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Sample records for 2d electron temperature

  1. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K. Sanpei, A. Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  2. Hartree-Fock Solutions of 2d Interacting Tight-Binding Electrons: Mott Properties and Room Temperature Superconductivity Indications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, A.; March, N. H.; Cabo-Bizet, A.

    2014-12-01

    Former results for a tight-binding (TB) model of CuO planes in La2CuO4 are reinterpreted here to underline their wider implications. It is noted that physical systems being appropriately described by the TB model can exhibit the main strongly correlated electron system (SCES) properties, when they are solved in the HF approximation, by also allowing crystal symmetry breaking effects and noncollinear spin orientations of the HF orbitals. It is argued how a simple 2D square lattice system of Coulomb interacting electrons can exhibit insulator gaps and pseudogap states, and quantum phase transitions as illustrated by the mentioned former works. A discussion is also presented here indicating the possibility of attaining room temperature superconductivity, by means of a surface coating with water molecules of cleaved planes of graphite, being orthogonal to its c-axis. The possibility that 2D arrays of quantum dots can give rise to the same effect is also proposed to consideration. The analysis also furnishes theoretical insight to solve the Mott-Slater debate, at least for the La2CuO4 and TMO band structures. The idea is to apply a properly noncollinear GW scheme to the electronic structure calculation of these materials. The fact is that the GW approach can be viewed as a HF procedure in which the screening polarization is also determined. This directly indicates the possibility of predicting the assumed dielectric constant in the previous works. Thus, the results seem to identify that the main correlation properties in these materials are determined by screening. Finally, the conclusions also seem to be of help for the description of the experimental observations of metal-insulator transitions and Mott properties in atoms trapped in planar photonic lattices.

  3. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  4. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  5. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  6. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  7. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  8. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  9. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  10. Temperature-driven disorder-order transitions in 2D copper-intercalated MoO3 revealed using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Bryan W.; Chung, Frank R.; Wang, Mengjing; LaGrange, Thomas; Koski, Kristie J.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate two different classes of disorder-order phase transitions in two-dimensional layered nanomaterial MoO3 intercalated with ˜9-15 atomic percent zero-valent copper using conventional in situ electron diffraction and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Heating to ˜325 °C on a time scale of minutes produces a superlattice consistent with the formation of a charge density wave stabilized by nanometer-scale ordering of the copper intercalant. Unlike conventional purely electronic charge-density-wave states which form, reform, and disappear on picosecond scales as the temperature is changed, once it forms the observed structure in Cu-MoO3 is stable indefinitely over a very large temperature range (30 °C to the decomposition temperature of 450 °C). Nanosecond-scale heating to ˜380-400 °C produced a completely different structure, replacing the disordered as-fabricated Cu-MoO3 with a much more crystallographically ordered metastable state that, according to a precession electron diffraction reconstruction, resembles the original MoO3 lattice apart from an asymmetric distortion that appears to expand parts of the van der Waals gaps to accommodate the copper intercalant. Control experiments in Cu-free material exhibited neither transformation, thus it appears the copper is a necessary part of the phase dynamics. This work shows how the combination of high-density metal atom intercalation and heat treatment over a wide range of time scales can produce nanomaterials of high crystalline quality in unique structural states that cannot be accessed through other methods.

  11. Splashing transients of 2D plasmons launched by swift electrons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao; Kaminer, Ido; Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Zhen; Buljan, Hrvoje; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Baile

    2017-01-01

    Launching of plasmons by swift electrons has long been used in electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) to investigate the plasmonic properties of ultrathin, or two-dimensional (2D), electron systems. However, the question of how a swift electron generates plasmons in space and time has never been answered. We address this issue by calculating and demonstrating the spatial-temporal dynamics of 2D plasmon generation in graphene. We predict a jet-like rise of excessive charge concentration that delays the generation of 2D plasmons in EELS, exhibiting an analog to the hydrodynamic Rayleigh jet in a splashing phenomenon before the launching of ripples. The photon radiation, analogous to the splashing sound, accompanies the plasmon emission and can be understood as being shaken off by the Rayleigh jet–like charge concentration. Considering this newly revealed process, we argue that previous estimates on the yields of graphene plasmons in EELS need to be reevaluated. PMID:28138546

  12. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Das Sarma, S; Hwang, E H

    2015-11-17

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover.

  13. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover. PMID:26572738

  14. Real-time 2-D temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2010-01-01

    We have previously introduced methods for noninvasive estimation of temperature change using diagnostic ultrasound. The basic principle was validated both in vitro and in vivo by several groups worldwide. Some limitations remain, however, that have prevented these methods from being adopted in monitoring and guidance of minimally invasive thermal therapies, e.g., RF ablation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). In this letter, we present first results from a real-time system for 2-D imaging of temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound. The front end of the system is a commercially available scanner equipped with a research interface, which allows the control of imaging sequence and access to the RF data in real time. A high-frame-rate 2-D RF acquisition mode, M2D, is used to capture the transients of tissue motion/deformations in response to pulsed HIFU. The M2D RF data is streamlined to the back end of the system, where a 2-D temperature imaging algorithm based on speckle tracking is implemented on a graphics processing unit. The real-time images of temperature change are computed on the same spatial and temporal grid of the M2D RF data, i.e., no decimation. Verification of the algorithm was performed by monitoring localized HIFU-induced heating of a tissue-mimicking elastography phantom. These results clearly demonstrate the repeatability and sensitivity of the algorithm. Furthermore, we present in vitro results demonstrating the possible use of this algorithm for imaging changes in tissue parameters due to HIFU-induced lesions. These results clearly demonstrate the value of the real-time data streaming and processing in monitoring, and guidance of minimally invasive thermotherapy.

  15. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  16. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  17. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Jr., Carlos M.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  18. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M., Jr.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  19. Optimizing sparse sampling for 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeding, Sebastian; Klimovich, Nikita; Brixner, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    We present a new data acquisition concept using optimized non-uniform sampling and compressed sensing reconstruction in order to substantially decrease the acquisition times in action-based multidimensional electronic spectroscopy. For this we acquire a regularly sampled reference data set at a fixed population time and use a genetic algorithm to optimize a reduced non-uniform sampling pattern. We then apply the optimal sampling for data acquisition at all other population times. Furthermore, we show how to transform two-dimensional (2D) spectra into a joint 4D time-frequency von Neumann representation. This leads to increased sparsity compared to the Fourier domain and to improved reconstruction. We demonstrate this approach by recovering transient dynamics in the 2D spectrum of a cresyl violet sample using just 25% of the originally sampled data points.

  20. Femtosecond Dynamics of Electrons in 2-D Dissipative Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Charles

    2000-03-01

    Transitions between weakly coupled initial and final states can be treated with a lowest order perturbation theory in the electronic coupling which yields the well-known golden rule in this non-adiabatic limit. In strongly interacting systems, one often resorts to semiclassical treatments, such as the Landau-Zener formula for the transition probability in the adiabatic limit. Recent electron transfer theory by Stuchebrukhov and Song treats the two limit on equal footing by summing over all perturbation orders in electronic coupling[1]. Here we present the application of this theory to model the dynamics of electron self-trapping in 2-D at the n-heptane/Ag(111) and anthracene/Ag(111) interface. Our results revealed an intermediate electronic coupling for the self-trapping process at the n-heptane/Ag(111) interface which can mainly be described by a non-adiabatic process. Results for electron self-trapping at the anthracene/Ag(111) interface revealed a stronger electronic coupling which requires the summing of higher perturbation orders. [1] A.A. Stuchebrukhov and X. song, J. Chem. Phys. 101, 9354, 1994. [2] N.-H. Ge,C.M. Wong, R.L. Lingle, Jr., J.D. McNeill, K.J. Gaffney, and C.B. Harris, Science 279, 202, 1998.

  1. Electron-Phonon Scattering in Atomically Thin 2D Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi; Wu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Tong; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Huang, Libai

    2016-11-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomically thin perovskites with strongly bound excitons are highly promising for optoelectronic applications. However, the nature of nonradiative processes that limit the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency remains elusive. Here, we present time-resolved and temperature-dependent PL studies to systematically address the intrinsic exciton relaxation pathways in layered (C4H9NH3)2(CH3NH3)n-1PbnI3n+1 (n = 1, 2, 3) structures. Our results show that scatterings via deformation potential by acoustic and homopolar optical phonons are the main scattering mechanisms for excitons in ultrathin single exfoliated flakes, exhibiting a T(γ) (γ = 1.3 to 1.9) temperature dependence for scattering rates. We attribute the absence of polar optical phonon and defect scattering to efficient screening of Coulomb potential, similar to what has been observed in 3D perovskites. These results establish an understanding of the origins of nonradiative pathways and provide guidelines for optimizing PL efficiencies of atomically thin 2D perovskites.

  2. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  3. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-31

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  4. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  5. Strongly Metallic Electron and Hole 2D Transport in an Ambipolar Si-Vacuum Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Binhui; Yazdanpanah, M M; Kane, B E; Hwang, E H; Das Sarma, S

    2015-07-17

    We report experiment and theory on an ambipolar gate-controlled Si(111)-vacuum field effect transistor where we study electron and hole (low-temperature 2D) transport in the same device simply by changing the external gate voltage to tune the system from being a 2D electron system at positive gate voltage to a 2D hole system at negative gate voltage. The electron (hole) conductivity manifests strong (moderate) metallic temperature dependence with the conductivity decreasing by a factor of 8 (2) between 0.3 K and 4.2 K with the peak electron mobility (∼18  m2/V s) being roughly 20 times larger than the peak hole mobility (in the same sample). Our theory explains the data well using random phase approximation screening of background Coulomb disorder, establishing that the observed metallicity is a direct consequence of the strong temperature dependence of the effective screened disorder.

  6. Calculation of 2D electronic band structure using matrix mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelich, R. L.; Marsiglio, F.

    2016-12-01

    We extend previous work, applying elementary matrix mechanics to one-dimensional periodic arrays (to generate energy bands), to two-dimensional arrays. We generate band structures for the square-lattice "2D Kronig-Penney model" (square wells), the "muffin-tin" potential (circular wells), and Gaussian wells. We then apply the method to periodic arrays of more than one atomic site in a unit cell, specifically to the case of materials with hexagonal lattices like graphene. These straightforward extensions of undergraduate-level calculations allow students to readily determine band structures of current research interest.

  7. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  8. Insulating Behavior of Strongly Interacting 2D Electrons in Si MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiqi; Sarachik, M. P.; Kravchenko, S. V.

    Experiments on low disorder strongly-interacting 2D electron systems have shown that in the absence of a magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the resistivity changes from metallic-like to insulating behavior as the electron density ns is reduced below a critical density nc. It has been shown that a metal to insulator transition also occurs in these systems for fixed electron density ns at a critical (density-dependent) in-plane magnetic field which results in complete spin polarization of the electrons. Here we report measurements of the temperature dependence of the resistivity in a high mobility Si-MOSFET sample, where in one case the insulating state is reached by reducing the electron density in zero field, and in the other case it is reached by ''quenching'' the metallic behavior with an in-plane field of 5 T. We find that the resistivity of the insulating state behaves in very similar ways for both cases, exhibiting Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping regardless of the degree of polarization of the electron spins Work at CCNY is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1309008 and BSF Grant 2012210; for S. K. by NSF Grant DMR-1309337 and BSF Grant 2012210.

  9. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  10. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Pan, X M; Yang, Z J; Ma, X D; Zhu, Y L; Luhmann, N C; Domier, C W; Ruan, B W; Zhuang, G

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  11. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  12. An influence of solar activity on latitudinal distribution of atmospheric ozone and temperature in 2-D radiative-photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyominov, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of the 2-D radiative-photochemical model of the ozone layer at heights 0 to 60 km in the Northern Hemisphere there are revealed and analyzed in detail the characteristic features of the season-altitude-latitude variations of ozone and temperature due to changes of the solar flux during the 11 year cycle, electron and proton precipitations.

  13. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  14. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  15. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  16. Probabilistic Cellular Automata for Low-Temperature 2-d Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procacci, Aldo; Scoppola, Benedetto; Scoppola, Elisabetta

    2016-12-01

    We construct a parallel stochastic dynamics with invariant measure converging to the Gibbs measure of the 2-d low-temperature Ising model. The proof of such convergence requires a polymer expansion based on suitably defined Peierls-type contours.

  17. Tunable electron heating induced giant magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Samaraweera, R. L.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    Electron-heating induced by a tunable, supplementary dc-current (Idc) helps to vary the observed magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system. The magnetoresistance at B = 0.3 T is shown to progressively change from positive to negative with increasing Idc, yielding negative giant-magnetoresistance at the lowest temperature and highest Idc. A two-term Drude model successfully fits the data at all Idc and T. The results indicate that carrier heating modifies a conductivity correction σ1, which undergoes sign reversal from positive to negative with increasing Idc, and this is responsible for the observed crossover from positive- to negative- magnetoresistance, respectively, at the highest B. PMID:27924953

  18. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  19. High temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1991-03-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have acknowledged a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high-temperature operation. Aeropropulsion applications for high-temperature electronic devices include engine ground test instrumentation such as multiplexers, analog-to-digital converters, and telemetry systems capable of withstanding hot section engine temperatures in excess of 600 C. Uncooled operation of control and condition monitoring systems in advanced supersonic aircraft would subject the electronics to temperatures in excess of 300 C. Similarly, engine-mounted integrated electronic sensors could reach temperatures which exceed 500 C. In addition to aeronautics, there are many other areas that could benefit from the existence of high-temperature electronic devices. Space applications include power electronic devices for space platforms and satellites. Since power electronics require radiators to shed waste heat, electronic devices that operate at higher temperatures would allow a reduction in radiator size. Terrestrial applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, high power electronics, and nuclear reactor instrumentation and control. To meet the needs of the applications mentioned previously, the high-temperature electronics (HTE) program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high-temperature semiconductor material. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, growth modeling, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices. Interest in SiC has grown dramatically in recent years due to solid advances in the technology. Much research remains to be performed, but SiC appears ready to emerge as a useful semiconductor material.

  20. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  1. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    DOE PAGES

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; ...

    2016-02-24

    In this paper, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M'2M"C2 and M'2M"2C3 – where M' and M" are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, andmore » Ti. The M' atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M" atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M' atomic layers sandwich the middle M"–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. Finally, this finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.« less

  2. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yu; Voigt, Cooper A.; Kent, Paul R. C.; May, Steven J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-24

    In this paper, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M'2M"C2 and M'2M"2C3 – where M' and M" are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, and Ti. The M' atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M" atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M' atomic layers sandwich the middle M"–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. Finally, this finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in

  3. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  4. Transverse instability of electron plasma waves study via direct 2 +2D Vlasov simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silantyev, Denis; Lushnikov, Pavel; Rose, Harvey

    2016-10-01

    Transverse instability can be viewed as initial stage of electron plasma waves (EPWs) filamentation. We performed direct 2 +2D Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless plasma to systematically study the growth rates of oblique modes of finite-amplitude EPW depending on its amplitude, wavenumber, angle of the oblique mode wavevector relative to the EPW's wavevector and the configuration of the trapped electrons in the EPW. Simulation results are compared to the predictions of theoretical models.

  5. Infrared imaging of 2-D temperature distribution during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bernard; Welch, Ashley J

    2002-12-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used in conjunction with pulsed laser irradiation for treatment of dermatologic indications. The main goal of this study was to determine the radial temperature distribution created by CSC and evaluate the importance of radial temperature gradients upon the subsequent analysis of tissue cooling throughout the skin. Since direct measurement of surface temperatures during CSC are hindered by the formation of a liquid cryogen layer, temperature distributions were estimated using a thin, black aluminum sheet. An infrared focal plane array camera was used to determine the 2-D backside temperature distribution during a cryogen spurt, which preliminary measurements have shown is a good indicator of the front-side temperature distribution. The measured temperature distribution was approximately gaussian in shape. Next, the transient temperature distributions in skin were calculated for two cases: 1) the standard 1-D solution which assumes a uniform cooling temperature distribution, and 2) a 2-D solution using a nonuniform surface cooling temperature distribution based upon the back-side infrared temperature measurements. At the end of a 100-ms cryogen spurt, calculations showed that, for the two cases, large discrepancies in temperatures at the surface and at a 60-micron depth were found at radii greater than 2.5 mm. These results suggest that it is necessary to consider radial temperature gradients during cryogen spray cooling of tissue.

  6. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  7. Tuning the packing density of 2D supramolecular self-assemblies at the solid-liquid interface using variable temperature.

    PubMed

    Marie, Camille; Silly, Fabien; Tortech, Ludovic; Müllen, Klaus; Fichou, Denis

    2010-03-23

    The two-dimensional (2D) crystal engineering of molecular architectures on surfaces requires controlling various parameters related respectively to the substrate, the chemical structure of the molecules, and the environmental conditions. We investigate here the influence of temperature on the self-assembly of hexakis(n-dodecyl)-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC-C(12)) adsorbed on gold using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the liquid/solid interface. We show that the packing density of 2D self-assembled HBC-C(12) can be precisely tuned by adjusting the substrate temperature. Increasing the temperature progressively over the 20-50 degrees C range induces three irreversible phase transitions and a 3-fold increase of the packing density from 0.111 to 0.356 molecule/nm(2). High-resolution STM images reveal that this 2D packing density increase arises from the stepwise desorption of the n-dodecyl chains from the gold surface. Such temperature-controlled irreversible phase transitions are thus a versatile tool that can then be used to adjust the packing density of highly ordered functional materials in view of applications in organic electronic devices.

  8. Surface effects on electronic transport of 2D chalcogenide thin films and nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yeonwoong; Shen, Jie; Cha, Judy J

    2014-01-01

    The renewed interest in two-dimensional materials, particularly transition metal dichalcogenides, has been explosive, evident in a number of review and perspective articles on the topic. Our ability to synthesize and study these 2D materials down to a single layer and to stack them to form van der Waals heterostructures opens up a wide range of possibilities from fundamental studies of nanoscale effects to future electronic and optoelectronic applications. Bottom-up and top-down synthesis and basic electronic properties of 2D chalcogenide materials have been covered in great detail elsewhere. Here, we bring attention to more subtle effects: how the environmental, surface, and crystal defects modify the electronic band structure and transport properties of 2D chalcogenide nanomaterials. Surface effects such as surface oxidation and substrate influence may dominate the overall transport properties, particularly in single layer chalcogenide devices. Thus, understanding such effects is critical for successful applications based on these materials. In this review, we discuss two classes of chalcogenides - Bi-based and Mo-based chalcogenides. The first are topological insulators with unique surface electronic properties and the second are promising for flexible optoelectronic applications as well as hydrogen evolution catalytic reactions.

  9. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Catapano, F. Zimbardo, G.; Artemyev, A. V. Vasko, I. Y.

    2015-09-15

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  10. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  11. Spin relaxations in 2D electron gas determined by the memory in the carrier dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Eugene; Glazov, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    The effects of long memory, in carrier dynamics in a magnetic field, on spin polarization evolution in 2D electron gas are investigated qualitatively and quantitatively. As examples we consider (i) systems with random Rashba-type SO coupling and (ii) quantum wells with rigid short-range scatterers (antidotes) and regular Dresselhaus SO coupling. In both cases the spin dynamics is strongly non-Markovian. In the system with the random SO coupling the time dependence of the spin polarization shows Gaussian rather than exponential behavior with the cusps corresponding to the electron revolutions. The relaxation speeds up with the increase of the magnetic field. In the system with antidotes scattering, the spin polarization shows a long-tail behavior with the relaxation rate determined by inelastic electron-phonon and electron-electron collisions and demonstrates unusual field dependence.

  12. Investigating fold structures of 2D materials by quantitative transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zengming; Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-04-01

    We report an approach developed for deriving 3D structural information of 2D membrane folds based on the recently-established quantitative transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Systematic multislice simulations reveal that the membrane folding leads to sufficiently strong electron scattering which enables a precise determination of bending radius. The image contrast depends also on the folding angles of 2D materials due to the variation of projection potentials, which however exerts much smaller effect compared with the bending radii. DFT calculations show that folded edges are typically characteristic of (fractional) nanotubes with the same curvature retained after energy optimization. Owing to the exclusion of Stobbs factor issue, numerical simulations were directly used in comparison with the experimental measurements on an absolute contrast scale, which results in a successful determination of bending radius of folded monolayer MoS2 films. The method should be applicable to characterizing all 2D membranes with 3D folding features.

  13. Calibration of an acoustic system for measuring 2-D temperature distribution around hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Chen, Ying

    2013-04-01

    One of the fundamental purposes of quantitative acoustic surveys of seafloor hydrothermal vents is to measure their 2-D temperature distributions. Knowing the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances between the underwater transducers in an acoustic tomography system is fundamental to the overall accuracy of the temperature reconstruction. However, commercial transducer sources typically do not supply the needed data. Here we present a novel calibration algorithm to automatically determine the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances. The possible system latency error and the resulting temperature error are derived and analyzed. We have also developed the experimental setup for calibration. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed calibration method, an experimental study was performed on acoustic imaging of underwater temperature fields in Lake Qiezishan, located at Longling County, Yunnan Province, China. Using the calibrated data, the reconstructed temperature distributions closely resemble the actual distributions measured with thermocouples, thus confirming the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  14. Electron temperature probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2013-11-01

    The electron temperature probe (ETP) was invented in Japan in 1970's. The probe measures the electron temperature accurately and the measurement is not influenced by the electrode contamination. The instrument has low weight, low data transmission bit rate and low power consumption. The probe has been deployed in many sounding rockets, Earth orbiting scientific satellites, and Mars exploration spacecraft in Japan. The probe has also been deployed in sounding rockets in West Germany, India, Canada, USA, and Brazil. The probe has also been deployed in Brazilian satellites, Korean satellites, and recently as a Taiwan satellite payload. The manuscript describes the principle of the ETP instrument, the system configuration, the mechanical interface with respect to the sensor location, the control timing between data processing units; some useful information, the interference with other instruments, and future improvements and tasks. Some useful information for conducting performance check after the instrument fabrication and before the flight deployment is also presented in Appendix A.

  15. Folding of a heterogeneous β-hairpin peptide from temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin C.; Peng, Chunte Sam; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We provide a time- and structure-resolved characterization of the folding of the heterogeneous β-hairpin peptide Tryptophan Zipper 2 (Trpzip2) using 2D IR spectroscopy. The amide I′ vibrations of three Trpzip2 isotopologues are used as a local probe of the midstrand contacts, β-turn, and overall β-sheet content. Our experiments distinguish between a folded state with a type I′ β-turn and a misfolded state with a bulged turn, providing evidence for distinct conformations of the peptide backbone. Transient 2D IR spectroscopy at 45 °C following a laser temperature jump tracks the nanosecond and microsecond kinetics of unfolding and the exchange between conformers. Hydrogen bonds to the peptide backbone are loosened rapidly compared with the 5-ns temperature jump. Subsequently, all relaxation kinetics are characterized by an observed 1.2 ± 0.2-μs exponential. Our time-dependent 2D IR spectra are explained in terms of folding of either native or nonnative contacts from a common compact disordered state. Conversion from the disordered state to the folded state is consistent with a zip-out folding mechanism. PMID:23382249

  16. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  17. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a ``background corrected`` experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  18. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a background corrected'' experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  19. Comparison of lifetime-based methods for 2D phosphor thermometry in high-temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Di; Liu, Yingzheng; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the currently available techniques for 2D phosphor thermometry, and compares the performance of two lifetime-based methods: high-speed imaging and the dual-gate. High-speed imaging resolves luminescent decay with a fast frame rate, and has become a popular method for phosphor thermometry in recent years. But it has disadvantages such as high equipment cost and long data processing time, and it would fail at sufficiently high temperature due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and short lifetime. The dual-gate method only requires two images on the decay curve and therefore greatly reduces cost in hardware and processing time. A dual-gate method for phosphor thermometry has been developed and compared with the high-speed imaging method through both calibration and a jet impingement experiment. Measurement uncertainty has been evaluated for a temperature range of 473-833 K. The effects of several key factors on uncertainty have been discussed, including the luminescent signal level, the decay lifetime and temperature sensitivity. The results show that both methods are valid for 2D temperature sensing within the given range. The high-speed imaging method shows less uncertainty at low temperatures where the signal level and the lifetime are both sufficient, but its performance is degraded at higher temperatures due to a rapidly reduced signal and lifetime. For T  >  750 K, the dual-gate method outperforms the high-speed imaging method thanks to its superiority in signal-to-noise ratio and temperature sensitivity. The dual-gate method has great potential for applications in high-temperature environments where the high-speed imaging method is not applicable.

  20. Optical and Electronic Properties of 2D Graphitic Carbon-Nitride and Carbon Enriched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therrien, Joel; Li, Yancen; Schmidt, Daniel; Masaki, Michael; Syed, Abdulmannan

    The two-dimensional form of graphitic carbon-nitride (gCN) has been successfully synthesized using a simple CVD process. In it's pure form, the carbon to nitrogen ratio is 0.75. By adding a carbon bearing gas to the growth environment, the C/N ratio can be increased, ultimately reaching the pure carbon form: graphene. Unlike attempts at making a 2D alloy system out of BCN, the CN system does not suffer from phase segregation and thus forms a homogeneous alloy. The synthesis approach and electronic and optical properties will be presented for the pure gCN and a selection of alloy compositions.

  1. The separation of overlapping transitions in β-carotene with broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, Tessa R.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Graham, Matthew W.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy is applied to β-carotene, revealing new insight into the excited state dynamics of carotenoids by exploring the full energetic range encompassing the S0→S2 and S1→S1n transitions at 77 K. Multiple signals are observed in the regime associated with the proposed S∗ state and isolated through separate analysis of rephasing and nonrephasing contributions. Peaks in rephasing pathways display dynamic lineshapes characteristic of coupling to high energy vibrational modes, and simulation with a simple model supports their assignment to impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. A signal persisting beyond 10 ps in the nonrephasing spectra is still under investigation.

  2. Ferroelectricity, Antiferroelectricity and Ultrathin 2D Electron/Hole Gas in Multifunctional Monolayer MXene.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Anand; Mishra, Avanish; Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    2017-04-04

    Presence of ferroelectric polarization in 2D materials is extremely rare due to the effect of the surface depolarizing field. Here, we use first-principles calculations to show the largest out-of-plane polarization observed in a monolayer in functionalized MXenes (Sc2CO2). The switching of polarization in this new class of ferroelectric materials occurs through an previously unknown intermediate antiferroelectric structure thus establishing three states for applications in low-dimensional non-volatile memory. We show that the armchair domain-interface acts as an 1D metallic nanowire separating two insulating domains. In the case of the van-der-Waals bilayer we observe, interestingly, the presence of an ultrathin 2D electron/hole gas (2DEG) on the top/bottom layers, respectively, due to the redistrubution of charge carriers. The 2DEG is non-degenerate due to spin-orbit-coupling, thus paving the way for spin-orbitronic devices. The coexistence of ferroelectricity, antiferroelectricity, 2DEG and spin-orbit splitting in this system suggests that such 2D polar materials possess high potential for device application in a multitude of fields ranging from nanoelectronics to photovoltaics.

  3. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  4. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams.

  5. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-08-01

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the "site-probe response." By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  6. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  7. Ternary recombination of H3+, H2D+, HD2+, and D3+ with electrons in He/Ar/H2/D2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalosi, Abel; Dohnal, Petr; Plasil, Radek; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosik, Juraj

    2016-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the ternary recombination rate coefficients of H2D+ and HD2+ ions has been studied in the temperature range of 80-150 K at pressures from 500 to 1700 Pa in a stationary afterglow apparatus equipped with a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Neutral gas mixtures consisting of He/Ar/H2/D2 (with typical number densities 1017 /1014 /1014 /1014 cm-3) were employed to produce the desired ionic species and their fractional abundances were monitored as a function of helium pressure and the [D2]/[H2] ratio of the neutral gas. In addition, the translational and the rotational temperature and the ortho to para ratio were monitored for both H2D+ and HD2+ ions. A fairly strong pressure dependence of the effective recombination rate coefficient was observed for both ion species, leading to ternary recombination rate coefficients close to those previously found for (helium assisted) ternary recombination of H3+ and D3+. Work supported by: Czech Science Foundation projects GACR 14-14649P, GACR 15-15077S, GACR P209/12/0233, and by Charles University in Prague Project Nr. GAUK 692214.

  8. Effective Temperature of 2D Dusty Plasma Liquids at the Discrete Level

    SciTech Connect

    Io, C.-W.; Chan, C.-L.; I Lin

    2007-07-13

    Fluctuation-dissipation theory has been used to measure the effective temperature of non-equilibrium system. In this work, using a 2D dusty plasma liquid formed by the negatively charged fine particles suspending in weakly ionized discharges and sheared by two CW counter parallel laser beams, we measure the micro-transport at the kinetic level. The effective temperatures Teff at different time scales are obtained through the Stokes-Einstein relation which relates the diffusion coefficient (D) and the viscosity ({eta}). The external energy is cascaded from the slow hopping modes to the fast caging modes through mutual coupling, which leads to the higher effective temperature of the slow hopping modes.

  9. Edge effect and significant increase of the superconducting transition onset temperature of 2D superconductors in flat and curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chi Ho; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method to model the curvature activated phonon softening in a 2D superconducting layer. The superconducting transition temperature Tc in the case of a 2D rectangular sheet, a hollow cylinder and a hollow sphere of one coherence length thickness is calculated by the quantum mechanical electron-phonon scattering matrix, and a series of collective lattice vibrations in the surface state. We will show that being extremely thin in a flat rectangular shape is not enough to significantly enhance the Tc through phonon softening. However, if a curvature is added, Tc can be strongly enhanced. The increase in Tc with respect to the bulk is greatest in a hollow sphere, intermediate in a hollow cylinder and weakest for the rectangular sheet, when systems of identical length scale are considered. In addition, we find that the edge effect of such a 2D sheet has a strong broadening effect on Tc in addition to the effect of order parameter phase fluctuations.

  10. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films.

    PubMed

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J; Lewis, Emily A; Lucci, Felicia R; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope (125)I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual (125)I atoms into (125)Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic (125)I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies.

  11. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J.; Lewis, Emily A.; Lucci, Felicia R.; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope 125I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual 125I atoms into 125Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic 125I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies.

  12. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  13. ICF target 2D modeling using Monte Carlo SNB electron thermal transport in DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet multigroup diffusion electron thermal transport method is adapted into a Monte Carlo (MC) transport method to better model angular and long mean free path non-local effects. The MC model was first implemented in the 1D LILAC code to verify consistency with the iSNB model. Implementation of the MC SNB model in the 2D DRACO code enables higher fidelity non-local thermal transport modeling in 2D implosions such as polar drive experiments on NIF. The final step is to optimize the MC model by hybridizing it with a MC version of the iSNB diffusion method. The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in intermediate mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions allowing for improved computational efficiency while maintaining accuracy. Work to date on the method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories and the Univ. of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  14. Investigation of fast particle driven instabilities by 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Lauber, Ph; Curran, D.; Boom, J. E.; Tobias, B. J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; Garcia Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Maraschek, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; da Graça, S.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-12-01

    Detailed measurements of the 2D mode structure of Alfvén instabilities in the current ramp-up phase of neutral beam heated discharges were performed on ASDEX Upgrade, using the electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic. This paper focuses on the observation of reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAEs) and bursting modes that, with the use of the information from ECEI, have been identified as beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs). Both RSAEs with first and second radial harmonic mode structures were observed. Calculations with the linear gyro-kinetic code LIGKA revealed that the ratio of the damping rates and the frequency difference between the first and second harmonic modes strongly depended on the shape of the q-profile. The bursting character of the BAE type modes, which were radially localized to rational q surfaces, was observed to sensitively depend on the plasma parameters, ranging from strongly bursting to almost steady state.

  15. Fatigue Life Prediction of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the fatigue life of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites, i.e., SiC/SiC, SiC/Si-N-C, SiC/Si-B4C, and Nextel 610™/Aluminosilicate, at room and elevated temperatures has been predicted using the micromechanics approach. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. The Budiansky-Hutchinson-Evans shear-lag model was used to describe the microstress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress and fibers strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the fatigue and oxidation effects on fatigue life of the composite, which is controlled by interface frictional slip and diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix multicrackings. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface/fiber oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures, based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the load carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing (GLS) criterion. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fractures. The fatigue life S-N curves of 2D SiC/SiC, SiC/Si-N-C, SiC/Si-B4C, and Nextel 610™/Aluminosilicate composites at room temperature and 800, 1000 and 1200 °C in air and steam have been predicted.

  16. Fatigue Life Prediction of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the fatigue life of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites, i.e., SiC/SiC, SiC/Si-N-C, SiC/Si-B4C, and Nextel 610™/Aluminosilicate, at room and elevated temperatures has been predicted using the micromechanics approach. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. The Budiansky-Hutchinson-Evans shear-lag model was used to describe the microstress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress and fibers strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the fatigue and oxidation effects on fatigue life of the composite, which is controlled by interface frictional slip and diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix multicrackings. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface/fiber oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures, based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the load carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing (GLS) criterion. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fractures. The fatigue life S- N curves of 2D SiC/SiC, SiC/Si-N-C, SiC/Si-B4C, and Nextel 610™/Aluminosilicate composites at room temperature and 800, 1000 and 1200 °C in air and steam have been predicted.

  17. 2D positive streamer modelling in NTP air under extreme pulse fronts. What about runaway electrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marode, E.; Dessante, Ph; Tardiveau, P.

    2016-12-01

    Using a 2D model, an attempt is made to understand the properties and aspects of a diffuse discharge, appearing in a positive point-to-plane gap submitted to very high voltage pulses. After presenting the model, comparisons between the computed low and high pulse heights of 10 kV and 50 kV, respectively, will be shown and analysed. A streamer ionising wave is still formed, but its role in ionising a region of low field is replaced by the role of providing a plasma within which the electrons will benefit from the presence of a high electrical field meant to induce strong electron collision activities. A comparison between the aspect of the computed and experimental discharge carried out in the same conditions at 50 kV will be presented, which seems to be in agreement with the diffuse aspect. Although the difference in order of magnitude of the speed of development and the height of the current must be underlined, similarities between the structures of both situations will, however, be recognised. A high probability of obtaining highly energetic electrons and runaways (RAEs) will also be derived following a simple approach.

  18. Electron-impact dissociative excitation and ionization of N2D+

    SciTech Connect

    FogleJr, Michael R; Bahati Musafiri, Eric; Bannister, Mark E; Deng, Shihu; Vane, C Randy; Thomas, R. D.; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    Absolute cross sections for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2}D{sub +} producing N{sub 2}{sub +}, ND{sub +}, and N{sub +} ion fragments were measured in the 5- to 100-eV range using a crossed electron-ion beams technique. In the 5- to 20-eV region, in which dissociative excitation (DE) is the principal contributing mechanism, N{sub 2}{sub +} production dominates. The N{sub 2}{sub +} + D dissociation channel shows a large resonant-like structure in the DE cross section, as observed previously in electron impact dissociation of triatomic dihydride species [ M. Fogle, E. M. Bahati, M. E. Bannister, S. H. M. Deng, C. R. Vane, R. D. Thomas and V. Zhaunerchyk Phys. Rev. A 82 042720 (2010)]. In the dissociative ionization (DI) region, 20- to 100-eV, N{sub 2}{sub +}, ND{sub +}, and N{sub +} ion fragment production are comparable. The observance of the ND{sub +} and N{sub +} ion fragments indicate breaking of the N - N bond along certain dissociation channels.

  19. Electron-impact dissociative excitation and ionization of N{sub 2}D{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Fogle, M.; Bahati, E. M.; Bannister, M. E.; Deng, S. H. M.; Vane, C. R.; Thomas, R. D.; Zhaunerchyk, V.

    2011-09-15

    Absolute cross sections for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2}D{sup +} producing N{sub 2}{sup +}, ND{sup +}, and N{sup +} ion fragments were measured in the 5- to 100-eV range using a crossed electron-ion beams technique. In the 5- to 20-eV region, in which dissociative excitation (DE) is the principal contributing mechanism, N{sub 2}{sup +} production dominates. The N{sub 2}{sup +} + D dissociation channel shows a large resonant-like structure in the DE cross section, as observed previously in electron impact dissociation of triatomic dihydride species [M. Fogle, E. M. Bahati, M. E. Bannister, S. H. M. Deng, C. R. Vane, R. D. Thomas, and V. Zhaunerchyk, Phys. Rev. A 82, 042720 (2010)]. In the dissociative ionization (DI) region, 20- to 100-eV, N{sub 2}{sup +}, ND{sup +}, and N{sup +} ion fragment production are comparable. The observance of the ND{sup +} and N{sup +} ion fragments indicate breaking of the N - N bond along certain dissociation channels.

  20. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ~ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ~ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  1. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: Electronic versus vibrational coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Plenio, M. B.; Almeida, J.; Huelga, S. F.

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  2. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: electronic versus vibrational coherence.

    PubMed

    Plenio, M B; Almeida, J; Huelga, S F

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  3. Temperature-dependent conformations of a membrane supported zinc porphyrin tweezer by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Widom, Julia R; Lee, Wonbae; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Molinski, Tadeusz F; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H

    2013-07-25

    We studied the equilibrium conformations of a zinc porphyrin tweezer composed of two carboxylphenyl-functionalized zinc tetraphenyl porphyrin subunits connected by a 1,4-butyndiol spacer, which was suspended inside the amphiphilic regions of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) liposomes. By combining phase-modulation two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) with linear absorbance and fluorimetry, we determined that the zinc porphyrin tweezer adopts a mixture of folded and extended conformations in the membrane. By fitting an exciton-coupling model to a series of data sets recorded over a range of temperatures (17-85 °C) and at different laser center wavelengths, we determined that the folded form of the tweezer is stabilized by a favorable change in the entropy of the local membrane environment. Our results provide insights toward understanding the balance of thermodynamic factors that govern molecular assembly in membranes.

  4. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  5. Tunneling Between 2D Electrons and Holes in an In-plane Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Mendez, E. E.; Magno, R.; Bennett, B. R.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the vertical transport properties of GaSb/AlSb/InAs/AlSb/GaSb (system A) and InAs/AlSb/GaSb/AlSb/InAs (system B) heterostructures in a magnetic field (B<20T) parallel to the interfaces. In these systems, electrons and holes accumulate in the InAs and GaSb regions, respectively, and tunneling between the two gases gives rise to a current-voltage (I-V) characteristic that exhibits negative differential conductance even at T=300K. In both cases, the zero-bias, low-T (1.7K) magnetoconductance showed the signature of tunneling between 2D gases with different carrier densities even though in system A, the holes are barely confined. In contrast, the dependence of the I-V characteristics on magnetic field was quite different. In system A, the observed shift of the peak voltage with field is explained by simple ground-state dispersion curves for electrons and holes. However, this picture cannot explain the appearance (above 5.5T) and field dependence of a secondary peak in system B, or of additional, weaker field-induced features. Their origin may lie in the complexities of highly confined hole states in the central GaSb quantum well.

  6. Temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for charge exchange of metastable O/+//2D/ with N2. [in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Using a data base of aeronomical parameters measured on board the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite, temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient is deduced for the charge exchange of O(+)(2D) with N2. The results indicate the Explorer values determined over the temperature range from 700 to 1900 K are not in conflict with laboratory measurements made at higher temperatures.

  7. A Static and Dynamic Investigation of Quantum Nonlinear Transport in Highly Dense and Mobile 2D Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Scott

    Heterostructures made of semiconductor materials may be one of most versatile environments for the study of the physics of electron transport in two dimensions. These systems are highly customizable and demonstrate a wide range of interesting physical phenomena. In response to both microwave radiation and DC excitations, strongly nonlinear transport that gives rise to non-equilibrium electron states has been reported and investigated. We have studied GaAs quantum wells with a high density of high mobility two-dimensional electrons placed in a quantizing magnetic field. This study presents the observation of several nonlinear transport mechanisms produced by the quantum nature of these materials. The quantum scattering rate, 1tau/q, is an important parameter in these systems, defining the width of the quantized energy levels. Traditional methods of extracting 1tau/q involve studying the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. We analyze the quantum positive magnetoresistance due to the cyclotron motion of electrons in a magnetic field. This method gives 1tau/q and has the additional benefit of providing access to the strength of electron-electron interactions, which is not possible by conventional techniques. The temperature dependence of the quantum scattering rate is found to be proportional to the square of the temperature and is in very good agreement with theory that considers electron-electron interactions in 2D systems. In quantum wells with a small scattering rate - which corresponds to well-defined Landau levels - quantum oscillations of nonlinear resistance that are independent of magnetic field strength have been observed. These oscillations are periodic in applied bias current and are connected to quantum oscillations of resistance at zero bias: either Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations for single subband systems or magnetointersubband oscillations for two subband systems. The bias-induced oscillations can be explained by a spatial variation of electron

  8. Numerical simulation of 2D buoyant jets in ice-covered and temperature-stratified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ruochuan

    A two-dimensional (2D) unsteady simulation model is applied to the problem of a submerged warm water discharge into a stratified lake or reservoir with an ice cover. Numerical simulations and analyses are conducted to gain insight into large-scale convective recirculation and flow processes in a cold waterbody induced by a buoyant jet. Jet behaviors under various discharge temperatures are captured by directly modeling flow and thermal fields. Flow structures and processes are described by the simulated spatial and temporal distributions of velocity and temperature in various regions: deflection, recirculation, attachment, and impingement. Some peculiar hydrothermal and dynamic features, e.g. reversal of buoyancy due to the dilution of a warm jet by entraining cold ambient water, are identified and examined. Simulation results show that buoyancy is the most important factor controlling jet behavior and mixing processes. The inflow boundary is treated as a liquid wall from which the jet is offset. Similarity and difference in effects of boundaries perpendicular and parallel to flow, and of buoyancy on jet attachment and impingement, are discussed. Symmetric flow configuration is used to de-emphasize the Coanda effect caused by offset.

