atomic weight growth, ceramic component particles dissolve in a metal binding melt more quickly, and an accelerated dispersion of ceramic particles to nano sized level can be observed. A multilevel structural phase condition causes friction ratio decrease, while a metal ceramic alloy surface layer wear ability increases many-folds.

  2. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  4. Quenching of electronically excited N2 molecules and Tb(3)(+) /Eu(3)(+) ions by polyatomic sulfur-containing gases upon triboluminescence of inorganic lanthanide salts.

    PubMed

    Sharipov, G L; Tukhbatullin, A A; Bagautdinova, A R

    2016-12-20

    The triboluminescence of Eu2 (SO4 )3 ·8H2 O and Tb2 (SO4 )3 ·8H2 O crystals in an atmosphere of sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 ) was studied. Quenching of the gaseous (emitter N2 ) and solid-state (emitter Ln(3+) ) components of the triboluminescence (TL) emission spectrum was seen when compared with the TL spectra of the crystals in air. One reason for the quenching is a reduction in the effective charge both on the crystal surface and in micro-cracks under an SO2 or SF6 atmosphere, leading to a decrease in the probability of electrical breakdown and a reduction in electric field strength responsible for the electroluminescence excitation of lanthanide ions in TL. In an SO2 atmosphere, there is an additional mode of quenching, as confirmed by quenching of the crystal photoluminescence (emitter Ln(3+) ). It is supposed that this quenching is due to an exchange of energy on electronic excitation of the lanthanide ions to the vibrational sublevels of the SO2 molecules adsorbed on the crystal surface. Another additional channel of TL quenching originates from non-radiative transfer of excitation energy during collisions between the *N2 and SO2 molecules in the gaseous phase.

  5. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet 2D fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-2D FS).

    PubMed

    Widom, Julia R; Johnson, Neil P; von Hippel, Peter H; Marcus, Andrew H

    2013-02-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analog of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) - a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy - to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 Å ± 0.5 Å, twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5°), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  6. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  7. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  8. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  9. Atmospheric trace gases in antarctica.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, R A; Khalil, M A; Dalluge, R W

    1981-01-16

    Trace gases have been measured, by electron-capture gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, at the South Pole (SP) in Antarctica and in the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW) ( approximately 45 degrees N) during January of each year from 1975 to 1980. These measurements show that the concentrations of CCl(3)F, CCl(2)F(2), and CH(3)CCl(3) have increased exponentially at substantial rates. The concentration of CCl(3)F increased at 12 percent per year at the SP and at 8 percent per year in the PNW; CCl(2)F(2) increased at about 9 percent per year at both locations, and CH(3)CCl(3) increased at 17 percent per year at the SP and 11.6 percent per year at the PNW site. There is some evidence that CCl(4) ( approximately 3 percent per year) and N(2)O (0.1 to 0.5 percent per year) may also have increased. Concentrations of nine other trace gases of importance in atmospheric chemistry are also being measured at these two locations. Results of the measurements of CHClF(2)(F-22), C(2)Cl(3)F(3)(F-113), SF(6), C(2)-hydrocarbons, and CH(3)Cl are reported here.

  10. One-atom-thick 2D copper oxide clusters on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kano, Emi; Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Sakai, Seiji; Chernozatonskii, Leonid A; Sorokin, Pavel B; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2017-03-17

    The successful isolation and remarkable properties of graphene have recently triggered investigation of two-dimensional (2D) materials from layered compounds; however, one-atom-thick 2D materials without bulk layered counterparts are scarcely reported. Here we report the structure and properties of novel 2D copper oxide studied by experimental and theoretical methods. Electron microscopy observations reveal that copper oxide can form monoatomic layers with an unusual square lattice on graphene. Density functional theory calculations suggest that oxygen atoms at the centre of the square lattice stabilizes the 2D Cu structure, and that the 2D copper oxide sheets have unusual electronic and magnetic properties different from 3D bulk copper oxide.

  11. Van der Waals Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Single-Crystalline GaSe Domains on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, Xufan; Basile, Leonardo; Huang, Bing; Ma, Cheng; Lee, Jaekwang; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Puretzky, Alexander A; Lin, Ming-Wei; Yoon, Mina; Chi, Miaofang; Idrobo, Juan C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Sumpter, Bobby G; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-08-25

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are a family of artificially structured materials that promise tunable optoelectronic properties for devices with enhanced functionalities. Compared to transferring, direct epitaxy of vdW heterostructures is ideal for clean interlayer interfaces and scalable device fabrication. Here we report the synthesis and preferred orientations of 2D GaSe atomic layers on graphene (Gr) by vdW epitaxy. GaSe crystals are found to nucleate predominantly on random wrinkles or grain boundaries of graphene, share a preferred lattice orientation with underlying graphene, and grow into large (tens of micrometers) irregularly shaped, single-crystalline domains. The domains are found to propagate with triangular edges that merge into the large single crystals during growth. Electron diffraction reveals that approximately 50% of the GaSe domains are oriented with a 10.5 ± 0.3° interlayer rotation with respect to the underlying graphene. Theoretical investigations of interlayer energetics reveal that a 10.9° interlayer rotation is the most energetically preferred vdW heterostructure. In addition, strong charge transfer in these GaSe/Gr vdW heterostructures is predicted, which agrees with the observed enhancement in the Raman E(2)1g band of monolayer GaSe and highly quenched photoluminescence compared to GaSe/SiO2. Despite the very large lattice mismatch of GaSe/Gr through vdW epitaxy, the predominant orientation control and convergent formation of large single-crystal flakes demonstrated here is promising for the scalable synthesis of large-area vdW heterostructures for the development of new optical and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Van der Waals epitaxial growth of two-dimensional single-crystalline GaSe domains on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xufan; Basile, Leonardo; Huang, Bing; ...

    2015-07-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are a family of artificially-structured materials that promise tunable optoelectronic properties for devices with enhanced functionalities. Compared to stamping, direct epitaxy of vdW heterostructures is ideal for clean interlayer interfaces and scalable device fabrication. Here, we explore the synthesis and preferred orientations of 2D GaSe atomic layers on graphene (Gr) by vdW epitaxy. Guided by the wrinkles on graphene, GaSe nuclei form that share a predominant lattice orientation. Due to vdW epitaxial growth many nuclei grow as perfectly aligned crystals and coalesce to form large (tens of microns), single-crystal flakes. Through theoretical investigationsmore » of interlayer energetics, and measurements of preferred orientations by atomic-resolution STEM and electron diffraction, a 10.9 interlayer rotation of the GaSe lattice with respect to the underlying graphene is found to be the most energetically preferred vdW heterostructure with the largest binding energy and the longest-range ordering. These GaSe/Gr vdW heterostructures exhibit an enhanced Raman E21g band of monolayer GaSe along with highly-quenched photoluminescence due to strong charge transfer. Despite the very large lattice mismatch of GaSe/Gr through vdW epitaxy, the predominant orientation control and convergent formation of large single-crystal flakes demonstrated here is promising for the scalable synthesis of large-area vdW heterostructures for the development of new optical and optoelectronic devices.« less

  13. Van der Waals epitaxial growth of two-dimensional single-crystalline GaSe domains on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Basile, Leonardo; Huang, Bing; Ma, Cheng; Lee, Jaekwang; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lin, Ming -Wei; Chi, Miaofang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Yoon, Mina; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2015-07-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are a family of artificially-structured materials that promise tunable optoelectronic properties for devices with enhanced functionalities. Compared to stamping, direct epitaxy of vdW heterostructures is ideal for clean interlayer interfaces and scalable device fabrication. Here, we explore the synthesis and preferred orientations of 2D GaSe atomic layers on graphene (Gr) by vdW epitaxy. Guided by the wrinkles on graphene, GaSe nuclei form that share a predominant lattice orientation. Due to vdW epitaxial growth many nuclei grow as perfectly aligned crystals and coalesce to form large (tens of microns), single-crystal flakes. Through theoretical investigations of interlayer energetics, and measurements of preferred orientations by atomic-resolution STEM and electron diffraction, a 10.9 interlayer rotation of the GaSe lattice with respect to the underlying graphene is found to be the most energetically preferred vdW heterostructure with the largest binding energy and the longest-range ordering. These GaSe/Gr vdW heterostructures exhibit an enhanced Raman E21g band of monolayer GaSe along with highly-quenched photoluminescence due to strong charge transfer. Despite the very large lattice mismatch of GaSe/Gr through vdW epitaxy, the predominant orientation control and convergent formation of large single-crystal flakes demonstrated here is promising for the scalable synthesis of large-area vdW heterostructures for the development of new optical and optoelectronic devices.

  14. Thickness dependence on the optoelectronic properties of multilayered GaSe based photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Pil Ju; Abderrahmane, Abdelkader; Takamura, Tsukasa; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials exhibit unique optoelectronic properties at atomic thicknesses. In this paper, we fabricated metal-semiconductor-metal based photodetectors using layered gallium selenide (GaSe) with different thicknesses. The electrical and optoelectronic properties of the photodetectors were studied, and these devices showed good electrical characteristics down to GaSe flake thicknesses of 30 nm. A photograting effect was observed in the absence of a gate voltage, thereby implying a relatively high photoresponsivity. Higher values of the photoresponsivity occurred for thicker layers of GaSe with a maximum value 0.57 AW-1 and external quantum efficiency of of 132.8%, and decreased with decreasing GaSe flake thickness. The detectivity was 4.05 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 532 nm laser wavelength, underscoring that GaSe is a promising p-type 2D material for photodetection applications in the visible spectrum.

  15. Magnetic gating of a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xiaoqian; Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-09-01

    Deterministic control of transport properties through manipulation of spin states is one of the paradigms of spintronics. Topological insulators offer a new playground for exploring interesting spin-dependent phenomena. Here, we consider a ferromagnetic ‘gate’ representing a magnetic adatom coupled to the topologically protected edge state of a two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator to modulate the electron transmission of the edge state. Due to the locked spin and wave vector of the transport electrons the transmission across the magnetic gate depends on the mutual orientation of the adatom magnetic moment and the current. If the Fermi energy matches an exchange-split bound state of the adatom, the electron transmission can be blocked due to the full back scattering of the incident wave. This antiresonance behavior is controlled by the adatom magnetic moment orientation so that the transmission of the edge state can be changed from 1 to 0. Expanding this consideration to a ferromagnetic gate representing a 1D chain of atoms shows a possibility to control the spin-dependent current of a strip of a 2D topological insulator by magnetization orientation of the ferromagnetic gate.

