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Sample records for 2d electron temperature

  1. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  2. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K. Sanpei, A. Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  3. Characterization of saturated MHD instabilities through 2D electron temperature profile reconstruction from 1D ECE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sertoli, M.; Horváth, L.; Pokol, G. I.; Igochine, V.; Barrera, L.

    2013-05-01

    A new method for the reconstruction of two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature profiles in the presence of saturated magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) modes from the one-dimensional (1D) electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic is presented. The analysis relies on harmonic decomposition of the electron temperature oscillations through short time Fourier transforms and requires rigid poloidal mode rotation as the only assumption. The method is applicable to any magnetic perturbation as long as the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers m and n are known. Its application to the case of a (m, n) = (1, 1) internal kink mode on ASDEX Upgrade is presented and a new way to estimate the mode displacement is explained. For such modes, it is shown that the higher order harmonics usually visible in the ECE spectrogram arise also for the pure m = n = 1 mode and that they cannot be directly associated with m = n > 1 magnetic perturbations. This method opens up new possibilities for electron heat transport studies in the presence of saturated MHD modes and a way to disentangle the impurity density contributions from electron temperature effects in the analysis of the soft x-ray data.

  4. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  5. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  6. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  7. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  8. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  9. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover. PMID:26572738

  10. THz devices based on 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Huili Grace; Yan, Rusen; Song, Bo; Encomendero, Jimy; Jena, Debdeep

    2015-05-01

    In two-dimensional electron systems with mobility on the order of 1,000 - 10,000 cm2/Vs, the electron scattering time is about 1 ps. For the THz window of 0.3 - 3 THz, the THz photon energy is in the neighborhood of 1 meV, substantially smaller than the optical phonon energy of solids where these 2D electron systems resides. These properties make the 2D electron systems interesting as a platform to realize THz devices. In this paper, I will review 3 approaches investigated in the past few years in my group toward THz devices. The first approach is the conventional high electron mobility transistor based on GaN toward THz amplifiers. The second approach is to employ the tunable intraband absorption in 2D electron systems to realize THz modulators, where I will use graphene as a model material system. The third approach is to exploit plasma wave in these 2D electron systems that can be coupled with a negative differential conductance element for THz amplifiers/sources/detectors.

  11. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; de Vries, P. C.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.; García-Muñoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  12. Finite temperature corrections in 2d integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Hasenbusch, M.

    2002-09-01

    We study the finite size corrections for the magnetization and the internal energy of the 2d Ising model in a magnetic field by using transfer matrix techniques. We compare these corrections with the functional form recently proposed by Delfino and LeClair-Mussardo for the finite temperature behaviour of one-point functions in integrable 2d quantum field theories. We find a perfect agreement between theoretical expectations and numerical results. Assuming the proposed functional form as an input in our analysis we obtain a relevant improvement in the precision of the continuum limit estimates of both quantities.

  13. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  14. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Jr., Carlos M.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  15. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M., Jr.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  16. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  17. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  18. Electron dynamics and valley relaxation in 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-03-01

    Single layer transition metal dichalcogenides are 2D semiconducting systems with unique electronic band structure. Two-valley energy bands along with strong spin-orbital coupling lead to valley dependent career spin polarization, which is the basis for recently proposed valleytronic applications. Since the durations of valley population provide the time window in which valley specific processes take place, it is an essential parameter for developing valleytronic devices. These systems also exhibit unusually strong many body affects, such as strong exciton and trion binding, due to reduced dielectric screening of Coulomb interactions. But there is not much known about the impact of strong many particle correlations on spin and valley polarization dynamics. Here we report direct measurements of ultrafast valley specific relaxation dynamics in single layer MoS2 and WS2. We found that excitonic many body interactions significantly contribute to the relaxation process. Biexciton formation reveals hole valley spin relaxation time. Our results also suggest initial fast intervalley electron scattering and electron spin relaxation leads to loss of electron valley polarization, which then facilitates hole valley relaxation via excitonic spin exchange interaction.

  19. Mesophases in nearly 2D room-temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Manini, N; Cesaratto, M; Del Pópolo, M G; Ballone, P

    2009-11-26

    Computer simulations of (i) a [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] film of nanometric thickness squeezed at kbar pressure by a piecewise parabolic confining potential reveal a mesoscopic in-plane density and composition modulation reminiscent of mesophases seen in 3D samples of the same room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). Near 2D confinement, enforced by a high normal load, as well as relatively long aliphatic chains are strictly required for the mesophase formation, as confirmed by computations for two related systems made of (ii) the same [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] adsorbed at a neutral solid surface and (iii) a shorter-chain RTIL ([C(4)mim][Tf(2)N]) trapped in the potential well of part i. No in-plane modulation is seen for ii and iii. In case ii, the optimal arrangement of charge and neutral tails is achieved by layering parallel to the surface, while, in case iii, weaker dispersion and packing interactions are unable to bring aliphatic tails together into mesoscopic islands, against overwhelming entropy and Coulomb forces. The onset of in-plane mesophases could greatly affect the properties of long-chain RTILs used as lubricants. PMID:19886615

  20. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  1. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  2. Critical Behavior of a Strongly-Interacting 2D Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) electron systems that obey Fermi liquid theory at high electron densities are expected to undergo one or more transitions to spatially and/or spin-ordered phases as the density is decreased, ultimately forming a Wigner crystal in the dilute, strongly-interacting limit. Interesting, unexpected behavior is observed with decreasing electron density as the electrons' interactions become increasingly important relative to their kinetic energy: the resistivity undergoes a transition from metallic to insulating temperature dependence; the resistance increases sharply and then saturates abruptly with increasing in-plane magnetic field; a number of experiments indicate that the electrons' effective mass exhibits a substantial increase approaching a finite ``critical'' density. There has been a great deal of debate concerning the underlying physics in these systems, and many have questioned whether the change of the resistivity from metallic to insulating signals a phase transition or a crossover. In this talk, I will report measurements that show that with decreasing density ns, the thermopower S of a low-disorder 2D electron system in silicon exhibits a sharp increase by more than an order of magnitude, tending to a divergence at a finite, disorder-independent density nt, consistent with the critical form (- T / S) ~(ns -nt) x with x = 1 . 0 +/- 0 . 1 (T is the temperature). Unlike the resistivity which may not clearly distinguish between a transition and crossover behavior, the thermopower provides clear evidence that a true phase transition occurs with decreasing density to a new low-density phase. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-84ER45153, BSF grant 2006375, RFBR, RAS, and the Russian Ministry of Science.

  3. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  4. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  5. Quantum Hall effect: The resistivity of a 2D electron gas—a thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2005-09-01

    Based on a thermodynamic approach, we have calculated the resistivity of a 2D electron gas, assumed dissipationless in a strong quantum limit. Standard measurements, with extra current leads, define the resistivity caused by a combination of Peltier and Seebeck effects. The current causes heating (cooling) at the first (second) sample contacts, due to the Peltier effect. The contact temperatures are different. The measured voltage is equal to the Peltier effect-induced thermoemf which is linear in current. As a result, the resistivity is non-zero as I→0. The resistivity is a universal function of magnetic field and temperature, expressed in fundamental units h/e2. The universal features of magnetotransport data observed in the experiment confirm our predictions.

  6. An influence of solar activity on latitudinal distribution of atmospheric ozone and temperature in 2-D radiative-photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyominov, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of the 2-D radiative-photochemical model of the ozone layer at heights 0 to 60 km in the Northern Hemisphere there are revealed and analyzed in detail the characteristic features of the season-altitude-latitude variations of ozone and temperature due to changes of the solar flux during the 11 year cycle, electron and proton precipitations.

  7. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  8. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C.; Wang, L.; Xu, M.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  9. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y H; Yang, X Y; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  10. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  11. Preparation of 2D crystals of membrane proteins for high-resolution electron crystallography data collection.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Pantelic, Radosav S; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Electron crystallography is a powerful technique for the structure determination of membrane proteins as well as soluble proteins. Sample preparation for 2D membrane protein crystals is a crucial step, as proteins have to be prepared for electron microscopy at close to native conditions. In this review, we discuss the factors of sample preparation that are key to elucidating the atomic structure of membrane proteins using electron crystallography.

  12. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  13. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    DOE PAGES

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yu; Voigt, Cooper A.; Kent, Paul R. C.; May, Steven J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-24

    In this paper, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M'2M"C2 and M'2M"2C3 – where M' and M" are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, andmore » Ti. The M' atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M" atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M' atomic layers sandwich the middle M"–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. Finally, this finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.« less

  14. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  15. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  16. Tuning the packing density of 2D supramolecular self-assemblies at the solid-liquid interface using variable temperature.

    PubMed

    Marie, Camille; Silly, Fabien; Tortech, Ludovic; Müllen, Klaus; Fichou, Denis

    2010-03-23

    The two-dimensional (2D) crystal engineering of molecular architectures on surfaces requires controlling various parameters related respectively to the substrate, the chemical structure of the molecules, and the environmental conditions. We investigate here the influence of temperature on the self-assembly of hexakis(n-dodecyl)-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC-C(12)) adsorbed on gold using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the liquid/solid interface. We show that the packing density of 2D self-assembled HBC-C(12) can be precisely tuned by adjusting the substrate temperature. Increasing the temperature progressively over the 20-50 degrees C range induces three irreversible phase transitions and a 3-fold increase of the packing density from 0.111 to 0.356 molecule/nm(2). High-resolution STM images reveal that this 2D packing density increase arises from the stepwise desorption of the n-dodecyl chains from the gold surface. Such temperature-controlled irreversible phase transitions are thus a versatile tool that can then be used to adjust the packing density of highly ordered functional materials in view of applications in organic electronic devices. PMID:20155970

  17. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Catapano, F. Zimbardo, G.; Artemyev, A. V. Vasko, I. Y.

    2015-09-15

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  18. Binary and ternary recombination of H2D(+) and HD2(+) ions with electrons at 80 K.

    PubMed

    Dohnal, Petr; Kálosi, Ábel; Plašil, Radek; Roučka, Štěpán; Kovalenko, Artem; Rednyk, Serhiy; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosík, Juraj

    2016-08-24

    The recombination of deuterated trihydrogen cations with electrons has been studied in afterglow plasmas containing mixtures of helium, argon, hydrogen and deuterium. By monitoring the fractional abundances of H3(+), H2D(+), HD2(+) and D3(+) as a function of the [D2]/[H2] ratio using infrared absorption observed in a cavity ring down absorption spectrometer (CRDS), it was possible to deduce effective recombination rate coefficients for H2D(+) and HD2(+) ions at a temperature of 80 K. From pressure dependences of the measured effective recombination rate coefficients the binary and the ternary recombination rate coefficients for both ions have been determined. The inferred binary and ternary recombination rate coefficients are: αbinH2D(80 K) = (7.1 ± 4.2) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), αbinHD2(80 K) = (8.7 ± 2.5) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), KH2D(80 K) = (1.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1) and KHD2(80 K) = (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1). PMID:27506912

  19. Calibration of an acoustic system for measuring 2-D temperature distribution around hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Chen, Ying

    2013-04-01

    One of the fundamental purposes of quantitative acoustic surveys of seafloor hydrothermal vents is to measure their 2-D temperature distributions. Knowing the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances between the underwater transducers in an acoustic tomography system is fundamental to the overall accuracy of the temperature reconstruction. However, commercial transducer sources typically do not supply the needed data. Here we present a novel calibration algorithm to automatically determine the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances. The possible system latency error and the resulting temperature error are derived and analyzed. We have also developed the experimental setup for calibration. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed calibration method, an experimental study was performed on acoustic imaging of underwater temperature fields in Lake Qiezishan, located at Longling County, Yunnan Province, China. Using the calibrated data, the reconstructed temperature distributions closely resemble the actual distributions measured with thermocouples, thus confirming the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  20. 2D PIC simulations for an EN discharge with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Michael A.; Kawamura, Emi; Lichtenberg, Allan J.

    2009-10-01

    We conducted 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for an electronegative (EN) discharge with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions, and compared the results to a previously developed 1D (radial) analytical model of an EN plasma with strongly magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions [1]. In both cases, there is a static uniform applied magnetic field in the axial direction. The 1D radial model mimics the wall losses of the particles in the axial direction by introducing a bulk loss frequency term νL. A special (desired) solution was found in which only positive and negative ions but no electrons escaped radially. The 2D PIC results show good agreement with the 1D model over a range of parameters and indicate that the analytical form of νL employed in [1] is reasonably accurate. However, for the PIC simulations, there is always a finite flux of electrons to the radial wall which is about 10 to 30% of the negative ion flux.[4pt] [1] G. Leray, P. Chabert, A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, J. Phys. D, accepted for publication 2009.

  1. Probing the low-temperature rotational population of H2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvany, Oskar; Hugo, Edouard; Wahed, Serjoscha; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2009-11-01

    The gas phase exchange reactions of isotopologues of H+3 with isotopologues of H2 are responsible for the observed deuteration in low-temperature interstellar clouds. At the prevailing cryogenic temperatures many quantum effects, as zero-point vibrational energies, large rotational level spacings and nuclear spin effects become important. In order to understand the processes on a level-to-level basis, experiments in a 22-pole ion trap are carried out accompanied by microcanonical simulations. In particular, the method of laser induced reaction (LIR) is applied to probe the four lowest rotational levels of H2D+.

  2. Spectroscopy of emergent states in strongly interacting 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirjibehedin, Cyrus Farokh

    In this dissertation I present my recent resonant inelastic light scattering studies of the remarkable emergent states formed by strongly interacting 2D electron systems. I describe the first experimental determinations of long wavelength, low energy dispersions in the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) regime. The demonstration of existence of well defined modes at small wavevectors for the nu = 1/3 state gives a measure of the macroscopic extent of the quantum fluid beyond the micron length scale. I report evidence of a novel splitting of modes and discuss interpretations of these modes as two-roton states. I report the first studies to probe the boundary between different FQH sequences that occurs at nu = 1/3. Evidence of the coexistence of excitations from both sequences at distinct energy scales is uncovered. The abrupt appearance of lower energy modes at nu ≲ 1/3 suggests a change in the quantum ground state on crossing the nu = 1/3 boundary. The coexistence of excitations indicates a layered set of excitations of different quasiparticle flavors from a single ground state. I discuss the resonant enhancements of light scattering for spin excitations at nu = 1/3, which are strongest near photoluminescence bands assigned in the literature to negatively charged excitons. The observed enhancement profiles are interpreted by scattering mechanisms with intermediate transitions to states with charged excitonic excitations. We fabricated the first ultra-low density quantum structures and were able to show that light scattering methods are sensitive enough to probe systems currently reaching as low as n = 7.7 x 108cm -2 at wavevectors large enough to show correlation and non-local effects. I find well-defined plasmons with dispersions that deviate from the long wavelength q limit, suggesting evidence of large correlation effects. I discuss the use of light scattering to measure the electron temperature through the anti-Stokes/Stokes scattering ratio, highlighting the

  3. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  4. Ultrafast tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in myoglobins revealed by UV 2D spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Consani, Cristina; Auböck, Gerald; van Mourik, Frank; Chergui, Majed

    2013-03-29

    Tryptophan is commonly used to study protein structure and dynamics, such as protein folding, as a donor in fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) studies. By using ultra-broadband ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy in the ultraviolet (UV) and transient absorption in the visible range, we have disentangled the excited state decay pathways of the tryptophan amino acid residues in ferric myoglobins (MbCN and metMb). Whereas the more distant tryptophan (Trp(7)) relaxes by energy transfer to the heme, Trp(14) excitation predominantly decays by electron transfer to the heme. The excited Trp(14)→heme electron transfer occurs in <40 picoseconds with a quantum yield of more than 60%, over an edge-to-edge distance below ~10 angstroms, outcompeting the FRET process. Our results raise the question of whether such electron transfer pathways occur in a larger class of proteins.

  5. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  6. Local electronic structures and 2D topological phase transition of ultrathin Sb films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Park, Joonbum; Kim, Jun Sung; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Yeom, Han Woong

    We investigate local electronic structures of ultrathin Sb islands and their edges grown on Bi2Te2Se by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Sb islands of various thickness are grown with atomically well ordered edge structure over the 3 bilayers (BL). On the surfaces and edges of these islands, we clearly resolve edge-localized electronic states by STS measurements, which depend on the thickness. The DFT calculations identify that the strongly localized edge states of 4 and 5 BL films correspond to a quantum spin Hall (QSH) states while the edge states of 3 BL are trivial. Our experimental and theoretical results confirm the 2D topological phase transition of the ultrathin Sb films from trivial to QSH phase. Center for Artificial Low Dimensional Electronic Systems, Institute for Basic Science and Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea.

  7. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle.

    PubMed

    Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  8. Measurement of electrostatic potential variations between 2D materials using low-energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Barrera, Sergio; Mende, Patrick; Li, Jun; Feenstra, Randall; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Robinson, Joshua; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili

    Among the many properties that evolve as isolated 2D materials are brought together to form a heterostructure, rearrangement of charges between layers due to unintentional doping results in dipole fields at the interface, which critically affect the electronic properties of the structure. Here we report a method for directly measuring work function differences, and hence electrostatic potential variations, across the surface of 2D materials and heterostructures thereof using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Study of MoSe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on epitaxial graphene on SiC with LEEM reveals a large work function difference between the MoSe2 and the graphene, indicating charge transfer between the layers and a subsequent dipole layer. In addition to quantifying dipole effects between transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene, direct imaging of the surface, diffraction information, and the spectroscopic dependence of electron reflectivity will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  9. Comparison of lifetime-based methods for 2D phosphor thermometry in high-temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Di; Liu, Yingzheng; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the currently available techniques for 2D phosphor thermometry, and compares the performance of two lifetime-based methods: high-speed imaging and the dual-gate. High-speed imaging resolves luminescent decay with a fast frame rate, and has become a popular method for phosphor thermometry in recent years. But it has disadvantages such as high equipment cost and long data processing time, and it would fail at sufficiently high temperature due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and short lifetime. The dual-gate method only requires two images on the decay curve and therefore greatly reduces cost in hardware and processing time. A dual-gate method for phosphor thermometry has been developed and compared with the high-speed imaging method through both calibration and a jet impingement experiment. Measurement uncertainty has been evaluated for a temperature range of 473–833 K. The effects of several key factors on uncertainty have been discussed, including the luminescent signal level, the decay lifetime and temperature sensitivity. The results show that both methods are valid for 2D temperature sensing within the given range. The high-speed imaging method shows less uncertainty at low temperatures where the signal level and the lifetime are both sufficient, but its performance is degraded at higher temperatures due to a rapidly reduced signal and lifetime. For T  >  750 K, the dual-gate method outperforms the high-speed imaging method thanks to its superiority in signal-to-noise ratio and temperature sensitivity. The dual-gate method has great potential for applications in high-temperature environments where the high-speed imaging method is not applicable.

  10. Comparison of lifetime-based methods for 2D phosphor thermometry in high-temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Di; Liu, Yingzheng; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the currently available techniques for 2D phosphor thermometry, and compares the performance of two lifetime-based methods: high-speed imaging and the dual-gate. High-speed imaging resolves luminescent decay with a fast frame rate, and has become a popular method for phosphor thermometry in recent years. But it has disadvantages such as high equipment cost and long data processing time, and it would fail at sufficiently high temperature due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and short lifetime. The dual-gate method only requires two images on the decay curve and therefore greatly reduces cost in hardware and processing time. A dual-gate method for phosphor thermometry has been developed and compared with the high-speed imaging method through both calibration and a jet impingement experiment. Measurement uncertainty has been evaluated for a temperature range of 473-833 K. The effects of several key factors on uncertainty have been discussed, including the luminescent signal level, the decay lifetime and temperature sensitivity. The results show that both methods are valid for 2D temperature sensing within the given range. The high-speed imaging method shows less uncertainty at low temperatures where the signal level and the lifetime are both sufficient, but its performance is degraded at higher temperatures due to a rapidly reduced signal and lifetime. For T  >  750 K, the dual-gate method outperforms the high-speed imaging method thanks to its superiority in signal-to-noise ratio and temperature sensitivity. The dual-gate method has great potential for applications in high-temperature environments where the high-speed imaging method is not applicable.

  11. Wavelet characterization of 2D turbulence and intermittency in magnetized electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2016-06-01

    A study of the free relaxation of turbulence in a two-dimensional (2D) flow is presented, with a focus on the role of the initial vorticity conditions. Exploiting a well-known analogy with 2D inviscid incompressible fluids, the system investigated here is a magnetized pure electron plasma. The dynamics of this system are simulated by means of a 2D particle-in-cell code, starting from different spiral density (vorticity) distributions. A wavelet multiresolution analysis is adopted, which allows the coherent and incoherent parts of the flow to be separated. Comparison of the turbulent evolution in the different cases is based on the investigation of the time evolution of statistical properties, including the probability distribution functions and structure functions of the vorticity increments. It is also based on an analysis of the enstrophy evolution and its spectrum for the two components. In particular, while the statistical features assess the degree of flow intermittency, spectral analysis allows us not only to estimate the time required to reach a state of fully developed turbulence, but also estimate its dependence on the thickness of the initial spiral density distribution, accurately tracking the dynamics of both the coherent structures and the turbulent background. The results are compared with those relevant to annular initial vorticity distributions (Chen et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 495810511).

  12. The separation of overlapping transitions in β-carotene with broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, Tessa R.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Graham, Matthew W.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy is applied to β-carotene, revealing new insight into the excited state dynamics of carotenoids by exploring the full energetic range encompassing the S0→S2 and S1→S1n transitions at 77 K. Multiple signals are observed in the regime associated with the proposed S∗ state and isolated through separate analysis of rephasing and nonrephasing contributions. Peaks in rephasing pathways display dynamic lineshapes characteristic of coupling to high energy vibrational modes, and simulation with a simple model supports their assignment to impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. A signal persisting beyond 10 ps in the nonrephasing spectra is still under investigation.

  13. Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy reveals a carotenoid dark state in purple bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ostroumov, Evgeny E; Mulvaney, Rachel M; Cogdell, Richard J; Scholes, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Although the energy transfer processes in natural light-harvesting systems have been intensively studied for the past 60 years, certain details of the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. We performed broadband two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy measurements on light-harvesting proteins from purple bacteria and isolated carotenoids in order to characterize in more detail the excited-state manifold of carotenoids, which channel energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules. The data revealed a well-resolved signal consistent with a previously postulated carotenoid dark state, the presence of which was confirmed by global kinetic analysis. The results point to this state's role in mediating energy flow from carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll.

  14. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  15. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, S. A.; Das, K. J. Maria; Raj, D. Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams. PMID:26170552

  16. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams.

  17. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  18. Effective Temperature of 2D Dusty Plasma Liquids at the Discrete Level

    SciTech Connect

    Io, C.-W.; Chan, C.-L.; I Lin

    2007-07-13

    Fluctuation-dissipation theory has been used to measure the effective temperature of non-equilibrium system. In this work, using a 2D dusty plasma liquid formed by the negatively charged fine particles suspending in weakly ionized discharges and sheared by two CW counter parallel laser beams, we measure the micro-transport at the kinetic level. The effective temperatures Teff at different time scales are obtained through the Stokes-Einstein relation which relates the diffusion coefficient (D) and the viscosity ({eta}). The external energy is cascaded from the slow hopping modes to the fast caging modes through mutual coupling, which leads to the higher effective temperature of the slow hopping modes.

  19. Increasing the lego of 2D electronics materials: silicene and germanene, graphene's new synthetic cousins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Guy; Salomon, Eric; Angot, Thierry; Eugenia Dávila, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The realization of the first Field Effect Transistors operating at room temperature, based on a single layer silicene channel, open up highly promising perspectives, e.g., typically, for applications in digital electronics. Here, we describe recent results on the growth, characterization and electronic properties of novel synthetic two-dimensional materials beyond graphene, namely silicene and germanene, its silicon and germanium counterparts.

  20. Dynamics of the Rydberg electron in H*+D2-->D*+HD reactive collisions.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael Y; Skodje, Rex T

    2007-03-14

    Experimental crossed-beam studies carried out previously have indicated that the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom-molecule reaction H*+D2-->D*+HD are very similar to those of the corresponding ion-molecule reaction H++D2-->D++HD. The equivalence of the cross sections for these related systems would open up a new approach to the experimental study of ion-molecule reactions. However, a recent experimental and theoretical study has brought to light some important qualitative differences between the Rydberg-atom reaction and the ion-molecule reaction; in particular, the experimental cross section for the Rydberg-atom reaction exhibits a higher degree of forward-backward scattering asymmetry than predicted by a quasiclassical trajectory study of the ion-molecule reaction. In this paper, the authors consider the dynamics of the Rydberg-electron over the course of a reactive collision and the implications of these dynamics for the Rydberg-atom-molecule crossed-beam experiment. Using an approach based on perturbation theory, they estimate the attenuation of the experimental signal due to the Rydberg-electron dynamics as a function of the scattering angle. They show that at least part of the experimental asymmetry can be ascribed to this angle dependent attenuation. Their results offer general insight into the practical aspects of the experimental study of ion-molecule reactions by means of their Rydberg-atom counterparts. PMID:17362067

  1. Correlating Structural and Electronic Degrees of Freedom in 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, I.-Cheng; Zhang, Z.; Seyler, K. L.; Jones, A. M.; Clark, G.; Xiao, D.; Laanait, N.; Xu, X.; Wen, H.

    We have conducted a microscopic study of the interplay between structural and electronic degrees of freedom in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers, multilayers and heterostructures. Using the recently developed full field x-ray reflection interface microscopy with the photoluminescence microscopic probe capability at the Advanced Photon Source, we demonstrated the x-ray reflection imaging of a monolayer 2D material for the first time. The structural variation across an exfoliated WSe2 monolayer is quantified by interlayer spacing relative to the crystal substrate and the smoothness of the layer. This structural information is correlated with the electronic properties of TMDs characterized by the in-situ photoluminescence measurements. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-SC0012509. The use of Advanced Photon Source is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films.

    PubMed

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J; Lewis, Emily A; Lucci, Felicia R; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope (125)I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual (125)I atoms into (125)Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic (125)I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies.

  3. Calibration and simulation of ASM2d at different temperatures in a phosphorus removal pilot plant.

    PubMed

    García-Usach, F; Ferrer, J; Bouzas, A; Seco, A

    2006-01-01

    In this work, an organic and nutrient removal pilot plant was used to study the temperature influence on phosphorus accumulating organisms. Three experiments were carried out at 13, 20 and 24.5 degrees C, achieving a high phosphorus removal percentage in all cases. The ASM2d model was calibrated at 13 and 20 degrees C and the Arrhenius equation constant was obtained for phosphorus removal processes showing that the temperature influences on the biological phosphorus removal subprocesses in a different degree. The 24.5 degrees C experiment was simulated using the model parameters obtained by means of the Arrhenius equation. The simulation results for the three experiments showed good correspondence with the experimental data, demonstrating that the model and the calibrated parameters were able to predict the pilot plant behaviour.

  4. Electron decoherence at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2001-03-01

    Electron decoherence is fundamental to condensed matter physics. Our understanding of metals and insulators in the Fermi-liquid framework relies entirely on a diverging decoherence rate 1/τ_φ at low temperatures, which is expected to vanish at T=0. However, recent experiments find that 1/τ_φ saturates at low temperatures [1-2]. We review these measurements on a variety of mesoscopic systems (in 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D) as well as the control experiments used to check for various artifacts [1-3]. We emphasize the connection between the temperature-independent decoherence rate and persistent current in normal metals [4]. We briefly discuss decoherence induced by dynamic defects or two-level systems [5,6], including its relevance--or lack thereof---to the experiments on metallic wires [2]. Saturation of decohrence rate is argued to be present in---and relevant to---the following phenomena: metal-insulator transition in 2D [7,8], superconductor-insulator transition in 2D [9], quantum-Hall-insulator transition [10], transport through superconductor/normal-metal hybrid junctions [11], normal-state resistivity of high Tc superconductors [12], persistent current in normal metals [4], and energy relaxation in normal metals [13]. [1] P. Mohanty, Physica B 280, 446 (2000). [2] P. Mohanty, E.M.Q. Jariwala, R. Webb, PRL 78, 3366 (1997); PRB 55, R13542 (1997). [3] P. Mohanty, R. Webb, PRL 84, 4481 (2000). [4] P. Mohanty, Ann. Phys. 8, 549 (1999). [5] P. Mohanty, M.L. Roukes (to be published). [6] K. Ahn, P. Mohanty, cond-mat/ 0011139. [7] S. Kravchenko et al. PRB 50, 8039 (1994). [8] G. Brunthaler, A. Prinz, G. Bauer, V. Pudalov, cond-mat/0007230. [9] A. Kapitulnik, N. Mason, S. Kivelson, S. Chakravarty, cond-mat/0008005. [10] D. Shahar, D. Tsui, M. Shayegan, J. Cunningham, E. Shimsoni, S. Sondhi, SSC. 102, 817 (1997). [11] A. Vaknin, A. Frydman, Z. Ovadyahu, PRB 61, 13037 (2000). [12] P. Fournier et al., PRB 62, R11993 (2000). [13] A. Gougam, F. Pierre, H. Pothier, D. Esteve, N

  5. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  6. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Leonid S.

    2012-04-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10-19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW.

  7. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near {{e}2}/π h .

  8. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near [Formula: see text]. PMID:27270084

  9. Weak-localization approach to a 2D electron gas with a spectral node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, K.; Sinner, A.

    2015-07-01

    We study a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and a spectral node within the weak-localization approach and compare its results with those of Gaussian fluctuations around the self-consistent Born approximation. The appearance of diffusive modes depends on the type of disorder. In particular, we find for a random gap a diffusive mode only from ladder contributions, whereas for a random scalar potential the diffusive mode is created by ladder and by maximally crossed contributions. The ladder (maximally crossed) contributions correspond to fermionic (bosonic) Gaussian fluctuations. We calculate the conductivity corrections from the density-density Kubo formula and find a good agreement with the experimentally observed V-shape conductivity of graphene.

  10. 2D MEMS scanning for LIDAR with sub-Nyquist sampling, electronics, and measurement procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Thorsten; Janes, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Electrostatic driven 2D MEMS scanners resonantly oscillate in both axes leading to Lissajous trajectories of a digitally modulated laser beam reflected from the micro mirror. A solid angle of about 0.02 is scanned by a 658nm laser beam with a maximum repetition rate of 350MHz digital pulses. Reflected light is detected by an APD with a bandwidth of 80MHz. The phase difference between the scanned laser light and the light reflected from an obstacle is analyzed by sub-Nyquist sampling. The FPGA-based electronics and software for the evaluation of distance and velocity of objects within the scanning range are presented. Furthermore, the measures to optimize the Lidar accuracy of about 1mm and the dynamic range of up to 2m are examined. First measurements demonstrating the capability of the system and the evaluation algorithms are discussed.

  11. Room temperature weak ferromagnetism in Sn1-xMnxSe2 2D films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Sining; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Xiang; Kanzyuba, Vasily; Yoo, Taehee; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili G.; Jena, Debdeep; Dobrowolska, Margaret; Furdyna, Jacek K.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss growth and magnetic properties of high-quality two dimensional (2D) Sn1-xMnxSe2 films. Thin films of this 2D ternary alloy with a wide range of Mn concentrations were successfully grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Mn concentrations up to x ≈ 0.60 were achieved without destroying the crystal structure of the parent SnSe2 2D system. Most important, the specimens show clear weak ferromagnetic behavior above room temperature, which should be of interest for 2D spintronic applications.

  12. Electronic and geometrical properties of monoatomic and diatomic 2D honeycomb lattices. A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Ángela; Rey, Rafael; Fonseca, Karen; Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica Team

    Since the discovery of graphene by Geim and Novoselov at 2004, several analogous systems have been theoretically and experimentally studied, due to their technological interest. Both monoatomic lattices, such as silicine and germanene, and diatomic lattices (h-GaAs and h-GaN) have been studied. Using Density Functional Theory we obtain and confirm the chemical stability of these hexagonal 2D systems through the total energy curves as a function of interatomic distance. Unlike graphene, silicine and germanene, gapless materials, h-GaAs and h-GaN exhibit electronic gaps, different from that of the bulk, which could be interesting for the industry. On the other hand, the ab initio band structure calculations for graphene, silicene and germanene show a non-circular cross section around K points, at variance with the prediction of usual Tight-binding models. In fact, we have found that Dirac cones display a dihedral group symmetry. This implies that Fermi speed can change up to 30 % due to the orientation of the wave vector, for both electrons and holes. Traditional analytic studies use the Dirac equation for the electron dynamics at low energies. However, this equation assumes an isotropic, homogeneous and uniform space. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia. A. M. Rojas-Cuervo would also like to thank the Colciencias, Colombia.

  13. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ~ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ~ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  14. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: Electronic versus vibrational coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Plenio, M. B.; Almeida, J.; Huelga, S. F.

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  15. Kondo effect at low electron density and high particle-hole asymmetry in 1D, 2D, and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, Rok; Horvat, Alen

    2016-09-01

    Using the perturbative scaling equations and the numerical renormalization group, we study the characteristic energy scales in the Kondo impurity problem as a function of the exchange coupling constant J and the conduction-band electron density. We discuss the relation between the energy gain (impurity binding energy) Δ E and the Kondo temperature TK. We find that the two are proportional only for large values of J , whereas in the weak-coupling limit the energy gain is quadratic in J , while the Kondo temperature is exponentially small. The exact relation between the two quantities depends on the detailed form of the density of states of the band. In the limit of low electron density the Kondo screening is affected by the strong particle-hole asymmetry due to the presence of the band-edge van Hove singularities. We consider the cases of one- (1D), two- (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) tight-binding lattices (linear chain, square lattice, cubic lattice) with inverse-square-root, step-function, and square-root onsets of the density of states that are characteristic of the respective dimensionalities. We always find two different regimes depending on whether TK is higher or lower than μ , the chemical potential measured from the bottom of the band. For 2D and 3D, we find a sigmoidal crossover between the large-J and small-J asymptotics in Δ E and a clear separation between Δ E and TK for TK<μ . For 1D, there is, in addition, a sizable intermediate-J regime where the Kondo temperature is quadratic in J due to the diverging density of states at the band edge. Furthermore, we find that in 1D the particle-hole asymmetry leads to a large decrease of TK compared to the standard result obtained by approximating the density of states to be constant (flat-band approximation), while in 3D the opposite is the case; this is due to the nontrivial interplay of the exchange and potential scattering renormalization in the presence of particle-hole asymmetry. The 2D square

  16. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  17. Electron transfer and ionic displacements at the origin of the 2D electron gas at the LAO/STO interface: direct measurements with atomic-column spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Cantoni, Claudia; Gazquez, Jaume; Miletto Granozio, Fabio; Oxley, Mark P; Varela, Maria; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J; Aruta, Carmela; di Uccio, Umberto Scotti; Perna, Paolo; Maccariello, Davide

    2012-08-01

    Using state-of-the-art, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with atomic-scale spatial resolution, experimental evidence for an intrinsic electronic reconstruction at the LAO/STO interface is shown. Simultaneous measurements of interfacial electron density and system polarization are crucial for establishing the highly debated origin of the 2D electron gas.

  18. Spin-Orbit Interaction and Related Transport Phenomena in 2d Electron and Hole Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaetskii, A.

    Spin-orbit interaction is responsible for many physical phenomena which are under intensive study currently. Here we discuss several of them. The first phenomenon is the edge spin accumulation, which appears due to spin-orbit interaction in 2D mesoscopic structures in the presence of a charge current. We consider the case of a strong spin-orbit-related splitting of the electron spectrum, i.e. a spin precession length is small compared to the mean free path l. The structure can be either in a ballistic regime (when the mean free path is the largest scale in the problem) or quasi-ballistic regime (when l is much smaller than the sample size). We show how physics of edge spin accumulation in different situations should be understood from the point of view of unitarity of boundary scattering. Using transparent method of scattering states, we are able to explain some previous puzzling theoretical results. We clarify the important role of the form of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian, the role of the boundary conditions, etc., and reveal the wrong results obtained in the field by other researchers. The relation between the edge spin density and the bulk spin current in different regimes is discussed. The detailed comparison with the existing theoretical works is presented. Besides, we consider several new transport phenomena which appear in the presence of spin-orbit interaction, for example, magnetotransport phenomena in an external classical magnetic field. In particular, new mechanism of negative magneto-resistance appears which is due to destruction of spin fluxes by the magnetic field, and which can be really pronounced in 2D systems with strong scatterers.