  9. Destabilization of 2D magnetic current sheets by resonance with bouncing electron - a new theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Gabriel; Louarn, Philippe; Tur, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons. The geometry is clearly 2D and uses Harris sheet profile. Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasi neutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. The present talk will focus on the main results of this theory. The electrostatic version of the model may be applied to the near-Earth environment (8-12 R_{E}) where beta is rather low. It is showed that inclusion of bouncing electron motion may enhance strongly the growth rate of the classical drift wave instability. This model could thus explain the generation of strong parallel electric fields in the ionosphere and the formation of aurora beads with wavelength of a few hundreds of km. In the electromagnetic version, it is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (B_{z} > 0.1 B _{lobes}) undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in B_{z}/B _{lobes}, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few

  10. Temperature dependence of the partially localized state in a 2D molecular nanoporous network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio; Nowakowska, Sylwia; Ortega, J. Enrique; Stöhr, Meike; Gade, Lutz H.; Jung, Thomas A.; Lobo-Checa, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional organic and metal-organic nanoporous networks can scatter surface electrons, leading to their partial localization. Such quantum states are related to intrinsic surface states of the substrate material. We further corroborate this relation by studying the thermally induced energy shifts of the electronic band stemming from coupled quantum states hosted in a metal-organic array formed by a perylene derivative on Cu(111). We observe by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), that both, the Shockley and the partially localized states, shift by the same amount to higher binding energies upon decreasing the sample temperature, providing evidence of their common origin. Our experimental approach and results further support the use of surface states for modelling these systems, which are expected to provide new insight into the physics concerning partially confined electronic states: scattering processes, potential barrier strengths, excited state lifetimes or the influence of guest molecules.

  11. Quantitative nanoscale visualization of heterogeneous electron transfer rates in 2D carbon nanotube networks

    PubMed Central

    Güell, Aleix G.; Ebejer, Neil; Snowden, Michael E.; McKelvey, Kim; Macpherson, Julie V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable interest for electrochemical, electrocatalytic, and sensing applications, yet there remains uncertainty concerning the intrinsic electrochemical (EC) activity. In this study, we use scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) to determine local heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) kinetics in a random 2D network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on an Si/SiO2 substrate. The high spatial resolution of SECCM, which employs a mobile nanoscale EC cell as a probe for imaging, enables us to sample the responses of individual portions of a wide range of SWNTs within this complex arrangement. Using two redox processes, the oxidation of ferrocenylmethyl trimethylammonium and the reduction of ruthenium (III) hexaamine, we have obtained conclusive evidence for the high intrinsic EC activity of the sidewalls of the large majority of SWNTs in networks. Moreover, we show that the ends of SWNTs and the points where two SWNTs cross do not show appreciably different HET kinetics relative to the sidewall. Using finite element method modeling, we deduce standard rate constants for the two redox couples and demonstrate that HET based solely on characteristic defects in the SWNT side wall is highly unlikely. This is further confirmed by the analysis of individual line profiles taken as the SECCM probe scans over an SWNT. More generally, the studies herein demonstrate SECCM to be a powerful and versatile method for activity mapping of complex electrode materials under conditions of high mass transport, where kinetic assignments can be made with confidence. PMID:22635266

  12. Electronic and structural properties of 3D, 2D and 1D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Filipe Joao

    In this work several applications of the ab initio pseudopotential density functional theory method are presented. With this method it is possible to calculate the electronic ground state properties of many systems like bulk solids, surfaces, nanotubes, and nanowires, and draw conclusions about the systems structural and electronic properties. With modifications of this approach excited states can also be treated. The first chapter of this thesis gives a brief description of the computational techniques employed. The second chapter describes results of calculations on the structural and electronic properties of carbon and germanium. We try to shed some light on a still poorly understood structural phase transition of graphite under pressure at low temperatures, which is different from the high temperature regime. Next, we study the phase transition path of germanium under pressure and predict the existence of a new phase. The following chapter explores the possibility of superconductivity in the graphite-like compound BC3 since there are many similarities between the electronic structure of this material and the 39 K superconductor MgB2. Subsequently, results of calculations on the adsorption of indium atoms on carbon nanotubes and graphite-like surfaces are presented. These studies explain some very interesting experimental results of In migration on nanotubes in an electrical potential. In the following chapters the electronic properties of very thin metallic MoSe nanowires are studied, and the different regimes of stability of metallic monatomic chains of Au, Al, Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru are investigated and compared. Chapter 7 addresses the possible polymerization of C60 molecules inside carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. Finally, the propagation of a light signal in a medium with gains and losses is investigated, and the possibility of a discontinuity in the index of refraction is discussed.

  13. Single crystal diamond boron 'delta doped' nanometric layers for 2D electronic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, James

    2016-10-01

    Use of diamond as a semiconductor material suffers from the high activation energy of all known impurity dopants (0.37 eV for Boron, 0.6 eV for Phosphorous). To achieve the simultaneous carrier concentration and mobility desired for devices operating at room temperature, growth of a nanometric thick `delta' layer doped to above the metal insulator transition adjacent to high mobility intrinsic material can provide a 2D high mobility conduction layer. Critical to obtaining the enhanced mobility of the carriers in the layer next to the `delta' doped layer is the abruptness of the doping interface. Single and multiple nanometer thick epitaxial layers of heavily boron `delta' doped diamond have been grown on high quality, intrinsic lab grown diamond single crystals. These layers were grown in a custom microwave plasma activated chemical vapor deposition reactor based on a rapid reactant switching technique. Characterization of the `delta' layers by various analytical techniques will be presented. Electrical measurements demonstrating enhanced hole mobility (100 to 800 cm2/V sec) as well as other electrical characterizations will be presented.

  14. Compelling experimental evidence of a Dirac cone in the electronic structure of a 2D Silicon layer

    PubMed Central

    Sadeddine, Sana; Enriquez, Hanna; Bendounan, Azzedine; Kumar Das, Pranab; Vobornik, Ivana; Kara, Abdelkader; Mayne, Andrew J.; Sirotti, Fausto; Dujardin, Gérald; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene stem from its two-dimensional (2D) structure, with a linear dispersion of the electronic states at the corners of the Brillouin zone (BZ) forming a Dirac cone. Since then, other 2D materials have been suggested based on boron, silicon, germanium, phosphorus, tin, and metal di-chalcogenides. Here, we present an experimental investigation of a single silicon layer on Au(111) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (HR-ARPES), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The HR-ARPES data show compelling evidence that the silicon based 2D overlayer is responsible for the observed linear dispersed feature in the valence band, with a Fermi velocity of comparable to that of graphene. The STM images show extended and homogeneous domains, offering a viable route to the fabrication of silicene-based opto-electronic devices. PMID:28281666

  15. Compelling experimental evidence of a Dirac cone in the electronic structure of a 2D Silicon layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeddine, Sana; Enriquez, Hanna; Bendounan, Azzedine; Kumar Das, Pranab; Vobornik, Ivana; Kara, Abdelkader; Mayne, Andrew J.; Sirotti, Fausto; Dujardin, Gérald; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2017-03-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene stem from its two-dimensional (2D) structure, with a linear dispersion of the electronic states at the corners of the Brillouin zone (BZ) forming a Dirac cone. Since then, other 2D materials have been suggested based on boron, silicon, germanium, phosphorus, tin, and metal di-chalcogenides. Here, we present an experimental investigation of a single silicon layer on Au(111) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (HR-ARPES), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The HR-ARPES data show compelling evidence that the silicon based 2D overlayer is responsible for the observed linear dispersed feature in the valence band, with a Fermi velocity of comparable to that of graphene. The STM images show extended and homogeneous domains, offering a viable route to the fabrication of silicene-based opto-electronic devices.

  16. Bcs-Bose Crossover Picture for a 2d Electron Gas with a Finite-Range Attractive Interfermion Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Miguel A.; Sevilla, Francisco J.; Fortes, Mauricio; de Llano, Manuel

    2002-03-01

    Cooper pair formation is studied in a 2D electron gas interacting pairwise through a finite-range, separable interfermion potential in wavevector space V_ kk^' =-(v_0/L^2)g_kg_k^' , where L^2 is the system area, v0 >= 0 the interaction strength, g_k≡ (1+k^2/k_0^2)-1/2 with k0 the inverse interaction range. The interaction strength v0 is eliminated [1] in favor of the (positive) binding energy B2 of an electron pair in vacuum under the same interfermion interaction. For finite range, i.e., 1/k_0>0, we report numerical calculations of the gap, the critical temperature and the chemical potential as functions of B2 and 1/k_0. For k_0= ∞ or zero-range (viz., a delta potential well) we recover at T=0 the well-known Miyake [2] results. Finally, the gap-to-Tc ratio is exhibited as a function of B2 and compared with other calculations as well as with empirical values for cuprate superconductors. [1] S.K. Adhikari, M. Casas, A. Puente, A. Rigo, M. Fortes, M.A. Solís, M. de Llano, A.A. Valladares and O. Rojo, Phys. Rev. B 62, 8671 (2000). [2] K. Miyake, Prog. Theor. Phys. 69, 1794 (1983). We thank UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT # IN102198 and CONACyT # 27828E for partial support.

  17. Conformation and electronic population transfer in membrane-supported self-assembled porphyrin dimers by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Widom, Julia R; Lott, Geoffrey A; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H

    2012-09-06

    Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) is applied to determine the conformation and femtosecond electronic population transfer in a dimer of magnesium meso tetraphenylporphyrin. The dimers are prepared by self-assembly of the monomer within the amphiphilic regions of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes. A theoretical framework to describe 2D FS experiments is presented, and a direct comparison is made between the observables of this measurement and those of 2D electronic spectroscopy (2D ES). The sensitivity of the method to varying dimer conformation is explored. A global multivariable fitting analysis of linear and 2D FS data indicates that the dimer adopts a "bent T-shaped" conformation. Moreover, the manifold of singly excited excitons undergoes rapid electronic dephasing and downhill population transfer on the time scale of ∼95 fs. The open conformation of the dimer suggests that its self-assembly is favored by an increase in entropy of the local membrane environment.

  18. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; J. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; J. Menard

    2000-07-20

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. where the plasma frequency is much greater than the electron cyclotron frequency, as in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition. Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large perpendicular wavenumber. This paper reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub o} {approximately} 2 kG, {approximately}10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} {approx} to 10 -- 200 eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode-converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be less than or equal to T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance, where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for overdense plasmas.

  19. Electronics Temperature Control,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    called the Seebeck potential or voltage. The Thomson effect occurs when a conductor is subjected to a thermal gradient. In such a conductor electrons...they add to their thermal energy state by absorption of heat. The Thomson effect is described-by the 38 _____IA Thomson coefficient,"C, by let where

  20. Study of the electrical conductivity at finite temperature in 2D Si- MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Limouny, L. Kaaouachi, A. El Tata, O.; Daoudi, E.; Errai, M.; Dlimi, S.; Idrissi, H. El; Zatni, A.

    2014-01-27

    We investigate the low temperature density dependent conductivity of two dimensional electron systems in zero magnetic field for sample Si-15 MOSFETs. The first purpose of this paper is to establish that the knee of the conductivity σ{sub 0} (σ{sub 0} is the T = 0.3 conductivity obtained by linear extrapolation of the curves of σ (T) for different values of electron density, n{sub s}) as a function of the carrier densities n{sub s} for T = 0.3 K, observed by Lai et al. and Limouny et al. in previous work for two different samples, is independent of temperature. The second aim is the determination of the critical density, n{sub c}, of the metal-insulator transition. Many methods are used in this investigation of n{sub c} which have been already used for other samples. The motivation behind this last study is the observation of many values of n{sub c} that have been obtained from different methods and that are slightly different. We will use in this study three methods with the intention to infer which one is more appropriate to obtain n{sub c}.

  1. Effects of in-plane magnetic field on the transport of 2D electron vortices in non-uniform plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Richardson, Andrew; Schumer, Joseph; Pulsed Power Team

    2015-11-01

    The formation of electron vortices in current-carrying plasmas is observed in 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the plasma-opening switch. In the presence of a background density gradient in Cartesian systems, vortices drift in the direction found by crossing the magnetic field with the background density gradient as a result of the Hall effect. However, most of the 2D simulations where electron vortices are seen and studied only allow for in-plane currents and thus only an out-of-plane magnetic field. Here we present results of numerical simulations of 2D, seeded electron vortices in an inhomogeneous background using the generalized 2D electron-magneto-hydrodynamic model that additionally allows for in-plane components of the magnetic field. By seeding vortices with a varying axial component of the velocity field, so that the vortex becomes a corkscrew, it is found that a pitch angle of around 20 degrees is sufficient to completely prevent the vortex from propagating due to the Hall effect for typical plasma parameters. This work is supported by the NRL Base Program.

  2. Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke; Upadhya, Prashanth C.; Morales, Eugenia T.; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Lin, Yong

    2009-09-01

    The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

  3. Quantum magnetotransport in 2D electron gas in InGaAs/InP heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podor, Balint; Savel'ev, I. G.; Kovacs, Gy.; Remenyi, G.; Gombos, G.; Kreshchuk, A. M.; Novikov, S. V.

    1997-08-01

    Quantum magnetotransport measurements were performed on liquid phase epitaxially grown In0.35Ga0.47As/InP heterostructures at 4.2 K temperature in magnetic fields up to 22 Tesla. Measurements in tilted magnetic field, in conjunction with the analysis of the derivatives with respect to the magnetic field of the magnetoresistance curves, allowed the resolution of spin-splitting of the Landau levels up to N equals 3. The spin-splitting energy ESPIN was deduced for the half-filled Landau levels 0ARDN, 1ARUP, 1ARDN, 2ARUP, and 2$ARDN. The magnetic field dependence of the spin-splitting energy was interpreted using a simple model based on the exchange interaction of the electrons in the spin-splitted Landau levels, incorporating the disorder induced broadening of the Landau levels.

  4. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-28

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ∼1000 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.

  5. Electronic structure of disordered CuPd alloys by positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Siegel, R.W.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.; Bansil, A.

    1988-01-01

    We report 2D-ACAR experiments and KKR CPA calculations on alpha-phase single-crystal Cu/sub 1-x/Pd/sub x/ in the range x less than or equal to 0.25. The flattening of the Fermi surface near (110) with increasing x predicted by theory is confirmed by our experimental results. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Layer-by-Layer Assembled 2D Montmorillonite Dielectrics for Solution-Processed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Xiaolong; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Jariwala, Deep; Beck, Megan E; Huang, Wei; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-06

    Layer-by-layer assembled 2D montmorillonite nanosheets are shown to be high-performance, solution-processed dielectrics. These scalable and spatially uniform sub-10 nm thick dielectrics yield high areal capacitances of ≈600 nF cm(-2) and low leakage currents down to 6 × 10(-9) A cm(-2) that enable low voltage operation of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube and n-type indium gallium zinc oxide field-effect transistors.

  7. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements of reciprocal space structure of 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Guo, F-W; Lu, T-M; Wang, G-C

    2016-12-02

    Knowledge on the symmetry and perfection of a 2D material deposited or transferred to a surface is very important and valuable. We demonstrate a method to map the reciprocal space structure of 2D materials using reflection high energy diffraction (RHEED). RHEED from a 2D material gives rise to 'streaks' patterns. It is shown that from these streaks patterns at different azimuthal rotation angles that the reciprocal space intensity distribution can be constructed as a function of momentum transfer parallel to the surface. To illustrate the principle, we experimentally constructed the reciprocal space structure of a commercial graphene/SiO2/Si sample in which the graphene layer was transferred to the SiO2/Si substrate after it was deposited on a Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition. The result reveals a 12-fold symmetry of the graphene layer which is a result of two dominant orientation domains with 30° rotation relative to each other. We show that the graphene can serve as a template to grow other materials such as a SnS film that follows the symmetry of graphene.

  8. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Helium Near its Transition Temperature T(sub lambda) in a 2D Confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerebets, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We report our recent experiments on thermal conductivity measurements of superfluid He-4 near its phase transition in a two-dimensional (2D) confinement under saturated vapor pressure. A 2D confinement is created by 2-mm- and 1-mm-thick glass capillary plates, consisting of densely populated parallel microchannels with cross-sections of 5 x 50 and 1 x 10 microns, correspondingly. A heat current (2 < Q < 400 nW/sq cm) was applied along the channels long direction. High-resolution measurements were provided by DC SQUID-based high-resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers (HRTs) with a nanokelvin resolution. We might find that thermal conductivity of confined helium is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Our 2D results will be compared with those in a bulk and 1D confinement.

  9. Solving structure in the CP29 light harvesting complex with polarization-phased 2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Naomi S.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2011-01-01

    The CP29 light harvesting complex from green plants is a pigment-protein complex believed to collect, conduct, and quench electronic excitation energy in photosynthesis. We have spectroscopically determined the relative angle between electronic transition dipole moments of its chlorophyll excitation energy transfer pairs in their local protein environments without relying on simulations or an X-ray crystal structure. To do so, we measure a basis set of polarized 2D electronic spectra and isolate their absorptive components on account of the tensor relation between the light polarization sequences used to obtain them. This broadly applicable advance further enhances the acuity of polarized 2D electronic spectroscopy and provides a general means to initiate or feed back on the structural modeling of electronically-coupled chromophores in condensed phase systems, tightening the inferred relations between the spatial and electronic landscapes of ultrafast energy flow. We also discuss the pigment composition of CP29 in the context of light harvesting, energy channeling, and photoprotection within photosystem II. PMID:21321222

  10. Beyond Graphene: Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Defective 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Humberto

    One of the challenges in the production of 2-D materials is the synthesis of defect free systems which can achieve the desired properties for novel applications. However, the reality so far indicates that we need to deal with defective systems and understand their main features in order to perform defect engineering in such a way that we can engineer a new material. In this talk I discuss first, the introduction of defects in a hierarchic way starting from 2-D graphene to form giant Schwarzites or graphene foams, which also can exhibit further defects, thus we can have several levels of defectiveness. In this context, it will be shown that giant Schwarzites, depending on their symmetry, can exhibit Dirac-Fermion behavior and further, possess protected topological states as shown by other authors. Regarding the mechanical properties of these systems, it is possible to tune the Poisson Ratio by the addition of defects, thus shedding light to the explanation of the almost zero Poisson ratios in experimentally obtained graphene foams. Second, the idea of Haeckelites, a planar sp2 graphene-like structure with heptagons and pentagons, can be extended to transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with square and octagonal-like defects, finding semi-metallic behaviors with Dirac-Fermions, and even topological insulating properties. National Science Foundation (EFRI-1433311).

  11. Electronic Transport Properties of New 2-D Materials GeH and NaSn2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Cultrara, Nicholas; Arguilla, Maxx; Goldberger, Joshua; Heremans, Joseph

    2-D materials potentially have superior thermoelectric properties compared to traditional 3-D materials due to their layered structure. Here we present electrical and thermoelectric transport properties of 2 types of 2-D materials, GeH and NaSn2As2. GeH is a graphane analog which is prepared using chemical exfoliation of CaGe2 crystals. Intrinsic GeH is proven to be a highly resistive material at room temperature. Resistance and Seebeck coefficient of Ga doped GeH are measured in a cryostat with a gating voltage varying from -100V to 100V. NaSn2As2 is another 2-D system, with Na atom embedded between nearly-2D Sn-As layers. Unlike GeH, NaSn2As2 is a metal based of Hall measurements, with p-type behavior, and with van der Pauw resistances on the order of 5m Ω/square. Thermoelectric transport properties of NaSn2As2 will be reported. This work is support by the NSF EFRI-2DARE project EFRI-1433467.

  12. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  13. Electron capture and excitation in collisions of O+ ( 4S , 2D , 2P ) with H2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichl, Lukáš; Li, Yan; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Kimura, Mineo

    2004-06-01

    Using an electronic-state close-coupling method, we treated the electron capture and excitation processes of O+ ions both in ground state O+ ( 4S ) and metastable states O+* ( 2D ) and O+* ( 2P ) in collisions with the H2 molecule. In the ground-state projectile energy region considered (from 50 eV/amu to 10 keV/amu ), the experimental data vary by orders of magnitude: our results smoothly connect to the data by FleschNg, J. Chem. Phys.9419912372 and Xuet al., J. Phys. B2319901235 at low energy and agree with Phaneufet al., Phys. Rev. A171978534 in the high-energy region. The present values differ from Sieglaffet al., Phys. Rev. A5919993538 and Nuttet al., J. Phys. B121979L157, especially in the energy region below 1 keV/amu . We provide the first calculated state-resolved cross sections of electron capture and target-projectile electronic excitations for the O+ ( 4S , 2D , 2P )- H2 collision system.

  14. Research on reconstruction algorithms for 2D temperature field based on TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography(TDLAT), as a promising technique which combines Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy(TDLAS) and computer tomography, has shown the advantages of high spatial resolution for temperature measurement. Given the large number of tomography algorithms, it is necessary to understand the feature of tomography algorithms and find suitable ones for the specific experiment. This paper illustrates two different algorithms including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and simulated annealing (SA) which are implemented using Matlab. The reconstruction simulations of unimodal and bimodal temperature phantom were done under different conditions, and the results of the simulation were analyzed. It shows that for the unimodal temperature phantom, the both algorithms work well, the reconstruction quality is acceptable under suitable conditions and the result of ART is better. But for the bimodal temperature phantom, the result of SA is much better. More specifically, the reconstruction quality of ART is mainly affected by the ray coverage, the maximum deviation for the unimodal temperature phantom is 5.9%, while for the bimodal temperature field, it is up to 25%. The reconstruction quality of SA is mainly affected by the number of the transitions, the maximum deviation for the unimodal temperature phantom is 9.2% when 6 transitions are used which is a little worse than the result of ART; however, the maximum deviation for the bimodal temperature phantom is much better than ART's, which is about 5.2% when 6 transitions are used.

  15. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kukk, E.; Wills, A.A.; Langer, B.; Bozek, J.D.; Berrah, N.

    2004-09-02

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions.

  16. Multi-field electron emission pattern of 2D emitter: Illustrated with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ma; Li, Zhibing

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of laser-assisted multi-field electron emission of two-dimensional emitters is investigated theoretically. The process is basically a cold field electron emission but having more controllable components: a uniform electric field controls the emission potential barrier, a magnetic field controls the quantum states of the emitter, while an optical field controls electron populations of specified quantum states. It provides a highly orientational vacuum electron line source whose divergence angle over the beam plane is inversely proportional to square root of the emitter height. Calculations are carried out for graphene with the armchair emission edge, as a concrete example. The rate equation incorporating the optical excitation, phonon scattering, and thermal relaxation is solved in the quasi-equilibrium approximation for electron population in the bands. The far-field emission patterns, that inherit the features of the Landau bands, are obtained. It is found that the optical field generates a characteristic structure at one wing of the emission pattern.

  17. Oxide 2D electron gases as a route for high carrier densities on (001) Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kornblum, Lior; Jin, Eric N.; Kumah, Divine P.; Walker, Fred J.; Ernst, Alexis T.; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2015-05-18

    Two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) formed at the interfaces of oxide heterostructures draw considerable interest owing to their unique physics and potential applications. Growing such heterostructures on conventional semiconductors has the potential to integrate their functionality with semiconductor device technology. We demonstrate 2DEGs on a conventional semiconductor by growing GdTiO{sub 3}-SrTiO{sub 3} on silicon. Structural analysis confirms the epitaxial growth of heterostructures with abrupt interfaces and a high degree of crystallinity. Transport measurements show the conduction to be an interface effect, ∼9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} electrons per interface. Good agreement is demonstrated between the electronic behavior of structures grown on Si and on an oxide substrate, validating the robustness of this approach to bridge between lab-scale samples to a scalable, technologically relevant materials system.

  18. Electronic Ambient-Temperature Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Larry; Barrows, William

    1995-01-01

    Electronic temperature-recording unit stores data in internal memory for later readout. Records temperatures from minus 40 degrees to plus 60 degrees C at intervals ranging from 1.875 to 15 minutes. With all four data channels operating at 1.875-minute intervals, recorder stores at least 10 days' data. For only one channel at 15-minute intervals, capacity extends to up to 342 days' data. Developed for recording temperatures of instruments and life-science experiments on satellites, space shuttle, and high-altitude aircraft. Adaptable to such terrestrial uses as recording temperatures of perishable goods during transportation and of other systems or processes over long times. Can be placed directly in environment to monitor.

  19. A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

    2009-09-25

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

  20. Stability and electronic properties of SiGe-based 2D layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdagni, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Thakur, Anil; Pandey, Ravindra; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the in-plane hybrids consisting of siligene (SiGe), and its derivatives in both mono and bilayer forms are investigated within density functional theory. Among several pristine and hydrogenated configurations, the so-called chair conformation is energetically favorable for monolayers. On the other hand, the bilayer siligane (HSiGeH) prefers AB-stacked chair conformation and bilayer siligone (HSiGe) prefers AA-stacked buckled conformation. In SiGe, the Dirac-cone character is predicted to be retained. HSiGe is a magnetic semiconductor with a band gap of ˜0.6 eV. The electronic properties show tunability under mechanical strain and transverse electric field; (i) the energy gap opens up in the SiGe bilayer, (ii) a direct-to-indirect gap transition is predicted by the applied strain in the HSiGeH bilayer, and (iii) a semiconductor-to-metal transition is predicted for HSiGe and HSiGeH bilayers under the application of strain and electric field, thus suggesting SiGe and its derivatives to be a potential candidate for electronic devices at nanoscale.

  1. Strong negative magnetoresistance in high-mobility 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zudov, Michael; Hatke, Anthony; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2012-02-01

    This talk reports on a remarkably strong negative magnetoresistance effect in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures and quantum wells. The effect is the strongest at about 1 kG where a deep and strongly temperature dependent minimum is observed. At low temperature, the resistivity at this minimum is a small fraction of the zero field resistivity. The talk will discuss the effects of temperature and in-plane magnetic field on this negative magnetoresistance and compare experimental findings with existing theories. A portion of this work was performed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, which is supported by NSF Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-0654118, by the State of Florida, and by the DOE and at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work at Minnesota was supported by the NSF Grant No. DMR-0548014 and by the DOE Grant No. DE-SC002567. The work at Princeton was partially funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the NSF MRSEC Program through the Princeton Center for Complex Materials (DMR-0819860) and the work at Sandia was supported by the Sandia Corporation under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed.

  2. ECE imaging of electron temperature and electron temperature fluctuations (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, B. H.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Brower, D. L.; Cima, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oyevaar, T.; van de Pol, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE imaging or ECEI) is a novel plasma diagnostic technique for the study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in magnetic fusion plasma devices. Instead of a single receiver located in the tokamak midplane as in conventional ECE radiometers, ECEI systems utilize large diameter imaging optics coupled with planar millimeter-wave imaging arrays to form multichannel ECE diagnostics with excellent spatial resolution. Combined with specially designed imaging optics, the use of these compact, low cost arrays has resulted in the excellent spatial resolution of the ECEI systems, the unique capability of two-dimensional measurements, and flexibility in the measurement of plasma fluctuations. Technical details and principles of this emerging diagnostic technique are described in this article. Illustrative experimental results are presented, together with a discussion of the further development of the diagnostic.

  3. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Ni, G. X.; Pan, C.; Fei, Z.; Cheng, B.; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  4. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B-Y; Ni, G X; Pan, C; Fei, Z; Cheng, B; Lau, C N; Bockrath, M; Basov, D N; Fogler, M M

    2016-08-19

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  5. Electron dose distributions in experimental phantoms: a comparison with 2D pencil beam calculations.

    PubMed

    Cygler, J; Battista, J J; Scrimger, J W; Mah, E; Antolak, J

    1987-09-01

    Dose distributions were measured and computed within inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with beams of electrons having initial energies of 10 and 18 MeV. The measurements were made with a small p-type silicon diode and the calculations were performed using the pencil beam algorithm developed originally at the M D Anderson Hospital (MDAH). This algorithm, which is available commercially on many radiotherapy planning computers, is based on the Fermi-Eyges theory of electron transport. The phantoms used in this work were composed of water into which two- and three-dimensional inhomogeneities of aluminum and air (embedded in wax) were introduced. This was done in order to simulate the small bones and the air cavities encountered clinically in radiation therapy of the chest wall or neck. Our intent was to test the adequacy of the two-dimensional implementation of the pencil beam approach. The agreement between measured and computed doses is very good for inhomogeneities which are essentially two-dimensional but discrepancies as large as 40% were observed for more complex three-dimensional inhomogeneities. We can only trace the discrepancies to the complex interplay of numerous approximations in the Fermi-Eyges theory of multiple scattering and its adaptation for practical computer-aided radiotherapy planning.

  6. Polymer Membranes with Vertically Oriented Pores Constructed by 2D Freezing at Ambient Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hong-Qing; Ji, Ke-Jia; Zha, Li-Yun; Hu, Wen-Bing; Ou, Yang; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2016-06-08

    Polymer membranes with well-controlled and vertically oriented pores are of great importance in the applications for water treatment and tissue engineering. On the basis of two-dimensional solvent freezing, we report environmentally friendly facile fabrication of such membranes from a broad spectrum of polymer resources including poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(l-lactic acid), polyacrylonitrile, polystyrene, polysulfone and polypropylene. Dimethyl sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and arachidic acid are selected as green solvents crystallized in the polymer matrices under two-dimensional temperature gradients induced by water at ambient temperature. Parallel Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice polymers demonstrate that the directional process is feasible for each polymer holding suitable interaction with a corresponding solvent. As a typical example of this approach, poly(vinylidene fluoride) membranes exhibit excellent tensile strength, high optical transparence, and outstanding separation performance for the mixtures of yeasts and lactobacilli.

  7. Iterative Stable Alignment and Clustering of 2D Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengfan; Fang, Jia; Chittuluru, Johnathan; Asturias, Francisco J.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of homogeneous subsets of images in a macromolecular electron microscopy (EM) image data set is a critical step in single-particle analysis. The task is handled by iterative algorithms, whose performance is compromised by the compounded limitations of image alignment and K-means clustering. Here we describe an approach, iterative stable alignment and clustering (ISAC) that, relying on a new clustering method and on the concepts of stability and reproducibility, can extract validated, homogeneous subsets of images. ISAC requires only a small number of simple parameters and, with minimal human intervention, can eliminate bias from two-dimensional image clustering and maximize the quality of group averages that can be used for ab initio three-dimensional structural determination and analysis of macromolecular conformational variability. Repeated testing of the stability and reproducibility of a solution within ISAC eliminates heterogeneous or incorrect classes and introduces critical validation to the process of EM image clustering. PMID:22325773

  8. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  9. Electron radiation damage mechanisms in 2D MoSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, T.; Lehtinen, O.; Algara-Siller, G.; Kaiser, U.

    2017-01-01

    The contributions of different damage mechanisms in single-layer MoSe2 were studied by investigating different MoSe2/graphene heterostructures by the aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (AC-HRTEM) at 80 keV. The damage cross-sections were determined by direct counting of atoms in the AC-HRTEM images. The contributions of damage mechanisms such as knock-on damage or ionization effects were estimated by comparing the damage rates in different heterostructure configurations, similarly to what has been earlier done with MoS2. The behaviour of MoSe2 was found to be nearly identical to that of MoS2, which is an unexpected result, as the knock-on mechanism should be suppressed in MoSe2 due to the high mass of Se, as compared to S.

  10. The electronic structure and spin states of 2D graphene/VX2 (X = S, Se) heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Popov, Z I; Mikhaleva, N S; Visotin, M A; Kuzubov, A A; Entani, S; Naramoto, H; Sakai, S; Sorokin, P B; Avramov, P V

    2016-12-07

    The structural, magnetic and electronic properties of 2D VX2 (X = S, Se) monolayers and graphene/VX2 heterostructures were studied using a DFT+U approach. It was found that the stability of the 1T phases of VX2 monolayers is linked to strong electron correlation effects. The study of vertical junctions comprising of graphene and VX2 monolayers demonstrated that interlayer interactions lead to the formation of strong spin polarization of both graphene and VX2 fragments while preserving the linear dispersion of graphene-originated bands. It was found that the insertion of Mo atoms between the layers leads to n-doping of graphene with a selective transformation of graphene bands keeping the spin-down Dirac cone intact.

  11. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part II. State estimation via impedance-based temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Impedance-based temperature detection (ITD) is a promising approach for rapid estimation of internal cell temperature based on the correlation between temperature and electrochemical impedance. Previously, ITD was used as part of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state-estimator in conjunction with a thermal model to enable estimation of the 1-D temperature distribution of a cylindrical lithium-ion battery. Here, we extend this method to enable estimation of the 2-D temperature field of a battery with temperature gradients in both the radial and axial directions. An EKF using a parameterised 2-D spectral-Galerkin model with ITD measurement input (the imaginary part of the impedance at 215 Hz) is shown to accurately predict the core temperature and multiple surface temperatures of a 32,113 LiFePO4 cell, using current excitation profiles based on an Artemis HEV drive cycle. The method is validated experimentally on a cell fitted with a heat sink and asymmetrically cooled via forced air convection. A novel approach to impedance-temperature calibration is also presented, which uses data from a single drive cycle, rather than measurements at multiple uniform cell temperatures as in previous studies. This greatly reduces the time required for calibration, since it overcomes the need for repeated cell thermal equalization.

  12. DC-current induced magneto-oscillations in very high-mobility 2D electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. L.; Zhang, Chi; Du, R. R.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2007-03-01

    We report on a systematic experimental study of DC-current induced magneto-oscillations [1] using Hall bar samples of very high-mobility (8-20 x 10^6 cm^2/Vs) GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures. Previously we show that remarkable nonlinear resistance and 1/B oscillations can arise when a high bias current (Ix) is passed through a Hall bar (width w), and the effect can be explained by a Zener tunneling model in the presence of a tilting Hall field [1]. Data of resistance Rxx≡Vx/Ix, differential resistance rxx≡Vx/Ix, and rxx'≡rxx/Ix in higher mobility samples, which show higher order oscillations, have confirmed the validity of this model. Our temperature dependent date show that this effect can persist to kBT>φc, where φc is the cyclotron energy. [1] Yang et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 076801 (2002).

  13. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  14. Stable spins in the zero temperature spinodal decomposition of 2D Potts models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Stauffer, D.

    1996-02-01

    We present the results of zero temperature Monte Carlo simulations of the q-state Potts model on a square lattice with either four or eight neighbors, and for the triangular lattice with six neighbors. In agreement with previous works, we observe that the domain growth process gets blocked for the nearest-neighbor square lattice when q is large enough, whereas for the eight neighbor square lattice and for the triangular lattice no blocking is observed. Our simulations indicate that the number of spins which never flipped from the beginning of the simulation up to time t follows a power law as a function of the energy, even in the case of blocking. The exponent of this power law varies from less than {sol1}/{2} for the Ising case (1 q = 2) to 2 for q → ∞ and seems to be universal. The effect of blocking on this exponent is invisible at least up to q = 7.

  15. 2D-PAGE protein analysis of dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum based on three different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latib, Norhidayu Abdul; Norshaha, Safida Anira; Usup, Gires; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Harmful algae bloom or red tide seems to be considered as threat to ecosystem, especially to human consumption because of the production of neurotoxin by dinoflagellates species such as Alexandrium minutum which can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning. The aim of this study is to determine the most suitable method for protein extraction of A. minutum followed by determination of differential protein expression of A. minutum on three different temperatures (15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C). After the optimization, the protein extract was subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to compare the intensity and distribution of the protein spots. Based on quantitative and qualitative protein assessment, use of Trizol reagent is the most suitable method to extract protein from A. minutum. 2-DE analysis of the samples results in different distribution and intensity of the protein spots were compared between 15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C.

  16. Graphene-assisted room-temperature synthesis of 2D nanostructured hybrid electrode materials: dramatic acceleration of the formation rate of 2D metal oxide nanoplates induced by reduced graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Sung, Da-Young; Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Lee, Yu Ri; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2013-05-27

    A new prompt room temperature synthetic route to 2D nanostructured metal oxide-graphene-hybrid electrode materials can be developed by the application of colloidal reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets as an efficient reaction accelerator for the synthesis of δ-MnO2 2D nanoplates. Whereas the synthesis of the 2D nanostructured δ-MnO2 at room temperature requires treating divalent manganese compounds with persulfate ions for at least 24 h, the addition of RGO nanosheet causes a dramatic shortening of synthesis time to 1 h, underscoring its effectiveness for the promotion of the formation of 2D nanostructured metal oxide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of the accelerated synthesis of 2D nanostructured hybrid material induced by the RGO nanosheets. The observed acceleration of nanoplate formation upon the addition of RGO nanosheets is attributable to the enhancement of the oxidizing power of persulfate ions, the increase of the solubility of precursor MnCO3, and the promoted crystal growth of δ-MnO2 2D nanoplates. The resulting hybridization between RGO nanosheets and δ-MnO2 nanoplates is quite powerful not only in increasing the surface area of manganese oxide nanoplate but also in enhancing its electrochemical activity. Of prime importance is that the present δ-MnO2 -RGO nanocomposites show much superior electrode performance over most of 2D nanostructured manganate systems including a similar porous assembly of RGO and layered MnO2 nanosheets. This result underscores that the present RGO-assisted solution-based synthesis can provide a prompt and scalable method to produce nanostructured hybrid electrode materials.

  17. A Stochastic Hill Climbing Approach for Simultaneous 2D Alignment and Clustering of Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Bonnet, Frederic; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2016-06-07

    A critical step in the analysis of novel cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle datasets is the identification of homogeneous subsets of images. Methods for solving this problem are important for data quality assessment, ab initio 3D reconstruction, and analysis of population diversity due to the heterogeneous nature of macromolecules. Here we formulate a stochastic algorithm for identification of homogeneous subsets of images. The purpose of the method is to generate improved 2D class averages that can be used to produce a reliable 3D starting model in a rapid and unbiased fashion. We show that our method overcomes inherent limitations of widely used clustering approaches and proceed to test the approach on six publicly available experimental cryo-EM datasets. We conclude that, in each instance, ab initio 3D reconstructions of quality suitable for initialization of high-resolution refinement are produced from the cluster centers.

  18. Structural, electronic transport and optical properties of functionalized quasi-2D TiC2 from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.; Madjet, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Using the first-principles density functional theory, we study the effect of surface functionalization on the structural and optoelectronic properties of recently proposed quasi-two-dimensional material TiC2 [T. Zhao, S. Zhang, Y. Guo, Q. Wang, Nanoscale 8 (2016) 233]. Hydrogenated, fluorinated, oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces are considered. Significant changes in the lattice parameters and partial charge distributions are found due to the surface termination. Direct contribution of the adatoms to the system density of states near the Fermi level is obtained, which has a major impact on the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, surface termination results in larger absorption in the visible range of the spectrum. The electronic transport is also affected by the surface functionalization: the current in the system can be reduced by an order of magnitude. These findings indicate the importance of the effects of surface passivation on optoelectronic properties of this quasi-2D material.

  19. Electronic absorption spectra of C60+ -L (L = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, H2, D2, N2) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Mathias; Campbell, Ewen Kyle; Rice, Corey Allen; Maier, John Paul

    2017-02-01

    Electronic spectra in the near infrared of C60+ with He, Ne, Ar, Kr, H2, D2 and N2 attached have been recorded below 10 K in a cryogenic radio frequency ion trap. Additional absorption bands are observed compared to the spectrum of C60+ -He. In the case of C60+ -N2, the strongest one of these shifts to lower energies by 21.3 cm-1 compared to the origin band of C60+ -He at 10378.5 cm-1. The pattern in the spectrum is dependent on the attached ligand. The gas-phase observations on C60+ -Ne allow a rationalization of the relative intensities of the absorptions of C60+ in a neon matrix.

  20. Photogalvanic effects originating from the violation of the Einstein relation in a 2D electron gas in high Landau levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    This talk will present a quantum kinetic theory [1] of the microwave-induced photocurrent and photovoltage magnetooscillations emerging in a spatially nonuniform 2D electron system in the absence of external dc driving [2]. It will show that in an irradiated sample the Landau quantization leads to violation of the Einstein relation between the dc conductivity and diffusion coefficient. Then, in the presence of a built-in electric field in a sample, the microwave illumination causes photo-galvanic signals which oscillate as a function of magnetic field as observed in the experiment. The discussed effects should also play an essential role for the transport in the zero resistance states where the system breaks into current domains and peculiarities of the transport properties of the inhomogeneous system become of central importance.[1] I. A. Dmitriev, S. I. Dorozhkin, and A. D. Mirlin, ``Theory of microwave-induced photocurrent and photovoltage magneto-oscillations in a spatially nonuniform two-dimensional electron gas '', Phys. Rev. B 80, 125418 (2009).[2] S. I. Dorozhkin, I. V. Pechenezhskiy, L. N. Pfeiffer, K. W. West, V. Umansky, K. von Klitzing, and J. H. Smet, ``Photocurrent and Photovoltage Oscillations in the Two-Dimensional Electron System: Enhancement and Suppression of Built-In Electric Fields'', Phys. Rev.Lett. 102, 036602 (2009).