  16. Kinetic Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theory, developed in the nineteenth century, notably by Rudolf Clausius (1822-88) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79), that the properties of a gas (temperature, pressure, etc) could be described in terms of the motions (and kinetic energy) of the molecules comprising the gases. The theory has wide implications in astrophysics. In particular, the perfect gas law, which relates the pressure, vol...

  17. Sudden releases of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaloupecká, Hana; Jaňour, Zbyněk; Jurčáková, Klára; Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štěpán

    2014-03-01

    Conurbations all over the world have enlarged for numberless years. The accidental or intentional releases of gases become more frequent. Therefore, these crises situations have to be studied. The aim of this paper is to describe experiments examining these processes that were carried out in the laboratory of Environmental Aerodynamics of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR in Nový Knín. Results show huge puff variability from replica to replica.

  18. Toxic gases from fires.

    PubMed

    Terrill, J B; Montgomery, R R; Reinhardt, C F

    1978-06-23

    The major lethal factors in uncontrolled fires are toxic gases, heat, and oxygen deficiency. The predominant toxic gas is carbon monoxide, which is readily generated from the combusion of wood and other cellulosic materials. Increasing use of a variety of synthetic polymers has stimulated interest in screening tests to evaluated the toxicity of polymeric materials when thermally decomposed. As yet, this country lacks a standardized fire toxicity test protocol.

  19. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  20. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  1. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  2. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  3. 2D optical beam splitter using diffractive optical elements (DOE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fung J.; Chung, Po S.

    2006-09-01

    A novel approach for optical beam distribution into a 2-dimensional (2-D) packaged fiber arrays using 2-D Dammann gratings is investigated. This paper focuses on the design and fabrication of the diffractive optical element (DOE) and investigates the coupling efficiencies of the beamlets into a packaged V-grooved 2x2 fibre array. We report for the first time experimental results of a 2-D optical signal distribution into a packaged 2x2 fibre array using Dammann grating. This grating may be applicable to the FTTH network as it can support sufficient channels with good output uniformity together with low polarization dependent loss (PDL) and acceptable insertion loss. Using an appropriate optimization algorithm (the steepest descent algorithm in this case), the optimum profile for the gratings can be calculated. The gratings are then fabricated on ITO glass using electron-beam lithography. The overall performance of the design shows an output uniformity of around 0.14 dB and an insertion loss of about 12.63 dB, including the DOE, focusing lens and the packaged fiber array.

  4. Broadband THz Spectroscopy of 2D Nanoscale Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Tripathi, Shivendra; Huang, Mengchen; Hsu, Jen-Feng; D'Urso, Brian; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) have attracted intense research interest in the past decade. Their unique electronic and optical properties offer the promise of novel optoelectronic applications in the terahertz regime. Recently, generation and detection of broadband terahertz (10 THz bandwidth) emission from 10-nm-scale LaAlO3/SrTiO3 nanostructures created by conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography has been demonstrated . This unprecedented control of THz emission at 10 nm length scales creates a pathway toward hybrid THz functionality in 2D-material/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. Here we report initial efforts in THz spectroscopy of 2D nanoscale materials with resolution comparable to the dimensions of the nanowire (10 nm). Systems under investigation include graphene, single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanoflakes. 1. Y. Ma, et al., Nano Lett. 13, 2884 (2013). We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: AFOSR (FA9550-12-1-0268 (JL, PRI), FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)), ONR (N00014-13-1-0806 (JL, CBE), N00014-15-1-2847 (JL)), NSF DMR-1124131 (JL, CBE) and DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  5. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  6. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  7. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  8. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  9. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  10. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases.

  11. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Das Sarma, S; Hwang, E H

    2015-11-17

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover.

  12. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover. PMID:26572738

  13. Electronic, bonding, and optical properties of 1d [CuCN]n (n = 1-10) chains, 2d [CuCN]n (n = 2-10) nanorings, and 3d [Cun (CN)n ]m (n = 4, m = 2, 3; n = 10, m = 2) tubes studied by DFT/TD-DFT methods.

    PubMed

    Tsipis, Athanassios C; Stalikas, Alexandros V

    2015-06-30

    The electronic, bonding, and photophysical properties of one-dimensional [CuCN](n) (n = 1-10) chains, 2-D [CuCN](n) (n = 2-10) nanorings, and 3-D [Cu(n)(CN)(n)](m) (n = 4, m = 2, 3; n = 10, m = 2) tubes are investigated by means of a multitude of computational methodologies using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent-density-functional theory (TD-DFT) methods. The calculations revealed that the 2-D [CuCN](n) (n = 2-10) nanorings are more stable than the respective 1-D [CuCN](n) (n = 2-10) linear chains. The 2-D [CuCN](n) (n = 2-10) nanorings are predicted to form 3-D [Cun (CN)(n)](m) (n = 4, m = 2, 3; n = 10, m = 2) tubes supported by weak stacking interactions, which are clearly visualized as broad regions in real space by the 3D plots of the reduced density gradient. The bonding mechanism in the 1-D [CuCN](n) (n = 1-10) chains, 2-D [CuCN](n) (n = 2-10) nanorings, and 3-D [Cu(n)(CN)(n)](m) (n = 4, m = 2, 3; n = 10, m = 2) tubes are easily recognized by a multitude of electronic structure calculation approaches. Particular emphasis was given on the photophysical properties (absorption and emission spectra) of the [CuCN](n) chains, nanorings, and tubes which were simulated by TD-DFT calculations. The absorption and emission bands in the simulated TD-DFT absorption and emission spectra have thoroughly been analyzed and assignments of the contributing principal electronic transitions associated to individual excitations have been made.

  14. Method for introduction of gases into microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.; Koo, Jackson C.; Rosencwaig, Allan

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing small hollow glass spheres filled with a gas by introduction of the gas during formation of the hollow glass spheres. Hollow glass microspheres having a diameter up to about 500.mu. with both thin walls (0.5 to 4.mu.) and thick walls (5 to 20.mu.) that contain various fill gases, such as Ar, Kr, Xe, Br, DT, H.sub.2, D.sub.2, He, N.sub.2, Ne, CO.sub.2, etc. in the interior thereof, can be produced by the diffusion of the fill gas or gases into the microsphere during the formation thereof from a liquid droplet of glass-forming solution. This is accomplished by filling at least a portion of the multiple-zone drop-furnace used in producing hollow microspheres with the gas or gases of interest, and then taking advantage of the high rate of gaseous diffusion of the fill gas through the wall of the gel membrane before it transforms into a glass microsphere as it is processed in the multiple-zone furnace. Almost any gas can be introduced into the inner cavity of a glass microsphere by this method during the formation of the microsphere provided that the gas is diffused into the gel membrane or microsphere prior to its transformation into glass. The process of this invention provides a significant savings of time and related expense of filling glass microspheres with various gases. For example, the time for filling a glass microballoon with 1 atmosphere of DT is reduced from about two hours to a few seconds.

  15. 2D vibrational properties of epitaxial silicene on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, Dmytro; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Le Lay, Guy; Sahin, Hasan; Cahangirov, Seymur; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.; Vogt, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    The two-dimensional silicon allotrope, silicene, could spur the development of new and original concepts in Si-based nanotechnology. Up to now silicene can only be epitaxially synthesized on a supporting substrate such as Ag(111). Even though the structural and electronic properties of these epitaxial silicene layers have been intensively studied, very little is known about its vibrational characteristics. Here, we present a detailed study of epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) using in situ Raman spectroscopy, which is one of the most extensively employed experimental techniques to characterize 2D materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and black phosphorous. The vibrational fingerprint of epitaxial silicene, in contrast to all previous interpretations, is characterized by three distinct phonon modes with A and E symmetries. Both, energies and symmetries of theses modes are confirmed by ab initio theory calculations. The temperature dependent spectral evolution of these modes demonstrates unique thermal properties of epitaxial silicene and a significant electron-phonon coupling. These results unambiguously support the purely two-dimensional character of epitaxial silicene up to about 300 °C, whereupon a 2D-to-3D phase transition takes place. The detailed fingerprint of epitaxial silicene will allow us to identify it in different environments or to study its modifications.

  16. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  17. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  18. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  19. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  20. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B.

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.

  1. Equilibration of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrelly, Terry

    2016-07-01

    Finding equilibration times is a major unsolved problem in physics with few analytical results. Here we look at equilibration times for quantum gases of bosons and fermions in the regime of negligibly weak interactions, a setting which not only includes paradigmatic systems such as gases confined to boxes, but also Luttinger liquids and the free superfluid Hubbard model. To do this, we focus on two classes of measurements: (i) coarse-grained observables, such as the number of particles in a region of space, and (ii) few-mode measurements, such as phase correlators. We show that, in this setting, equilibration occurs quite generally despite the fact that the particles are not interacting. Furthermore, for coarse-grained measurements the timescale is generally at most polynomial in the number of particles N, which is much faster than previous general upper bounds, which were exponential in N. For local measurements on lattice systems, the timescale is typically linear in the number of lattice sites. In fact, for one-dimensional lattices, the scaling is generally linear in the length of the lattice, which is optimal. Additionally, we look at a few specific examples, one of which consists of N fermions initially confined on one side of a partition in a box. The partition is removed and the fermions equilibrate extremely quickly in time O(1/N).