  19. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfven Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, Ben; Classen, I.G.J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W.; Luhmann, N.C.; Nazikian, Raffi; Park, H.K.; Spong, Donald A; Van Zeeland, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfven eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  20. Numerical simulation of 2D buoyant jets in ice-covered and temperature-stratified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ruochuan

    A two-dimensional (2D) unsteady simulation model is applied to the problem of a submerged warm water discharge into a stratified lake or reservoir with an ice cover. Numerical simulations and analyses are conducted to gain insight into large-scale convective recirculation and flow processes in a cold waterbody induced by a buoyant jet. Jet behaviors under various discharge temperatures are captured by directly modeling flow and thermal fields. Flow structures and processes are described by the simulated spatial and temporal distributions of velocity and temperature in various regions: deflection, recirculation, attachment, and impingement. Some peculiar hydrothermal and dynamic features, e.g. reversal of buoyancy due to the dilution of a warm jet by entraining cold ambient water, are identified and examined. Simulation results show that buoyancy is the most important factor controlling jet behavior and mixing processes. The inflow boundary is treated as a liquid wall from which the jet is offset. Similarity and difference in effects of boundaries perpendicular and parallel to flow, and of buoyancy on jet attachment and impingement, are discussed. Symmetric flow configuration is used to de-emphasize the Coanda effect caused by offset.

  1. Destabilization of 2D magnetic current sheets by resonance with bouncing electron - a new theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Gabriel; Louarn, Philippe; Tur, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons. The geometry is clearly 2D and uses Harris sheet profile. Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasi neutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. The present talk will focus on the main results of this theory. The electrostatic version of the model may be applied to the near-Earth environment (8-12 R_{E}) where beta is rather low. It is showed that inclusion of bouncing electron motion may enhance strongly the growth rate of the classical drift wave instability. This model could thus explain the generation of strong parallel electric fields in the ionosphere and the formation of aurora beads with wavelength of a few hundreds of km. In the electromagnetic version, it is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (B_{z} > 0.1 B _{lobes}) undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in B_{z}/B _{lobes}, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few

  2. The effect of electron-hole scattering on transport properties of a 2D semimetal in the HgTe quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Entin, M. V.; Magarill, L. I.; Olshanetsky, E. B. Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2013-11-15

    The influence of e-h scattering on the conductivity and magnetotransport of 2D semimetallic HgTe is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The presence of e-h scattering leads to the friction between electrons and holes resulting in a large temperature-dependent contribution to the transport coefficients. The coefficient of friction between electrons and holes is determined. The comparison of experimental data with the theory shows that the interaction between electrons and holes based on the long-range Coulomb potential strongly underestimates the e-h friction. The experimental results are in agreement with the model of strong short-range e-h interaction.

  3. Optimal interlayer hopping and high temperature Bose-Einstein condensation of local pairs in quasi 2D superconductors.

    PubMed

    Kornilovitch, P E; Hague, J P

    2015-02-25

    Both FeSe and cuprate superconductors are quasi 2D materials with high transition temperatures and local fermion pairs. Motivated by such systems, we investigate real space pairing of fermions in an anisotropic lattice model with intersite attraction, V, and strong local Coulomb repulsion, U, leading to a determination of the optimal conditions for superconductivity from Bose-Einstein condensation. Our aim is to gain insight as to why high temperature superconductors tend to be quasi 2D. We make both analytically and numerically exact solutions for two body local pairing applicable to intermediate and strong V. We find that the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature of such local pairs pairs is maximal when hopping between layers is intermediate relative to in-plane hopping, indicating that the quasi 2D nature of unconventional superconductors has an important contribution to their high transition temperatures. PMID:25629425

  4. Study of the electrical conductivity at finite temperature in 2D Si- MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Limouny, L. Kaaouachi, A. El Tata, O.; Daoudi, E.; Errai, M.; Dlimi, S.; Idrissi, H. El; Zatni, A.

    2014-01-27

    We investigate the low temperature density dependent conductivity of two dimensional electron systems in zero magnetic field for sample Si-15 MOSFETs. The first purpose of this paper is to establish that the knee of the conductivity σ{sub 0} (σ{sub 0} is the T = 0.3 conductivity obtained by linear extrapolation of the curves of σ (T) for different values of electron density, n{sub s}) as a function of the carrier densities n{sub s} for T = 0.3 K, observed by Lai et al. and Limouny et al. in previous work for two different samples, is independent of temperature. The second aim is the determination of the critical density, n{sub c}, of the metal-insulator transition. Many methods are used in this investigation of n{sub c} which have been already used for other samples. The motivation behind this last study is the observation of many values of n{sub c} that have been obtained from different methods and that are slightly different. We will use in this study three methods with the intention to infer which one is more appropriate to obtain n{sub c}.

  5. Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke; Upadhya, Prashanth C.; Morales, Eugenia T.; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Lin, Yong

    2009-09-01

    The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

  6. Stable and high-power few cycle supercontinuum for 2D ultrabroadband electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spokoyny, Boris; Koh, Christine J; Harel, Elad

    2015-03-15

    Broadband supercontinuum (SC) pulses in the few cycle regime are a promising source for spectroscopic and imaging applications. However, SC sources are plagued by poor stability, greatly limiting their utility in phase-resolved nonlinear experiments such as 2D photon echo spectroscopy (2D PES). Here, we generated SC by two-stage filamentation in argon and air starting from 100 fs input pulses, which are sufficiently high-power and stable to record time-resolved 2D PE spectra in a single laser shot. We obtain a total power of 400 μJ/pulse in the visible spectral range of 500-850 nm and, after compression, yield pulses with duration of 6 fs according to transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) measurements. We demonstrate the method on the laser dye, Cresyl Violet, and observe coherent oscillations indicative of nuclear wavepacket dynamics.

  7. A Study of Two Dimensional Electron Gas Using 2D Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Carl; Paul, Jagannath; Karaiskaj, Denis

    2015-03-01

    The dephasing of FES was measured in a symmetrically modulation doped 12 nm single quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas system using time integrated four wave mixing (TIFWM) and a two dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy (2DFTS). At high in-well carrier densities of ~4 x 1011 cm-2, many body effects that are prevalent and measurable with non-linear optical spectroscopy. Effects of exciton-exciton and exciton-phonon scattering events, exciton populations, and biexciton formation are detectable at these carrier concentrations. Homogeneous linewidths obtained from 2DFT and TIFWM yield a zero Kelvin linewidth of 1.42 meV and an acoustic phonon scattering coefficient of 158 μ eV/K. These observations indicate a rapid increase in homogeneous linewidth with increased temperature. NSF REU Grant # DMR-1263066: REU Site in Applied Physics at USF.

  8. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-28

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ∼1000 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.

  9. A Bioactive Carbon Nanotube-Based Ink for Printing 2D and 3D Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Farzad, Raziyeh; Tamayol, Ali; Manoharan, Vijayan; Mostafalu, Pooria; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Akbari, Mohsen; Jung, Sung Mi; Kim, Duckjin; Comotto, Mattia; Annabi, Nasim; Al-Hazmi, Faten Ebrahim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The development of electrically conductive carbon nanotube-based inks is reported. Using these inks, 2D and 3D structures are printed on various flexible substrates such as paper, hydrogels, and elastomers. The printed patterns have mechanical and electrical properties that make them beneficial for various biological applications. PMID:26915715

  10. Electronic structure of disordered CuPd alloys by positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Siegel, R.W.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.; Bansil, A.

    1988-01-01

    We report 2D-ACAR experiments and KKR CPA calculations on alpha-phase single-crystal Cu/sub 1-x/Pd/sub x/ in the range x less than or equal to 0.25. The flattening of the Fermi surface near (110) with increasing x predicted by theory is confirmed by our experimental results. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  11. A Bioactive Carbon Nanotube-Based Ink for Printing 2D and 3D Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Farzad, Raziyeh; Tamayol, Ali; Manoharan, Vijayan; Mostafalu, Pooria; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Akbari, Mohsen; Jung, Sung Mi; Kim, Duckjin; Comotto, Mattia; Annabi, Nasim; Al-Hazmi, Faten Ebrahim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The development of electrically conductive carbon nanotube-based inks is reported. Using these inks, 2D and 3D structures are printed on various flexible substrates such as paper, hydrogels, and elastomers. The printed patterns have mechanical and electrical properties that make them beneficial for various biological applications.

  12. Broadband 7-fs diffractive-optic-based 2D electronic spectroscopy using hollow-core fiber compression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonan; Dostál, Jakub; Brixner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate noncollinear coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy for which broadband pulses are generated in an argon-filled hollow-core fiber pumped by a 1-kHz Ti:Sapphire laser. Compression is achieved to 7 fs duration (TG-FROG) using dispersive mirrors. The hollow fiber provides a clean spatial profile and smooth spectral shape in the 500-700 nm region. The diffractive-optic-based design of the 2D spectrometer avoids directional filtering distortions and temporal broadening from time smearing. For demonstration we record data of cresyl-violet perchlorate in ethanol and use phasing to obtain broadband absorptive 2D spectra. The resulting quantum beating as a function of population time is consistent with literature data. PMID:27607681

  13. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; J. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; J. Menard

    2000-07-20

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. where the plasma frequency is much greater than the electron cyclotron frequency, as in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition. Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large perpendicular wavenumber. This paper reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub o} {approximately} 2 kG, {approximately}10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} {approx} to 10 -- 200 eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode-converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be less than or equal to T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance, where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for overdense plasmas.

  14. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Helium Near its Transition Temperature T(sub lambda) in a 2D Confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerebets, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We report our recent experiments on thermal conductivity measurements of superfluid He-4 near its phase transition in a two-dimensional (2D) confinement under saturated vapor pressure. A 2D confinement is created by 2-mm- and 1-mm-thick glass capillary plates, consisting of densely populated parallel microchannels with cross-sections of 5 x 50 and 1 x 10 microns, correspondingly. A heat current (2 < Q < 400 nW/sq cm) was applied along the channels long direction. High-resolution measurements were provided by DC SQUID-based high-resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers (HRTs) with a nanokelvin resolution. We might find that thermal conductivity of confined helium is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Our 2D results will be compared with those in a bulk and 1D confinement.

  15. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-01

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ~1000 cm2 V-1 s-1 even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor

  16. Layer-by-Layer Assembled 2D Montmorillonite Dielectrics for Solution-Processed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Xiaolong; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Jariwala, Deep; Beck, Megan E; Huang, Wei; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembled 2D montmorillonite nanosheets are shown to be high-performance, solution-processed dielectrics. These scalable and spatially uniform sub-10 nm thick dielectrics yield high areal capacitances of ≈600 nF cm(-2) and low leakage currents down to 6 × 10(-9) A cm(-2) that enable low voltage operation of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube and n-type indium gallium zinc oxide field-effect transistors. PMID:26514248

  17. Beyond Graphene: Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Defective 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Humberto

    One of the challenges in the production of 2-D materials is the synthesis of defect free systems which can achieve the desired properties for novel applications. However, the reality so far indicates that we need to deal with defective systems and understand their main features in order to perform defect engineering in such a way that we can engineer a new material. In this talk I discuss first, the introduction of defects in a hierarchic way starting from 2-D graphene to form giant Schwarzites or graphene foams, which also can exhibit further defects, thus we can have several levels of defectiveness. In this context, it will be shown that giant Schwarzites, depending on their symmetry, can exhibit Dirac-Fermion behavior and further, possess protected topological states as shown by other authors. Regarding the mechanical properties of these systems, it is possible to tune the Poisson Ratio by the addition of defects, thus shedding light to the explanation of the almost zero Poisson ratios in experimentally obtained graphene foams. Second, the idea of Haeckelites, a planar sp2 graphene-like structure with heptagons and pentagons, can be extended to transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with square and octagonal-like defects, finding semi-metallic behaviors with Dirac-Fermions, and even topological insulating properties. National Science Foundation (EFRI-1433311).

  18. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  19. Ray tracing of Electron Bernstein Waves in 2D for C-2 Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, E.; Kruszelnicki, J.; Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu.; TAE Team

    2013-10-01

    Ray propagation in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ECRF) has been studied for simulated two dimensional equilibria on the C-2 device. Studies have been performed using the Genray ray tracing code, with modifications to allow ray trajectories on open magnetic flux surfaces. Primary studies are focused on Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) coupling mechanisms to study the potential for microwave heating of Field Reversed Configurations (FRC).

  20. Research on reconstruction algorithms for 2D temperature field based on TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography(TDLAT), as a promising technique which combines Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy(TDLAS) and computer tomography, has shown the advantages of high spatial resolution for temperature measurement. Given the large number of tomography algorithms, it is necessary to understand the feature of tomography algorithms and find suitable ones for the specific experiment. This paper illustrates two different algorithms including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and simulated annealing (SA) which are implemented using Matlab. The reconstruction simulations of unimodal and bimodal temperature phantom were done under different conditions, and the results of the simulation were analyzed. It shows that for the unimodal temperature phantom, the both algorithms work well, the reconstruction quality is acceptable under suitable conditions and the result of ART is better. But for the bimodal temperature phantom, the result of SA is much better. More specifically, the reconstruction quality of ART is mainly affected by the ray coverage, the maximum deviation for the unimodal temperature phantom is 5.9%, while for the bimodal temperature field, it is up to 25%. The reconstruction quality of SA is mainly affected by the number of the transitions, the maximum deviation for the unimodal temperature phantom is 9.2% when 6 transitions are used which is a little worse than the result of ART; however, the maximum deviation for the bimodal temperature phantom is much better than ART's, which is about 5.2% when 6 transitions are used.

  1. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  2. Dynamic polarization of graphene by moving external charges: Comparison with 2D electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka, D.; Radović, I.; Mišković, Z. L.

    2011-06-01

    We calculate the stopping and image forces on a point charge moving over a single-layer graphene grown on an SiC substrate, and compare them with forces arising when a charge moves over a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in an Ag monolayer on a Si substrate. Given that both these systems constitute a one-atom thick 2DEG, major differences are found in the velocity and distance dependencies of the two forces owing to different electronic structures of the respective 2DEG. Within the massless Dirac fermion picture of graphene's π electron bands, the inter-band single particle excitations are found to affect the stopping and image forces at high speeds in a substantial way, whereas such excitations are absent in the 2DEG of the metallic layer described by a single parabolic band.

  3. Oxide 2D electron gases as a route for high carrier densities on (001) Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kornblum, Lior; Jin, Eric N.; Kumah, Divine P.; Walker, Fred J.; Ernst, Alexis T.; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2015-05-18

    Two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) formed at the interfaces of oxide heterostructures draw considerable interest owing to their unique physics and potential applications. Growing such heterostructures on conventional semiconductors has the potential to integrate their functionality with semiconductor device technology. We demonstrate 2DEGs on a conventional semiconductor by growing GdTiO{sub 3}-SrTiO{sub 3} on silicon. Structural analysis confirms the epitaxial growth of heterostructures with abrupt interfaces and a high degree of crystallinity. Transport measurements show the conduction to be an interface effect, ∼9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} electrons per interface. Good agreement is demonstrated between the electronic behavior of structures grown on Si and on an oxide substrate, validating the robustness of this approach to bridge between lab-scale samples to a scalable, technologically relevant materials system.

  4. Electron-impact excitation of the Rb 7 2S1/2, 8 2S1/2, 5 2D3/2, and 6 2D3/2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zuyi; Flynn, Connor; Redd, Aaron; Stumpf, Bernhard

    1993-03-01

    Electron-impact cross sections for excitation of the 7 2S1/2, 8 2S1/2, 5 2D3/2, and 6 2D3/2 states of rubidium have been measured from threshold to 1000 eV. The optical-excitation-function method has been employed in a crossed atom- and electron-beam apparatus. Relative, total (cascade including) experimental cross sections are made absolute by comparison with the known total cross section of the Rb D1 line. Total excitation cross sections are compared with theoretical calculations employing first Born approximation and theoretical branching ratios. Born cross sections for the 7 2S1/2 and 8 2S1/2 states are obtained from the literature, while Born cross sections for the 5 2D3/2, 6 2D3/2, and all cascading states are calculated in this paper. At high energies, the measured total 2D3/2 state cross sections show 1/E behavior and converge to first Born theory; for E>100 eV, experiment and theory agree within 6.7% for 5 2D3/2 and within 3.7% for 6 2D3/2. The total cross sections for the 2S1/2 states do not converge to Born theory even at 1000 eV, and it is shown that this cannot be attributed to cascading. At low energies, 2S1/2 and 2D3/2 state total excitation cross sections have similar shapes with sharply peaked maxima at about 0.9 eV above threshold. After cascading is corrected using first Born theory, estimated experimental cross sections for direct excitation of higher fine-structure states of rubidium are given.

  5. SPE-LEEM Studies on the Surface and Electronic Structure of 2-D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun; Jin, Wencan; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Sadowski, Jerzy; Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; van de Zande, Arend; Chenet, Daniel; Dadap, Jerry; Herman, Irving; Sutter, Petter; Hone, James; Osgood, Richard

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we studied the surface and electronic structure of monolayer and few-layer exfoliated MoS2 and WSe2, as well as chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown MoS2, using Spectroscopic Photoemission and Low Energy Electron Microscope (SPE-LEEM). LEEM measurements reveal that, unlike exfoliated MoS2, CVD-grown MoS2 exhibits grain-boundary alterations due to surface strain. However, LEEM and micro-probe low energy electron diffraction show that the quality of CVD-grown MoS2 is comparable to that of exfoliated MoS2. Micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurement on exfoliated MoS2 and WSe2 single-crystals provides direct evidence for the shifting of the valence band maximum from Γ to K, when the layer number is thinned down to one, as predicted by density functional theory. Our measurements of the k-space resolved electronic structure allow for further comparison with other theoretical predictions and with transport measurements. Session I and II

  6. A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

    2009-09-25

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

  7. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part II: Feedback between composition and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, V.; Greathouse, T. K.; Cavalié, T.; Dobrijevic, M.; Hersant, F.

    2016-03-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. The atmospheric thermal structure is controlled and regulated by the amount of hydrocarbons in the stratosphere, which act as absorbers and coolants from the UV to the far-IR spectral range, and this structure has an influence on the amount of hydrocarbons. We study here the feedback between the chemical composition and the thermal structure by coupling a latitudinal and seasonal photochemical model with a radiative seasonal model. Our results show that the seasonal temperature peak in the higher stratosphere, associated with the seasonal increase of insolation, is shifted earlier than the maximum insolation peak. This shift is increased with increasing latitudes and is caused by the low amount of stratospheric coolants in the spring season. At 80° in both hemispheres, the temperature peak at 10-2 mbar is seen to occur half a season (3-4 Earth years) earlier than was previously predicted by radiative seasonal models that assumed spatially and temporally uniform distribution of coolants. This shift progressively decreases with increasing pressure, up to around the 0.5 mbar pressure level where it vanishes. On the opposite, the thermal field has a small feedback on the abundance distributions. Accounting for that feedback modifies the predicted equator-to-pole temperature gradient. The meridional gradients of temperature at the mbar pressure levels are better reproduced when this feedback is accounted for. At lower pressure levels, Saturn's stratospheric thermal structure seems to depart from pure radiative seasonal equilibrium as previously suggested by Guerlet et al. (2014). Although the agreement with the absolute value of the stratospheric temperature observed by Cassini is moderate, it is a mandatory step toward a fully coupled GCM-photochemical model.

  8. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  9. 2D transition-metal diselenides: phase segregation, electronic structure, and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph

    2016-02-17

    Density-functional theory is used to investigate the phase-segregation behavior of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, which are of current interest as beyond-graphene materials for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. Our focus is on the behavior of W1-x V x Se2 monolayers, whose end members are semiconducting WSe2 and ferromagnetic VSe2. The energetics favors phase segregation, but the spinodal decomposition temperature is rather low, about 420 K. The addition of V leads to a transition from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a metallic ferromagnet, with a ferromagnetic moment of about 1.0 μ B per V atom. The transition is caused by a p-type doping mechanism, which shifts the Fermi level into the valence band. The finite-temperature structure and magnetism of the diselenide systems are discussed in terms of Onsager-type critical fluctuations and Bruggeman effective-medium behavior.

  10. 2D transition-metal diselenides: phase segregation, electronic structure, and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Density-functional theory is used to investigate the phase-segregation behavior of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, which are of current interest as beyond-graphene materials for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. Our focus is on the behavior of W1-x V x Se2 monolayers, whose end members are semiconducting WSe2 and ferromagnetic VSe2. The energetics favors phase segregation, but the spinodal decomposition temperature is rather low, about 420 K. The addition of V leads to a transition from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a metallic ferromagnet, with a ferromagnetic moment of about 1.0 μ B per V atom. The transition is caused by a p-type doping mechanism, which shifts the Fermi level into the valence band. The finite-temperature structure and magnetism of the diselenide systems are discussed in terms of Onsager-type critical fluctuations and Bruggeman effective-medium behavior.

  11. Strong negative magnetoresistance in high-mobility 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zudov, Michael; Hatke, Anthony; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2012-02-01

    This talk reports on a remarkably strong negative magnetoresistance effect in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures and quantum wells. The effect is the strongest at about 1 kG where a deep and strongly temperature dependent minimum is observed. At low temperature, the resistivity at this minimum is a small fraction of the zero field resistivity. The talk will discuss the effects of temperature and in-plane magnetic field on this negative magnetoresistance and compare experimental findings with existing theories. A portion of this work was performed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, which is supported by NSF Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-0654118, by the State of Florida, and by the DOE and at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work at Minnesota was supported by the NSF Grant No. DMR-0548014 and by the DOE Grant No. DE-SC002567. The work at Princeton was partially funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the NSF MRSEC Program through the Princeton Center for Complex Materials (DMR-0819860) and the work at Sandia was supported by the Sandia Corporation under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed.

  12. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B-Y; Ni, G X; Pan, C; Fei, Z; Cheng, B; Lau, C N; Bockrath, M; Basov, D N; Fogler, M M

    2016-08-19

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept. PMID:27588873

  13. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Ni, G. X.; Pan, C.; Fei, Z.; Cheng, B.; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  14. Theoretical predictions on the electronic structure and charge carrier mobility in 2D Phosphorus sheets

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Long, Mengqiu; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Hui; Gao, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure and carrier mobility of four types of phosphorous monolayer sheet (α-P, β-P,γ-P and δ-P) using density functional theory combined with Boltzmann transport method and relaxation time approximation. It is shown that α-P, β-P and γ-P are indirect gap semiconductors, while δ-P is a direct one. All four sheets have ultrahigh carrier mobility and show anisotropy in-plane. The highest mobility value is ~3 × 105 cm2V−1s−1, which is comparable to that of graphene. Because of the huge difference between the hole and electron mobilities, α-P, γ-P and δ-P sheets can be considered as n-type semiconductors, and β-P sheet can be considered as a p-type semiconductor. Our results suggest that phosphorous monolayer sheets can be considered as a new type of two dimensional materials for applications in optoelectronics and nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26035176

  15. New insights in a 2-D hard disk system under a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pozo, J. J.; Pérez-Espigares, C.; Hurtado, P. I.; Garrido, P. L.

    2011-03-01

    Hard Disks system is a paradicmatic model well suited, numericaly, to test new approaches to nonequi-librium fenomena, being also easy and fast to simulate due to efficient event driven algorithms present in the literature. In this poster we study several properties of the model under a temperature gradient on the stationary regime. In this situation the sistem has well defined gradients in temperatures and densities allowing us to calculate experimentaly the thermal conductivity. We found this result compatible with the Enskog expresion even for large gradients. We also check that Henderson's state equation, although is an expresion derived under equilibrium conditions, is valid in our system for a wide range of temperatures gradients. We explain this fact showing that the system reach a local thermal equilibrium. Finaly we focus on the role of fluctuations of the energy current finding good agreement with the, recently introduced, Isometric Fluctuation Relation (IFR). We conclude that IFR also stands in our system, although it was formulated from a much simpler case.

  16. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H2, D2, and O2: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. M.; Krynski, Kamil; Streeter, Zachary; Findley, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V0(ρ) for H2, D2, and O2 from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V0(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O2) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H2 and D2). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V0(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths.

  17. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  18. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part II. State estimation via impedance-based temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Impedance-based temperature detection (ITD) is a promising approach for rapid estimation of internal cell temperature based on the correlation between temperature and electrochemical impedance. Previously, ITD was used as part of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state-estimator in conjunction with a thermal model to enable estimation of the 1-D temperature distribution of a cylindrical lithium-ion battery. Here, we extend this method to enable estimation of the 2-D temperature field of a battery with temperature gradients in both the radial and axial directions. An EKF using a parameterised 2-D spectral-Galerkin model with ITD measurement input (the imaginary part of the impedance at 215 Hz) is shown to accurately predict the core temperature and multiple surface temperatures of a 32,113 LiFePO4 cell, using current excitation profiles based on an Artemis HEV drive cycle. The method is validated experimentally on a cell fitted with a heat sink and asymmetrically cooled via forced air convection. A novel approach to impedance-temperature calibration is also presented, which uses data from a single drive cycle, rather than measurements at multiple uniform cell temperatures as in previous studies. This greatly reduces the time required for calibration, since it overcomes the need for repeated cell thermal equalization.

  19. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  20. 2D-PAGE protein analysis of dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum based on three different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latib, Norhidayu Abdul; Norshaha, Safida Anira; Usup, Gires; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Harmful algae bloom or red tide seems to be considered as threat to ecosystem, especially to human consumption because of the production of neurotoxin by dinoflagellates species such as Alexandrium minutum which can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning. The aim of this study is to determine the most suitable method for protein extraction of A. minutum followed by determination of differential protein expression of A. minutum on three different temperatures (15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C). After the optimization, the protein extract was subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to compare the intensity and distribution of the protein spots. Based on quantitative and qualitative protein assessment, use of Trizol reagent is the most suitable method to extract protein from A. minutum. 2-DE analysis of the samples results in different distribution and intensity of the protein spots were compared between 15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C.

  1. Electronic Structure calculations in a 2D SixGe1-x alloy under an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilha, José. Eduardo; Pontes, Renato B.; Seixas, Leandro; da Silva, António J. R.; Fazzio, Adalberto

    2013-03-01

    The recent advances and promises in nanoscience and nanotechnology have been focused on hexagonal materials, mainly on carbon-based nanostructures. Recently, new candidates have been raised, where the greatest efforts are devoted to a new hexagonal and buckled material made of silicon, named Silicene. This new material presents an energy gap due to spin-orbit interaction of approximately 1.5 meV, where the measurement of quantum spin Hall effect(QSHE) can be made experimentally. Some investigations also show that the QSHE in 2D low-buckled hexagonal structures of germanium is present. Since the similarities, and at the same time the differences, between Si and Ge, over the years, have motivated a lot of investigations in these materials. In this work we performed systematic investigations on the electronic structure and band topology in both ordered and disordered SixGe1-x alloys monolayer with 2D honeycomb geometry by first-principles calculations. We show that an applied electric field can tune the gap size for both alloys. However, as a function of electric field, the disordered alloy presents a W-shaped behavior, similarly to the pure Si or Ge, whereas for the ordered alloy a V-shaped behavior is observed. This work is supported by CAPES, CNPq and FAPESP.

  2. Optoacoustic temperature monitoring during HIFU impact on biological tissues: ex vivo study and numerical simulations of 2D temperature reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Sergey; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Pelivanov, Ivan

    2012-02-01

    Dependencies of the optoacoustic (OA) transformation efficiency on tissue temperature were obtained for the application in OA temperature monitoring during thermal therapies. Accurate measurement of the OA signal amplitude versus temperature was performed in different ex-vivo tissues in the temperature range 25°C - 80°C. The investigated tissues were selected to represent different structural components: chicken breast (skeletal muscle), porcine lard (fatty tissue) and porcine liver (richly perfused tissue). Backward mode of the OA signal detection and a narrow probe laser beam were used in the experiments to avoid the influence of changes in light scattering with tissue coagulation on the OA signal amplitude. Measurements were performed in heating and cooling regimes. Characteristic behavior of the OA signal amplitude temperature dependences in different temperature ranges were described in terms of changes in different structural components of the tissue samples. Finally, numerical simulation of the OA temperature monitoring with a linear transducers array was performed to demonstrate the possibility of real-time temperature mapping.

  3. A Stochastic Hill Climbing Approach for Simultaneous 2D Alignment and Clustering of Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Bonnet, Frederic; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2016-06-01

    A critical step in the analysis of novel cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle datasets is the identification of homogeneous subsets of images. Methods for solving this problem are important for data quality assessment, ab initio 3D reconstruction, and analysis of population diversity due to the heterogeneous nature of macromolecules. Here we formulate a stochastic algorithm for identification of homogeneous subsets of images. The purpose of the method is to generate improved 2D class averages that can be used to produce a reliable 3D starting model in a rapid and unbiased fashion. We show that our method overcomes inherent limitations of widely used clustering approaches and proceed to test the approach on six publicly available experimental cryo-EM datasets. We conclude that, in each instance, ab initio 3D reconstructions of quality suitable for initialization of high-resolution refinement are produced from the cluster centers. PMID:27184214

  4. ZnO Nanorods on a LaAlO3 -SrTiO3 Interface: Hybrid 1D-2D Diodes with Engineered Electronic Properties.

    PubMed

    Bera, Ashok; Lin, Weinan; Yao, Yingbang; Ding, Junfeng; Lourembam, James; Wu, Tom

    2016-02-10

    Integrating nanomaterials with different dimensionalities and properties is a versatile approach toward realizing new functionalities in advanced devices. Here, a novel diode-type heterostructure is reported consisting of 1D semiconducting ZnO nanorods and 2D metallic LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. Tunable insulator-to-metal transitions, absent in the individual components, are observed as a result of the competing temperature-dependent conduction mechanisms. Detailed transport analysis reveals direct tunneling at low bias, Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward bias, and Zener breakdown at high reverse bias. Our results highlight the rich electronic properties of such artificial diodes with hybrid dimensionalities, and the design principle may be generalized to other nanomaterials.

  5. Study of proton conductivity of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer at higher temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Suresh; Biswas, Soumava; Konar, Sanjit

    2015-02-16

    We report the proton conduction properties of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer having the molecular formulas {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·5H2O]}n (1) and {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·2H2O]}n (2), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 show high conductivity values of 2.55 × 10(-7) and 4.39 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 80 °C and 95% RH. The conductivity value of compound 1 is in the range of those for previously reported flexible MOFs, and compound 2 shows the highest proton conductivity among the carboxylate-based 1D CPs. The dimensionality and the internal hydrogen bonding connectivity play a vital role in the resultant conductivity. Variable-temperature experiments of both compounds at high humidity reveal that the conductivity values increase with increasing temperature, whereas the variable humidity studies signify the influence of relative humidity on high-temperature proton conductivity. The time-dependent measurements for both compounds demonstrate their ability to retain conductivity up to 10 h.

  6. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Miriam M; Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-06-01

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Qy band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240-270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet-singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  7. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang; Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H.

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  8. Comparative Variable Temperature Studies of Polyamide II with a Benchtop Fourier Transform and a Miniature Handheld Near-Infrared Spectrometer Using 2D-COS and PCMW-2D Analysis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this communication is to compare the performance of a miniaturized handheld near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer with a benchtop Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectrometer. Generally, NIR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful analytical tool to study hydrogen-bonding changes of amide functionalities in solid and liquid materials and therefore variable temperature NIR measurements of polyamide II (PAII) have been selected as a case study. The information content of the measurement data has been further enhanced by exploiting the potential of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and the perturbation correlation moving window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) evaluation technique. The data provide valuable insights not only into the changes of the hydrogen-bonding structure and the recrystallization of the hydrocarbon segments of the investigated PAII but also in their sequential order. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the 2D-COS and PCMW2D results derived from the spectra measured with the miniaturized NIR instrument are equivalent to the information extracted from the data obtained with the high-performance FT-NIR instrument.

  9. Fast ion induced shearing of 2D Alfvén eigenmodes measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Tobias, B J; Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Heidbrink, W W; Luhmann, N C; Nazikian, R; Park, H K; Spong, D A; Van Zeeland, M A

    2011-02-18

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  10. Ceria-Zirconia Particles Wrapped in a 2D Carbon Envelope: Improved Low-Temperature Oxygen Transfer and Oxidation Activity.

    PubMed

    Aneggi, Eleonora; Rico-Perez, Veronica; de Leitenburg, Carla; Maschio, Stefano; Soler, Lluís; Llorca, Jordi; Trovarelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-16

    Engineering the interface between different components of heterogeneous catalysts at nanometer level can radically alter their performances. This is particularly true for ceria-based catalysts where the interactions are critical for obtaining materials with enhanced properties. Here we show that mechanical contact achieved by high-energy milling of CeO2-ZrO2 powders and carbon soot results in the formation of a core of oxide particles wrapped in a thin carbon envelope. This 2D nanoscale carbon arrangement greatly increases the number and quality of contact points between the oxide and carbon. Consequently, the temperatures of activation and transfer of the oxygen in ceria are shifted to exceptionally low temperatures and the soot combustion rate is boosted. The study confirms the importance of the redox behavior of ceria-zirconia particles in the mechanism of soot oxidation and shows that the organization of contact points at the nanoscale can significantly modify the reactivity resulting in unexpected properties and functionalities. PMID:26448053

  11. Ceria–Zirconia Particles Wrapped in a 2D Carbon Envelope: Improved Low-Temperature Oxygen Transfer and Oxidation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aneggi, Eleonora; Rico-Perez, Veronica; de Leitenburg, Carla; Maschio, Stefano; Soler, Lluís; Llorca, Jordi; Trovarelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Engineering the interface between different components of heterogeneous catalysts at nanometer level can radically alter their performances. This is particularly true for ceria-based catalysts where the interactions are critical for obtaining materials with enhanced properties. Here we show that mechanical contact achieved by high-energy milling of CeO2–ZrO2 powders and carbon soot results in the formation of a core of oxide particles wrapped in a thin carbon envelope. This 2D nanoscale carbon arrangement greatly increases the number and quality of contact points between the oxide and carbon. Consequently, the temperatures of activation and transfer of the oxygen in ceria are shifted to exceptionally low temperatures and the soot combustion rate is boosted. The study confirms the importance of the redox behavior of ceria-zirconia particles in the mechanism of soot oxidation and shows that the organization of contact points at the nanoscale can significantly modify the reactivity resulting in unexpected properties and functionalities. PMID:26448053

  12. Ceria-Zirconia Particles Wrapped in a 2D Carbon Envelope: Improved Low-Temperature Oxygen Transfer and Oxidation Activity.

    PubMed

    Aneggi, Eleonora; Rico-Perez, Veronica; de Leitenburg, Carla; Maschio, Stefano; Soler, Lluís; Llorca, Jordi; Trovarelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-16

    Engineering the interface between different components of heterogeneous catalysts at nanometer level can radically alter their performances. This is particularly true for ceria-based catalysts where the interactions are critical for obtaining materials with enhanced properties. Here we show that mechanical contact achieved by high-energy milling of CeO2-ZrO2 powders and carbon soot results in the formation of a core of oxide particles wrapped in a thin carbon envelope. This 2D nanoscale carbon arrangement greatly increases the number and quality of contact points between the oxide and carbon. Consequently, the temperatures of activation and transfer of the oxygen in ceria are shifted to exceptionally low temperatures and the soot combustion rate is boosted. The study confirms the importance of the redox behavior of ceria-zirconia particles in the mechanism of soot oxidation and shows that the organization of contact points at the nanoscale can significantly modify the reactivity resulting in unexpected properties and functionalities.

  13. 2D perovskite nanosheets with thermally-stable high-κ response: a new platform for high-temperature capacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Osada, Minoru; Li, Bao-Wen; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2014-11-26

    We investigated high-temperature dielectric responses of high-κ perovskite nanosheet (Ca2Nb3O10), an important material platform for postgraphene technology and ultrascale electronic devices. Through in situ characterizations using conducting atomic force microscopy, we found a robust high-temperature property of Ca2Nb3O10 nanosheet even in a monolayer form (∼2 nm). Furthermore, layer-by-layer assembled nanocapacitors retained both size-free high-εr characteristic (∼200) and high insulation resistance (∼1×10(-7) A/cm2) at high temperatures up to 250 °C. The simultaneous improvement of εr and thermal stability in high-κ nanodielectrics is of critical technological importance, and perovskite nanosheet has great potential for a rational design and construction of high-temperature capacitors.

  14. Can fractional quantum Hall effect be due to the formation of coherent wave structures in a 2D electron gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Babur M.

    2016-05-01

    A microscopic theory of integer and fractional quantum Hall effects is presented here. In quantum density wave representation of charged particles, it is shown that, in a two-dimensional electron gas coherent structures form under the low temperature and high density conditions. With a sufficiently high applied magnetic field, the combined N particle quantum density wave exhibits collective periodic oscillations. As a result the corresponding quantum Hall voltage function shows a step-wise change in multiples of the ratio h/e2. At lower temperatures further subdivisions emerge in the Hall resistance, exhibiting the fractional quantum Hall effect.