  1. Revealing high room and low temperatures mobilities of 2D holes in a strained Ge quantum well heterostructures grown on a standard Si(0 0 1) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myronov, Maksym; Morrison, Christopher; Halpin, John; Rhead, Stephen; Foronda, Jamie; Leadley, David

    2015-08-01

    Carrier mobility is one of the most important parameters of any semiconductor material, determining its suitability for applications in a large variety of electronic devices including field effect transistors (FETs). Today the capabilities of modern planar Si FET devices are almost exhausted and researchers are seeking either new device architectures or new materials. Here we report an extremely high room temperature (at 293 K) 2D hole gas (2DHG) drift mobility of 4500 cm2 V-1 s-1 at a carrier density of 1.2 × 1011 cm-2 obtained in a compressively strained Ge quantum well (QW) heterostructure, grown by an industrial type chemical vapor deposition system on a standard Si(0 0 1) substrate. The low-temperature Hall mobility and carrier density of this structure, measured at 333 mK, are 777,000 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 1.9 × 1011 cm-2, respectively. These hole mobilities are the highest not only among the group-IV Si and Ge based semiconductors, but also among p-type III-V and II-VI materials. The obtained room temperature mobility is substantially higher than those reported so far in strained Ge QW heterostructures and reveals a huge potential for further applications of this material in a wide variety of electronic devices.

  2. Crystal and electronic characterization of Nd{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}BO{sub 2+d} semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkendir, Osman Murat

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Crystal and electronic structure properties of Nd{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}BO{sub 2+d} structure were investigated. • New crystal structures for Nd–Ti complexes are determined. • Distortions in the crystal structure were observed as a result of Boron shortage. • Prominent change in electronic properties of the samples with the increasing Nd amount. - Abstract: Neodymium substituted TiBO{sub 3} samples were investigated according to their crystal, electric and electronic properties. Studies were conducted by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technique for the samples with different substitutions in the preparation processes. To achieve better crystal structure results during the study, XRD pattern results were supported by extended-XAFS (EXAFS) analysis. The electronic structure analysis were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) measurements at the room temperatures. Due to the substituted Nd atoms, prominent changes in crystal structure, new crystal geometries for Nd-Ti complexes, phase transitions in the crystals structure were detected according to the increasing Nd substitutions in the samples. In the entire stages of the substitutions, Nd atoms were observed as governing the whole phenomena due to their dominant characteristics in Ti geometries. Besides, electrical resistivity decay was determined in the materials with the increasing amount of Nd substitution.

  3. 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1) surface: atomic arrangement and electronic band structure.

    PubMed

    Gruznev, D V; Bondarenko, L V; Tupchaya, A Y; Eremeev, S V; Mihalyuk, A N; Chou, J P; Wei, C M; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2017-01-25

    Structural transformations and evolution of the electron band structure in the (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) system have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The two 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1), [Formula: see text]-(Tl, Pb) and [Formula: see text]-(Tl, Pb), have been found and their composition, atomic arrangement and electron properties has been characterized. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compound is almost identical to the alike (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] system from the viewpoint of its atomic structure and electronic properties. They contain 1.0 ML of Tl atoms arranged into a honeycomb network of chained trimers and 1/3 ML of Pb atoms occupying the centers of the honeycomb units. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compound contains six Tl atoms and seven Pb atoms per [Formula: see text] unit cell (i.e.  ∼0.67 ML Tl and  ∼0.78 ML Pb). Its atomic structure can be visualized as consisting of Pb hexagons surrounded by Tl trimers. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] and (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compounds are metallic and their band structures contain spin-split surface-state bands. By analogy with the (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text], these (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) compounds are believed to be promising objects for prospective studies of superconductivity in one-atom-layer systems.

  4. 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1) surface: atomic arrangement and electronic band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruznev, D. V.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Eremeev, S. V.; Mihalyuk, A. N.; Chou, J. P.; Wei, C. M.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Structural transformations and evolution of the electron band structure in the (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) system have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The two 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1), \\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} -(Tl, Pb) and 3× 3 -(Tl, Pb), have been found and their composition, atomic arrangement and electron properties has been characterized. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} compound is almost identical to the alike (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} system from the viewpoint of its atomic structure and electronic properties. They contain 1.0 ML of Tl atoms arranged into a honeycomb network of chained trimers and 1/3 ML of Pb atoms occupying the centers of the honeycomb units. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)3× 3 compound contains six Tl atoms and seven Pb atoms per 3× 3 unit cell (i.e.  ˜0.67 ML Tl and  ˜0.78 ML Pb). Its atomic structure can be visualized as consisting of Pb hexagons surrounded by Tl trimers. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} and (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)3× 3 compounds are metallic and their band structures contain spin-split surface-state bands. By analogy with the (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} , these (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) compounds are believed to be promising objects for prospective studies of superconductivity in one-atom-layer systems.

  5. Study of proton conductivity of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer at higher temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Suresh; Biswas, Soumava; Konar, Sanjit

    2015-02-16

    We report the proton conduction properties of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer having the molecular formulas {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·5H2O]}n (1) and {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·2H2O]}n (2), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 show high conductivity values of 2.55 × 10(-7) and 4.39 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 80 °C and 95% RH. The conductivity value of compound 1 is in the range of those for previously reported flexible MOFs, and compound 2 shows the highest proton conductivity among the carboxylate-based 1D CPs. The dimensionality and the internal hydrogen bonding connectivity play a vital role in the resultant conductivity. Variable-temperature experiments of both compounds at high humidity reveal that the conductivity values increase with increasing temperature, whereas the variable humidity studies signify the influence of relative humidity on high-temperature proton conductivity. The time-dependent measurements for both compounds demonstrate their ability to retain conductivity up to 10 h.

  6. Spin-Orbit Interaction in High-κ Dielectric Gated Rashba-2D Electron Gas and Mesoscopic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yanhua; Yuan, Zhuoquan; Stone, Kristjan; Du, Rui-Rui; Xu, Min; Ye, Peide

    2008-03-01

    There is increasing current interest in the quantum interference effect in mesoscopic devices fabricated on a Rashba-2D electron gas (2DEG), where the spin-orbit interaction parameters can be tuned by a potential gate. We explore ring structures that use a gate consisting of thin (5nm-50nm) high-κ dielectric Al2O3 or HfO2 layer and nano-patterned metals. The 2DEG is provided by lattice-matched In0.52Al0.48As/In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.52Al0.48As quantum wells that have a typical electron density n of 1.5x10^12/cm^2 and mobility μ>=2x10^4cm^2/Vs. The dielectric material was grown by atomic layer deposition. We will present the gate characteristics of Hall bars as well as magnetic transport data from gated mesoscopic rings. The work at Rice is funded by NSF DMR-0706634. Reference: M. Konig et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 076804 (2006); T. Bergsten et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 196803 (2006); B. Grbic et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 176803 (2007).

  7. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang; Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H.

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  8. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Miriam M; Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Qy band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240-270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet-singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  9. Fast ion induced shearing of 2D Alfvén eigenmodes measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Tobias, B J; Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Heidbrink, W W; Luhmann, N C; Nazikian, R; Park, H K; Spong, D A; Van Zeeland, M A

    2011-02-18

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  10. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfvén Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B. J.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H. K.; Spong, D. A.; van Zeeland, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  11. A temperature dependent 2D-ACAR study of untwinned metallic YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1992-02-01

    The authors have carried out 2D-ACAR measurements in the c-axis projection on an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. These temperature dependent 2D-ACAR spectra can be approximated by a superposition of two temperature independent spectra with temperature dependent weighting factors. The authors discuss how the temperature dependence of the data can be exploited to obtain a {open_quote}background corrected{close_quote} experimental spectrum, which is found to be in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory based predictions, including for the first time the overall amplitude of the anisotropy in the 2D-ACAR. The corrected data also show clear signatures of the ridge Fermi surface and an indication of the pillbox surface.

  12. 2D perovskite nanosheets with thermally-stable high-κ response: a new platform for high-temperature capacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Osada, Minoru; Li, Bao-Wen; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2014-11-26

    We investigated high-temperature dielectric responses of high-κ perovskite nanosheet (Ca2Nb3O10), an important material platform for postgraphene technology and ultrascale electronic devices. Through in situ characterizations using conducting atomic force microscopy, we found a robust high-temperature property of Ca2Nb3O10 nanosheet even in a monolayer form (∼2 nm). Furthermore, layer-by-layer assembled nanocapacitors retained both size-free high-εr characteristic (∼200) and high insulation resistance (∼1×10(-7) A/cm2) at high temperatures up to 250 °C. The simultaneous improvement of εr and thermal stability in high-κ nanodielectrics is of critical technological importance, and perovskite nanosheet has great potential for a rational design and construction of high-temperature capacitors.

  13. Ceria-Zirconia Particles Wrapped in a 2D Carbon Envelope: Improved Low-Temperature Oxygen Transfer and Oxidation Activity.

    PubMed

    Aneggi, Eleonora; Rico-Perez, Veronica; de Leitenburg, Carla; Maschio, Stefano; Soler, Lluís; Llorca, Jordi; Trovarelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-16

    Engineering the interface between different components of heterogeneous catalysts at nanometer level can radically alter their performances. This is particularly true for ceria-based catalysts where the interactions are critical for obtaining materials with enhanced properties. Here we show that mechanical contact achieved by high-energy milling of CeO2-ZrO2 powders and carbon soot results in the formation of a core of oxide particles wrapped in a thin carbon envelope. This 2D nanoscale carbon arrangement greatly increases the number and quality of contact points between the oxide and carbon. Consequently, the temperatures of activation and transfer of the oxygen in ceria are shifted to exceptionally low temperatures and the soot combustion rate is boosted. The study confirms the importance of the redox behavior of ceria-zirconia particles in the mechanism of soot oxidation and shows that the organization of contact points at the nanoscale can significantly modify the reactivity resulting in unexpected properties and functionalities.

  14. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(100) surface yield a 2D and not a 1D electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, R.; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Golden, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced nanowires do indeed host exotic, 1D (one-dimensional) metallic states. In light of this debate, we report here a thorough study of the electronic properties of high quality nanowires formed at the Au/Ge(100) surface. The high-resolution ARPES data show the low-lying Au-induced electronic states to possess a dispersion relation that depends on two orthogonal directions in k space. Comparison of the E (kx,ky) surface measured using high-resolution ARPES to tight-binding calculations yields hopping parameters in the two different directions that differ by approximately factor of two. Additionally, by pinpointing the Au-induced surface states in the first, second, and third surface Brillouin zones and analyzing their periodicity in k||, the nanowire propagation direction seen clearly in STM can be imported into the ARPES data. We find that the larger of the two hopping parameters corresponds, in fact, to the direction perpendicular to the nanowires (tperp). This proves that the Au-induced electron pockets possess a two-dimensional, closed Fermi surface, and this firmly places the Au/Ge(100) nanowire system outside potential hosts of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. We combine these ARPES data with scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of the spatially resolved electronic structure and find that the spatially straight—wirelike—conduction channels observed up to energies of order one electron volt below the Fermi level do not originate from the Au-induced states seen in the ARPES data. The former are rather more likely to be associated with bulk Ge states that are localized to the subsurface region. Despite our proof of the 2D (two-dimentional) nature of the Au

  15. Comparative Variable Temperature Studies of Polyamide II with a Benchtop Fourier Transform and a Miniature Handheld Near-Infrared Spectrometer Using 2D-COS and PCMW-2D Analysis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this communication is to compare the performance of a miniaturized handheld near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer with a benchtop Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectrometer. Generally, NIR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful analytical tool to study hydrogen-bonding changes of amide functionalities in solid and liquid materials and therefore variable temperature NIR measurements of polyamide II (PAII) have been selected as a case study. The information content of the measurement data has been further enhanced by exploiting the potential of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and the perturbation correlation moving window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) evaluation technique. The data provide valuable insights not only into the changes of the hydrogen-bonding structure and the recrystallization of the hydrocarbon segments of the investigated PAII but also in their sequential order. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the 2D-COS and PCMW2D results derived from the spectra measured with the miniaturized NIR instrument are equivalent to the information extracted from the data obtained with the high-performance FT-NIR instrument.

  16. An unambiguous identification of 2D electron gas features in the photoluminescence spectrum of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Sharma, T. K.

    2016-07-01

    A fast and non-destructive method for probing the true signatures of 2D electron gas (2DEG) states in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is presented. Two broad features superimposed with interference oscillations are observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The two features are identified as the ground and excited 2DEG states which are confirmed by comparing the PL spectra of as-grown and top barrier layer etched samples. Broad PL features disappear at a certain temperature along with the associated interference oscillations. Furthermore, the two broad PL features depicts specific temperature and excitation intensity dependencies which make them easily distinguishable from the bandedge excitonic or defect related PL features. The presence of strong interference oscillations associated with the 2DEG PL features is explained by considering the localized generation of PL signal at the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Finally, a large value of the polarization induced electric field of ~1.01 MV cm-1 is reported from PL measurements for AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures. It became possible only when the true identification of 2DEG features was made possible by the proposed method.

  17. A 2D simulation study of Langmuir, whistler, and cyclotron maser instabilities induced by an electron ring-beam distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, L. C.; Omura, Y.

    2011-09-15

    We carried out a series of 2D simulations to study the beam instability and cyclotron maser instability (CMI) with the initial condition that a population of tenuous energetic electrons with a ring-beam distribution is present in a magnetized background plasma. In this paper, weakly relativistic cases are discussed with the ring-beam kinetic energy ranging from 25 to 100 keV. The beam component leads to the two-stream or beam instability at an earlier stage, and the beam mode is coupled with Langmuir or whistler mode, leading to excitation of beam-Langmuir or beam-whistler waves. When the beam velocity is large with a strong beam instability, the initial ring-beam distribution is diffused in the parallel direction rapidly. The diffused distribution may still support CMI to amplify the X1 mode (the fundamental X mode). On the contrary, when the beam velocity is small and the beam instability is weak, CMI can amplify the Z1 (the fundamental Z mode) effectively while the O1 (the fundamental O mode) and X2 (the second harmonic X mode) modes are very weak and the X1 mode is not excited. In this report, different cases with various parameters are presented and discussed for a comprehensive understanding of ring-beam instabilities.

  18. Influence of electron-neutral elastic collisions on the instability of an ion-contaminated cylindrical electron cloud: 2D3V PIC-with-MCC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is a simulation based investigation of the effect of elastic collisions and effectively elastic-like excitation collisions between electrons and background neutrals on the dynamics of a cylindrically trapped electron cloud that also has an ion contaminant mixed in it. A cross section of the trapped non neutral cloud composed of electrons mixed uniformly with a fractional population of ions is loaded on a 2D PIC grid with the plasma in a state of unstable equilibrium due to differential rotation between the electron and the ion component. The electrons are also loaded with an axial velocity component, vz, that mimics their bouncing motion between the electrostatic end plugs of a Penning-Malmberg trap. This vz loading facilitates 3D elastic and excitation collisions of the electrons with background neutrals under a MCC scheme. In the present set of numerical experiments, the electrons do not ionize the neutrals. This helps in separating out only the effect of non-ionizing collisions of electrons on the dynamics of the cloud. Simulations reveal that these non-ionizing collisions indirectly influence the ensuing collisionless ion resonance instability of the contaminated electron cloud by a feedback process. The collisional relaxation reduces the average density of the electron cloud and thereby increases the fractional density of the ions mixed in it. The dynamically changing electron density and fractional density of ions feed back on the ongoing ion-resonance (two-stream) instability between the two components of the nonneutral cloud and produce deviations in the paths of progression of the instability that are uncorrelated at different background gas pressures. Effects of the collisions on the instability are evident from alteration in the growth rate and energetics of the instability caused by the presence of background neutrals as compared to a vacuum background. Further in order to understand if the non-ionizing collisions can independently be a cause

  19. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of the electron drift instability and associated anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system modeling the radial-azimuthal (r{--}θ ) plane for large radius thrusters. A magnetic field, {{B}}0, is aligned along the Oy axis (r direction), a constant applied electric field, {{E}}0, along the Oz axis (perpendicular to the simulation plane), and the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction is along the Ox axis (θ direction). Although electron transport can be well described by electron–neutral collisions for low plasma densities, at high densities (similar to those in typical HETs), a strong instability is observed that enhances the electron cross-field mobility; even in the absence of electron–neutral collisions. The instability generates high frequency (of the order of MHz) and short wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the azimuthal electric field and charged particle densities, and propagates in the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction with a velocity close to the ion sound speed. The correlation between the electric field and density fluctuations (which leads to an enhanced electron–ion friction force) is investigated and shown to be directly responsible for the increased electron transport. Results are compared with a recent kinetic theory, showing good agreement with the instability properties and electron transport.

  20. Electron temperatures in the Jovian ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, A. F.; Chameides, W. L.; Chen, R. H.; Atreya, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The daytime electron temperature profile of the Jovian ionosphere was calculated, taking into account the effects of thermal conduction and heat inflow from the plasmasphere. The photoelectron fluxes and electron heating rates were determined by using the two-stream approach of Banks and Nagy (1970) and Nagy and Banks (1970). The calculated electron temperatures were found to follow the neutral temperature up to an altitude slightly above the electron density peak, while at higher altitudes they were significantly enhanced above the assumed neutral temperature value.

  1. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-03-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance.

  2. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  3. Noninvasive real-time 2D imaging of temperature distribution during the plastic pellet cooling process by using electrical capacitance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Yusuke; Sapkota, Achyut; Sugawara, Michiko; Takei, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study has launched a concept to image a real-time 2D temperature distribution noninvasively by a combination of the electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) technique and a permittivity-temperature calibration equation for the plastic pellet cooling process. The concept has two steps, which are the relative permittivity calculation from the measured capacitance among the many electrodes by the ECT technique, and the temperature distribution imaging from the relative permittivity by the permittivity-temperature calibration equation. An ECT sensor with 12 electrodes was designed to image the cross-sectional temperature distribution during the polymethyl methacrylate pellets cooling process. The images of temperature distribution were successfully reconstructed from the relative permittivity distribution at every time step during the process. The images reasonably indicate the temperature diffusion in a 2D space and time within a 0.0065 and 0.0175 time-dependent temperature deviation, as compared to an analytical thermal conductance simulation and thermocouple measurement.

  4. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  5. Orbital dependent Rashba splitting and electron-phonon coupling of 2D Bi phase on Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiani, Pierluigi; Lisi, Simone; Betti, Maria Grazia; Ibrahimi, Amina Taleb; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Chiodo, Letizia

    2013-11-14

    A monolayer of bismuth deposited on the Cu(100) surface forms a highly ordered c(2×2) reconstructed phase. The low energy single particle excitations of the c(2×2) Bi/Cu(100) present Bi-induced states with a parabolic dispersion in the energy region close to the Fermi level, as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic state dispersion, the charge density localization, and the spin-orbit coupling have been investigated combining photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, unraveling a two-dimensional Bi phase with charge density well localized at the interface. The Bi-induced states present a Rashba splitting, when the charge density is strongly localized in the Bi plane. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the spectral density close to the Fermi level has been evaluated. Dispersive electronic states offer a large number of decay channels for transitions coupled to phonons and the strength of the electron-phonon coupling for the Bi/Cu(100) system is shown to be stronger than for Bi surfaces and to depend on the electronic state symmetry and localization.

  6. Automated screening of 2D crystallization trials using transmission electron microscopy: a high-throughput tool-chain for sample preparation and microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Nicolas; Hermann, Gilles; Caujolle-Bert, Daniel; Karathanou, Argyro; Erne-Brand, Françoise; Buessler, Jean-Luc; Daum, Pamela; Plitzko, Juergen M; Chami, Mohamed; Mueller, Urs; Kihl, Hubert; Urban, Jean-Philippe; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2011-02-01

    We have built and extensively tested a tool-chain to prepare and screen two-dimensional crystals of membrane proteins by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature. This automated process is an extension of a new procedure described recently that allows membrane protein 2D crystallization in parallel (Iacovache et al., 2010). The system includes a gantry robot that transfers and prepares the crystalline solutions on grids suitable for TEM analysis and an entirely automated microscope that can analyze 96 grids at once without human interference. The operation of the system at the user level is solely controlled within the MATLAB environment: the commands to perform sample handling (loading/unloading in the microscope), microscope steering (magnification, focus, image acquisition, etc.) as well as automatic crystal detection have been implemented. Different types of thin samples can efficiently be screened provided that the particular detection algorithm is adapted to the specific task. Hence, operating time can be shared between multiple users. This is a major step towards the integration of transmission electron microscopy into a high throughput work-flow.

  7. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  8. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  9. Electron temperature differences and double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C.; Hershkowitz, N.; Lonngren, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    Electron temperature differences across plasma double layers are studied experimentally. It is shown that the temperature differences across a double layer can be varied and are not a result of thermalization of the bump-on-tail distribution. The implications of these results for electron thermal energy transport in laser-pellet and tandem-mirror experiments are also discussed.

  10. Mn2C monolayer: a 2D antiferromagnetic metal with high Néel temperature and large spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    To realize antiferromagnetic spintronics in the nanoscale, it is highly desirable to identify new nanometer-scale antiferromagnetic metals with both high Néel temperature and large spin-orbit coupling. In this work, on the basis of first-principles calculation and particle swarm optimization (PSO) global structure search, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional Mn2C monolayer is an antiferromagnetic metal with a Mn magnetic moment of ~3μB. Mn2C monolayer has an anti-site structure of MoS2 sheet with carbon atoms hexagonally coordinated by neighboring Mn atoms. Remarkably, the in-plane carrier mobility of 2D Mn2C is highly anisotropic, amounting to about 47 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the a' direction, which is much higher than that of MoS2 monolayer. The Néel temperature of Mn2C monolayer is high up to 720 K. Due to strong spin-orbit coupling in plane, the magnetic anisotropy energy of Mn2C monolayer is larger than those of pure metals, such as Fe, Co, and Ni. These advantages render 2D Mn2C sheet with great potential applications in nanometer-scale antiferromagnetic spintronics.To realize antiferromagnetic spintronics in the nanoscale, it is highly desirable to identify new nanometer-scale antiferromagnetic metals with both high Néel temperature and large spin-orbit coupling. In this work, on the basis of first-principles calculation and particle swarm optimization (PSO) global structure search, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional Mn2C monolayer is an antiferromagnetic metal with a Mn magnetic moment of ~3μB. Mn2C monolayer has an anti-site structure of MoS2 sheet with carbon atoms hexagonally coordinated by neighboring Mn atoms. Remarkably, the in-plane carrier mobility of 2D Mn2C is highly anisotropic, amounting to about 47 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the a' direction, which is much higher than that of MoS2 monolayer. The Néel temperature of Mn2C monolayer is high up to 720 K. Due to strong spin-orbit coupling in plane, the magnetic anisotropy energy of Mn2C monolayer is

  11. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  12. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  13. High-throughput critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) measurement of two-dimensional (2D) structures using scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullam, Jennifer; Boye, Carol; Standaert, Theodorus; Gaudiello, John; Tomlinson, Derek; Xiao, Hong; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we tested a novel methodology of measuring critical dimension (CD) uniformity, or CDU, with electron beam (e-beam) hotspot inspection and measurement systems developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). The systems were used to take images of two-dimensional (2D) array patterns and measure CDU values in a custom designated fashion. Because this methodology combined imaging of scanning micro scope (SEM) and CD value averaging over a large array pattern of optical CD, or OCD, it can measure CDU of 2D arrays with high accuracy, high repeatability and high throughput.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo finite temperature electronic structure of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, Markku; Rantala, Tapio T.

    2002-08-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods allow a straightforward procedure for evaluation of electronic structures with a proper treatment of electronic correlations. This can be done even at finite temperatures [1]. We test the Path Integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulation method [2] for one and two electrons in one and three dimensional harmonic oscillator potentials and apply it in evaluation of finite temperature effects of single and coupled quantum dots. Our simulations show the correct finite temperature excited state populations including degeneracy in cases of one and three dimensional harmonic oscillators. The simulated one and two electron distributions of a single and coupled quantum dots are compared to those from experiments and other theoretical (0 K) methods [3]. Distributions are shown to agree and the finite temperature effects are discussed. Computational capacity is found to become the limiting factor in simulations with increasing accuracy. Other essential aspects of PIMC and its capability in this type of calculations are also discussed. [1] R.P. Feynman: Statistical Mechanics, Addison Wesley, 1972. [2] D.M. Ceperley, Rev.Mod.Phys. 67, 279 (1995). [3] M. Pi, A. Emperador and M. Barranco, Phys.Rev.B 63, 115316 (2001).

  15. Approximation of Engine Casing Temperature Constraints for Casing Mounted Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, Jonathan; Culley, Dennis; Chapman, Jeffryes

    2016-01-01

    The performance of propulsion engine systems is sensitive to weight and volume considerations. This can severely constrain the configuration and complexity of the control system hardware. Distributed Engine Control technology is a response to these concerns by providing more flexibility in designing the control system, and by extension, more functionality leading to higher performing engine systems. Consequently, there can be a weight benefit to mounting modular electronic hardware on the engine core casing in a high temperature environment. This paper attempts to quantify the in-flight temperature constraints for engine casing mounted electronics. In addition, an attempt is made at studying heat soak back effects. The Commercial Modular Aero Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) software is leveraged with real flight data as the inputs to the simulation. A two-dimensional (2-D) heat transfer model is integrated with the engine simulation to approximate the temperature along the length of the engine casing. This modification to the existing C-MAPSS40k software will provide tools and methodologies to develop a better understanding of the requirements for the embedded electronics hardware in future engine systems. Results of the simulations are presented and their implications on temperature constraints for engine casing mounted electronics is discussed.

  16. Study on Fracture Behavior of 2D-C/C Composite for Application to Control Rod of Very High Temperature Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, J.; Fujita, I.; Shibata, T.; Makita, T.; Takagi, T.; Kunimoto, E.; Sawa, K.; Kim, W.; Park, J.

    2011-10-01

    For a control rod element of the Very High Temperature Reactor, a carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite (C/C composite) is one of the major candidate materials for its high strength and thermal stability. In this study, in order to establish the data base of the 2D-C/C composite, the fracture data was obtained by simulating the crack expected to be generated under the VHTR condition and the oxidation effect on the fracture behavior was evaluated. Moreover, the fracture mechanism of the C/C composite was investigated through scanning electron microscope observation. This study showed that the oxidized matrix caused reduction of the fracture toughness and the reduction ratio was dependent on the density of matrix and a number cracks. With increasing the oxidation, the fracture toughness is mainly dependent on the fiber characteristics. Furthermore, the crack grows along the boundary between fiber bundles without breaking the fiber. The cracks which were initiated at the interface between the matrix and the fiber were gathered into the voids in the boundary between fiber bundles, and, then, the cracks grew up in the matrix.

  17. The 2D method for determining the temperatures field of the gas flow at the outlet of a multi-channel heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slesareva, E. Yu; Elistratov, S. L.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    The method for experimental determination of energy efficiency in the multichannel heat exchanger was tested. The visualization of a temperatures field has been performed to determine the thermal structure of gas flows with the use of fast-response fine- meshed wire. Thermograms of the temperature fields of the multi-channels assembly at the outlet were registered by thermal imaging camera. Results show that the 2D method provides a sufficient time resolution for the temperature field for the steady-state gas flow regime, heat generation, and nonsteady regime. The 2D method allows us to determine the gas stream parameters at the channel outlet in real time, which are necessary for determining the efficiency of the heat exchanger. Qualitative and quantitative characters of temperature changes in the thermograms are consistent with modern physical understanding of the gas flow in channels.

  18. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  19. Measuring electron temperature in the extended corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A technique for measuring electron temperature in the extended corona from the line profile of the electron scattered component of coronal H I Ly alpha produced by Thomson scattering of chromospheric Ly alpha emission is discussed. Because of the high thermal velocity of electrons at coronal temperatures (approximately 6800 km/s at T(sub e) = 1,500,000 K) the effect of nonthermal velocities and solar wind flows on the electron velocity distribution are negligible. However, the low electron mass which is responsible for the high thermal velocity also results in a very wide profile (approximately equal to 50 A). This wide profile, together with an intensity that is three orders of magnitude weaker than the resonantly scattered component of Ly alpha makes the direct measurement of T(sub e) a challenging observational problem. An evaluation of this technique based on simulated measurements is presented and the subsequent instrumental requirements necessary to make a meaningful determination of the electron temperature are discussed. Estimates of uncertainties in the measured electron temperature are related to critical instrument parameters such as grating stray light suppression.

  20. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  1. Low-Temperature Electronic Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    In many future NASA missions, such as deep space planetary exploration and the Next Generation Space Telescope, electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in extremely low temperature environments. Most modern electronic components cannot operate below moderately low operating temperatures (-40 to -55 C). The low-temperature electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is focusing on the development and characterization of low-temperature components and the integration of the developed devices into demonstrable very low-temperature (-200 C) power systems such as dc-dc converters. Such low-temperature electronics will not only tolerate hostile environments but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating radioisotope heating units, thereby reducing launch cost, improving reliability and lifetime, and increasing energy densities. Low-temperature electronic components will also have a great influence on terrestrial applications such as medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic and antarctic exploration. Lewis researchers are now performing extensive evaluations of commercially available as well as custom-made devices. These include various types of energy storage and signal capacitors, power switching devices, magnetic and superconducting materials, and primary lithium batteries, to name a few.

  2. Tension-Compression Fatigue Behavior of 2D and 3D Polymer Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-21

    performance in elevated temperature environments. High- temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMCs) are being considered for such applications . However...the polymer matrix in most HTPMCs cannot operate at temperatures required for many aerospace structural applications . Continuous research seeks to...temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMCs) applications , other polyimide resins replacement are being researched and developed due to the carcinogenic

  3. Reversible Formation of 2D Electron Gas at the LaFeO3 /SrTiO3 Interface via Control of Oxygen Vacancies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfa; Han, Wei; Rice, Philip M; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G; Mohseni, Katayoon; Meyerheim, Holger L; Ostanin, Sergey; Maznichenko, Igor V; Mertig, Ingrid; Gross, Eberhard K U; Ernst, Arthur; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2017-03-01

    A conducting 2D electron gas (2DEG) is formed at the interface between epitaxial LaFeO3 layers >3 unit cells thick and the surface of SrTiO3 single crystals. The 2DEG is exquisitely sensitive to cation intermixing and oxygen nonstoichiometry. It is shown that the latter thus allows the controllable formation of the 2DEG via ionic liquid gating, thereby forming a nonvolatile switch.

  4. Electronics Demonstrated for Low- Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many NASA spacecraft, such as planetary explorers and deep space probes. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would experience an average temperature near Saturn of about 183 C. Electronics capable of low-temperature operation in the harsh deep space environment also would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. An ongoing research and development program on low-temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is focusing on the design of efficient power systems that can survive and exploit the advantages of low-temperature environments. The targeted systems, which are mission driven, include converters, inverters, controls, digital circuits, and special-purpose circuits. Initial development efforts successfully demonstrated the low-temperature operation and cold-restart of several direct-current/direct-current (dc/dc) converters based on different types of circuit design, some with superconducting inductors. The table lists some of these dc/dc converters with their properties, and the photograph shows a high-voltage, high-power dc/dc converter designed for an ion propulsion system for low-temperature operation. The development efforts of advanced electronic systems and the supporting technologies for low-temperature operation are being carried out in-house and through collaboration with other Government agencies, industry, and academia. The Low Temperature Electronics Program supports missions and development programs at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Goddard Space Flight Center. The developed technologies will be transferred to commercial end users for applications such as satellite infrared sensors and medical diagnostic equipment.

  5. Destabilization of a cylindrically confined electron cloud by impact ionization of background neutrals: 2D3v PIC simulation with Monte-Carlo-collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we have investigated, through simulation, the process of destabilization of a cylindrically confined electron cloud due to the presence of a single species of neutral atoms, Ar in the background of the trap at a pressure relevant to experiments. The destabilization occurs because of a gradual accumulation of Ar+ in the cloud by the electron-impact ionization of the background neutrals. The trapped ions gradually collectively form a sizeable ion cloud which engages in a rotational two-stream instability (the ion resonance instability) with the electron cloud. The instability excites a growing fundamental diocotron mode on both components of the mixed non-neutral cloud. With the help of a set of numerical diagnostics, we have investigated the nonlinear evolution of the excited fundamental mode under the combined influence of two ongoing processes viz, (i) the changing electron and ion populations caused by electron impact ionization of the background Ar, and also by the radial loss of both charged species to the grounded trap wall at later stages and (ii) the elastic scattering of electrons and ions that make non-ionizing collisions with the background neutrals. The 2D collisionless dynamics of the instability has been simulated using a 2D Particle-in-Cell code operating on a Cartesian grid laid out on the cylindrical trap's cross-section, and the 3D ionizing and non-ionizing collisions between charged particles and background neutrals have been simulated using the technique of Monte-Carlo-Collisions.

  6. High-Temperature Passive Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In many future NASA missions - such as deep-space exploration, the National AeroSpace Plane, minisatellites, integrated engine electronics, and ion or arcjet thrusters - high-power electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in high-temperature environments. The high-temperature power electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating material research, the development and characterization of high-temperature components, and the integration of the developed components into a demonstrable 200 C power system - such as an inverter. NASA Lewis has developed high-temperature power components through collaborative efforts with the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, and the University of Wisconsin. Ceramic and film capacitors, molypermalloy powder inductors, and a coaxially wound transformer were designed, developed, and evaluated for high-temperature operation.

  7. Temperature measurement systems in wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, S.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the concept of temperature measurement system, adapted to wearable electronics applications. Temperature is one of the most commonly monitored factor in smart textiles, especially in sportswear, medical and rescue products. Depending on the application, measured temperature could be used as an initial value of alert, heating, lifesaving or analysis system. The concept of the temperature measurement multi-point system, which consists of flexible screen-printed resistive sensors, placed on the T-shirt connected with the central unit and the power supply is elaborated in the paper.

  8. Ionospheric electron temperature at solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1987-01-01

    Langmuir-probe measurements made at solar maximum from the DE-2 satellite in 1981 and 1982 are used to examine the latitudinal variation of electron temperature at altitudes between 300 and 400 km and its response to 27-day variations of solar EUV. A comparison of these data with models based on solar-minimum measurements from the AE-C suggests that the daytime electron temperature does not change very much during the solar cycle except at low latitudes where a particularly large 27-day variation occurs. It is found that the daytime electron temperature near the F2 peak is more responsive to short-term variations in F10.7 than to any longer-term changes that may occur between solar minimum and maximum.

  9. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to study temporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium sustained in two different configurations, (i) diffuse filament discharge between two spherical electrodes, and (ii) surface discharge over plane quartz surface. In the diffuse filament discharge, the experimental results are compared with the predictions of a 2D plasma fluid model. Electron densities are put on an absolute scale using pure rotational Raman spectra in nitrogen, taken without the plasma, for calibration. In the diffuse filament discharge, electron density and electron temperature increase rapidly after breakdown, peaking at n e  ≈  3.5 · 1015 cm-3 and T e  ≈  4.0 eV. After the primary discharge pulse, both electron density and electron temperature decrease (to n e ~ 1014 cm-3 over ~1 µs and to T e ~ 0.5 eV over ~200 ns), with a brief transient rise produced by the secondary discharge pulse. At the present conditions, the dominant recombination mechanism is dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular ions, \\text{He}2+ . In the afterglow, the electron temperature does not relax to gas temperature, due to superelastic collisions. Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) inferred from the Thomson scattering spectra are nearly Maxwellian, which is expected at high ionization fractions, when the shape of EEDF is controlled primarily by electron-electron collisions. The kinetic model predictions agree well with the temporal trends detected in the experiment, although peak electron temperature and electron density are overpredicted. Heavy species temperature predicted during the discharge and the early afterglow remains low and does not exceed T  =  400 K, due to relatively slow quenching of metastable He* atoms in two-body and three-body processes. In the surface discharge, peak electron density and electron temperature are n e  ≈  3 · 1014 cm3 and T e

  10. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  11. 2D Particle-In-Cell simulations of the electron-cyclotron instability and associated anomalous transport in Hall-Effect Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Péchereau, François; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the electron-cyclotron instability in Hall-Effect Thrusters (HETs) using a 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system where a magnetic field, B0, is aligned along the X-axis (radial direction, including absorbing walls), a constant electric field, E0, along the Z-axis (axial direction, perpendicular to simulation plane), and the E0xB0 direction along the Y-axis (O direction, with periodic boundaries). Although for low plasma densities classical electron-neutral collisions theory describes well electron transport, at sufficiently high densities (as measured in HETs) a strong instability can be observed that enhances the electron mobility, even in the absence of collisions. The instability generates high frequency ( MHz) and short wavelength ( mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and charged particle densities. We investigate the correlation between these fluctuations and their role with anomalous electron transport; complementing previous 1D simulations. Plasma is self-consistently heated by the instability, but since the latter does not reach saturation in an infinitely long 2D system, saturation is achieved through implementation of a finite axial length that models convection in E0 direction. With support of Safran Aircraft Engines.

  12. The Conference on High Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. J.; Mccormick, J. B.; Kerwin, W. J.; Narud, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of and directions for high temperature electronics research and development were evaluated. Major objectives were to (1) identify common user needs; (2) put into perspective the directions for future work; and (3) address the problem of bringing to practical fruition the results of these efforts. More than half of the presentations dealt with materials and devices, rather than circuits and systems. Conference session titles and an example of a paper presented in each session are (1) User requirements: High temperature electronics applications in space explorations; (2) Devices: Passive components for high temperature operation; (3) Circuits and systems: Process characteristics and design methods for a 300 degree QUAD or AMP; and (4) Packaging: Presently available energy supply for high temperature environment.

  13. Electron capture and excitation in collisions of O{sup +}({sup 4}S,{sup 2}D,{sup 2}P) with H{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pichl, Lukas; Li Yan; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Kimura, Mineo

    2004-06-01

    Using an electronic-state close-coupling method, we treated the electron capture and excitation processes of O{sup +} ions both in ground state O{sup +}({sup 4}S) and metastable states O{sup +*}({sup 2}D) and O{sup +*}({sup 2}P) in collisions with the H{sub 2} molecule. In the ground-state projectile energy region considered (from 50 eV/amu to 10 keV/amu), the experimental data vary by orders of magnitude: our results smoothly connect to the data by Flesch and Ng [J. Chem. Phys. 94, 2372 (1991)] and Xu et al. [J. Phys. B 23, 1235 (1990)] at low energy and agree with Phaneuf et al. [Phys. Rev. A 17, 534 (1978)] in the high-energy region. The present values differ from Sieglaff et al. [Phys. Rev. A 59, 3538 (1999)] and Nutt et al. [J. Phys. B 12, L157 (1979)], especially in the energy region below 1 keV/amu. We provide the first calculated state-resolved cross sections of electron capture and target-projectile electronic excitations for the O{sup +}({sup 4}S,{sup 2}D,{sup 2}P)-H{sub 2} collision system.

  14. Effects of Temperature on First-Excited-State Energy of the Strong Coupling Magnetopolaron in 2D RbCl Parabolic Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chun-Yu; Zhao, Cui-Lan; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2015-02-01

    We study the effects of external fields that are present in nanostructures and can trap particles and manipulate their quantum states. To obtain the effects of temperature on the strong coupling magnetopolaron's first-excited-state energy (FESE) and transition frequency (TF), we use the Lee-Low-Pines unitary transformation (LLPUT) and linear combination operation (LCO) methods. Numerical results, performed in the 2D RbCl parabolic quantum dot (QD), show that the magnetopolaron's FESE and TF (MFESETF) increase with increasing the effective confinement strength and cyclotron frequency (CF) of the magnetic field and temperature.

  15. Broadband 2D electronic spectrometer using white light and pulse shaping: noise and signal evaluation at 1 and 100 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Nicholas M; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Jones, Andrew C; Zanni, Martin T

    2017-04-03

    We have developed a broad bandwidth two-dimensional electronic spectrometer that operates shot-to-shot at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using an acousto-optic pulse shaper. It is called a two-dimensional white-light (2D-WL) spectrometer because the input is white-light supercontinuum. Methods for 100 kHz data collection are studied to understand how laser noise is incorporated into 2D spectra during measurement. At 100 kHz, shot-to-shot scanning of the delays and phases of the pulses in the pulse sequence produces a 2D spectrum 13-times faster and with the same signal-to-noise as using mechanical stages and a chopper. Comparing 100 to 1 kHz repetition rates, data acquisition time is decreased by a factor of 200, which is beyond the improvement expected by the repetition rates alone due to reduction in 1/f noise. These improvements arise because shot-to-shot readout and modulation of the pulse train at 100 kHz enables the electronic coherences to be measured faster than the decay in correlation between laser intensities. Using white light supercontinuum for the pump and probe pulses produces high signal-to-noise spectra on samples with optical densities <0.1 within a few minutes of averaging and an instrument response time of <46 fs thereby demonstrating that that simple broadband continuum sources, although weak, are sufficient to create high quality 2D spectra with >200 nm bandwidth.