  2. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  3. Coherent phenomena in terahertz 2D plasmonic structures: strong coupling, plasmonic crystals, and induced transparency by coupling of localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gregory C.; Aizin, Gregory R.; Allen, S. James; Grine, Albert D.; Bethke, Don; Reno, John L.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2014-05-01

    The device applications of plasmonic systems such as graphene and two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in III-V heterostructures include terahertz detectors, mixers, oscillators and modulators. These two dimensional (2D) plasmonic systems are not only well-suited for device integration, but also enable the broad tunability of underdamped plasma excitations via an applied electric field. We present demonstrations of the coherent coupling of multiple voltage tuned GaAs/AlGaAs 2D plasmonic resonators under terahertz irradiation. By utilizing a plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism to downconvert the near field of plasma waves to a DC signal, we directly detect the spectrum of coupled plasmonic micro-resonator structures at cryogenic temperatures. The 2DEG in the studied devices can be interpreted as a plasmonic waveguide where multiple gate terminals control the 2DEG kinetic inductance. When the gate tuning of the 2DEG is spatially periodic, a one-dimensional finite plasmonic crystal forms. This results in a subwavelength structure, much like a metamaterial element, that nonetheless Bragg scatters plasma waves from a repeated crystal unit cell. A 50% in situ tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges is observed. By introducing gate-controlled defects or simply terminating the lattice, localized states arise in the plasmonic crystal. Inherent asymmetries at the finite crystal boundaries produce an induced transparency-like phenomenon due to the coupling of defect modes and crystal surface states known as Tamm states. The demonstrated active control of coupled plasmonic resonators opens previously unexplored avenues for sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detection, planar metamaterials, and slow-light devices.

  4. Salt-Templated Synthesis of 2D Metallic MoN and Other Nitrides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xu; Yu, Huimin; Jin, Huanyu; Wu, Menghao; Fang, Yunsheng; Sun, Jiyu; Hu, Zhimi; Li, Tianqi; Wu, Jiabin; Huang, Liang; Gogotsi, Yury; Zhou, Jun

    2017-02-28

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal nitrides just recently entered the research arena, but already offer a potential for high-rate energy storage, which is needed for portable/wearable electronics and many other applications. However, a lack of efficient and high-yield synthesis methods for 2D metal nitrides has been a major bottleneck for the manufacturing of those potentially very important materials, and only MoN, Ti4N3, and GaN have been reported so far. Here we report a scalable method that uses reduction of 2D hexagonal oxides in ammonia to produce 2D nitrides, such as MoN. MoN nanosheets with subnanometer thickness have been studied in depth. Both theoretical calculation and experiments demonstrate the metallic nature of 2D MoN. The hydrophilic restacked 2D MoN film exhibits a very high volumetric capacitance of 928 F cm(-3) in sulfuric acid electrolyte with an excellent rate performance. We expect that the synthesis of metallic 2D MoN and two other nitrides (W2N and V2N) demonstrated here will provide an efficient way to expand the family of 2D materials and add many members with attractive properties.

  5. Ultrafast dynamics of metal plasmons induced by 2D semiconductor excitons in hybrid nanostructure arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Wang, Kai; ...

    2016-11-17

    With the advanced progress achieved in the field of nanotechnology, localized surface plasmons resonances (LSPRs) are actively considered to improve the efficiency of metal-based photocatalysis, photodetection, and photovoltaics. Here, we report on the exchange of energy and electric charges in a hybrid composed of a two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayer and an array of aluminum (Al) nanodisks. Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy results indicate that within ~830 fs after photoexcitation of the 2D-WS2 semiconductor, energy transfer from the 2D-WS2 excitons excites the plasmons of the Al array. Then, upon the radiative and/or nonradiative damping of these excited plasmons, energy and/or electron transfermore » back to the 2D-WS2 semiconductor takes place as indicated by an increase in the reflected probe at the 2D exciton transition energies at later time-delays. This simultaneous exchange of energy and charges between the metal and the 2D-WS2 semiconductor resulted in an extension of the average lifetime of the 2D-excitons from ~15 to ~58 ps in absence and presence of the Al array, respectively. Furthermore, the indirectly excited plasmons were found to live as long as the 2D-WS2 excitons exist. Furthermore, the demonstrated ability to generate exciton-plasmons coupling in a hybrid nanostructure may open new opportunities for optoelectronic applications such as plasmonic-based photodetection and photocatalysis.« less

  6. 2-D Acousto-Optic Signal Processors for Simultaneous Spectrum Analysis and Direction Finding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    National Dfense Defence nationale 2-D ACOUSTO - OPTIC SIGNAL PROCESSORS FOR SIMULTANEOUS SPECTRUM ANALYSIS 00 AND DIRECTION FINDING (U) by NM Jim P.Y...Wr pdft .1w I0~1111191 3 05089 National DIfense Defence nationale 2-D ACOUSTO - OPTIC SIGNAL PROCESSORS FOR SIMULTANEOUS SPECTRUM ANALYSIS AND DIRECTION...Processing, J.T. Tippet et al., Eds., Chapter 38, pp. 715-748, MIT Press, Cambridge 1965. [6] A.E. Spezio," Acousto - optics for Electronic Warfare

  7. 2D Crystal Semiconductors New Materials for GHz-THz Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-02

    frequency operation. 4) Identify methods to improve carrier transport in 2D Crystal semiconductors. 5) Compare FETs made from naturally occuring and... chemically synthesized 2D Crystal semic???ductors. 6) Elucidate the effect of contact resistance, and gauge the challenges for GHz-THz electronics by... chemical doping, which involved replac- ing a small number of atoms of the 3-D semiconductor by those with higher or lower valence. The next advance

  8. Multi-Scale Modeling, Design Strategies and Physical Properties of 2D Composite Sheets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    of Pennsylvania. The breakthrough results obtained are 1) prediction and subsequent experimental observation of strain induced changes in electronic...structure of TMD materials 2) Prediction and experimental observation of using defects in 2D materials to enhance charge storage capacity and 3...221 Philadelphia , PA 19104 -6205 4-Mar-2014 ABSTRACT Final Report: 9.4: Multi-scale modeling, design strategies and physical properties of 2D

  9. Jet flows of reacting gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Farkhadzhan; Zhumaev, Zair Sh.

    The book presents fundamentals of the aerodynamic theory and calculation of straight gas jets. The discussion focuses on the flow structure and turbulent combustion of unmixed gases and thermal characteristics of the jet. The following three types of problems are considered: motion of unmixed chemically active gases; gas motion under conditions of chemical equilibrium; and motion of gases under conditions of finite-rate chemical reactions.

  10. Electric Field Cancellation on Quartz by Rb Adsorbate-Induced Negative Electron Affinity.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, J A; Kim, E; Rittenhouse, S T; Weck, P F; Sadeghpour, H R; Shaffer, J P

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results will be important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems, as fundamental probes of atom-surface interactions, and for studies of 2D electron gases bound to surfaces.

  11. Booming Development of Group IV–VI Semiconductors: Fresh Blood of 2D Family

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Gan, Lin; Li, Huiqiao; Xiong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of 2D layered materials (2DLMs), the 2D group IV metal chalcogenides (GIVMCs) have drawn much attention recently due to their earth‐abundant, low‐cost, and environmentally friendly characteristics, thus catering well to the sustainable electronics and optoelectronics applications. In this instructive review, the booming research advancements of 2D GIVMCs in the last few years have been presented. First, the unique crystal and electronic structures are introduced, suggesting novel physical properties. Then the various methods adopted for synthesis of 2D GIVMCs are summarized such as mechanical exfoliation, solvothermal method, and vapor deposition. Furthermore, the review focuses on the applications in field effect transistors and photodetectors based on 2D GIVMCs, and extends to flexible devices. Additionally, the 2D GIVMCs based ternary alloys and heterostructures have also been presented, as well as the applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Finally, the conclusion and outlook have also been presented in the end of the review. PMID:27981008

  12. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  13. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  14. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  15. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  16. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  17. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  18. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  19. Apparent Low-Energy Scale Invariance in Two-Dimensional Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward

    2013-05-01

    Strongly-interacting systems in two dimensions have occupied a central position in the study of quantum materials. From high temperature superconductors to the Hall effect in two-dimensional electron gases, strong quantum and thermal fluctuations conspire to make this an extremely rich yet poorly-understood regime to work in. Several remarkable and surprising recent experiments in ultracold atomic gases show us that there are puzzles to be understood even in the simplest nontrivial two-dimensional system: a dilute quantum gas with strong s-wave interactions. Amongst these is an experiment that finds an undamped breathing mode oscillating at twice the trap frequency over a wide range of parameters, behaviour nominally associated with scale invariance, even though scale invariance is strictly broken in this system by a finite s-wave scattering length. This apparent scale symmetry is all the more remarkable given that the mean-field BCS theory for the 2D gas predicts an exact low-energy scale invariance, relevant to the low-energy breathing mode, meaning that only quantum and thermal fluctuations can break this low-energy scale symmetry. Understanding why the symmetry breaking is so weak may give insight into how to make reliable theoretical predictions in systems with strong fluctuation effects, where there is no obvious small parameter from which a perturbation expansion can be formulated. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1006532 (Mohit Randeria), NSERC, and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  20. Homogeneous Atomic Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Yan, Zhenjie; Patel, Parth B.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Yefsah, Tarik; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the creation of homogeneous Fermi gases of ultracold atoms in a uniform potential. In the momentum distribution of a spin-polarized gas, we observe the emergence of the Fermi surface and the saturated occupation of one particle per momentum state: the striking consequence of Pauli blocking in momentum space for a degenerate gas. Cooling a spin-balanced Fermi gas at unitarity, we create homogeneous superfluids and observe spatially uniform pair condensates. For thermodynamic measurements, we introduce a hybrid potential that is harmonic in one dimension and uniform in the other two. The spatially resolved compressibility reveals the superfluid transition in a spin-balanced Fermi gas, saturation in a fully polarized Fermi gas, and strong attraction in the polaronic regime of a partially polarized Fermi gas.

  1. Density functional theory for atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ping Nang; Pilati, Sebastiano; Troyer, Matthias; Dai, Xi

    2012-08-01

    The interplay between interaction and inhomogeneity for electrons in solids generates many interesting phenomena, including insulating and metallic behaviour, magnetism, superconductivity, quantum criticality and more exotic phases. Many of the same phenomena appear in ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices, which provide clean, controlled and tunable `quantum simulators' to explore the intriguing physics of fermionic systems. Although density functional theory (DFT) is widely used to calculate material properties, it has not yet been applied to cold atomic gases in optical lattices. Here we present a new density functional for short-range interactions (as opposed to Coulomb interactions of electrons), which renders DFT suitable for atomic Fermi gases. This grants us access to an extensive toolset, previously developed for materials simulations, to calculate the static and dynamic properties of atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices and external potentials. Ultracold atom quantum simulators can in turn be used to explore limitations of DFT functionals, and to further improve hybrid functionals, thus forming a bridge between materials simulations and atomic physics.