  15. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(100) surface yield a 2D and not a 1D electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, R.; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Golden, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced nanowires do indeed host exotic, 1D (one-dimensional) metallic states. In light of this debate, we report here a thorough study of the electronic properties of high quality nanowires formed at the Au/Ge(100) surface. The high-resolution ARPES data show the low-lying Au-induced electronic states to possess a dispersion relation that depends on two orthogonal directions in k space. Comparison of the E (kx,ky) surface measured using high-resolution ARPES to tight-binding calculations yields hopping parameters in the two different directions that differ by approximately factor of two. Additionally, by pinpointing the Au-induced surface states in the first, second, and third surface Brillouin zones and analyzing their periodicity in k||, the nanowire propagation direction seen clearly in STM can be imported into the ARPES data. We find that the larger of the two hopping parameters corresponds, in fact, to the direction perpendicular to the nanowires (tperp). This proves that the Au-induced electron pockets possess a two-dimensional, closed Fermi surface, and this firmly places the Au/Ge(100) nanowire system outside potential hosts of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. We combine these ARPES data with scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of the spatially resolved electronic structure and find that the spatially straight—wirelike—conduction channels observed up to energies of order one electron volt below the Fermi level do not originate from the Au-induced states seen in the ARPES data. The former are rather more likely to be associated with bulk Ge states that are localized to the subsurface region. Despite our proof of the 2D (two-dimentional) nature of the Au

  16. An unambiguous identification of 2D electron gas features in the photoluminescence spectrum of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Sharma, T. K.

    2016-07-01

    A fast and non-destructive method for probing the true signatures of 2D electron gas (2DEG) states in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is presented. Two broad features superimposed with interference oscillations are observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The two features are identified as the ground and excited 2DEG states which are confirmed by comparing the PL spectra of as-grown and top barrier layer etched samples. Broad PL features disappear at a certain temperature along with the associated interference oscillations. Furthermore, the two broad PL features depicts specific temperature and excitation intensity dependencies which make them easily distinguishable from the bandedge excitonic or defect related PL features. The presence of strong interference oscillations associated with the 2DEG PL features is explained by considering the localized generation of PL signal at the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Finally, a large value of the polarization induced electric field of ~1.01 MV cm-1 is reported from PL measurements for AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures. It became possible only when the true identification of 2DEG features was made possible by the proposed method.

  17. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Island, Joshua O; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M; Ares, José R; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S J; Ferrer, Isabel J; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  18. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  19. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-03-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance.

  20. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Herwig; Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance Ron,dyn vs. the breakdown voltage Vbd. In literature, it has been shown that with a high Vbd, Ron,dyn is deteriorated. The impairment of Ron,dyn is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  1. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  2. Moving-window 2D correlation spectroscopy in studies of fluphenazine-DPPC dehydrated film as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwed, Joanna; Cieślik-Boczula, Katarzyna; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Bogusława; Jaszczyszyn, Agata; Gąsiorowski, Kazimierz; Świątek, Piotr; Malinka, Wiesław

    2010-06-01

    The effect of incorporating fluphenazine (FPh) into the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) multibilayers was studied by means of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) applied to attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared spectra. DPPC is used as a model membrane that mimics the organization of lipids in biological membranes and their interaction with FPh. ATR-IR spectra for both DPPC dry film alone and the film doped with FPh were recorded as a function of temperature to provide information about the interaction between FPh molecules and DPPC lipid. The chain-melting phase-transition temperature changes are strictly correlated with the conformational order of the lipid hydrocarbon chains. To gain deeper insight into the accompanying spectral changes, we employed moving-window 2D correlation spectroscopy. Subdividing all the measurements from 10 to 90 °C into 20° subsets enables a detailed identification of spectral features induced by embedding FPh into DPPC multilayers. Moving-window analysis of the power spectra for the ν asym,symCH 2, δ sCH 2, and δ rCH 2 vibrations provides evidence that FPh is embedded in the region between the bilayers, penetrating their hydrophilic part, which destabilizes the interchain interaction. Above 60 °C the FPh-DPPC system reaches the liquid crystalline phase with the well-established location of FPh. A further temperature increase to 90 °C has little effect on the intrachain conformational order and the packing character of the FPh-DPPC system in the liquid crystalline phase. In addition, FPh hinders the formation of large domains. Comparison of the moving-window analysis done by using slice spectra for DPPC and FPh-doped DPPC dry film for ν asym,symCH 2, νC dbnd O, and νPO2- shows that the interaction between the DPPC and FPh molecules is accompanied by very distinct spectral changes located in a both lower and narrower temperature range than those observed in pure DPPC film.

  3. Two-dimensional-spatial distribution measurement of electron temperature and plasma density in low temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Jang, Sung-Ho; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-05-15

    A real-time measurement method for two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density was developed. The method is based on the floating harmonic method and the real time measurement is achieved with little plasma perturbation. 2D arrays of the sensors on a 300 mm diameter wafer-shaped printed circuit board with a high speed multiplexer circuit were used. Experiments were performed in an inductive discharge under various external conditions, such as powers, gas pressures, and different gas mixing ratios. The results are consistent with theoretical prediction. Our method can measure the 2D spatial distribution of plasma parameters on a wafer-level in real-time. This method can be applied to plasma diagnostics to improve the plasma uniformity of plasma reactors for plasma processing.

  4. Orbital dependent Rashba splitting and electron-phonon coupling of 2D Bi phase on Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiani, Pierluigi; Lisi, Simone; Betti, Maria Grazia; Ibrahimi, Amina Taleb; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Chiodo, Letizia

    2013-11-14

    A monolayer of bismuth deposited on the Cu(100) surface forms a highly ordered c(2×2) reconstructed phase. The low energy single particle excitations of the c(2×2) Bi/Cu(100) present Bi-induced states with a parabolic dispersion in the energy region close to the Fermi level, as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic state dispersion, the charge density localization, and the spin-orbit coupling have been investigated combining photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, unraveling a two-dimensional Bi phase with charge density well localized at the interface. The Bi-induced states present a Rashba splitting, when the charge density is strongly localized in the Bi plane. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the spectral density close to the Fermi level has been evaluated. Dispersive electronic states offer a large number of decay channels for transitions coupled to phonons and the strength of the electron-phonon coupling for the Bi/Cu(100) system is shown to be stronger than for Bi surfaces and to depend on the electronic state symmetry and localization.

  5. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  6. Mn2C monolayer: a 2D antiferromagnetic metal with high Néel temperature and large spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    To realize antiferromagnetic spintronics in the nanoscale, it is highly desirable to identify new nanometer-scale antiferromagnetic metals with both high Néel temperature and large spin-orbit coupling. In this work, on the basis of first-principles calculation and particle swarm optimization (PSO) global structure search, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional Mn2C monolayer is an antiferromagnetic metal with a Mn magnetic moment of ~3μB. Mn2C monolayer has an anti-site structure of MoS2 sheet with carbon atoms hexagonally coordinated by neighboring Mn atoms. Remarkably, the in-plane carrier mobility of 2D Mn2C is highly anisotropic, amounting to about 47 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the a' direction, which is much higher than that of MoS2 monolayer. The Néel temperature of Mn2C monolayer is high up to 720 K. Due to strong spin-orbit coupling in plane, the magnetic anisotropy energy of Mn2C monolayer is larger than those of pure metals, such as Fe, Co, and Ni. These advantages render 2D Mn2C sheet with great potential applications in nanometer-scale antiferromagnetic spintronics.To realize antiferromagnetic spintronics in the nanoscale, it is highly desirable to identify new nanometer-scale antiferromagnetic metals with both high Néel temperature and large spin-orbit coupling. In this work, on the basis of first-principles calculation and particle swarm optimization (PSO) global structure search, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional Mn2C monolayer is an antiferromagnetic metal with a Mn magnetic moment of ~3μB. Mn2C monolayer has an anti-site structure of MoS2 sheet with carbon atoms hexagonally coordinated by neighboring Mn atoms. Remarkably, the in-plane carrier mobility of 2D Mn2C is highly anisotropic, amounting to about 47 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the a' direction, which is much higher than that of MoS2 monolayer. The Néel temperature of Mn2C monolayer is high up to 720 K. Due to strong spin-orbit coupling in plane, the magnetic anisotropy energy of Mn2C monolayer is

  7. Dissipative dynamics within the electronic friction approach: the femtosecond laser desorption of H2/D2 from Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    Füchsel, Gernot; Klamroth, Tillmann; Monturet, Serge; Saalfrank, Peter

    2011-05-21

    An electronic friction approach based on Langevin dynamics is used to describe the multidimensional (six-dimensional) dynamics of femtosecond laser induced desorption of H(2) and D(2) from a H(D)-covered Ru(0001) surface. The paper extends previous reduced-dimensional models, using a similar approach. In the present treatment forces and frictional coefficients are calculated from periodic density functional theory (DFT) and essentially parameter-free, while the action of femtosecond laser pulses on the metal surface is treated by using the two-temperature model. Our calculations shed light on the performance and validity of various adiabatic, non-adiabatic, and Arrhenius/Kramers type kinetic models to describe hot-electron mediated photoreactions at metal surfaces. The multidimensional frictional dynamics are able to reproduce and explain known experimental facts, such as strong isotope effects, scaling of properties with laser fluence, and non-equipartitioning of vibrational, rotational, and translational energies of desorbing species. Further, detailed predictions regarding translations are made, and the question for the controllability of photoreactions at surfaces with the help of vibrational preexcitation is addressed.

  8. Electron temperature differences and double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C.; Hershkowitz, N.; Lonngren, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    Electron temperature differences across plasma double layers are studied experimentally. It is shown that the temperature differences across a double layer can be varied and are not a result of thermalization of the bump-on-tail distribution. The implications of these results for electron thermal energy transport in laser-pellet and tandem-mirror experiments are also discussed.

  9. Study on Fracture Behavior of 2D-C/C Composite for Application to Control Rod of Very High Temperature Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, J.; Fujita, I.; Shibata, T.; Makita, T.; Takagi, T.; Kunimoto, E.; Sawa, K.; Kim, W.; Park, J.

    2011-10-01

    For a control rod element of the Very High Temperature Reactor, a carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite (C/C composite) is one of the major candidate materials for its high strength and thermal stability. In this study, in order to establish the data base of the 2D-C/C composite, the fracture data was obtained by simulating the crack expected to be generated under the VHTR condition and the oxidation effect on the fracture behavior was evaluated. Moreover, the fracture mechanism of the C/C composite was investigated through scanning electron microscope observation. This study showed that the oxidized matrix caused reduction of the fracture toughness and the reduction ratio was dependent on the density of matrix and a number cracks. With increasing the oxidation, the fracture toughness is mainly dependent on the fiber characteristics. Furthermore, the crack grows along the boundary between fiber bundles without breaking the fiber. The cracks which were initiated at the interface between the matrix and the fiber were gathered into the voids in the boundary between fiber bundles, and, then, the cracks grew up in the matrix.

  10. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  11. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  12. Time-dependent resonant UHF CI approach for the photo-induced dynamics of the multi-electron system confined in 2D QD

    SciTech Connect

    Okunishi, Takuma; Clark, Richard; Takeda, Kyozaburo; Kusakabe, Kouichi; Tomita, Norikazu

    2013-12-04

    We extend the static multi-reference description (resonant UHF) to the dynamic system in order to include the correlation effect over time, and simplify the TD Schrödinger equation (TD-CI) into a time-developed rate equation where the TD external field Ĥ′(t) is then incorporated directly in the Hamiltonian without any approximations. We apply this TD-CI method to the two-electron ground state of a 2D quantum dot (QD) under photon injection and study the resulting two-electron Rabi oscillation.

  13. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  14. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Park, H K; Yun, G S; Nam, Y B; Choe, G H; Lee, W; Jardin, S

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  15. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  16. Failure behavior of a 2-D woven SiC fiber/SiC matrix composite at ambient and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, S.V.; Wang, Yu-Lin

    1992-08-01

    The failure behavior of a 2D woven SiC fiber/SiC matrix composite at ambient and elevated temperatures was studied by characterizing the R-curve behavior at ambient temperature and at 1200 C using compact tension fracture mechanics specimens. A rising R-curve behavior was observed at ambient temperature caused by fiber bridging and microcracking in the crack wake. Significant toughening was also generated by microcracking in the crack front zone. The R-curve effect at ambient temperature was substantially reduced at 1200 C as a result of degradation of the Nicalon fibers. Delamination crack growth was observed at 1200 deg indicative of a weakened fiber/matrix interface. Toughening at elevated temperature appears to result from a combination of crack branching and microcracking. 6 refs.

  17. Dynamics of non-planar vortices in the classical 2D anisotropic heisenberg model at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamppeter, T.; Mertens, F. G.; Sánchez, Angel; Gronbech-Jensen, N.; Bishop, A. R.; Dominguez-Adame, F.

    The 2-dimensional anisotropic Heisenberg model with XY- or easy-plane symmetry bears non-planar vortices which exhibit a localized structure of the z-components of the spins around the vortex center. In order to study the dynamics of these vortices under thermal fluctuations we use the Landau-Lifshitz equation and add white noise and Gilbert damping. Using a collective variable theory we derive an equation of motion with stochastic forces which are shown to represent white noise with an effective diffusion constant. We compare the results with Langevin dynamics simulations for the Landau-Lifshitz equation and find three temperature regimes: For low temperatures the dynamics is described by a 3rd-order equation of motion, for intermediate temperatures by a 1st-order equation. For higher temperatures, but still below the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature, the spontaneous appearance of vortex-antivortex pairs does not allow a single-particle description.

  18. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part I. Low-order thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the temperature distribution within Li-ion batteries during operation is critical for safety and control purposes. Although existing control-oriented thermal models - such as thermal equivalent circuits (TEC) - are computationally efficient, they only predict average temperatures, and are unable to predict the spatially resolved temperature distribution throughout the cell. We present a low-order 2D thermal model of a cylindrical battery based on a Chebyshev spectral-Galerkin (SG) method, capable of predicting the full temperature distribution with a similar efficiency to a TEC. The model accounts for transient heat generation, anisotropic heat conduction, and non-homogeneous convection boundary conditions. The accuracy of the model is validated through comparison with finite element simulations, which show that the 2-D temperature field (r, z) of a large format (64 mm diameter) cell can be accurately modelled with as few as 4 states. Furthermore, the performance of the model for a range of Biot numbers is investigated via frequency analysis. For larger cells or highly transient thermal dynamics, the model order can be increased for improved accuracy. The incorporation of this model in a state estimation scheme with experimental validation against thermocouple measurements is presented in the companion contribution (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775316308163)

  19. Tuning the Growth Pattern in 2D Confinement Regime of Sm2O3 and the Emerging Room Temperature Unusual Superparamagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Guria, Amit K.; Dey, Koushik; Sarkar, Suresh; Patra, Biplab K.; Giri, Saurav; Pradhan, Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Programming the reaction chemistry for superseding the formation of Sm2O3 in a competitive process of formation and dissolution, the crystal growth patterns are varied and two different nanostructures of Sm2O3 in 2D confinement regime are designed. Among these, the regular and self-assembled square platelets nanostructures exhibit paramagnetic behavior analogous to the bulk Sm2O3. But, the other one, 2D flower like shaped nanostructure, formed by irregular crystal growth, shows superparamagnetism at room temperature which is unusual for bulk paramagnet. It has been noted that the variation in the crystal growth pattern is due to the difference in the binding ability of two organic ligands, oleylamine and oleic acid, used for the synthesis and the magnetic behavior of the nanostructures is related to the defects incorporated during the crystal growth. Herein, we inspect the formation chemistry and plausible origin of contrasting magnetism of these nanostructures of Sm2O3. PMID:25269458

  20. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to study temporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium sustained in two different configurations, (i) diffuse filament discharge between two spherical electrodes, and (ii) surface discharge over plane quartz surface. In the diffuse filament discharge, the experimental results are compared with the predictions of a 2D plasma fluid model. Electron densities are put on an absolute scale using pure rotational Raman spectra in nitrogen, taken without the plasma, for calibration. In the diffuse filament discharge, electron density and electron temperature increase rapidly after breakdown, peaking at n e  ≈  3.5 · 1015 cm-3 and T e  ≈  4.0 eV. After the primary discharge pulse, both electron density and electron temperature decrease (to n e ~ 1014 cm-3 over ~1 µs and to T e ~ 0.5 eV over ~200 ns), with a brief transient rise produced by the secondary discharge pulse. At the present conditions, the dominant recombination mechanism is dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular ions, \\text{He}2+ . In the afterglow, the electron temperature does not relax to gas temperature, due to superelastic collisions. Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) inferred from the Thomson scattering spectra are nearly Maxwellian, which is expected at high ionization fractions, when the shape of EEDF is controlled primarily by electron-electron collisions. The kinetic model predictions agree well with the temporal trends detected in the experiment, although peak electron temperature and electron density are overpredicted. Heavy species temperature predicted during the discharge and the early afterglow remains low and does not exceed T  =  400 K, due to relatively slow quenching of metastable He* atoms in two-body and three-body processes. In the surface discharge, peak electron density and electron temperature are n e  ≈  3 · 1014 cm3 and T e

  1. Temperature measurement systems in wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, S.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the concept of temperature measurement system, adapted to wearable electronics applications. Temperature is one of the most commonly monitored factor in smart textiles, especially in sportswear, medical and rescue products. Depending on the application, measured temperature could be used as an initial value of alert, heating, lifesaving or analysis system. The concept of the temperature measurement multi-point system, which consists of flexible screen-printed resistive sensors, placed on the T-shirt connected with the central unit and the power supply is elaborated in the paper.

  2. SPE-LEEM Studies on the Surface and Electronic Structure of 2-D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po-Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Sadowski, Jerzy; Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; van de Zande, Arend; Chenet, Daniel; Dadap, Jerry; Herman, Irving; Sutter, Peter; Hone, James; Osgood, Richard

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we studied the surface and electronic structure of monolayer and few-layer exfoliated MoS2 and WSe2, as well as chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown MoS2, using Spectroscopic Photoemission and Low Energy Electron Microscope (SPE-LEEM). LEEM measurements reveal that, unlike exfoliated MoS2, CVD-grown MoS2 exhibits grain-boundary alterations due to surface strain. However, LEEM and micro-probe low energy electron diffraction show that the quality of CVD-grown MoS2 is comparable to that of exfoliated MoS2. Micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurement on exfoliated MoS2 and WSe2 single-crystals provides direct evidence for the shifting of the valence band maximum from Γ to K, when the layer number is thinned down to one, as predicted by density functional theory. Our measurements of the k-space resolved electronic structure allow for further comparison with other theoretical predictions and with transport measurements. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG 02-04-ER-46157, research carried out in part at the CFN and NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  3. Analysis of bell-shape negative giant-magnetoresistance in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron systems using multi-conduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaraweera, Rasanga; Liu, Han-Chun; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh

    Recent advancements in the growth techniques of the GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) routinely yield high quality heterostructures with enhanced physical and electrical properties, including devices with 2D electron mobilities well above 107 cm2/Vs. These improvements have opened new pathways to study interesting physical phenomena associated with the 2D electron system. Negative giant-magnetoresistance (GMR) is one such phenomenon which can observed in the high mobility 2DES. However, the negative GMR in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2DES is still not fully understood. In this contribution, we present an experimental study of the bell-shape negative GMR in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs devices and quantitatively analyze the results utilizing the multi-conduction model. The multi-conduction model includes interesting physical characteristics such as negative diagonal conductivity, non-vanishing off-diagonal conductivity, etc. The aim of the study is to examine GMR over a wider experimental parameter space and determine whether the multi-conduction model serves to describe the experimental results.

  4. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  5. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Spaleta, J.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either ''overdense,'' operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g., {omega}{sub pe}>>{Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau}>2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers as a result of their large k{sub perp}. In this article we report on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0}{approx}2kG, {approx}10{sup 13}cm{sup -3} and T{sub e}{approx}10--200eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {<=}T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in the edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe}>>{Omega}{sub ce}.

  6. Selection and Testing of Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Dyes for 2-D Flow Characterization via Synthesized Microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Alex; Zhu, Cun; Xia, Younan; Khalil, Gamal; Dabiri, Dana

    2011-11-01

    Airborne temperature and pressure sensitive microbeads provide a vehicle with which to conduct two-dimensional flow characterization. An array of temperature and pressure sensitive dyes have been synthesized with microbeads (of silica, polystyrene, and polydimethylsiloxane) for this purpose. These microbeads were evaluated based on emission spectra, pressure response (0-760 torr), temperature response (5-45°C), and response time. Work will be presented showing the various combinations of dyes and microbead materials, as well as the testing process and examples of future application. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. #DEG-0718124, as well as National Science Foundation Grant No. NSF/CBET-IDR- 0929864.

  7. Electronics for Low Temperature Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2007-01-01

    Exploration missions to outer planets and deep space require spacecraft, probes, and on-board data and communication systems to operate reliably and efficiently under severe harsh conditions. On-board electronics, in particular those in direct exposures to the space environment without any shielding or protection, will encounter extreme low temperature and thermal cycling in their service cycle in most of NASA s upcoming exploration missions. For example, Venus atmosphere, Jupiter atmosphere, Moon surface, Pluto orbiter, Mars, comets, Titan, Europa, and James Webb Space Telescope all involve low-temperature surroundings. Therefore, electronics for space exploration missions need to be designed for operation under such environmental conditions. There are ongoing efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to establish a database on the operation and reliability of electronic devices and circuits under extreme temperature operation for space applications. This work is being performed under the Extreme Temperature Electronics Program with collaboration and support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. The results of these investigations will be used to establish safe operating areas and to identify degradation and failure modes, and the information will be disseminated to mission planners and system designers for use as tools for proper part selection and in risk mitigation. An overview of this program along with experimental data will be presented.

  8. Instantaneous 2D Velocity and Temperature Measurements in High Speed Flows Based on Spectrally Resolved Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for high speed flows is described for the simultaneous, instantaneous measurement of gas temperature and velocity at a number (up to about one hundred) of locations in a plane illuminated by an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Molecular Rayleigh scattered light is collected and passed through a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. The resulting image is analyzed to determine the gas temperature and bulk velocity at each of the regions. The Cramer Rao lower bound for measurement uncertainty is calculated. Experimental data is presented for a free jet and for preliminary measurements in the Lewis 4 inch by 10 inch supersonic wind tunnel.

  9. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Morgan, Sarah E; Kehoe, Tom B; Wilson, Mark W B; Chin, Alex W; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  10. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Morgan, Sarah E.; Kehoe, Tom B.; Wilson, Mark W. B.; Chin, Alex W.; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  11. The Conference on High Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. J.; Mccormick, J. B.; Kerwin, W. J.; Narud, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of and directions for high temperature electronics research and development were evaluated. Major objectives were to (1) identify common user needs; (2) put into perspective the directions for future work; and (3) address the problem of bringing to practical fruition the results of these efforts. More than half of the presentations dealt with materials and devices, rather than circuits and systems. Conference session titles and an example of a paper presented in each session are (1) User requirements: High temperature electronics applications in space explorations; (2) Devices: Passive components for high temperature operation; (3) Circuits and systems: Process characteristics and design methods for a 300 degree QUAD or AMP; and (4) Packaging: Presently available energy supply for high temperature environment.

  12. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-J CO rotational lines is a powerful tool for assessing the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-J (Ju> 14) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new Herschel/HIFI and archival PACS observations of 12CO, 13CO, and [C ii] emission in four Herbig AeBe disks (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and three T Tauri disks (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya). In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all the other systems, the Herschel CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyzed simultaneously assuming power-law temperature and column density profiles, using the velocity profile to locate the emission in the disk. The temperature profile varies substantially from disk to disk. In particular, Tgas in the disk surface layers can differ by up to an order of magnitude among the four Herbig AeBe systems; HD 100546 is the hottest and HD 163296 the coldest disk in the sample. Clear evidence of a warm disk layer where Tgas>Tdust is found in all the Herbig Ae disks. The observed CO fluxes and line profiles are compared to predictions of physical-chemical models. The primary parameters affecting the disk temperature structure are the flaring angle, the gas-to-dust mass ratio, the scale height, and the dust settling.

  13. Electron Temperature Modification in Gas Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyak, Valery

    2011-10-01

    In gas discharge plasma with a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF), the ionization balance results in the electron temperature Te being solely a function of the product of gas pressure p and plasma characteristic size d, Te = Te(pd), independently on plasma density and electron heating mechanism. This common feature of gas discharge plasma takes place in self-sustained discharges where ionization is locally coupled with electron heating, usually in a uniform heating electric field. At such condition, there is no room for electron temperature change at fixed pd. Variety of non-equilibrium phenomena observed in self-organized dc and rf discharge structures, and in relaxation process therein suggests the way to EEDF and Te modification. At such conditions, the electron heating can be separated (in space or/and in time) from the ionization. Few examples of such discharge structures in well know stationary dc and rf discharges and in plasma transient processes, leading to considerable mean electron energy reduction, will be considered in the presentation together with abbreviated review of existing methods and experimental results on EEDF control in laboratory plasmas. This work was supported in part by the DOE OFES (Contract No DE-SC0001939).

  14. State of the art of AIM LWIR and VLWIR MCT 2D focal plane detector arrays for higher operating temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figgemeier, H.; Hanna, S.; Eich, D.; Mahlein, K.-M.; Fick, W.; Schirmacher, W.; Thöt, R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper AIM presents its latest results on both n-on-p and p-on-n low dark current planar MCT photodiode technology LWIR and VLWIR two-dimensional focal plane detector arrays with a cut-off wavelength >11μm at 80K and a 640x512 pixel format at a 20μm pitch. Thermal dark currents significantly reduced as compared to `Tennant's Rule 07' at a yet good detection efficiency >60% as well as results from NETD and photo response performance characterization are presented. The demonstrated detector performance paces the way for a new generation of higher operating temperature LWIR MCT FPAs with a <30mK NETD up to a 110K detector operating temperature and with good operability.

  15. Synthesis, structure and temperature-depended 2D IR correlation spectroscopy of an organo-bismuth benzoate with 1,10-phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan-Qiong; Zhong, Jie-Cen; Liu, Le-Hui; Qiu, Xing-Tai; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2016-11-01

    An organo-bismuth benzoate with phen as auxiliary ligand, [Bi(phen)(C6H5COO)(C6H4COO)] (1) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized from bismuth nitrate, 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid with phen as auxiliary ligand and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, PXRD, IR spectra, TG analyses, temperature-depended 2D-IR COS (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Interestingly, benzoate anions in 1 came from the desulfuration reaction of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 is a discrete organo-bismuth compound with benzoate and phen ligands. The offset face-to-face π-π stacking interactions and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the isolate complex into a 3D supramolecular network. The temperature-depended 2D-IR COS indicates that the stretching vibrations of Cdbnd C/Cdbnd N of aromatic rings and Cdbnd O bonds are sensitive to the temperature change.

  16. Variable-temperature Fourier-transform infrared studies of poly(L-lactic acid) in different states of order: A 2DCOS and PCMW2D analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pudun; Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W.

    2016-11-01

    Variable-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of a predominantly amorphous and a semi-crystalline poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) film were measured between 30 °C and 170 °C in order to investigate their temperature-dependent structural changes as a function of the initial state of order. For an in-depth analysis of the spectral variations in the carbonyl stretching band region (1803-1722 cm-1) two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and perturbation-correlation moving-window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) analyses were applied. Significant spectral changes were observed during heating of the amorphous PLLA sample whereas the semi-crystalline specimen showed only slight band shifts as a function of the external perturbation. The PCMW2D results suggested that for efficient 2DCOS analyses the heating process should be split up in two temperature intervals. These analyses then provided information on the recrystallization of the amorphous regions, the presence of an intermediate state of order and a sequence scenario for the observed spectral changes.

  17. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  18. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  19. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  20. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C. M. Krynski, Kamil; Streeter, Zachary; Findley, G. L.

    2015-12-14

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V{sub 0}(ρ) for H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V{sub 0}(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O{sub 2}) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V{sub 0}(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths.

  1. HSCT Assessment Calculations with the AER 2-D Model: Sensitivities to Transport Formulation, PSC Formulation, Interannual Temperature Variation. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Shia, Run-Lie; Jackman, Charles; Fleming, Eric; Considine, David; Kinnison, Douglas; Connell, Peter; Rotman, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    The summary are: (1) Some chemical differences in background atmosphere are surprisingly large (NOY). (2) Differences in model transport explain a majority of the intertnodel differences in the absence of PSCs. (3) With PSCS, large differences exist in predicted O3 depletion between models with the same transport. (4) AER/LLNL model calculates more O3 depletion in NH than LLNL. (5) AER/GSFC model cannot match calculated O3 depletion of GSFC model in SH. and (6) Results sensitive to interannual temperature variations (at least in NH).

  2. Thermal management of low temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Louis C.; Sehmbey, Maninder S.; Mahefkey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Operation of electronics at liquid nitrogen temperature is a very attractive possibility. High temperature superconducting circuits operating at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have great potential in supercomputers and in the medical field. The limitations of superconducting switches in handling high power levels can be overcome by employing hybrid circuits where MOSFET switches are used in conjunction with superconducting elements. These hybrid circuits can be employed advantageously in many applications; for example, high-voltage power conversion, and superconducting-brushless-ac motors for locomotives. However, the thermal management of LNT electronics is an issue that has to be addressed. In this paper, two thermal management techniques, direct immersion cooling, and high-heat-flux spray cooling are discussed. Immersion cooling can handle relatively low heat flux levels (100 kW/m2) while spray cooling is capable of very high heat flux removal (over 1000 kW/m2).

  3. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J.; Batson, Philip E.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ~-0.1 V and ~50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  4. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER. PMID:27295098

  5. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  6. Mn2C monolayer: a 2D antiferromagnetic metal with high Néel temperature and large spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lin; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-07-14

    To realize antiferromagnetic spintronics in the nanoscale, it is highly desirable to identify new nanometer-scale antiferromagnetic metals with both high Néel temperature and large spin-orbit coupling. In this work, on the basis of first-principles calculation and particle swarm optimization (PSO) global structure search, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional Mn2C monolayer is an antiferromagnetic metal with a Mn magnetic moment of ∼3μB. Mn2C monolayer has an anti-site structure of MoS2 sheet with carbon atoms hexagonally coordinated by neighboring Mn atoms. Remarkably, the in-plane carrier mobility of 2D Mn2C is highly anisotropic, amounting to about 47 000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in the a' direction, which is much higher than that of MoS2 monolayer. The Néel temperature of Mn2C monolayer is high up to 720 K. Due to strong spin-orbit coupling in plane, the magnetic anisotropy energy of Mn2C monolayer is larger than those of pure metals, such as Fe, Co, and Ni. These advantages render 2D Mn2C sheet with great potential applications in nanometer-scale antiferromagnetic spintronics. PMID:27304676

  7. New Electron Temperature Diagnostic for Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Loch, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    A new line ratio diagnostic design to measure electron temperature in plasma is presented. Unlike previous diagnostics, this new technique features emission lines originating from levels with different principal quantum numbers. A significant advantage of this approach is that the line ratio varies considerably with temperature in the 1 to 20 eV range. Another advantage is that both transitions are optically thin even for plasma density up to 1 E 14 cm-3. The drawbacks are: a large difference in the line intensities and the significant difference in wavelength. The event of high sensitivity CCD camera combine with precise calibration can to a large extent minimize these latest two issues. The diagnostic is tested on the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source. ASTRAL is a 2.3 m long helicon source designed to investigate basic plasma and space plasma processes. The device produces plasmas with the following typical parameters ne = 1 E9 to 1 E13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 20 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.3 eV. A series of 8 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.2 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr. A water cooled fractional helix antenna is used to introduce RF power up to 2 kwatt through a standard matching circuit. The line ratio temperatures are measured by means of a 0.33 m McPherson Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator instrumented with a SPH5 Apogee CCD camera. The line ratio temperatures are compared to electron temperatures measured by a rf compensated Langmuir Probe. To validate the diagnostic, a new collisional radiative model that makes use of the latest excitation cross-section values is presented. The model is also used to predict the potential range of this new diagnostic both in terms of electron temperature and plasma density.

  8. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Sushko, Peter V; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32](2+) ⋅ (e(-))2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. The concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: It invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a unique avenue in rational materials design. PMID:27559083

  9. Electron heat transport down steep temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, J.P.; Virmont, J.

    1982-12-27

    Electron heat transport is studied by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, with a spherical harmonic representation of the distribution function. The first two terms (f/sub 0/, f/sub 1/) suffice, even in steep temperature gradients. Deviations from the Spitzer-Haerm law appear for lambda/L/sub T/ ((mean free path)/(temperature gradient length))> or approx. =0.01, as a result of non-Maxwellian f/sub 0/. For lambda/L/sub T/> or approx. =1, the heat flux is (1/3) of the free-streaming value. In intermediate cases, a harmonic law describes well the hottest part of the plasma.

  10. Effects of substrate on 2D materials, graphene, MoS2, WS2, and black phosphorus, investigated by high temperature and spatially resolved Raman scattering and photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Liqin

    The exploration of a group of new 2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, has become the hottest research of interest in recent years. With the dependable techniques of producing 2D materials, particularly mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition, we are able to study all kinds of their unique properties in mechanical, electrical and optical fields. In this dissertation, we examine the vibrational and thermal properties of four 2D materials---graphene, MoS2, WS2 and black phosphorus---as well as their interaction with the supporting substrates, by using temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Regarding the increasing interests of studying on the fabrication and applications of 2D materials, the role of 2D-material/substrate interaction has seldom been taken into consideration which would significantly affects the quality of the grown films and the performance of the devices. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to systematically investigate on this issue. At first, we performed temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy on two graphene samples prepared by CVD and ME up to 400°C, as well as graphite as a reference. The temperature dependence of both graphene samples shows very non-linear behavior for G and 2D bands, but with the CVD-grown graphene more nonlinear. Comparing to the Raman spectra collected before the measurements, the spectra after the measurements exhibit not only a shift of peak position but also a huge broadening of linewidth, especially for CVD-grown graphene. This study implies that the polymeric residues from either scotch tape or PMMA during transfer process are converted to amorphous carbon after annealed at high temperature, which may significantly change the optical and electrical properties of graphene. With the same temperature-dependent Raman technique as graphene, we examine on monolayer MoS2 and WS2, and thin-film black phosphorus and demonstrate that the film morphology and the

  11. Electron temperatures and densities in the Venus ionosphere - Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Krehbiel, J. P.; Nagy, A. F.; Donahue, T. M.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Pedersen, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe was used to obtain altitude profiles of electron temperature and density in the ionosphere of Venus. Elevated temperatures at times of low solar wind flux might indicate support for a certain model. According to this model, less than 5% of the solar wind energy is deposited at the ionopause and is conducted downward through an unmagnetized ionosphere to the region below 200 km where electron cooling to the neutral atmosphere proceeds rapidly. The patterns of electron temperatures and densities at higher solar wind fluxes are considered, the variability of the ionopause height in the late afternoon is noted, and the role of an induced magnetic barrier in the neighborhood of the ionopause is discussed.

  12. Measuring the Electron Temperature in the Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph; SaintCyr, Orville C.; Reginald, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    We report on an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of a new method to obtain the electron temperature and flow speed in the solar corona by observing the visible Kcoronal spectrum during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya. Results show that this new method is indeed feasible, giving electron temperatures and speeds of 1.10 $\\pm$ 0.05 MK, 103.0 $\\pm$ 92.0 $kmsA{-l}$; 0.98 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-1)s; 0.70 $\\pm$ 0.08 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l)$ at l.l{\\it R)$ {\\odot}$ in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and 0.93 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l}$ at 1.2{\\it R}$ {\\odot}$ in the solar east. This new technique could be easily used from a space-based platform in a coronagraph to produce two dimensional maps of the electron temperature and bulk flow speed at the base of the solar wind useful for the study of heliospheric structure and space weather.

  13. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  14. Correlation between excitation temperature and electron temperature with two groups of electron energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hoyong; Choe, Wonho; You, S. J.

    2010-10-15

    The relationship between the electron excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) determined by optical emission spectroscopy and the electron temperature (T{sub e}) using a rf-compensated Langmuir probe was investigated in argon capacitively coupled plasmas. In the experiment performed at the gas pressure range of 30 mTorr to 1 Torr and the rf power range of 5-37 W, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) obtained from the probe current versus voltage characteristic curve showed two energy groups of electrons. The measured EEPF demonstrated that the electron energy distribution changed from Druyvesteyn to single Maxwellian as the discharge current was increased and from bi-Maxwellian to Druyvesteyn as the pressure was increased. As a result, T{sub exc} showed a tendency identical to that of T{sub e} of the high energy part of electrons as pressure and rf power were varied. This suggests that electron temperature can be determined from the measured T{sub exc} through a calibration experiment by which the ratio between electron and excitation temperatures is measured.

  15. Impact of stratospheric aircraft on calculations of nitric acid trihydrate cloud surface area densities using NMC temperatures and 2D model constituent distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, David B.; Douglass, Anne R.