  16. Diamond switches for high temperature electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.R.; Rondeau, G.; Qi, Niansheng

    1996-04-25

    Diamond switches are well suited for use in high temperature electronics. Laboratory feasibility of diamond switching at 1 kV and 18 A was demonstrated. DC blocking voltages up to 1 kV were demonstrated. A 50 {Omega} load line was switched using a diamond switch, with switch on-state resistivity {approx}7 {Omega}-cm. An electron beam, {approx}150 keV energy, {approx}2 {mu}s full width at half maximum was used to control the 5 mm x 5 mm x 100 {mu}m thick diamond switch. The conduction current temporal history mimics that of the electron beam. These data were taken at room temperature.

  17. Evaluation of the Performance of HYDRUS-2D in Simulating Effects of Shading and Irrigation on Soil Water Content and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, A.; Simunek, J.; Parsons, L. R.; van Genuchten, T. M.; Wheaton, T. A.; Morgan, K. T.

    2001-12-01

    Citrus root systems are exposed to different thermal and hydrologic conditions as a result of tree canopy shading and undertree microirrigation. Because microsprinklers wet only part of the soil surface and are located under the tree, roots under the canopy usually receive more water than those outside the tree canopy. The combined effects of different soil temperature and water input on water redistribution under field conditions have not been fully studied in Florida sandy soils. The objective of this study was to investigate shading and irrigation effects on spatial distribution of water content and soil temperature at different soil depths. Real-time capacitance probe systems (EnviroSCAN, SENTEK, Ltd. South Australia) and thermocouples were used to monitor soil water content and temperature at depths of 0, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 150 cm. Weather parameters were monitored simultaneously at the same location. HYDRUS-2D, a two dimensional computer package for simulating movement of water, heat, and multiple solutes in variably saturated media, was used to simulate water flow and heat transport under such conditions. The predicted water contents and soil temperatures compared favorably with their corresponding observed parameters. Shading substantially influenced hydraulic and thermal regimes of the system as shown by both predicted and measured water content and soil temperature. In addition to its accuracy in simulating this system, HYDRUS-2D helped to improve the analysis of this research project.

  18. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part I. Low-order thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the temperature distribution within Li-ion batteries during operation is critical for safety and control purposes. Although existing control-oriented thermal models - such as thermal equivalent circuits (TEC) - are computationally efficient, they only predict average temperatures, and are unable to predict the spatially resolved temperature distribution throughout the cell. We present a low-order 2D thermal model of a cylindrical battery based on a Chebyshev spectral-Galerkin (SG) method, capable of predicting the full temperature distribution with a similar efficiency to a TEC. The model accounts for transient heat generation, anisotropic heat conduction, and non-homogeneous convection boundary conditions. The accuracy of the model is validated through comparison with finite element simulations, which show that the 2-D temperature field (r, z) of a large format (64 mm diameter) cell can be accurately modelled with as few as 4 states. Furthermore, the performance of the model for a range of Biot numbers is investigated via frequency analysis. For larger cells or highly transient thermal dynamics, the model order can be increased for improved accuracy. The incorporation of this model in a state estimation scheme with experimental validation against thermocouple measurements is presented in the companion contribution (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775316308163).

  19. Terahertz-Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations in High-Mobility 2D Electron Systems Under Bichromatic and Multichromatic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iñarrea, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the magnetotransport under terahertz radiation in high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems, focusing on irradiation by bichromatic and multichromatic terahertz sources. We observed strong modulation of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at sufficient terahertz radiation power. We determined that the origin of the modulation was the interference between the average distance advanced by the scattered electrons between irradiated Landau states and the available initial density of states at a certain magnetic field. In the case of multifrequency illumination, we found that with the appropriate frequencies, the irradiated magnetoresistance could reach an almost zero-resistance state regime even at moderate radiation power.

  20. 2D nano-Y2O3:Eu3+ photoluminescence with different preparation methods and annealing temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Zhu, Yanhua; Liu, Huangqing; Chai, Yifeng; Yang, Yibo; Zhang, Qingjun; Wang, Lingling

    2017-03-01

    Y2O3:Eu3+ (YOE) material is an important photoluminescence (PL) material. In this paper, YOE nano-powder was prepared by the low-temperature combustion method (LTC) and sol-gel method (SG), and annealed with different temperatures, respectively. The influence of the preparation methods and annealing temperature on the optical properties of YOE were well studied. The as-synthesized nano-YOE samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), PL spectra, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results show that with the increase in annealing temperature, the charge transfer band (CTB) of samples blue-shifts and shows higher intensity. FTIR results indicate that low emission intensity decreases luminescence intensity and deteriorates the optical properties of nano-YOE. We also studied the spectral intensity changes before and after laser-induced, which shows the intensity of significant changes over time.

  1. Tuning the Growth Pattern in 2D Confinement Regime of Sm2O3 and the Emerging Room Temperature Unusual Superparamagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Guria, Amit K.; Dey, Koushik; Sarkar, Suresh; Patra, Biplab K.; Giri, Saurav; Pradhan, Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Programming the reaction chemistry for superseding the formation of Sm2O3 in a competitive process of formation and dissolution, the crystal growth patterns are varied and two different nanostructures of Sm2O3 in 2D confinement regime are designed. Among these, the regular and self-assembled square platelets nanostructures exhibit paramagnetic behavior analogous to the bulk Sm2O3. But, the other one, 2D flower like shaped nanostructure, formed by irregular crystal growth, shows superparamagnetism at room temperature which is unusual for bulk paramagnet. It has been noted that the variation in the crystal growth pattern is due to the difference in the binding ability of two organic ligands, oleylamine and oleic acid, used for the synthesis and the magnetic behavior of the nanostructures is related to the defects incorporated during the crystal growth. Herein, we inspect the formation chemistry and plausible origin of contrasting magnetism of these nanostructures of Sm2O3. PMID:25269458

  2. Engineering the electronic and magnetic properties of d(0) 2D dichalcogenide materials through vacancy doping and lattice strains.

    PubMed

    Ao, L; Pham, A; Xiao, H Y; Zu, X T; Li, S

    2016-03-14

    We have systematically investigated the effects of different vacancy defects in 2D d(0) materials SnS2 and ZrS2 using first principles calculations. The theoretical results show that the single cation vacancy and the vacancy complex like V-SnS6 can induce large magnetic moments (3-4 μB) in these single layer materials. Other defects, such as V-SnS3, V-S, V-ZrS3 and V-ZrS6, can result in n-type conductivity. In addition, the ab initio studies also reveal that the magnetic and conductive properties from the cation vacancy and the defect complex V-SnS6 can be modified using the compressive/tensile strain of the in-plane lattices. Specifically, the V-Zr doped ZrS2 monolayer can be tuned from a ferromagnetic semiconductor to a metallic/half-metallic material with decreasing/increasing magnetic moments depending on the external compressive/tensile strains. On the other hand, the semiconducting and magnetic properties of V-Sn doped SnS2 is preserved under different lattice compression and tension. For the defect complex like V-SnS6, only the lattice compression can tune the magnetic moments in SnS2. As a result, by manipulating the fabrication parameters, the magnetic and conductive properties of SnS2 and ZrS2 can be tuned without the need for chemical doping.

  3. 2D 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benndorf, Christopher; Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP7 was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published 31P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the 31P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP7 decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP7 as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s2 lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF.

  4. Advances in High-Temperature Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normann, R. A.; Henfling, J. A.

    2001-05-01

    It has long been known that SOI (Silicon-On-Insulator) electronics are more resistant to elevated temperatures and radiation than common bulk silicon devices. Bulk silicon devices are used in consumer grade electronics. A new line of SOI devices have a proven life of 5 years at 225\\deg C where commercial electronics have an 80% failure rate at 180\\deg C and above. This improvement is the result of building each transistor on a non-conductive 'glass' substrate. The transistor isolation reduces the effects of heat, radiation and in general provides for better performing devices with greatly increased life expectancies. This paper shows how SOI electronics can greatly increase the instrumentation life of permanently installed electronics within the wellbore at any temperature. Information is provided from an SOI designed logging tool operating without any heat-shielding up to 300\\deg C. Additional information is provided on the future of micro-machines built out of silicon, silicon-carbide, and diamond. Silicon micro-machines are already being used to measure pressure, inclination, rotation and vibration. In the future, these micro-machines will offer a significant jump in technology for wellbore instrumentation.

  5. Controlling quantum-beating signals in 2D electronic spectra by packing synthetic heterodimers on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Griffin, Graham B.; Zhang, Alice; Zhai, Feng; Williams, Nicholas E.; Jordan, Richard F.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2017-02-01

    In multidimensional spectroscopy, dynamics of coherences between excited states report on the interactions between electronic states and their environment. The prolonged coherence lifetimes revealed through beating signals in the spectra of some systems may result from vibronic coupling between nearly degenerate excited states, and recent observations confirm the existence of such coupling in both model systems and photosynthetic complexes. Understanding the origin of beating signals in the spectra of photosynthetic complexes has been given considerable attention; however, strategies to generate them in artificial systems that would allow us to test the hypotheses in detail are still lacking. Here we demonstrate control over the presence of quantum-beating signals by packing structurally flexible synthetic heterodimers on single-walled carbon nanotubes, and thereby restrict the motions of chromophores. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, we find that both limiting the relative rotation of chromophores and tuning the energy difference between the two electronic transitions in the dimer to match a vibrational mode of the lower-energy monomer are necessary to enhance the observed quantum-beating signals.

  6. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Morgan, Sarah E; Kehoe, Tom B; Wilson, Mark W B; Chin, Alex W; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  7. Instantaneous 2D Velocity and Temperature Measurements in High Speed Flows Based on Spectrally Resolved Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for high speed flows is described for the simultaneous, instantaneous measurement of gas temperature and velocity at a number (up to about one hundred) of locations in a plane illuminated by an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Molecular Rayleigh scattered light is collected and passed through a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. The resulting image is analyzed to determine the gas temperature and bulk velocity at each of the regions. The Cramer Rao lower bound for measurement uncertainty is calculated. Experimental data is presented for a free jet and for preliminary measurements in the Lewis 4 inch by 10 inch supersonic wind tunnel.

  8. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sushko, Peter V.; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32]2+ ⋅ (e–)2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. The concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: It invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a unique avenue in rational materials design. PMID:27559083

  9. Dynamic characteristics of temperature-dependent viscoelastic FG nanobeams subjected to 2D-magnetic field under periodic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirafzal, A.; Fereidoon, A.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, natural frequency and dynamic stability of functionally graded (FG) viscoelastic nanobeams based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory on the visco-Pasternak foundation are predicted. The material characteristics of FG nanobeam are temperature-dependent, and vary according to power-law model along thickness. The FG viscoelastic nanobeam is located on a two-dimensional magnetic field which considers the effects of transverse and longitudinal magnetic field. The uniform, linear, and sinusoidal temperature fields are applied on the FG viscoelastic nanobeam. The governing equations are derived through Hamilton's principle and Eringen's nonlocal theory. The equations are solved by a Navier-type method and the Bolotin method for simply supported conditions. The effect of three different temperature fields on natural frequency and dynamic stability region of the nanobeam is analyzed. The importance of various parameters such as nonlocal parameter, gradient indexes, magnitude of magnetic field, angle of magnetic field, temperature changes, and aspect ratio on both natural frequency and dynamic stability region of the FG viscoelastic nanobeam is investigated.

  10. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-J CO rotational lines is a powerful tool for assessing the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-J (Ju> 14) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new Herschel/HIFI and archival PACS observations of 12CO, 13CO, and [C ii] emission in four Herbig AeBe disks (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and three T Tauri disks (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya). In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all the other systems, the Herschel CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyzed simultaneously assuming power-law temperature and column density profiles, using the velocity profile to locate the emission in the disk. The temperature profile varies substantially from disk to disk. In particular, Tgas in the disk surface layers can differ by up to an order of magnitude among the four Herbig AeBe systems; HD 100546 is the hottest and HD 163296 the coldest disk in the sample. Clear evidence of a warm disk layer where Tgas>Tdust is found in all the Herbig Ae disks. The observed CO fluxes and line profiles are compared to predictions of physical-chemical models. The primary parameters affecting the disk temperature structure are the flaring angle, the gas-to-dust mass ratio, the scale height, and the dust settling.

  11. Assessment of a 2D electronic portal imaging devices-based dosimetry algorithm for pretreatment and in-vivo midplane dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Jomehzadeh, Ali; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Amouheidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is a method for the dosimetric verification of radiotherapy plans, both pretreatment and in vivo. The aim of this study is to test a 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm for dose verification of some plans inside a homogenous and anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo as well. Materials and Methods: Dose distributions were reconstructed from EPID images using a 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm inside a homogenous slab phantom for a simple 10 × 10 cm2 box technique, 3D conformal (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate plans inside an anthropomorphic (Alderson) phantom and in the patients (one fraction in vivo) for 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck and lung). Results: The planned and EPID dose difference at the isocenter, on an average, was 1.7% for pretreatment verification and less than 3% for all in vivo plans, except for head-and-neck, which was 3.6%. The mean γ values for a seven-field prostate IMRT plan delivered to the Alderson phantom varied from 0.28 to 0.65. For 3D conformal plans applied for the Alderson phantom, all γ1% values were within the tolerance level for all plans and in both anteroposterior and posteroanterior (AP-PA) beams. Conclusion: The 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm provides an accurate method to verify the dose of a simple 10 × 10 cm2 field, in two dimensions, inside a homogenous slab phantom and an IMRT prostate plan, as well as in 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung plans) applied using an anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo. However, further investigation to improve the 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm for a head-and-neck case, is necessary. PMID:28028511

  12. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  13. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals.

    PubMed

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  14. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  15. State of the art of AIM LWIR and VLWIR MCT 2D focal plane detector arrays for higher operating temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figgemeier, H.; Hanna, S.; Eich, D.; Mahlein, K.-M.; Fick, W.; Schirmacher, W.; Thöt, R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper AIM presents its latest results on both n-on-p and p-on-n low dark current planar MCT photodiode technology LWIR and VLWIR two-dimensional focal plane detector arrays with a cut-off wavelength >11μm at 80K and a 640x512 pixel format at a 20μm pitch. Thermal dark currents significantly reduced as compared to `Tennant's Rule 07' at a yet good detection efficiency >60% as well as results from NETD and photo response performance characterization are presented. The demonstrated detector performance paces the way for a new generation of higher operating temperature LWIR MCT FPAs with a <30mK NETD up to a 110K detector operating temperature and with good operability.

  16. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C. M. Krynski, Kamil; Streeter, Zachary; Findley, G. L.

    2015-12-14

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V{sub 0}(ρ) for H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V{sub 0}(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O{sub 2}) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V{sub 0}(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths.

  17. Variable-temperature Fourier-transform infrared studies of poly(L-lactic acid) in different states of order: A 2DCOS and PCMW2D analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pudun; Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W.

    2016-11-01

    Variable-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of a predominantly amorphous and a semi-crystalline poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) film were measured between 30 °C and 170 °C in order to investigate their temperature-dependent structural changes as a function of the initial state of order. For an in-depth analysis of the spectral variations in the carbonyl stretching band region (1803-1722 cm-1) two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and perturbation-correlation moving-window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) analyses were applied. Significant spectral changes were observed during heating of the amorphous PLLA sample whereas the semi-crystalline specimen showed only slight band shifts as a function of the external perturbation. The PCMW2D results suggested that for efficient 2DCOS analyses the heating process should be split up in two temperature intervals. These analyses then provided information on the recrystallization of the amorphous regions, the presence of an intermediate state of order and a sequence scenario for the observed spectral changes.

  18. Synthesis, structure and temperature-depended 2D IR correlation spectroscopy of an organo-bismuth benzoate with 1,10-phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan-Qiong; Zhong, Jie-Cen; Liu, Le-Hui; Qiu, Xing-Tai; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2016-11-01

    An organo-bismuth benzoate with phen as auxiliary ligand, [Bi(phen)(C6H5COO)(C6H4COO)] (1) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized from bismuth nitrate, 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid with phen as auxiliary ligand and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, PXRD, IR spectra, TG analyses, temperature-depended 2D-IR COS (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Interestingly, benzoate anions in 1 came from the desulfuration reaction of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 is a discrete organo-bismuth compound with benzoate and phen ligands. The offset face-to-face π-π stacking interactions and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the isolate complex into a 3D supramolecular network. The temperature-depended 2D-IR COS indicates that the stretching vibrations of Cdbnd C/Cdbnd N of aromatic rings and Cdbnd O bonds are sensitive to the temperature change.

  19. Measuring the Electron Temperature in the Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph; SaintCyr, Orville C.; Reginald, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    We report on an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of a new method to obtain the electron temperature and flow speed in the solar corona by observing the visible Kcoronal spectrum during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya. Results show that this new method is indeed feasible, giving electron temperatures and speeds of 1.10 $\\pm$ 0.05 MK, 103.0 $\\pm$ 92.0 $kmsA{-l}$; 0.98 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-1)s; 0.70 $\\pm$ 0.08 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l)$ at l.l{\\it R)$ {\\odot}$ in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and 0.93 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l}$ at 1.2{\\it R}$ {\\odot}$ in the solar east. This new technique could be easily used from a space-based platform in a coronagraph to produce two dimensional maps of the electron temperature and bulk flow speed at the base of the solar wind useful for the study of heliospheric structure and space weather.

  20. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  1. 50-kHz-rate 2D imaging of temperature and H2O concentration at the exhaust plane of a J85 engine using hyperspectral tomography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Li, Xuesong; Sanders, Scott T; Caswell, Andrew W; Roy, Sukesh; Plemmons, David H; Gord, James R

    2013-01-14

    This paper describes a novel laser diagnostic and its demonstration in a practical aero-propulsion engine (General Electric J85). The diagnostic technique, named hyperspectral tomography (HT), enables simultaneous 2-dimensional (2D) imaging of temperature and water-vapor concentration at 225 spatial grid points with a temporal response up to 50 kHz. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such sensing capabilities have been reported. This paper introduces the principles of the HT techniques, reports its operation and application in a J85 engine, and discusses its perspective for the study of high-speed reactive flows.

  2. Non-linear transport in microwave-irradiated 2D electron systems at the cyclotron resonance subharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Hatke, Anthony; Zudov, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2009-03-01

    We study microwave photoresistivity oscillations in a high mobility two-dimensional electron system subject to strong dc electric fields. We find [1] that near the second subharmonic of the cyclotron resonance the frequency of the resistivity oscillations with dc electric field is twice the frequency of the oscillations at the cyclotron resonance, its harmonics, or in the absence of microwave radiation. This observation is discussed in terms of the microwave-induced sidebands in the density of states and the interplay between different scattering processes in the separated Landau level regime. [1] A. T. Hatke, H.-S. Chiang, M. A. Zudov, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. accepted for publication.

  3. Electron momentum distribution and singlet-singlet annihilation in the organic anthracene molecular crystals using positron 2D-ACAR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Sellaiyan; Sivaji, Krishnan; Arulchakkaravarthi, Arjunan; Sankar, Sambasivam

    2014-08-14

    We present the mapping of electron momentum distribution (EMD) in a single crystal of anthracene by two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained on the basis of the crystallographic features of the material. The EMD spectra provide information about the positron states and their behavior and also about the hindrance of the positronium (Ps) formation in this material. The EMD has exhibited evidence for the absence of free volume defects. The characteristic EMD features regarding the delocalized electronic states are explained. Further, scintillation characteristics such as fluorescence and time-correlated single photon counting have also been studied. The emission peaks are attributed to vibrational bands of fluorescence emission from the singlet excitons and lifetime components are observed to be due to singlet fission and the singlet-singlet excitons annihilation.

  4. HSCT Assessment Calculations with the AER 2-D Model: Sensitivities to Transport Formulation, PSC Formulation, Interannual Temperature Variation. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Shia, Run-Lie; Jackman, Charles; Fleming, Eric; Considine, David; Kinnison, Douglas; Connell, Peter; Rotman, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    The summary are: (1) Some chemical differences in background atmosphere are surprisingly large (NOY). (2) Differences in model transport explain a majority of the intertnodel differences in the absence of PSCs. (3) With PSCS, large differences exist in predicted O3 depletion between models with the same transport. (4) AER/LLNL model calculates more O3 depletion in NH than LLNL. (5) AER/GSFC model cannot match calculated O3 depletion of GSFC model in SH. and (6) Results sensitive to interannual temperature variations (at least in NH).

  5. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J.; Batson, Philip E.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ~-0.1 V and ~50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  6. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  7. EHW Approach to Temperature Compensation of Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Efforts are under way to apply the concept of evolvable hardware (EHW) to compensate for variations, with temperature, in the operational characteristics of electronic circuits. To maintain the required functionality of a given circuit at a temperature above or below the nominal operating temperature for which the circuit was originally designed, a new circuit would be evolved; moreover, to obtain the required functionality over a very wide temperature range, there would be evolved a number of circuits, each of which would satisfy the performance requirements over a small part of the total temperature range. The basic concepts and some specific implementations of EHW were described in a number of previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, namely, "Reconfigurable Arrays of Transistors for Evolvable Hardware" (NPO-20078), Vol. 25, No. 2 (February 2001), page 36; Evolutionary Automated Synthesis of Electronic Circuits (NPO- 20535), Vol. 26, No. 7 (July 2002), page 37; "Designing Reconfigurable Antennas Through Hardware Evolution" (NPO-20666), Vol. 26, No. 7 (July 2002), page 38; "Morphing in Evolutionary Synthesis of Electronic Circuits" (NPO-20837), Vol. 26, No. 8 (August 2002), page 31; "Mixtrinsic Evolutionary Synthesis of Electronic Circuits" (NPO-20773) Vol. 26, No. 8 (August 2002), page 32; and "Synthesis of Fuzzy-Logic Circuits in Evolvable Hardware" (NPO-21095) Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 38. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: EHW is characterized as evolutionary in a quasi-genetic sense. The essence of EHW is to construct and test a sequence of populations of circuits that function as incrementally better solutions of a given design problem through the selective, repetitive connection and/or disconnection of capacitors, transistors, amplifiers, inverters, and/or other circuit building blocks. The connection and disconnection can be effected by use of field-programmable transistor arrays (FPTAs). The evolution is guided by a search

  8. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  9. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Sushko, Peter V.; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-08-24

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32]2+ ∙ (e)2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass-modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. Concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: it invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a new avenue in rational materials design.

  10. Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, Larry H.

    1994-01-01

    This document lists the scientific accomplishments of the Orbiter Electron Temperature Probe (OETP) group. The OETP instrument was fabricated in 1976, integrated into the PVO spacecraft in 1977, and placed in orbit about Venus in December 1978. The instrument operated flawlessly for nearly 14 years until PVO was lost as it entered the Venusian atmosphere in October 1992. The OETP group worked closely with other PVO investigators to examine the Venus ionosphere and its interactions with the solar wind. After the mission was completed we continued to work with the scientist selected for the Venus Data Analysis Program (VDAP), and this is currently leading to additional publications.

  11. Effect of radiative transfer of heat released from combustion reaction on temperature distribution: A numerical study for a 2-D system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huai-Chun; Ai, Yu-Hua

    2006-09-01

    Both light and heat are produced during a chemical reaction in a combustion process, but traditionally all the energy released is taken as to be transformed into the internal energy of the combustion medium. So the temperature of the medium increases, and then the thermal radiation emitted from it increases too. Chemiluminescence is generated during a chemical reaction and independent of the temperature, and has been used widely for combustion diagnostics. It was assumed in this paper that the total energy released in a combustion reaction is divided into two parts, one part is a self-absorbed heat, and the other is a directly emitted heat. The former is absorbed immediately by the products, becomes the internal energy and then increases the temperature of the products as treated in the traditional way. The latter is emitted directly as radiation into the combustion domain and should be included in the radiation transfer equation (RTE) as a part of radiation source. For a simple, 2-D, gray, emitting absorbing, rectangular system, the numerical study showed that the temperatures in reaction zones depended on the fraction of the directly emitted energy, and the smaller the gas absorption coefficient was, the more strong the dependence appeared. Because the effect of the fraction of the directly emitted heat on the temperature distribution in the reacting zones for gas combustion is significant, it is required to conduct experimental measurements to determine the fraction of self-absorbed heat for different combustion processes.

  12. Momentum-resolved view of mixed 2D and nonbulklike 3D electronic structure of the surface state on SrTiO3 (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, N. C.; Salluzzo, M.; Razzoli, E.; Mansson, M.; Krempasky, J.; Matt, C. E.; Schmitt, T.; Shi, M.; Mesot, J.; Patthey, L.; Radovic, M.

    2014-03-01

    The recent discovery of a metallic surface state on SrTiO3 may open a route to simplified low-dimensional oxide-based conductors, as well as give new insights into interfacial phenomena in heterostructures such as LaAlO3/SrTiO3. Our recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study demonstrates that not only quasi-2D but also non-bulklike 3D Fermi surface components make up the surface state. Like their more 2D counterparts, the size and character of the 3D components are fixed with respect to a broad range of sample preparations. As seen in previous studies, the surface state can be ``prepared'' by photon irradiation under UHV conditions. An extremely high fraction of the surface valence states are affected by this process, especially in relation to the stability of oxygen core level intensity during the same exposure, which points to a key role of electronic/structural changes that spread over the surface as the metal emerges.

  13. Effects of substrate on 2D materials, graphene, MoS2, WS2, and black phosphorus, investigated by high temperature and spatially resolved Raman scattering and photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Liqin

    The exploration of a group of new 2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, has become the hottest research of interest in recent years. With the dependable techniques of producing 2D materials, particularly mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition, we are able to study all kinds of their unique properties in mechanical, electrical and optical fields. In this dissertation, we examine the vibrational and thermal properties of four 2D materials---graphene, MoS2, WS2 and black phosphorus---as well as their interaction with the supporting substrates, by using temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Regarding the increasing interests of studying on the fabrication and applications of 2D materials, the role of 2D-material/substrate interaction has seldom been taken into consideration which would significantly affects the quality of the grown films and the performance of the devices. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to systematically investigate on this issue. At first, we performed temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy on two graphene samples prepared by CVD and ME up to 400°C, as well as graphite as a reference. The temperature dependence of both graphene samples shows very non-linear behavior for G and 2D bands, but with the CVD-grown graphene more nonlinear. Comparing to the Raman spectra collected before the measurements, the spectra after the measurements exhibit not only a shift of peak position but also a huge broadening of linewidth, especially for CVD-grown graphene. This study implies that the polymeric residues from either scotch tape or PMMA during transfer process are converted to amorphous carbon after annealed at high temperature, which may significantly change the optical and electrical properties of graphene. With the same temperature-dependent Raman technique as graphene, we examine on monolayer MoS2 and WS2, and thin-film black phosphorus and demonstrate that the film morphology and the

  14. Electron attachment to halomethanes at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. M.; Friedman, J. F.; Schaffer, L. C.; Viggiano, A. A.

    2009-10-01

    We have modified our high-temperature flowing-afterglow apparatus to include a movable Langmuir probe, a 4-needle reactant gas inlet, and a microwave discharge plasma source for the purpose of measuring electron attachment rate constants at high temperatures. We have focused initially on molecules which have very small attachment rate constants, ka, at room temperature to see if their behavior at high temperatures can be described in Arrhenius fashion. We have reported ka for CH3Cl, but only above 600 K, because the value at 600 K was quite small: 5.8 x10-12 cm^3 s-1. The Arrhenius plot for these data imply ka = 10-17 cm^3 s-1 at 300 K, a value that is so small as to be immeasurable with any current apparatus. We now have ka for other halomethanes, CF3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CH2Cl2. The halomethane data cover seven orders-of-magnitude in ka. Electron attachment to CF3Cl is endothermic by 143 meV at 300 K, but our measurements indicate that there is a barrier of about 400 meV, probably related to the energy at which the anion surface crosses that of the neutral. The reactions for CH3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CH2Cl2 are exothermic, but our data again indicate large barriers to attachment which accounts for the extremely slow attachment at 300 K. From these data and literature measurements at 300 K, one can make educated guesses as to the behavior of ka for other halomethanes.

  15. Giant piezoresistance of p-type nano-thick silicon induced by interface electron trapping instead of 2D quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Li, Xinxin

    2011-01-07

    The p-type silicon giant piezoresistive coefficient is measured in top-down fabricated nano-thickness single-crystalline-silicon strain-gauge resistors with a macro-cantilever bending experiment. For relatively thicker samples, the variation of piezoresistive coefficient in terms of silicon thickness obeys the reported 2D quantum confinement effect. For ultra-thin samples, however, the variation deviates from the quantum-effect prediction but increases the value by at least one order of magnitude (compared to the conventional piezoresistance of bulk silicon) and the value can change its sign (e.g. from positive to negative). A stress-enhanced Si/SiO(2) interface electron-trapping effect model is proposed to explain the 'abnormal' giant piezoresistance that should be originated from the carrier-concentration change effect instead of the conventional equivalent mobility change effect for bulk silicon piezoresistors. An interface state modification experiment gives preliminary proof of our analysis.

  16. Room-temperature subnanosecond waveguide lasers in Nd:YVO4 Q-switched by phase-change VO2: A comparison with 2D materials

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Weijie; Li, Rang; Cheng, Chen; Chen, Yanxue; Lu, Qingming; Romero, Carolina; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Hao, Xiaotao; Chen, Feng

    2017-01-01

    We report on room-temperature subnanosecond waveguide laser operation at 1064 nm in a Nd:YVO4 crystal waveguide through Q-switching of phase-change nanomaterial vanadium dioxide (VO2). The unique feature of VO2 nanomaterial from the insulating to metallic phases offers low-saturation-intensity nonlinear absorptions of light for subnanosecond pulse generation. The low-loss waveguide is fabricated by using the femtosecond laser writing with depressed cladding geometry. Under optical pump at 808 nm, efficient pulsed laser has been achieved in the Nd:YVO4 waveguide, reaching minimum pulse duration of 690 ps and maximum output average power of 66.7 mW. To compare the Q-switched laser performances by VO2 saturable absorber with those based on two-dimensional materials, the 1064-nm laser pulses have been realized in the same waveguide platform with either graphene or transition metal dichalcogenide (in this work, WS2) coated mirror. The results on 2D material Q-switched waveguide lasers have shown that the shortest pulses are with 22-ns duration, whilst the maximum output average powers reach ~161.9 mW. This work shows the obvious difference on the lasing properties based on phase-change material and 2D materials, and suggests potential applications of VO2 as low-cost saturable absorber for subnanosecond laser generation. PMID:28383017

  17. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  18. A summary of high-temperature electronics research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, F.V.; King, D.B.

    1991-10-18

    Current and future needs in automative, aircraft, space, military, and well logging industries require operation of electronics at higher temperatures than today's accepted limit of 395 K. Without the availability of high-temperature electronics, many systems must operate under derated conditions or must accept severe mass penalties required by coolant systems to maintain electronic temperatures below critical levels. This paper presents ongoing research and development in the electronics community to bring high-temperature electronics to commercial realization. Much of this work was recently reviewed at the First International High-Temperature Electronics Conference held 16--20 June 1991 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-15

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (T{sub e}) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity I{sub ECE} ∝ T{sub e} in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat T{sub e} assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (T{sub e,rel}) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  20. Electron temperatures and densities in the venus ionosphere: pioneer venus orbiter electron temperature probe results.

    PubMed

    Brace, L H; Theis, R F; Krehbiel, J P; Nagy, A F; Donahue, T M; McElroy, M B; Pedersen, A

    1979-02-23

    Altitude profiles of electron temperature and density in the ionosphere of Venus have been obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperatutre probe. Elevated temperatutres observed at times of low solar wind flux exhibit height profiles that are consistent with a model in which less than 5 percent of the solar wind energy is deposited at the ionopause and is conducted downward through an unmagnetized ionosphere to the region below 200 kilomneters where electron cooling to the neutral atmosphere proceeds rapidly. When solar wind fluxes are higher, the electron temperatures and densities are highly structured and the ionopause moves to lower altitudes. The ionopause height in the late afternoon sector observed thus far varies so widely from day to (day that any height variation with solar zenith angle is not apparent in the observations. In the neighborhood of the ionopause, measuremnents of plasma temperatures and densities and magnetic field strength indicate that an induced magnetic barrier plays an important role in the pressure transfer between the solar wind and the ionosphere. The bow, shock is marked by a distinct increase in electron current collected by the instrument, a featutre that provides a convenient identification of the bow shock location.

  1. Synergistic Effects of Temperature, Oxidation and Multicracking Modes on Damage Evolution and Life Prediction of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites under Tension-Tension Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the synergistic effects of temperature, oxidation and multicracking modes on damage evolution and life prediction in 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) have been investigated. The damage parameter of fatigue hysteresis dissipated energy and the interface shear stress were used to monitor the damage evolution inside of CMCs. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface/fiber oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperature, based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the load carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing (GLS) criterion. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composite fatigue fractures. The evolution of fatigue hysteresis dissipated energy, the interface shear stress and broken fibers fraction versus cycle number, and the fatigue life S-N curves of SiC/SiC at 1000, 1200 and 1300 °C in air and steam condition have been predicted. The synergistic effects of temperature, oxidation, fatigue peak stress, and multicracking modes on the evolution of interface shear stress and fatigue hysteresis dissipated energy versus cycle numbers curves have been analyzed.

  2. Probing environment fluctuations by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular systems at temperatures below 5 K

    SciTech Connect

    Rancova, Olga; Abramavicius, Darius; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic and room temperatures reveals excitation energy relaxation and transport, as well as vibrational dynamics, in molecular systems. These phenomena are related to the spectral densities of nuclear degrees of freedom, which are directly accessible by means of hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing approaches at low temperatures (few K). The 2D spectroscopy, in principle, should reveal more details about the fluctuating environment than the 1D approaches due to peak extension into extra dimension. By studying the spectral line shapes of a dimeric aggregate at low temperature, we demonstrate that 2D spectra have the potential to reveal the fluctuation spectral densities for different electronic states, the interstate correlation of static disorder and, finally, the time scales of spectral diffusion with high resolution.

  3. Characterization of the growth of 2D protein crystals on a lipid monolayer by ellipsometry and rigidity measurements coupled to electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Vénien-Bryan, C; Lenne, P F; Zakri, C; Renault, A; Brisson, A; Legrand, J F; Berge, B

    1998-01-01

    We present here some sensitive optical and mechanical experiments for monitoring the process of formation and growth of two-dimensional (2D) crystals of proteins on a lipid monolayer at an air-water interface. The adsorption of proteins on the lipid monolayer was monitored by ellipsometry measurements. An instrument was developed to measure the shear elastic constant (in plane rigidity) of the monolayer. These experiments have been done using cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and annexin V as model proteins interacting with a monosialoganglioside (GM1) and dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), respectively. Electron microscopy observations of the protein-lipid layer transferred to grids were systematically used as a control. We found a good correlation between the measured in-plane rigidity of the monolayer and the presence of large crystalline domains observed by electron microscopy grids. Our interpretation of these data is that the crystallization process of proteins on a lipid monolayer passes through at least three successive stages: 1) molecular recognition between protein and lipid-ligand, i.e., adsorption of the protein on the lipid layer; 2) nucleation and growth of crystalline patches whose percolation is detected by the appearance of a non-zero in-plane rigidity; and 3) annealing of the layer producing a slower increase of the lateral or in-plane rigidity. PMID:9591688

  4. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; McKeown Walker, S.; Tamai, A.; Wang, Y.; Ristic, Z.; Bruno, F. Y.; de la Torre, A.; Riccò, S.; Plumb, N. C.; Shi, M.; Hlawenka, P.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Varykhalov, A.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; King, P. D. C.; Meevasana, W.; Diebold, U.; Mesot, J.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Radovic, M.; Baumberger, F.

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  5. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; Wang, Y; Ristic, Z; Bruno, F Y; de la Torre, A; Riccò, S; Plumb, N C; Shi, M; Hlawenka, P; Sánchez-Barriga, J; Varykhalov, A; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Diebold, U; Mesot, J; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Radovic, M; Baumberger, F

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  6. Dynamics of a Room Temperature Ionic Liquid in Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes vs the Bulk Liquid: 2D IR and Polarized IR Pump-Probe Experiments.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Yamada, Steven A; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-01-11

    Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) are membranes that have ionic liquids impregnated in their pores. SILMs have been proposed for advanced carbon capture materials. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective IR pump-probe (PSPP) techniques were used to investigate the dynamics of reorientation and spectral diffusion of the linear triatomic anion, SeCN(-), in poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes and room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2). The dynamics in the bulk EmimNTf2 were compared to its dynamics in the SILM samples. Two PES membranes, PES200 and PES30, have pores with average sizes, ∼300 nm and ∼100 nm, respectively. Despite the relatively large pore sizes, the measurements reveal that the reorientation of SeCN(-) and the RTIL structural fluctuations are substantially slower in the SILMs than in the bulk liquid. The complete orientational randomization, slows from 136 ps in the bulk to 513 ps in the PES30. 2D IR measurements yield three time scales for structural spectral diffusion (SSD), that is, the time evolution of the liquid structure. The slowest decay constant increases from 140 ps in the bulk to 504 ps in the PES200 and increases further to 1660 ps in the PES30. The results suggest that changes at the interface propagate out and influence the RTIL structural dynamics even more than a hundred nanometers from the polymer surface. The differences between the IL dynamics in the bulk and in the membranes suggest that studies of bulk RTIL properties may be poor guides to their use in SILMs in carbon capture applications.

  7. Electron temperature dynamics of TEXTOR plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udintsev, Victor Sergeevich

    2003-11-01

    To study plasma properties in the presence of large and small MHD modes, new high-resolution ECE diagnostics have been installed at TEXTOR tokamak, and some of the already existing systems have been upgraded. Two models for the plasma transport properties inside large m/n = 2/1 MHD islands have been found to give estimations for the heat diffusivities, which are much lower than the global plasma heat diffusivity, which is in agreement with previous measurements in different tokamaks. The 3D-reconstruction of large m/n = 2/1 modes in TEXTOR with the help of all available ECE diagnostics allows modelling the island as a structure with closed flux surfaces. The main plasma heat flux flows through the X-point area probably along stochastic magnetic field lines. The confinement is improved within the magnetic island, compared to the background plasma. This is confirmed by a temperature profile flattening and sometimes even a secondary peaking inside the island, compared to the X-point. Making use of the mode rotation, assumed to be a rigid rotor, it has been possible to obtain information on the topology of the m = 1 precursor mode leading to sawtooth collapses. It becomes clear that this precursor cannot be described by an m = 1 cold tearing mode island but by a hot crescent wrapped around a cold high-density bubble. In the future multi-chord ECE-imaging will allow this mode reconstruction without the assumption of the rotation to be rigid. From the measurements of the broadband temperature and density fluctuations one can conclude that the turbulent structures inside the q = 1 surface are separated from the turbulence outside the q = 1 surface. This fits nicely with the observation that q = 1 surface acts as a barrier for the thermal transport. Correlation length and time measured inside q = 1 are in agreement with the observed turbulent heat diffusivity. Qualitative studies of non-thermal electrons at different heating regimes (ECRH and Ohmic) at TEXTOR were done

  8. Acentric 2-D Ensembles of D-br-A Electron-Transfer Chromophores via Vectorial Orientation within Amphiphilic n-Helix Bundle Peptides for Photovoltaic Device Applications

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jaseung; Park, Jaehong; Tronin, Andrey; Zhang, Ruili; Krishnan, Venkata; Strzalka, Joseph; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Fry, H. Christopher; Therien, Michael J.; Blasie, J. Kent

    2012-01-01

    We show that simply designed amphiphilic 4-helix bundle peptides can be utilized to vectorially-orient a linearly-extended Donor-bridge-Acceptor (D-br-A) electron transfer (ET) chromophore within its core. The bundle’s interior is shown to provide a unique solvation environment for the D-br-A assembly not accessible in conventional solvents, and thereby control the magnitudes of both light-induced ET and thermal charge recombination rate constants. The amphiphilicity of the bundle’s exterior was employed to vectorially-orient the peptide-chromophore complex at a liquid-gas interface, and its ends tailored for subsequent covalent attachment to an inorganic surface, via a “directed assembly” approach. Structural data, combined with evaluation of the excited state dynamics exhibited by these peptide-chromophore complexes, demonstrates that densely-packed, acentrically ordered 2-D monolayer ensembles of such complexes at high in-plane chromophore densities approaching 1/200Å2 offer unique potential as active layers in binary heterojucntion photovoltaic devices. PMID:22242787

  9. Large-Size 2D β-Cu2 S Nanosheets with Giant Phase Transition Temperature Lowering (120 K) Synthesized by a Novel Method of Super-Cooling Chemical-Vapor-Deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Huang, Le; Zhao, Guangyao; Wei, Zhongming; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping; Wang, Lin-Wang; Li, Jingbo

    2016-10-01

    2D triangular β-Cu2 S nanosheets with large size and high quality are synthesized by a novel method of super-cooling chemical-vapor-deposition. The phase transition of this 2D material from β-Cu2 S to γ-Cu2 S occurs at 258 K (-15 °C), and such transition temperature is 120 K lower than that of its bulk counterpart (about 378 K).

  10. A simple model for electron temperature in dilute plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunpei; Cooke, David L.