  2. 2D Radiative Transfer in Magnetically Confined Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.; Anzer, U.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetically confined structures in the solar atmosphere exhibit a large complexity in their shapes and physical conditions. As an example, we show the case of so-called magnetic dips in prominences which are in magnetohydrostatic equilibria. For such models we solve 2D non-LTE multilevel problem for hydrogen with PRD in Lyman resonance lines. The iterative technique used is based on the MALI approach with simple diagonal ALO and SC formal solver. To compute the hydrogen ionization balance, the preconditioned MALI equations are linearized with respect to atomic level populations and electron density and solved iteratively using the Newton-Raphson scheme. Two additional problems are addressed: (i) an adequate iteration method for cases when the column-mass scale is used in one of the two dimensions but varies along the other dimension (which has a geometrical scaling); and (ii) a possibility of using AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) algorithms to account for steep 2D gradients of selected variables (temperature, density, etc.).

  3. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on an equal footing. Electron bandstructure is treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are consistent with 1D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller leakage current than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current.

  4. Gases in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2003-12-01

    The annual gross and net primary productivity of the surface oceans is similar in size to that on land (IPCC, 2001). Marine productivity drives the cycling of gases such as oxygen (O2), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methyl iodide (CH3I) which are of fundamental importance in studies of marine productivity, biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health, respectively. For example, ˜30% of the world's population (1,570 million) is thought to be at risk of iodine-deficiency disorders that impair mental development (WHO, 1996). The main source of iodine to land is the supply of volatile iodine compounds produced in the ocean and then transferred to the atmosphere via the air-surface interface. The flux of these marine iodine species to the atmosphere is also thought to be important in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere by the production of the iodine oxide radical ( Alicke et al., 1999). A further example is that the net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the ocean, ˜1.7±0.5 Gt C yr-1, represents ˜30% of the annual release of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere (IPCC, 2001). This net flux is superimposed on a huge annual flux (90 Gt C yr-1) of CO2 that is cycled "naturally" between the ocean and the atmosphere. The long-term sink for anthropogenic CO2 is recognized as transfer to the ocean from the atmosphere. A final example is the emission of volatile sulfur, in the form of DMS, from the oceans. Not only is an oceanic flux from the oceans needed to balance the loss of sulfur (a bioessential element) from the land via weathering, it has also been proposed as having a major control on climate due to the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (Charlson et al., 1987). Indeed, the existence of DMS and CH3I has been used as evidence in support of the Gaia hypothesis (Lovelock, 1979).There are at least four main processes that affect the concentration of gases in the water column: biological

  5. Interpretive 2-D treatment of scrape-off-layer plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M.; Allen, A.; Daughton, W.

    1996-12-31

    The width of the scrape-off-layer in a tokamak is determined by cross field transport. In Alcator C-mod the plasma parameters in the scrape-off-layer are measured at upstream and divertor plate locations. We solve a 2-D scrape-off-layer heat conduction equation in the flux geometry (as determined by EFIT) of the C-mod experiment. Bolometric measurements are utilized for the radiative loss term. We use the end wall probe measurements of electron temperature as a boundary condition and the fast scanning probe measurements of upstream temperature are treated as constraints to determine the cross field transport and thermal conductivity. Results are compared with 1-D onion-skin-model predictions.

  6. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  7. SEM signal emulation for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Evgenii; Muelders, Thomas; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Braylovska, Mariya

    2016-03-01

    The application of accurate and predictive physical resist simulation is seen as one important use model for fast and efficient exploration of new patterning technology options, especially if fully qualified OPC models are not yet available at an early pre-production stage. The methodology of using a top-down CD-SEM metrology to extract the 3D resist profile information, such as the critical dimension (CD) at various resist heights, has to be associated with a series of presumptions which may introduce such small, but systematic CD errors. Ideally, the metrology effects should be carefully minimized during measurement process, or if possible be taken into account through proper metrology modeling. In this paper we discuss the application of a fast SEM signal emulation describing the SEM image formation. The algorithm is applied to simulated resist 3D profiles and produces emulated SEM image results for 1D and 2D patterns. It allows estimating resist simulation quality by comparing CDs which were extracted from the emulated and from the measured SEM images. Moreover, SEM emulation is applied for resist model calibration to capture subtle error signatures through dose and defocus. Finally, it should be noted that our SEM emulation methodology is based on the approximation of physical phenomena which are taking place in real SEM image formation. This approximation allows achieving better speed performance compared to a fully physical model.

  8. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  9. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  10. Lagrangian statistics in laboratory 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hua; Francois, Nicolas; Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent mixing in liquids and gases is ubiquitous in nature and industrial flows. Understanding statistical properties of Lagrangian trajectories in turbulence is crucial for a range of problems such as spreading of plankton in the ocean, transport of pollutants, etc. Oceanic data on trajectories of the free-drifting instruments, indicate that the trajectory statistics can often be described by a Lagrangian integral scale. Turbulence however is a state of a flow dominated by a hierarchy of scales, and it is not clear which of these scales mostly affect particle dispersion. Moreover, coherent structures often coexist with turbulence in laboratory experiments [1]. The effect of coherent structures on particle dispersion in turbulent flows is not well understood. Recent progress in scientific imaging and computational power made it possible to tackle this problem experimentally. In this talk, we report the analysis of the higher order Lagrangian statistics in laboratory two-dimensional turbulence. Our results show that fluid particle dispersion is diffusive and it is determined by a single measurable Lagrangian scale related to the forcing scale [2]. Higher order moments of the particle dispersion show strong self-similarity in fully developed turbulence [3]. Here we introduce a new dispersion law that describes single particle dispersion during the turbulence development [4]. These results offer a new way of predicting dispersion in turbulent flows in which one of the low energy scales are persistent. It may help better understanding of drifter Lagrangian statistics in the regions of the ocean where small scale coherent eddies are present [5]. Reference: 1. H. Xia, H. Punzmann, G. Falkovich and M. Shats, Physical Review Letters, 101, 194504 (2008) 2. H. Xia, N. Francois, H. Punzmann, and M. Shats, Nature Communications, 4, 2013 (2013) 3. R. Ferrari, A.J. Manfroi , W.R. Young, Physica D 154 111 (2001) 4. H. Xia, N. Francois, H. Punzmann and M. Shats, submitted (2014

  11. Precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Qian, Y.; Gao, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca. The measurement was performed using a high-efficiency quantum-state detection technique to monitor quantum jumps and a high-precision and highly synchronous measurement sequence for laser control. A feature in our measurement is the pumping rate of the 729-nm laser that was corrected in a real-time way. The 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime was obtained through the measurement of the spontaneous decay rate after incoherent shelving of the ion to the 3 d 3/2 2D state with a wait time. Systematic errors, such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates, and state detection, were carefully analyzed and estimated. We determined an improved value of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime to be τ3 /2=1.195 (8 ) s. Furthermore, the 3 d 3/2 2D →4 s 1/2 2S quadrupole transition matrix element was measured to be Sk i=7.936 (26 ) e a02 , and the ratio between the lifetimes of 3 d 2D3 /2 and 3 d 2D5 /2 was determined to be 1.018(11). Our method can be universally applied to lifetime measurements of other single ions and atoms with a similar structure.

  12. Disorder and interaction in 2D: exact diagonalization study of the Anderson-Hubbard-Mott model.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, R; Das Sarma, S

    2001-03-12

    We investigate, by numerically calculating the charge stiffness, the effects of random diagonal disorder and electron-electron interaction on the nature of the ground state in the 2D Hubbard model through the finite-size exact diagonalization technique. By comparing with the corresponding 1D Hubbard model results and by using heuristic arguments we conclude that it is unlikely that there is a 2D metal-insulator quantum phase transition, although the effect of interaction in some range of parameters is to substantially enhance the noninteracting charge stiffness.

  13. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  14. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Appenzeller, J

    2015-12-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  15. On the current drive capability of low dimensional semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-29

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Lastly, our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  16. Silicene, a promising new 2D material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughaddou, Hamid; Enriquez, Hanna; Tchalala, Mohammed Rachid; Yildirim, Handan; Mayne, Andrew J.; Bendounan, Azzedine; Dujardin, Gérald; Ait Ali, Mustapha; Kara, Abdelkader

    2015-02-01

    Silicene is emerging as a two-dimensional material with very attractive electronic properties for a wide range of applications; it is a particularly promising material for nano-electronics in silicon-based technology. Over the last decade, the existence and stability of silicene has been the subject of much debate. Theoretical studies were the first to predict a puckered honeycomb structure with electronic properties resembling those of graphene. Though these studies were for free-standing silicene, experimental fabrication of silicene has been achieved so far only through epitaxial growth on crystalline surfaces. Indeed, it was only in 2010 that researchers presented the first experimental evidence of the formation of silicene on Ag(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 1), which has launched silicene in a similar way to graphene. This very active field has naturally led to the recent growth of silicene on Ir(1 1 1), ZrB2(0 0 0 1) and Au(1 1 0) substrates. However, the electronic properties of epitaxially grown silicene on metal surfaces are influenced by the strong silicene-metal interactions. This has prompted experimental studies of the growth of multi-layer silicene, though the nature of its "silicene" structure remains questionable. Of course, like graphene, synthesizing free-standing silicene represents the ultimate challenge. A first step towards this has been reported recently through chemical exfoliation from calcium disilicide (CaSi2). In this review, we discuss the experimental and theoretical studies of silicene performed to date. Special attention is given to different experimental studies of the electronic properties of silicene on metal substrates. New avenues for the growth of silicene on other substrates with different chemical characteristics are presented along with foreseeable applications such as nano-devices and novel batteries.