    1994-01-01

    A parameterization of NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) clouds is developed for use in 2D models of the stratosphere. The parameterization uses model distributions of HNO3 and H2O to determine critical temperatures for NAT formation as a function of latitude and pressure. National Meteorological Center temperature fields are then used to determine monthly temperature frequency distributions, also as a function of latitude and pressure. The fractions of these distributions which fall below the critical temperatures for NAT formation are then used to determine the NAT cloud surface area density for each location in the model grid. By specifying heterogeneous reaction rates as functions of the surface area density, it is then possible to assess the effects of the NAT clouds on model constituent distributions. We also consider the increase in the NAT cloud formation in the presence of a fleet of stratospheric aircraft. The stratospheric aircraft NO(x) and H2O perturbations result in increased HNO3 as well as H2O. This increases the probability of NAT formation substantially, especially if it is assumed that the aircraft perturbations are confined to a corridor region.

  16. Effect of strong phonon-phonon coupling on the temperature dependent structural stability and frequency shift of 2D hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Anees, P; Valsakumar, M C; Panigrahi, B K

    2016-01-28

    The temperature dependent structural stability, frequency shift and linewidth of 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are studied using a combination of lattice dynamics (LD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The in-plane lattice parameter shows a negative thermal expansion in the whole computed temperature range (0-2000 K). When the in-plane lattice parameter falls below the equilibrium value, the quasi-harmonic bending (ZA) mode frequency becomes imaginary along the Γ-M direction in the Brillouin zone, leading to a structural instability of the 2D sheet. The ZA mode is seen to be stabilized in the dispersion obtained from MD simulations, due to the automatic incorporation of higher order phonon scattering processes in MD, which are absent in a quasi-harmonic dispersion. The mode resolved phonon spectra computed with a quasi-harmonic method predict a blueshift of the longitudinal and transverse (LO/TO) optic mode frequencies with an increase in temperature. On the other hand, both canonical (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensembles predict a redshift with an increase in temperature, which is more prominent in the NVT ensemble. The strong phonon-phonon coupling dominates over the thermal contraction effect and leads to a redshift in LO/TO mode frequency in the NPT ensemble simulations. The out-of-plane (ZO) optic mode quasi-harmonic frequencies are redshifted due to a membrane effect. The phonon-phonon coupling effects in the NVT and NPT ensemble simulations lead to a further reduction in the ZO mode frequencies. The linewidth of the LO/TO and ZO mode frequencies increases in a monotonic fashion. The temperature dependence of acoustic modes is also analyzed. The quasi-harmonic calculations predict a redshift of ZA mode, and at the same time the TA (transverse acoustic) and LA (longitudinal acoustic) mode frequencies are blueshifted. The strong phonon-phonon coupling in MD simulations causes a redshift of the LA and TA mode frequencies, while the ZA mode

  17. Crystal structure and temperature-dependent fluorescent property of a 2D cadmium (II) complex based on 3,6-dibromobenzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Guo, Yu; Wei, Yan-Hui; Guo, Jie; Wang, Xing-Po; Sun, Dao-Feng

    2013-04-01

    A new cadmium (II) organic coordination polymers [Cd(dbtec)0.5(H2O)3]·H2O (1), has been constructed based on 3,6-dibromobenzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (H4dbtec), and characterized by elemental analysis (EA), infrared spectroscopy (IR), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In 1, μ2-η1:η1 and μ4-η2:η2 dbtec ligands link four hepta-coordinated CdII ions to form a 2D 44 topological layer structure, which is further connected into an interesting 3D network by hydrogen bond and Br⋯O halogen bond. Moreover, the thermal stabilities, solid ultraviolet spectroscopy and temperature-dependent fluorescent properties of 1 were investigated.

  18. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  19. Perspectives on high temperature superconducting electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1990-01-01

    The major challenges in making high temperature superconducting (HTSC) electronics viable are predominantly materials problems. Unlike their predecessors the metal oxide-based superconductors are integratable with other advanced technologies such as opto-electronics and micro-electronics. The materials problems to be addressed relate to the epitaxial growth of high quality films, highly oriented films on non-lattice matched substrates, heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces of junctions and other novel devices, and the processing of these films with negligible deterioration of the superconducting properties. These issues are illustrated with results based on films prepared in-situ by a pulsed laser deposition process. Films with zero-transition temperatures of 90 K and critical current densities of 5 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K have been prepared by this technique. Ultra-thin films, less than 100 A show T(sub c) is greater than 80 K, supporting the idea of two-dimensional transport in these materials. By the use of appropriate buffer layers, films with T(sub c) of 87 K and J(sub c) of 6 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm were fabricated on silicon substrates. Submicron structures with J(sub c) is greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) at 10 K were fabricated. Results on nonlinear switching elements, IR detectors, and microwave studies will be briefly summarized.

  20. Perspectives on high temperature superconducting electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1991-01-01

    The major challenges in making high temperature superconducting (HTSC) electronics viable are predominantly materials problems. Unlike their predecessors, the metal oxide-based superconductors are integratable with other advanced technologies such as opto-electronics and micro-electronics. The materials problems to be addressed relate to the epitaxial growth of high quality films, highly oriented films on non-lattice matched substrates, heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces of junctions and other novel devices, and the processing of these films with negligible deterioration of the superconducting properties. These issues are illustrated with results based on films prepared in-situ by a pulsed laser deposition process. Films with zero-transition temperatures of 90 K and critical current densities of 5 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K have been prepared by this technique. Ultra-thin films, less than 100 A show T(sub c) is greater than 80 K, supporting the idea of two-dimensional transport in these materials. By the use of appropriate buffer layers, films with T(sub c) of 87 K and J(sub c) of 6 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm were fabricated on silicon substrates. Submicron structures with J(sub c) is greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) at 10 K were fabricated. Results on nonlinear switching elements, IR detectors, and microwave studies will be briefly summarized.

  1. EHW Approach to Temperature Compensation of Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Efforts are under way to apply the concept of evolvable hardware (EHW) to compensate for variations, with temperature, in the operational characteristics of electronic circuits. To maintain the required functionality of a given circuit at a temperature above or below the nominal operating temperature for which the circuit was originally designed, a new circuit would be evolved; moreover, to obtain the required functionality over a very wide temperature range, there would be evolved a number of circuits, each of which would satisfy the performance requirements over a small part of the total temperature range. The basic concepts and some specific implementations of EHW were described in a number of previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, namely, "Reconfigurable Arrays of Transistors for Evolvable Hardware" (NPO-20078), Vol. 25, No. 2 (February 2001), page 36; Evolutionary Automated Synthesis of Electronic Circuits (NPO- 20535), Vol. 26, No. 7 (July 2002), page 37; "Designing Reconfigurable Antennas Through Hardware Evolution" (NPO-20666), Vol. 26, No. 7 (July 2002), page 38; "Morphing in Evolutionary Synthesis of Electronic Circuits" (NPO-20837), Vol. 26, No. 8 (August 2002), page 31; "Mixtrinsic Evolutionary Synthesis of Electronic Circuits" (NPO-20773) Vol. 26, No. 8 (August 2002), page 32; and "Synthesis of Fuzzy-Logic Circuits in Evolvable Hardware" (NPO-21095) Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 38. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: EHW is characterized as evolutionary in a quasi-genetic sense. The essence of EHW is to construct and test a sequence of populations of circuits that function as incrementally better solutions of a given design problem through the selective, repetitive connection and/or disconnection of capacitors, transistors, amplifiers, inverters, and/or other circuit building blocks. The connection and disconnection can be effected by use of field-programmable transistor arrays (FPTAs). The evolution is guided by a search

  2. Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, Larry H.

    1994-01-01

    This document lists the scientific accomplishments of the Orbiter Electron Temperature Probe (OETP) group. The OETP instrument was fabricated in 1976, integrated into the PVO spacecraft in 1977, and placed in orbit about Venus in December 1978. The instrument operated flawlessly for nearly 14 years until PVO was lost as it entered the Venusian atmosphere in October 1992. The OETP group worked closely with other PVO investigators to examine the Venus ionosphere and its interactions with the solar wind. After the mission was completed we continued to work with the scientist selected for the Venus Data Analysis Program (VDAP), and this is currently leading to additional publications.

  3. Two dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bihe

    An innovative plasma diagnostic technique, electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), was successfully developed and implemented on the TEXT-U and RTP tokamaks for the study of plasma electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. Due to the high spatial and temporal resolution of this new diagnostic, plasma filamentation was observed during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in TEXT-U, and was identified as multiple rotating magnetic islands. In RTP, under special plasma conditions, evidence for magnetic bubbling was first observed, which is characterized by the flattening of the electron temperature and pressure profiles over a small annular region of about 1-2 cm extent near the q = 2 surface. More important results arose from the detailed study of the broadband plasma turbulence in TEXT-U and RTP. With the first measurements of poloidal wavenumbers and dispersion relations, turbulent Te fluctuations in the confinement region of TEXT-U plasmas were identified as electron drift wave turbulence. The fluctuation amplitude is found to follow the mixing length scaling, and the fluctuation-induced conducted- heat flux can account for the observed anomalous energy transport in TEXT-U. In RTP, detailed ECEI study of broadband Te fluctuations has shown that many characteristics of the observed fluctuations are consistent with the predictions of toroidal ηi mode theory. These include the global dependence of the fluctuation frequency and amplitude on the plasma density and current. The measured isotope and impurity scalings quantitatively match the predictions of toroidal ηi mode theory. The ECEI measurements in combination with ECRH modification of T e profiles argue against the Te gradients serving as the driving force of the turbulence. With the detailed 2- D measurements of the fluctuation distribution over the plasma minor cross-section, large scale, coherent structures similar to the eigenmode structures predicted by toroidal ηi mode theory

  4. Probing environment fluctuations by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular systems at temperatures below 5 K.

    PubMed

    Rancova, Olga; Jankowiak, Ryszard; Abramavicius, Darius

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic and room temperatures reveals excitation energy relaxation and transport, as well as vibrational dynamics, in molecular systems. These phenomena are related to the spectral densities of nuclear degrees of freedom, which are directly accessible by means of hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing approaches at low temperatures (few K). The 2D spectroscopy, in principle, should reveal more details about the fluctuating environment than the 1D approaches due to peak extension into extra dimension. By studying the spectral line shapes of a dimeric aggregate at low temperature, we demonstrate that 2D spectra have the potential to reveal the fluctuation spectral densities for different electronic states, the interstate correlation of static disorder and, finally, the time scales of spectral diffusion with high resolution.

  5. Probing environment fluctuations by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular systems at temperatures below 5 K

    SciTech Connect

    Rancova, Olga; Abramavicius, Darius; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic and room temperatures reveals excitation energy relaxation and transport, as well as vibrational dynamics, in molecular systems. These phenomena are related to the spectral densities of nuclear degrees of freedom, which are directly accessible by means of hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing approaches at low temperatures (few K). The 2D spectroscopy, in principle, should reveal more details about the fluctuating environment than the 1D approaches due to peak extension into extra dimension. By studying the spectral line shapes of a dimeric aggregate at low temperature, we demonstrate that 2D spectra have the potential to reveal the fluctuation spectral densities for different electronic states, the interstate correlation of static disorder and, finally, the time scales of spectral diffusion with high resolution.

  6. A summary of high-temperature electronics research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, F.V.; King, D.B.

    1991-10-18

    Current and future needs in automative, aircraft, space, military, and well logging industries require operation of electronics at higher temperatures than today's accepted limit of 395 K. Without the availability of high-temperature electronics, many systems must operate under derated conditions or must accept severe mass penalties required by coolant systems to maintain electronic temperatures below critical levels. This paper presents ongoing research and development in the electronics community to bring high-temperature electronics to commercial realization. Much of this work was recently reviewed at the First International High-Temperature Electronics Conference held 16--20 June 1991 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; Wang, Y; Ristic, Z; Bruno, F Y; de la Torre, A; Riccò, S; Plumb, N C; Shi, M; Hlawenka, P; Sánchez-Barriga, J; Varykhalov, A; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Diebold, U; Mesot, J; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Radovic, M; Baumberger, F

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs. PMID:27064529

  8. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; Wang, Y; Ristic, Z; Bruno, F Y; de la Torre, A; Riccò, S; Plumb, N C; Shi, M; Hlawenka, P; Sánchez-Barriga, J; Varykhalov, A; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Diebold, U; Mesot, J; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Radovic, M; Baumberger, F

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  9. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; McKeown Walker, S.; Tamai, A.; Wang, Y.; Ristic, Z.; Bruno, F. Y.; de la Torre, A.; Riccò, S.; Plumb, N. C.; Shi, M.; Hlawenka, P.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Varykhalov, A.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; King, P. D. C.; Meevasana, W.; Diebold, U.; Mesot, J.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Radovic, M.; Baumberger, F.

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  10. Electron temperature measurements in mid-latitude sporadic E layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, S. R.; Smith, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    By using rocket-borne Langmuir probes, electron temperature profiles have been obtained in five mid-latitude sporadic E layers. The data show the electron temperature within the layers to be lower than the electron temperature at the adjacent altitudes. This is consistent with the layers' being maintained by a vertical redistribution of ionization. The magnitude of the observed electron temperature variation is, however, larger than expected.

  11. Diagnosis of gas temperature, electron temperature, and electron density in helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Zhengshi; Zhang Guanjun; Shao Xianjun; Zhang Zenghui

    2012-07-15

    The optical emission spectra of helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are captured with a three grating spectrometer. The grating primary spectrum covers the whole wavelength range from 200 nm to 900 nm, with the overlapped grating secondary spectrum appearing from 500 nm to 900 nm, which has a higher resolution than that of the grating primary spectrum. So the grating secondary spectrum of OH (A{sup 2}{Sigma} {sup +}({upsilon} Prime = 0) {yields} X{sup 2}{Pi}({upsilon} Double-Prime = 0)) is employed to calculate the gas temperature (T{sub g}) of helium APPJ. Moreover, the electron temperature (T{sub e}) is deduced from the Maxwellian electron energy distribution combining with T{sub g}, and the electron density (n{sub e}) is extracted from the plasma absorbed power. The results are helpful for understanding the physical property of APPJs.

  12. Effects of Pauli, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on electronic states in 2D circular hydrogenic anti-dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuali, Z.; Golshan, M. M.; Davatolhagh, S.

    2016-09-01

    The present work is concerned with a report on the effects of Pauli, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) on the energy levels of a 2D circular hydrogenic quantum anti-dot(QAD). To pursue this aim, we first present a brief review on the analytical solutions to the Schrödinger equation of electronic states in a quantum anti-dot when a hydrogenic donor is placed at the center, revealing the degeneracies involved in the ground, first and second excited states. We then proceed by adding the aforementioned spin-orbit interactions to the Hamiltonian and treat them as perturbation, thereby, calculating the energy shifts to the first three states. As we show, the Rashba spin-orbit interaction gives rise to a shift in the energies of the ground and second excited states, while it partially lifts the degeneracy of the first excited state. Our calculations also indicate that the Dresselhaus effect, while keeping the degeneracy of the ground and second excited states intact, removes the degeneracy of the first excited state in the opposite sense. The Pauli spin-orbit interaction, on the other hand, is diagonal in the appropriate bases, and thus its effect is readily calculated. The results show that degeneracy of ℓ = 0 (prevailing in the ground and second excited state) remains but the degeneracy of ℓ = 1 (prevailing in the first excited state) is again partially lifted. Moreover, we present the energy corrections due to the three spin-orbit interactions as functions of anti-dot's radius, Rashba and Dresselhaus strengths discussing how they affect the corresponding states. The material presented in the article conceives the possibility of generating spin currents in the hydrogenic circular anti-dots.

  13. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  14. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  15. Three- to two-dimensional transition of the electronic structure in CaFe2As2: a parent compound for an iron arsenic high-temperature superconductor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Kondo, Takeshi; Ni, Ni; Palczewski, A D; Bostwick, A; Samolyuk, G D; Khasanov, R; Shi, M; Rotenberg, E; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C; Kaminski, A

    2009-04-24

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the electronic properties of CaFe2As2-parent compound of a pnictide superconductor. We find that the structural and magnetic transition is accompanied by a three- to two-dimensional (3D-2D) crossover in the electronic structure. Above the transition temperature (T_{s}) Fermi surfaces around Gamma and X points are cylindrical and quasi 2D. Below T_{s}, the Gamma pocket forms a 3D ellipsoid, while the X pocket remains quasi 2D. This finding strongly suggests that low dimensionality plays an important role in understanding the superconducting mechanism in pnictides. PMID:19518747

  16. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  17. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  18. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Narges; Germaschewski, Kai; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron-free energy so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  19. Low-Resistance 2D/2D Ohmic Contacts: A Universal Approach to High-Performance WSe2, MoS2, and MoSe2 Transistors.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsun-Jen; Chamlagain, Bhim; Koehler, Michael; Perera, Meeghage Madusanka; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David; Tománek, David; Zhou, Zhixian

    2016-03-01

    We report a new strategy for fabricating 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts for a variety of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) using van der Waals assembly of substitutionally doped TMDs as drain/source contacts and TMDs with no intentional doping as channel materials. We demonstrate that few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors (FETs) with 2D/2D contacts exhibit low contact resistances of ∼0.3 kΩ μm, high on/off ratios up to >10(9), and high drive currents exceeding 320 μA μm(-1). These favorable characteristics are combined with a two-terminal field-effect hole mobility μFE ≈ 2 × 10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature, which increases to >2 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at cryogenic temperatures. We observe a similar performance also in MoS2 and MoSe2 FETs with 2D/2D drain and source contacts. The 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts presented here represent a new device paradigm that overcomes a significant bottleneck in the performance of TMDs and a wide variety of other 2D materials as the channel materials in postsilicon electronics.

  20. Low-temperature bonding of temperature-resistant electronic connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peluso, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Bonding of flat metal surfaces utilizes low temperature melting intermediate material, pulse heating, and pressure application to produce strong, electrically conductive bond resistant to melting at temperatures well above melting point of intermediate material. Little or no intermediate material remains at the interface.

  1. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  2. Ion and electron temperatures in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munninghoff, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical ion and electron temperatures in the topside ionosphere were investigated. Experimental results came from an analysis of incoherent scatter data taken at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Consideration of the energy balance equations gave the theoretical ion and electron temperatures.

  3. Control of electron temperature and space potential gradients by superposition of thermionic electrons on electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chanho; Kaneko, Toshiro; Tamura, Shuichi; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2010-05-01

    An electron temperature gradient (ETG) is formed perpendicular to the magnetic field lines by superimposing low-temperature thermionic electrons emitted from a tungsten hot plate upon high-temperature electrons of an electron cyclotron resonance plasma, which pass through two different-shaped mesh grids. The radial profile of the plasma space potential can be controlled independent of the ETG by changing the bias voltages of the hot plate.

  4. Low-temperature electron microscopy: techniques and protocols.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Roland A

    2015-01-01

    Low-temperature electron microscopy endeavors to provide "solidification of a biological specimen by cooling with the aim of minimal displacement of its components through the use of low temperature as a physical fixation strategy" (Steinbrecht and Zierold, Cryotechniques in biological electron microscopy. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, p 293, 1987). The intention is to maintain confidence that the tissue observed retains the morphology and dimensions of the living material while also ensuring soluble cellular components are not displaced. As applied to both scanning and transmission electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy is a strategy whereby the application of low-temperature techniques are used to reduce or remove processing artifacts which are commonly encountered in more conventional room temperature electron microscopy techniques which rely heavily on chemical fixation and heavy metal staining. Often, cryo-electron microscopy allows direct observation of specimens, which have not been stained or chemically fixed.

  5. Determining electron temperature and density in a hydrogen microwave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Gicquel, Alix; Hassouni, Khaled; Lefebvre, Michel

    1993-01-01

    A three-temperature thermo-chemical model is developed for analyzing the chemical composition and energy states of a hydrogen microwave plasma used for studying diamond deposition. The chemical and energy exchange rate coefficients are determined from cross section data, assuming Maxwellian velocity distributions for electrons. The model is reduced to a zero-dimensional problem to solve for the electron temperature and ion mole fraction, using measured vibrational and rotational temperatures. The calculations indicate that the electron temperature may be determined to within a few percent error even though the uncertainty in dissociation fraction is many times larger.

  6. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  7. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  8. First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, Randy Allen

    2006-04-01

    On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

  9. Rocket measurements of electron temperature in the E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. K., Jr.; Smith, L. G.

    1980-01-01

    The rocket borne equipment, experimental method, and data reduction techniques used in the measurement of electron temperature in the E region are fully described. Electron temperature profiles from one daytime equatorial flight and two nighttime midlatitude flights are discussed. The last of these three flights, Nike Apache 14.533, showed elevated E region temperatures which are interpreted as the heating effect of a stable auroral red arc.

  10. Rocket-borne measurements of electron temperature and density with the Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Widholm, M.; Lessard, M. R.; Riley, P.; Heavisides, J.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Determining electron temperature in the ionosphere is a fundamentally important measurement for space science. Obtaining measurements of electron temperatures at high altitudes (>700 km) is difficult because of limitations on ground-based radar and classic spacecraft instrumentation. In light of these limitations, the rocket-borne Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer (ERPA) was developed to allow for accurate in situ measurement of ionospheric electron temperature with a simple and low-resource instrument. The compact ERPA, a traditional retarding potential analyzer with multiple baffle collimators, allows for a straightforward calculation of electron temperature. Since its first mission in 2004, it has amassed significant flight heritage and obtained data used in multiple studies investigating a myriad of phenomena related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In addition to highlighting the scientific contributions of the ERPA instrument, this paper outlines its theory and operation, the methodology used to obtain electron temperature measurements, and a comparative study suggesting that the ERPA can also provide electron density measurements.

  11. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-15

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature T{sub e} is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain T{sub e} by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature T{sub e} obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures T{sub eff} derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  12. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-01

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature Te is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain Te by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature Te obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures Teff derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  13. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically <1 K. Here we show that electron thermal excitation can be effectively suppressed at room temperature, and energy-suppressed electrons, whose energy distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature. PMID:25204839

  14. Comparative electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics in TCABR plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, M. P.; Figueiredo, A. C. A.; Berni, L. A.; Machida, M.

    2010-10-15

    We present the first simultaneous measurements of the Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission radiometer diagnostics performed at TCABR tokamak with Alfven wave heating. The Thomson scattering diagnostic is an upgraded version of the one previously installed at the ISTTOK tokamak, while the electron cyclotron emission radiometer employs a heterodyne sweeping radiometer. For purely Ohmic discharges, the electron temperature measurements from both diagnostics are in good agreement. Additional Alfven wave heating does not affect the capability of the Thomson scattering diagnostic to measure the instantaneous electron temperature, whereas measurements from the electron cyclotron emission radiometer become underestimates of the actual temperature values.

  15. Temperature enhancement of secondary electron emission from hydrogenated diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Akhvlediani, R.; Michaelson, Sh.; Hoffman, A.

    2009-09-15

    The effect of temperature on the stability of the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield from approx100-nm-thick continuous diamond films is reported. At room temperature, the SEE yield was found to decay as a function of electron irradiation dose. The SEE yield is observed to increase significantly upon heating of the diamond surface. Furthermore, by employing moderate temperatures, the decay of the SEE yield observed at room temperature is inhibited, showing a nearly constant yield with electron dose at 200 deg. C. The results are explained in terms of the temperature dependence of the electron beam-induced hydrogen desorption from the diamond surface and surface band bending. These findings demonstrate that the longevity of diamond films in practical applications of SEE can be increased by moderate heating.

  16. Electron-temperature dependence of dissociative recombination of electrons with N2/+/.N2 dimer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, M.; Biondi, M. A.; Johnsen, R.

    1981-01-01

    The variation with electron temperature of the dissociative recombination of electrons with N2(+).N2 dimer ions is investigated in light of the importance of such ions in the lower ionosphere and in laser plasmas. Dissociative recombination coefficients were determined by means of a microwave afterglow mass spectrometer technique for electron temperatures from 300-5600 K and an ion and neutral temperature of 300 K. The recombination coefficient is found to be proportional to the -0.41 power of the electron temperature in this range, similar to that observed for the CO(+).CO dimer ion and consistent with the expected energy dependence for a fast dissociative process.

  17. High temperature electronics and instrumentation seminar proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Veneruso, A.F.; Arnold, C.; Simpson, R.S.

    1980-05-01

    This seminar was tailored to address the needs of the borehole logging industry and to stimulate the development and application of this technology, for logging geothermal, hot oil and gas, and steam injection wells. The technical sessions covered the following topics: hybrid circuits, electronic devices, transducers, cables and connectors, materials, mechanical tools and thermal protection. Thirty-eight papers are included. Separate entries were prepared for each one. (MHR)

  18. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  19. A deterministic solver for the transport of the AlGaN/GaN 2D electron gas including hot-phonon and degeneracy effects

    SciTech Connect

    Galler, M. . E-mail: galler@itp.tu-graz.ac.at; Schuerrer, F. . E-mail: schuerrer@itp.tu-graz.ac.at

    2005-12-10

    The transport of the two-dimensional electron gas formed at an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure in the presence of strain polarization fields is investigated. For this purpose, we develop a deterministic multigroup model to the Boltzmann transport equations. The envelope wave functions for the confined electrons are calculated using a self-consistent Poisson-Schroedinger solver. The electron gas degeneracy and hot phonons are included in our transport equations. Numerical results are given for the dependence of macroscopic quantities on the electric field strength and on time and for the electron and phonon distribution functions. We compare our results to those of Monte Carlo simulations and with experiments.

  20. Temperature Coefficient of Secondary Electron Emission: A Novel Thermal Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Imran; Lubner, Sean Daniel; Ogletree, David Frank; Wong, Ed; Dames, Chris

    State of the art nanoscale temperature mapping techniques include Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) and optical thermoreflectance, though these have the challenges of requiring sample contact and being diffraction limited, respectively. Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) can beat the diffraction limit but still cannot measure temperature at 10s of nanometer resolution. SEM is well known for topographic imaging but has not been previously used for thermal mapping. Past literature suggested that secondary electron yields might have a small temperature dependence due to electron-phonon scattering and/or temperature dependence of work function. We previously measured the temperature coefficient of secondary electron emission of several group IV and III-V semiconductors and found it to range from around 100 to 1000 ppm/K. Here, we utilize this to map a spatial temperature gradient in an SEM image. We implement a double-heater structure to produce a temperature gradient along the plane of a substrate. The primary electron beam is scanned across the sample's surface while the emitted (secondary plus backscattered) electron current and net absorbed sample currents are simultaneously recorded. The results demonstrate the ability to map a spatial temperature gradient.

  1. High temperature electronic excitation and ionization rates in gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Frederick

    1991-01-01

    The relaxation times for electronic excitation due to electron bombardment of atoms was found to be quite short, so that electron kinetic temperature (T sub e) and the electron excitation temperature (T asterisk) should equilibrate quickly whenever electrons are present. However, once equilibrium has been achieved, further energy to the excited electronic states and to the kinetic energy of free electrons must be fed in by collisions with heavy particles that cause vibrational and electronic state transitions. The rate coefficients for excitation of electronic states produced by heavy particle collision have not been well known. However, a relatively simple semi-classical theory has been developed here which is analytic up to the final integration over a Boltzmann distribution of collision energies; this integral can then be evaluated numerically by quadrature. Once the rate coefficients have been determined, the relaxation of electronic excitation energy can be evaluated and compared with the relaxation rates of vibrational excitation. Then the relative importance of these two factors, electronic excitation and vibrational excitation by heavy particle collision, on the transfer of energy to free electron motion, can be assessed.

  2. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  3. Ion temperature effects on magnetotail Alfvén wave propagation and electron energization: ION TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON ALFVÉN WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Chaston, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    A new 2-D self-consistent hybrid gyrofluid-kinetic electron model in dipolar coordinates is presented and used to simulate dispersive-scale Alfvén wave pulse propagation from the equator to the ionosphere along an L = 10 magnetic field line. The model is an extension of the hybrid MHD-kinetic electron model that incorporates ion Larmor radius corrections via the kinetic fluid model of Cheng and Johnson (1999). It is found that consideration of a realistic ion to electron temperature ratio decreases the propagation time of the wave from the plasma sheet to the ionosphere by several seconds relative to a ρi=0 case (which also implies shorter timing for a substorm onset signal) and leads to significant dispersion of wave energy perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Additionally, ion temperature effects reduce the parallel current and electron energization all along the field line for the same magnitude perpendicular electric field perturbation.

  4. 100 eV electron temperatures in the Maryland centrifugal experiment observed using electron Bernstein emission

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R. R.; Romero-Talamás, C. A.; Young, W. C.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.

    2014-06-15

    Thermal electron Bernstein emission has been observed at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency at the mid-plane of the Maryland Centrifugal eXperiment. The emission is received in the X-mode polarization and coupled to the Bernstein wave by the B-X mode conversion process. The average B-X coupling efficiency is approximately 20%. The observed emission indicates thermal electron temperatures an excess of 100 eV in the core of the rotating plasma. The measured electron temperature is consistent with recent ion temperature measurements and indicates that the total energy confinement time exceeds 500 μs.

  5. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  6. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases.

  7. Transport Properties of 2D-Electron Gas in a InGaAs/GaAs DQW in a Vicinity of Low Magnetic-Field-Induced Insulator-Quantum Hall Liquid Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapov, Yu. G.; Yakunin, M. V.; Gudina, S. V.; Harus, G. I.; Neverov, V. N.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Podgornyh, S. M.; Uskova, E. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2007-04-01

    The resistivity ρ of low mobility dilute 2D-elecron gas in a InGaAs/GaAs double quantum well (DQW) exhibits the monotonic "insulating-like" temperature dependence (dρ/dT < 0) at T = 1.8-70K in zero magnetic field. This temperature interval corresponds to a ballistic regime (kBTτ/ℏ > 0.1) for our samples. We observed the coexistence of both the quantum Hall (QH) effect for the filling factors v = 2, 4 and the low magnetic field insulator — QH liquid (with v = 10) transition.

  8. Electronic Components and Circuits for Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior and tolerance in the electrical and thermal properties of semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial-off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low temperature applications. An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronic Program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with

  9. High-Temperature Electronics: A Role for Wide Bandgap Semiconductors?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that semiconductor based electronics that can function at ambient temperatures higher than 150 C without external cooling could greatly benefit a variety of important applications, especially-in the automotive, aerospace, and energy production industries. The fact that wide bandgap semiconductors are capable of electronic functionality at much higher temperatures than silicon has partially fueled their development, particularly in the case of SiC. It appears unlikely that wide bandgap semiconductor devices will find much use in low-power transistor applications until the ambient temperature exceeds approximately 300 C, as commercially available silicon and silicon-on-insulator technologies are already satisfying requirements for digital and analog very large scale integrated circuits in this temperature range. However, practical operation of silicon power devices at ambient temperatures above 200 C appears problematic, as self-heating at higher power levels results in high internal junction temperatures and leakages. Thus, most electronic subsystems that simultaneously require high-temperature and high-power operation will necessarily be realized using wide bandgap devices, once the technology for realizing these devices become sufficiently developed that they become widely available. Technological challenges impeding the realization of beneficial wide bandgap high ambient temperature electronics, including material growth, contacts, and packaging, are briefly discussed.

  10. Development of Electronics for Low Temperature Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott; Overton, Eric

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about -183 C. In addition to surviving the deep space harsh environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. An on-going research and development program on low temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of efficient power systems capable of surviving and exploiting the advantages of low temperature environments. Inhouse efforts include the design, fabrication, and characterization of low temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low temperature operations, such as dielectric and insulating materials, semiconductor devices, passive power components, opto-electronic devices, as well as packaging and integration of the developed components into prototype flight hardware.

  11. Preparation of cultured cells using high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution for subsequent 2D or 3D visualization in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Philippa C

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an invaluable technique used for imaging the ultrastructure of samples and it is particularly useful when determining virus-host interactions at a cellular level. The environment inside a TEM is not favorable for biological material (high vacuum and high energy electrons). Also biological samples have little or no intrinsic electron contrast, and rarely do they naturally exist in very thin sheets, as is required for optimum resolution in the TEM. To prepare these samples for imaging in the TEM therefore requires extensive processing which can alter the ultrastructure of the material. Here we describe a method which aims to minimize preparation artifacts by freezing the samples at high pressure to instantaneously preserve ultrastructural detail, then rapidly substituting the ice and infiltrating with resin to provide a firm matrix which can be cut into thin sections for imaging. Thicker sections of this material can also be imaged and reconstructed into 3D volumes using electron tomography.

  12. Local temperature of out-of-equilibrium quantum electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meair, J.; Bergfield, J. P.; Stafford, C. A.; Jacquod, Ph.

    2014-07-01

    We show how the local temperature of out-of-equilibrium, quantum electron systems can be consistently defined with the help of an external voltage and temperature probe. We determine sufficient conditions under which the temperature measured by the probe (i) is independent of details of the system-probe coupling, (ii) is equal to the temperature obtained from an independent current-noise measurement, (iii) satisfies the transitivity condition expressed by the zeroth law of thermodynamics, and (iv) is consistent with Carnot's theorem. This local temperature therefore characterizes the system in the common sense of equilibrium thermodynamics, but remains well defined even in out-of-equilibrium situations with no local equilibrium.

  13. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  14. Dissociative electron attachment to HBr: A temperature effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fedor, J.; Cingel, M.; Skalny, J. D.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T. D.; Cizek, M.; Kolorenc, P.; Horacek, J.

    2007-02-15

    The effects of rovibrational temperature on dissociative electron attachment to hydrogen bromide has been investigated from the experimental and theoretical point of view. Theoretical calculations based on the nonlocal resonance model predict a strong temperature effect on the Br{sup -} fragment ion yield due to population of higher vibrational and rotational states. A crossed beam experimental setup consisting of a temperature controlled effusive molecular beam and a trochoidal electron monochromator has been used to confirm this prediction. The high degree of agreement between experiment and theory indicates the validity of the theoretical model and its underlying physical picture.

  15. Continuous gas discharge plasma with 200 K electron temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Shannon; Robertson, Scott

    2010-03-15

    A very cold and collisional hot-filament discharge plasma is created in a vacuum chamber with an inner wall cooled by liquid nitrogen. The inner chamber (16.5 cm diameterx30 cm) has two negatively biased tungsten filaments for plasma generation and a Langmuir probe on axis for diagnostic measurements. With the wall at 140 K, 0.5-16 mA filament emission, and 1.6 mTorr carbon monoxide as the working gas, probe data give electron temperatures of 17-28 meV (197-325 K) with corresponding densities of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}. With He, Ar, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} at 140 K, the electron temperatures are >500 K. The lower electron temperature with CO is attributed to the asymmetric CO molecule having a larger cross section for electron excitation of rotational modes as a consequence of its dipole moment.

  16. Electronics for Low-Temperature Space Operation Being Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2001-01-01

    Electronic components and systems capable of low-temperature operation are needed for many future NASA missions where it is desirable to have smaller, lighter, and cheaper (unheated) spacecraft. These missions include Mars (-20 to -120 C) orbiters, landers, and rovers; Europa (-150 C) oceanic exploratory probes and instrumentation; Saturn (-183 C) and Pluto (-229 C) interplanetary probes. At the present, most electronic equipment can operate down to only -55 C. It would be very desirable to have electronic components that expand the operating temperature range down to -233 C. The successful development of these low-temperature components will eventually allow space probes and onboard electronics to operate in very cold environments (out as far as the planet Pluto). As a result, radioisotope heating units, which are used presently to keep space electronics near room temperature, will be reduced in number or eliminated. The new cold electronics will make spacecraft design and operation simpler, more flexible, more reliable, lighter, and cheaper. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are evaluating potential commercial off-the- shelf devices and are developing new electronic components that will tolerate operation at low temperatures down to -233 C. This work is being carried out mainly inhouse and also through university grants and commercial contracts. The components include analog-to-digital converters, semiconductor switches, capacitors, dielectric and packaging material, and batteries. For example, the effect of low temperature on the capacitance of three different types of capacitors is shown in the graph. Using these advanced components, system products will be developed, including dc/dc converters, battery charge/discharge management systems, digital control electronics, transducers, and sensor instrumentation.

  17. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Chowdhury, Satyajit; Palivela, Yaswanth; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-01

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  18. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Subir Chowdhury, Satyajit; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-14

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  19. Temperature-dependent kinetic measurements and quasi-classical trajectory studies for the OH(+) + H2/D2 → H2O(+)/HDO(+) + H/D reactions.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Oscar; Ard, Shaun G; Li, Anyang; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A

    2015-09-21

    We have measured the temperature-dependent kinetics for the reactions of OH(+) with H2 and D2 using a selected ion flow tube apparatus. Reaction occurs via atom abstraction to result in H2O(+)/HDO(+) + H/D. Room temperature rate coefficients are in agreement with prior measurements and resulting temperature dependences are T(0.11) for the hydrogen and T(0.25) for the deuterated reactions. This work is prompted in part by recent theoretical work that mapped a full-dimensional global potential energy surface of H3O(+) for the OH(+) + H2 → H + H2O(+) reaction [A. Li and H. Guo, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11168 (2014)], and reported results of quasi-classical trajectory calculations, which are extended to a wider temperature range and initial rotational state specification here. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with these calculations which accurately predict the isotope effect in addition to an enhancement of the reaction rate constant due to the molecular rotation of OH(+). The title reaction is of high importance to astrophysical models, and the temperature dependence of the rate coefficients determined here should now allow for better understanding of this reaction at temperatures more relevant to the interstellar medium.