    2016-10-01

    In this short note, we present some work on investigating electron temperatures and potentials in steady dilute plasma flows. The analysis is based on the detailed fluid model for electrons. Ionizations, normalized electron number density gradients, and magnetic fields are neglected. The transport properties are assumed as local constants. With these treatments, the partial differential equation for electron temperature degenerates as an ordinary differential equation. Along an electron streamline, two simple formulas for electron temperature and plasma potential are obtained. These formulas offer some insights, e.g., the electron temperature and plasma potential distributions along an electron streamline include two exponential functions, and the one for plasma potential includes an extra linear distribution function.

  11. Spin Polarization of 2D Electrons in GaAs Quantum Wells at ν=1/2 from Gallium NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytag, N.; Horvatić, M.; Berthier, C.; Lévy, L.-P.; Melinte, S.; Bayot, V.; Shayegan, M.

    2000-03-01

    The spin polarization (\\cal P) of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in two GaAs/AlGaAs multiple-quantum-well heterostructures was probed by measurements of magnetic hyperfine shifts of gallium nuclei located in the quantum wells. The low temperature (50 mK <= T<= 10 K) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were observed using a standard spin-echo technique(S. Melinte et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. in press (cond-mat/9908098).. Here we report on the temperature and magnetic field-orientation dependence of \\cal P at Landau level filling factor ν =1/2. Our interpretation of the data relies on the concept of polarization mass (m_p) for composite fermions (CFs) introduced by Park and Jain(K. Park and J.K. Jain, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80), 4237 (1998).. The results in perpendicular magnetic fields (θ = 0) compare well to the simplest model for \\cal P, derived by assuming non-interacting CFs of mass m^*_p, carrying a spin, and with a g-factor the same as electrons. An unexpected behavior is observed when the 2DEG is tilted in the magnetic field; these θ neq 0 data do not agree with predictions by the non-interacting CF model by Park and Jain or the Hamiltonian model by Shankar(R. Shankar, cond-mat/9911288.).

  12. Phase diagram of electronic systems with quadratic Fermi nodes in 2 <d <4 : 2 +ɛ expansion, 4 -ɛ expansion, and functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Lukas; Herbut, Igor F.

    2017-02-01

    Several materials in the regime of strong spin-orbit interaction such as HgTe, the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7 , and the half-Heusler compound LaPtBi, as well as various systems related to these three prototype materials, are believed to host a quadratic band touching point at the Fermi level. Recently, it has been proposed that such a three-dimensional gapless state is unstable to a Mott-insulating ground state at low temperatures when the number of band touching points N at the Fermi level is smaller than a certain critical number Nc. We further substantiate and quantify this scenario by various approaches. Using ɛ expansion near two spatial dimensions, we show that Nc=64 /(25 ɛ2) +O (1 /ɛ ) and demonstrate that the instability for N 2 <d <4 . Directly in d =3 we therewith find Nc=1.86 , and thus again above the physical N =1 . All these results are consistent with the prediction that the interacting ground state of pure, unstrained HgTe, and possibly also Pr2Ir2O7 , is a strong topological insulator with a dynamically generated gap—a topological Mott insulator.

  13. Path Integral Monte Carlo finite-temperature electronic structure of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, Markku; Rantala, Tapio T.

    2003-03-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods allow a straightforward procedure for evaluation of electronic structures with a proper treatment of electronic correlations. This can be done even at finite temperatures [1]. We apply the Path Integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulation method [2] for one and two electrons in a single and double quantum dots. With this approach we evaluate the electronic distributions and correlations, and finite temperature effects on those. Temperature increase broadens the one-electron distribution as expected. This effect is smaller for correlated electrons than for single ones. The simulated one and two electron distributions of a single and two coupled quantum dots are also compared to those from experiments and other theoretical (0 K) methods [3]. Computational capacity is found to become the limiting factor in simulations with increasing accuracy. This and other essential aspects of PIMC and its capability in this type of calculations are also discussed. [1] R.P. Feynman: Statistical Mechanics, Addison Wesley, 1972. [2] D.M. Ceperley, Rev.Mod.Phys. 67, 279 (1995). [3] M. Pi, A. Emperador and M. Barranco, Phys.Rev.B 63, 115316 (2001).

  14. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  15. Ion and electron temperatures in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munninghoff, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical ion and electron temperatures in the topside ionosphere were investigated. Experimental results came from an analysis of incoherent scatter data taken at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Consideration of the energy balance equations gave the theoretical ion and electron temperatures.

  16. Electron Temperature Measurement by Floating Probe Method Using AC Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoshi, Nodomi; Shuichi, Sato; Mikio, Ohuchi

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a novel floating probe method to measure electron temperatures using a hollow cathode-type discharge tube. The proposed method detects a shift in the floating potential when an AC voltage is applied to a probe through an intermediary blocking capacitor. The shift in the floating potential is described as a function of the electron temperature and the applied AC voltage. The floating probe method is simpler than the Langmuir probe method because it does not require the measurement of volt-ampere characteristics. As the input AC voltage increases, the electron temperature converges. The electron temperature measured using the floating probe method with an applied sinusoidal voltage shows a value close to the first (tail) electron temperature in the range of the floating potential.

  17. Dependence of Electron Flux on Electron Temperature in Spacecraft Charging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    those at lower energies fall . For a given energy E, the maxi- mum of the flux curve is located at T=(2£/3). in agreement with Eq. (111. Figure 0... Bastille Day event, 2000. The spacecraft potential (negative kV) rises whenever the electron tempera- ture exceeds a critical value (from Ref. 7

  18. First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, Randy Allen

    2006-04-01

    On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

  19. Rocket measurements of electron temperature in the E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. K., Jr.; Smith, L. G.

    1980-01-01

    The rocket borne equipment, experimental method, and data reduction techniques used in the measurement of electron temperature in the E region are fully described. Electron temperature profiles from one daytime equatorial flight and two nighttime midlatitude flights are discussed. The last of these three flights, Nike Apache 14.533, showed elevated E region temperatures which are interpreted as the heating effect of a stable auroral red arc.

  20. First principles simulation of temperature dependent electronic transition of FM-AFM phase BFO.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liang; Xu, Jin-bao; Song, Mian-xin; Dong, Fa-qin; Dong, Hai-liang; Shi, Fa-Nian; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Duan, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how temperature affects the electronic transitions of BFO is important for design of BiFeO3 (BFO)-based temperature-sensitive device. Hitherto, however, there have been only very limited reports of the quantitative simulation. Here, we used density functional theory (DFT) and two-dimensional correlation analysis (2D-CA) techniques to calculate the systematic variations in electronic transitions of BFO crystal, over a range of temperature (50~1500 K). The results suggest that the heat accumulation accelerates the O-2p(4) orbital splitting, inducing the Fe(3+)-3d(5) → Fe(2+)-3d(5)d(0) charge disproportionation. The origin is observed as the temperature-dependent electron transfer process changes from threefold degeneracy to twofold degeneracy. Additionally, the crystallographic orientation (111) can be used to control the 2p-hole-induced electronic transition as O → unoccupied Fe(3+)-3d(5), in comparison to the O → Bi-6p(3) + Fe(3+)-3d(5)d(0) on the orientations (001) and (101). This study offers new perspective on the improvement of BFO-based temperature-sensitive device.

  1. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-15

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature T{sub e} is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain T{sub e} by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature T{sub e} obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures T{sub eff} derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  2. Rocket-borne measurements of electron temperature and density with the Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Widholm, M.; Lessard, M. R.; Riley, P.; Heavisides, J.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Determining electron temperature in the ionosphere is a fundamentally important measurement for space science. Obtaining measurements of electron temperatures at high altitudes (>700 km) is difficult because of limitations on ground-based radar and classic spacecraft instrumentation. In light of these limitations, the rocket-borne Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer (ERPA) was developed to allow for accurate in situ measurement of ionospheric electron temperature with a simple and low-resource instrument. The compact ERPA, a traditional retarding potential analyzer with multiple baffle collimators, allows for a straightforward calculation of electron temperature. Since its first mission in 2004, it has amassed significant flight heritage and obtained data used in multiple studies investigating a myriad of phenomena related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In addition to highlighting the scientific contributions of the ERPA instrument, this paper outlines its theory and operation, the methodology used to obtain electron temperature measurements, and a comparative study suggesting that the ERPA can also provide electron density measurements.

  3. Temperature enhancement of secondary electron emission from hydrogenated diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Akhvlediani, R.; Michaelson, Sh.; Hoffman, A.

    2009-09-15

    The effect of temperature on the stability of the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield from approx100-nm-thick continuous diamond films is reported. At room temperature, the SEE yield was found to decay as a function of electron irradiation dose. The SEE yield is observed to increase significantly upon heating of the diamond surface. Furthermore, by employing moderate temperatures, the decay of the SEE yield observed at room temperature is inhibited, showing a nearly constant yield with electron dose at 200 deg. C. The results are explained in terms of the temperature dependence of the electron beam-induced hydrogen desorption from the diamond surface and surface band bending. These findings demonstrate that the longevity of diamond films in practical applications of SEE can be increased by moderate heating.

  4. Electron Temperature Measurement of Buried Layer Targets Using Time Resolved K-shell Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Edward; Foord, M. E.; Shepherd, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Scott, H.; London, R.; Martin, M.; Wilson, B.; Iglesias, C.; Mauche, C.; Whitley, H.; Nilsen, J.; Hoarty, D.; James, S.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M.; Allan, P.; Hobbs, L.

    2016-10-01

    Short pulse laser-heated buried layer experiments have been performed with the goal of creating plasmas with mass densities >= 1 g/cm3 and electron temperatures >= 500 eV. The buried layer geometry has the advantage of rapid energy deposition before significant hydrodynamic expansion occurs. For brief periods (< 40 ps) this provides a low gradient, high density platform for studying emission characteristics under extreme plasma conditions. A study of plasma conditions achievable using the Orion laser facility has been performed. Time resolved K-shell spectroscopy was used to determine the temperature evolution of buried layer aluminum foil targets. The measured evolution is compared to a 2-D PIC simulation done using LSP, which shows late time heating from the non-thermal electron population. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. High temperature electronics and instrumentation seminar proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Veneruso, A.F.; Arnold, C.; Simpson, R.S.

    1980-05-01

    This seminar was tailored to address the needs of the borehole logging industry and to stimulate the development and application of this technology, for logging geothermal, hot oil and gas, and steam injection wells. The technical sessions covered the following topics: hybrid circuits, electronic devices, transducers, cables and connectors, materials, mechanical tools and thermal protection. Thirty-eight papers are included. Separate entries were prepared for each one. (MHR)

  6. Electromagnetic electron temperature gradient driven instability in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, J.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.

    2017-02-01

    The fluid theory of a new type of electron temperature gradient instability is proposed. This mode is closely related to the short wavelength Alfvén mode in the regime k⊥ 2 ρi 2 > 1 . Contrary to standard electron temperature gradient modes, which are mostly electrostatic, the considered mode is fundamentally electromagnetic and does not exist in the electrostatic limit. The mechanism of instability relies on gradients in both the electron temperature and magnetic field. It is suggested that this instability may be a destabilizing mechanism for collisionless microtearing modes, which are observed in a number of gyrokinetic simulations.

  7. Predictions of electron temperatures in the Mars ionosphere and their effects on electron densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Paul; Fallows, Kathryn; Matta, Majd

    2014-04-01

    Observations of peak electron densities in the Mars ionosphere are well fit by a simplistic theory that assumes the electron temperature, Te, at the peak remains constant as solar zenith angle, χ, changes. However, Te ought to vary with both altitude and χ. Here we use an existing numerical model of ionospheric energetics, which includes both vertical and diurnal variations in temperatures, to predict that Te at the ionospheric peak is relatively independent of χ. This model accurately predicts the observed dependence of peak electron density on χ, whereas predictions using Viking-based electron temperatures that are held constant with time do not. A simplified analytic model is developed to interpret these results further. It predicts that the difference between electron and neutral temperatures is proportional to the ratio of electron heating rate to electron production rate and proportional to the square root of solar irradiance.

  8. The Electron Temperature Gradient in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quireza, Cintia; Rood, Robert T.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Maciel, Walter J.

    2006-12-01

    We derive the electron temperature gradient in the Galactic disk, using a sample of H II regions that spans Galactocentric distances of 0-17 kpc. The electron temperature was calculated using high-precision radio recombination line and continuum observations for more than 100 H II regions. Nebular Galactocentric distances were calculated in a consistent manner, using the radial velocities measured by our radio recombination line survey. The large number of nebulae widely distributed over the Galactic disk, together with the uniformity of our data, provide a secure estimate of the present electron temperature gradient in the Milky Way. Because metals are the main coolants in the photoionized gas, the electron temperature along the Galactic disk should be directly related to the distribution of heavy elements in the Milky Way. Our best estimate of the electron temperature gradient is derived from a sample of 76 sources for which we have the highest quality data. The present gradient in electron temperature has a minimum at the Galactic center and rises at a rate of 287+/-46 K kpc-1. There are no significant variations in the value of the gradient as a function of Galactocentric radius or azimuth. The scatter we find in the H II region electron temperatures at a given Galactocentric radius is not due to observational error, but rather to intrinsic fluctuations in these temperatures, which are almost certainly due to fluctuations in the nebular heavy-element abundances. Comparing the H II region gradient with the much steeper gradient found for planetary nebulae suggests that the electron temperature gradient evolves with time, becoming flatter as a consequence of the chemical evolution of the Milky Way's disk.

  9. Low-Resistance 2D/2D Ohmic Contacts: A Universal Approach to High-Performance WSe2, MoS2, and MoSe2 Transistors.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsun-Jen; Chamlagain, Bhim; Koehler, Michael; Perera, Meeghage Madusanka; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David; Tománek, David; Zhou, Zhixian

    2016-03-09

    We report a new strategy for fabricating 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts for a variety of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) using van der Waals assembly of substitutionally doped TMDs as drain/source contacts and TMDs with no intentional doping as channel materials. We demonstrate that few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors (FETs) with 2D/2D contacts exhibit low contact resistances of ∼0.3 kΩ μm, high on/off ratios up to >10(9), and high drive currents exceeding 320 μA μm(-1). These favorable characteristics are combined with a two-terminal field-effect hole mobility μFE ≈ 2 × 10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature, which increases to >2 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at cryogenic temperatures. We observe a similar performance also in MoS2 and MoSe2 FETs with 2D/2D drain and source contacts. The 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts presented here represent a new device paradigm that overcomes a significant bottleneck in the performance of TMDs and a wide variety of other 2D materials as the channel materials in postsilicon electronics.

  10. Low-resistance 2D/2D ohmic contacts: A universal approach to high-performance WSe2, MoS2, and MoSe2 transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Chuang, Hsun -Jen; Chamlagain, Bhim; Koehler, Michael; ...

    2016-02-04

    Here, we report a new strategy for fabricating 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts for a variety of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) using van der Waals assembly of substitutionally doped TMDs as drain/source contacts and TMDs with no intentional doping as channel materials. We demonstrate that few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors (FETs) with 2D/2D contacts exhibit low contact resistances of ~0.3 kΩ μm, high on/off ratios up to >109, and high drive currents exceeding 320 μA μm–1. These favorable characteristics are combined with a two-terminal field-effect hole mobility μFE ≈ 2 × 102 cm2 V–1 s–1 at room temperature, which increases to >2more » × 103 cm2 V–1 s–1 at cryogenic temperatures. We observe a similar performance also in MoS2 and MoSe2 FETs with 2D/2D drain and source contacts. The 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts presented here represent a new device paradigm that overcomes a significant bottleneck in the performance of TMDs and a wide variety of other 2D materials as the channel materials in postsilicon electronics.« less

  11. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  12. High temperature electronic excitation and ionization rates in gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Frederick

    1991-01-01

    The relaxation times for electronic excitation due to electron bombardment of atoms was found to be quite short, so that electron kinetic temperature (T sub e) and the electron excitation temperature (T asterisk) should equilibrate quickly whenever electrons are present. However, once equilibrium has been achieved, further energy to the excited electronic states and to the kinetic energy of free electrons must be fed in by collisions with heavy particles that cause vibrational and electronic state transitions. The rate coefficients for excitation of electronic states produced by heavy particle collision have not been well known. However, a relatively simple semi-classical theory has been developed here which is analytic up to the final integration over a Boltzmann distribution of collision energies; this integral can then be evaluated numerically by quadrature. Once the rate coefficients have been determined, the relaxation of electronic excitation energy can be evaluated and compared with the relaxation rates of vibrational excitation. Then the relative importance of these two factors, electronic excitation and vibrational excitation by heavy particle collision, on the transfer of energy to free electron motion, can be assessed.

  13. Measurement of electron density and temperature in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Rowley, P. D.; Presley, L. L.; Stallcop, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of two laser wavelengths passing through plasma measures electron density and temperature. Function depends on determining absorption of light at two wavelengths. Nature of reaction is explained and schematic diagram of equipment is included.

  14. a Nonlinear Model for Relativistic Electrons at Positive Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, Christian; Lewin, Mathieu; Seiringer, Robert

    We study the relativistic electron-positron field at positive temperature in the Hartree-Fock approximation. We consider both the case with and without exchange terms, and investigate the existence and properties of minimizers. Our approach is non-perturbative in the sense that the relevant electron subspace is determined in a self-consistent way. The present work is an extension of previous work by Hainzl, Lewin, Séré and Solovej where the case of zero temperature was considered.

  15. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  16. Ion temperature effects on magnetotail Alfvén wave propagation and electron energization: ION TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON ALFVÉN WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Chaston, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    A new 2-D self-consistent hybrid gyrofluid-kinetic electron model in dipolar coordinates is presented and used to simulate dispersive-scale Alfvén wave pulse propagation from the equator to the ionosphere along an L = 10 magnetic field line. The model is an extension of the hybrid MHD-kinetic electron model that incorporates ion Larmor radius corrections via the kinetic fluid model of Cheng and Johnson (1999). It is found that consideration of a realistic ion to electron temperature ratio decreases the propagation time of the wave from the plasma sheet to the ionosphere by several seconds relative to a ρi=0 case (which also implies shorter timing for a substorm onset signal) and leads to significant dispersion of wave energy perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Additionally, ion temperature effects reduce the parallel current and electron energization all along the field line for the same magnitude perpendicular electric field perturbation.

  17. Electronic Components and Circuits for Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior and tolerance in the electrical and thermal properties of semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial-off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low temperature applications. An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronic Program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with

  18. Electron temperature anisotropy effects on tearing mode in ion-scale current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haijima, K.; Tanaka, K. G.; Fujimoto, M.; Shinohara, I.

    Recent two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that there is a critical thickness of a current sheet, above which no significant saturation amplitude of the 2-D tearing (TI) mode can be expected. Here, we have introduced the initial electron temperature anisotropy (αe0 = Te⊥/Te|| > 1), which is known to raise significantly the linear growth rates, and inspected if αe0 > 1 can change the saturation level of the TI in a super-critical current sheet. Varying αe0 and D (D: the current sheet half-thickness) systematically, we have found that while αe0 boosts up the linear growth rate in both sub- and super-critical current sheets, macroscopic effects are obtained only in sub-critical current sheets, that is, energy transfer from the fastest growing short wavelength modes to longer wavelength modes are available only in the sub-critical regime. Since the critical thickness is a fraction of the ion inertial length, the tearing mode assisted by the electron temperature anisotropy alone, despite its significant boost in the linear growth rate, cannot be the agent for reconnection triggering in a current sheet of ion-scale thickness.

  19. High-Temperature Electronics: A Role for Wide Bandgap Semiconductors?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that semiconductor based electronics that can function at ambient temperatures higher than 150 C without external cooling could greatly benefit a variety of important applications, especially-in the automotive, aerospace, and energy production industries. The fact that wide bandgap semiconductors are capable of electronic functionality at much higher temperatures than silicon has partially fueled their development, particularly in the case of SiC. It appears unlikely that wide bandgap semiconductor devices will find much use in low-power transistor applications until the ambient temperature exceeds approximately 300 C, as commercially available silicon and silicon-on-insulator technologies are already satisfying requirements for digital and analog very large scale integrated circuits in this temperature range. However, practical operation of silicon power devices at ambient temperatures above 200 C appears problematic, as self-heating at higher power levels results in high internal junction temperatures and leakages. Thus, most electronic subsystems that simultaneously require high-temperature and high-power operation will necessarily be realized using wide bandgap devices, once the technology for realizing these devices become sufficiently developed that they become widely available. Technological challenges impeding the realization of beneficial wide bandgap high ambient temperature electronics, including material growth, contacts, and packaging, are briefly discussed.

  20. Development of Electronics for Low Temperature Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott; Overton, Eric

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about -183 C. In addition to surviving the deep space harsh environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. An on-going research and development program on low temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of efficient power systems capable of surviving and exploiting the advantages of low temperature environments. Inhouse efforts include the design, fabrication, and characterization of low temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low temperature operations, such as dielectric and insulating materials, semiconductor devices, passive power components, opto-electronic devices, as well as packaging and integration of the developed components into prototype flight hardware.

  1. Non-contact temperature measurement requirements for electronic materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for non-contact temperature measurement capabilities for electronic materials processing in space are assessed. Non-contact methods are probably incapable of sufficient accuracy for the actual absolute measurement of temperatures in most such applications but would be useful for imaging in some applications.

  2. Temperature Dependent Electron Transport Studies for Diffuse Discharge Switching Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    of <e>, k (<e >), for C2F6 and C3F8 at gas temperature up to 7!fu K. These results may be used to under stand the influence of elevated gas...of k (<&>) have also been performed in c3F8 as a functionaof gas temperature up to 750 R in Ar buffer gas (over the mean electron energy range 0.76...dependent electron attachment pro- cesses are negligible indicating that electron attachment to C3F8 at t hese t emperatures i s predomi- nantly dissociati

  3. Dissociative electron attachment to HBr: A temperature effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fedor, J.; Cingel, M.; Skalny, J. D.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T. D.; Cizek, M.; Kolorenc, P.; Horacek, J.

    2007-02-15

    The effects of rovibrational temperature on dissociative electron attachment to hydrogen bromide has been investigated from the experimental and theoretical point of view. Theoretical calculations based on the nonlocal resonance model predict a strong temperature effect on the Br{sup -} fragment ion yield due to population of higher vibrational and rotational states. A crossed beam experimental setup consisting of a temperature controlled effusive molecular beam and a trochoidal electron monochromator has been used to confirm this prediction. The high degree of agreement between experiment and theory indicates the validity of the theoretical model and its underlying physical picture.

  4. Langmuir solitons in a plasma with inhomogeneous electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Evgeny M.; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-06-01

    Dynamics of Langmuir solitons is considered in plasmas with spatially inhomogeneous electron temperature. An underlying Zakharov-type system of two unidirectional equations for the Langmuir and ion-sound fields is reduced to an inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with spatial variation of the second-order dispersion and self-phase modulation coefficients, induced by a spatially inhomogeneous profile of the electron temperature. Analytical trajectories of motion of a soliton in the plasma with an electron-temperature hole, barrier, or cavity between two barriers are found, using the method of integral moments. The possibility of the soliton to pass a high-temperature barrier is shown too. Analytical results are well corroborated by numerical simulations.

  5. Electronics for Low-Temperature Space Operation Being Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2001-01-01

    Electronic components and systems capable of low-temperature operation are needed for many future NASA missions where it is desirable to have smaller, lighter, and cheaper (unheated) spacecraft. These missions include Mars (-20 to -120 C) orbiters, landers, and rovers; Europa (-150 C) oceanic exploratory probes and instrumentation; Saturn (-183 C) and Pluto (-229 C) interplanetary probes. At the present, most electronic equipment can operate down to only -55 C. It would be very desirable to have electronic components that expand the operating temperature range down to -233 C. The successful development of these low-temperature components will eventually allow space probes and onboard electronics to operate in very cold environments (out as far as the planet Pluto). As a result, radioisotope heating units, which are used presently to keep space electronics near room temperature, will be reduced in number or eliminated. The new cold electronics will make spacecraft design and operation simpler, more flexible, more reliable, lighter, and cheaper. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are evaluating potential commercial off-the- shelf devices and are developing new electronic components that will tolerate operation at low temperatures down to -233 C. This work is being carried out mainly inhouse and also through university grants and commercial contracts. The components include analog-to-digital converters, semiconductor switches, capacitors, dielectric and packaging material, and batteries. For example, the effect of low temperature on the capacitance of three different types of capacitors is shown in the graph. Using these advanced components, system products will be developed, including dc/dc converters, battery charge/discharge management systems, digital control electronics, transducers, and sensor instrumentation.

  6. Stopping power of an electron gas with anisotropic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelemelia, O. V.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    A general theory of motion of a heavy charged particle in the electron gas with an anisotropic velocity distribution is developed within the quantum-field method. The analytical expressions for the dielectric susceptibility and the stopping power of the electron gas differs in no way from well-known classic formulas in the approximation of large and small velocities. Stopping power of the electron gas with anisotropic temperature in the framework of the quantum-field method is numerically calculated for an arbitrary angle between directions of the motion of the projectile particle and the electron beam. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the dielectric model approach.

  7. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Subir Chowdhury, Satyajit; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-14

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  8. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for

  9. Towards functional assembly of 3D and 2D nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.; Wang, Kai; Ievlev, Anton V.; Muckley, Eric S.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-09-01

    Functional assemblies of materials can be realized by tuning the work function and band gap of nanomaterials by rational material selection and design. Here we demonstrate the structural assembly of 2D and 3D nanomaterials and show that layering a 2D material monolayer on a 3D metal oxide leads to substantial alteration of both the surface potential and optical properties of the 3D material. A 40 nm thick film of polycrystalline NiO was produced by room temperature rf-sputtering, resulting in a 3D nanoparticle assembly. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown 10-30 μm WS2 flakes (2D material) were placed on the NiO surface using a PDMS stamp transfer technique. The 2D/3D WS2/NiO assembly was characterized using confocal micro Raman spectroscopy to evaluate the vibrational properties and using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to evaluate the surface potential. Raman maps of the 2D/3D assembly show spatial non-uniformity of the A1g mode ( 418 cm-1) and the disorder-enhanced longitudinal acoustic mode, 2LA(M) ( 350 cm-1), suggesting that the WS2 exists in a strained condition on when transferred onto 3D polycrystalline NiO. KPFM measurements show that single layer WS2 on SiO2 has a surface potential 75 mV lower than that of SiO2, whereas the surface potential of WS2 on NiO is 15 mV higher than NiO, indicating that WS2 could act as electron donor or acceptor depending on the 3D material it is interfaced with. Thus 2D and 3D materials can be organized into functional assemblies with electron flow controlled by the WS2 either as the electron donor or acceptor.

  10. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  11. Analysis of the Critical Electron Temperature Gradient in Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Hu, B.; Zhu, P.; Hoang, G. T.; Bourdelle, C.; Ottaviani, M.; Garbet, X.; Giruzzi, G.

    2001-10-01

    The Tore Supra database of fast wave electron heating (FWEH) discharges is analyzed with respect to the role of the critical electron temperature gradient. The experimental evidence for the linear theory critical gradient is presented from both (i) power balance thermal flux versus the temperature gradient extrapolated to zero flux and (ii) the fluctuation spectra versus the gadient extrapolated to the vanishing point. Case studies with the LOCO and BALDUR transport codes are used to investigate the impact of the critical gradient in both cases close to the Ohmic discharge with 0.75 MW of rf power and strongly heated discharges with up to 7.4 MW of RF power. The interpretation of the critical gradient as a heat pinch term is also explored with thermodynamic theory and the space-time symmetries of the underlying dynamical equations. There is a relationship between the critical electron temperature gradient and the particle pinch. The evidence for the two candidates to explain the electron transport: trapped electron modes (TEM), characterized by wavenumbers much longer than the ion gyroradius, and the smaller-scale electron temperature gradient modes (ETG) with wavelengths comparable and smaller than the ion gyroradius is presented in detail.

  12. Electronic Components for use in Extreme Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electrical power management and control systems designed for use in planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electronics that are capable of efficient and reliable operation under extreme temperature conditions. Space-based infra-red satellites, all-electric ships, jet engines, electromagnetic launchers, magnetic levitation transport systems, and power facilities are also typical examples where the electronics are expected to be exposed to harsh temperatures and to operate under severe thermal swings. Most commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices are not designed to function under such extreme conditions and, therefore, new parts must be developed or the conventional devices need to be modified. For example, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. At the other end, built-in radiators and coolers render the operation of electronics possible under hot conditions. These thermal measures lead to design complexity, affect development costs, and increase size and weight. Electronics capable of operation at extreme temperatures, thus, will not only tolerate the hostile operational environment, but also make the overall system efficient, more reliable, and less expensive. The Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electronics suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices, including COTS parts, for potential use under extreme temperatures. These components include semiconductor switching devices, passive devices, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators. An overview of the program will be presented along with some experimental findings.

  13. Electron temperature and density relationships in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, C. M.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    We examine 10 coronal mass ejections from the in-ecliptic portion of the Ulysses mission. Five of these CMEs are magnetic clouds. In each case we observe an inverse relationship between electron temperature and density. For protons this relationship is less clear. Earlier work has shown a similar inverse relationship for electrons inside magnetic clouds and interpreted it to mean that the polytropic index governing the expansion of electrons is less than unity. This requires electrons to be heated as the CME expands. We offer an alternative view that the inverse relationship between electron temperature and density is caused by more rapid cooling of the denser plasma through collisions. More rapid cooling of denser plasma has been shown for 1 AU measurements in the solar wind. As evidence for this hypothesis we show that the denser plasma inside the CMEs tends to be more isotropic indicating a different history of collisions for the dense plasma. Thus, although the electron temperature inside CMEs consistently shows an inverse correlation with the density, this is not an indication of the polytropic index of the plasma but instead supports the idea of collisional modification of the electrons during their transit from the sun.

  14. Temperature Calibration for In Situ Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, JP; Lin, PA; Sharma, R

    2016-01-01

    In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) experiments require specimen heating holders to study material behavior in gaseous environments at elevated temperatures. In order to extract meaningful kinetic parameters, such as activation energies, it is essential to have a direct and accurate measurement of local sample temperature. This is particularly important if the sample temperature might fluctuate, for example when room temperature gases are introduced to the sample area. Using selected-area diffraction (SAD) in an ETEM, the lattice parameter of Ag nanoparticles was measured as a function of the temperature and pressure of hydrogen gas to provide a calibration of the local sample temperature. SAD permits measurement of temperature to an accuracy of ± 30 °C using Ag lattice expansion. Gas introduction can cause sample cooling of several hundred degrees celsius for gas pressures achievable in the ETEM. PMID:26441334

  15. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A.; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases. PMID:26318383

  16. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases.

  17. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  18. Electron temperature and heat flow in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Mayr, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    A steady-state two-dimensional heat balance model is used to analyze the night side Venusian ionospheric electron temperatures given by the Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe. The energy calculation includes the solar EUV heating at the terminator, electron cooling to ions and neutrals, and heat conduction within the ionospheric plasma. An optimum magnetic field is derived by solving for the heat flux directions which force energy conservation while constrained by the observed temperatures within the range of 80-170 deg solar zenith angle and 160-170 km. The heat flux vectors indicate a magnetic field that connects the lower night side ionosphere to the day side ionosphere, and connects the upper ionosphere to the ionosheath. The lower ionosphere is heated through conduction of heat from the dayside, and the upper ionosphere is heated by the solar wind in the ionosheath with heat flowing downward and from the nightside to the day side.

  19. Low Temperature Photoluminescence (PL) from High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    temperature Photoluminescence (PL) from High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) structures that have been modified by proton irradiation. The samples are...samples and exposed the structures to various levels of proton irradiation. For electronics operating in extreme environments where the parts...valence band, generating photons. This emission could be used to determine the effects of proton irradiation on a 2DEG. Exciting the HEMT samples

  20. Seasonal variations in the subauroral electron temperature enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, M.C.; Kozyra, J.U.; Warren, M.F. ); Brace, L.H. )

    1991-06-01

    The subauroral nightside electron temperature peak is one of the phenomena showing the response of the subauroral ionosphere to the influx of magnetic storm energy in the vicinity of the plasmapause. A statistical study of the seasonal variations of the subauroral electron temperature enhancement was undertaken using data from the Langmuir probe experiment on the DE 2 satellite throughout most of the mission (1981-1982). In the winter hemisphere the nighttime background electron temperature is the highest and the magnitude of the peak T{sub e} responds most weakly to the geomagnetic activity. This behavior can be explained by seasonal trends in the nighttime downward heat flux due to conjugate photoelectrons. Moreover, model results indicate that a factor of {approximately}3 increase in heat inflow during equinox relative to solstice is required to raise the electron temperature to a given level. This is a consequence of the higher electron densities at the T{sub e} peak near equinox. The T{sub e} peak occurs on field lines which thread the outer plasmasphere in the vicinity of the plasmapause and thus can be used as a tracer of the plasmapause position. Correlating the position of the T{sub e} peak with K{sub p} (the highest value of 3-hour K{sub p} in the preceding 12 hours) indicates a trend toward a more expanded quiet time plasmasphere and one which is more easily compressed by magnetic storms at equinox than during the solstice period.

  1. Determining coronal electron temperatures from observations with UVCS/SOHO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, S.; Esser, R.; Habbal, S. R.; Karovska, M.; Romoli, M.; Strachan, L.; Kohl, J. L.; Huber, M. C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The electron temperature is a fundamental physical parameter of the coronal plasma. Currently, there are no direct measurements of this quantity in the extended corona. Observations with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the upcoming Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission can provide the most direct determination of the electron kinetic temperature (or, more precisely, the electron velocity distribution along the line of sight). This measurement is based on the observation of the Thomson-scattered Lyman alpha (Ly-alpha) profile. This observation is made particularly challenging by the fact that the integrated intensity of the electron-scattered Ly-alpha line is about 10(exp 3) times fainter than that of the resonantly-scattered Ly-alpha component. In addition, the former is distributed across 50 A (FWHM), unlike the latter that is concentrated in 1 A. These facts impose stringent requirements on the stray-light rejection properties of the coronagraph/spectrometer, and in particular on the requirements for the grating. We make use of laboratory measurements of the UVCS Ly-alpha grating stray-light, and of simulated electron-scattered Ly-alpha profiles to estimate the expected confidence levels of electron temperature determination. Models of different structures typical of the corona (e.g., streamers, coronal holes) are used for this parameter study.

  2. Wide-Temperature Electronics for Thermal Control of Nanosats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, John Ellis; Gerber, Scott

    2000-01-01

    This document represents a presentation which examines the wide and low-temperature electronics required for NanoSatellites. In the past, larger spacecraft used Radioisotope Heating Units (RHU's). The advantage of the use of these electronics is that they could eliminate or reduce the requirement for RHU's, reduce system weight and simplify spacecraft design by eliminating containment/support structures for RHU's. The Glenn Research Center's Wide/Low Temperature Power Electronics Program supports the development of power systems capable of reliable, efficient operation over wide and low temperature ranges. Included charts review the successes and failures of various electronic devices, the IRF541 HEXFET, The NE76118n-Channel GaAS MESFET, the Lithium Carbon Monofluoride Primary Battery, and a COTS DC-DC converter. The preliminary result of wide/low temperature testing of CTS and custom parts and power circuit indicate that through careful selection of components and technologies it is possible to design and build power circuits which operate from room temperature to near 100K.

  3. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  4. Optimizing the temperature compensation of an electronic pressure measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Blalock, T.V.

    1990-08-01

    In an effort to minimize temperature sensitivity, the pressure measurement channels in the sensor/electronics modules of a high-resolution multiplexed pressure measurement system were analyzed. The pressure sensor (a silicon diaphragm strain gage) was known to have two temperature-dependent parameters. Component testing revealed that the current source driving the pressure sensor was also temperature sensitive. Although the transducer manufacturer supplies empirically selected temperature compensation resistors with each transducer, it was determined that the temperature sensitivity compensation could be optimized for this application by changing one of these resistors. By modifying the value of the sensitivity compensation resistor to optimize performance in this application, the temperature sensitivity of the pressure measurement channels was reduced by more than 60%.

  5. Temperature dependence of damage coefficient in electron irradiated solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faith, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of light-generated current vs cell temperature on electron-irradiated n/p silicon solar cells show the temperature coefficient of this current to increase with increasing fluence for both 10-ohm and 20-ohm cells. A relationship between minority-carrier diffusion length and light-generated current was derived by combining measurements of these two parameters: vs fluence at room temperature, and vs cell temperature in cells irradiated to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 15th power e/sq cm. This relationship was used, together with the light-generated current data, to calculate the temperature dependence of the diffusion-length damage coefficient. The results show a strong decrease in the damage coefficient with increasing temperature in the range experienced by solar panels in synchronous earth orbit.

  6. Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on O-X conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe; Zhao, Ai-Hui

    2013-10-15

    Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on Ordinary-Extraordinary (O-X) conversion in the range of electron cyclotron frequency are investigated. The modified optimal parallel refraction index, N{sub zc}, and the conversion coefficient are obtained analytically from the kinetic dispersion relation. The presence of finite electron temperature shifts the O-X conversion layer towards a region of lower density and increases the value of N{sub zc}; while the effect of electron flow depends on its direction with respect to the parallel wave vector. When the electron flow is along the parallel wave vector, N{sub zc} will be increased and the effects of finite electron temperature and finite electron flow accumulate. As a result, a more oblique incidence angle is required for efficient O-X conversion. For typical Tokamak plasmas, the efficiency of O-X conversion will decrease without the consideration of the two effects. When the electron flow is in the direction opposite to the parallel wave vector, the two effects compete, even cancel each other.

  7. Electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges over liquid water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeni Simeni, M.; Roettgen, A.; Petrishchev, V.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved electron density, electron temperature, and gas temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium and O2-He mixtures near liquid water surface are measured using Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering, in two different geometries, (a) ‘diffuse filament’ discharge between a spherical high-voltage electrode and a grounded pin electrode placed in a reservoir filled with distilled water, with the tip exposed, and (b) dielectric barrier discharge between the high-voltage electrode and the liquid water surface. A diffuse plasma filament generated between the electrodes in helium during the primary discharge pulse exhibits noticeable constriction during the secondary discharge pulse several hundred ns later. Adding oxygen to the mixture reduces the plasma filament diameter and enhances constriction during the secondary pulse. In the dielectric barrier discharge, diffuse volumetric plasma occupies nearly the entire space between the high voltage electrode and the liquid surface, and extends radially along the surface. In the filament discharge in helium, adding water to the container results in considerable reduction of plasma lifetime compared to the discharge in dry helium, by about an order of magnitude, indicating rapid electron recombination with water cluster ions. Peak electron density during the pulse is also reduced, by about a factor of two, likely due to dissociative attachment to water vapor during the discharge pulse. These trends become more pronounced as oxygen is added to the mixture, which increases net rate of dissociative attachment. Gas temperature during the primary discharge pulse remains near room temperature, after which it increases up to T ~ 500 K over 5 µs and decays back to near room temperature before the next discharge pulse several tens of ms later. As expected, electron density and electron temperature in diffuse DBD plasmas are considerably lower compared to peak values in the filament discharge. Use of Thomson

  8. Modeling the uniform transport in thin film SOI MOSFETs with a Monte-Carlo simulator for the 2D electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Luca; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Esseni, David; Selmi, Luca

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we present simulations of some of the most relevant transport properties of the inversion layer of ultra-thin film SOI devices with a self-consistent Monte-Carlo transport code for a confined electron gas. We show that size induced quantization not only decreases the low-field mobility (as experimentally found in [Uchida K, Koga J, Ohba R, Numata T, Takagi S. Experimental eidences of quantum-mechanical effects on low-field mobility, gate-channel capacitance and threshold voltage of ultrathin body SOI MOSFETs, IEEE IEDM Tech Dig 2001;633-6; Esseni D, Mastrapasqua M, Celler GK, Fiegna C, Selmi L, Sangiorgi E. Low field electron and hole mobility of SOI transistors fabricated on ultra-thin silicon films for deep sub-micron technology application. IEEE Trans Electron Dev 2001;48(12):2842-50; Esseni D, Mastrapasqua M, Celler GK, Fiegna C, Selmi L, Sangiorgi E, An experimental study of mobility enhancement in ultra-thin SOI transistors operated in double-gate mode, IEEE Trans Electron Dev 2003;50(3):802-8. [1-3

  9. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori

    2012-12-01

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, θ, and ellipticity angle, ε, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n(e), and the electron temperature, T(e), and that the separation of n(e) and T(e) from θ and ε is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10(20) m(-3), and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I(p), is known and when I(p) is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j(φ), n(e), and T(e) are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j(φ) without the information of I(p) indicates the new method of I(p) measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  10. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori

    2012-12-15

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, {theta}, and ellipticity angle, {epsilon}, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n{sub e}, and the electron temperature, T{sub e}, and that the separation of n{sub e} and T{sub e} from {theta} and {epsilon} is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}, and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I{sub p}, is known and when I{sub p} is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j{sub {phi}}, n{sub e}, and T{sub e} are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j{sub {phi}} without the information of I{sub p} indicates the new method of I{sub p} measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  11. Electron attachment to SF6 at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. M.; Friedman, J. F.; Viggiano, A. A.; Troe, J.