  17. Hydrostatic pressure response of an oxide-based two-dimensional electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabaleta, J.; Borisov, V. S.; Wanke, R.; Jeschke, H. O.; Parks, S. C.; Baum, B.; Teker, A.; Harada, T.; Syassen, K.; Kopp, T.; Pavlenko, N.; Valentí, R.; Mannhart, J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron systems with fascinating properties exist in multilayers of standard semiconductors, on helium surfaces, and in oxides. Compared to the two-dimensional (2D) electron gases of semiconductors, the 2D electron systems in oxides are typically more strongly correlated and more sensitive to the microscopic structure of the hosting lattice. This sensitivity suggests that the oxide 2D systems are highly tunable by hydrostatic pressure. Here we explore the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the well-characterized 2D electron system formed at LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interfaces [A. Ohtomo and H. Y. Hwang, Nature (London) 427, 423 (2004), 10.1038/nature02308] and measure a pronounced, unexpected response. Pressure of ˜2 GPa reversibly doubles the 2D carrier density ns at 4 K. Along with the increase of ns, the conductivity and mobility are reduced under pressure. First-principles pressure simulations reveal the same behavior of the carrier density and suggest a possible mechanism of the mobility reduction, based on the dielectric properties of both materials and their variation under external pressure.

  18. Few-layer III-VI and IV-VI 2D semiconductor transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Liu, Mei; Kumar, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang C.; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Gao, Xuan

    Since the discovery of atomically thin graphene, a large variety of exfoliable 2D materials have been thoroughly explored for their exotic transport behavior and promises in technological breakthroughs. While most attention on 2D materials beyond graphene is focused on transition metal-dichalcogenides, relatively less attention is paid to layered III-VI and IV-VI semiconductors such as InSe, SnSe etc which bear stronger potential as 2D materials with high electron mobility or thermoelectric figure of merit. We will discuss our recent work on few-layer InSe 2D field effect transistors which exhibit carrier mobility approaching 1000 cm2/Vs and ON-OFF ratio exceeding 107 at room temperature. In addition, the fabrication and device performance of transistors made of mechanically exfoliated multilayer IV-VI semiconductor SnSe and SnSe2 will be discussed.

  19. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  20. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  1. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  2. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  3. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  4. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  5. Electronic transport in graphene-based heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, J. Y.; Avsar, A.; Balakrishnan, J.; Taychatanapat, T.; O'Farrell, E. C. T.; Eda, G.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Koon, G. K. W.; Özyilmaz, B.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.

    2014-05-05

    While boron nitride (BN) substrates have been utilized to achieve high electronic mobilities in graphene field effect transistors, it is unclear how other layered two dimensional (2D) crystals influence the electronic performance of graphene. In this Letter, we study the surface morphology of 2D BN, gallium selenide (GaSe), and transition metal dichalcogenides (tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2})) crystals and their influence on graphene's electronic quality. Atomic force microscopy analysis shows that these crystals have improved surface roughness (root mean square value of only ∼0.1 nm) compared to conventional SiO{sub 2} substrate. While our results confirm that graphene devices exhibit very high electronic mobility (μ) on BN substrates, graphene devices on WS{sub 2} substrates (G/WS{sub 2}) are equally promising for high quality electronic transport (μ ∼ 38 000 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature), followed by G/MoS{sub 2} (μ ∼ 10 000 cm{sup 2}/V s) and G/GaSe (μ ∼ 2200 cm{sup 2}/V s). However, we observe a significant asymmetry in electron and hole conduction in G/WS{sub 2} and G/MoS{sub 2} heterostructures, most likely due to the presence of sulphur vacancies in the substrate crystals. GaSe crystals are observed to degrade over time even under ambient conditions, leading to a large hysteresis in graphene transport making it a less suitable substrate.

  6. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-02-05

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics.

  7. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics. PMID:26846617

  8. Environmental implications of anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Yasny, Jeffrey S; White, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, anesthetic gases have greatly enhanced the comfort and outcome for patients during surgery. The benefits of these agents have heavily outweighed the risks. In recent years, the attention towards their overall contribution to global climate change and the environment has increased. Anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by utilizing techniques that can lessen any adverse effects of these gases on the environment. Moreover, health care facilities that use anesthetic gases are accountable for ensuring that all anesthesia equipment, including the scavenging system, is effective and routinely maintained. Implementing preventive practices and simple strategies can promote the safest and most healthy environment.

  9. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  10. 2D/2D nano-hybrids of γ-MnO₂ on reduced graphene oxide for catalytic ozonation and coupling peroxymonosulfate activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxian; Xie, Yongbing; Sun, Hongqi; Xiao, Jiadong; Cao, Hongbin; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-01-15

    Two-dimensional reduced graphene oxide (2D rGO) was employed as both a shape-directing medium and support to fabricate 2D γ-MnO2/2D rGO nano-hybrids (MnO2/rGO) via a facile hydrothermal route. For the first time, the 2D/2D hybrid materials were used for catalytic ozonation of 4-nitrophenol. The catalytic efficiency of MnO2/rGO was much higher than either MnO2 or rGO only, and rGO was suggested to play the role for promoting electron transfers. Quenching tests using tert-butanol, p-benzoquinone, and sodium azide suggested that the major radicals responsible for 4-nitrophenol degradation and mineralization are O2(-) and (1)O2, but not ·OH. Reusability tests demonstrated a high stability of the materials in catalytic ozonation with minor Mn leaching below 0.5 ppm. Degradation mechanism, reaction kinetics, reusability and a synergistic effect between catalytic ozonation and coupling peroxymonosulfate (PMS) activation were also discussed.

  11. Quasi 2D Materials: Raman Nanometrology and Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahil, Khan Mohammad Farhan

    Quasi two-dimensional (2D) materials obtained by the "graphene-like" exfoliation attracted tremendous attention. Such materials revealed unique electronic, thermal and optical properties, which can be potentially used in electronics, thermal management and energy conversion. This dissertation research addresses two separate but synergetic problems: (i) preparation and optical characterization of quasi-2D films of the bismuth-telluride (Bi 2Te3) family of materials, which demonstrate both thermoelectric and topological insulator properties; and (ii) investigation of thermal properties of composite materials prepared with graphene and few-layer graphene (FLG). The first part of dissertation reports properties of the exfoliated few-quintuple layers of Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and Sb 2Te3. Both non-resonant and resonant Raman scattering spectra have been investigated. It was found that the crystal symmetry breaking in few-quintuple films results in appearance of A1u-symmetry Raman peaks, which are not active in the bulk crystals. The scattering spectra measured under the 633-nm wavelength excitation reveals a number of resonant features, which could be used for analysis of the electronic and phonon processes in these materials. The obtained results help to understand the physical mechanisms of Raman scattering in the few-quintuple-thick films and can be used for nanometrology of topological insulator films on various substrates. The second part of the dissertation is dedicated to investigation of properties of composite materials prepared with graphene and FLG. It was found that the optimized mixture of graphene and multilayer graphene---produced by the high-yield inexpensive liquid-phase-exfoliation technique---can lead to an extremely strong enhancement of the cross-plane thermal conductivity K of the composite. The "laser flash" measurements revealed a record-high enhancement of K by 2300 % in the graphene-based polymer at the filler loading fraction f =10 vol. %. It was

  12. Study of the heterointerfaces InSe on GaSe and GaSe on InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargues, D.; Brahim-Otsmane, L.; Eddrief, M.; Sébenne, C.; Balkanski, M.

    1993-03-01

    InSe and GaSe thin films are grown on freshly cleaved (00.1) substrates of GaSe and InSe, respectively, by molecular beam epitaxy. They are studied in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). From the attenuation curves of the XPS substrate core level peaks, the quasi layer-by-layer growth is shown during the first stages of deposition in agreement with RHEED results. But both interfaces are not totally symmetrical. For InSe on GaSe(00.1), the sharpness of the interface is shown and the conditions of growth are well established. For GaSe on InSe(00.1), the sharpness of the interface can also be suggested although it is less clear; this is related to the growth conditions.

  13. Laboratory studies on N(2D) reactions of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, N.; Casavecchia, P.

    Molecular nitrogen is a very stable molecule, practically inert from a chemical point of view. For a nitrogen chemistry to occur in the planetary atmospheres which contain N2 , it is necessary to transform it into an active form, such as atoms or ions. As far as the production of atomic nitrogen in the upper atmospheres of planets (like Mars) or moons (like Titan) is concerned, several processes - as N2 dissociation induced by electron impact, EUV photolysis (λ <80 nm) and dissociative photoionization, or galactic cosmic ray absorption and N+ dissociative recombination all 2 lead to atomic nitrogen, notably in the ground, 4 S3/2 , and first electronically excited, 2 D3/2,5/2 , states with comparable yields. The radiative lifetimes of the metastable states 2 D3/2 and 2 D5/2 are quite long (12.3 and 48 hours, respectively), because the transition from a doublet to a quartet state is strongly forbidden. In addition, the physical quenching of N(2 D) is often a slow process and in some important cases the main fate of N(2 D) is chemical reaction with other constituents of the planetary atmospheres. The production of N atoms in the 2 D state is an important fact, because N(4 S) atoms exhibit very low reactivity with closed-shell molecules and the probability of collision with an open-shell radical is small. Unfortunately laboratory experiments on the gas-phase reactions of N(2 D) have been lacking until recently, because of serious experimental difficulties in studying these reactive systems. Accurate kinetic data on the reactions of N(2 D) with the some molecules of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres have finally become available in the late 90's, but a better knowledge of the reactive behavior requires a dynamical investigation of N(2 D) reactions. The capability of generating intense continuous beams of N(2 D) achieved in our laboratory some years ago has opened up the possibility of studying the reactive scattering of this species under single

  14. Photocarrier transport in 2D macroporous silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Onyshchenko, V.; Sachenko, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mechanisms of photocarrier transport through a barrier in the surface space-charge region (SCR) of 2D macroporous silicon structures have been studied at photon energies comparable to that of the silicon indirect band-to-band transition. It was found that the photoconductivity relaxation time was determined by the light modulation of barrier on the macropore surface; as a result, the relaxation itself obeyed the logarithmic law. The temperature dependence of the photoconductivity relaxation time was determined by the thermionic emission mechanism of the current transport in the SCR at temperatures T > 180 K, and by the tunnel current flow at T < 100 K, with temperature-independent tunnelling probability. The photo-emf was found to become saturated or reverse its sign to negative at temperatures below 130 K because of light absorption due to optical transitions via surface electronic states close to the silicon conduction band. In this case, the surface band bending increases due to the growth of a negative charge of the semiconductor surface. The equilibrium electrons in the bulk and photoexcited holes on the macropore surface recombine through the channel of multistage tunnel recombination between the conduction and valence bands.