  20. Temperature-dependent kinetic measurements and quasi-classical trajectory studies for the OH+ + H2/D2 → H2O+/HDO+ + H/D reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Oscar; Ard, Shaun G.; Li, Anyang; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2015-09-01

    We have measured the temperature-dependent kinetics for the reactions of OH+ with H2 and D2 using a selected ion flow tube apparatus. Reaction occurs via atom abstraction to result in H2O+/HDO+ + H/D. Room temperature rate coefficients are in agreement with prior measurements and resulting temperature dependences are T0.11 for the hydrogen and T0.25 for the deuterated reactions. This work is prompted in part by recent theoretical work that mapped a full-dimensional global potential energy surface of H3O+ for the OH+ + H2 → H + H2O+ reaction [A. Li and H. Guo, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11168 (2014)], and reported results of quasi-classical trajectory calculations, which are extended to a wider temperature range and initial rotational state specification here. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with these calculations which accurately predict the isotope effect in addition to an enhancement of the reaction rate constant due to the molecular rotation of OH+. The title reaction is of high importance to astrophysical models, and the temperature dependence of the rate coefficients determined here should now allow for better understanding of this reaction at temperatures more relevant to the interstellar medium.

  1. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for

  2. Electronic phase diagram of high-temperature copper oxide superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Utpal; Ai, Dingfei; Zhao, Junjing; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Kaminski, Adam; Raffy, Helene; Li, Zhizhong; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Randeria, Mohit; Norman, Michael R.; Campuzano, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the origin of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides, we must understand the normal state from which it emerges. Here, we examine the evolution of the normal state electronic excitations with temperature and carrier concentration in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ using angle-resolved photoemission. In contrast to conventional superconductors, where there is a single temperature scale Tc separating the normal from the superconducting state, the high-temperature superconductors exhibit two additional temperature scales. One is the pseudogap scale T∗, below which electronic excitations exhibit an energy gap. The second is the coherence scale Tcoh, below which sharp spectral features appear due to increased lifetime of the excitations. We find that T∗ and Tcoh are strongly doping dependent and cross each other near optimal doping. Thus the highest superconducting Tc emerges from an unusual normal state that is characterized by coherent excitations with an energy gap. PMID:21606341

  3. Temperature dependent structural variation from 2D supramolecular network to 3D interpenetrated metal–organic framework: In situ cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Ugale, Bharat; Singh, Divyendu; Nagaraja, C.M.

    2015-03-15

    Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds, [Zn(muco)(dbds){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (1) and [Zn(muco)(dbs)] (2) (where, muco=trans, trans-muconate dianion, dbds=4,4′-dipyridyldisulfide and dbs=4,4′-dipyridylsulfide) have been synthesized from same precursors but at two different temperatures. Both the compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and photoluminescence studies. Compound 1 prepared at room temperature possesses a molecular structure extended to 2D supramolecular network through (H–O…H) hydrogen-bonding interactions. Compound 2, obtained at high temperature (100 °C) shows a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework constituted by an in situ generated dbs linker by the cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds of dbds linker. Thus, the influence of reaction temperature on the formation of two structural phases has been demonstrated. Both 1 and 2 exhibit ligand based luminescence emission owing to n→π⁎ and π→π⁎ transitions and also high thermal stabilities. - Graphical abstract: The influence of temperature on the formation of two structural phases, a 2D supramolecular network and a 3D 3-fold interpenetrating framework has been demonstrated and their luminescence emission is measured. - Highlights: • Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds were synthesized by tuning reaction temperatures. • Temperature induced in situ generation of dbs linker has been observed. • The compounds exhibit high thermal stability and luminescence emission properties. • The effect of temperature on structure, dimension and topology has been presented.

  4. Electronic Components for use in Extreme Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electrical power management and control systems designed for use in planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electronics that are capable of efficient and reliable operation under extreme temperature conditions. Space-based infra-red satellites, all-electric ships, jet engines, electromagnetic launchers, magnetic levitation transport systems, and power facilities are also typical examples where the electronics are expected to be exposed to harsh temperatures and to operate under severe thermal swings. Most commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices are not designed to function under such extreme conditions and, therefore, new parts must be developed or the conventional devices need to be modified. For example, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. At the other end, built-in radiators and coolers render the operation of electronics possible under hot conditions. These thermal measures lead to design complexity, affect development costs, and increase size and weight. Electronics capable of operation at extreme temperatures, thus, will not only tolerate the hostile operational environment, but also make the overall system efficient, more reliable, and less expensive. The Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electronics suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices, including COTS parts, for potential use under extreme temperatures. These components include semiconductor switching devices, passive devices, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators. An overview of the program will be presented along with some experimental findings.

  5. Temperature Calibration for In Situ Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, JP; Lin, PA; Sharma, R

    2016-01-01

    In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) experiments require specimen heating holders to study material behavior in gaseous environments at elevated temperatures. In order to extract meaningful kinetic parameters, such as activation energies, it is essential to have a direct and accurate measurement of local sample temperature. This is particularly important if the sample temperature might fluctuate, for example when room temperature gases are introduced to the sample area. Using selected-area diffraction (SAD) in an ETEM, the lattice parameter of Ag nanoparticles was measured as a function of the temperature and pressure of hydrogen gas to provide a calibration of the local sample temperature. SAD permits measurement of temperature to an accuracy of ± 30 °C using Ag lattice expansion. Gas introduction can cause sample cooling of several hundred degrees celsius for gas pressures achievable in the ETEM. PMID:26441334

  6. 2D-2D tunneling field-effect transistors using WSe2/SnSe2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tania; Tosun, Mahmut; Hettick, Mark; Ahn, Geun Ho; Hu, Chenming; Javey, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials present a versatile platform for developing steep transistors due to their uniform thickness and sharp band edges. We demonstrate 2D-2D tunneling in a WSe2/SnSe2 van der Waals vertical heterojunction device, where WSe2 is used as the gate controlled p-layer and SnSe2 is the degenerately n-type layer. The van der Waals gap facilitates the regulation of band alignment at the heterojunction, without the necessity of a tunneling barrier. ZrO2 is used as the gate dielectric, allowing the scaling of gate oxide to improve device subthreshold swing. Efficient gate control and clean interfaces yield a subthreshold swing of ˜100 mV/dec for >2 decades of drain current at room temperature, hitherto unobserved in 2D-2D tunneling devices. The subthreshold swing is independent of temperature, which is a clear signature of band-to-band tunneling at the heterojunction. A maximum switching ratio ION/IOFF of 107 is obtained. Negative differential resistance in the forward bias characteristics is observed at 77 K. This work bodes well for the possibilities of two-dimensional materials for the realization of energy-efficient future-generation electronics.

  7. Revisiting 2D Lattice Based Spin Flip-Flop Ising Model: Magnetic Properties of a Thin Film and Its Temperature Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Satya Pal

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of Ising's work done in 1925 for one dimensional spin chain with periodic boundary condition. Ising observed that no phase transition occurred at finite temperature in one dimension. He erroneously generalized his views in higher dimensions but that was not true. In 1941 Kramer and Wannier obtained…

  8. Electron temperature and density measurements of laser induced germanium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hira; Arshad, Saboohi; Haq, S. U.; Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The germanium plasma produced by the fundamental harmonics (1064 nm) of Nd:YAG laser in single and double pulse configurations have been studied spectroscopically. The plasma is characterized by measuring the electron temperature using the Boltzmann plot method for neutral and ionized species and electron number density as a function of laser irradiance, ambient pressure, and distance from the target surface. It is observed that the plasma parameters have an increasing trend with laser irradiance (9-33 GW/cm2) and with ambient pressure (8-250 mbar). However, a decreasing trend is observed along the plume length up to 4.5 mm. The electron temperature and electron number density are also determined using a double pulse configuration, and their behavior at fixed energy ratio and different interpulse delays is discussed.

  9. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  10. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  11. Seasonal variations in the subauroral electron temperature enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, M.C.; Kozyra, J.U.; Warren, M.F. ); Brace, L.H. )

    1991-06-01

    The subauroral nightside electron temperature peak is one of the phenomena showing the response of the subauroral ionosphere to the influx of magnetic storm energy in the vicinity of the plasmapause. A statistical study of the seasonal variations of the subauroral electron temperature enhancement was undertaken using data from the Langmuir probe experiment on the DE 2 satellite throughout most of the mission (1981-1982). In the winter hemisphere the nighttime background electron temperature is the highest and the magnitude of the peak T{sub e} responds most weakly to the geomagnetic activity. This behavior can be explained by seasonal trends in the nighttime downward heat flux due to conjugate photoelectrons. Moreover, model results indicate that a factor of {approximately}3 increase in heat inflow during equinox relative to solstice is required to raise the electron temperature to a given level. This is a consequence of the higher electron densities at the T{sub e} peak near equinox. The T{sub e} peak occurs on field lines which thread the outer plasmasphere in the vicinity of the plasmapause and thus can be used as a tracer of the plasmapause position. Correlating the position of the T{sub e} peak with K{sub p} (the highest value of 3-hour K{sub p} in the preceding 12 hours) indicates a trend toward a more expanded quiet time plasmasphere and one which is more easily compressed by magnetic storms at equinox than during the solstice period.

  12. High-temperature electronics applications in space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    One of the most exciting applications of high-temperature electronics is related to the exploration of the planet Venus. On this planet the atmospheric temperatures range from about 170 K at elevations of 100 km to a searing 730 K near the surface. Mechanisms for exploring the atmosphere might include balloons, airplanes, surface landers, and surface-launched probes. Balloons, for example, could fly in the region from 20 (320 C at 22 bars) to 60 km (-20 C at 0.2 bar). Suitable balloon fabrics presently exclude excursions to lower altitudes; however, adequate electronic systems could survive to 325 C. Small airplanes would require more sophisticated electronics for guidance and control. Long life surface landers would most likely be developed first, as these could be used to measure long-term variations in weather. Ranging transponders would be important for ephemeris development, measurement of spin state, and studies of general relativity. Surface temperatures of 460 C and pressures of 90 bars present a challenge to the developers of such instruments. Other space applications for high-temperature electronics include transponders for the surface of Mercury, near solar drag-free orbiters, and deep atmospheric penetrators for Jupiter and Saturn. Each of these has its own particular problems with respect to instrumentation adequate to meet the desired scientific goals. This paper is primarily concerned with defining possible mission applications, the required electronic systems, and the approaches that are currently being studied for their development.

  13. The characteristic electronic structure needed for high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyper, N. C.; Edwards, P. P.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the magnon mechanism proposed by Goddard and co-workers to explain high-temperature superconductivity in oxidized cuprates can also account for such superconductivity in both oxidized barium bismuthate and the electron superconductors based on neodynium cuprate. The specific and characteristic electronic structure required for the operation of the magnon mechanism naturally accounts for why only a small number of basic types of high-temperature superconductors are currently known. This mechanism can readily explain the effects of doping cuprate superconductors with both magnetic and non-magnetic ions.

  14. Wide-Temperature Electronics for Thermal Control of Nanosats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, John Ellis; Gerber, Scott

    2000-01-01

    This document represents a presentation which examines the wide and low-temperature electronics required for NanoSatellites. In the past, larger spacecraft used Radioisotope Heating Units (RHU's). The advantage of the use of these electronics is that they could eliminate or reduce the requirement for RHU's, reduce system weight and simplify spacecraft design by eliminating containment/support structures for RHU's. The Glenn Research Center's Wide/Low Temperature Power Electronics Program supports the development of power systems capable of reliable, efficient operation over wide and low temperature ranges. Included charts review the successes and failures of various electronic devices, the IRF541 HEXFET, The NE76118n-Channel GaAS MESFET, the Lithium Carbon Monofluoride Primary Battery, and a COTS DC-DC converter. The preliminary result of wide/low temperature testing of CTS and custom parts and power circuit indicate that through careful selection of components and technologies it is possible to design and build power circuits which operate from room temperature to near 100K.

  15. Time-resolving electron temperature diagnostic for ALCATOR C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairfax, S. A.

    1984-05-01

    A diagnostic that provides time-resolved central electron temperatures was designed, built, and tested on the ALCATOR C Tokamak. The diagnostic uses an array of fixed-wavelength X-ray crystal monochromators to sample the X-ray continuum and determine the absolute electron temperature. The resolution and central energy of each channel were chosen to exclude any contributions from impurity line radiation. The need for such a diagnostic tool, the design methodology, and the results with typical ALCATOR C plasmas are described. Sawtooth (m = 1) temperature oscillations were observed after pellet fueling of the plasma. This is the first time that such oscillations were observed with an X-ray temperature diagnostic.

  16. A 2-D ECE Imaging Diagnostic for TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Deng, B. H.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, H. Lu, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    A true 2-D extension to the UC Davis ECE Imaging (ECEI) concept is under development for installation on the TEXTOR tokamak in 2003. This combines the use of linear arrays with multichannel conventional wideband heterodyne ECE radiometers to provide a true 2-D imaging system. This is in contrast to current 1-D ECEI systems in which 2-D images are obtained through the use of multiple plasma discharges (varying the scanned emission frequency each discharge). Here, each array element of the 20 channel mixer array measures plasma emission at 16 simultaneous frequencies to form a 16x20 image of the plasma electron temperature Te. Correlation techniques can then be applied to any pair of the 320 image elements to study both radial and poloidal characteristics of turbulent Te fluctuations. The system relies strongly on the development of low cost, wideband (2-18 GHz) IF detection electronics for use in both ECE Imaging as well as conventional heterodyne ECE radiometry. System details, with a strong focus on the wideband IF electronics development, will be presented. *Supported by U.S. DoE Contracts DE-FG03-95ER54295 and DE-FG03-99ER54531.

  17. A molecular dynamics study of twin width, grain size and temperature effects on the toughness of 2D-columnar nanotwinned copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabib, I.; Miller, R. E.

    2009-07-01

    The introduction of twin boundaries (TBs) within nanocrystalline grains has given scientists an opportunity to enhance mechanical properties that are usually mutually exclusive: strength and ductility. This research is focused on developing a complete understanding of the influences of twin width, grain size and temperature on the deformation characteristics and properties of nanotwinned Cu by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation results have shown that a material's toughness can be enhanced by introducing nanotwins, and the enhancement is more pronounced for the higher twin density structures and at lower temperatures. Nanotwinned grains are found to be highly anisotropic in their plastic response; ductile along TBs but strong across them. A random polycrystalline sample gains toughness through the combined response of variously oriented grains. At extremely low temperature, toughness values are elevated further due to depressed dislocation activities inside the grains. The study has also revealed that, unlike twin width refinement, grain size refinement may not always yield superior properties, and may deteriorate material toughness.

  18. Optimizing the temperature compensation of an electronic pressure measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Blalock, T.V.

    1990-08-01

    In an effort to minimize temperature sensitivity, the pressure measurement channels in the sensor/electronics modules of a high-resolution multiplexed pressure measurement system were analyzed. The pressure sensor (a silicon diaphragm strain gage) was known to have two temperature-dependent parameters. Component testing revealed that the current source driving the pressure sensor was also temperature sensitive. Although the transducer manufacturer supplies empirically selected temperature compensation resistors with each transducer, it was determined that the temperature sensitivity compensation could be optimized for this application by changing one of these resistors. By modifying the value of the sensitivity compensation resistor to optimize performance in this application, the temperature sensitivity of the pressure measurement channels was reduced by more than 60%.

  19. Controlled Confinement of Half-metallic 2D Electron Gas in BaTiO3/Ba2FeReO6/BaTiO3 Heterostructures: A First-principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Baidya, Santu; Waghmare, Umesh; Paramekanti, Arun

    Using density functional theory calculations, we establish that the half-metallicity of bulk Ba2FeReO6 survives down i to 1 nm thickness in BaTiO3/Ba2FeReO6/BaTiO3 heterostructures grown along the (001) and (111) directions. The confinement of the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas in this quantum well structure arises from the suppressed hybridization between Re/Fe d states and unoccupied Ti d states, and it is further strengthened by polar fields for the (111) direction. This mechanism, distinct from the polar catastrophe, leads to an order of magnitude stronger confinement of the 2D electron gas than that at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. We further show low-energy bands of (111) heterostructure display nontrivial topological character. Our work opens up the possibility of realizing ultra-thin spintronic devices. Journal Ref: Phys. Rev. B 92, 161106(R) (2015) S.B. and T.S.D thank Department of Science and Technology, India for the support through Thematic Unit of Excellence. AP was supported by NSERC (Canada).

  20. Small-angle shubnikov-de haas measurements in a 2D electron system: the effect of a strong In-plane magnetic field

    PubMed

    Vitkalov; Zheng; Mertes; Sarachik; Klapwijk

    2000-09-01

    Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of 2 increase of the frequency of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at H>H(sat). This signals the onset of full spin polarization above H(sat), the parallel field above which the resistivity saturates to a constant value. For H

  1. A quantum dynamical comparison of the electronic couplings derived from quantum electrodynamics and Förster theory: application to 2D molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, James E.; Jones, Garth A.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate under what circumstances Förster theory of electronic (resonance) energy transfer breaks down in molecular aggregates. This is achieved by simulating the dynamics of exciton diffusion, on the femtosecond timescale, in molecular aggregates using the Liouville-von Neumann equation of motion. Specifically the focus of this work is the investigation of both spatial and temporal deviations between exciton dynamics driven by electronic couplings calculated from Förster theory and those calculated from quantum electrodynamics. The quantum electrodynamics (QED) derived couplings contain medium- and far-zone terms that do not exist in Förster theory. The results of the simulations indicate that Förster coupling is valid when the dipole centres are within a few nanometres of one another. However, as the distance between the dipole centres increases from 2 nm to 10 nm, the intermediate- and far-zone coupling terms play non-negligible roles and Förster theory begins to break down. Interestingly, the simulations illustrate how contributions to the exciton dynamics from the intermediate- and far-zone coupling terms of QED are quickly washed-out by the near-zone mechanism of Förster theory for lattices comprising closely packed molecules. On the other hand, in the case of sparsely packed arrays, the exciton dynamics resulting from the different theories diverge within the 100 fs lifetime of the trajectories. These results could have implications for the application of spectroscopic ruler techniques as well as design principles relating to energy harvesting materials.

  2. Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on O-X conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe; Zhao, Ai-Hui

    2013-10-15

    Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on Ordinary-Extraordinary (O-X) conversion in the range of electron cyclotron frequency are investigated. The modified optimal parallel refraction index, N{sub zc}, and the conversion coefficient are obtained analytically from the kinetic dispersion relation. The presence of finite electron temperature shifts the O-X conversion layer towards a region of lower density and increases the value of N{sub zc}; while the effect of electron flow depends on its direction with respect to the parallel wave vector. When the electron flow is along the parallel wave vector, N{sub zc} will be increased and the effects of finite electron temperature and finite electron flow accumulate. As a result, a more oblique incidence angle is required for efficient O-X conversion. For typical Tokamak plasmas, the efficiency of O-X conversion will decrease without the consideration of the two effects. When the electron flow is in the direction opposite to the parallel wave vector, the two effects compete, even cancel each other.

  3. Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on O-X conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe; Zhao, Ai-Hui

    2013-10-01

    Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on Ordinary-Extraordinary (O-X) conversion in the range of electron cyclotron frequency are investigated. The modified optimal parallel refraction index, Nzc, and the conversion coefficient are obtained analytically from the kinetic dispersion relation. The presence of finite electron temperature shifts the O-X conversion layer towards a region of lower density and increases the value of Nzc; while the effect of electron flow depends on its direction with respect to the parallel wave vector. When the electron flow is along the parallel wave vector, Nzc will be increased and the effects of finite electron temperature and finite electron flow accumulate. As a result, a more oblique incidence angle is required for efficient O-X conversion. For typical Tokamak plasmas, the efficiency of O-X conversion will decrease without the consideration of the two effects. When the electron flow is in the direction opposite to the parallel wave vector, the two effects compete, even cancel each other.

  4. Electron density and temperature in the solar corona from multifrequency radio imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, C.; Chambe, G.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The 2D images obtained through rotational aperture synthesis with the Nançay Radioheliograph are suitable for quantitative exploitation. First results are presented. Aims: We study the variations of the quiet corona in brightness and size during an 8-year period and derive electron density and temperature in the corona. Methods: Images at 6 frequencies between 150 and 450 MHz for 183 quiet days between 2004 and 2011 were used. Measurements of the brightness temperature Tb beyond the limb allowed coronal density models to be derived in both EW and NS radial directions, with a weak dependence on the electron temperature. The total ranges in the heliocentric distance r are 1.15-1.60 R⊙ (EW) and 1.0-1.4 R⊙ (NS). The agreement between results from different frequencies, in the ranges of r where there is overlapping shows the robustness of the method. The electron temperature, in turn, can be derived from the comparison of the observed mean spectra on the disk with those predicted through transfer calculations from the density models derived from limb observations. Results: The widths of the brightness profiles that were averaged yearly have minima at cycle minimum (2008-2009). These minima are more pronounced for EW profiles than for NS ones. The derived yearly-averaged density models along equatorial and polar diameters are consistent with isothermal and hydrostatic models. They are characterized by their density value n0 extrapolated down to the base of the corona and their scale-height temperature TH. Changes in n0 and TH with solar cycle are given for equatorial and polar regions. The kinetic temperature Te of electrons in the corona (~0.62 MK) is found to be significantly less than TH (~1.5 MK). This implies an ion temperature Ti ~ 2.2 MK. Conclusions: The yearly-averaged variations of these models are less than the dispersion between models derived from other techniques, such as white light and EUV observations, partly because these two techniques

  5. Mixing of Proton and Electron Scales - Effects of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on the Electron Firehose Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A. F.; Poedts, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    We perform kinetic linear theory instability analysis in a non-drifting anisotropic electron-proton plasma to study the effects of proton temperature anisotropies on the electron firehose instability in the collisionless solar wind. We solve the Vlasov linear theory dispersion relation for hot highly anisotropic electron-proton plasma in high-beta regime to study the behavior of the solar wind plasma close to the instability thresholds as observed by different spacecraft at 1 AU. We consider temperature and anisotropy regimes for which the electrons and the protons can interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters simultaneous electron and proton firehose instabilities can be observed with the growth rate of the electron firehose instability extending towards the proton scales. The co-existance of the proton and the electron firehose and the mixing of scales for the electromagnetic fluctuations excited by the two instabilities depends on the initial temperatures, anisotropies and angle of propagation. In the case of parallel wave propagation both left and right-hand polarized waves are simultaneously excited. As we increase the angle of propagation the electron firehose starts to dominate with excitation of large-amplitude aperiodic fluctuations over a large range of wave-numbers, starting at the protons scales and extending up to the smaller electron scales. We calculate the maximum growth rate of the oblique electron firehose as a function of the proton temperature anisotropy and discuss the implications of the electron-proton scale mixing for the observed plasma properties and instability thresholds in the undisturbed solar wind.

  6. Temperature diagnostics of ECR plasma by measurement of electron bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Kasthurirangan, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Desai, C. A.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2012-07-15

    The x-ray bremsstrahlung spectrum emitted by the electron population in a 14.5 GHz ECR plasma source has been measured using a NaI(Tl) detector, and hence the electron temperature of the higher energy electron population in the plasma has been determined. The x-ray spectra for Ne and Ar gases have been systematically studied as a function of inlet gas pressure from 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mbar to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mbar and for input microwave power {approx}1 W to {approx}300 W. At the highest input power and optimum pressure conditions, the end point bremsstrahlung energies are seen to reach {approx}700 keV. The estimated electron temperatures (T{sub e}) were found to be in the range 20 keV-80 keV. The T{sub e} is found to be peaking at a pressure of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mbar for both gases. The T{sub e} is seen to increase with increasing input power in the intermediate power region, i.e., between 100 and 200 W, but shows different behaviour for different gases in the low and high power regions. Both gases show very weak dependence of electron temperature on inlet gas pressure, but the trends in each gas are different.

  7. Proceedings of the Conference on High-temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of electronic devices for use in high temperature environments is addressed. The instrumentational needs of planetary exploration, fossil and nuclear power reactors, turbine engine monitoring, and well logging are defined. Emphasis is place on the fabrication and performance of materials and semiconductor devices, circuits and systems and packaging.

  8. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  9. Profiles of electron temperature and Bz along Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Nakamura, R.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    We study the electron temperature distribution and the structure of the current sheet along the magnetotail using simultaneous observations from THEMIS spacecraft. We perform a statistical study of 40 crossings of the current sheet when the three spacecraft THB, THC, and THD were distributed along the tail in the vicinity of midnight with coordinates XB \\in [-30 RE, -20 RE], XC \\in [-20 RE, -15 RE], and XD ~ -10 RE. We obtain profiles of the average electron temperature \\mlab Te\\mrab and the average magnetic field \\mlab Bz\\mrab along the tail. Electron temperature and \\mlab Bz\\mrab increase towards the Earth with almost the same rates (i.e., ratio \\mlab Te\\mrab/\\mlab Bz\\mrab ≈ 2 keV/7 nT is approximately constant along the tail). We also use statistics of 102 crossings of the current sheet from THB and THC to estimate dependence of Te and Bz distributions on geomagnetic activity. The ratio \\mlab Te \\mrab/\\mlab Bz\\mrab depends on geomagnetic activity only slightly. Additionally we demonstrate that anisotropy of the electron temperature \\mlab T∥/T⊥\\mrab ≈ 1.1 is almost constant along the tail for X \\in [-30 RE, -10 RE].

  10. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, G.H.; Smith, J.L.; Sim, J.W.

    1983-11-10

    This invention pertains to a high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  11. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, Gene H.; Smith, James L.; Sim, James W.

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  12. Wave-particle interaction and the nonlinear saturation of the electron temperature gradient mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Srinath; Parker, Scott E.; Chen, Yang; Howard, James E.

    2004-11-01

    It has been proposed that the electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence is responsible for experimentally relevant electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas. Significant transport levels are possible by the creation of radially elongated vortices or ``streamers" [1,2], which are sustained by the nonlinear saturation of the instability and are not susceptible to shear flow destruction, as is the case with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode. We present a dynamical system to explore the dependence of saturation level due to E × B and E_\\| motion, as well as the effect of radial elongation. With this model, we can predict the nonlinear saturation level of the ETG streamers. We compare our theoretical predictions with a 2D shear-less slab gyrokinetic electron code that includes the E_\\| nonlinearity. [1]F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M Kotschenreuther, and B.N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000). [2]C. Holland, and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3857 (2002). [3]W. M. Manheimer, Phys. Fluids 14, 579 (1971). [4]R. A. Smith, John A. Krommes, and W. W. Lee, Phys. Fluids 28, 1069 (1985).

  13. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890. PMID:26049453

  14. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  15. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890.

  16. Microwave polarization angle study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system under dc current bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad-Zahir; Liu, Han-Chun; Heimbeck, Martin S.; Everitt, Henry O.; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh G.

    Microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations followed by the vanishing resistance states are a prime representation of non-equilibrium transport phenomena in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES). The effect of a dc current bias on the nonlinear response of 2DES with microwave polarization angle under magnetic field is a subject of interest. Here, we have studied the effect of various dc current bias on microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in a high mobility 2DES. Further, we systematically investigate the effect of the microwave polarization angle on the magneto-resistance oscillations at two different frequencies 152.78 GHz and 185.76 GHz. This study aims to better understand the effects of both dc current and microwave polarization angle in the GaAs/AlGaAs system, both of which modify the observed magneto-transport properties DOE-BES, Mat'l. Sci. & Eng. Div., DE-SC0001762; ARO W911NF-14-2-0076; ARO W911NF-15-1-0433.

  17. Study of microwave reflection in the regime of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriisa, Annika; Liu, H.-C.; Samaraweera, R. L.; Heimbeck, M. S.; Everitt, H. O.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R. G.

    Microwave-induced zero-resistance-states in the photo-excited GaAs/AlGaAs system evolve from the minima of microwave photo-excited ``quarter-cycle shifted'' magnetoresistance oscillations. Such magnetoresistance oscillations are known to exhibit nodes at cyclotron resonance (hf = ℏωc) and cyclotron resonance harmonics (hf = nℏωc). Further, the effective mass extracted from the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations is known to differ from the canonical effective mass ratio for electrons in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. In an effort to reconcile this difference, we have looked for cyclotron resonance in the microwave reflection from the high mobility 2DES and attempted to correlate the observations with observed oscillatory magnetoresistance over the 30 <= f <= 330 GHz band. The results of such a study will be reported here. DOE-BES, Mat'l. Sci. & Eng. Div., DE-SC0001762; ARO W911NF-14-2-0076; ARO W911NF-15-1-0433.

  18. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  19. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J.; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry

    2015-06-07

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S{sub 2} of the Spx towards the Q{sub x} state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Q{sub x} to Q{sub y} within the B890.

  20. Engineering the Electronic Structure of 2D WS2 Nanosheets Using Co Incorporation as Cox W(1- x ) S2 for Conspicuously Enhanced Hydrogen Generation.

    PubMed

    Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Liu, Kaili; Xu, Kai; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhan, Xueying; Jiang, Chao; He, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), as one of potential electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), have been extensively studied. Such TMD-based ternary materials are believed to engender optimization of hydrogen adsorption free energy to thermoneutral value. Theoretically, cobalt is predicted to actively promote the catalytic activity of WS2 . However, experimentally it requires systematic approach to form Cox W(1- x ) S2 without any concomitant side phases that are detrimental for the intended purpose. This study reports a rational method to synthesize pure ternary Cox W(1- x ) S2 nanosheets for efficiently catalyzing HER. Benefiting from the modification in the electronic structure, the resultant material requires overpotential of 121 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) to achieve current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and shows Tafel slope of 67 mV dec(-1) . Furthermore, negligible loss of activity is observed over continues electrolysis of up to 2 h demonstrating its fair stability. The finding provides noticeable experimental support for other computational reports and paves the way for further works in the area of HER catalysis based on ternary materials. PMID:27322598

  1. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive at High Electron Temperature on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, C. C.; Austin, M. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M. A.; Prater, R.

    2007-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have measured the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency for co- and counter-injection in low density plasmas with radiation temperatures from electron cyclotron emission (ECE) above 20 keV. The radiation temperature is generally higher than the Thomson scattering temperature, indicating that there is a significant population of non-thermal electrons. The experimental ECCD profile measured with motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry is found to agree with quasi-linear theory except for the highest power density cases (QEC/ne2≫1). Radial transport of the energetic electrons with diffusion coefficients of ˜0.4 m2/s is needed to model the broadened ECCD profile at high power density.

  2. Effect of re-heating on the hot electron temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Rosen, M.

    1980-06-17

    Resonant absorption is the direct conversion of the transverse laser light to longitudinal electron plasma waves (epw) at the critical density (10/sup 21/ (1.06 ..mu..m/lambda/sub 0/)/sup 2/ cm/sup -3/). The oscillating longitudinal electric field of the epw heats the electrons by accelerating them down the density gradient to a temperature of approximately 21T/sub e//sup 0/ /sup 25/ ((I(W/cm/sup 2/)/10/sup 16/)(lambda/sub 0//1.06 ..mu..m)/sup 2/)/sup 0/ /sup 4/. This section extends the previous work by studying the effects of magnetic fields and collisions (albedo) which return the heated electrons for further heating. A magnetic field increases their temperature and collisions do not.

  3. NUBOW-2D Inelastic

    2002-01-31

    This program solves the two-dimensional mechanical equilbrium configuration of a core restraint system, which is subjected to radial temperature and flux gradients, on a time increment basis. At each time increment, the code calculates the irradiation creep and swelling strains for each duct from user-specified creep and swelling correlations. Using the calculated thermal bowing, inelastic bowing and the duct dilation, the corresponding equilibrium forces, beam deflections, total beam displacements, and structural reactivity changes are calculated.

  4. Development of Electronics for Low-Temperature Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott S.; Overton, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Electronic systems that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures will be needed for many future NASA space missions, including deep space probes and spacecraft for planetary surface exploration. In addition to being able to survive the harsh deep space environment, low-temperature electronics would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic exploration. An ongoing research and development project for the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature electronics and supporting technologies at NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on efficient power systems capable of surviving in and exploiting the advantages of low-temperature environments. Supporting technologies include dielectric and insulating materials, semiconductor devices, passive power components, optoelectronic devices, and packaging and integration of the developed components into prototype flight hardware. An overview of the project is presented, including a description of the test facilities, a discussion of selected data from component testing, and a presentation of ongoing research activities being performed in collaboration with various organizations.

  5. High Temperature Electronics for Intelligent Harsh Environment Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of intelligent instrumentation systems is of high interest in both public and private sectors. In order to obtain this ideal in extreme environments (i.e., high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation), both sensors and electronics must be developed concurrently in order that the entire system will survive for extended periods of time. The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. The advantages of SiC over conventional materials include its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical properties in harsh environments, and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  6. Electron heat transport in a steep temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; De Groot, J.S.; Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Matte, J.P.; Johnston, T.W.; Rosen, M.D.

    1989-04-01

    Temporal and spatial measurements of electron heat transport are made in the University of California Davis AURORA device (J. H. Rogers, Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Davis, 1987). In AURORA, a microwave pulse heats a region of underdense, collisional, plasma (n/n/sub cr/ approx. <1, where n/sub cr/ = 1.8 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/ is the critical density, T/sub e//sub 0/ approx. =0.15 eV, and the electron scattering mean free path lambda/sub perpendicular/approx. >2 cm). In this region, strong thermal heating (T/sub c/ approx. <0.7 eV) as well as suprathermal heating (T/sub h/approx. =3 eV) is observed. The strong heating results in a steep temperature gradient that violates the approximations of classical heat diffusion theory (L/sub T//lambda/sub perpendicular/approx. >3 for thermal electrons, where L/sub T/ = T/sub c/(partialT/sub c//partialz)/sup -1/ is the cold electron temperature scale length. The time evolution of the electron temperature profile is measured using Langmuir probes. The measured relaxation of the temperature gradient after the microwave pulse is compared to calculations using the Fokker--Planck International code (Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1936 (1982)) and the multigroup, flux-limited, target design code LASNEX (Comm. Plasma Phys. 2, 51 (1975)). The electron distribution function at the end of the microwave pulse is used as initial conditions for both codes. The Fokker--Planck calculations are found to agree very well with the measurements.

  7. Resonant tunneling modulation in quasi-2D Cu2O/SnO2 p-n horizontal-multi-layer heterostructure for room temperature H2S sensor application

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guangliang; Zhang, Mingzhe; Zou, Guangtian

    2013-01-01

    Heterostructure material that acts as resonant tunneling system is a major scientific challenge in applied physics. Herein, we report a resonant tunneling system, quasi-2D Cu2O/SnO2 p-n heterostructure multi-layer film, prepared by electrochemical deposition in a quasi-2D ultra-thin liquid layer. By applying a special half-sine deposition potential across the electrodes, Cu2O and SnO2 selectively and periodically deposited according to their reduction potentials. The as-prepared heterostructure film displays excellent sensitivity to H2S at room temperature due to the resonant tunneling modulation. Furthermore, it is found that the laser illumination could enhance the gas response, and the mechanism with laser illumination is discussed. It is the first report on gas sensing application of resonant tunneling modulation. Hence, heterostructure material act as resonant tunneling system is believed to be an ideal candidate for further improvement of room temperature gas sensing. PMID:23409241

  8. Turbulent electron transport in edge pedestal by electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.

    2013-11-15

    We present a model for turbulent electron thermal transport at the edge pedestal in high (H)-mode plasmas based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. A quasi-linear analysis of electrostatic toroidal ETG modes shows that both turbulent electron thermal diffusivity and hyper-resistivity exhibits the Ohkawa scaling in which the radial correlation length of turbulence becomes the order of electron skin depth. Combination of the Ohkawa scales and the plasma current dependence results in a novel confinement scaling inside the pedestal region. It is also shown that ETG turbulence induces a thermoelectric pinch, which may accelerate the density pedestal formation.

  9. Evidence of excited state localization and static disorder in LH2 investigated by 2D-polarization single-molecule imaging at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tubasum, Sumera; Camacho, Rafael; Meyer, Matthias; Yadav, Dheerendra; Cogdell, Richard J; Pullerits, Tõnu; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional polarization fluorescence imaging of single light harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) of Rps. acidophila was carried out to investigate the polarization properties of excitation and fluorescence emission simultaneously, at room temperature. In two separate experiments we excited LH2 with a spectrally narrow laser line matched to the absorption bands of the two chromophore rings, B800 and B850, thereby indirectly and directly triggering fluorescence of the B850 exciton state. A correlation analysis of the polarization modulation depths in excitation and emission for a large number of single complexes was performed. Our results show, in comparison to B800, that the B850 ring is a more isotropic absorber due to the excitonic nature of its excited states. At the same time, we observed a strong tendency for LH2 to emit with dipolar character, from which preferential localization of the emissive exciton, stable for minutes, is inferred. We argue that the observed effects can consistently be explained by static energetic disorder and/or deformation of the complex, with possible involvement of exciton self-trapping.