    2008-10-01

    We have recently reported flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe experiments on electron attachment to SF6, thermal electron detachment from SF6^-, and the pressure dependence of the processes involved, in the temperature range 300-670 K, including theoretical analysis of the possible outcomes of the electron-SF6 interaction, with modeling of the data. One significant result of that work was the finding that the electron affinity of SF6 is 1.20 ± 0.05 eV.ootnotetextA. A. Viggiano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 244303, (2007). We have now extended the temperature range up to 1300 K. The electron attachment rate constant at 700 K is 1.7 x 10-7 cm^3 s-1 (yielding SF5^- and SF6^- product), and the thermal detachment rate constant for SF6^- is 580 s-1. F^- becomes a major ion product at 1000 K and above. We suspect that in this temperature range the SF6 molecules are decomposing, because the SF5^- ion product disappears above 1100 K, and only the F^- ion product remains. Further work must be carried out to determine the origin of the F^-, whether from decomposition or a surface-ionization effect.

  12. Characterization of electron temperature by simulating a multicusp ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, Yeong Heum; Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Kim, Sang Bum; Jun, Woo Jung; Lee, Jong Chul; Mohamed Gad, Khaled Mohamed; Namgoong, Ho; Chai, Jong Seo

    2016-12-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used in cyclotrons and linear accelerators to produce high beam currents. The structure of a multicusp ion source consists of permanent magnets, filaments, and an anode body. The configuration of the array of permanent magnets, discharge voltage of the plasma, extraction bias voltage, and structure of the multicusp ion source body decide the quality of the beam. The electrons are emitted from the filament by thermionic emission. The emission current can be calculated from thermal information pertaining to the filament, and from the applied voltage and current. The electron trajectories were calculated using CST Particle Studio to optimize the plasma. The array configuration of the permanent magnets decides the magnetic field inside the ion source. The extraction bias voltage and the structure of the multicusp ion source body decide the electric field. Optimization of the electromagnetic field was performed with these factors. CST Particle Studio was used to calculate the electron temperature with a varying permanent magnet array. Four types of permanent magnet array were simulated to optimize the electron temperature. It was found that a 2-layer full line cusp field (with inverse field) produced the best electron temperature control behavior.

  13. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, G.H.; Smith, J.L.; Sim, J.W.

    1983-11-10

    This invention pertains to a high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  14. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, Gene H.; Smith, James L.; Sim, James W.

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  15. Proceedings of the Conference on High-temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of electronic devices for use in high temperature environments is addressed. The instrumentational needs of planetary exploration, fossil and nuclear power reactors, turbine engine monitoring, and well logging are defined. Emphasis is place on the fabrication and performance of materials and semiconductor devices, circuits and systems and packaging.

  16. Profiles of electron temperature and Bz along Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Nakamura, R.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    We study the electron temperature distribution and the structure of the current sheet along the magnetotail using simultaneous observations from THEMIS spacecraft. We perform a statistical study of 40 crossings of the current sheet when the three spacecraft THB, THC, and THD were distributed along the tail in the vicinity of midnight with coordinates XB \\in [-30 RE, -20 RE], XC \\in [-20 RE, -15 RE], and XD ~ -10 RE. We obtain profiles of the average electron temperature \\mlab Te\\mrab and the average magnetic field \\mlab Bz\\mrab along the tail. Electron temperature and \\mlab Bz\\mrab increase towards the Earth with almost the same rates (i.e., ratio \\mlab Te\\mrab/\\mlab Bz\\mrab ≈ 2 keV/7 nT is approximately constant along the tail). We also use statistics of 102 crossings of the current sheet from THB and THC to estimate dependence of Te and Bz distributions on geomagnetic activity. The ratio \\mlab Te \\mrab/\\mlab Bz\\mrab depends on geomagnetic activity only slightly. Additionally we demonstrate that anisotropy of the electron temperature \\mlab T∥/T⊥\\mrab ≈ 1.1 is almost constant along the tail for X \\in [-30 RE, -10 RE].

  17. Spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature on VX-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma, Ella; Lee, Charles; Bengtson, Roger; Jacobson, Verlin; Lavagni-Bolanos, Frank; McCaskill, Greg

    2004-11-01

    We have made spectroscopic measurements at several locations in the VX-10 experiment in the near UV, visible, and near IR spectral region. We estimate electron temperatures using a collisional radiative model. Residual gas analysis is also performed with plasma discharges. Quantitative estimates of plasma composition are also discussed.

  18. Experimental Time Resolved Electron Beam Temperature Measurements Using Bremsstrahlung Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Menge, P.R.; Maenchen, J.E.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Rosenthal, S.E.

    1999-06-25

    Electron beam temperature, {beta}{perpendicular} (= v{perpendicular}/v), is important to control for the development of high dose flash radiographic bremsstrahlung sources. At high voltage (> 5 MV) increasing electron beam temperature has a serious deleterious effect on dose production. The average and time resolved behavior of beam temperature was measured during radiographic experiments on the HERMES III accelerator (10 MV, 50 kA, 70 ns). A linear array of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to estimate the time integrated average of beam temperature. On and off-axis photoconducting diamond (PCD) detectors were used to measure the time resolved bremsstrahlung dose rate, which is dependent on beam energy and temperature. The beam temperature can be determined by correlating PCD response with accelerator voltage and current and also by analyzing the ratio of PCD amplitudes on and off axis. This ratio is insensitive to voltage and current and thus, is more reliable than utilizing absolute dose rate. The data is unfolded using comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations to obtain absolute beam temperatures. The data taken on HERMES III show abrupt increases in {beta}{perpendicular} midway through the pulse indicating rapid onset of beam instability.

  19. Effect of re-heating on the hot electron temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Rosen, M.

    1980-06-17

    Resonant absorption is the direct conversion of the transverse laser light to longitudinal electron plasma waves (epw) at the critical density (10/sup 21/ (1.06 ..mu..m/lambda/sub 0/)/sup 2/ cm/sup -3/). The oscillating longitudinal electric field of the epw heats the electrons by accelerating them down the density gradient to a temperature of approximately 21T/sub e//sup 0/ /sup 25/ ((I(W/cm/sup 2/)/10/sup 16/)(lambda/sub 0//1.06 ..mu..m)/sup 2/)/sup 0/ /sup 4/. This section extends the previous work by studying the effects of magnetic fields and collisions (albedo) which return the heated electrons for further heating. A magnetic field increases their temperature and collisions do not.

  20. High Temperature Electronics for Intelligent Harsh Environment Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of intelligent instrumentation systems is of high interest in both public and private sectors. In order to obtain this ideal in extreme environments (i.e., high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation), both sensors and electronics must be developed concurrently in order that the entire system will survive for extended periods of time. The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. The advantages of SiC over conventional materials include its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical properties in harsh environments, and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  1. A novel 2D and 3D method for automated insulin granule measurement and its application in assessing accepted preparation methods for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantell, J.; Nam, D.; Bull, D.; Achim, A.; Verkade, P.

    2014-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy images of insulin-producing beta cells in the islets of Langerhans contain many complex structures, making it difficult to accurately segment insulin granules. Furthermore the appearance of the granules and surrounding halo and limiting membrane can vary enormously depending on the methods used for sample preparation. An automated method has been developed using active contours to segment the insulin core initially and then expand to segment the halos [1]. The method has been validated against manual measurements and also yields higher accuracy than other automated methods [2]. It has then been extended to three dimensions to analyse a tomographic reconstruction from a thick section of the same material. The final step has been to produce a GUI and use the automated process to compare a number of different electron microscopy preparation protocols including chemical fixation (where many of halos are often distended) and to explore the many subtleties of high pressure freezing (where the halos are often minimal, [3]).

  2. Development of Electronics for Low-Temperature Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott S.; Overton, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Electronic systems that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures will be needed for many future NASA space missions, including deep space probes and spacecraft for planetary surface exploration. In addition to being able to survive the harsh deep space environment, low-temperature electronics would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic exploration. An ongoing research and development project for the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature electronics and supporting technologies at NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on efficient power systems capable of surviving in and exploiting the advantages of low-temperature environments. Supporting technologies include dielectric and insulating materials, semiconductor devices, passive power components, optoelectronic devices, and packaging and integration of the developed components into prototype flight hardware. An overview of the project is presented, including a description of the test facilities, a discussion of selected data from component testing, and a presentation of ongoing research activities being performed in collaboration with various organizations.

  3. Electron density and temperature in the solar corona from multifrequency radio imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, C.; Chambe, G.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The 2D images obtained through rotational aperture synthesis with the Nançay Radioheliograph are suitable for quantitative exploitation. First results are presented. Aims: We study the variations of the quiet corona in brightness and size during an 8-year period and derive electron density and temperature in the corona. Methods: Images at 6 frequencies between 150 and 450 MHz for 183 quiet days between 2004 and 2011 were used. Measurements of the brightness temperature Tb beyond the limb allowed coronal density models to be derived in both EW and NS radial directions, with a weak dependence on the electron temperature. The total ranges in the heliocentric distance r are 1.15-1.60 R⊙ (EW) and 1.0-1.4 R⊙ (NS). The agreement between results from different frequencies, in the ranges of r where there is overlapping shows the robustness of the method. The electron temperature, in turn, can be derived from the comparison of the observed mean spectra on the disk with those predicted through transfer calculations from the density models derived from limb observations. Results: The widths of the brightness profiles that were averaged yearly have minima at cycle minimum (2008-2009). These minima are more pronounced for EW profiles than for NS ones. The derived yearly-averaged density models along equatorial and polar diameters are consistent with isothermal and hydrostatic models. They are characterized by their density value n0 extrapolated down to the base of the corona and their scale-height temperature TH. Changes in n0 and TH with solar cycle are given for equatorial and polar regions. The kinetic temperature Te of electrons in the corona (~0.62 MK) is found to be significantly less than TH (~1.5 MK). This implies an ion temperature Ti ~ 2.2 MK. Conclusions: The yearly-averaged variations of these models are less than the dispersion between models derived from other techniques, such as white light and EUV observations, partly because these two techniques

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation in Dense Hydrogen: Electronic Quantum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qian; Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-10-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation is an important non-equilibrium process in the generation of dense plasmas, particularly in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Classical molecular dynamics considers electrons as point charges, ignoring important quantum processes. We use an Electron Force Field (EFF) method to study the temperature relaxation processes, considering the nuclei as semi-classical point charges and assume electrons as Gaussian wave packets which includes the influences of the size and the radial motion of electrons. At the same time, a Pauli potential is used to describe the electronic exchange effect. At this stage, quantum effects such as exchange, tunneling can be included in this model. We compare the results from EFF and classical molecular dynamics, and find that the relaxation time is much longer with including quantum effects, which can be explained directly by the deference of collision cross sections between quantum particles and classical particles. Further, the final thermal temperature of electron and ion is different compared with classical results that the electron quantum effects cannot be neglected.

  5. Determination of the neutron electric formfactor in quasielastic collisions of polarized electrons with 3He and 2D. Collaboration A3 at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, H. G.; Annand, J. R. M.; Aulenbacher, K.; Becker, J.; Blume-Werry, J.; Dombo, Th.; Drescher, P.; Ducret, J. E.; Eyl, D.; Fischer, H.; Frey, A.; Grabmayr, P.; Hall, S.; Hartmann, P.; Hehl, T.; Heil, W.; Hoffmann, J.; Kellie, J. D.; Klein, F.; Leduc, M.; Meierhoff, M.; Möller, H.; Nachtigall, Ch.; Ostrick, M.; Otten, E. W.; Owens, R. O.; Plützer, S.; Reichert, E.; Rohe, D.; Schäfer, M.; Schearer, L. D.; Schmieden, H.; Steffens, K.; Surkau, R.; Walcher, Th.

    1995-07-01

    The determination of the neutron electric formfactor from quasielastic reactions 3H↘e(e↘,e'n) and D(e↘,e',n↘) respectively is one of the present goals of experiments with polarized electrons at the Mainz race track microtron MAMI. A GaAsP-photoelectron source is used at MAMI to get an 855 MeV electron beam spinpolarized to a degree of 35% at a current of 10 μA. Polarized 3He-nuclei are produced by optical pumping metastable 3He. Scattered electrons are detected in coincidence with the recoil neutrons, the transverse spinpolarization of the neutrons may be analyzed by neutron-proton scattering in a double wall plastic scintillator detector. A subset of the final detector set-up has been tested successfully now by investigating the polarization transfer to the proton in reactions H(e↘,e'p↘) and D(e↘,e'p↘) and to the neutron in D(e↘,e'n↘) at a 4-momentum transfer with -Q2=8fm-2. First data from the exclusive quasielastic collision 3H↘e(e↘,e'n) indicate a value of the neutron electric formfactor of GnE=0.035±0.015 at -Q2=8fm-2.

  6. Interlayer couplings, Moiré patterns, and 2D electronic superlattices in MoS2/WSe2 hetero-bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chendong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Ren, Xibiao; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Jin, Chuanhong; Chou, Mei-Yin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2017-01-01

    By using direct growth, we create a rotationally aligned MoS2/WSe2 hetero-bilayer as a designer van der Waals heterostructure. With rotational alignment, the lattice mismatch leads to a periodic variation of atomic registry between individual van der Waals layers, exhibiting a Moiré pattern with a well-defined periodicity. By combining scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and first-principles calculations, we investigate interlayer coupling as a function of atomic registry. We quantitatively determine the influence of interlayer coupling on the electronic structure of the hetero-bilayer at different critical points. We show that the direct gap semiconductor concept is retained in the bilayer although the valence and conduction band edges are located at different layers. We further show that the local bandgap is periodically modulated in the X-Y direction with an amplitude of ~0.15 eV, leading to the formation of a two-dimensional electronic superlattice. PMID:28070558

  7. Wave-particle interaction and the nonlinear saturation of the electron temperature gradient mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Srinath; Parker, Scott E.; Chen, Yang; Howard, James E.

    2004-11-01

    It has been proposed that the electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence is responsible for experimentally relevant electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas. Significant transport levels are possible by the creation of radially elongated vortices or ``streamers" [1,2], which are sustained by the nonlinear saturation of the instability and are not susceptible to shear flow destruction, as is the case with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode. We present a dynamical system to explore the dependence of saturation level due to E × B and E_\\| motion, as well as the effect of radial elongation. With this model, we can predict the nonlinear saturation level of the ETG streamers. We compare our theoretical predictions with a 2D shear-less slab gyrokinetic electron code that includes the E_\\| nonlinearity. [1]F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M Kotschenreuther, and B.N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000). [2]C. Holland, and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3857 (2002). [3]W. M. Manheimer, Phys. Fluids 14, 579 (1971). [4]R. A. Smith, John A. Krommes, and W. W. Lee, Phys. Fluids 28, 1069 (1985).

  8. Revisiting 2D Lattice Based Spin Flip-Flop Ising Model: Magnetic Properties of a Thin Film and Its Temperature Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Satya Pal

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of Ising's work done in 1925 for one dimensional spin chain with periodic boundary condition. Ising observed that no phase transition occurred at finite temperature in one dimension. He erroneously generalized his views in higher dimensions but that was not true. In 1941 Kramer and Wannier obtained…

  9. Simultaneous 2-D Measurements of Transient Velocity and Temperature Fields in a Thermal Starting Plume: Laboratory Models of Entrainment and Structure of Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, I.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurita, K.

    2002-12-01

    Both numerical and experimental models of thermal plumes suggest that mantle plumes entrain surrounding mantle and their morphology (temperature and compositional fields in the plume head) evolves as they rise. Recent geochemical and isotopic studies of mantle plume products have revealed mixing of the ambient mantle with the primitive plume source. In order to make a quantitative comparison of the geophysical modeling with geological evidences, it is desired to show a precise image of spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and compositional fields in the plumes. Here, we present preliminary results of our laboratory experiments on thermal starting plumes using a quantitative technique of digital image processing. By coupling Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) we can measure simultaneous 2-dimensional transient velocity and temperature fields in a thermal plume. Our experiments were conducted in a transparent rectangular tank containing a viscous fluid. Buoyancy in the form of heat was injected into the fluid by operating a heater at the base of the tank. The flow was marked with tracer particles for velocity and with the fluorescence dye, Rhodamine B, for temperature measurements. The particles and the fluorescence dye were illuminated and exited by a thin vertical sheet of laser light that was oriented to contain the axis of symmetry. We succeeded in simultaneous measurements of ascent velocity of the plume head, precise velocity field within the plume head, and evolution of the temperature field. This makes clear their relation and is useful for considering the entrainment process of plumes. Our aim of this study is to clarify the physics of entrainment and mixing phenomena of starting plumes, and to make quantitative geophysical models of mantle plumes connecting with geological and seismic evidences. In this presentation, we will show that this quantitative technique is a powerful tool for approaching these issues.

  10. Two-Temperature Model of Nonequilibrium Electron Relaxation:. a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Navinder

    The present paper is a review of the phenomena related to nonequilibrium electron relaxation in bulk and nano-scale metallic samples. The workable Two-Temperature Model (TTM) based on Boltzmann-Bloch-Peierls kinetic equation has been applied to study the ultra-fast (femto-second) electronic relaxation in various metallic systems. The advent of new ultra-fast (femto-second) laser technology and pump-probe spectroscopy has produced wealth of new results for micro- and nano-scale electronic technology. The aim of this paper is to clarify the TTM, conditions of its validity and nonvalidity, its modifications for nano-systems, to sum-up the progress, and to point out open problems in this field. We also give a phenomenological integro-differential equation for the kinetics of nondegenerate electrons that goes beyond the TTM.

  11. Low-temperature electron dephasing time in AuPd revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Lee, T. C.; Wang, S. W.

    2007-10-01

    Ever since the first discoveries of the quantum-interference transport in mesoscopic systems, the electron dephasing times, τϕ, in the concentrated AuPd alloys have been extensively measured. The samples were made from different sources with different compositions, prepared by different deposition methods, and various geometries (1D narrow wires, 2D thin films, and 3D thick films) were studied. Surprisingly, the low-temperature behavior of τϕ inferred by different groups over two decades reveals a systematic correlation with the level of disorder of the sample. At low temperatures, where τϕ is (nearly) independent of temperature, a scaling τϕmax∝D is found, where τϕmax is the maximum value of τϕ measured in the experiment, D is the electron diffusion constant, and the exponent α is close to or slightly larger than 1. We address this nontrivial scaling behavior and suggest that the most possible origin for this unusual dephasing is due to dynamical structure defects, while other theoretical explanations may not be totally ruled out.

  12. Deriving large electron temperatures and small electron densities with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Philippe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Holmberg, Mika; Lewis, Geraint; Schippers, Patricia; Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Gurnett, Donald; Coates, Andrew; Dandouras, Iannis; Waite, Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Langmuir Probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigate the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), and manage to reproduce the observations with a reasonable precision through empirical and theoretical methods. Conversely, the modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). We finally show that a significant influence of the energetic electrons (larger than the contribution of thermal ions) is also expected in various plasma environments of the Solar System, such as at Jupiter (i.e near Ganymede, Europa, Callisto and Io), or even at Earth (in the plasmasheet, the magnetosheath or in plasma cavities). Large electron temperatures and small electron densities could potentially be derived in these environments, which may be of interest for Langmuir Probes in the Earth magnetosphere or onboard the future JUICE mission at Jupiter.

  13. 2D-2D tunneling field-effect transistors using WSe2/SnSe2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tania; Tosun, Mahmut; Hettick, Mark; Ahn, Geun Ho; Hu, Chenming; Javey, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials present a versatile platform for developing steep transistors due to their uniform thickness and sharp band edges. We demonstrate 2D-2D tunneling in a WSe2/SnSe2 van der Waals vertical heterojunction device, where WSe2 is used as the gate controlled p-layer and SnSe2 is the degenerately n-type layer. The van der Waals gap facilitates the regulation of band alignment at the heterojunction, without the necessity of a tunneling barrier. ZrO2 is used as the gate dielectric, allowing the scaling of gate oxide to improve device subthreshold swing. Efficient gate control and clean interfaces yield a subthreshold swing of ˜100 mV/dec for >2 decades of drain current at room temperature, hitherto unobserved in 2D-2D tunneling devices. The subthreshold swing is independent of temperature, which is a clear signature of band-to-band tunneling at the heterojunction. A maximum switching ratio ION/IOFF of 107 is obtained. Negative differential resistance in the forward bias characteristics is observed at 77 K. This work bodes well for the possibilities of two-dimensional materials for the realization of energy-efficient future-generation electronics.

  14. Electron Attachment to POCl3: Measurement and Theoretical Analysis of Rate Constants and Branching Ratios as a Function of Gas Pressure and Temperature, Electron Temperature, and Electron Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-31

    the pulse along the flow tube axis variation in the total rate constant with temperature.2 In con- with the Langmuir probe . In the electron-He+-Ar...calculations 5 reported in Ref. 4 and should cylindrical Langmuir probe . The plasma velocity is measured be reliable within ±0.1 eV. Electron attachment...increasing temperature decreased diffusion. the amount of parent ion substantially in flowing - afterglow In the present work, POCI3 gas was added

  15. Sourcebook on high-temperature electronics and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Veneruso, A.F.

    1981-10-01

    This sourcebook summarizes the high-temperature characteristics of a number of commercially available electronic components and materials required in geothermal well-logging instruments that must operate to 275/sup 0/C. The sourcebook is written to provide a starting place for instrument designers, who need to know the high-temperature electronic products that are available and the design and performance limitations of these products. The electronic component information given includes the standard repertoire of passive devices such as resistors, capacitors, and magnetics; the active devices and integrated circuits sections emphasize silicon semiconductor JFETs and CMOS circuits; and, to complete the electronics, interconnections and packaging of hybrid microelectronics are described. Thermal insulation and refrigeration alternatives are also presented in the sourcebook. Finally, instrument housing materials and high-temperature cables and cablehead connectors are listed. This information was compiled as part of the Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program that Sandia National Laboratories conducted for the US Department of Energy's Divison of Geothermal Energy from 1976 to 1981.

  16. Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope determination of the Io torus electron temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. T.; Bednar, C. J.; Durrance, S. T.; Feldman, P. D.; Mcgrath, M. A.; Moos, H. W.; Strobel, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfur ion emissions from the Io plasma torus observed by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) in 1990 December have been analyzed to determine the effective temperature of the exciting electrons. Spectra were obtained with a long slit that extended from 3.1 to 8.7 Jupiter radii R(sub J) on both dawn and dusk torus ansae. The average temperature of electrons exciting S(2+) emissions from the dawn ansa is (4800 +/- 2400) K lower than on the dusk ansa, a dawn-dusk asymmetry comparable in both sign and magnitude to that measured by the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) experiment. Emissions from S(2+) ions are generated in a source region with electron temperatures in the range 32,000-56,000 K; S(3+) ion emissions are excited by electrons that average 20,000-40,000 K hotter. This distinct difference suggests that the S(3+) emission source region is spatially separate from the S(2+) source region. Estimated relative aperture filling factors suggest that the S(3+) emissions originate from a region more extended out of the centrifugal plane than the S(2+) emissions.

  17. Measurements of electron number density and plasma temperature using LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-xia; Luo, Wen-feng; He, Jun-fang; Wang, Hong-ying; Yang, Sen-lin; Li, Yuan-yuan

    2016-10-01

    Plasma produced by the radiation of a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser focused onto a standard aluminum alloy E311 was studied spectroscopically. The electron density was inferred by measuring the Stark broadened line profile of Cu I 324.75 nm at a distance of 1.5 mm from the target surface with the laser irradiance of 3.27 GW/cm2. The electron temperature was determined using the Boltzmann plot method with eight neutral iron lines. At the same time, the validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium was discussed in light of the results obtained.

  18. A quantum dynamical comparison of the electronic couplings derived from quantum electrodynamics and Förster theory: application to 2D molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, James E.; Jones, Garth A.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate under what circumstances Förster theory of electronic (resonance) energy transfer breaks down in molecular aggregates. This is achieved by simulating the dynamics of exciton diffusion, on the femtosecond timescale, in molecular aggregates using the Liouville-von Neumann equation of motion. Specifically the focus of this work is the investigation of both spatial and temporal deviations between exciton dynamics driven by electronic couplings calculated from Förster theory and those calculated from quantum electrodynamics. The quantum electrodynamics (QED) derived couplings contain medium- and far-zone terms that do not exist in Förster theory. The results of the simulations indicate that Förster coupling is valid when the dipole centres are within a few nanometres of one another. However, as the distance between the dipole centres increases from 2 nm to 10 nm, the intermediate- and far-zone coupling terms play non-negligible roles and Förster theory begins to break down. Interestingly, the simulations illustrate how contributions to the exciton dynamics from the intermediate- and far-zone coupling terms of QED are quickly washed-out by the near-zone mechanism of Förster theory for lattices comprising closely packed molecules. On the other hand, in the case of sparsely packed arrays, the exciton dynamics resulting from the different theories diverge within the 100 fs lifetime of the trajectories. These results could have implications for the application of spectroscopic ruler techniques as well as design principles relating to energy harvesting materials.

  19. Long-lived magnetoexcitons in 2D-fermion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, L. V.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Gorbunov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper addresses the experimental technique that, when applied to a 2D-electron system in the integer quantum Hall regime with filling factor ν = 2 (the Hall insulating state), allows resonant excitation of magnetoexcitons, their detection, control of an ensemble of long-lived triplet excitons and investigation of their radiationless decay related to exciton spin relaxation into the ground state. The technique proposed enables independent control of photoexcited electrons and Fermi-holes using photoinduced resonance reflection spectra as well as estimate with a reasonable degree of accuracy the resulting density of photoinduced electron-hole pairs bound into magnetoexcitons. The mere existence of triplet excitons was directly established by inelastic light scattering spectra which were analyzed to determine the value of singlet-triplet exciton splitting. It was found that the lifetimes of triplet excitons conditioned by electron spin relaxation in highly perfect GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with highly mobile 2D electrons are extremely long exceeding 100 μs at T < 1 K. The paper presents a qualitative explanation of the long-spin relaxation lifetimes which are unprecedented for translation-invariant 2D systems. This enabled us to create sufficiently high concentrations of triplet magnetoexcitons, electrically neutral excitations following Bose-Einstein statistics, in a Fermi electron system and investigate their collective properties. At sufficiently high densities of triplet magnetoexcitons and low temperatures, T < 1 K, the degenerate magnetofermionic system exhibits condensation of the triplet magnetoexcitons into a qualitatively new collective state with unusual properties which occurs in the space of generalized moments (magnetic translation vectors). The occurrence of a condensed phase is accompanied with a significant decrease in the viscosity of the photoexcited system, which is responsible for electron spin transport at macroscopic distances, as well

  20. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  1. Electronic phase diagram of high-temperature copper oxide superconductors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Utpal; Ai, Dingfei; Zhao, Junjing; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Kaminski, Adam; Raffy, Helene; Li, Zhizhong; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Randeria, Mohit; Norman, Michael R; Campuzano, J C

    2011-06-07

    In order to understand the origin of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides, we must understand the normal state from which it emerges. Here, we examine the evolution of the normal state electronic excitations with temperature and carrier concentration in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ) using angle-resolved photoemission. In contrast to conventional superconductors, where there is a single temperature scale T(c) separating the normal from the superconducting state, the high-temperature superconductors exhibit two additional temperature scales. One is the pseudogap scale T(∗), below which electronic excitations exhibit an energy gap. The second is the coherence scale T(coh), below which sharp spectral features appear due to increased lifetime of the excitations. We find that T(∗) and T(coh) are strongly doping dependent and cross each other near optimal doping. Thus the highest superconducting T(c) emerges from an unusual normal state that is characterized by coherent excitations with an energy gap.

  2. Equatorial plasma bubbles with enhanced ion and electron temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Min, Kyoung Wook; Kim, Vitaly P.; Kil, Hyosub; Su, Shin-Yi; Chao, Chi Kuang; Lee, Jae-Jin

    2008-09-01

    While the ion and electron temperatures inside equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are normally lower than those in an ambient plasma, bubbles with enhanced temperatures (BETs) are found occasionally in the topside ionosphere. Here we report the characteristics of BETs identified from observations of the first Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1), the first Korea Multi-purpose Satellite (KOMPSAT-1), and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15 during the solar maximum period between 2000 and 2001. The oxygen ion fraction inside the BETs, which was no lower than that of the ambient ionosphere, was similar to the case of ordinary low-temperature EPBs. These observations indicate that the BETs and low-temperature EPBs detected on the topside were produced by the upward drift of low-density plasma from lower altitudes. The feature that distinguishes BETs from normal EPBs is the occurrence of an unusually fast poleward field-aligned plasma flow relative to the ambient plasma. The BETs occurred preferentially around geomagnetic latitudes of 10° in the summer hemisphere, where the ambient ion and electron temperatures are lower than those in the conjugate winter hemisphere. The occurrence of BETs did not show any notable dependence on geomagnetic activities. The characteristics of the BETs suggest that the BETs were produced by adiabatic plasma heating associated with a fast poleward oxygen ion transport along magnetic flux tubes.

  3. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Hsu, Y W; Jiang, G S; Chen, W H; Cheng, C Z; Fang, H K; Liu, W T

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T(e) in low frequency mode and N(e) in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f(UHR)). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  4. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  5. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.; Liu, W. T.

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both Te in low frequency mode and Ne in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (fUHR). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  6. Role of magnetic shear in dynamics of large-scale structures in electron temperature gradient turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.; Miyato, N.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate how the magnetic shear governs the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as zonal flows and streamers, in electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence. Based on the well-known 2D Hasegawa-Mima turbulence modeling, which is the inviscid version of fluid (or gyrofluid) ETG turbulence [1], we derive a general dispersion relation of secondary fluctuations through modulation instability analysis. The results show that the formation of different large-scale structures including zonal flow, streamer and so-called generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (GKH) mode in ETG turbulence depends on the spectral anisotropy of turbulent fluctuation. In a slab geometry, the magnetic shear closely relates to the ETG mode structures so that it may determine the pattern selection in the quasi-steady ETG turbulence. 3D gyrofluid slab ETG simulations show that turbulent ETG fluctuation energy condenses to the zonal flows in the weak shear plasmas and to the streamer component for the high shears. 2D ETG simulations with rather high resolution not only exhibits the global spectral distribution of zonal flows, but also further confirm a mechanism: enhanced zonal flow in weak shear ETG turbulence is limited by exciting a KH mode [1]. Furthermore, in toroidal ETG simulations, streamer structures are observed at around good curvature region along the flux tube in the quasisteady state in some medium shear regime. Related streamer dynamics are also investigated. [1] Jiquan Li and Y. Kishimoto, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1493(2004)

  7. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  8. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  9. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms.

    PubMed

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Boothroyd, C; Pan, C-T; Gwilliam, R

    2016-06-07

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  10. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J.; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry

    2015-06-07

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S{sub 2} of the Spx towards the Q{sub x} state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Q{sub x} to Q{sub y} within the B890.

  11. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J.; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890.

  12. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  13. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, N. J.; Belancourt, P.; Chapman, D. A.; Döppner, T.; Drake, R. P.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Khaghani, D.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Neumayer, P.; Pak, A.; Peters, L.; Richardson, S.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.; Gregori, G.

    2015-03-01

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. However, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  14. Proton, Electron and Ion Temperatures in Fast Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Korreck, Kelly E.

    2005-08-01

    The Coulomb equilibration time scale among various particle species behind a fast collisionless shock can be much larger than the dynamical time scale in a supernova remnant or CME. Ultraviolet and optical emission line profiles can be used to measure proton, electron and ion temperatures. Particles are fairly close to thermal equilibrium behind a relatively slow (350 km/s) shock, but very far from equilibrium in faster (2000-3000 km/s) shocks.

  15. Wide temperature range electronic device with lead attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A electronic device including lead attachment structure which permits operation of the devices over a wide temperature range is reported. The device comprises a core conductor having a thin coating of metal thereon whereby only a limited amount of coating material is available to form an alloy which bonds the core conductor to the device electrode, the electrode composition thus being affected only in the region adjacent to the lead.

  16. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; Richardson, S.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Khaghani, D.; Neumayer, P.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  17. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    DOE PAGES

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; ...

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  18. Applications of Silicon Carbide for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide bandgap material that shows great promise in high-power and high temperature electronics applications because of its high thermal conductivity and high breakdown electrical field. The excellent physical and electronic properties of SiC allows the fabrication of devices that can operate at higher temperatures and power levels than devices produced from either silicon or GaAs. Although modern electronics depends primarily upon silicon based devices, this material is not capable of handling may special requirements. Devices which operate at high speeds, at high power levels and are to be used in extreme environments at high temperatures and high radiation levels need other materials with wider bandgaps than that of silicon. Many space and terrestrial applications also have a requirement for wide bandgap materials. SiC also has great potential for high power and frequency operation due to a high saturated drift velocity. The wide bandgap allows for unique optoelectronic applications, that include blue light emitting diodes and ultraviolet photodetectors. New areas involving gas sensing and telecommunications offer significant promise. Overall, the properties of SiC make it one of the best prospects for extending the capabilities and operational regimes of the current semiconductor device technology.

  19. The Influence of Energetic Electrons on the Cassini Langmuir Probe at Saturn : Deriving Large Electron Temperatures and Small Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.; Holmberg, M.; Lewis, G.; Schippers, P.; Thomsen, M. F.; Rochel Grimald, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Langmuir probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigated the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), showing that both the DC level and slope of the I-V curve are modified. The influence of energetic electrons may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept that is important for spacecraft charging studies. Estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface are obtained without using laboratory measurements. Empirical and theoretical methods were developed to reproduce the influence of the energetic electrons with a reasonable precision. Conversely, this modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). The understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions JUICE at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, or even the probes in the Earth magnetosphere.

  20. The behavior of electron density and temperature during ionospheric heating near the fifth electron gyrofrequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Wu, Jian; Rietveld, M. T.; Haggstrom, I.; Zhao, Haisheng; Xu, Zhengwen

    2017-01-01

    The experimental phenomena involving the changes in electron temperature and electron density as a function of pump frequency during an ionospheric heating campaign at European Incoherent Scatter near Tromsø, Norway, are reported. When the pump frequency is slightly above the fifth electron gyrofrequency, the UHF radar observation shows some apparent enhancements over a wide altitude range in radar echo, ion line, and electron density respectively, which are apparently altitude independent and consistent temporally with the upshifting and spread of plasma line around the reflection altitude. However, they do not, in fact, correspond to true increase in electron density. Based on some existing theories, some discussions are presented to try to explain the above enhancements and the upshifting and spread of plasma line. Even so, the mechanism remains to be determined. In addition, the observation also shows some enhancements in electron temperature as a function of pump frequency around the reflection altitude of the pump, which are dependent on the behavior of dispersion of the upper hybrid wave near the fifth electron gyrofrequency.

  1. Resonant tunneling modulation in quasi-2D Cu2O/SnO2 p-n horizontal-multi-layer heterostructure for room temperature H2S sensor application

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guangliang; Zhang, Mingzhe; Zou, Guangtian

    2013-01-01

    Heterostructure material that acts as resonant tunneling system is a major scientific challenge in applied physics. Herein, we report a resonant tunneling system, quasi-2D Cu2O/SnO2 p-n heterostructure multi-layer film, prepared by electrochemical deposition in a quasi-2D ultra-thin liquid layer. By applying a special half-sine deposition potential across the electrodes, Cu2O and SnO2 selectively and periodically deposited according to their reduction potentials. The as-prepared heterostructure film displays excellent sensitivity to H2S at room temperature due to the resonant tunneling modulation. Furthermore, it is found that the laser illumination could enhance the gas response, and the mechanism with laser illumination is discussed. It is the first report on gas sensing application of resonant tunneling modulation. Hence, heterostructure material act as resonant tunneling system is believed to be an ideal candidate for further improvement of room temperature gas sensing. PMID:23409241

  2. 2D modeling and simulation of the flow dynamics, electric field and reactions in a low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure nitrogen plasma sharp-end plate-to-plane configuration and CVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wilde, Juray; Lorant, Christophe; Descamps, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    In atmospheric-pressure plasma reactors, the flow dynamics can be complex, determine the reactor performance and complicate scale-up. Coupling computational fluid dynamics to the calculation of the electric field and plasma chemistry is challenging because of the numerical stiffness introduced by the difference in time scale of the different phenomena involved. Focusing on low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure pure nitrogen plasma, a model and model reduction based solution strategy to deal with the numerical stiffness are presented and evaluated. The influence of the electric field on the flow dynamics and species concentration fields is first qualitatively studied by means of 2D simulations of a sharp-end plate-to-plane configuration. Next, a specific reactor prototype for low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for in-line surface treatments is simulated to illustrate the importance of accounting for the detailed flow dynamics.

  3. PIV, 2D-LIF and 1D-Raman measurements of flow field, composition and temperature in premixed gas turbine flames

    SciTech Connect

    Stopper, U.; Aigner, M.; Ax, H.; Meier, W.; Sadanandan, R.; Stoehr, M.; Bonaldo, A.

    2010-04-15

    Several laser diagnostic measurement techniques have been applied to study the lean premixed natural gas/air flames of an industrial swirl burner. This was made possible by equipping the burner with an optical combustion chamber that was installed in the high-pressure test rig facility at the DLR Institute of Combustion Technology in Stuttgart. The burner was operated with preheated air at various operating conditions with pressures up to p = 6 bar and a maximum thermal power of P = 1 MW. The instantaneous planar flow field inside the combustor was studied with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals on a single-shot basis was used to determine the shape and the location of the flame front as well as the spatial distribution of reaction products. 1D laser Raman spectroscopy was successfully applied for the measurement of the temperature and the concentration of major species under realistic gas turbine conditions. Results of the flow field analysis show the shape and the size of the main flow regimes: the inflow region, the inner and the outer recirculation zone. The highly turbulent flow field of the inner shear layer is found to be dominated by small and medium sized vortices. High RMS fluctuations of the flow velocity in the exhaust gas indicate the existence of a rotating exhaust gas swirl. From the PLIF images it is seen that the primary reactions happened in the shear layers between inflow and the recirculation zones and that the appearance of the reaction zones changed with flame parameters. The results of the multiscalar Raman measurements show a strong variation of the local mixture fraction allowing conclusions to be drawn about the premix quality. Furthermore, mixing effects of unburnt fuel and air with fully reacted combustion products are studied giving insights into the processes of the turbulence-chemistry interaction. (author)

  4. To the problem of electron temperature control in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galechyan, G.A.; Anna, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    One of the main problems in low temperature plasma is control plasma parameters at fixed values of current and gas pressure in the discharge. It is known that an increase in the intensity of sound wave directed along the positive column to values in excess of a definite threshold leads to essential rise of the temperature of electrons. However, no less important is the reduction of electron temperature in the discharge down to the value less than that in plasma in the absence external influence. It is known that to reduce the electron temperature in the plasma of CO{sub 2} laser, easily ionizable admixture are usually introduced in the discharge area with the view of increasing the overpopulation. In the present work we shall show that the value of electron temperature can be reduced by varying of sound wave intensity at its lower values. The experiment was performed on an experimental setup consisted of the tube with length 52 cm and diameter 9.8 cm, two electrodes placed at the distance of 27 cm from each other. An electrodynamical radiator of sound wave was fastened to one of tube ends. Fastened to the flange at the opposite end was a microphone for the control of sound wave parameters. The studies were performed in range of pressures from 40 to 180 Torr and discharge currents from 40 to 110 mA. The intensity of sound wave was varied from 74 to 92 dB. The measurement made at the first resonance frequency f = 150 Hz of sound in the discharge tube, at which a quarter of wave length keep within the length of the tube. The measurement of longitudinal electric field voltage in plasma of positive column was conducted with the help of two probes according to the compensation method. Besides, the measurement of gas temperature in the discharge were taken. Two thermocouple sensors were arranged at the distance of 8 cm from the anode, one of them being installed on the discharge tube axis, the second-fixed the tube wall.

  5. Exfoliated β-Ga2O3 nano-belt field-effect transistors for air-stable high power and high temperature electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janghyuk; Oh, Sooyeoun; Mastro, Michael A; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-06-21

    This study demonstrated the exfoliation of a two-dimensional (2D) β-Ga2O3 nano-belt and subsequent processing into a thin film transistor structure. This mechanical exfoliation and transfer method produces β-Ga2O3 nano-belts with a pristine surface as well as a continuous defect-free interface with the SiO2/Si substrate. This β-Ga2O3 nano-belt based transistor displayed an on/off ratio that increased from approximately 10(4) to 10(7) over the operating temperature range of 20 °C to 250 °C. No electrical breakdown was observed in our measurements up to VDS = +40 V and VGS = -60 V between 25 °C and 250 °C. Additionally, the electrical characteristics were not degraded after a month-long storage in ambient air. The demonstration of high-temperature/high-voltage operation of quasi-2D β-Ga2O3 nano-belts contrasts with traditional 2D materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides that intrinsically have limited temperature and power operational envelopes owing to their narrow bandgap. This work motivates the application of 2D β-Ga2O3 to high power nano-electronic devices for harsh environments such as high temperature chemical sensors and photodetectors as well as the miniaturization of power circuits and cooling systems in nano-electronics.

  6. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Poncé, S. Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X.; Marini, A.; Verstraete, M.