  15. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  16. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  17. 2D Quantum Mechanical Study of Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density-gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. Surprisingly, the self-consistent potential profile shows lower injection barrier in the channel in quantum case. These results are qualitatively consistent with ID Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  18. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  19. Efficient screening of 2D molecular polymorphs at the solution-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shern-Long; Adisoejoso, Jinne; Fang, Yuan; Tahara, Kazukuni; Tobe, Yoshito; Mali, Kunal S.; de Feyter, Steven

    2015-03-01

    gradient along the substrate surface. In situ generation of such gradient allows rapid discovery and nanoscale separation of multiple 2D polymorphs in a single experiment. The concept is demonstrated using three structurally different building blocks that differ in terms of intermolecular interactions responsible for 2D crystal formation. The method described here represents a powerful tool for efficient screening of 2D polymorphs formed at the solution-solid interface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional STM data. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06808d

  20. Crab Chitin-Based 2D Soft Nanomaterials for Fully Biobased Electric Devices.

    PubMed

    You, Jun; Li, Mingjie; Ding, Beibei; Wu, Xiaochen; Li, Chaoxu

    2017-03-17

    2D nanomaterials have various size/morphology-dependent properties applicable in electronics, optics, sensing, and actuating. However, intensively studied inorganic 2D nanomaterials are frequently hindered to apply in some particular and industrial fields, owing to harsh synthesis, high-cost, cytotoxicity, and nondegradability. Endeavor has been made to search for biobased 2D nanomaterials with biocompatibility, sustainability, and biodegradability. A method of hydrophobization-induced interfacial-assembly is reported to produce an unprecedented type of nanosheets from marine chitin. During this process, two layers of chitin aggregations assemble into nanosheets with high aspect ratio. With super stability and amphiphilicity, these nanosheets have super ability in creating highly stable Pickering emulsions with internal phase up to 83.4% and droplet size up to 140 μm, in analogue to graphene oxide. Combining emulsifying and carbonization can further convert these 2D precursors to carbon nanosheets with thickness as low as ≈3.8 nm. Having biologic origin, conductivity, and dispersibility in various solvents, resultant carbon nanosheets start a new scenario of exploiting marine resources for fully biobased electric devices with sustainability and biodegradability, e.g., supercapacitor, flexible circuits, and electronic sensors. Hybrid films of chitin and carbon nanosheets also offer low-cost and environment-friendly alternative of conductive components desirable in green electronics, wearable electronics, biodegradable circuits, and biologic devices.

  1. Lipid-gramicidin interactions: dynamic structure of the boundary lipid by 2D-ELDOR.

    PubMed

    Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Crepeau, Richard H; Borbat, Petr P; Ge, Mingtao; Freed, Jack H

    2003-05-01

    The use of 2D-electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) for the characterization of the boundary lipid in membrane vesicles of DPPC and gramicidin A' (GA) is reported. We show that 2D-ELDOR, with its enhanced spectral resolution to dynamic structure as compared with continuous-wave electron spin resonance, provides a reliable and useful way of studying lipid-protein interactions. The 2D-ELDOR spectra of the end-chain spin label 16-PC in DPPC/GA vesicles is composed of two components, which are assigned to the bulk lipids (with sharp auto peaks and crosspeaks) and to the boundary lipids (with broad auto peaks). Their distinction is clearest for higher temperatures and higher GA concentrations. The quantitative analysis of these spectra shows relatively faster motions and very low ordering for the end chain of the bulk lipids, whereas the boundary lipids show very high "y-ordering" and slower motions. The y-ordering represents a dynamic bending at the end of the boundary lipid acyl chain, which can then coat the GA molecules. These results are consistent with the previous studies by Ge and Freed (1999) using continuous-wave electron spin resonance, thereby supporting their model for GA aggregation and H(II) phase formation for high GA concentrations. Improved instrumental and simulation methods have been employed.

  2. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  3. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    DOE PAGES

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; ...

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate bymore » pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.« less

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Cytochrome P450 2D6 with Prinomastat Bound*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An; Savas, Uzen; Hsu, Mei-Hui; Stout, C. David; Johnson, Eric F.

    2012-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2D6 contributes to the metabolism of >15% of drugs used in clinical practice. This study determined the structure of P450 2D6 complexed with a substrate and potent inhibitor, prinomastat, to 2.85 Å resolution by x-ray crystallography. Prinomastat binding is well defined by electron density maps with its pyridyl nitrogen bound to the heme iron. The structure of ligand-bound P450 2D6 differs significantly from the ligand-free structure reported for the P450 2D6 Met-374 variant (Protein Data Bank code 2F9Q). Superposition of the structures reveals significant differences for β sheet 1, helices A, F, F′, G″, G, and H as well as the helix B-C loop. The structure of the ligand complex exhibits a closed active site cavity that conforms closely to the shape of prinomastat. The closure of the open cavity seen for the 2F9Q structure reflects a change in the direction and pitch of helix F and introduction of a turn at Gly-218, which is followed by a well defined helix F′ that was not observed in the 2F9Q structure. These differences reflect considerable structural flexibility that is likely to contribute to the catalytic versatility of P450 2D6, and this new structure provides an alternative model for in silico studies of substrate interactions with P450 2D6. PMID:22308038

  5. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  6. Synthesis, properties and applications of 2D non-graphene materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhenxing; Wang, Qisheng; Wang, Fengmei; Yin, Lei; Xu, Kai; Huang, Yun; He, Jun

    2015-07-24

    As an emerging class of new materials, two-dimensional (2D) non-graphene materials, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in electronics, optoelectronics and clean energy. In contrast to traditional semiconductors, such as Si, Ge and III-V group materials, 2D materials show significant merits of ultrathin thickness, very high surface-to-volume ratio, and high compatibility with flexible devices. Owing to these unique properties, while scaling down to ultrathin thickness, devices based on these materials as well as artificially synthetic heterostructures exhibit novel and surprising functions and performances. In this review, we aim to provide a summary on the state-of-the-art research activities on 2D non-graphene materials. The scope of the review will cover the preparation of layered and non-layered 2D materials, construction of 2D vertical van der Waals and lateral ultrathin heterostructures, and especially focus on the applications in electronics, optoelectronics and clean energy. Moreover, the review is concluded with some perspectives on the future developments in this field.

  7. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  8. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  9. Bioinspired 2D-Carbon Flakes and Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Composite for Arsenite Removal.

    PubMed

    Venkateswarlu, Sada; Lee, Daeho; Yoon, Minyoung

    2016-09-14

    Development of carbon-based materials has received tremendous attention owing to their multifunctional properties. Biomaterials often serve as an inspiration for the preparation of new carbon materials. Herein, we present a facile synthesis of a new bioinspired graphene oxide-like 2D-carbon flake (CF) using a natural resource, waste onion sheathing (Allium cepa). The 2D-CF was further decorated with crystalline Fe3O4 nanoparticles for applications. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (7 nm) were well-dispersed on the surface of the 2D-CF, which was characterized by X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy. Batch As(III) adsorption experiments showed that aqueous arsenic ions strongly adsorbed to the Fe3O4@2D-CF composite. The adsorption capacity of the Fe3O4@2D-CF composite for As(III) was 57.47 mg g(-1). The synergetic effect of both graphene oxide-like 2D-CF and Fe3O4 nanoparticles aided in excellent As(III) adsorption. An As(III) ion adsorption kinetics study showed that adsorption was very fast at the initial stage, and equilibrium was reached within 60 min following a pseudo-second-order rate model. Owing to the excellent superparamagnetic properties (52.6 emu g(-1)), the Fe3O4@2D-CF composite exhibited superb reusability with the shortest recovery time (28 s) among reported materials. This study indicated that Fe3O4@2D-CF composites can be used for practical applications as a global economic material for future generations.

  10. 2D-MoO3 nanosheets for superior gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Fangxu; Ren, Xianpei; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Liu, Yucheng; Pang, Liuqing; Jiang, Jiaxing; Liu, Shengzhong (Frank)

    2016-04-01

    By taking advantages of both grinding and sonication, an effective exfoliation process is developed to prepare two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxide (MoO3) nanosheets. The approach avoids high-boiling-point solvents that would leave a residue and cause aggregation. Gas sensors fabricated using the 2D-MoO3 nanosheets provide a significantly enhanced chemical sensor performance. Compared with the sensors using bulk MoO3, the response of the 2D-MoO3 sensor increases from 7 to 33; the sensor response time is reduced from 27 to 21 seconds, and the recovery time is shortened from 26 to 10 seconds. We attribute the superior performance to the 2D-structure with a much increased surface area and reactive sites.By taking advantages of both grinding and sonication, an effective exfoliation process is developed to prepare two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxide (MoO3) nanosheets. The approach avoids high-boiling-point solvents that would leave a residue and cause aggregation. Gas sensors fabricated using the 2D-MoO3 nanosheets provide a significantly enhanced chemical sensor performance. Compared with the sensors using bulk MoO3, the response of the 2D-MoO3 sensor increases from 7 to 33; the sensor response time is reduced from 27 to 21 seconds, and the recovery time is shortened from 26 to 10 seconds. We attribute the superior performance to the 2D-structure with a much increased surface area and reactive sites. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00880a