  10. Preconcentration of Aromatic Compounds in Aqueous Samples with a Polymer-coated Fiber-packed Capillary and Subsequent Temperature-programmed Elution with Water for Pseudo-2D LC Separations.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Toshiaki; Mori, Yuuhi; Kobayashi, Akira; Nakane, Kenichi; Monobe, Tomoya; Ueta, Ikuo; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    A bundle of polymer-coated filaments was successfully introduced as an extraction medium for the preconcentration of an aqueous solution of aromatic compounds. The extraction was simply carried out with pumping the aqueous sample solution to the extraction capillary at ambient temperature. The extracted analytes were sequentially eluted with a flow of pure water using temperature-programmed heating of the extraction capillary in an oven. The results clearly suggest that the polymer-coated fiber-packed capillary could be employed in the sample preparation process for the analysis of various aqueous samples. Introducing the fractions eluted from the fiber-packed capillary to a conventional microcolumn liquid chromatography (micro-LC) system via a home-made valve-based modulator, an on-line coupled extraction/separation system was developed and a possibility to a pseudo-two-dimensional (pseudo-2D) LC separation of aromatic compounds in aqueous matrices has also been demonstrated.

  11. Two-Temperature Model of Nonequilibrium Electron Relaxation:. a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Navinder

    The present paper is a review of the phenomena related to nonequilibrium electron relaxation in bulk and nano-scale metallic samples. The workable Two-Temperature Model (TTM) based on Boltzmann-Bloch-Peierls kinetic equation has been applied to study the ultra-fast (femto-second) electronic relaxation in various metallic systems. The advent of new ultra-fast (femto-second) laser technology and pump-probe spectroscopy has produced wealth of new results for micro- and nano-scale electronic technology. The aim of this paper is to clarify the TTM, conditions of its validity and nonvalidity, its modifications for nano-systems, to sum-up the progress, and to point out open problems in this field. We also give a phenomenological integro-differential equation for the kinetics of nondegenerate electrons that goes beyond the TTM.

  12. Deriving large electron temperatures and small electron densities with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Philippe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Holmberg, Mika; Lewis, Geraint; Schippers, Patricia; Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Gurnett, Donald; Coates, Andrew; Dandouras, Iannis; Waite, Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Langmuir Probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigate the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), and manage to reproduce the observations with a reasonable precision through empirical and theoretical methods. Conversely, the modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). We finally show that a significant influence of the energetic electrons (larger than the contribution of thermal ions) is also expected in various plasma environments of the Solar System, such as at Jupiter (i.e near Ganymede, Europa, Callisto and Io), or even at Earth (in the plasmasheet, the magnetosheath or in plasma cavities). Large electron temperatures and small electron densities could potentially be derived in these environments, which may be of interest for Langmuir Probes in the Earth magnetosphere or onboard the future JUICE mission at Jupiter.

  13. Measurements of Schottky barrier heights formed from metals and 2D transition metal dichalcogedides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changsik; Moon, Inyong; Nam, Seunggeol; Cho, Yeonchoo; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Park, Seongjun; Yoo, Won Jong

    Schottky barrier height (SBH) is an important parameter that needs to be considered for designing electronic devices. However, for two dimensional (2D) materials based devices, SBH control is limited by 2D structure induced quantum confinement and 2D surface induced Fermi level pinning. In this work, we explore differences in measuring SBH between 2D and 3D materials. Recently, low temperature I-V measurement has been reported to extract SBH based on thermionic emission equation for Schottky diode. However, 2D devices are not real Schottky diode in that both source and drain metal electrodes make Schottky contact. According to our experimental results, SBH extracted from linear slope of ln (I/T3/2) against 1/T show widely diverse values, dependent on applied voltage bias and tested temperature which affect carrier transport including tunneling or thermionic emission across the metal-2D material interface. In this work, we wish to demonstrate the method to determine SBH and Fermi level pinning which are attributed to 2D transition metal dichalcogedides, differently from conventional 3D materials. .

  14. Temperature evolution of strongly coupled electron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Shaffer, Nathaniel; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of electron-ion plasmas have been carried out, focusing on the classical strongly coupled regime relevant to ultracold neutral plasmas. The interaction of oppositely charged species is modeled using a pseudopotential with a repulsive core at a specified distance ɛ in units of average interparticle spacing. This parameter distinguishes classical from quantum statistical regimes. Simulations are initiated with an equilibration phase in which ions and electrons are held to fixed independent temperatures using a thermostat. Subsequently, the thermostats are removed and the system is allowed to evolve. Two effects are observed: (1) For sufficiently small values of ɛ, the plasma rapidly heats, (2) electrons and ions equilibrate on a longer time scale. The critical ɛ value for the onset of heating and the temperature equilibration rate are compared with existing theory. Excess pressure is calculated in each case based on the equilibrium radial distribution functions obtained during the equilibration phase. The Γ - ɛ phase space is explored, revealing qualitative differences in the temperature evolution due to electron-ion interactions in the classical and quantum regimes. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grant PHY-1453736.

  15. Sourcebook on high-temperature electronics and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Veneruso, A.F.

    1981-10-01

    This sourcebook summarizes the high-temperature characteristics of a number of commercially available electronic components and materials required in geothermal well-logging instruments that must operate to 275/sup 0/C. The sourcebook is written to provide a starting place for instrument designers, who need to know the high-temperature electronic products that are available and the design and performance limitations of these products. The electronic component information given includes the standard repertoire of passive devices such as resistors, capacitors, and magnetics; the active devices and integrated circuits sections emphasize silicon semiconductor JFETs and CMOS circuits; and, to complete the electronics, interconnections and packaging of hybrid microelectronics are described. Thermal insulation and refrigeration alternatives are also presented in the sourcebook. Finally, instrument housing materials and high-temperature cables and cablehead connectors are listed. This information was compiled as part of the Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program that Sandia National Laboratories conducted for the US Department of Energy's Divison of Geothermal Energy from 1976 to 1981.

  16. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  17. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  18. Equatorial plasma bubbles with enhanced ion and electron temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Min, Kyoung Wook; Kim, Vitaly P.; Kil, Hyosub; Su, Shin-Yi; Chao, Chi Kuang; Lee, Jae-Jin

    2008-09-01

    While the ion and electron temperatures inside equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are normally lower than those in an ambient plasma, bubbles with enhanced temperatures (BETs) are found occasionally in the topside ionosphere. Here we report the characteristics of BETs identified from observations of the first Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1), the first Korea Multi-purpose Satellite (KOMPSAT-1), and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15 during the solar maximum period between 2000 and 2001. The oxygen ion fraction inside the BETs, which was no lower than that of the ambient ionosphere, was similar to the case of ordinary low-temperature EPBs. These observations indicate that the BETs and low-temperature EPBs detected on the topside were produced by the upward drift of low-density plasma from lower altitudes. The feature that distinguishes BETs from normal EPBs is the occurrence of an unusually fast poleward field-aligned plasma flow relative to the ambient plasma. The BETs occurred preferentially around geomagnetic latitudes of 10° in the summer hemisphere, where the ambient ion and electron temperatures are lower than those in the conjugate winter hemisphere. The occurrence of BETs did not show any notable dependence on geomagnetic activities. The characteristics of the BETs suggest that the BETs were produced by adiabatic plasma heating associated with a fast poleward oxygen ion transport along magnetic flux tubes.

  19. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  20. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  1. Eucken correction in high-temperature gases with electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V. Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2014-05-14

    In the present paper, thermal conductivity coefficient of high-temperature molecular and atomic gases with excited electronic states is studied using both the kinetic theory algorithm developed by authors earlier and the well known simple expression for the thermal conductivity coefficient proposed by Eucken and generalized by Hirschfelder. The influence of large collision diameters of excited states on the thermal conductivity is discussed. The limit of validity of the Eucken correction is evaluated on the basis of the kinetic theory calculations; an improved model suitable for air species under high-temperature conditions is proposed.

  2. Low-temperature elastic and electronic properties of MAX phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkel, Peter

    The Mn+1AXn phases (where M is an early transition metal, A is an A-group element and, X is C and/or N and n = 1 to 3) represent a new class of carbides and nitrides and can be best described as polycrystalline nanolaminates. They combine some of the best properties of ceramics and metals. Their physical properties (stiffness, damage and thermal shock resistance, high thermal and electrical conductivity) along with the fact they are readily machinable, make them extremely attractive in terms of the potential technological applications. Knowledge of low-temperature behavior is vital because it can provide insight into Mn+1AXn-phases' physical properties. This work entails the systematic study of the elastic, electrical, galvanomagnetic and thermal properties of these materials in the 4--300 K temperature range. The elastic constants of these compounds (Ti3SiC2, Ti3AlC2 and Ti4AlN3) were measured over the 20--300 K temperature range. Their Young's and shear modulii determined from ultrasonic velocities were in 300--335 and 124--140 GPa range, respectively; both moduli increase slowly with decreasing temperature and reaching a maximum at temperatures below 125 K; Poisson's ratio is 0.2. The Debye temperatures, thetaD, of these compounds calculated from the mean ultrasonic velocity are in 650--780K range which is in agreement with data obtained from low-temperature heat capacity measurements. To characterize the electronic transport properties, the resistivity, magnetoresistance, Hall effect, Seebeck coefficient and magnetic susceptibility were measured in the 4--300K range, and in magnetic fields up to 9T. All MAX-phases exhibit metal-like temperature dependence of the resistivity rho(T). theta D for most of the MAX-phases determined by fitting rho(T) with the Bloch T5 formula were in good agreement with the values determined from elastic and calorimetric measurements. The carrier density of electrons n (or holes, p) and their mobilities were calculated utilizing a

  3. Exfoliated β-Ga2O3 nano-belt field-effect transistors for air-stable high power and high temperature electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janghyuk; Oh, Sooyeoun; Mastro, Michael A; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-06-21

    This study demonstrated the exfoliation of a two-dimensional (2D) β-Ga2O3 nano-belt and subsequent processing into a thin film transistor structure. This mechanical exfoliation and transfer method produces β-Ga2O3 nano-belts with a pristine surface as well as a continuous defect-free interface with the SiO2/Si substrate. This β-Ga2O3 nano-belt based transistor displayed an on/off ratio that increased from approximately 10(4) to 10(7) over the operating temperature range of 20 °C to 250 °C. No electrical breakdown was observed in our measurements up to VDS = +40 V and VGS = -60 V between 25 °C and 250 °C. Additionally, the electrical characteristics were not degraded after a month-long storage in ambient air. The demonstration of high-temperature/high-voltage operation of quasi-2D β-Ga2O3 nano-belts contrasts with traditional 2D materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides that intrinsically have limited temperature and power operational envelopes owing to their narrow bandgap. This work motivates the application of 2D β-Ga2O3 to high power nano-electronic devices for harsh environments such as high temperature chemical sensors and photodetectors as well as the miniaturization of power circuits and cooling systems in nano-electronics. PMID:27230724

  4. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  5. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Hsu, Y W; Jiang, G S; Chen, W H; Cheng, C Z; Fang, H K; Liu, W T

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T(e) in low frequency mode and N(e) in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f(UHR)). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode. PMID:26329217

  6. Effects of electrons on the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Michno, M. J.; Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H. E-mail: mlazar@tp4.rub.de E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu

    2014-01-20

    Among the kinetic microinstabilities, the firehose instability is one of the most efficient mechanisms to restrict the unlimited increase of temperature anisotropy in the direction of an ambient magnetic field as predicted by adiabatic expansion of collision-poor solar wind. Indeed, the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy detected near 1 AU shows that it is constrained by the marginal firehose condition. Of the two types of firehose instabilities, namely, parallel and oblique, the literature suggests that the solar wind data conform more closely to the marginal oblique firehose condition. In the present work, however, it is shown that the parallel firehose instability threshold is markedly influenced by the presence of anisotropic electrons, such that under some circumstances, the cumulative effects of both electron and proton anisotropies could describe the observation without considering the oblique firehose mode.

  7. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Hsu, Y W; Jiang, G S; Chen, W H; Cheng, C Z; Fang, H K; Liu, W T

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T(e) in low frequency mode and N(e) in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f(UHR)). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  8. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  9. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; Richardson, S.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Khaghani, D.; Neumayer, P.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  10. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    DOE PAGES

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; et al

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  11. Probing plasma turbulence by modulating the electron temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Holland, C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J.; Peebles, W. A.; Zeng, L.; White, A. E.; Austin, M. E.; Yan, Z.

    2010-05-15

    The local value of a/L{sub Te}, a turbulence drive term, was modulated with electron cyclotron heating in L-mode discharges on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and the density and electron temperature fluctuations in low, intermediate, and high-k regimes were measured and compared with nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The local drive term at rhoapprox0.6 was reduced by up to 50%, which produced comparable reductions in electron temperature fluctuations at low-k. At intermediate k, k{sub t}hetaapprox4 cm{sup -1} and k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}approx0.8, a very interesting and unexpected result was observed where density fluctuations increased by up to 10% when the local drive term was decreased by 50%. Initial comparisons of simulations from GYRO with the thermal diffusivity from power balance analysis and measured turbulence response are reported. Simulations for the case with the lowest drive term are challenging as they are near the marginal value of a/L{sub Te} for trapped electron mode activity.

  12. The Influence of Energetic Electrons on the Cassini Langmuir Probe at Saturn : Deriving Large Electron Temperatures and Small Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.; Holmberg, M.; Lewis, G.; Schippers, P.; Thomsen, M. F.; Rochel Grimald, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Langmuir probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigated the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), showing that both the DC level and slope of the I-V curve are modified. The influence of energetic electrons may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept that is important for spacecraft charging studies. Estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface are obtained without using laboratory measurements. Empirical and theoretical methods were developed to reproduce the influence of the energetic electrons with a reasonable precision. Conversely, this modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). The understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions JUICE at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, or even the probes in the Earth magnetosphere.

  13. Few-layer III-VI and IV-VI 2D semiconductor transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Liu, Mei; Kumar, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang C.; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Gao, Xuan

    Since the discovery of atomically thin graphene, a large variety of exfoliable 2D materials have been thoroughly explored for their exotic transport behavior and promises in technological breakthroughs. While most attention on 2D materials beyond graphene is focused on transition metal-dichalcogenides, relatively less attention is paid to layered III-VI and IV-VI semiconductors such as InSe, SnSe etc which bear stronger potential as 2D materials with high electron mobility or thermoelectric figure of merit. We will discuss our recent work on few-layer InSe 2D field effect transistors which exhibit carrier mobility approaching 1000 cm2/Vs and ON-OFF ratio exceeding 107 at room temperature. In addition, the fabrication and device performance of transistors made of mechanically exfoliated multilayer IV-VI semiconductor SnSe and SnSe2 will be discussed.

  14. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  15. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  16. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  17. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  18. Phase coherence of conduction electrons below the Kondo temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzoubi, Gassem M.; Birge, Norman O.

    2007-03-01

    The scattering of conduction electrons by magnetic impurities is known as the Kondo effect. This effect has been the subject of theoretical and experimental investigations for several decades. Until very recently [1, 2], however, there was no theoretical expression for the temperature dependence of the inelastic scattering rate valid for temperatures T not too far below the Kondo temperature, TK. We present experimental measurements of the phase decoherence rate, τφ-1, of conduction electrons in disordered dilute AgFe Kondo wires [3]. We compare the temperature dependence of the magnetic scattering rate, γm, with a recent theory of dephasing by Kondo impurities [2]. A good agreement with theory is obtained for T/TK > 0.1. At lower T, γm deviates from theory with a flatter T-dependence. [1] G. Zarand, L. Borda, J. von Delft, and N. Andrei, Phys.Rev. Lett. 93, 107204 (2004). [2] T. Micklitz, A. Altland, T. A. Costi, A. Rosch, Phys.Rev. Lett. 96, 226601 (2006). [3] G.M. Alzoubi and N.O. Birge, Phys.Rev. Lett. in press (2006).

  19. Temperature Dependence in Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, T. F.; Misewich, J. A.

    1996-03-01

    The process of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) is a subject of great theoretical and experimental interest. We have extended the classic MGR model for DIET to include initial thermal excitation of the adsorbate. In the MGR model, an electronic transition causes the adsorbate to move on excited potential energy surface. Desorption ensues whenever the adsorbate stays in the excited state long enough to acquire the necessary energy to escape from the surface. At finite temperatures, the initial transition occurs from a distribution of ground-state vibrational energies and momenta. Compared with the zero temperature desorption yield some components of the finite-temperature distribution will have enhanced yields while others will have suppressed yields. Averaging over the initial distribution, we find that the desorption yield increases substantially with temperature, particularly for short excited-state lifetimes. These findings and their extension to the multiple excitation regime are relevant to understanding the long-time scale response observed in femtosecond two-pulse correlation measurements of O_2/Pd(111). J. A. Misewich et al., J. Chem. Phys. 100, 736 (1994)

  20. Characterizing Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence Via Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Candy, J; Cowley, S; Dannert, T; Dimits, A; Dorland, W; Estrada-Mila, C; Hammett, G W; Jenko, F; Pueschel, M J; Shumaker, D E

    2006-05-22

    Numerical simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence are presented which characterize the ETG fluctuation spectrum, establish limits to the validity of the adiabatic ion model often employed in studying ETG turbulence, and support the tentative conclusion that plasmaoperating regimes exist in which ETG turbulence produces sufficient electron heat transport to be experimentally relevant. We resolve prior controversies regarding simulation techniques and convergence by benchmarking simulations of ETG turbulence from four microturbulence codes, demonstrating agreement on the electron heat flux, correlation functions, fluctuation intensity, and rms flow shear at fixed simulation cross section and resolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Excellent convergence of both continuum and particle-in-cell codes with time step and velocity-space resolution is demonstrated, while numerical issues relating to perpendicular (to the magnetic field) simulation dimensions and resolution are discussed. A parameter scan in the magnetic shear, s, demonstrates that the adiabatic ion model is valid at small values of s (s < 0.4 for the parameters used in this scan) but breaks down at higher magnetic shear. A proper treatment employing gyrokinetic ions reveals a steady increase in the electron heat transport with increasing magnetic shear, reaching electron heat transport rates consistent with analyses of experimental tokamak discharges.

  1. To the problem of electron temperature control in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galechyan, G.A.; Anna, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    One of the main problems in low temperature plasma is control plasma parameters at fixed values of current and gas pressure in the discharge. It is known that an increase in the intensity of sound wave directed along the positive column to values in excess of a definite threshold leads to essential rise of the temperature of electrons. However, no less important is the reduction of electron temperature in the discharge down to the value less than that in plasma in the absence external influence. It is known that to reduce the electron temperature in the plasma of CO{sub 2} laser, easily ionizable admixture are usually introduced in the discharge area with the view of increasing the overpopulation. In the present work we shall show that the value of electron temperature can be reduced by varying of sound wave intensity at its lower values. The experiment was performed on an experimental setup consisted of the tube with length 52 cm and diameter 9.8 cm, two electrodes placed at the distance of 27 cm from each other. An electrodynamical radiator of sound wave was fastened to one of tube ends. Fastened to the flange at the opposite end was a microphone for the control of sound wave parameters. The studies were performed in range of pressures from 40 to 180 Torr and discharge currents from 40 to 110 mA. The intensity of sound wave was varied from 74 to 92 dB. The measurement made at the first resonance frequency f = 150 Hz of sound in the discharge tube, at which a quarter of wave length keep within the length of the tube. The measurement of longitudinal electric field voltage in plasma of positive column was conducted with the help of two probes according to the compensation method. Besides, the measurement of gas temperature in the discharge were taken. Two thermocouple sensors were arranged at the distance of 8 cm from the anode, one of them being installed on the discharge tube axis, the second-fixed the tube wall.

  2. Development of an electron-temperature-dependent interatomic potential for molecular dynamics simulation of tungsten under electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakshouri, S.; Alfè, D.; Duffy, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Irradiation of a metal by lasers or swift heavy ions causes the electrons to become excited. In the vicinity of the excitation, an electronic temperature is established within a thermalization time of 10-100 fs, as a result of electron-electron collisions. For short times, corresponding to less than 1 ps after excitation, the resulting electronic temperature may be orders of magnitude higher than the lattice temperature. During this short time, atoms in the metal experience modified interatomic forces as a result of the excited electrons. These forces can lead to ultrafast nonthermal phenomena such as melting, ablation, laser-induced phase transitions, and modified vibrational properties. We develop an electron-temperature-dependent empirical interatomic potential for tungsten that can be used to model such phenomena using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Finite-temperature density functional theory calculations at high electronic temperatures are used to parametrize the model potential.

  3. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liangyu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500degC silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chiplevel packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550degC. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500degC for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500degC are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  4. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500 C silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chip-level packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550 C. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500 C for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500 C are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  5. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Poncé, S. Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X.; Marini, A.; Verstraete, M.

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  6. Temperature dependences of the electron phonon coupling, electron heat capacity and thermal conductivity in Ni under femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhibin; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2007-05-01

    The electron temperature dependences of the electron-phonon coupling factor, electron heat capacity and thermal conductivity are investigated for Ni in a range of temperatures typically realized in femtosecond laser material processing applications, from room temperature up to temperatures of the order of 10 4 K. The analysis is based on the electronic density of states obtained through the electronic structure calculations. Thermal excitation of d band electrons is found to result in a significant decrease in the strength of the electron-phonon coupling, as well as large deviations of the electron heat capacity and the electron thermal conductivity from the commonly used linear temperature dependences on the electron temperature. Results of the simulations performed with the two-temperature model demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the thermophysical parameters accounting for the thermal excitation of d band electrons leads to higher maximum lattice and electron temperatures achieved at the surface of an irradiated Ni target and brings the threshold fluences for surface melting closer to the experimentally measured values as compared to the predictions obtained with commonly used approximations of the thermophysical parameters.

  7. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A{sup +}+ B{sup -}+ e{sup -}{yields} A + B + e{sup -}. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl{sub 3}{sup -} and POCl{sub 2}{sup -}) and one diatomic species (Br{sub 2}{sup -}) each with two monatomic cations (Ar{sup +}and Kr{sup +}) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions ({approx}1 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br{sub 2}{sup -}[(5.5 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K].

  8. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  9. Regulation of electron temperature gradient turbulence by zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Y. Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2014-05-15

    Turbulent transport caused by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes was investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that the ETG turbulence can be regulated by meso-scale zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes (TEMs), which are excited with much smaller growth rates than those of ETG modes. The zonal flows of which radial wavelengths are in between the ion and the electron banana widths are not shielded by trapped ions nor electrons, and hence they are effectively driven by the TEMs. It was also shown that an E × B shearing rate of the TEM-driven zonal flows is larger than or comparable to the growth rates of long-wavelength ETG modes and TEMs, which make a main contribution to the turbulent transport before excitation of the zonal flows.

  10. Plasma electron temperature and the entropy effect on hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakartnarodom, Parinya

    that atomic hydrogen is produced in the plasma, and the results from flue-gas analyzer show that H 2 is a product from the reaction in the plasma. From the experimental results, the yield of H2 is increased with the increasing of the electron temperature in gas/gas plasma reactions having positive entropy. For solid/gas plasma reactions which DeltaSo is either positive or negative, there is no correlation between H2 yield and electron temperature. However, H2 yield from all plasma reactions is lower than the prediction from the van't Hoff equation. Based on an analysis of the Saha equation, the effective temperature of the chemical species in the plasma may be lower than the electron temperature, thus rationalizing our observation of reduced H2 yield. An alternative hypothesis is that the quenching rates of the products from the plasma are not fast enough to avoid recombination of the reaction products at low temperature, where the enthalpy term dominates.

  11. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  12. Measurements of Electron Temperature and Gas Temperature in a Pulsed Atmospheric Pressure Air Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipold, Frank; Hufney Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-10-01

    The application of electrical pulses with duration shorter than the time constant for glow-to-arc transition allows us to shift the electron energy distribution in high pressure glow discharges temporally to high energy values [1]. Application of these nonequilibrium plasmas are plasma ramparts, plasma reactors, and excimer light sources. In order to obtain information on the electron energy distribution , or electron energy, respectively, and the gas temperature with the required temporal resolution of 1 ns, we have explored two diagnostic methods. One is based on the evaluation of the bremsstrahlung. This method allows us to determine the electron temperature [2]. The gas temperature is obtained from the rotational spectrum of the second positive system of nitrogen. The results of measurement on a 10 ns pulsed atmospheric pressure air glow will be presented. References [1] Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 3568 (2001) [2] Jaeyoung Park, Ivars Henins, Hans W. Herrmann, and Gary S. Selwyn, Physics of Plasmas 7, 3141 (2000). [3] R. Block, O. Toedter, and K. H. Schoenbach, Bull. APS 43, 1478 (1998)

  13. Two-temperature radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure is studied for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. Approximate solutions are obtained, with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km/s and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities.

  14. Weakly nonlinear ion waves in striated electron temperatures.

    PubMed

    Guio, P; Pécseli, H L

    2016-04-01

    The existence of low-frequency waveguide modes of electrostatic ion acoustic waves is demonstrated in magnetized plasmas for cases where the electron temperature is striated along magnetic field lines. For low frequencies, the temperature striation acts as waveguide that supports a trapped mode. For conditions where the ion cyclotron frequency is below the ion plasma frequency we find a dispersion relation having also a radiative frequency band, where waves can escape from the striation. Arguments for the formation and propagation of an equivalent of electrostatic shocks are presented and demonstrated numerically for these conditions. The shock represents here a balance between an external energy input maintained by ion injection and a dissipation mechanism in the form of energy leakage of the harmonics generated by nonlinear wave steepening. This is a reversible form for energy loss that can replace the time-irreversible losses in a standard Burgers equation. PMID:27176415

  15. Estimation of Electron Temperature on Glass Spherical Tokamak (GLAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Sadiq, M.; Shah, S. I. W.; GLAST Team

    2015-03-01

    Glass Spherical Tokamak (GLAST) is a small spherical tokamak indigenously developed in Pakistan with an insulating vacuum vessel. A commercially available 2.45 GHz magnetron is used as pre-ionization source for plasma current startup. Different diagnostic systems like Rogowski coils, magnetic probes, flux loops, Langmuir probe, fast imaging and emission spectroscopy are installed on the device. The plasma temperature inside of GLAST, at the time of maxima of plasma current, is estimated by taking into account the Spitzer resistivity calculations with some experimentally determined plasma parameters. The plasma resistance is calculated by using Ohm's law with plasma current and loop voltage as experimentally determined inputs. The plasma resistivity is then determined by using length and area of the plasma column. Finally, the average plasma electron temperature is predicted to be 12.65eV for taking neon (Ne) as a working gas.

  16. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  17. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  18. Fractional electron number, temperature, and perturbations in chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-06-01

    We provide a perspective on the role of non-integer electron number in the density functional theory approach to chemical reactivity (conceptual DFT), emphasizing that it is important to not only treat reagents as open systems, but also as non-isolated systems, in contact with their surroundings. The special case of well-separated reagents is treated in some detail, as is the case where reagents interact strongly. The resulting expressions for the chemical potential of an acid, μacid = -(αI + A)/(1 + α), and a base, μbase = -(I + αA)/(1 + α), elucidate and generalize the assumptions inherent in the chemical potential models of Mulliken (α = 1) and Gazquez, Cedillo, and Vela (α = 3). In the strongly-interacting limit, it is appropriate to model the effects of the environment as a state-specific effective temperature, thereby providing a rigorous justification for the phenomenological effective-temperature model one of the authors previously proposed. The framework for the strongly interacting limit subsumes our model for weakly-interacting subsystems at nonzero temperature, the case of open but otherwise noninteracting subsystems, and the zero-temperature limit.

  19. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  20. Towards Room Temperature Silicon Memory Using Single Electron Effects.^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sandip

    1996-03-01

    In a semiconductor device, transport, where single electron effects prevail, is usually characterized by sub-μ A currents, large time-constants, and non-linearities that are not suitably harnessed by conventional methods of implementing logic. However, many of the attributes of single electron effects are quite appropriate for memories and we summarize one promising implementation involving low interface state density nano-crystals of silicon that are electrostatically coupled to a conducting channel whose conduction is modulated by a control gate.(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of 52nd Annual Device Research Conference IVA-4 (1994))(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of 53rd Annual Device Research Conference, 50 (1995))(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of International Electron Devices Meeting (1995)) Single electron effects manifest themselves in the nano-crystals of silicon (5--7 nm in dimensions) where Coulombic energies of ≈ 60 meV are presently achieved, sufficient for 77 K demonstrations. Large threshold voltage shifts (> 0.2--0.25 V) are achieved by using large enough density of such nano-crystals where single/multiple electron storage occurs and appear as plateaus in threshold voltage - gate voltage characteristics. The charging of the nano-crystals occurs from an inversion layer and discharging occurs to a depletion region. Scaling of nano-crystals size is expected to shift this operational behavior to room temperature, and very low power behavior should be expected from scaled structures utilizing only a single nano-crystal. ^*Performed in collaboration with F. Rana, K. Chan, J. Welser, and H. Hanafi

  1. Gas temperature and electron temperature measurements by emission spectroscopy for an atmospheric microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Davide; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2007-01-01

    A microplasma suitable for material processing at atmospheric pressure in argon and argon-oxygen mixtures is being studied here. The microplasma is ignited by a high voltage dc pulse and sustained by low power (1-5W) at 450MHz. the mechanisms responsible for sustaining the microplasma require a more detailed analysis, which will be the subject of further study. Here it is shown that the microplasma is in nonequilibrium and appears to be in glow mode. The effect of power and oxygen content is also analyzed in terms of gas temperature and electron temperature. Both the gas temperature and the electron temperature have been determined by spectral emission and for the latter a very simple method has been used based on a collisional-radiative model. It is observed that power coupling is affected by a combination of factors and that prediction and control of the energy flow are not always straightforward even for simple argon plasmas. Varying gas content concentration has shown that oxygen creates a preferential energy channel towards increasing the gas temperature. Overall the results have shown that combined multiple diagnostics are necessary to understand plasma characteristics and that spectral emission can represent a valuable tool for tailoring microplasma to specific processing requirements.

  2. Single and bilayer bismuthene: Stability at high temperature and mechanical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktürk, E.; Aktürk, O. Üzengi; Ciraci, S.

    2016-07-01

    Based on first-principles phonon and finite temperature molecular dynamics calculations including spin-orbit coupling, we showed that free-standing single-layer phases of bismuth, namely buckled honeycomb and asymmetric washboard structures named as bismuthene, are stable at high temperature. We studied the atomic structure, mechanical, and electronic properties of these single-layer bismuthene phases and their bilayers. The spin-orbit coupling is found to be crucial in determining lattice constants, phonon frequencies, band gaps, and cohesion. In particular, phonons of 3D hexagonal crystal, as well as those of single-layer bismuthene phases, are softened with spin orbit coupling. By going from 3D hexagonal crystal to free-standing single-layer structures, 2D hexagonal lattice is compressed and semimetal is transformed to semiconductor as a result of confinement effect. On the contrary, by going from single-layer to bilayer bismuthenes, the lattice is slightly expanded and fundamental band gaps are narrowed. Our results reveals that interlayer coupling in multilayer and 3D Bi crystal is crucial for topologically trivial to nontrivial and semimetal to semiconductor transitions.

  3. Non-linear response of two-dimensional electron systems at low temperatures to electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Kalmanovitz, Natalia

    2009-12-01

    The nonlinear behavior of low-dimensional electron systems has attracted a great deal of attention for its fundamental interest as well as for potentially important applications in nanoelectronics. This work focuses on experimental results related to the nonlinear behavior of two dimensional electron systems. We first observed the non-linear zero-differential resistance state (ZDRS) that occurs for highly mobile two dimensional electron systems in response to a dc bias in the presence of a strong magnetic field applied perpendicular to the electron plane is suppressed. We found that it disappears gradually as the magnetic field is tilted away from the perpendicular at fixed filling factor. Good agreement is found with a model that considers the effect of the Zeeman splitting of Landau levels enhanced by the in-plane component of the magnetic field. Furthermore, we observed that when an electric field is applied to conductors, it heats electric charge carriers. It is demonstrated that an electric field applied to a conductor with a discrete electron spectrum produces a non-equilibrium electron distribution, which cannot be described by temperature. Such electron distribution changes significantly the conductivity of the electrons in a magnetic field, and forces them into a state with a zero differential resistance. Most importantly, the results demonstrate that in general, the effective overheating in the systems with discrete spectrum is significantly stronger than the one in systems with continuous and homogeneous distribution of the energy levels at the same input power. In the last part we observed non-linear behavior in a silicon MOSFET. Measurements of the rectification of microwave radiation at the boundary between two-dimensional electron systems separated by a narrow gap on a silicon surface for different temperatures, electron densities and microwave power, were performed. A theory is proposed that attributes the rectification to the thermoelectric

  4. Interpretive 2-D treatment of scrape-off-layer plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M.; Allen, A.; Daughton, W.

    1996-12-31

    The width of the scrape-off-layer in a tokamak is determined by cross field transport. In Alcator C-mod the plasma parameters in the scrape-off-layer are measured at upstream and divertor plate locations. We solve a 2-D scrape-off-layer heat conduction equation in the flux geometry (as determined by EFIT) of the C-mod experiment. Bolometric measurements are utilized for the radiative loss term. We use the end wall probe measurements of electron temperature as a boundary condition and the fast scanning probe measurements of upstream temperature are treated as constraints to determine the cross field transport and thermal conductivity. Results are compared with 1-D onion-skin-model predictions.

  5. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  6. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  7. Experimental evidence of excited electron number density and temperature effects on electron-phonon coupling in gold films

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Foley, Brian M.; Cheaito, Ramez; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-28

    The electronic transport properties of metals with weak electron-phonon coupling can be influenced by non-thermal electrons. Relaxation processes involving non-thermal electrons competing with the thermalized electron system have led to inconsistencies in the understanding of how electrons scatter and relax with the less energetic lattice. Recent theoretical and computational works have shown that the rate of energy relaxation with the metallic lattice will change depending on the thermalization state of the electrons. Even though 20 years of experimental works have focused on understanding and isolating these electronic relaxation mechanisms with short pulsed irradiation, discrepancies between these existing works have not clearly answered the fundamental question of the competing effects between non-thermal and thermal electrons losing energy to the lattice. In this work, we demonstrate the ability to measure the electron relaxation for varying degrees of both electron-electron and electron-phonon thermalization. This series of measurements of electronic relaxation over a predicted effective electron temperature range up to ∼3500 K and minimum lattice temperatures of 77 K validate recent computational and theoretical works that theorize how a nonequilibrium distribution of electrons transfers energy to the lattice. Utilizing this wide temperature range during pump-probe measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, we explain discrepancies in the past two decades of literature of electronic relaxation rates. We experimentally demonstrate that the electron-phonon coupling factor in gold increases with increasing lattice temperature and laser fluences. Specifically, we show that at low laser fluences corresponding to small electron perturbations, energy relaxation between electrons and phonons is mainly governed by non-thermal electrons, while at higher laser fluences, non-thermal electron scattering with the lattice is less influential on the energy relaxation

  8. Effects of electron irradiation on high temperature superconductors and contacts to high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caton, Randall

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of a new class of ceramic superconductors with transition temperatures above liquid nitrogen has opened the doors for exciting space applications. Energy storage, pointing maneuvers, magnetic shielding, and sensitive detection of electromagnetic radiation are some of the longer term possible applications. One near term application involves low electrical resistance, high thermal resistance connections between a detector operating at approximatly or equal to 4 and the electronics operating at approximatly or equal to 77 K. The new high temperature superconductors could accomplish this providing the necessary electrical connections to the ground plane while isolating the system thermally, thus prolonging the life of the mission. With such possibilities it is clearly of value to study the effects of radiation that would be experienced during a typical space mission. In this work we focused specifically on the effects of the electron radiation environment.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  10. Temperature dependence of electronic eigenenergies in the adiabatic harmonic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncé, S.; Antonius, G.; Gillet, Y.; Boulanger, P.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Marini, A.; Côté, M.; Gonze, X.

    2014-12-01

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon interactions (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is important in many materials. We address it in the adiabatic harmonic approximation, based on first principles (e.g., density-functional theory), from different points of view: directly from atomic position fluctuations or, alternatively, from Janak's theorem generalized to the case where the Helmholtz free energy, including the vibrational entropy, is used. We prove their equivalence, based on the usual form of Janak's theorem and on the dynamical equation. We then also place the Allen-Heine-Cardona (AHC) theory of the renormalization in a first-principles context. The AHC theory relies on the rigid-ion approximation, and naturally leads to a self-energy (Fan) contribution and a Debye-Waller contribution. Such a splitting can also be done for the complete harmonic adiabatic expression, in which the rigid-ion approximation is not required. A numerical study within the density-functional perturbation theory framework allows us to compare the AHC theory with frozen-phonon calculations, with or without the rigid-ion approximation. For the two different numerical approaches without non-rigid-ion terms, the agreement is better than 7 μ eV in the case of diamond, which represent an agreement to five significant digits. The magnitude of the non-rigid-ion terms in this case is also presented, distinguishing specific phonon modes contributions to different electronic eigenenergies.