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  7. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500 C silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chip-level packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550 C. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500 C for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500 C are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  8. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liangyu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500degC silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chiplevel packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550degC. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500degC for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500degC are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  9. Exact e-e (exchange) correlations of 2-D quantum dots in magnetic field: Size extensive N = 3 , 4 , … , ‧ n ‧ -electron systems via multi-pole expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Priyanka; Sharma, Shivalika; Singh, Sunny; Kaur, Harsimran; Hazra, Ram Kuntal

    2017-04-01

    Inclusion of coulomb interaction emerges with the complexity of either convergence of integrals or separation of variables of Schrödinger equations. For an N-electron system, interaction terms grow by N(N-1)/2 factors. Therefore, 2-e system stands as fundamental basic unit for generalized N-e systems. For the first time, we have evaluated e-e correlations in very simple and absolutely terminating finite summed hypergeometric series for 2-D double carrier parabolic quantum dot in both zero and arbitrary non-zero magnetic field (symmetric gauge) and have appraised these integrals in variational methods. The competitive role among confinement strength, magnetic field, mass of the carrier and dielectric constant of the medium on energy level diagram, level-spacing statistics, heat capacities (Cv at 1 K) and magnetization (T ∼ (0-1)K) is studied on systems spanning over wide range of materials (GaAs,Ge,CdS,SiO2 and He, etc). We have also constructed an exact theory for generalized correlated N-e 2-D quantum dots via multi-pole expansion but for the sake of compactness of the article we refrain from data.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Transistor Characteristics and Electronic Structure for Amorphous In-Ga-Zn-Oxide Thin Film Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godo, Hiromichi; Kawae, Daisuke; Yoshitomi, Shuhei; Sasaki, Toshinari; Ito, Shunichi; Ohara, Hiroki; Kishida, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Masahiro; Miyanaga, Akiharu; Yamazaki, Shunpei

    2010-03-01

    We fabricated an inverted-staggered amorphous In-Ga-Zn-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistor (TFT) and measured the temperature dependence of its characteristics. A threshold voltage (Vth) shift between 120 and 180 °C was as large as 4 V. In an analysis with two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation, we reproduced the measured result by assuming two types of donor-like states as carrier generation sources. Furthermore, by ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we determined the electronic structures of three types of a-IGZO structures, namely, “stoichiometric a-IGZO”, “oxygen deficiency”, and “hydrogen doping”.

  11. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A+ + B- + e- → A + B + e-. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl3- and POCl2-) and one diatomic species (Br2-) each with two monatomic cations (Ar+and Kr+) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions (˜1 × 10-18 cm6 s-1 at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br2- [(5.5 ± 2) × 10-19 cm6 s-1 at 300 K].

  12. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A{sup +}+ B{sup -}+ e{sup -}{yields} A + B + e{sup -}. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl{sub 3}{sup -} and POCl{sub 2}{sup -}) and one diatomic species (Br{sub 2}{sup -}) each with two monatomic cations (Ar{sup +}and Kr{sup +}) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions ({approx}1 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br{sub 2}{sup -}[(5.5 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K].

  13. An electron spectroscopic investigation of high-temperature superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Blair, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution X-ray Photoelectron and X-ray-excited Auger Electron Spectroscopy (XPS and XAES) have been used to study the electronic structure of La-Sr-Cu and Y-Ba-Cu superconducting oxide surfaces. The experiments were carried out on freshly cleaved (ex-situ) samples at room temperature and the results were compared with spectra obtained from Cu and CuO. The XPS Cu(2p) features show clearly that Cu/sup +2/ (3d/sup 9/) is present in the near surface region of both superconducting oxides and suggests that they are mixed valent containing both 3d/sup 9/ and 3d/sup 10/ contributions. No evidence for Cu/sup +3/ (3d/sup 8/) was found. XAES Cu(LMM) spectral features are consistent with the superposition of mixed valent Cu sites and the hole-hole interaction energies for the Cu(LMM) transitions, a direct experimental measurement of electron correlation in the Cu 3d levels, indicate strong electron correlation. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained.

  15. Two-temperature radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure is studied for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. Approximate solutions are obtained, with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km/s and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities.

  16. Basic experimental studies of ion and electron temperature gradient instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao

    Important issues related to the temperature gradient driven instabilities are investigated in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM). The main purpose of this research is to produce, definitively identify and elucidate the basic physics of these instabilities. The first part of the thesis is about the study of Zonal flows (ZF) associated with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes. The difficult problem of the ZF detection has been solved via a novel diagnostic using the paradigm of frequency modulation (FM) in radio transmission. Through the discrete short time Fourier transform (STFT) analysis, the most important ZF characteristics such as low frequency (˜ 2kHz), poloidal symmetry ( m = 0), toroidal symmetry (k∥ = 0) and radial structure (kr ≠ 0) have been identified directly in the experiment. Furthermore, the ZF saturation physics has been investigated through unique feedback control diagnostics. Finally, the experimental results are compared with various existing theoretical models. The second part of the thesis is about the research on the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode. ETG modes, which are believed to be one of the strongest candidates for the anomalous electron energy transport in plasmas, is difficult to detect in experiments because of its high frequency (˜ MHz ) and short wave length (k⊥rho e ≈ 1). Using a DC bias heating scheme of the core plasma, we are able to produce a sufficiently strong electron temperature gradient for exciting ETG modes in the CLM. A high frequency mode at ˜ 2MHz, with azimuthal wave number m ˜ 14--16 and parallel wave number k∥ ≈ 0.01cm-1, has been observed. This frequency is consistent with the result of a kinetic dispersion relation of slab ETG modes with an appropriate E⃗xB⃗ Doppler shift. The scaling of its fluctuation level with the temperature gradient scale length and the radial structure are found to be roughly consistent with theoretical expectations. With all the parametric signatures

  17. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  18. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  19. Experimental evidence of excited electron number density and temperature effects on electron-phonon coupling in gold films

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Foley, Brian M.; Cheaito, Ramez; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-28

    The electronic transport properties of metals with weak electron-phonon coupling can be influenced by non-thermal electrons. Relaxation processes involving non-thermal electrons competing with the thermalized electron system have led to inconsistencies in the understanding of how electrons scatter and relax with the less energetic lattice. Recent theoretical and computational works have shown that the rate of energy relaxation with the metallic lattice will change depending on the thermalization state of the electrons. Even though 20 years of experimental works have focused on understanding and isolating these electronic relaxation mechanisms with short pulsed irradiation, discrepancies between these existing works have not clearly answered the fundamental question of the competing effects between non-thermal and thermal electrons losing energy to the lattice. In this work, we demonstrate the ability to measure the electron relaxation for varying degrees of both electron-electron and electron-phonon thermalization. This series of measurements of electronic relaxation over a predicted effective electron temperature range up to ∼3500 K and minimum lattice temperatures of 77 K validate recent computational and theoretical works that theorize how a nonequilibrium distribution of electrons transfers energy to the lattice. Utilizing this wide temperature range during pump-probe measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, we explain discrepancies in the past two decades of literature of electronic relaxation rates. We experimentally demonstrate that the electron-phonon coupling factor in gold increases with increasing lattice temperature and laser fluences. Specifically, we show that at low laser fluences corresponding to small electron perturbations, energy relaxation between electrons and phonons is mainly governed by non-thermal electrons, while at higher laser fluences, non-thermal electron scattering with the lattice is less influential on the energy relaxation

  20. Few-layer III-VI and IV-VI 2D semiconductor transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Liu, Mei; Kumar, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang C.; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Gao, Xuan

    Since the discovery of atomically thin graphene, a large variety of exfoliable 2D materials have been thoroughly explored for their exotic transport behavior and promises in technological breakthroughs. While most attention on 2D materials beyond graphene is focused on transition metal-dichalcogenides, relatively less attention is paid to layered III-VI and IV-VI semiconductors such as InSe, SnSe etc which bear stronger potential as 2D materials with high electron mobility or thermoelectric figure of merit. We will discuss our recent work on few-layer InSe 2D field effect transistors which exhibit carrier mobility approaching 1000 cm2/Vs and ON-OFF ratio exceeding 107 at room temperature. In addition, the fabrication and device performance of transistors made of mechanically exfoliated multilayer IV-VI semiconductor SnSe and SnSe2 will be discussed.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  2. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  3. Effects of electron irradiation on high temperature superconductors and contacts to high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caton, Randall

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of a new class of ceramic superconductors with transition temperatures above liquid nitrogen has opened the doors for exciting space applications. Energy storage, pointing maneuvers, magnetic shielding, and sensitive detection of electromagnetic radiation are some of the longer term possible applications. One near term application involves low electrical resistance, high thermal resistance connections between a detector operating at approximatly or equal to 4 and the electronics operating at approximatly or equal to 77 K. The new high temperature superconductors could accomplish this providing the necessary electrical connections to the ground plane while isolating the system thermally, thus prolonging the life of the mission. With such possibilities it is clearly of value to study the effects of radiation that would be experienced during a typical space mission. In this work we focused specifically on the effects of the electron radiation environment.

  4. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  5. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  6. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  7. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  8. RESOLVING THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE DISCREPANCIES IN H II REGIONS AND PLANETARY NEBULAE: {kappa}-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.

    2012-06-20

    The measurement of electron temperatures and metallicities in H II regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) has-for several decades-presented a problem: results obtained using different techniques disagree. What is worse, they disagree consistently. There have been numerous attempts to explain these discrepancies, but none has provided a satisfactory solution to the problem. In this paper, we explore the possibility that electrons in H II regions and PNe depart from a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium energy distribution. We adopt a '{kappa}-distribution' for the electron energies. Such distributions are widely found in solar system plasmas, where they can be directly measured. This simple assumption is able to explain the temperature and metallicity discrepancies in H II regions and PNe arising from the different measurement techniques. We find that the energy distribution does not need to depart dramatically from an equilibrium distribution. From an examination of data from H II regions and PNe, it appears that {kappa} {approx}> 10 is sufficient to encompass nearly all objects. We argue that the kappa-distribution offers an important new insight into the physics of gaseous nebulae, both in the Milky Way and elsewhere, and one that promises significantly more accurate estimates of temperature and metallicity in these regions.

  9. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated Electron Cyclotron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S.; Conway, G. D.; Classen, I.; Creely, A. J.; Happel, T.; Vanovac, B.; White, A. E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    First measurements of core (r/a < 0.95) turbulent electron temperature fluctuations made on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak using a Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission (CECE) technique are presented. Validation of gyro-kinetic models against measurements of the underlying turbulent micro-structure are essential for developing predictive capabilities for future devices. In tokamak plasmas, turbulent temperature fluctuations are sufficiently broadband ( 0.5 MHz) and low-amplitude ( 1%) that conventional radiometer techniques are fundamentally unable to detect them and a correlation technique is required to further extract the signals. An application of the spectral decorrelation method had been designed and built for AUG. This CECE radiometer shares an optical path with a reflectometer and is sensitive to wavenumbers perpendicular to the magnetic field k⊥ up to 0.76 cm-1 . An upgrade to the focusing mirror will increase this range to k⊥ up to 1.4 cm-1. Measurements in Helium plasmas have been made at three radial locations simultaneously, providing a profile of the temperature fluctuation amplitude in the outer core of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated heated L-mode plasmas. New results and future plans will be presented. This work is supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-SC0006419.

  10. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  11. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  12. Electrons In Water-ices At Outer Solar System Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, Murthy; Allamandola, L. J.

    2006-09-01

    Solid water-rich ice is an important constituent of our Solar System. The importance of both laboratory and in-situ observational work to make advances in this field cannot be overstated. Over the past several years, we have been studying VUV-radiation processing of organic impurities such as the extraterrestrially abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) embedded in water-ices between 20 K and 180 K. During these in-situ studies we discovered several counter-intuitive phenomena (See Gudipati and Allamandola, J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 9020, 2006 and references therein for details): 1) PAHs embedded in cryogenic water-ice are easily and efficiently ionized (>80%, i.e., near quantitative ion yields) to the cation form by VUV photons. 2) In water ice, PAH ionization energy is lowered by up to 2 eV compared to the gas-phase, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. 3) PAH cations are stabilized in water ice to temperatures as high as 120 K. 4) Sequential photoionization leading to the formation and stabilization of doubly positively charged organic (PAH) species in water ice has also been found. Our recent laboratory studies have focused on the fate of electrons that are produced during PAH photoionization in the ice. Careful warm-up experiments suggest that indeed some electrons are stored over several hours in these ices. During warm-up of these ices between 20 K and 70 K, these stored electrons become mobilized and react with positively charged PAH ions in the ice. Taken together, these laboratory findings strongly suggest that ice rich trans-Saturnian icy objects including moons, comets, and KBOs, as well as some of Saturn's rings, can host ionized organic impurities and free electrons. These species have physical and chemical properties that can fundamentally alter ice properties such as color, strength, structure, energy-budget, reaction networks etc. Acknowledgments: Funded by NASA's Exobiology, Astrobiology, LTSA, and PG&G Programs

  13. Possible cause of enhancement of electron temperature in high electron density region in the dayside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto

    2016-07-01

    When neutral atmosphere is ionized by solar EUV, energetic electrons named photoelectrons are emitted. The photoelectrons are primary heat source of electrons in the ionosphere in the daytime. The heating rate of electron by photoelectron is proportion to 0.97 power of electron density (Ne) while the heated electron is cooled through the Column collision with ions, the rate of which rate is square of Ne. Therefore, electron temperature (Te) decreases and approach ion temperature (Ti) with increase of Ne. Ions are also cooled through the collision with neutral spices. Finally, these temperatures (Te, Ti and Tn) show very similar values in high Ne region. However, Te enhancement with increase of Ne is found in the satellite observation at 600 km in the daytime ionosphere [Kakinami et al., 2011]. Similar Ti variation is also found around the magnetic dip equator [Kakinami et al., 2014]. One possible cause of the enhancement of Te is enhacement of Tn with increase Ne because both Ne and Tn increase with increase of solar irradiance flux, F10.7 [Lei et al., 2007]. However, since such the enhancements of Te are seen in any F10.7, it is hard to explain the phenomenon. In this paper, we present correlation between Te (Ti) and Ne obtained by the Incoherent Scatter radar at Jicamarca. The similar correlation, namely positive correlation of Te (Ti) with Ne in high Ne region are found above 300 km. Using the observations and Tn and neutral density calculated with MSIS, the Column collision cooling with ions, and inelastic collision cooling with neutral spices for electron are shown. The heat conduction along the magnetic field line is also estimated by using IRI model. Using these information, we discuss possible cause of the enhancement of Te in the high Ne region. References Kakinami et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016905. Kakinami et al. (2014), J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2014JA020302. Lei et al.(2007), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2006JA012041.

  14. Electron-temperature dependence of the recombination of electrons with O4(+) ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulaney, J. L.; Biondi, M. A.; Johnsen, R.

    1988-01-01

    The coefficient for recombination of O4(+) ions with electrons has been measured as a function of Te by analyzing electron- and ion-density decays in microwave-generated afterglow plasmas in neon-oxygen mixtures. Te values in the afterglow were elevated above those of the neutral species and ions by continuous application of microwave power. The data analysis included effects on the Te arising from inelastic collisions of electrons with the minority oxygen molecules and spatial nonuniformities of Te due to the spatially nonuniform microwave heating field. Over the temperature range Te = 143-5500 K the recombination coefficients were found to have a Te exp -z dependence, with z = 0.48 + 0.1 or - 0.05. While the values of the recombination coefficients for this dimer ion are an order of magnitude larger than those of the monomer ions, the temperature dependence is close to the Te exp -0.5 dependence predicted and often observed for diatomic ions.

  15. High temperature superconducting films and multilayers for electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavaler, John R.; Talvacchio, John

    1994-04-01

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a materials and fundamental device base for high-transition-temperature superconducting (HTS) electronics capable of operating at greater than 50K. Progress is reported on four tasks which address problems fundamental to the understanding of the superconducting state in HTS films, the application of HTS films in passive microwave circuits, the realization of HTS digital electronics, and the development of new superconducting devices. Large-area epitaxial YBCO films with low RF losses developed under this program and techniques for depositing them on both sides of single-crystal substrates were used in other Westinghouse and government-funded programs to develop HTS channelized filterbanks, delay lines, UHF antenna matching networks, and low-phase-noise resonators. An understanding was achieved of the role of oxygenation during film growth and the effect of film microstructure on RF losses. For HTS digital circuit fabrication, both active devices step-edge and edge-type YBCO Josephson junctions and trilayer BKBO junctions and passive structures were developed, such as crossovers, vias, and contacts. These capabilities were transfered to other Westinghouse and government-funded programs which demonstrated the first HTS SFQ circuits and SQUID's with integrated ground planes.

  16. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  17. Determination of electron density and temperature in non-LTE plasmas from spectral lines of impurity ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    A novel approach for calculating the populations of the excited Li-like ions C IV, N V, O VI, and Ne VIII is presented. The populations of the 2(2P), 3(2S), 3(2P), and 3(2D) electronic levels in these ions in optically thin plasmas with a broad range of electron density, N(e), and temperature, T(e), are determined from the collisional-radiative model by solving the system of rate equations for the production of excited ions; the equations are linear with respect to the excited ion populations, and the N(e) and T(e) are taken as independent variables. These populations are used to determine the ratios of line intensities for dipole allowed transitions between various energy levels. This approach can be applied to impurities other than the lithiumlike ions and is especially useful for diagnostics of systems where nonintrusive spectroscopic techniques must be used.

  18. Temperature-dependent electron transport in quantum dot photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Derek J.

    Quantum dot photovoltaics have attracted much interest from researchers in recent years. They have the potential to address both costs and efficiencies of solar cells while simultaneously demonstrating novel physics. Thin-film devices inherently require less material than bulk crystalline silicon, and solution deposition removes the high energy used in fabrication processes. The ease of bandgap tunability in quantum dots through size control allows for simple graded bandgap structures, which is one method of breaking beyond the Shockley-Queisser limit. Power output can also be increased through the process of multiple exciton generation, whereby more than one electron participates in conduction after the absorption of a single photon. In this dissertation work, quantum dot photovoltaics are examined through a range of temperatures. Exploring the current-voltage-temperature parameter space provides insight into the dominant conduction mechanisms within these materials, which is largely not agreed upon. Beginning with PbS quantum dots, changes in device structure are examined by varying the capping ligand and nanoparticle size. This leads similar studies of new, germanium quantum dot devices. Through this understanding, further optimization of device structure can lead to enhanced device performance.

  19. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  20. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  1. Electron-electron Interactions in Highly Doped Heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhenskyy, K. V.; Dubois, A. B.; Gordova, T. V.; Kucheryavyy, S. I.; Mashnina, S. N.; Safoshkin, A. S.

    We report results from calculations of temperature-dependent intra and intersubband electron-electron scattering rates in two subbands in a two-dimentional (2D) quantum structure in Random Phase Approximations (RPA). Electron-electron interactions in a single highly doped heterojunction are considered taking into account both intra- and intersubband transitions. Expressions are derived for the time of electron-electron interaction, matrix elements of the full screening potential and dynamic dielectric function in a 2D electron system with the fine structure of the energy spectrum, and for the electron density spatial distribution. The theoretical dependences provide a good description of the experimental times of Landau levels collisional broadening.

  2. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  3. Interpretive 2-D treatment of scrape-off-layer plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M.; Allen, A.; Daughton, W.

    1996-12-31

    The width of the scrape-off-layer in a tokamak is determined by cross field transport. In Alcator C-mod the plasma parameters in the scrape-off-layer are measured at upstream and divertor plate locations. We solve a 2-D scrape-off-layer heat conduction equation in the flux geometry (as determined by EFIT) of the C-mod experiment. Bolometric measurements are utilized for the radiative loss term. We use the end wall probe measurements of electron temperature as a boundary condition and the fast scanning probe measurements of upstream temperature are treated as constraints to determine the cross field transport and thermal conductivity. Results are compared with 1-D onion-skin-model predictions.

  4. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  5. Circular photogalvanic effect caused by the transitions between edge and 2D states in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron absorption and the edge photocurrent of a 2D topological insulator are studied for transitions between edge states to 2D states. The circular polarized light is found to produce the edge photocurrent, the direction of which is determined by light polarization and edge orientation. It is shown that the edge-state current is found to exceed the 2D current owing to the topological protection of the edge states.

  6. Stationary afterglow measurements of the temperature dependence of the electron–ion recombination rate coefficients of {{\\rm{H}}}_{2}{{\\rm{D}}}^{+} and {{HD}}_{2}^{+} in He/Ar/H2/D2 gas mixtures at T = 80–145 K 

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plašil, Radek; Dohnal, Petr; Kálosi, Ábel; Roučka, Štěpán; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosík, Juraj

    2017-03-01

    We report measurements of the binary and ternary recombination rate coefficients of deuterated isotopologues of {{{H}}}3+. A cavity ring-down absorption spectrometer was used to monitor the fractional abundances of {{{H}}}3+, {{{H}}}2{{{D}}}+, {{HD}}2+ and {{{D}}}3+ during the decay of a plasma in He/Ar/{{{H}}}2/{{{D}}}2 mixtures. A dependence of the measured effective recombination rate coefficients on the helium buffer gas density was observed and hence both the binary and the ternary recombination rate coefficients for {{{H}}}2{{{D}}}+ and {{HD}}2+ were obtained in the temperature range 80–145 K.

  7. Nonlocal control of electron temperature in short direct current glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Stepanova, O. M.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2014-09-15

    To demonstrate controlling the electron temperature in nonlocal plasma, experiments have been performed on a short (without positive column) dc glow discharge with a cold cathode by applying different voltages to the conducting discharge wall. The experiments have been performed for low-pressure noble gas discharges. The applied voltage can modify trapping the energetic electrons emitted from the cathode sheath and arising from the atomic and molecular processes in the plasma within the device volume. This phenomenon results in the energetic electrons heating the slow plasma electrons, which consequently modifies the electron temperature. Furthermore, a numerical model of the discharge has demonstrated the electron temperature modification for the above case.

  8. 2D vibrational properties of epitaxial silicene on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, Dmytro; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Le Lay, Guy; Sahin, Hasan; Cahangirov, Seymur; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.; Vogt, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    The two-dimensional silicon allotrope, silicene, could spur the development of new and original concepts in Si-based nanotechnology. Up to now silicene can only be epitaxially synthesized on a supporting substrate such as Ag(111). Even though the structural and electronic properties of these epitaxial silicene layers have been intensively studied, very little is known about its vibrational characteristics. Here, we present a detailed study of epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) using in situ Raman spectroscopy, which is one of the most extensively employed experimental techniques to characterize 2D materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and black phosphorous. The vibrational fingerprint of epitaxial silicene, in contrast to all previous interpretations, is characterized by three distinct phonon modes with A and E symmetries. Both, energies and symmetries of theses modes are confirmed by ab initio theory calculations. The temperature dependent spectral evolution of these modes demonstrates unique thermal properties of epitaxial silicene and a significant electron-phonon coupling. These results unambiguously support the purely two-dimensional character of epitaxial silicene up to about 300 °C, whereupon a 2D-to-3D phase transition takes place. The detailed fingerprint of epitaxial silicene will allow us to identify it in different environments or to study its modifications.

  9. Low-temperature electron irradiation and annealing in pure magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Simester, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    In this study of magnesium after 1.0 MeV electron irradiations at 1.55/sup 0/K, it has been observed that the damage production rate in Mg is (3.57 +- 0.03) x 10/sup -26/ ..cap omega..cm/(e/sup -/ cm/sup 2/). There is no evidence for thermal annealing up to 4/sup 0/K. The low temperature recovery in magnesium is found to consist of two broad substages between 4 to 14/sup 0/K, both of which exhibit evidence for correlated and uncorrelated recovery processes. The two substages are found to have very different frequency factors for annealing, and there is evidence that the recovery processes in the second substage are influenced by those in the first. A model for recovery is proposed using the split configuration in the plane which explains the first substage as being due to interstitial migration in the basal plane and the second to migration perpendicular to the plane.

  10. Photocarrier transport in 2D macroporous silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Onyshchenko, V.; Sachenko, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mechanisms of photocarrier transport through a barrier in the surface space-charge region (SCR) of 2D macroporous silicon structures have been studied at photon energies comparable to that of the silicon indirect band-to-band transition. It was found that the photoconductivity relaxation time was determined by the light modulation of barrier on the macropore surface; as a result, the relaxation itself obeyed the logarithmic law. The temperature dependence of the photoconductivity relaxation time was determined by the thermionic emission mechanism of the current transport in the SCR at temperatures T > 180 K, and by the tunnel current flow at T < 100 K, with temperature-independent tunnelling probability. The photo-emf was found to become saturated or reverse its sign to negative at temperatures below 130 K because of light absorption due to optical transitions via surface electronic states close to the silicon conduction band. In this case, the surface band bending increases due to the growth of a negative charge of the semiconductor surface. The equilibrium electrons in the bulk and photoexcited holes on the macropore surface recombine through the channel of multistage tunnel recombination between the conduction and valence bands.

  11. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, N.; Sobolev, E.; Lakhno, V.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T ∼ 0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  12. Peltier Effect and Electron Temperature Distribution in Quantum Hall Systems with Potential Discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Akera, Hiroshi; Suzuura, Hidekatsu

    2005-06-01

    Spatial variations of the electron temperature are calculated in the linear-response regime in a quantum Hall system with a potential discontinuity in the current direction. It is shown that the sign of the induced deviation of the electron temperature from the lattice temperature exhibits quantum oscillations.

  13. Lipid-gramicidin interactions: dynamic structure of the boundary lipid by 2D-ELDOR.

    PubMed

    Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Crepeau, Richard H; Borbat, Petr P; Ge, Mingtao; Freed, Jack H

    2003-05-01

    The use of 2D-electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) for the characterization of the boundary lipid in membrane vesicles of DPPC and gramicidin A' (GA) is reported. We show that 2D-ELDOR, with its enhanced spectral resolution to dynamic structure as compared with continuous-wave electron spin resonance, provides a reliable and useful way of studying lipid-protein interactions. The 2D-ELDOR spectra of the end-chain spin label 16-PC in DPPC/GA vesicles is composed of two components, which are assigned to the bulk lipids (with sharp auto peaks and crosspeaks) and to the boundary lipids (with broad auto peaks). Their distinction is clearest for higher temperatures and higher GA concentrations. The quantitative analysis of these spectra shows relatively faster motions and very low ordering for the end chain of the bulk lipids, whereas the boundary lipids show very high "y-ordering" and slower motions. The y-ordering represents a dynamic bending at the end of the boundary lipid acyl chain, which can then coat the GA molecules. These results are consistent with the previous studies by Ge and Freed (1999) using continuous-wave electron spin resonance, thereby supporting their model for GA aggregation and H(II) phase formation for high GA concentrations. Improved instrumental and simulation methods have been employed.

  14. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-15

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  15. Effect of electron temperature anisotropy on near-wall conductivity in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fengkui E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn; Kong, Lingyi; Zhang, Xueyi; Li, Wei; Yu, Daren E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn

    2014-06-15

    The electron velocity distribution in Hall thrusters is anisotropic, which not only makes the sheath oscillate in time, but also causes the sheath to oscillate in space under the condition of low electron temperatures. The spatial oscillation sheath has a significant effect on near-wall transport current. In this Letter, the method of particle-in-cell (2D + 3 V) was adopted to simulate the effect of anisotropic electron temperatures on near-wall conductivity in a Hall thruster. Results show that the electron-wall collision frequency is within the same order in magnitude for both anisotropic and isotropic electron temperatures. The near-wall transport current produced by collisions between the electrons and the walls is much smaller than experimental measurements. However, under the condition of anisotropic electron temperatures, the non-collision transport current produced by slow electrons which reflected by the spatial oscillation sheath is much larger and closes to measurements.

  16. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  17. Electron-temperature dependence of dissociative recombination of electrons with CO(+)-(CO)n-series ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, M.; Biondi, M. A.; Johnsen, R.

    1980-01-01

    A microwave afterglow mass spectrometer apparatus is used to determine the dependence on electron temperature T sub e of the recombination coefficients alpha sub n of the dimer and trimer ions of the series CO+.(CO) sub n. It is found that alpha sub 1 = (1.3 + or - 0.3)x 0.000001 (T sub e(K)/300) to the -0.34; and alpha sub 2 = (1.9 + or - 0.4)x 0.000001 (T sub e(K)/300) to the -0.33 cu cm/sec. These dependences on T sub e are quite different from those obtained previously for polar-cluster ions of the hydronium and ammonium series but are similar to that for simple diatomic ions.

  18. Modulating the vibronic correlation in 2D superconductor by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazempour, Ali; Morshedloo, Toktam

    2017-04-01

    Superconductivity in the extreme two-dimensional atomic layers has been suffered because of the strong affection dimensionality confinement on electron-phonon binding. Here, using first-principles method, we study the effect of applied perpendicular and parallel electric field on the strength of phonon renormalization and electron-phonon coupling in bi-layer MgB2 as a known 2D superconductor. The changes of phonon frequency and line-width demonstrate that important E2 g optical modes are strongly sensitive to the applied parallel electric field which directs to sharp reduction of vibronic coupling. Whereas, we show that perpendicular electric field modulates the system to the strong-coupling superconductor and predict the enhancement of critical temperature Tc . Our study opens up the use of electric filed to probe and measure the variation amount of electron-phonon renormalization as a gauge in 2D superconductivity.

  19. Thermal Conductivity and Thermopower near the 2D Metal-Insulator transition, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2015-02-20

    STUDIES OF STRONGLY-INTERACTING 2D ELECTRON SYSTEMS – There is a great deal of current interest in the properties of systems in which the interaction between electrons (their potential energy) is large compared to their kinetic energy. We have investigated an apparent, unexpected metal-insulator transition inferred from the behavior of the temperature-dependence of the resistivity; moreover, detailed analysis of the behavior of the magnetoresistance suggests that the electrons’ effective mass diverges, supporting this scenario. Whether this is a true phase transition or crossover behavior has been strenuously debated over the past 20 years. Our measurements have now shown that the thermoelectric power of these 2D materials diverges at a finite density, providing clear evidence that this is, in fact, a phase transition to a new low-density phase which may be a precursor or a direct transition to the long sought-after electronic crystal predicted by Eugene Wigner in 1934.

  20. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  1. Secondary electron emission from sodium chloride, glass and aluminum oxide at various temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shulman, A. R.; Makedonskiy, V. L.; Yaroshetskiy, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    The method of single impulses was used to measure the coefficients of the secondary electronic emission for 2 types of Al2O2, monocrystalline NaCl and glass at different temperatures and for different values of the energy of the primary electrons. The value of the secondary electron emission does not depend upon temperature. The effect of a gas film on the value of the secondary electron emission was detected.

  2. Observation of electron temperature turbulence with a correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogi, Y.; Higashi, T.; Tamura, N.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kuwahara, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Mase, A.; Takehara, K.; Tokuzawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence measurement is important in the study of plasma confinement. We developed a multi-channel correlation electron cyclotron emission (cECE) radiometer system, using an existing conventional ECE radiometer system (RADH) on a large helical device (LHD) . The signal received by the RADH was split and fed to our cECE system, and then electron temperatures at three separate radial positions were measured by resolving frequency component with three narrow (200 MHz) band-pass filters. Data taken by the cECE system were compared with those taken by the RADH system. Turbulence-like signals below 10 kHz were detected by the cECE measurement using coherence analysis, but were not detected by RADH measurement. We considered this to be due to differences in the radial separation length between the two channels and in the radial measurement depth of each channel. The cECE system was able to detect higher frequency turbulence because its separation length and measurement depth in the radial direction was shorter than the correlation length of the turbulence.

  3. Evaluation of COTS Electronic Parts for Extreme Temperature Use in NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems capable of extreme temperature operation are required for many future NASA space exploration missions where it is desirable to have smaller, lighter, and less expensive spacecraft and probes. Presently, spacecraft on-board electronics are maintained at about room temperature by use of thermal control systems. An Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on development of electronics suitable for space exploration missions. The effects of exposure to extreme temperatures and thermal cycling are being investigated for commercial-off-the-shelf components as well as for components specially developed for harsh environments. An overview of this program along with selected data is presented.

  4. Tuning the hysteresis voltage in 2D multilayer MoS2 FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Zheng, Zhouming; Guo, Junjie

    2016-10-01

    The hysteresis tuning is of great significance before the two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) can be practically used in the next-generation nanoelectronic devices. In this paper, a simple and effective annealing method was developed to tune the hysteresis voltage in 2D MoS2 transistors. It was found that high temperature (175 °C) annealing in air could increase the hysteresis voltage from 8.0 V (original device) to 28.4 V, while a next vacuum annealing would reduce the hysteresis voltage to be only 2.0 V. An energyband diagram model based on electron trapping/detrapping due to oxygen adsorption is proposed to understand the hysteresis mechanism in multilayer MoS2 FET. This simple method for tuning the hysteresis voltage of MoS2 FET can make a significant step toward 2D nanoelectronic device applications.

  5. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-07-14

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  6. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx Gázquez, José L. E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx

    2015-07-14

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  7. Space Charge Saturated Sheath Regime and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; A. Smirnov; N.J. Fisch

    2005-03-16

    Secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is predicted to lead to space charge saturated wall sheaths resulting in enhanced power losses in the thruster channel. Analysis of experimentally obtained electron-wall collision frequency suggests that the electron temperature saturation, which occurs at high discharge voltages, appears to be caused by a decrease of the Joule heating rather than by the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission.

  8. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. It is shown that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  9. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    DOE PAGES

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; ...

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Importantmore » swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.« less

  10. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy of 2D-layered gallium selenide on GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Hee; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; O'Hara, Dante J.; Brenner, Mark R.; Johnson, Jared M.; Jamison, John S.; Myers, Roberto C.; Kawakami, Roland K.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Rajan, Siddharth

    2017-03-01

    Large area epitaxy of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials with high material quality is a crucial step in realizing novel device applications based on 2D materials. In this work, we report high-quality, crystalline, large-area gallium selenide (GaSe) films grown on bulk substrates such as c-plane sapphire and gallium nitride (GaN) using a valved cracker source for Se. (002)-Oriented GaSe with random in-plane orientation of domains was grown on sapphire and GaN substrates at a substrate temperature of 350-450 °C with complete surface coverage. Higher growth temperature (575 °C) resulted in the formation of single-crystalline ɛ-GaSe triangular domains with six-fold symmetry confirmed by in-situ reflection high electron energy diffraction and off-axis x-ray diffraction. A two-step growth method involving high temperature nucleation of single crystalline domains and low temperature growth to enhance coalescence was adopted to obtain continuous (002)-oriented GaSe with an epitaxial relationship with the substrate. While six-fold symmetry was maintained in the two step growth, β-GaSe phase was observed in addition to the dominant ɛ-GaSe in cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy images. This work demonstrates the potential of growing high quality 2D-layered materials using molecular beam epitaxy and can be extended to the growth of other transition metal chalcogenides.

  12. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L; Ayers, Paul W; Vela, Alberto

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μe) and chemical hardness (ηe) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μe. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (-I), positive (-A), and zero values of the fractional charge (-(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  13. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  14. Preliminary low temperature electron irradiation of triple junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2005-01-01

    JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature.

  15. Space charge saturated sheath regime and electron temperature saturation in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Y.; Staack, D.; Smirnov, A.; Fisch, N. J.

    2005-07-01

    Existing electron-wall interaction models predict that secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is significant and that the near-wall sheaths are space charge saturated. The experimental electron-wall collision frequency is computed using plasma parameters measured in a laboratory Hall thruster. In spite of qualitative similarities between the measured and predicted dependencies of the maximum electron temperature on the discharge voltage, the deduced electron-wall collision frequency for high discharge voltages is much lower than the theoretical value obtained for space charge saturated sheath regime, but larger than the wall recombination frequency. The observed electron temperature saturation appears to be directly associated with a decrease of the Joule heating rather than with the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission. Another interesting experimental result is related to the near-field plasma plume, where electron energy balance appears to be independent on the magnetic field.

  16. 2D Radiative Transfer in Magnetically Confined Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.; Anzer, U.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetically confined structures in the solar atmosphere exhibit a large complexity in their shapes and physical conditions. As an example, we show the case of so-called magnetic dips in prominences which are in magnetohydrostatic equilibria. For such models we solve 2D non-LTE multilevel problem for hydrogen with PRD in Lyman resonance lines. The iterative technique used is based on the MALI approach with simple diagonal ALO and SC formal solver. To compute the hydrogen ionization balance, the preconditioned MALI equations are linearized with respect to atomic level populations and electron density and solved iteratively using the Newton-Raphson scheme. Two additional problems are addressed: (i) an adequate iteration method for cases when the column-mass scale is used in one of the two dimensions but varies along the other dimension (which has a geometrical scaling); and (ii) a possibility of using AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) algorithms to account for steep 2D gradients of selected variables (temperature, density, etc.).

  17. Mixing the Solar Wind Proton and Electron Scales: Effects of Electron Temperature Anisotropy on the Oblique Proton Firehose Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A.; Poedts, S.

    2016-01-01

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons,? unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma ß and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  18. Electronic clinical predictive thermometer using logarithm for temperature prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambridge, Vivien J. (Inventor); Koger, Thomas L. (Inventor); Nail, William L. (Inventor); Diaz, Patrick (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A thermometer that rapidly predicts body temperature based on the temperature signals received from a temperature sensing probe when it comes into contact with the body. The logarithms of the differences between the temperature signals in a selected time frame are determined. A line is fit through the logarithms and the slope of the line is used as a system time constant in predicting the final temperature of the body. The time constant in conjunction with predetermined additional constants are used to compute the predicted temperature. Data quality in the time frame is monitored and if unacceptable, a different time frame of temperature signals is selected for use in prediction. The processor switches to a monitor mode if data quality over a limited number of time frames is unacceptable. Determining the start time on which the measurement time frame for prediction is based is performed by summing the second derivatives of temperature signals over time frames. When the sum of second derivatives in a particular time frame exceeds a threshold, the start time is established.

  19. Transport simulations of the C-2 and C-2U Field Reversed Configurations with the Q2D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, Marco; Dettrick, Sean; Barnes, Daniel; Tajima, Toshiki; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    The Q2D code is a 2D MHD code, which includes a neutral fluid and separate ion and electron temperatures, coupled with a 3D Monte Carlo code, which is used to calculate source terms due to neutral beams. Q2D has been benchmarked against the 1D transport code Q1D and is used to simulate the evolution of the C-2 and C-2U field reversed configuration experiments [1]. Q2D simulations start from an initial equilibrium and transport coefficients are chosen to match C-2 experimental data. C-2U is an upgrade of C-2, with more beam power and angled beam injection, which demonstrates plasma sustainment for 5 + ms. The simulations use the same transport coefficients for C-2 and C-2U, showing the formation of a steady state in C-2U, sustained by fast ion pressure and current drive.

  20. Two-temperature models of old supernova remnants with ion and electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Wei; Cox, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects thermal conduction may have on the evolution of old supernova remnants, we present the results of 1D (spherically symmetric) numerical simulations of a remnant in a homogeneous interstellar medium for four different cases: (1) without thermal conduction; (2) with both electron and ion thermal conduction assuming equal temperatures; (3) with electron thermal conduction only, following electron and ion temperatures separately; and (4) with both electron and ion thermal conduction following separate temperatures. We followed the entire evolution until the completion of the remnant bubble collapse. Our most significant result is that in remnant evolution studies concerned principally with either the shell or bubble evolution at late times, reasonable results are obtained with single-temperature models. When the electron and ion temperatures are followed separately, however, ion thermal conduction cannot safely be ignored.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of zinc(II)-phosphonate coordination polymers with different dimensionality (0D, 2D, 3D) and dimensionality change in the solid phase (0D→3D) induced by temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Zapico, Eva; Montejo-Bernardo, Jose; Fernández-González, Alfonso; García, José R. García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-05-15

    Three new zinc(II) coordination polymers, [Zn(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO)(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)] (1), [Zn{sub 3}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})](H{sub 2}O){sub 3.40} (2) and [Zn{sub 5}(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}){sub 4}](H{sub 2}O){sub 0.32} (3), with different structural dimensionality (0D, 2D and 3D, respectively) have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system (P2{sub 1}/c) forming discrete dimeric units bonded through H-bonds, while compounds 2 and 3 crystallize in the triclinic (P−1) and the monoclinic (C2/c) systems, respectively. Compound 3, showing three different coordination numbers (4, 5 and 6) for the zinc atoms, has also been obtained by thermal treatment of 1 (probed by high-temperature XRPD experiments). The crystalline features of these compounds, related to the coordination environments for the zinc atoms in each structure, provoke the increase of the relative fluorescence for 2 and 3, compared to the free phenanthroline. Thermal analysis (TG and DSC) and XPS studies have been also carried out for all compounds. - Graphical abstract: Three new coordination compounds of zinc with 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid (H{sub 2}PPA) and phenanthroline have been obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. The crystalline structure depends on the different coordination environments of the zinc atoms (see two comparative Zn{sub 6}-moieties). The influence of the different coordination modes of H{sub 2}PPA with the central atom in all structures have been studied, being found new coordination modes for this ligand. Several compounds show a significant increase in relative fluorescence with respect to the free phenanthroline. - Highlights: • Compounds have been obtained modifying the reaction time and the rate of

  2. Height variation of electron temperature associated with equatorial plasma bubbles - some recent rocket observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralikrishna, P.; Batista, I. S.; Domingos, S.; Aquino, M. G.