  11. Human Liver Mitochondrial Cytochrome P450 2D6: Individual Variations and Implications in Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cook Sangar, Michelle L.; Anandatheerthavarada, Hindupur K.; Tang, Weigang; Prabu, Subbuswamy K.; Martin, Martha V.; Dostalek, Miroslav; Guengerich, F. Peter; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Constitutively expressed human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is responsible for the metabolism of approximately 25% of drugs in common clinical use. It is widely accepted that CYP2D6 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells; however, we have identified this enzyme in the mitochondria of human liver samples and found that extensive inter-individual variability exists in the level of the mitochondrial enzyme. Metabolic assays using 7-methoxy-4-aminomethylcoumarin as a substrate show that the human liver mitochondrial enzyme is capable of oxidizing this substrate and that the catalytic activity is supported by mitochondrial electron transfer proteins. Here we show that CYP2D6 contains an N-terminal chimeric signal that mediates its bimodal targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. In vitro mitochondrial import studies using both N-terminal deletions and point mutations suggest that the mitochondrial targeting signal is localized between residues 23-33 and that the positively charged residues at positions 24, 25, 26, 28, and 32 are required for mitochondrial targeting. The importance of the positively charged residues was confirmed by transient transfection of a CYP2D6 mitochondrial targeting signal mutant in COS-7 cells. Both the mitochondria and the microsomes from a CYP2D6 stable expression cell line contain the enzyme and both fractions exhibit bufuralol 1′-hydroxylation activity, which is completely inhibited by CYP2D6 inhibitory antibody. Overall these results suggest that the targeting of CYP2D6 to mitochondria could be an important physiological process that has significance in xenobiotic metabolism. PMID:19438707

  12. Ultrafast dynamics of metal plasmons induced by 2D semiconductor excitons in hybrid nanostructure arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Wang, Kai; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lin, Ming -Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Xiao, Kai; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-17

    With the advanced progress achieved in the field of nanotechnology, localized surface plasmons resonances (LSPRs) are actively considered to improve the efficiency of metal-based photocatalysis, photodetection, and photovoltaics. Here, we report on the exchange of energy and electric charges in a hybrid composed of a two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayer and an array of aluminum (Al) nanodisks. Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy results indicate that within ~830 fs after photoexcitation of the 2D-WS2 semiconductor, energy transfer from the 2D-WS2 excitons excites the plasmons of the Al array. Then, upon the radiative and/or nonradiative damping of these excited plasmons, energy and/or electron transfer back to the 2D-WS2 semiconductor takes place as indicated by an increase in the reflected probe at the 2D exciton transition energies at later time-delays. This simultaneous exchange of energy and charges between the metal and the 2D-WS2 semiconductor resulted in an extension of the average lifetime of the 2D-excitons from ~15 to ~58 ps in absence and presence of the Al array, respectively. Furthermore, the indirectly excited plasmons were found to live as long as the 2D-WS2 excitons exist. Furthermore, the demonstrated ability to generate exciton-plasmons coupling in a hybrid nanostructure may open new opportunities for optoelectronic applications such as plasmonic-based photodetection and photocatalysis.

  13. D-dimensional Bose gases and the Lambert W function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguay, J.; Gil, M.; Jeffrey, D. J.; Valluri, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    The applications of the Lambert W function (also known as the W function) to D-dimensional Bose gases are presented. We introduce two sets of families of logarithmic transcendental equations that occur frequently in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics and present their solution in terms of the W function. The low temperature T behavior of free ideal Bose gases is considered in three and four dimensions. It is shown that near condensation in four dimensions, the chemical potential μ and pressure P can be expressed in terms of T through the W function. The low T behavior of one- and two-dimensional ideal Bose gases in a harmonic trap is studied. In 1D, the W function is used to express the condensate temperature, T_C, in terms of the number of particles N; in 2D, it is used to express μ in terms of T. In the low T limit of the 1D hard-core and the 3D Bose gas, T can be expressed in terms of P and μ through the W function. Our analysis allows for the possibility to consider μ, T, and P as complex variables. The importance of the underlying logarithmic structure in ideal quantum gases is seen in the polylogarithmic and W function expressions relating thermodynamic variables such as μ, T, and P.

  14. 2D Crystal heterostructures properties and growth by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Grace Huili

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystals such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) along with other families of layered materials including graphene, SnSe2, GaSe, BN etc, has attracted intense attention from the scientific community. One monolayer of such materials represent the thinnest ``quantum wells''. These layered materials typically possess an in-plane hexagonal crystal structure, and can be stacked together by interlayer van der Waals interactions. Therefore, it is possible to create novel heterostructures by stacking materials with large lattice mismatches and different properties, for instance, superconductors (NbSe2) , metals, semi-metals (graphene), semiconductors (MoS2) and insulators (BN). Numerous novel material properties and device concepts have been discovered, proposed and demonstrated lately. However, the low internal photoluminescence efficiency (IPE, <1%) and low carrier mobility observed in the 2D semiconductors suggest strongly that the materials under investigation today most likely suffer from a high concentration of defects. In this talk, I will share our progress and the challenges we face in terms of preparing, characterizing these 2D crystals as well as pursuing their applications. This work has been supported in part by NSF, AFOSR and LEAST, one of the STARnet centers.

  15. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  16. Sir William Ramsay and the noble gases.

    PubMed

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Ramsay was one of the world's leading scientists at the end of the 19th century, and in a spectacular period of research between 1894 and 1898, he discovered five new elements. These were the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon; they added a whole new group to the Periodic Table of the elements, and provided the keystone to our understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, and the way those electrons bind the atoms together into molecules. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904, the first such prize to come to a British subject. He was also a man of great charm, a good linguist, and a composer and performer of music, poetry and song. This review will trace his career, describe his character and give and account of the chemistry which led to the award of the Nobel Prize.

  17. Thermodynamic characteristics of Fermi gases in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lipovetskii, S.S.; Olesik, A.A.; Sekerzhitskii, V.S.

    1987-11-01

    Within the framework of statistical thermodynamics of equilibrium systems, general expressions are obtained for the chemical potential, pressure, and magnetic susceptibility for degenerate ideal nonrelativistic electron, proton, and neutron gases in magnetic fields, which exert no pronounced influence on the anomalous magnetic moments of the fermions.

  18. Band Gap Engineering in a 2D Material for Solar-to-Chemical Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Guo, Zhenkun; Mcwilliams, Peter E; Darges, John E; Druffel, Daniel L; Moran, Andrew M; Warren, Scott C

    2016-01-13

    The electronic structure of 2D semiconductors depends on their thickness, providing new opportunities to engineer semiconductors for energy conversion, electronics, and catalysis. Here we show how a 3D semiconductor, black phosphorus, becomes active for solar-to-chemical energy conversion when it is thinned to a 2D material. The increase in its band gap, from 0.3 eV (3D) to 2.1 eV (2D monolayer), is accompanied by a 40-fold enhancement in the formation of chemical products. Despite this enhancement, smaller flakes also have shorter excited state lifetimes. We deduce a mechanism in which recombination occurs at flake edges, while the "van der Waals" surface of black phosphorus bonds to chemical intermediates and facilitates electron transfer. The unique properties of black phosphorus highlight its potential as a customizable material for solar energy conversion and catalysis, while also allowing us to identify design rules for 2D photocatalysts that will enable further improvements in these materials.

  19. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  20. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  1. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  2. Ab initio modeling of 2D layered organohalide lead perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccarollo, Alberto; Cantatore, Valentina; Boschetto, Gabriele; Marchese, Leonardo; Cossi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    A number of 2D layered perovskites A2PbI4 and BPbI4, with A and B mono- and divalent ammonium and imidazolium cations, have been modeled with different theoretical methods. The periodic structures have been optimized (both in monoclinic and in triclinic systems, corresponding to eclipsed and staggered arrangements of the inorganic layers) at the DFT level, with hybrid functionals, Gaussian-type orbitals and dispersion energy corrections. With the same methods, the various contributions to the solid stabilization energy have been discussed, separating electrostatic and dispersion energies, organic-organic intralayer interactions and H-bonding effects, when applicable. Then the electronic band gaps have been computed with plane waves, at the DFT level with scalar and full relativistic potentials, and including the correlation energy through the GW approximation. Spin orbit coupling and GW effects have been combined in an additive scheme, validated by comparing the computed gap with well known experimental and theoretical results for a model system. Finally, various contributions to the computed band gaps have been discussed on some of the studied systems, by varying some geometrical parameters and by substituting one cation in another's place.

  3. Fracture morphology of 2-D carbon-carbon composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, W. B.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Out-of-plane tensile tests of a woven fabric carbon-carbon composite were performed in a scanning electron microscope equipped with a tensile stage and a videotape recording system. The composite was prepared from T-300 8-harness satin graphite fabric and a phenolic resin. The (0/90/0/90/0 sub 1/2) sub 2 laminate, with a Theta describing the orientation of the warp fibers of the fabric, was cured at 160 C and pyrolized at 871 C. This was followed by four cycles of resin impregnation, curing, and pyrolysis. A micrograph of the cross section of the composite is presented. Inspection of the specimen fracture surface revealed that the filaments had no residual matrix bonded to them. Further inspection revealed that the fracture was interlaminar in nature. Failure occurred where filaments of adjacent plies had the same orientation. Thus it is postulated that improvement in transverse tensile strength of 2-D carbon-carbon depends on the improvement of the filament-matrix bond strength.

  4. 2D Vortex Motion Driven by a Background Vorticity Gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schecter, D. A.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    1999-11-01

    A background vorticity gradient can strongly influence the motion of vortices in 2D fluids. Examples are vortex motion in magnetized electron plasmas and hurricane tracks in planetary atmospheres.(See for example Huang, Fine and Driscoll, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 4424 (1995); C.G. Rossby, J. Mar. Res. 7, 175 (1948). Here, the vortex motion is examined numerically and analytically for the case of a point-like vortex in a background shear flow that is initially axisymmetric. The vortex acts to level the local background vorticity gradient. Conservation of angular momentum dictates that positive vortices (``clumps'') and negative vortices (``holes'') react oppositely: clumps move up the gradient, whereas holes move down the gradient. Both clumps and holes can be classified as either prograde or retrograde, depending on whether they rotate with or against the local background shear. An analysis, in which the background response to the vortex is linearized, gives the trajectory of a small retrograde vortex. When the vortex is prograde, the background response is nonlinear. A prograde vortex moves along the gradient at a slower rate that is given by a simple ``mix-and-move'' estimate. This rate vanishes when the local shear is sufficiently large, due to the trapping of background fluid around the vortex.