  11. RESOLVING THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE DISCREPANCIES IN H II REGIONS AND PLANETARY NEBULAE: {kappa}-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.

    2012-06-20

    The measurement of electron temperatures and metallicities in H II regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) has-for several decades-presented a problem: results obtained using different techniques disagree. What is worse, they disagree consistently. There have been numerous attempts to explain these discrepancies, but none has provided a satisfactory solution to the problem. In this paper, we explore the possibility that electrons in H II regions and PNe depart from a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium energy distribution. We adopt a '{kappa}-distribution' for the electron energies. Such distributions are widely found in solar system plasmas, where they can be directly measured. This simple assumption is able to explain the temperature and metallicity discrepancies in H II regions and PNe arising from the different measurement techniques. We find that the energy distribution does not need to depart dramatically from an equilibrium distribution. From an examination of data from H II regions and PNe, it appears that {kappa} {approx}> 10 is sufficient to encompass nearly all objects. We argue that the kappa-distribution offers an important new insight into the physics of gaseous nebulae, both in the Milky Way and elsewhere, and one that promises significantly more accurate estimates of temperature and metallicity in these regions.

  12. Upgrading electron temperature and electron density diagnostic diagrams of forbidden line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proxauf, B.; Öttl, S.; Kimeswenger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Diagnostic diagrams of forbidden lines have been a useful tool for observers for many decades now. They are used to obtain information on the basic physical properties of thin gaseous nebulae. Some diagnostic diagrams are in wavelength domains that were difficult to apply either due to missing wavelength coverage or the low resolution of older spectrographs. Furthermore, most of the diagrams were calculated using just the species involved as a single atom gas, although several are affected by well-known fluorescence mechanisms as well. Additionally, the atomic data have improved up to the present time. Aims: The aim of this work is to recalculate well-known, but also sparsely used, unnoted diagnostics diagrams. The new diagrams provide observers with modern, easy-to-use recipes for determining electron temperature and densities. Methods: The new diagnostic diagrams were calculated using large grids of parameter space in the photoionization code CLOUDY. For a given basic parameter (e.g., electron density or temperature), the solutions with cooling-heating-equilibrium were chosen to derive the diagnostic diagrams. Empirical numerical functions were fitted to provide formulas usable in, e.g., data reduction pipelines. Results: The resulting diagrams differ significantly from those used up to now and will improve thermodynamic calculations. To our knowledge, detailed, directly applicable fit formulas are given for the first time, leading to the calculation of electron temperature or density from the line ratios.

  13. New electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for measurement of temperature based upon the electron Bernstein wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimion, P. C.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Taylor, G.

    1999-01-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics to measure temperature. They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g., ωp≫Ωc in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition (τ>2). The standard ECE technique measures the electromagnetic waves emanating from the plasma. Here we propose to measure electron Bernstein waves (EBW) to ascertain the local electron temperature in these plasmas. The optical thickness of EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large ki. For example, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) will have an optical thickness τ≈3000 and CDX-U will have τ≈300. One can reach the blackbody condition with a plasma density ≈1011cm-3 and Te≈1 eV. This makes it attractive to most plasma devices. The serious issue with using EBW is the wave accessibility for the emission measurement. Simple accessibility arguments indicate the wave may be accessible by either direct coupling or mode conversion through an extremely narrow layer (≈1-2 mm). EBW experiments on the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) will test the accessibility properties of the spherical tokamak configuration.

  14. New electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for measurement of temperature based upon the electron Bernstein wave

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Hosea, J.C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Taylor, G.

    1999-01-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics to measure temperature. They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g., {omega}{sub p}{gt}{Omega}{sub c} in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau}{gt}2). The standard ECE technique measures the electromagnetic waves emanating from the plasma. Here we propose to measure electron Bernstein waves (EBW) to ascertain the local electron temperature in these plasmas. The optical thickness of EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large k{sub i}. For example, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) will have an optical thickness {tau}{approx}3000 and CDX-U will have {tau}{approx}300. One can reach the blackbody condition with a plasma density {approx}10{sup 11}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e}{approx}1thinspeV. This makes it attractive to most plasma devices. The serious issue with using EBW is the wave accessibility for the emission measurement. Simple accessibility arguments indicate the wave may be accessible by either direct coupling or mode conversion through an extremely narrow layer ({approx}1{endash}2 mm). EBW experiments on the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) will test the accessibility properties of the spherical tokamak configuration. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Possible cause of enhancement of electron temperature in high electron density region in the dayside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto

    2016-07-01

    When neutral atmosphere is ionized by solar EUV, energetic electrons named photoelectrons are emitted. The photoelectrons are primary heat source of electrons in the ionosphere in the daytime. The heating rate of electron by photoelectron is proportion to 0.97 power of electron density (Ne) while the heated electron is cooled through the Column collision with ions, the rate of which rate is square of Ne. Therefore, electron temperature (Te) decreases and approach ion temperature (Ti) with increase of Ne. Ions are also cooled through the collision with neutral spices. Finally, these temperatures (Te, Ti and Tn) show very similar values in high Ne region. However, Te enhancement with increase of Ne is found in the satellite observation at 600 km in the daytime ionosphere [Kakinami et al., 2011]. Similar Ti variation is also found around the magnetic dip equator [Kakinami et al., 2014]. One possible cause of the enhancement of Te is enhacement of Tn with increase Ne because both Ne and Tn increase with increase of solar irradiance flux, F10.7 [Lei et al., 2007]. However, since such the enhancements of Te are seen in any F10.7, it is hard to explain the phenomenon. In this paper, we present correlation between Te (Ti) and Ne obtained by the Incoherent Scatter radar at Jicamarca. The similar correlation, namely positive correlation of Te (Ti) with Ne in high Ne region are found above 300 km. Using the observations and Tn and neutral density calculated with MSIS, the Column collision cooling with ions, and inelastic collision cooling with neutral spices for electron are shown. The heat conduction along the magnetic field line is also estimated by using IRI model. Using these information, we discuss possible cause of the enhancement of Te in the high Ne region. References Kakinami et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016905. Kakinami et al. (2014), J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2014JA020302. Lei et al.(2007), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2006JA012041.

  16. Electron temperature gradient driven instability in the tokamak boundary plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-12-15

    A general method is developed for calculating boundary plasma fluctuations across a magnetic separatrix in a tokamak with a divertor or a limiter. The slab model, which assumes a periodic plasma in the edge reaching the divertor or limiter plate in the scrape-off layer(SOL), should provide a good estimate, if the radial extent of the fluctuation quantities across the separatrix to the edge is small compared to that given by finite particle banana orbit. The Laplace transform is used for solving the initial value problem. The electron temperature gradient(ETG) driven instability is found to grow like t{sup {minus}1/2}e{sup {gamma}mt}.

  17. Electron Temperature and Potential Measurements in a Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, J.; Hayes, T. R.; Gilmore, M.

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of plasma potential, floating potential, and electron temperature, Te, are notoriously difficult in RF-produced plasmas such as helicons. This work presents comparisons of potential and Te measurements made via swept and stepped compensated and uncompensated single and double Langmuir probes, emissive probes, and static triple probes. These measurements have been made in the HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) linear plasma device at the University of New Mexico using HelCat's helicon source. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device with magnetic field, B0 <2.2 kG, and typical densities n ~ 1018 - 1020 m-3. Comparisons between the measurements and expected theoretical differences will be presented. Supported by US National Science Foundation Award 1201995.

  18. Suspended 2-D photonic crystal aluminum nitride membrane reflector.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chong Pei; Pitchappa, Prakash; Soon, Bo Woon; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-04-20

    We experimentally demonstrated a free-standing two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal (PhC) aluminum nitride (AlN) membrane to function as a free space (or out-of-plane) reflector working in the mid infrared region. By etching circular holes of radius 620nm in a 330nm thick AlN slab, greater than 90% reflection was measured from 3.08μm to 3.78μm, with the peak reflection of 96% at 3.16μm. Due to the relatively low refractive index of AlN, we also investigated the importance of employing methods such as sacrificial layer release to enhance the performance of the PhC. In addition, characterization of the AlN based PhC was also done up to 450°C to examine the impact of thermo-optic effect on the performance. Despite the high temperature operation, the redshift in the peak reflection wavelengths of the device was estimated to be only 14.1nm. This equates to a relatively low thermo-optic coefficient 2.22 × 10(-5) K(-1) for AlN. Such insensitivity to thermo-optic effect makes AlN based 2-D PhC a promising technology to be used as photonic components for high temperature applications such as Fabry-Perot interferometer used for gas sensing in down-hole oil drilling and ruggedized electronics. PMID:25969099

  19. Suspended 2-D photonic crystal aluminum nitride membrane reflector.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chong Pei; Pitchappa, Prakash; Soon, Bo Woon; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-04-20

    We experimentally demonstrated a free-standing two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal (PhC) aluminum nitride (AlN) membrane to function as a free space (or out-of-plane) reflector working in the mid infrared region. By etching circular holes of radius 620nm in a 330nm thick AlN slab, greater than 90% reflection was measured from 3.08μm to 3.78μm, with the peak reflection of 96% at 3.16μm. Due to the relatively low refractive index of AlN, we also investigated the importance of employing methods such as sacrificial layer release to enhance the performance of the PhC. In addition, characterization of the AlN based PhC was also done up to 450°C to examine the impact of thermo-optic effect on the performance. Despite the high temperature operation, the redshift in the peak reflection wavelengths of the device was estimated to be only 14.1nm. This equates to a relatively low thermo-optic coefficient 2.22 × 10(-5) K(-1) for AlN. Such insensitivity to thermo-optic effect makes AlN based 2-D PhC a promising technology to be used as photonic components for high temperature applications such as Fabry-Perot interferometer used for gas sensing in down-hole oil drilling and ruggedized electronics.

  20. Electron-impact vibrational relaxation in high-temperature nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Hun

    1992-01-01

    Vibrational relaxation process of N2 molecules by electron-impact is examined for the future planetary entry environments. Multiple-quantum transitions from excited states to higher/lower states are considered for the electronic ground state of the nitrogen molecule N2 (X 1Sigma-g(+)). Vibrational excitation and deexcitation rate coefficients obtained by computational quantum chemistry are incorporated into the 'diffusion model' to evaluate the time variations of vibrational number densities of each energy state and total vibrational energy. Results show a non-Boltzmann distribution of number densities at the earlier stage of relaxation, which in turn suppresses the equilibrium process but affects little the time variation of total vibrational energy. An approximate rate equation and a corresponding relaxation time from the excited states, compatible with the system of flow conservation equations, are derived. The relaxation time from the excited states indicates the weak dependency of the initial vibrational temperature. The empirical curve-fit formula for the improved e-V relaxation time is obtained.

  1. Atomic precision etch using a low-electron temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L.; Wang, J.-C.; Rauf, S.; Zhang, Y.; Agarwal, A.; Kenney, J.; Ramaswamy, K.; Collins, K.

    2016-03-01

    Sub-nm precision is increasingly being required of many critical plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. Accurate control over ion energy and ion/radical composition is needed during plasma processing to meet these stringent requirements. Described in this work is a new plasma etch system which has been designed with the requirements of atomic precision plasma processing in mind. In this system, an electron sheet beam parallel to the substrate surface produces a plasma with an order of magnitude lower electron temperature Te (~ 0.3 eV) and ion energy Ei (< 3 eV without applied bias) compared to conventional radio-frequency (RF) plasma technologies. Electron beam plasmas are characterized by higher ion-to-radical fraction compared to RF plasmas, so a separate radical source is used to provide accurate control over relative ion and radical concentrations. Another important element in this plasma system is low frequency RF bias capability which allows control of ion energy in the 2-50 eV range. Presented in this work are the results of etching of a variety of materials and structures performed in this system. In addition to high selectivity and low controllable etch rate, an important requirement of atomic precision etch processes is no (or minimal) damage to the remaining material surface. It has traditionally not been possible to avoid damage in RF plasma processing systems, even during atomic layer etch. The experiments for Si etch in Cl2 based plasmas in the aforementioned etch system show that damage can be minimized if the ion energy is kept below 10 eV. Layer-by-layer etch of Si is also demonstrated in this etch system using electrical and gas pulsing.

  2. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  4. Electron temperature measurements during electron cyclotron heating on PDX using a ten channel grating polychromator

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.; Hsuan, H.; Boyd, D.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Kritz, A.; Mikkelsen, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Takahashi, H.

    1984-10-01

    During first harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH) on the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX) (R/sub 0/ = 137 cm, a = 40 cm), electron temperature was monitored using a grating polychromator which measured second harmonic electron cyclotron emission from the low field side of the tokamak. Interference from the high power heating pulse on the broadband detectors in the grating instrument was eliminated by using a waveguide filter in the transmission line which brought the emission signal to the grating instrument. Off-axis (approx. 4 cm) location of the resonance zone resulted in heating without sawtooth or m = 1 activity. However, heating with the resonance zone at the plasma center caused very large amplitude sawteeth accompanied by strong m = 1 activity: ..delta..T/T/sub MAX/ approx. = 0.41, sawtooth period approx. = 4 msec, m = 1 period approx. = 90 ..mu.. sec, (11 kHz). This is the first time such intense MHD activity driven by ECH has been observed. (For both cases there was no sawtooth activity in the ohmic phase of the discharge before ECH.) At very low densities there is a clear indication that a superthermal electron population is created during ECH.

  5. Thermal Conductivity and Thermopower near the 2D Metal-Insulator transition, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    SARACHIK, MYRIAM P

    2015-02-20

    STUDIES OF STRONGLY-INTERACTING 2D ELECTRON SYSTEMS – There is a great deal of current interest in the properties of systems in which the interaction between electrons (their potential energy) is large compared to their kinetic energy. We have investigated an apparent, unexpected metal-insulator transition inferred from the behavior of the temperature-dependence of the resistivity; moreover, detailed analysis of the behavior of the magnetoresistance suggests that the electrons’ effective mass diverges, supporting this scenario. Whether this is a true phase transition or crossover behavior has been strenuously debated over the past 20 years. Our measurements have now shown that the thermoelectric power of these 2D materials diverges at a finite density, providing clear evidence that this is, in fact, a phase transition to a new low-density phase which may be a precursor or a direct transition to the long sought-after electronic crystal predicted by Eugene Wigner in 1934.

  6. Tuning the hysteresis voltage in 2D multilayer MoS2 FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Zheng, Zhouming; Guo, Junjie

    2016-10-01

    The hysteresis tuning is of great significance before the two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) can be practically used in the next-generation nanoelectronic devices. In this paper, a simple and effective annealing method was developed to tune the hysteresis voltage in 2D MoS2 transistors. It was found that high temperature (175 °C) annealing in air could increase the hysteresis voltage from 8.0 V (original device) to 28.4 V, while a next vacuum annealing would reduce the hysteresis voltage to be only 2.0 V. An energyband diagram model based on electron trapping/detrapping due to oxygen adsorption is proposed to understand the hysteresis mechanism in multilayer MoS2 FET. This simple method for tuning the hysteresis voltage of MoS2 FET can make a significant step toward 2D nanoelectronic device applications.

  7. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  8. Electron temperatures in the F region of the ionosphere - Theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The theory and observations relating to electron temperatures in the F region of the ionosphere are reviewed. The review is divided into three basic parts. In the first part the theory concerning electron heating, cooling, and energy transport processes is reviewed, and all the relevant expressions are updated. In the second part the behavior of F region electron temperatures, as measured by satellites, rockets, and incoherent scatter radars, is discussed. This portion covers electron temperature variations with altitude, latitude, local time, season, geomagnetic activity, and solar cycle. The third part is primarily devoted to a discussion of the various attempts to compare measured and calculated F region electron temperatures.

  9. Helical Quantum Edge Gears in 2D Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yang-Zhi; Levchenko, Alex; Foster, Matthew

    A remarkable and as-yet-unexploited aspect of topological insulator (TI) physics is the topology of the edge states, i.e. the fact that the edge liquid of a 2D TI forms a closed, unbreakable loop in the absence of electrical contacts or magnetic fields. We propose a novel experimental setup in which edge loops rotate as interlocking ``gears'' through Coulomb drag, in TIs with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We show that two-terminal transport can measure the Luttinger liquid parameter K, a quantity that is otherwise notoriously difficult to measure. In the low-temperature (T --> 0) perfect drag regime, the conductance is (e2 / h) (2 K + 1) / (K + 1) . At higher T we predict a conductivity ~T - 4 K + 3 . Our results should trigger new experiments and may open a new venue for edge gear-based electronic devices.Ref: Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 186404 (2015)

  10. Radiolytic yields of solvated electrons in ionic liquid and its solvation dynamics at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Raluca M.; Kondoh, Takafumi; Gohdo, Masao; Yoshida, Yoichi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2016-07-01

    We present an investigation of the solvated electron in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (P14NTf2) using pulse radiolytic techniques. Temperature-dependent studies reveal that the yield of the solvated electron decreases with decreasing temperature. The lower initial yield measured indicates that we have a loss of some electrons before they become fully solvated. There may be a high probability that the excess dry electrons (pre-solvated electron) react before the electron solvation is completed because the solvation dynamics is slowing down with decreasing temperature.

  11. Low-temperature electron irradiation and annealing in pure magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Simester, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    In this study of magnesium after 1.0 MeV electron irradiations at 1.55/sup 0/K, it has been observed that the damage production rate in Mg is (3.57 +- 0.03) x 10/sup -26/ ..cap omega..cm/(e/sup -/ cm/sup 2/). There is no evidence for thermal annealing up to 4/sup 0/K. The low temperature recovery in magnesium is found to consist of two broad substages between 4 to 14/sup 0/K, both of which exhibit evidence for correlated and uncorrelated recovery processes. The two substages are found to have very different frequency factors for annealing, and there is evidence that the recovery processes in the second substage are influenced by those in the first. A model for recovery is proposed using the split configuration in the plane which explains the first substage as being due to interstitial migration in the basal plane and the second to migration perpendicular to the plane.

  12. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  13. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-15

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  14. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (˜2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  15. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3. PMID:25725841

  16. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  17. Effect of electron temperature anisotropy on near-wall conductivity in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fengkui E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn; Kong, Lingyi; Zhang, Xueyi; Li, Wei; Yu, Daren E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn

    2014-06-15

    The electron velocity distribution in Hall thrusters is anisotropic, which not only makes the sheath oscillate in time, but also causes the sheath to oscillate in space under the condition of low electron temperatures. The spatial oscillation sheath has a significant effect on near-wall transport current. In this Letter, the method of particle-in-cell (2D + 3 V) was adopted to simulate the effect of anisotropic electron temperatures on near-wall conductivity in a Hall thruster. Results show that the electron-wall collision frequency is within the same order in magnitude for both anisotropic and isotropic electron temperatures. The near-wall transport current produced by collisions between the electrons and the walls is much smaller than experimental measurements. However, under the condition of anisotropic electron temperatures, the non-collision transport current produced by slow electrons which reflected by the spatial oscillation sheath is much larger and closes to measurements.

  18. Electron-temperature dependence of dissociative recombination of electrons with CO(+)-(CO)n-series ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, M.; Biondi, M. A.; Johnsen, R.

    1980-01-01

    A microwave afterglow mass spectrometer apparatus is used to determine the dependence on electron temperature T sub e of the recombination coefficients alpha sub n of the dimer and trimer ions of the series CO+.(CO) sub n. It is found that alpha sub 1 = (1.3 + or - 0.3)x 0.000001 (T sub e(K)/300) to the -0.34; and alpha sub 2 = (1.9 + or - 0.4)x 0.000001 (T sub e(K)/300) to the -0.33 cu cm/sec. These dependences on T sub e are quite different from those obtained previously for polar-cluster ions of the hydronium and ammonium series but are similar to that for simple diatomic ions.

  19. Secondary electron emission from sodium chloride, glass and aluminum oxide at various temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shulman, A. R.; Makedonskiy, V. L.; Yaroshetskiy, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    The method of single impulses was used to measure the coefficients of the secondary electronic emission for 2 types of Al2O2, monocrystalline NaCl and glass at different temperatures and for different values of the energy of the primary electrons. The value of the secondary electron emission does not depend upon temperature. The effect of a gas film on the value of the secondary electron emission was detected.

  20. Hydrothermal synthesis of zinc(II)-phosphonate coordination polymers with different dimensionality (0D, 2D, 3D) and dimensionality change in the solid phase (0D→3D) induced by temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Zapico, Eva; Montejo-Bernardo, Jose; Fernández-González, Alfonso; García, José R. García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-05-15

    Three new zinc(II) coordination polymers, [Zn(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO)(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)] (1), [Zn{sub 3}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})](H{sub 2}O){sub 3.40} (2) and [Zn{sub 5}(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}){sub 4}](H{sub 2}O){sub 0.32} (3), with different structural dimensionality (0D, 2D and 3D, respectively) have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system (P2{sub 1}/c) forming discrete dimeric units bonded through H-bonds, while compounds 2 and 3 crystallize in the triclinic (P−1) and the monoclinic (C2/c) systems, respectively. Compound 3, showing three different coordination numbers (4, 5 and 6) for the zinc atoms, has also been obtained by thermal treatment of 1 (probed by high-temperature XRPD experiments). The crystalline features of these compounds, related to the coordination environments for the zinc atoms in each structure, provoke the increase of the relative fluorescence for 2 and 3, compared to the free phenanthroline. Thermal analysis (TG and DSC) and XPS studies have been also carried out for all compounds. - Graphical abstract: Three new coordination compounds of zinc with 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid (H{sub 2}PPA) and phenanthroline have been obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. The crystalline structure depends on the different coordination environments of the zinc atoms (see two comparative Zn{sub 6}-moieties). The influence of the different coordination modes of H{sub 2}PPA with the central atom in all structures have been studied, being found new coordination modes for this ligand. Several compounds show a significant increase in relative fluorescence with respect to the free phenanthroline. - Highlights: • Compounds have been obtained modifying the reaction time and the rate of

  1. Evaluation of COTS Electronic Parts for Extreme Temperature Use in NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems capable of extreme temperature operation are required for many future NASA space exploration missions where it is desirable to have smaller, lighter, and less expensive spacecraft and probes. Presently, spacecraft on-board electronics are maintained at about room temperature by use of thermal control systems. An Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on development of electronics suitable for space exploration missions. The effects of exposure to extreme temperatures and thermal cycling are being investigated for commercial-off-the-shelf components as well as for components specially developed for harsh environments. An overview of this program along with selected data is presented.

  2. Electronic weighing, identification and subdermal body temperature sensing of range livestock

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Landt, J.A.; Salazar, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    Individual animal weights can be obtained manually or automatically in a computer-compatible format with an electronic scale. If an electronic identification, subdermal body temperature sensing unit is interfaced with an electronic scale, the weight, identification, and subdermal body temperature of individually identified animals can be obtained either manually or automatically, and transcriptional and phonetic errors thus eliminated. Electronics can be used at remote locations despite extreme temperatures, dust, and fluctuation in battery power. For research purposes, daily weight fluctuations, watering behavior, and subdermal body temperature can be recorded continuously. When the system becomes commercially available, increased livestock production at a lower cost will be possible.

  3. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  4. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices. PMID:26839956

  5. Comparison of the measured and modeled electron densities and temperatures in the ionosphere and plasmasphere during 14-16 May 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2004-01-01

    the calculated daytime electron temperature up to about 960K at the F-region main peak altitude giving closer agreement between the measured and modeled electron temperatures. Both the daytime and nighttime electron densities and temperatures are not reproduced by the model without vibrationally excited N2 and O2, and inclusion of vibrationally excited N2 and O2 brings the model and data into agreement. The model with including vibrationally excited N2 and O2 in the loss rate of O+(4S) ions produces ion temperatures close to those given by the middle latitude model without including vibrationally excited N2 and O2. The detailed investigation of the ionospheric electron energy balance was carried out. It is shown for the first time that the revised electron cooling rates derived by Pavlov (1998a, c), and Pavlov and Berrington (1999), and Lobzin et al. (1999) produce a better fit of the calculated electron temperature and density to the radar data than the outdated cooling rates of Schunk and Nagy (1978). Revised (decreased) electron cooling rates increase the electron temperature and decrease the electron density. The difference between the revised and outdated cooling rates of thermal electrons leads to the maximum difference of 230 K between the calculated electron temperatures at the F2-peak altitude and to the increase of the calculated F-region main peak electron density by up to a factor of 1.13. Contrary to previous studies given by Richards (1986), Richards and Khazanov (1997), and Aponte et al. (1999), we found that the resulting effect of N(2D) electron quenching included in thermal electron heating on the electron temperature at the F2 peak altitude is the very weak increase of the calculated electron temperature up to about 35K. It is found that the effect of including the N(2D) diffusion results in a decrease in the calculated daytime N(2D) number density above about 290km and in a decrease of the daytime integral intensity at 520nm up to a factor of 1.11.

  6. Electron temperature and concentration in a thermal atomic oxygen source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrow, Patrick Dennis

    1990-01-01

    A thermal atomic oxygen source for materials screening was built for NASA by Boeing Aerospace. The objective here was to use a microwave interferometer and Langmuir probe to characterize the electron concentration in this thermal atomic oxygen source. Typical operating conditions in the thermal atomic oxygen source were found to produce electron concentrations that were well below the detection threshold of the interferometer (10(exp 8) cm (sup -3)). The researchers calibrated (with the interferometer) the Langmuir probe at an artificially high plasma density and then used the circular and the square Langmuir probes to measure the low electron concentrations that exist during materials exposure tests. Electron concentration was measured as a function of power and position. The electrons were lost to the walls through ambipolar diffusion, and their concentration was accurately described by an equation. The electron concentration was proportional to power squared and decayed exponentially with distance.

  7. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-07-14

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  8. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx Gázquez, José L. E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx

    2015-07-14

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  9. Local Measurement of Electron Density and Temperature in High Temperature Laser Plasma Using the Ion-Acoustic Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Davis, P; Ross, S; Meezan, N; Divol, L; Price, D; Glenzer, S H; Rousseaux, C

    2005-09-20

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

  10. Effects of Spatial Variations in Coronal Temperatures on Type III Bursts. I. Variations in Electron Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2011-03-01

    The electron temperature Te and ion temperature Ti in the corona vary with time and location, due to transient and persistent activity on the Sun. A method is developed for incorporating spatial variations of coronal temperatures into our previous simulation model for coronal type III bursts. The effects on type III bursts are simulated here for monotonic Te variations and/or for spatially localized disturbances in Te . Localized Te disturbances are found to have stronger effects than monotonic variations. In the presence of localized Te disturbances, the dynamic spectra of fp and 2fp emission are modulated at frequencies corresponding to the disturbances, showing intense fine structures that are narrow band and slowly drifting. The fp emission may be observable although still significantly weaker and more patchy than the 2fp emission. Distinct signatures of Te disturbances are found in the dependence on frequency of the 2fp spectral characteristics, e.g., the maximum flux. In the presence of monotonically varying Te , the frequency drift rate for 2fp emission agrees quantitatively with an extended version of the standard prediction, depending on the plasma density profile and a characteristic, non-constant beam speed, which varies with position via dependence on Te , and agrees quantitatively with the simulated beam dynamics. The results thus indicate that nonthermal type III bursts offer a new tool to probe both spatially localized Te structures and monotonic Te variations in the corona. The presence of localized Te disturbances may be responsible for some fine structures in type IIIs, e.g., the flux modulations in type IIIb bursts.

  11. Reliability assessment of indium solder for low temperature electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rui W.; Patrick McCluskey, F.

    2009-11-01

    Indium is the choice of material for cryogenic joining applications. It is superior under repeated wide temperature excursions including extreme cold temperatures (below -55 °C) because of its excellent electrical conductivity and ductility at cryogenic temperatures. In particular, it is being considered for die/substrate attaches in low temperature SiGe BiCMOS modules for Martian and Lunar exploration. An efficient and systematic assessment was conducted to evaluate the reliability of indium solder under thermal fatigue and extended cold temperature mechanical fatigue conditions encountered in space exploration missions. In addition, fatigue failure sites, modes and mechanisms in indium solder at low temperature were investigated. A fatigue model was also calibrated for indium solder joint at cryogenic temperatures.

  12. Impact of Interface Roughness on the Metallic Transport of Strongly Correlated 2D Holes in GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goble, Nicholas; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Gao, Xuan

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the non-monotonic behavior in the temperature dependent resistance, R(T) , of strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) carriers in clean semiconductors has been a central issue in the studies of 2D metallic states and metal-insulator transitions. We have studied the transport of high mobility 2D holes in 20nm wide GaAs quantum wells with varying interface roughness by changing the Al fraction x in the AlxGa1-xAs barrier. Prior to this work, no comprehensive study of the non-monotonic resistance peak against controlled barrier characteristics has been conducted. We show that the shape of the electronic contribution to R(T) is qualitatively unchanged throughout all of our measurements, regardless of the percentage of Al in the barrier. It is observed that increasing x or short range interface roughness suppresses both the strength and characteristic temperature scale of the 2D metallicity, pointing to the distinct role of short range versus long range disorder in the 2D metallic transport in this 2D hole system with interaction parameter rs ~ 20. N.G. acknowledges the US DOE GAANN fellowship (P200A090276 & P200A070434). M.J.M. is supported by the Miller Family Foundation and the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DMS (DE-SC0006671). X.P.A.G thanks the NSF for funding support (DMR-0906415).

  13. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  14. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-06-15

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential.

  15. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-06-01

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential.

  16. Space Charge Saturated Sheath Regime and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; A. Smirnov; N.J. Fisch

    2005-03-16

    Secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is predicted to lead to space charge saturated wall sheaths resulting in enhanced power losses in the thruster channel. Analysis of experimentally obtained electron-wall collision frequency suggests that the electron temperature saturation, which occurs at high discharge voltages, appears to be caused by a decrease of the Joule heating rather than by the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission.

  17. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  18. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. It is shown that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  19. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    DOE PAGES

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Importantmore » swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.« less

  20. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L; Ayers, Paul W; Vela, Alberto

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μe) and chemical hardness (ηe) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μe. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (-I), positive (-A), and zero values of the fractional charge (-(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  1. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  2. Preliminary low temperature electron irradiation of triple junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2005-01-01

    JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature.

  3. The 2-D growth of gold on single-layer graphene/Ru(0001): Enhancement of CO adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Zhou, Zihao; Guo, Qinlin; Yan, Zhen; Yao, Yunxi; Goodman, D. Wayne

    2011-09-01

    The growth and morphology of two-dimensional (2-D) gold islands on a single-layer graphene supported on Ru(0001) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Our findings show that gold exhibits 2-D structures up to a gold dosage of 0.75 equivalent monolayers, and that these 2-D gold islands are thermally stable at room temperature. Parallel polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic (PM-IRAS) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopic (HREELS) studies indicate that carbon monoxide (CO) adsorbs on these 2-D gold islands at 85 K, showing a characteristic CO stretching feature at 2095 cm-1 for a saturation coverage of CO. The red shift of the CO stretching frequency compared to that on charge neutral gold is consistent with electron transfer from graphene to gold, i.e., an electron-rich gold overlayer. Preliminary data obtained by dosing molecular oxygen onto this CO pre-covered surface suggest that the 2-D gold islands catalyze the oxidation of CO.

  4. QUENCH2D. Two-Dimensional IHCP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, A.; Beck, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    QUENCH2D* is developed for the solution of general, non-linear, two-dimensional inverse heat transfer problems. This program provides estimates for the surface heat flux distribution and/or heat transfer coefficient as a function of time and space by using transient temperature measurements at appropriate interior points inside the quenched body. Two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric geometries such as turnbine disks and blades, clutch packs, and many other problems can be analyzed using QUENCH2D*.

  5. Electronic clinical predictive thermometer using logarithm for temperature prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambridge, Vivien J. (Inventor); Koger, Thomas L. (Inventor); Nail, William L. (Inventor); Diaz, Patrick (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A thermometer that rapidly predicts body temperature based on the temperature signals received from a temperature sensing probe when it comes into contact with the body. The logarithms of the differences between the temperature signals in a selected time frame are determined. A line is fit through the logarithms and the slope of the line is used as a system time constant in predicting the final temperature of the body. The time constant in conjunction with predetermined additional constants are used to compute the predicted temperature. Data quality in the time frame is monitored and if unacceptable, a different time frame of temperature signals is selected for use in prediction. The processor switches to a monitor mode if data quality over a limited number of time frames is unacceptable. Determining the start time on which the measurement time frame for prediction is based is performed by summing the second derivatives of temperature signals over time frames. When the sum of second derivatives in a particular time frame exceeds a threshold, the start time is established.

  6. Negative Magnetoresistance in Viscous Flow of Two-Dimensional Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. S.

    2016-10-01

    At low temperatures, in very clean two-dimensional (2D) samples, the electron mean free path for collisions with static defects and phonons becomes greater than the sample width. Under this condition, the electron transport occurs by formation of a viscous flow of an electron fluid. We study the viscous flow of 2D electrons in a magnetic field perpendicular to the 2D layer. We calculate the viscosity coefficients as the functions of magnetic field and temperature. The off-diagonal viscosity coefficient determines the dispersion of the 2D hydrodynamic waves. The decrease of the diagonal viscosity in magnetic field leads to negative magnetoresistance which is temperature and size dependent. Our analysis demonstrates that this viscous mechanism is responsible for the giant negative magnetoresistance recently observed in the ultrahigh-mobility GaAs quantum wells. We conclude that 2D electrons in those structures in moderate magnetic fields should be treated as a viscous fluid.

  7. Two-temperature models of old supernova remnants with ion and electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Wei; Cox, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects thermal conduction may have on the evolution of old supernova remnants, we present the results of 1D (spherically symmetric) numerical simulations of a remnant in a homogeneous interstellar medium for four different cases: (1) without thermal conduction; (2) with both electron and ion thermal conduction assuming equal temperatures; (3) with electron thermal conduction only, following electron and ion temperatures separately; and (4) with both electron and ion thermal conduction following separate temperatures. We followed the entire evolution until the completion of the remnant bubble collapse. Our most significant result is that in remnant evolution studies concerned principally with either the shell or bubble evolution at late times, reasonable results are obtained with single-temperature models. When the electron and ion temperatures are followed separately, however, ion thermal conduction cannot safely be ignored.

  8. Temperature and donor concentration dependence of the conduction electron Lande g-factor in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Konakov, Anton A.; Ezhevskii, Alexander A.; Soukhorukov, Andrey V.; Guseinov, Davud V.; Popkov, Sergey A.; Burdov, Vladimir A.

    2013-12-04

    Temperature and donor concentration dependence of the conduction electron g-factor in silicon has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. We performed electron spin resonance experiments on Si samples doped with different densities of phosphorus and lithium. Theoretical consideration is based on the renormalization of the electron energy in a weak magnetic field by the interaction with possible perturbing agents, such as phonons and impurity centers. In the second-order perturbation theory interaction of the electron subsystem with the lattice vibrations as well as ionized donors results in decreasing the conduction electron g-factor, which becomes almost linear function both of temperature and impurity concentration.

  9. On effective temperatures and electron spin polarization in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1998-05-01

    This note is a summary of the author`s views on the subject of effective temperatures (and the Unruh temperature in particular) in accelerators. Unruh analyzes the response to vacuum fluctuations of a linearly accelerated two-level atom serving as a detector and shows that the relative populations of the two states are given by a boltzmann factor with kT = {h_bar}a/2{pi}c, where a is the acceleration. The inference is that the detector is immersed in a black-body spectrum of Unruh radiation at the Unruh temperature. He refers to these ideas as the Unruh effect.

  10. High-temperature superconductivity: Electron mirages in an iron salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaanen, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The detection of unusual 'mirage' energy bands in photoemission spectra of single-atom layers of iron selenide reveals the probable cause of high-temperature superconductivity in these artificial structures. See Letter p.245

  11. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  12. New results of ultra-low temperature experiments in the second Landau level of a two-dimensional electron system.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Vicente, C.; Stormer, H. L.; Sullivan, N. S.; Xia, J. S.; Adams, E. D.; West, Ken W.; Tsui, Daniel Chee; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; Baldwin, K. W.

    2003-07-01

    In the second Landau level around {nu} = 5/2 filling of an extremely high quality 2D electron system and at temperatures T down to 9 mK we observe a very strong even-denominator fractional quantum Hall effect at Landau level filling {nu} = 5/2 and its energy gap is large and {Delta} {approx} 0.45 K. A clear FQHE state is seen at {nu} = 2+2/5, with well-quantized R{sub xy}. A novel, even denominator FQHE state at {nu} = 2+3/8 seems to develop, as deduced from the T-dependence of dR{sub xy}/dB. In addition, four fully developed re-entrant integral quantum Hall effect (RIQHE) states are also observed. At low temperatures, the wide RIQHE plateau around at {nu} = 2+2/7 is interrupted by a dip, indicating an additional reentrance. Finally, the tilted magnetic field experiment at an ultra-low temperature of 10 mK was carried out to examine the spin-polarization of the {nu} = 5/2 FQHE state.