    2013-05-01

    In-situ measurements made from Brazil recently using rocket-borne swept-bias Langmuir Probes show that the electron temperatures in the valley region between the equatorial E and F regions get modified before the onset of plasma bubbles. During one of the post sunset launches made on 18-th December 1995 from the equatorial rocket launching station CLA in Alcântara, Brazil the Langmuir probe measured abnormally large electron temperatures below the F-region just before the onset of plasma bubbles but temperatures became normal soon after the onset of bubbles. Later on 2-nd December 2011 a Brazilian VS-30 single stage rocket was launched from the equatorial rocket launching station CLBI in Natal, Brazil carrying a Langmuir probe operating alternately in swept and constant bias modes to measure both electron temperature and electron density respectively. The ground equipments operated before and during the rocket launch clearly showed the presence of plasma bubbles above the F-region. At the time of launch the bubble activity was at its peak. The electron density and temperature height profiles could be estimated from the LP data up to the rocket apogee altitude of 139km. During the rocket upleg and downleg the valley region showed the presence electron temperatures as high as 2000 degree K while the temperatures expected from the existing models are around 500 degree K. A two stage VS-30/Orion rocket was launched on 8-th December soon after sunset carrying a Langmuir Probe operating alternately in swept and constant bias modes to measure the electron density and electron temperature, mainly in the valley between the E and F regions. At the time of launch ground equipments operated at equatorial stations showed ionospheric conditions favorable for the generation of plasma bubbles. These profiles are compared with model electron density and temperature profiles as well as with electron density and temperature profiles observed under conditions of no plasma bubbles.

  3. Low-resistance 2D/2D ohmic contacts: A universal approach to high-performance WSe2, MoS2, and MoSe2 transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Hsun -Jen; Chamlagain, Bhim; Koehler, Michael; Perera, Meeghage Madusanka; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David; Tomanek, David; Zhou, Zhixian

    2016-02-04

    Here, we report a new strategy for fabricating 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts for a variety of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) using van der Waals assembly of substitutionally doped TMDs as drain/source contacts and TMDs with no intentional doping as channel materials. We demonstrate that few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors (FETs) with 2D/2D contacts exhibit low contact resistances of ~0.3 kΩ μm, high on/off ratios up to >109, and high drive currents exceeding 320 μA μm–1. These favorable characteristics are combined with a two-terminal field-effect hole mobility μFE ≈ 2 × 102 cm2 V–1 s–1 at room temperature, which increases to >2 × 103 cm2 V–1 s–1 at cryogenic temperatures. We observe a similar performance also in MoS2 and MoSe2 FETs with 2D/2D drain and source contacts. The 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts presented here represent a new device paradigm that overcomes a significant bottleneck in the performance of TMDs and a wide variety of other 2D materials as the channel materials in postsilicon electronics.

  4. High-temperature superconductivity: Electron mirages in an iron salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaanen, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The detection of unusual 'mirage' energy bands in photoemission spectra of single-atom layers of iron selenide reveals the probable cause of high-temperature superconductivity in these artificial structures. See Letter p.245

  5. High Temperature Superconducting Films and Multilayers for Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-20

    GROUP SUB-GROUP superconductors, yttrium , barium, copper, oxides, high, ’ critical, temperature, thin films, tunneling, barriers, sputtering 19. ABSTRACT...levels of a stabilizing element into the film’s crystal structure (i.e. " doping *). During this reporting period the effect of using very low...crystallization temperatures and also doping known superconductors with various elements have been studied. Although no enhancements in T ’s above those presently

  6. Hall-velocity limited magnetoconductivity in a 2D Wigner solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fozooni, P.; Djerfi, K.; Kristensen, Anders; Lea, M. J.; Richardson, P. J.; Santrich-Badal, A.; Blackburn, A.; van der Heijden, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetoconductivity σ( B) of a classical 2D electron crystal on superfluid4He is non-linear. Experimentally we find a contribution to σ( B) which at constant field, gives σ( B)∞ J x, the current density, while at constant current, σ( B) ∞ 1/ B. In this region the Hall velocity νH slowly approaches the ripplon velocity νI at the first reciprocal lattice vector, due to strong electron-ripplon interactions with the helium. The magnetoconductivity decreases sharply for νH>νI. Fluctuations in σ( B) are seen above the melting temperature.

  7. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  8. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-09

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  9. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  10. Dynamic molecular structure and phase diagram of DPPC-cholesterol binary mixtures: a 2D-ELDOR study.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Freed, Jack H

    2007-09-27

    This paper is an application of 2D electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) with the "full Sc- method" to study model membranes. We obtain and confirm the phase diagram of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-cholesterol binary mixtures versus temperature and provide quantitative descriptions for its dynamic molecular structure using 2D-ELDOR at the Ku band. The spectra from the end-chain 16-PC spin label in multilamellar phospholipid vesicles are obtained for cholesterol molar concentrations ranging from 0 to 50% and from 25 to 60 degrees C. This phase diagram consists of liquid-ordered, liquid-disordered, and gel phases and phase coexistence regions. The phase diagram is carefully examined according to the spectroscopic evidence, and the rigorous interpretation for the line shape changes. We show that the 2D-ELDOR spectra differ markedly with variation in the composition. The extensive line shape changes in the 2D-plus-mixing-time representation provide useful information to define and characterize the membrane phases with respect to their dynamic molecular structures and to determine the phase boundaries. The homogeneous T2's are extracted from the pure absorption spectra and are used to further distinguish the membrane phases. These results show 2D-ELDOR to be naturally suitable for probing and reporting the dynamic structures of microdomains in model membrane systems and, moreover, providing a very detailed picture of their molecular dynamic structure, especially with the aid of the "full Sc- method".

  11. Threefold Increase of the Bulk Electron Temperature of Plasma Discharges in a Magnetic Mirror Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagryansky, P. A.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Lizunov, A. A.; Maximov, V. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Soldatkina, E. I.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    This Letter describes plasma discharges with a high temperature of bulk electrons in the axially symmetric high-mirror-ratio (R =35 ) open magnetic system gas dynamic trap (GDT) in the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk). According to Thomson scattering measurements, the on-axis electron temperature averaged over a number of sequential shots is 660 ±50 eV with the plasma density being 0.7 ×1 019 m-3 ; in few shots, electron temperature exceeds 900 eV. This corresponds to at least a threefold increase with respect to previous experiments both at GDT and at other comparable machines, thus, demonstrating the highest quasistationary (about 1 ms) electron temperature achieved in open traps. The breakthrough is made possible by application of a new 0.7 MW /54.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating system in addition to standard 5 MW heating by neutral beams, and application of a radial electric field to mitigate the flute instability.

  12. Electron-Temperature Dependence of the Recombination of NH4(+)((NH3)(sub n) Ions with Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Johnson, R.

    1997-01-01

    The two-body recombination of NH4(+)(NH3)(sub 2,3) cluster-ions with electrons has been studied in an afterglow experiment in which the electron temperature T, was elevated by radio-frequency heating from 300 K up to 900 K. The recombination coefficients for the n = 2 and n = 3 cluster ions were found to be equal, alpha(sub 2, sup(2)) = alpha(sub 3, sup(2)) = (4.8 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp - 6)cu cm/s, and to vary with electron temperature as T(sub c, sup -0.65) rather than to be nearly temperature-independent as had been inferred from measurements in microwave-heated plasmas.

  13. New results of ultra-low temperature experiments in the second Landau level of a two-dimensional electron system.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Vicente, C.; Stormer, H. L.; Sullivan, N. S.; Xia, J. S.; Adams, E. D.; West, Ken W.; Tsui, Daniel Chee; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; Baldwin, K. W.

    2003-07-01

    In the second Landau level around {nu} = 5/2 filling of an extremely high quality 2D electron system and at temperatures T down to 9 mK we observe a very strong even-denominator fractional quantum Hall effect at Landau level filling {nu} = 5/2 and its energy gap is large and {Delta} {approx} 0.45 K. A clear FQHE state is seen at {nu} = 2+2/5, with well-quantized R{sub xy}. A novel, even denominator FQHE state at {nu} = 2+3/8 seems to develop, as deduced from the T-dependence of dR{sub xy}/dB. In addition, four fully developed re-entrant integral quantum Hall effect (RIQHE) states are also observed. At low temperatures, the wide RIQHE plateau around at {nu} = 2+2/7 is interrupted by a dip, indicating an additional reentrance. Finally, the tilted magnetic field experiment at an ultra-low temperature of 10 mK was carried out to examine the spin-polarization of the {nu} = 5/2 FQHE state.

  14. Encapsulation for smart textile electronics - humidity and temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Andreas; Tran, Thanh-Nam; Aasmundtveit, Knut E; Seeberg, Trine M

    2015-01-01

    A combined humidity and temperature sensor was packaged by vacuum casting onto three different types of textiles; cotton, nylon and a waterproof fabric. This was done in order to integrate the sensor in a jacket in a soft and reliable way without changing the sensor performance. A membrane was custom made and integrated into the device to protect the sensor from the environment. The packaged sensors performance was characterized in a climate chamber were the relative humidity and temperature ranged from 25 % to 95 % and -10 °C to 75 °C respectively. The packaged sensors showed insignificant to limited performance degradation.

  15. Measurement of the ionization state and electron temperature of plasma during the ablation stage of a wire-array Z pinch using absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Hakel, P; Mancini, R C; Chittenden, J P; Anderson, A; Durmaz, T; Wiewior, P; Papp, D; Altemara, S D; Astanovitskiy, A L; Chalyy, O

    2011-06-03

    Wire-array plasmas were investigated in the nonradiative ablation stage via x-ray absorption spectroscopy. A laser-produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al wire arrays. The Sm spectrum was simultaneously observed by two spectrometers: one recorded the unattenuated spectrum and the other the transmission spectrum with 1.45-1.55 keV K-shell absorption lines. Analysis of absorption spectra revealed electron temperature in the range of 10-30 eV and the presence of F-, O-, N- and C-like Al ions in the absorbing plasma. A comparison of this electron temperature with the postprocessed absorption spectra of a 2D MHD simulation yields results in general agreement with the data analysis.

  16. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  17. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  18. Mite Biodiversity Under the Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, more than 55,000 mite species have been described and only a few of them have been studied. Some mites are adapted to live deep in soil, others in fresh or sea water, some are on plants, algae, fungi or animals, and others are able to survive in both extreme cold and hot temperatures. The...

  19. Time required to document temperature by electronic skin thermometer in a healthy neonate.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananada Shankar; Chowdhury, T; Bandhopadhya, D; Ghosh, Gautam

    2009-12-01

    We studied the actual time taken to document temperature in a stable neonate by an electronic digital skin thermometer with automatic time beeper. We studied 100 neonates after initial stabilization. The mean time required for documenting the temperature by a electronic thermometer in axilla was 56.34+/-1.54 secs for term neonates (>2500g) and 54.87+/-1.23 secs for low birth weight (<2500g). The skin temperature measured simultaneously by the ordinary mercury thermometer kept for traditional 3 minutes supported the electronic measurement (P < 0.01).

  20. Effects of relativistic electron temperature on parametric instabilities for intense laser propagation in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Jun; Chen, Min; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming; Ren, Chuang; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Sheng, Zheng-Ming E-mail: zhengming.sheng@strath.ac.uk

    2014-11-15

    Effects of relativistic electron temperature on stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering instabilities for high intensity lasers propagating in underdense plasma are studied theoretically and numerically. The dispersion relations for these instabilities are derived from the relativistic fluid equation. For a wide range of laser intensity and electron temperature, it is found that the maximum growth rate and the instability region in k-space can be reduced at relativistic electron temperature. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out, which confirm the theoretical analysis.

  1. SiGe Based Low Temperature Electronics for Lunar Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Blalock, Benjamin; Cressler, John

    2012-01-01

    The temperature at the permanently shadowed regions of the moon's surface is approximately -240 C. Other areas of the lunar surface experience temperatures that vary between 120 C and -180 C during the day and night respectively. To protect against the large temperature variations of the moon surface, traditional electronics used in lunar robotics systems are placed inside a thermally controlled housing which is bulky, consumes power and adds complexity to the integration and test. SiGe Based electronics have the capability to operate over wide temperature range like that of the lunar surface. Deploying low temperature SiGe electronics in a lander platform can minimize the need for the central thermal protection system and enable the development of a new generation of landers and mobility platforms with highly efficient distributed architecture. For the past five years a team consisting of NASA, university and industry researchers has been examining the low temperature and wide temperature characteristic of SiGe based transistors for developing electronics for wide temperature needs of NASA environments such as the Moon, Titan, Mars and Europa. This presentation reports on the status of the development of wide temperature SiGe based electronics for the landers and lunar surface mobility systems.

  2. Hotspot electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Chen, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S. R.; Landen, O. L.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schneider, M.; Scott, H. A.

    2016-11-01

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature in the hotspot of inertially confined, layered, spherical implosions on the National Ignition Facility using a differential filtering diagnostic. Measurements of the DT and DD ion temperatures using neutron time-of-flight detectors are complicated by the contribution of hot spot motion to the peak width, which produce an apparent temperature higher than the thermal temperature. The electron temperature is not sensitive to this non-thermal velocity and is thus a valuable input to interpreting the stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we show that the current differential filtering diagnostic provides insufficient temperature resolution for the hot spot temperatures of interest. We then propose a new differential filter configuration utilizing larger pinhole size to increase spectral fluence, as well as thicker filtration. This new configuration will improve measurement uncertainty by more than a factor of three, allowing for a more accurate hotspot temperature.

  3. Hotspot electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Jarrott, L C; Benedetti, L R; Chen, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Ma, T; Nagel, S R; Landen, O L; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Schneider, M; Scott, H A

    2016-11-01

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature in the hotspot of inertially confined, layered, spherical implosions on the National Ignition Facility using a differential filtering diagnostic. Measurements of the DT and DD ion temperatures using neutron time-of-flight detectors are complicated by the contribution of hot spot motion to the peak width, which produce an apparent temperature higher than the thermal temperature. The electron temperature is not sensitive to this non-thermal velocity and is thus a valuable input to interpreting the stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we show that the current differential filtering diagnostic provides insufficient temperature resolution for the hot spot temperatures of interest. We then propose a new differential filter configuration utilizing larger pinhole size to increase spectral fluence, as well as thicker filtration. This new configuration will improve measurement uncertainty by more than a factor of three, allowing for a more accurate hotspot temperature.

  4. Arbitrary amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons in three-electron temperature space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-06-15

    We examine the characteristics of large amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons supported in a four-component unmagnetised plasma composed of cool, warm, hot electrons, and cool ions. The inertia and pressure for all the species in this plasma system are retained by assuming that they are adiabatic fluids. Our findings reveal that both positive and negative potential slow electron-acoustic solitons are supported in the four-component plasma system. The polarity switch of the slow electron-acoustic solitons is determined by the number densities of the cool and warm electrons. Negative potential solitons, which are limited by the cool and warm electron number densities becoming unreal and the occurrence of negative potential double layers, are found for low values of the cool electron density, while the positive potential solitons occurring for large values of the cool electron density are only limited by positive potential double layers. Both the lower and upper Mach numbers for the slow electron-acoustic solitons are computed and discussed.

  5. Evidence against a universal electron-beam-induced virtual temperature in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Pia; Kaiser, Ute; Lehtinen, Ossi

    2016-04-01

    The continuous electron bombardment of a sample during transmission electron microscopy (TEM) drives atomic-scale transformations. In earlier studies the transformations appeared to proceed as if the sample was held at an elevated temperature, and, indeed, the hypothesis of an electron-beam-induced virtual temperature has gained traction in the scientific community. However, the sample is not significantly heated by the electron beam, meaning the processes are not activated by thermal vibrations. Instead, individual collisions between the electrons and the target atoms, and/or excitations of the electronic system, lead to the observed transformations. It is not a priori clear what virtual temperature can be assigned to the conditions under the electron irradiation, or even if such a temperature can be defined at all. Here, we attempt to measure the virtual temperature, specific to this system, by comparing the relative population of the three different divacancy defect states in single-layer graphene to the Boltzmann distribution using calculated energy levels of the defect states. The experiment is conducted using aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM at an acceleration voltage of 80 kV. Atomistic simulations are used to learn about the energetics of the defects. We find that the measured populations cannot be fitted to the Boltzmann distribution, and consequently no universal virtual temperature can be assigned to the system.

  6. High Temperature Coatings by Pulsed Electron Beam Ablation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    successfully deposited. Rare-earth phosphates are of interest for thermal barrier coatings, while rare-earth silicates are of interest for environmental...thicknesses required for thermal or environmental barrier coating technology. We also developed an efficient laboratory-scale facility to assess the...stability and degradation of thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TBCs and EBCs) in high temperature, high-velocity water-vapor conditions

  7. High Temperature Superconducting Films and Multilayers for Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-19

    earth -Cu-O .................... 81 MP - Melt processing . ........... 97 td - tangent delta meas ..................... 107 BS - Bi-Sr-(Ca)-Cu-O...34V. For sapphire and YSZ, fthe lattice spacing isth lengfth of a diagonal in the two-dimenskonal surface lattice Owa lies Iparalki ID a < 100...and the plasma edge, this behavior reproducible in both the cooling and warm - we measured the reflectance at each temperature up to ing process. At

  8. High-temperature superconducting thin-film-based electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.D; Finokoglu, A.; Hawley, M.; Jia, Q.; Mitchell, T.; Mueller, F.; Reagor, D.; Tesmer, J.

    1996-09-01

    This the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project involved optimization of processing of Y123 and Tl-2212 thin films deposited on novel substrates for advanced electronic devices. The Y123 films are the basis for development of Josephson Junctions to be utilized in magnetic sensors. Microwave cavities based on the Tl-2212 films are the basis for subsequent applications as communication antennas and transmitters in satellites.

  9. Current profile reconstruction using electron temperature imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; Kaita, R.; Stratton, B.; Sabbagh, S.

    2004-10-01

    Flux surface shape information can be used to constrain the current profile for reconstruction of the plasma equilibrium. One method of inferring flux surface shape relies on plasma x-ray emission; however, deviations from the flux surfaces due to impurity and density asymmetries complicate the interpretation. Electron isotherm surfaces should correspond well to the plasma flux surfaces, and equilibrium constraint modeling using this isotherm information constrains the current profile. The KFIT code is used to assess the profile uncertainty and to optimize the number, location and SNR required for the Te detectors. As Te imaging detectors we consider tangentially viewing, vertically spaced, linear gas electron multiplier arrays operated in pulse height analysis (PHA) mode and multifoil soft x-ray arrays. Isoflux coordinate sets provided by T{sub e} measurements offer a strong constraint on the equilibrium reconstruction in both a stacked horizontal array configuration and a crossed horizontal and vertical beam system, with q{sub 0} determined to within {+-}4%. The required SNR can be provided with either PHA or multicolor diagnostic techniques, though the multicolor system requires {approx}x4 better statistics for comparable final errors.

  10. Temperature dependence of electron focusing in In1-xGaxAs/InP heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, J.; Fuller, B. K.; Thrush, C. M.; Partin, D. L.

    1995-08-01

    Transverse electron focusing is studied in a two-dimensional electron gas in the lattice-matched In1-xGaxAs/InP system, as a function of temperature (3 Kelectron density (5×1011 cm-2temperatures above 100 K. The electron mean free path in this system is influenced by phonon scattering at temperatures above 30 K. The purpose of this study is to provide experimental data on the dependence of the amplitude of the focusing peak on temperature, along with mobility data in the same temperature range. The decay of the focusing peak amplitude with increasing temperature is not solely correlated with the reduction in electron relaxation time τ, as calculated from mobility. The results could possibly indicate a temperature dependence for the small-angle scattering. The energies involved in this focusing experiment scale as ħ/2τ~=kT<ħωc at low temperature (4 K), while they scale as ħ/2τ<ħωc15 K. This implies that thermal smearing of the Fermi surface is also important.

  11. Dust-acoustic solitary structures in a magnetized dusty plasma with two-temperature nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an obliquely propagating magnetized dusty plasma, containing nonextensively distributed electrons of distinct temperatures (namely lower and higher temperature nonextensive electrons), negatively charged mobile dust grains, and Maxwellian ions, is rigorously studied and analyzed by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the characteristics of the DA solitary waves (DASWs) are significantly modified by the external magnetic field, obliqueness of the system, nonextensivity of the electrons, electron temperature-ratios, and the respective number densities of two species of electrons. The results obtained from this analysis can be employed in understanding and treating the structures and the characteristics of DASWs both in laboratory and astrophysical plasma system.

  12. Linear electrostatic waves in two-temperature electron-positron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, I. J.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Pillay, S. R.; Lakhina, G. S.; Lakhina

    2012-12-01

    Linear electrostatic waves in a magnetized four-component, two-temperature electron-positron plasma are investigated, with the hot species having the Boltzmann density distribution and the dynamics of cooler species governed by fluid equations with finite temperatures. A linear dispersion relation for electrostatic waves is derived for the model and analyzed for different wave modes. Analysis of the dispersion relation for perpendicular wave propagation yields a cyclotron mode with contributions from both cooler and hot species, which in the absence of hot species goes over to the upper hybrid mode of cooler species. For parallel propagation, both electron-acoustic and electron plasma modes are obtained, whereas for a single-temperature electron-positron plasma, only electron plasma mode can exist. Dispersion characteristics of these modes at different propagation angles are studied numerically.

  13. Reprint of : Single-electron coherence: Finite temperature versus pure dephasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalets, Michael; Haack, Géraldine

    2016-08-01

    We analyze a coherent injection of single electrons on top of the Fermi sea in two situations, at finite-temperature and in the presence of pure dephasing. Both finite-temperature and pure dephasing change the property of the injected quantum states from pure to mixed. However, we show that the temperature-induced mixedness does not alter the coherence properties of these single-electron states. In particular two such mixed states exhibit perfect antibunching while colliding at an electronic wave splitter. This is in striking difference with the dephasing-induced mixedness which suppresses antibunching. On the contrary, a single-particle shot noise is suppressed at finite temperatures but is not affected by pure dephasing. This work therefore extends the investigation of the coherence properties of single-electron states to the case of mixed states and clarifies the difference between different types of mixedness.

  14. Laboratory observations of electron temperature in the wake of a sphere in a streaming plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, W. A.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.; Fontheim, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A parametric study was performed of electron-temperature variation in the wake of a conducting sphere in a streaming plasma. The flow conditions were varied as follows: the ambient electron temperatures in the range from 850 to 2450 K; the ambient electron densities in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00007 per cu cm; and body potentials relative to plasma potential in the range from +1.7 to -2.8 V for an ion-beam energy of approximately 4 eV. Electron-temperature enhancements were observed which ranged up to 200 per cent above ambient in the nearest proximity of the body surface. The magnitude of the enhancement depends upon the ambient density, temperature, and body potential.

  15. Electron-temperature requirements for neutralized inertial-confinement-fusion light-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their large self-space-charge fields, light ion beam drivers of energy and power sufficient to achieve inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cannot be focused on a small fuel pellet unless neutralized. Even if initially neutralized with comoving electrons, these beams will not stay neutralized and focus during propagation through a vacuum chamber unless the initial thermal energy of the neutralizing electrons is sufficiently small. In this paper we discuss the effects which contribute to the effective initial temperature of the neutralizing electrons, including compressional shock heating. We also employ a simple heuristic model to construct envelope equations which govern axial as well as radial beam compression and use them to predict the largest initial electron temperature consistent with the required beam compression. This temperature for typical light ion beam systems is about ten eV - a temperature which may be possible to achieve.

  16. Low temperature processable binderless silver inks for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Arun

    2013-01-01

    A new class of screen-printable conductive silver inks that can be transformed into conductive traces at temperatures below 120°C is presented. The low transformation temperature required for processing these inks renders them suitable for printing on flexible substrates, such as polyester films to form conductive patterns/devices. The ink composition includes silver flakes (average particle size of 0.45 μm-8 μm), an organometallic silver salt, a free radical initiator and a novel dispersant. This binder-free silver ink can be thermally converted into pure metallic patterns containing no binder or any other organic moieties. The initiator catalyzes the decomposition of organometallic silver compounds to produce reactive silver at a relatively lower temperature. The silver thus generated chemically welds the silver flakes. Conductive silver traces with conductivities approaching within two orders of magnitude of elemental silver have been fabricated using these inks. In addition, a novel dispersant comprising amine-carbamate based gels was also developed. These gels act as suitable transport agents for the ink and completely decompose and vaporize during the thermal transformation process. The ink was formulated after careful optimization of the particle sizes of the silver flakes, weight percentages of the silver organometallic salt, silver flakes and amine carbamate gel and the relative molar ratio of the silver salt to the catalyst. These factors influence the conductivity and the mechanical integrity of the printed patterns fabricated from the ink. The inks have also been characterized for their rheological properties to assess their suitability for being processed using commercial roll to roll manufacturing processes such as screen, flexographic or gravure printing. The inks show shear thinning behavior with a viscosity in the range of 5-6.6 Pa.s at 1000 s-1, which within commercially acceptable ranges. Applications of these inks range from interconnect for

  17. Low temperature sintering of Ag nanoparticles for flexible electronics packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, A.; Guo, J. Y.; Alarifi, H.; Patane, G.; Zhou, Y.; Compagnini, G.; Xu, C. X.

    2010-10-01

    We achieve robust bonding of Cu wires to Cu pads on polyimide with silver nanopaste cured at 373 K. The paste is prepared by simply condensing Ag nanoparticle (NP) solution via centrifuging. The bonding is formed by solid state sintering of Ag NPs through neck growth and direct metallic bonding between clean Ag-Cu interfaces. Both experiment and Monte Carlo simulation confirm that the melting point of joint clusters increases during sintering. This creates improved bonds for use at an elevated operating temperature using Ag NPs.

  18. Synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles via room-temperature electron reduction with argon glow discharge as electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Manman; Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Chang-jun

    2014-08-01

    Argon glow discharge has been employed as a cheap, environmentally friendly, and convenient electron source for simultaneous reduction of HAuCl4 and PdCl2 on the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrate. The thermal imaging confirms that the synthesis is operated at room temperature. The reduction is conducted with a short time (30 min) under the pressure of approximately 100 Pa. This room-temperature electron reduction operates in a dry way and requires neither hydrogen nor extra heating nor chemical reducing agent. The analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm all the metallic ions have been reduced. The characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are formed. There also exist some highly dispersed Au and Pd monometallic particles that cannot be detected by XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of their small particle sizes. The observed AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are spherical with an average size of 14 nm. No core-shell structure can be observed. The room-temperature electron reduction can be operated in a larger scale. It is an easy way for the synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles.

  19. Synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles via room-temperature electron reduction with argon glow discharge as electron source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Manman; Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Argon glow discharge has been employed as a cheap, environmentally friendly, and convenient electron source for simultaneous reduction of HAuCl4 and PdCl2 on the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrate. The thermal imaging confirms that the synthesis is operated at room temperature. The reduction is conducted with a short time (30 min) under the pressure of approximately 100 Pa. This room-temperature electron reduction operates in a dry way and requires neither hydrogen nor extra heating nor chemical reducing agent. The analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm all the metallic ions have been reduced. The characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are formed. There also exist some highly dispersed Au and Pd monometallic particles that cannot be detected by XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of their small particle sizes. The observed AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are spherical with an average size of 14 nm. No core-shell structure can be observed. The room-temperature electron reduction can be operated in a larger scale. It is an easy way for the synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles.

  20. Synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles via room-temperature electron reduction with argon glow discharge as electron source

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon glow discharge has been employed as a cheap, environmentally friendly, and convenient electron source for simultaneous reduction of HAuCl4 and PdCl2 on the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrate. The thermal imaging confirms that the synthesis is operated at room temperature. The reduction is conducted with a short time (30 min) under the pressure of approximately 100 Pa. This room-temperature electron reduction operates in a dry way and requires neither hydrogen nor extra heating nor chemical reducing agent. The analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm all the metallic ions have been reduced. The characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are formed. There also exist some highly dispersed Au and Pd monometallic particles that cannot be detected by XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of their small particle sizes. The observed AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are spherical with an average size of 14 nm. No core-shell structure can be observed. The room-temperature electron reduction can be operated in a larger scale. It is an easy way for the synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles. PMID:25177221

  1. Temperature control of electronic components using fluidised beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, R.

    1981-06-01

    This paper introduces the concept of fluidized bed cooling applied to electronic systems. It is shown that, when fluidized with air, the cooling efficiency and the pumping power are principally dependent on particle characteristics; in particular the mean diameter should not be less than 100 microns. Design rules are developed and applied to two types of fluid-bed systems: (1) a small bed of alumina particles cooling single devices of 40 W power dissipation where the fluidizing air is the main heat transporting medium, and (2) a large bed of cenospheres with a simple integrated heat exchanger to extract more than 1 KW of heat from complete sub-rack assemblies of up to 40 printed circuit boards, for a fluidizing power of about 3 W. The effect of board spacing on the overall thermal performance is considered, and a minimum spacing of 10-20 mm is shown to be required to maintain cooling efficiency.

  2. Electron Temperature of the Arc Discharge for Nanomaterial Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feurer, Matthew; Vekselman, Vladislav; Startton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny; LaboratoryPlasma Nanosynthesis Team

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of different allotropes of carbon in the twentieth century many uses have been found for carbon based nanomaterials such as buckyballs, nanotubes (CNTs), and graphene. An atmospheric pressure arc discharge with graphite electrodes is a promising technique for producing large volumes of these carbon nanostructures. Plasma drives the synthesis providing carbon feedstock by anode ablation and sustaining required composition and temperature of nanomaterial species, as such it is important to characterize the plasma used in this process in order to control the quality and attributes of the resulting carbon nanostructures. In work we present detailed in-situ measurements of spatial distribution of arc plasma parameters obtained with optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnostics. The plasma temperature has been determined using Boltzmann diagram method with collisional radiative modeling due to plasma deviation from complete local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Results of these measurements demonstrate a strong correlation between arc plasma and synthesis processes. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  3. DLTS Studies of high-temperature electron irradiated Cz n-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neimash, V.; Kras'ko, M.; Kraitchinskii, A.; Voytovych, V.; Tishchenko, V.; Simoen, E.; Rafi, J. M.; Claeys, C.; Versluys, J.; de Gryse, O.; Clauws, P.

    2004-02-01

    This paper reports on a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) study of both oxygen-related thermal donors (OTDs) and radiation-induced defects (RDs) formed in high-temperature 1 MeV electron irradiated n-type Czochralski silicon. The heating of Si samples is done in-situ by the electron beam. The formation of deep levels is studied on both heat-treated and irradiated at high temperature sides of samples. The interaction between OTDs and RDs is investigated.

  4. Analytic description of the electron temperature behavior in the upper ionosphere and plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Nagy, A. F.; Gombosi, T. I.; Koen, M. A.; Cariglia, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions to the well-known and commonly used time-dependent electron energy balance equation for the upper ionosphere and plasmasphere have been obtained and are discussed. The various potential heating sources for the terrestrial plasmasphere are summarized and the corresponding electron temperatures and related characteristic heating and cooling times are calculated. A comparison between the analytic expressions for the temperature variations and relevant measurements shows excellent agreement.

  5. Temperature-dependent hybridization gaps: A cause of phonon anomalies in f electron systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, Peter S.

    2012-12-01

    There is evidence that a number of heavy-fermion/mixed-valent materials show strongly renormalized hybridization gaps either at the Fermi-energy or close to the Fermi-energy. In the former case, a heavy-fermion semiconducting state ensues and in the later case, the system remains metallic at low temperatures. Due to the temperature-dependence of the electronic correlations, the magnitudes of the hybridization gaps decrease with increasing temperatures. The existence of a temperature-dependent low-energy electronic energy scale opens up the possibility that the Born-Oppenheimer approximation may fail and that there may be a resonant coupling between the phonons and the electronic excitations. It is argued that such a mechanism may be the cause of the anomalous phonon mode observed in α-uranium at high temperatures.

  6. A Physical Relationship Between Electron-Proton Temperature Equilibration and Mach Number in Fast Collisionless Shocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    PHYSICAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELECTRON-PROTON TEMPERATURE EQUILIBRATION AND MACH NUMBER IN FAST COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS Parviz Ghavamian,1 J. Martin Laming,2...neutrals have had little time to equilibrate with electrons and 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Balti- more, MD; parviz

  7. An instrument for the direct measurement of electron temperature in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, V.; Genov, V.; Bliznakov, K.

    An instrument based on a modified Langmuir-probe method is described which is used to measure ratios of the electron currents of two identical probes in the electron-deceleration region of the volt-ampere characteristics. The instrument makes it possible to perform precise measurements of temperature with a relatively simple processing method. A block diagram of the instrument is presented.

  8. Sustenance of inhomogeneous electron temperature in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Karkari, S. K. Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the equilibrium properties of a magnetized plasma column sustained by direct-current (dc) operated hollow cathode discharge in conjunction with a conducting end-plate, acting as the anode. The survey of radial plasma characteristics, performed in argon plasma, shows hotter plasma in the periphery as compared to the central plasma region; whereas the plasma density peaks at the center. The off-centered peak in radial temperature is attributed due to inhomogeneous power deposition in the discharge volume in conjunction with short-circuiting effect by the conducting end plate. A theoretical model based on particle flux and energy balance is given to explain the observed characteristics of the plasma column.

  9. High temperature superconductor analog electronics for millimeter-wavelength communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of high temperature superconductor (HTS) passive microwave circuits up to X-band was encouraging when compared to their metallic counterparts. The extremely low surface resistance of HTS films up to about 10 GHz enables a reduction in loss by as much as 100 times compared to copper when both materials are kept at about 77 K. However, a superconductor's surface resistance varies in proportion to the frequency squared. Consequently, the potential benefit of HTS materials to millimeter-wave communications requires careful analysis. A simple ring resonator was used to evaluate microstrip losses at Ka-band. Additional promising components were investigated such as antennas and phase shifters. Prospects for HTS to favorable impact millimeter-wave communications systems are discussed.

  10. Dynamical behaviour of nanocrystals in transmission electron microscopy: size, temperature or irradiation effects.

    PubMed

    Buffat, Philippe André

    2003-02-15

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that metal nanoparticles sinter within a fraction of a second under an electron beam at 'room temperature' as long as classical models of thermal equilibrium apply. Images exhibit crystal planes that change in orientation with time as if the particle was undergoing melting and resolidification processes. We explore whether these dynamical effects are the result of heating or transformation effects in the electron microscope or quantum fluctuations in small systems.

  11. Evaluation of Power Electronic Components and Systems at Cryogenic Temperatures For Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Power electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space applications and outer planetary exploration are required to operate reliably and efficiently under extreme temperature conditions. This requirement is dictated by the fact that the operational environments associated with some of the space missions would encompass temperatures as low as -183 C. The development and utilization of electronics capable of low temperature operation would not only fulfill the advanced technology requirements, but also would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. These benefits are generally achieved by the improved intrinsic properties of some of the electronic materials at low temperature, reduced device losses, and the elimination of heating elements used in conventional systems at low temperatures. Power electronic circuits are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management, conditioning, and control. In this work, the performance of certain power electronic components and systems was investigated under low temperature. These include inductors, capacitors, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) controllers, and advanced commercial DC/DC converter modules. Different properties were determined as a function of temperature in the range of 20 C to -140 C, at various current and voltages levels. The experimental procedures along with the experimental data obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  12. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  13. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-07

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  14. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  15. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  16. Consistent multi-internal-temperature models for vibrational and electronic nonequilibrium in hypersonic nitrogen plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Aurélien Bourdon, Anne Perrin, Marie-Yvonne

    2015-04-15

    In this work, a state-to-state vibrational and electronic collisional model is developed to investigate nonequilibrium phenomena behind a shock wave in an ionized nitrogen flow. In the ionization dynamics behind the shock wave, the electron energy budget is of key importance and it is found that the main depletion term corresponds to the electronic excitation of N atoms, and conversely the major creation terms are the electron-vibration term at the beginning, then replaced by the electron ions elastic exchange term. Based on these results, a macroscopic multi-internal-temperature model for the vibration of N{sub 2} and the electronic levels of N atoms is derived with several groups of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and electronic levels of N with their own internal temperatures to model the shape of the vibrational distribution of N{sub 2} and of the electronic excitation of N, respectively. In this model, energy and chemistry source terms are calculated self-consistently from the rate coefficients of the state-to-state database. For the shock wave condition studied, a good agreement is observed on the ionization dynamics as well as on the atomic bound-bound radiation between the state-to-state model and the macroscopic multi-internal temperature model with only one group of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and two groups of electronic levels of N.

  17. Resonance Raman and temperature-dependent electronic absorption spectra of cavity and noncavity models of the hydrated electron

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jennifer R.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Most of what is known about the structure of the hydrated electron comes from mixed quantum/classical simulations, which depend on the pseudopotential that couples the quantum electron to the classical water molecules. These potentials usually are highly repulsive, producing cavity-bound hydrated electrons that break the local water H-bonding structure. However, we recently developed a more attractive potential, which produces a hydrated electron that encompasses a region of enhanced water density. Both our noncavity and the various cavity models predict similar experimental observables. In this paper, we work to distinguish between these models by studying both the temperature dependence of the optical absorption spectrum, which provides insight into the balance of the attractive and repulsive terms in the potential, and the resonance Raman spectrum, which provides a direct measure of the local H-bonding environment near the electron. We find that only our noncavity model can capture the experimental red shift of the hydrated electron’s absorption spectrum with increasing temperature at constant density. Cavity models of the hydrated electron predict a solvation structure similar to that of the larger aqueous halides, leading to a Raman O–H stretching band that is blue-shifted and narrower than that of bulk water. In contrast, experiments show the hydrated electron has a broader and red-shifted O–H stretching band compared with bulk water, a feature recovered by our noncavity model. We conclude that although our noncavity model does not provide perfect quantitative agreement with experiment, the hydrated electron must have a significant degree of noncavity character. PMID:23382233

  18. Collisions of slow polyatomic ions with surfaces: dissociation and chemical reactions of C2H2+*, C2H3+, C2H4+*, C2H5+, and their deuterated variants C2D2+* and C2D4+* on room-temperature and heated carbon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jasík, Juraj; Zabka, Jan; Feketeova, Linda; Ipolyi, Imre; Märk, Tilmann D; Herman, Zdenek

    2005-11-17

    Interaction of C2Hn+ (n = 2-5) hydrocarbon ions and some of their isotopic variants with room-temperature and heated (600 degrees C) highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces was investigated over the range of incident energies 11-46 eV and an incident angle of 60 degrees with respect to the surface normal. The work is an extension of our earlier research on surface interactions of CHn+ (n = 3-5) ions. Mass spectra, translational energy distributions, and angular distributions of product ions were measured. Collisions with the HOPG surface heated to 600 degrees C showed only partial or substantial dissociation of the projectile ions; translational energy distributions of the product ions peaked at about 50% of the incident energy. Interactions with the HOPG surface at room temperature showed both surface-induced dissociation of the projectiles and, in the case of radical cation projectiles C2H2+* and C2H4+*, chemical reactions with the hydrocarbons on the surface. These reactions were (i) H-atom transfer to the projectile, formation of protonated projectiles, and their subsequent fragmentation and (ii) formation of a carbon chain build-up product in reactions of the projectile ion with a terminal CH3-group of the surface hydrocarbons and subsequent fragmentation of the product ion to C3H3+. The product ions were formed in inelastic collisions in which the translational energy of the surface-excited projectile peaked at about 32% of the incident energy. Angular distributions of reaction products showed peaking at subspecular angles close to 68 degrees (heated surfaces) and 72 degrees (room-temperature surfaces). The absolute survival probability at the incident angle of 60 degrees was about 0.1% for C2H2+*, close to 1% for C2H4+* and C2H5+, and about 3-6% for C2H3+.

  19. Temperature gradient scale length measurement: A high accuracy application of electron cyclotron emission without calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshmandyar, S.; Yang, Z. J.; Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L.; Hubbard, A. E.; Rice, J. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2016-11-01

    Calibration is a crucial procedure in electron temperature (Te) inference from a typical electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic on tokamaks. Although the calibration provides an important multiplying factor for an individual ECE channel, the parameter ΔTe/Te is independent of any calibration. Since an ECE channel measures the cyclotron emission for a particular flux surface, a non-perturbing change in toroidal magnetic field changes the view of that channel. Hence the calibration-free parameter is a measure of Te gradient. BT-jog technique is presented here which employs the parameter and the raw ECE signals for direct measurement of electron temperature gradient scale length.

  20. Ion-acoustic Gardner Solitons in electron-positron-ion plasma with two-electron temperature distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Momin A.; Mishra, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ion-acoustic solitons in collisionless plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions, isothermal positrons, and two temperature distribution of electrons have been studied. Using reductive perturbation method, Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), the modified K-dV (m-KdV), and Gardner equations are derived for the system. The soliton solution of the Gardner equation is discussed in detail. It is found that for a given set of parameter values, there exists a critical value of β=Tc/Th, (ratio of cold to hot electron temperature) below which only rarefactive KdV solitons exist and above it compressive KdV solitons exist. At the critical value of β, both compressive and rarefactive m-KdV solitons co-exist. We have also investigated the soliton in the parametric regime where the KdV equation is not valid to study soliton solution. In this region, it is found that below the critical concentration the system supports rarefactive Gardner solitons and above it compressive Gardner solitons are found. The effects of temperature ratio of two-electron species, cold electron concentration, positron concentration on the characteristics of solitons are also discussed.