  5. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anasori, Babak; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-01-01

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of 2D molybdenum carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGES

    Halim, Joseph; Kota, Sankalp; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; ...

    2016-02-17

    Large scale synthesis and delamination of 2D Mo2CT x (where T is a surface termination group) has been achieved by selectively etching gallium from the recently discovered nanolaminated, ternary transition metal carbide Mo2Ga2C. Different synthesis and delamination routes result in different flake morphologies. The resistivity of free-standing Mo2CT x films increases by an order of magnitude as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 10 K, suggesting semiconductor-like behavior of this MXene, in contrast to Ti3C2T x which exhibits metallic behavior. At 10 K, the magnetoresistance is positive. Additionally, changes in electronic transport are observed upon annealing of the films.more » When 2 μm thick films are tested as electrodes in supercapacitors, capacitances as high as 700 F cm–3 in a 1 m sulfuric acid electrolyte and high capacity retention for at least 10,000 cycles at 10 A g–1 are obtained. Free-standing Mo2CT x films, with ≈8 wt% carbon nanotubes, perform well when tested as an electrode material for Li-ions, especially at high rates. In conclusion, at 20 and 131 C cycling rates, stable reversible capacities of 250 and 76 mAh g–1, respectively, are achieved for over 1000 cycles.« less

  7. 2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2014-02-12

    The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

  8. Modulating the vibronic correlation in 2D superconductor by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazempour, Ali; Morshedloo, Toktam

    2017-04-01

    Superconductivity in the extreme two-dimensional atomic layers has been suffered because of the strong affection dimensionality confinement on electron-phonon binding. Here, using first-principles method, we study the effect of applied perpendicular and parallel electric field on the strength of phonon renormalization and electron-phonon coupling in bi-layer MgB2 as a known 2D superconductor. The changes of phonon frequency and line-width demonstrate that important E2 g optical modes are strongly sensitive to the applied parallel electric field which directs to sharp reduction of vibronic coupling. Whereas, we show that perpendicular electric field modulates the system to the strong-coupling superconductor and predict the enhancement of critical temperature Tc . Our study opens up the use of electric filed to probe and measure the variation amount of electron-phonon renormalization as a gauge in 2D superconductivity.

  9. Thermal Conductivity and Thermopower near the 2D Metal-Insulator transition, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2015-02-20

    STUDIES OF STRONGLY-INTERACTING 2D ELECTRON SYSTEMS – There is a great deal of current interest in the properties of systems in which the interaction between electrons (their potential energy) is large compared to their kinetic energy. We have investigated an apparent, unexpected metal-insulator transition inferred from the behavior of the temperature-dependence of the resistivity; moreover, detailed analysis of the behavior of the magnetoresistance suggests that the electrons’ effective mass diverges, supporting this scenario. Whether this is a true phase transition or crossover behavior has been strenuously debated over the past 20 years. Our measurements have now shown that the thermoelectric power of these 2D materials diverges at a finite density, providing clear evidence that this is, in fact, a phase transition to a new low-density phase which may be a precursor or a direct transition to the long sought-after electronic crystal predicted by Eugene Wigner in 1934.

  10. Impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the ozonosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the role of the greenhouse gases CO2 , CH4 , and N2 O in the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular in its recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abundance of the greenhouse gases on the dynamics of recovery of the Earth's ozone layer, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2 , essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weakness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification begins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard the expected recovery of the

  11. Landau levels in 2D materials using Wannier Hamiltonians obtained by first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, J. L.; Fernández-Rossier, J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a method to calculate the Landau levels and the corresponding edge states of two dimensional (2D) crystals using as a starting point their electronic structure as obtained from standard density functional theory (DFT). The DFT Hamiltonian is represented in the basis of maximally localized Wannier functions. This defines a tight-binding Hamiltonian for the bulk that can be used to describe other structures, such as ribbons, provided that atomic scale details of the edges are ignored. The effect of the orbital magnetic field is described using the Peierls substitution in the hopping matrix elements. Implementing this approach in a ribbon geometry, we obtain both the Landau levels and the dispersive edge states for a series of 2D crystals, including graphene, Boron Nitride, MoS2, Black Phosphorous, Indium Selenide and MoO3. Our procedure can readily be used in any other 2D crystal, and provides an alternative to effective mass descriptions.

  12. Tuning the hysteresis voltage in 2D multilayer MoS2 FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Zheng, Zhouming; Guo, Junjie

    2016-10-01

    The hysteresis tuning is of great significance before the two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) can be practically used in the next-generation nanoelectronic devices. In this paper, a simple and effective annealing method was developed to tune the hysteresis voltage in 2D MoS2 transistors. It was found that high temperature (175 °C) annealing in air could increase the hysteresis voltage from 8.0 V (original device) to 28.4 V, while a next vacuum annealing would reduce the hysteresis voltage to be only 2.0 V. An energyband diagram model based on electron trapping/detrapping due to oxygen adsorption is proposed to understand the hysteresis mechanism in multilayer MoS2 FET. This simple method for tuning the hysteresis voltage of MoS2 FET can make a significant step toward 2D nanoelectronic device applications.

  13. Effects of inert gases on fatigue crack growth and their transportation into subsurface regions in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Shimojo, M.; Higo, Y.; Oya-Seimiya, Y.

    2000-05-01

    To clarify the effects of inert gases on the fatigue behavior of titanium, fatigue crack growth tests were carried out in pure inert gases and in vacuum. Fatigue crack growth rates increased, and the fracture surface appearance was changed in inert gases, as compared to those in vacuum. The transportation of inert gases into subsurface regions of fracture surfaces was confirmed using Auger electron spectroscopy. This transportation is considered to be due to the reverse slip of slip planes on which inert gas atoms have adsorbed.

  14. Tuning the electronic properties at the surface of BaBiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreyra, C.; Guller, F.; Marchini, F.; Lüders, U.; Albornoz, C.; Leyva, A. G.; Williams, F. J.; Llois, A. M.; Vildosola, V.; Rubi, D.

    2016-06-01

    The presence of 2D electron gases at surfaces or interfaces in oxide thin films remains a hot topic in condensed matter physics. In particular, BaBiO3 appears as a very interesting system as it was theoretically proposed that its (001) surface should become metallic if a Bi-termination is achieved (Vildosola et al., PRL 110, 206805 (2013)). Here we report on the preparation by pulsed laser deposition and characterization of BaBiO3 thin films on silicon. We show that the texture of the films can be tuned by controlling the growth conditions, being possible to stabilize strongly (100)-textured films. We find significant differences on the spectroscopic and transport properties between (100)-textured and non-textured films. We rationalize these experimental results by performing first principles calculations, which indicate the existence of electron doping at the (100) surface. This stabilizes Bi ions in a 3+ state, shortens Bi-O bonds and reduces the electronic band gap, increasing the surface conductivity. Our results emphasize the importance of surface effects on the electronic properties of perovskites, and provide strategies to design novel oxide heterostructures with potential interface-related 2D electron gases.

  15. Energy Efficiency of D2D Multi-User Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zufan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-28

    The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication system is an important part of heterogeneous networks. It has great potential to improve spectrum efficiency, throughput and energy efficiency cooperation of multiple D2D users with the advantage of direct communication. When cooperating, D2D users expend extraordinary energy to relay data to other D2D users. Hence, the remaining energy of D2D users determines the life of the system. This paper proposes a cooperation scheme for multiple D2D users who reuse the orthogonal spectrum and are interested in the same data by aiming to solve the energy problem of D2D users. Considering both energy availability and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is introduced in the cooperation scheme to solve relay selection problems. Thus, the cooperation issue is transformed into a maximum weighted matching (MWM) problem. In order to enhance energy efficiency without the deterioration of Quality of Service (QoS), the link outage probability is derived according to the Shannon Equation by considering the data rate and delay. The simulation studies the relationships among the number of cooperative users, the length of shared data, the number of data packets and energy efficiency.

  16. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  17. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  18. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  19. Probing electric properties at the boundary of planar 2D heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jewook

    The quest for novel two-dimensional (2D) materials has led to the discovery of hybridized 2D atomic crystals. Especially, planar 2D heterostructure provides opportunities to explore fascinating electric properties at abrupt one-dimensional (1D) boundaries reminiscent to those seen in the 2D interfaces of complex oxides. By implementing the concept of epitaxy to 2D space, we developed a new growth technique to epitaxially grow hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) from the edges of graphene, forming a coherent planar heterostructure. At the interface of hBN and graphene, a polar-on-nonpolar 1D boundary can be formed which is expected to possess peculiar electronic states associated with the polarity of hBN and edge states of graphene Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S) measurements revealed an abrupt 1D zigzag oriented boundary, with boundary states about 0.6 eV below or above the Fermi level depending on the termination of the hBN at the boundary. The boundary states are extended along the boundary and exponentially decay into the bulk of graphene and hBN. Combined STM/S and first-principles theory study not only disclose spatial and energetic distribution of interfacial state but also reveal the origin of boundary states and the effect of the polarity discontinuity at the interface By probing electric properties at the boundary in the atomic scale, planar 2D heterostructure is demonstrated as a promising platform for discovering emergent phenomena at the 1D interface in 2D materials. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  20. A Large-Area Transferable Wide Band Gap 2D Silicon Dioxide Layer.

    PubMed

    Büchner, Christin; Wang, Zhu-Jun; Burson, Kristen M; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Heyde, Markus; Schlögl, Robert; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-23

    An atomically smooth silica bilayer is transferred from the growth substrate to a new support via mechanical exfoliation at millimeter scale. The atomic structure and morphology are maintained perfectly throughout the process. A simple heating treatment results in complete removal of the transfer medium. Low-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy show the success of the transfer steps. Excellent chemical and thermal stability result from the absence of dangling bonds in the film structure. By adding this wide band gap oxide to the toolbox of 2D materials, possibilities for van der Waals heterostructures will be broadened significantly.