  13. Coronal electron temperature in the protracted solar minimum, the cycle 24 mini maximum, and over centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Goelzer, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Korreck, K.; Leamon, R. J.; Lepri, S. T.; Maruca, B. A.; McComas, D.; Steven, M. L.

    2014-03-01

    Recent in situ observations of the solar wind show that charge states (e.g., the O7+/O6+and C6+/C5+abundance ratios) evolved through the extended, deep solar minimum between solar cycles 23 and 24 (i.e., from 2006 to 2009) reflecting cooler electron temperatures in the corona. We extend previous analyses to study the evolution of the coronal electron temperature through the protracted solar minimum and observe not only the reduction in coronal temperature in the cycles 23-24 solar minimum but also a small increase in coronal temperature associated with increasing activity during the "mini maximum" in cycle 24. We use a new model of the interplanetary magnetic flux since 1749 to estimate coronal electron temperatures over more than two centuries. The reduction in coronal electron temperature in the cycles 23-24 protracted solar minimum is similar to reductions observed at the beginning of the Dalton Minimum (˜1805-1840). If these trends continue to reflect the evolution of the Dalton Minimum, we will observe further reductions in coronal temperature in the cycles 24-25 solar minimum. Preliminary indications in 2013 do suggest a further post cycle 23 decline in solar activity. Thus, we extend our understanding of coronal electron temperature using the solar wind scaling law and compare recent reductions in coronal electron temperature in the protracted solar minimum to conditions that prevailed in the Dalton Minimum.

  14. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  15. Resistivity at low temperatures in electron-doped cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelman, S.; Sachs, M.; Droulers, G.; Butch, N. P.; Paglione, J.; Bach, P.; Greene, R. L.; Dagan, Y.

    2010-09-01

    We measured the magnetoresistance as a function of temperature down to 20 mK and magnetic field for a set of underdoped Pr1.88Ce0.12CuO4-δ thin films with controlled oxygen content. This allows us to access the edge of the superconducting dome on the underdoped side. The sheet resistance increases with increasing oxygen content whereas the superconducting transition temperature is steadily decreasing down to zero. Upon applying various magnetic fields to suppress superconductivity we found that the sheet resistance increases when the temperature is lowered. It saturates at very low temperatures. These results, along with the magnetoresistance, cannot be described in the context of zero-temperature two-dimensional superconductor-to-insulator transition nor as a simple Kondo effect due to scattering off spins in the copper-oxide planes. We conjecture that due to the proximity to an antiferromagnetic phase magnetic droplets are induced. This results in negative magnetoresistance and in an upturn in the resistivity.

  16. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Zhao, S. F.; Yuan, G. P.

    2015-04-01

    Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than -0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere), which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne-Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple parameters helps to

  17. Threefold Increase of the Bulk Electron Temperature of Plasma Discharges in a Magnetic Mirror Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagryansky, P. A.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Lizunov, A. A.; Maximov, V. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Soldatkina, E. I.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    This Letter describes plasma discharges with a high temperature of bulk electrons in the axially symmetric high-mirror-ratio (R =35 ) open magnetic system gas dynamic trap (GDT) in the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk). According to Thomson scattering measurements, the on-axis electron temperature averaged over a number of sequential shots is 660 ±50 eV with the plasma density being 0.7 ×1 019 m-3 ; in few shots, electron temperature exceeds 900 eV. This corresponds to at least a threefold increase with respect to previous experiments both at GDT and at other comparable machines, thus, demonstrating the highest quasistationary (about 1 ms) electron temperature achieved in open traps. The breakthrough is made possible by application of a new 0.7 MW /54.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating system in addition to standard 5 MW heating by neutral beams, and application of a radial electric field to mitigate the flute instability.

  18. Electron-Temperature Dependence of the Recombination of NH4(+)((NH3)(sub n) Ions with Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Johnson, R.

    1997-01-01

    The two-body recombination of NH4(+)(NH3)(sub 2,3) cluster-ions with electrons has been studied in an afterglow experiment in which the electron temperature T, was elevated by radio-frequency heating from 300 K up to 900 K. The recombination coefficients for the n = 2 and n = 3 cluster ions were found to be equal, alpha(sub 2, sup(2)) = alpha(sub 3, sup(2)) = (4.8 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp - 6)cu cm/s, and to vary with electron temperature as T(sub c, sup -0.65) rather than to be nearly temperature-independent as had been inferred from measurements in microwave-heated plasmas.

  19. Encapsulation for smart textile electronics - humidity and temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Andreas; Tran, Thanh-Nam; Aasmundtveit, Knut E; Seeberg, Trine M

    2015-01-01

    A combined humidity and temperature sensor was packaged by vacuum casting onto three different types of textiles; cotton, nylon and a waterproof fabric. This was done in order to integrate the sensor in a jacket in a soft and reliable way without changing the sensor performance. A membrane was custom made and integrated into the device to protect the sensor from the environment. The packaged sensors performance was characterized in a climate chamber were the relative humidity and temperature ranged from 25 % to 95 % and -10 °C to 75 °C respectively. The packaged sensors showed insignificant to limited performance degradation. PMID:25980871

  20. Measurement of electron temperature of imploded capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Edwards, J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S.; Landen, O. L.; Springer, P.; Suter, L.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D. K.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Kyrala, G.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The electron and ion temperatures of the imploded core plasma are two of the most important metrics of inertial confinement fusion experiments. We have developed a technique for inferring electron temperatures from the contrast of x-ray images observed through a group of x-ray filters. Generally, the plasma electron temperature exhibits spatial and temporal variations, so time-averaged and time-resolved measurements are expected to yield somewhat different results. By analyzing the intensity of images observed with both a time-integrated detector (imaging plates) and a time-resolved detector (gated micro-channel plate), we found the electron temperature observed from x-ray images to be systematically higher than the ion temperature inferred from fusion neutron spectroscopy.

  1. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  2. Time required to document temperature by electronic skin thermometer in a healthy neonate.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananada Shankar; Chowdhury, T; Bandhopadhya, D; Ghosh, Gautam

    2009-12-01

    We studied the actual time taken to document temperature in a stable neonate by an electronic digital skin thermometer with automatic time beeper. We studied 100 neonates after initial stabilization. The mean time required for documenting the temperature by a electronic thermometer in axilla was 56.34+/-1.54 secs for term neonates (>2500g) and 54.87+/-1.23 secs for low birth weight (<2500g). The skin temperature measured simultaneously by the ordinary mercury thermometer kept for traditional 3 minutes supported the electronic measurement (P < 0.01).

  3. Measurements of electron temperature in the ionosphere using a low-frequency impedance meter

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, V.I.; Modestov, A.P.; Sokolov, L.Yu.

    1987-07-01

    Two ways of measuring the electron temperature in the ionosphere are proposed, based on measurements in the low-frequency range of the impedance of an electrical whip antenna mounted on an earth satellite. The errors are analyzed and the sources of possible systematic errors and methods of allowing for them are discussed. Some results of measurements of electron temperature on the Interkosmos-Kopernik 500 satellite, made in the period of the autumnal equinox at temperate latitudes during a solar activity minimum, are given. The data obtained are in fully satisfactory agreement with the results of measurements of electron temperature by other methods known from the literature.

  4. Analysis by kinetic modeling of the temperature dependence of thermal electron attachment to CF3Br.

    PubMed

    Troe, Jürgen; Miller, Thomas M; Shuman, Nicholas S; Viggiano, Albert A

    2012-07-14

    Experimental data from the literature for cross sections and rate constants for dissociative electron attachment to CF(3)Br, with separately varied electron and gas temperatures, are analyzed by a kinetic modeling approach. The analysis suggests that electronic and nuclear contributions to the rate constants can be roughly separated, the former leading to a negative temperature coefficient, the latter to a positive temperature coefficient. The nuclear factor in the rate constant is found to be of Arrhenius form with an activation energy which is close to the energy of crossing of the CF(3)Br and CF(3)Br(-) potential curves along the CBr bond. PMID:22803532

  5. Empirical models of the electron temperature and density in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Niemann, H. B.; Mayr, H. G.; Hoegy, W. R.; Nagy, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical models of the electron temperature and density of the late afternoon and nightside Venus ionosphere based on the Pioneer Venus measurements are presented. They describe the ionosphere conditions near 18 deg latitude between 150 and 700 km altitude for solar zenith angles of 80 to 180 deg, with a 10-fold decrease beyond 90 deg and a gradual decrease between 120 and 180 deg. The nightside electron density profile, the ion transport process, and electron precipitation are discussed. The high nocturnal temperatures and the well defined nightside ionopause suggest that energetic processes occur across the top of the entire nightside ionosphere, maintaining elevated temperatures.

  6. A statistical study of the subauroral electron temperature enhancement using dynamics Explorer 2 Langmuir probe observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Brace, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical study of the subauroral electron temperature enhancement was undertaken using Langmuir probe observations during 488 traversals of the midlatitude plasmapause region by the DE-2 satellite. The subauroral electron temperature enhancement on the nightside is a quasi-permanent feature at all altitudes between 350 and 1000 km with an occurrence frequency that depends on altitude. The occurrence frequency of the subauroral electron temperature peak has a strong altitude dependence on the dayside. The position of the subauroral Te peak decreases with increasing magnetic activity in a manner similar to that of the equatorial plasmapause and other midlatitude plasmapause signatures.

  7. Hotspot electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Chen, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S. R.; Landen, O. L.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schneider, M.; Scott, H. A.

    2016-11-01

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature in the hotspot of inertially confined, layered, spherical implosions on the National Ignition Facility using a differential filtering diagnostic. Measurements of the DT and DD ion temperatures using neutron time-of-flight detectors are complicated by the contribution of hot spot motion to the peak width, which produce an apparent temperature higher than the thermal temperature. The electron temperature is not sensitive to this non-thermal velocity and is thus a valuable input to interpreting the stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we show that the current differential filtering diagnostic provides insufficient temperature resolution for the hot spot temperatures of interest. We then propose a new differential filter configuration utilizing larger pinhole size to increase spectral fluence, as well as thicker filtration. This new configuration will improve measurement uncertainty by more than a factor of three, allowing for a more accurate hotspot temperature.

  8. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements on the Solar Orbiter with thermal noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Perche, C.; Moncuquet, M.; Zouganelis, I.; Bale, S. D.; Vilmer, N.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    The measurement of the solar wind electron temperature in the unexplored region between 1 and 45 Rs is of prime importance for understanding the solar wind acceleration. Solar Orbiter's location, combined with the fact that the spacecraft will nearly co-rotate with the sun on some portions of its orbit, will furnish observations placing constraints on solar wind models. We discuss the implementation of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order to get accurate measurements of the total electron density and electron temperature and to correct the spacecraft charging effects which affect the electron analyzers.

  9. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements for the Solar Orbiter using the thermal noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zouganelis, I.; Bale, S. D.; Vilmer, N.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    The measurement of the solar wind electron temperature radial profile in the unexplored region between 1 and 45 R_s is of prime importance for understanding the solar wind acceleration. Solar Orbiter's location, combined with its ability to observe the corona in co-rotation, will furnish strong observational constraints on solar wind models. We discuss the implementation of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order (i) to get accurate measurements of the total electron density and core electron temperature and (ii) to allow direct determination of the spacecraft charging effects which affect the electron analyzers.

  10. Arbitrary amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons in three-electron temperature space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-06-15

    We examine the characteristics of large amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons supported in a four-component unmagnetised plasma composed of cool, warm, hot electrons, and cool ions. The inertia and pressure for all the species in this plasma system are retained by assuming that they are adiabatic fluids. Our findings reveal that both positive and negative potential slow electron-acoustic solitons are supported in the four-component plasma system. The polarity switch of the slow electron-acoustic solitons is determined by the number densities of the cool and warm electrons. Negative potential solitons, which are limited by the cool and warm electron number densities becoming unreal and the occurrence of negative potential double layers, are found for low values of the cool electron density, while the positive potential solitons occurring for large values of the cool electron density are only limited by positive potential double layers. Both the lower and upper Mach numbers for the slow electron-acoustic solitons are computed and discussed.

  11. Intermolecular electronic coupling in organic molecular thin films measured by temperature modulation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Abhishek; Jin, Y; Chan, P. K. L.; Shtein, Max; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature modulation spectroscopy is used to obtain the temperature dependences of oscillator strength, exciton transition energy, and line width for a copper phthalocyanine thin film. With increasing temperature, the oscillator strength exhibits a pronounced decrease for charge transfer (CT) excitons, making this technique suitable for differentiating exciton types. From the measured magnitude and temperature dependence of the CT oscillator strength, we obtain estimates for the intermolecular electronic coupling and its exponential decay coefficient.

  12. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  13. Evidence against a universal electron-beam-induced virtual temperature in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Pia; Kaiser, Ute; Lehtinen, Ossi

    2016-04-01

    The continuous electron bombardment of a sample during transmission electron microscopy (TEM) drives atomic-scale transformations. In earlier studies the transformations appeared to proceed as if the sample was held at an elevated temperature, and, indeed, the hypothesis of an electron-beam-induced virtual temperature has gained traction in the scientific community. However, the sample is not significantly heated by the electron beam, meaning the processes are not activated by thermal vibrations. Instead, individual collisions between the electrons and the target atoms, and/or excitations of the electronic system, lead to the observed transformations. It is not a priori clear what virtual temperature can be assigned to the conditions under the electron irradiation, or even if such a temperature can be defined at all. Here, we attempt to measure the virtual temperature, specific to this system, by comparing the relative population of the three different divacancy defect states in single-layer graphene to the Boltzmann distribution using calculated energy levels of the defect states. The experiment is conducted using aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM at an acceleration voltage of 80 kV. Atomistic simulations are used to learn about the energetics of the defects. We find that the measured populations cannot be fitted to the Boltzmann distribution, and consequently no universal virtual temperature can be assigned to the system.

  14. On the electron-ion temperature ratio established by collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco; Broersen, Sjors; Bykov, Andrei; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often collisionless shocks, in which the changes in plasma flow and temperatures across the shock are established not through Coulomb interactions, but through electric and magnetic fields. An open question about collisionless shocks is whether electrons and ions each establish their own post-shock temperature (non-equilibration of temperatures), or whether they quickly equilibrate in the shock region. Here we provide a simple, thermodynamic, relation for the minimum electron-ion temperature ratios that should be expected as a function of Mach number. The basic assumption is that the enthalpy-flux of the electrons is conserved separately, but that all particle species should undergo the same density jump across the shock, in order for the plasma to remain charge neutral. The only form of additional electron heating that we allow for is adiabatic heating, caused by the compression of the electron gas. These assumptions result in an analytic treatment of expected electron-ion temperature ratio that agrees with observations of collisionless shocks: at low sonic Mach numbers, Ms ≲ 2, the electron-ion temperature ratio is close to unity, whereas for Mach numbers above Ms ≈ 60 the electron-ion temperature ratio asymptotically approaches a temperature ratio of Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩. In the intermediate Mach number range the electron-ion temperature ratio scales as Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2. In addition, we calculate the electron-ion temperature ratios under the assumption of adiabatic heating of the electrons only, which results in a higher electron-ion temperature ratio, but preserves the Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2 scaling. We also show that for magnetised shocks the electron-ion temperature ratio approaches the asymptotic value Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩ for lower magnetosonic Mach numbers (Mms), mainly because for a strongly magnetised shock the sonic Mach number is larger than the magnetosonic Mach number (Mms ≤ Ms). The predicted scaling of the electron

  15. Out-of-Equilibrium Heating of Electron Liquid: Fermionic and Bosonic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, A.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Baturina, T. I.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate out-of-the equilibrium properties of the electron liquid in a two-dimensional disordered superconductor subject to the electric bias and temperature gradient. We calculate kinetic coefficients and Nyquist noise, and find that they are characterized by distinct effective temperatures: Te, characterizing single-particle excitations, TCp, describing the Cooper pairs, and Teh, corresponding to electron-hole or dipole excitations. Varying the ratio between the electric j and thermal jth currents and boundary conditions one can heat different kinds of excitations tuning their corresponding temperatures. We propose the experiment to determine these effective temperatures.

  16. Oblique shock waves in a two electron temperature superthermally magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, A. S.; Panwar, A.; Ryu, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of low-frequency ion acoustic ( IA) shock waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermally distributed electrons. A nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries-Burger ( KdV-Burger) equation is obtained by using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) which governs the dynamics of the IA shock wave. Using the solution of KdV-Burger equation, the characteristics of the IA shock wave have been studied for various plasma parameters. The combined effects of the cold to hot electron temperature ratio (σ), the density ratio of hot electrons to ions (f), the superthermality of cold and hot electrons (κc, κh), the strength of the magnetic field (ω_{ci}), and the obliqueness (θ), significantly influence the profile of the shock wave. The findings in the present study could be important for the electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere, where two temperature electrons exist with a kappa distribution.

  17. Dust-acoustic solitary structures in a magnetized dusty plasma with two-temperature nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an obliquely propagating magnetized dusty plasma, containing nonextensively distributed electrons of distinct temperatures (namely lower and higher temperature nonextensive electrons), negatively charged mobile dust grains, and Maxwellian ions, is rigorously studied and analyzed by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the characteristics of the DA solitary waves (DASWs) are significantly modified by the external magnetic field, obliqueness of the system, nonextensivity of the electrons, electron temperature-ratios, and the respective number densities of two species of electrons. The results obtained from this analysis can be employed in understanding and treating the structures and the characteristics of DASWs both in laboratory and astrophysical plasma system.

  18. Reprint of : Single-electron coherence: Finite temperature versus pure dephasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalets, Michael; Haack, Géraldine

    2016-08-01

    We analyze a coherent injection of single electrons on top of the Fermi sea in two situations, at finite-temperature and in the presence of pure dephasing. Both finite-temperature and pure dephasing change the property of the injected quantum states from pure to mixed. However, we show that the temperature-induced mixedness does not alter the coherence properties of these single-electron states. In particular two such mixed states exhibit perfect antibunching while colliding at an electronic wave splitter. This is in striking difference with the dephasing-induced mixedness which suppresses antibunching. On the contrary, a single-particle shot noise is suppressed at finite temperatures but is not affected by pure dephasing. This work therefore extends the investigation of the coherence properties of single-electron states to the case of mixed states and clarifies the difference between different types of mixedness.

  19. Laboratory observations of electron temperature in the wake of a sphere in a streaming plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, W. A.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.; Fontheim, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A parametric study was performed of electron-temperature variation in the wake of a conducting sphere in a streaming plasma. The flow conditions were varied as follows: the ambient electron temperatures in the range from 850 to 2450 K; the ambient electron densities in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00007 per cu cm; and body potentials relative to plasma potential in the range from +1.7 to -2.8 V for an ion-beam energy of approximately 4 eV. Electron-temperature enhancements were observed which ranged up to 200 per cent above ambient in the nearest proximity of the body surface. The magnitude of the enhancement depends upon the ambient density, temperature, and body potential.

  20. Synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles via room-temperature electron reduction with argon glow discharge as electron source

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon glow discharge has been employed as a cheap, environmentally friendly, and convenient electron source for simultaneous reduction of HAuCl4 and PdCl2 on the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrate. The thermal imaging confirms that the synthesis is operated at room temperature. The reduction is conducted with a short time (30 min) under the pressure of approximately 100 Pa. This room-temperature electron reduction operates in a dry way and requires neither hydrogen nor extra heating nor chemical reducing agent. The analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm all the metallic ions have been reduced. The characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are formed. There also exist some highly dispersed Au and Pd monometallic particles that cannot be detected by XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of their small particle sizes. The observed AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are spherical with an average size of 14 nm. No core-shell structure can be observed. The room-temperature electron reduction can be operated in a larger scale. It is an easy way for the synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles. PMID:25177221

  1. High and low frequency instabilities driven by a single electron beam in two-electron temperature space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.

    2013-12-15

    In an attempt to understand the excitation mechanisms of broadband electrostatic noise, beam-generated electrostatic instabilities are investigated using kinetic theory in a four-component magnetised plasma model composed of beam electrons (magnetic field-aligned), background hot and cool electrons and ions. All species are fully magnetised and considered to be Maxwellian. The dependence of the instability growth rates and real frequencies on various plasma parameters such as beam speed, particle densities and temperatures, magnetic field strength, wave propagation angle, and temperature anisotropy of the beam are examined. In this study we have found that the electron-acoustic, electron beam-resonant and ion-acoustic instabilities are excited. Our studies have focused on three velocity regimes, namely, the low (v{sub dbz}2 C{sub h}) regimes, where v{sub dbz} (C{sub h}) is the electron beam drift speed (thermal speed of the hot electrons). Plasma parameters from satellite measurements are used where applicable to provide realistic predictions.

  2. Investigation of sounding rocket observations of field-aligned currents and electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Lessard, M.; Zettergren, M. D.; Moen, J.; Lynch, K. A.; Heavisides, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Strangeway et al. [2005] and other authors have concluded that the establishment of the ambipolar field by the deposition of energy from soft electron precipitation is a significant driver of type-2 ion upflows. Likewise, Clemmons et al. [2008] and Zhang et al. [2012] proposed processes by which soft electron precipitation may play a role in heating neutrals and contribute to neutral upwelling. In both situations the thermal ionospheric electron population plays a crucial role in both generation of the ambipolar field and in collisional energy exchange with the atmosphere through a variety of processes. In this study we examine the dynamics of the electron population, specifically the temperature, in a slightly different context - focusing on the auroral downward current region (DCR). In many cases auroral DCRs may be depleted of plasma, which sets up interesting conditions involving thermoelectric heat fluxes (which flow upward - in the opposite direction from the current), adiabatic expansion due to the high (upward) speed of the electrons carrying the downward current, heat exchange from ions which have elevated temperatures due to frictional heating, and direct frictional heating of the electrons. A detailed understanding of the electron temperature in auroral DCRs is necessary to make quantitative statements about recombination, upflow, cavitation and a host of other processes relevant to ion outflow. In this study, we compare in situ rocket observations of electron temperature, density, and current densities with predictions from the Zettergren and Semeter [2012] model in an attempt to better understand the dynamics and relationships between these parameters in DCRs.

  3. Verification of Gyrokinetic (delta)f Simulations of Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Parker, S E; Chen, Y; Candy, J; Dimits, A; Dorland, W; Hammett, G W; Jenko, F

    2007-05-07

    The GEM gyrokinetic {delta}f simulation code [Chen, 2003] [Chen, 2007] is shown to reproduce electron temperature gradient turbulence at the benchmark operating point established in previous work [Nevins, 2006]. The electron thermal transport is within 10% of the expected value, while the turbulent fluctuation spectrum is shown to have the expected intensity and two-point correlation function.

  4. Sustenance of inhomogeneous electron temperature in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Karkari, S. K. Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the equilibrium properties of a magnetized plasma column sustained by direct-current (dc) operated hollow cathode discharge in conjunction with a conducting end-plate, acting as the anode. The survey of radial plasma characteristics, performed in argon plasma, shows hotter plasma in the periphery as compared to the central plasma region; whereas the plasma density peaks at the center. The off-centered peak in radial temperature is attributed due to inhomogeneous power deposition in the discharge volume in conjunction with short-circuiting effect by the conducting end plate. A theoretical model based on particle flux and energy balance is given to explain the observed characteristics of the plasma column.

  5. High temperature superconductor analog electronics for millimeter-wavelength communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of high temperature superconductor (HTS) passive microwave circuits up to X-band was encouraging when compared to their metallic counterparts. The extremely low surface resistance of HTS films up to about 10 GHz enables a reduction in loss by as much as 100 times compared to copper when both materials are kept at about 77 K. However, a superconductor's surface resistance varies in proportion to the frequency squared. Consequently, the potential benefit of HTS materials to millimeter-wave communications requires careful analysis. A simple ring resonator was used to evaluate microstrip losses at Ka-band. Additional promising components were investigated such as antennas and phase shifters. Prospects for HTS to favorable impact millimeter-wave communications systems are discussed.

  6. Evaluation of Power Electronic Components and Systems at Cryogenic Temperatures For Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Power electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space applications and outer planetary exploration are required to operate reliably and efficiently under extreme temperature conditions. This requirement is dictated by the fact that the operational environments associated with some of the space missions would encompass temperatures as low as -183 C. The development and utilization of electronics capable of low temperature operation would not only fulfill the advanced technology requirements, but also would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. These benefits are generally achieved by the improved intrinsic properties of some of the electronic materials at low temperature, reduced device losses, and the elimination of heating elements used in conventional systems at low temperatures. Power electronic circuits are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management, conditioning, and control. In this work, the performance of certain power electronic components and systems was investigated under low temperature. These include inductors, capacitors, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) controllers, and advanced commercial DC/DC converter modules. Different properties were determined as a function of temperature in the range of 20 C to -140 C, at various current and voltages levels. The experimental procedures along with the experimental data obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  7. Spectroscopy and Thermometry of Drumhead Modes in a Mesoscopic 2D Coulomb Crystal of ^9Be^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Teale, Carson; Keith, Adam; Wang, Joseph; Freericks, James; Bollinger, John

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate spectroscopy and thermometry of individual motional modes in a mesoscopic 2D ion array using entanglement between ion valence electron spins and collective motion. Our system is a ˜400 μm-diameter planar crystal of several hundred ^9Be^+ ions exhibiting complex drumhead modes in the confining potential of a Penning trap. Exploiting precise control over the ^9Be^+ valence electron spins, we apply a homogeneous spin-dependent optical dipole force to excite arbitrary transverse modes with wavelengths ranging from the array diameter to the interparticle spacing of ˜20 μm. In addition to temperature measurements, this spin-motion entanglement induced by the spin-dependent optical dipole force allows for extremely sensitive detection of external forces (˜100 yN) acting on the ion crystal. Characterization of mode frequencies and temperatures is critical for quantum simulation experiments that make use of the ion spins.

  8. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  9. Consistent multi-internal-temperature models for vibrational and electronic nonequilibrium in hypersonic nitrogen plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Aurélien Bourdon, Anne Perrin, Marie-Yvonne

    2015-04-15

    In this work, a state-to-state vibrational and electronic collisional model is developed to investigate nonequilibrium phenomena behind a shock wave in an ionized nitrogen flow. In the ionization dynamics behind the shock wave, the electron energy budget is of key importance and it is found that the main depletion term corresponds to the electronic excitation of N atoms, and conversely the major creation terms are the electron-vibration term at the beginning, then replaced by the electron ions elastic exchange term. Based on these results, a macroscopic multi-internal-temperature model for the vibration of N{sub 2} and the electronic levels of N atoms is derived with several groups of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and electronic levels of N with their own internal temperatures to model the shape of the vibrational distribution of N{sub 2} and of the electronic excitation of N, respectively. In this model, energy and chemistry source terms are calculated self-consistently from the rate coefficients of the state-to-state database. For the shock wave condition studied, a good agreement is observed on the ionization dynamics as well as on the atomic bound-bound radiation between the state-to-state model and the macroscopic multi-internal temperature model with only one group of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and two groups of electronic levels of N.

  10. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  11. Resonance Raman and temperature-dependent electronic absorption spectra of cavity and noncavity models of the hydrated electron

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jennifer R.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Most of what is known about the structure of the hydrated electron comes from mixed quantum/classical simulations, which depend on the pseudopotential that couples the quantum electron to the classical water molecules. These potentials usually are highly repulsive, producing cavity-bound hydrated electrons that break the local water H-bonding structure. However, we recently developed a more attractive potential, which produces a hydrated electron that encompasses a region of enhanced water density. Both our noncavity and the various cavity models predict similar experimental observables. In this paper, we work to distinguish between these models by studying both the temperature dependence of the optical absorption spectrum, which provides insight into the balance of the attractive and repulsive terms in the potential, and the resonance Raman spectrum, which provides a direct measure of the local H-bonding environment near the electron. We find that only our noncavity model can capture the experimental red shift of the hydrated electron’s absorption spectrum with increasing temperature at constant density. Cavity models of the hydrated electron predict a solvation structure similar to that of the larger aqueous halides, leading to a Raman O–H stretching band that is blue-shifted and narrower than that of bulk water. In contrast, experiments show the hydrated electron has a broader and red-shifted O–H stretching band compared with bulk water, a feature recovered by our noncavity model. We conclude that although our noncavity model does not provide perfect quantitative agreement with experiment, the hydrated electron must have a significant degree of noncavity character. PMID:23382233

  12. Relaxation of ferroelectric states in 2D distributions of quantum dots: EELS simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, C. M.; Meza-Montes, L.; Moctezuma, R. E.; Carrillo, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    The relaxation time of collective electronic states in a 2D distribution of quantum dots is investigated theoretically by simulating EELS experiments. From the numerical calculation of the probability of energy loss of an electron beam, traveling parallel to the distribution, it is possible to estimate the damping time of ferroelectric-like states. We generate this collective response of the distribution by introducing a mean field interaction among the quantum dots, and then, the model is extended incorporating effects of long-range correlations through a Bragg-Williams approximation. The behavior of the dielectric function, the energy loss function, and the relaxation time of ferroelectric-like states is then investigated as a function of the temperature of the distribution and the damping constant of the electronic states in the single quantum dots. The robustness of the trends and tendencies of our results indicate that this scheme of analysis can guide experimentalists to develop tailored quantum dots distributions for specific applications.

  13. Temperature gradient scale length measurement: A high accuracy application of electron cyclotron emission without calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshmandyar, S.; Yang, Z. J.; Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L.; Hubbard, A. E.; Rice, J. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2016-11-01

    Calibration is a crucial procedure in electron temperature (Te) inference from a typical electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic on tokamaks. Although the calibration provides an important multiplying factor for an individual ECE channel, the parameter ΔTe/Te is independent of any calibration. Since an ECE channel measures the cyclotron emission for a particular flux surface, a non-perturbing change in toroidal magnetic field changes the view of that channel. Hence the calibration-free parameter is a measure of Te gradient. BT-jog technique is presented here which employs the parameter and the raw ECE signals for direct measurement of electron temperature gradient scale length.

  14. Gas temperature and electron density profiles in an argon dc microdischarge measured by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Ouk, Tola; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-03-01

    Optical emisssion spectroscopy was employed to study a high pressure (100 s of Torr), slot-type (600 μm interelectrode gap), argon dc microdischarge, with added traces of nitrogen. Spatially resolved gas temperature profiles were obtained by analyzing rovibrational bands of the N2 first positive system. The gas temperature peaked near the cathode and increased with current. The contribution of Stark broadening to the hydrogen Hβ emission lineshape was used to extract the electron density. The axial distribution of electron density as well as visual observation revealed that the microdischarge positive column was highly constricted. The electron density near the sheath edge increased with both pressure and current.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of 2D molybdenum carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGES

    Halim, Joseph; Kota, Sankalp; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Naguib, Michael; Zhao, Meng -Qiang; Moon, Eun Ju; Pitock, Jeremy; Nanda, Jagjit; May, Steven J.; Gogotsi, Yury; et al

    2016-02-17

    Large scale synthesis and delamination of 2D Mo2CT x (where T is a surface termination group) has been achieved by selectively etching gallium from the recently discovered nanolaminated, ternary transition metal carbide Mo2Ga2C. Different synthesis and delamination routes result in different flake morphologies. The resistivity of free-standing Mo2CT x films increases by an order of magnitude as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 10 K, suggesting semiconductor-like behavior of this MXene, in contrast to Ti3C2T x which exhibits metallic behavior. At 10 K, the magnetoresistance is positive. Additionally, changes in electronic transport are observed upon annealing of the films.more » When 2 μm thick films are tested as electrodes in supercapacitors, capacitances as high as 700 F cm–3 in a 1 m sulfuric acid electrolyte and high capacity retention for at least 10,000 cycles at 10 A g–1 are obtained. Free-standing Mo2CT x films, with ≈8 wt% carbon nanotubes, perform well when tested as an electrode material for Li-ions, especially at high rates. In conclusion, at 20 and 131 C cycling rates, stable reversible capacities of 250 and 76 mAh g–1, respectively, are achieved for over 1000 cycles.« less

  16. Quantum Simulation with 2D Arrays of Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richerme, Philip

    2016-05-01

    The computational difficulty of solving fully quantum many-body spin problems is a significant obstacle to understanding the behavior of strongly correlated quantum matter. This work proposes the design and construction of a 2D quantum spin simulator to investigate the physics of frustrated materials, highly entangled states, mechanisms potentially underpinning high-temperature superconductivity, and other topics inaccessible to current 1D systems. The effective quantum spins will be encoded within the well-isolated electronic levels of trapped ions, confined in a two-dimensional planar geometry, and made to interact using phonon-mediated optical dipole forces. The system will be scalable to 100+ quantum particles, far beyond the realm of classical intractability, while maintaining individual-ion control, long quantum coherence times, and site-resolved projective spin measurements. Once constructed, the two-dimensional quantum simulator will implement a broad range of spin models on a variety of reconfigurable lattices and characterize their behavior through measurements of spin-spin correlations and entanglement. This versatile tool will serve as an important experimental resource for exploring difficult quantum many-body problems in a regime where classical methods fail.

  17. Ion-acoustic Gardner Solitons in electron-positron-ion plasma with two-electron temperature distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Momin A.; Mishra, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ion-acoustic solitons in collisionless plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions, isothermal positrons, and two temperature distribution of electrons have been studied. Using reductive perturbation method, Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), the modified K-dV (m-KdV), and Gardner equations are derived for the system. The soliton solution of the Gardner equation is discussed in detail. It is found that for a given set of parameter values, there exists a critical value of β=Tc/Th, (ratio of cold to hot electron temperature) below which only rarefactive KdV solitons exist and above it compressive KdV solitons exist. At the critical value of β, both compressive and rarefactive m-KdV solitons co-exist. We have also investigated the soliton in the parametric regime where the KdV equation is not valid to study soliton solution. In this region, it is found that below the critical concentration the system supports rarefactive Gardner solitons and above it compressive Gardner solitons are found. The effects of temperature ratio of two-electron species, cold electron concentration, positron concentration on the characteristics of solitons are also discussed.

  18. Modification of classical Spitzer ion-electron energy transfer rate for large ratios of ion to electron temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, Todd H.; Catto, Peter J.

    1995-06-01

    Corrections to the classical Spitzer heat transfer rate between ions and electrons are calculated for the case when the ion temperature Ti is significantly higher than the electron temperature Te. It is found that slow electrons are partially depleted by their interactions with the ions, resulting in a decrease in the heat transfer in comparison with the Spitzer rate, which assumes perfectly Maxwellian electrons. The heat transfer steadily decreases from the classical value as Ti/Te increases; for Ti/Te values of several hundred, the heat transfer rate drops to around 60%-80% of the Spitzer result. A useful expression for the heat transfer correction factor in the case when all of the ion species are at the temperature Ti is found to be Pie/(Pie)Spitzer ≊[1+(me/mi)(Ti/Te)]3/2 exp{-[3.5∑i (Z2ini/ne)(me/mi) (Ti/Te)]2/3}. This expression is quite accurate for values of ∑i (Z2ini/ne)(mp/mi)(Ti/Te) less than about 50 (where mp is the proton mass), although it underestimates the heat transfer rate for larger values of Ti/Te, and one must resort to the more accurate but more complex analytical results derived in the paper. In the event that the ion distribution is non-Maxwellian, Ti in the correction factor should be replaced by 2/3, where is the mean ion energy.

  19. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  20. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation.more » By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  1. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  2. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  3. Temperature-dependent kinetic measurements and quasi-classical trajectory studies for the OH{sup +} + H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} → H{sub 2}O{sup +}/HDO{sup +} + H/D reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Oscar; Ard, Shaun G.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A. E-mail: afrl.rvborgmailbox@kirtland.af.mil; Li, Anyang; Guo, Hua E-mail: afrl.rvborgmailbox@kirtland.af.mil

    2015-09-21

    We have measured the temperature-dependent kinetics for the reactions of OH{sup +} with H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} using a selected ion flow tube apparatus. Reaction occurs via atom abstraction to result in H{sub 2}O{sup +}/HDO{sup +} + H/D. Room temperature rate coefficients are in agreement with prior measurements and resulting temperature dependences are T{sup 0.11} for the hydrogen and T{sup 0.25} for the deuterated reactions. This work is prompted in part by recent theoretical work that mapped a full-dimensional global potential energy surface of H{sub 3}O{sup +} for the OH{sup +} + H{sub 2} → H + H{sub 2}O{sup +} reaction [A. Li and H. Guo, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11168 (2014)], and reported results of quasi-classical trajectory calculations, which are extended to a wider temperature range and initial rotational state specification here. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with these calculations which accurately predict the isotope effect in addition to an enhancement of the reaction rate constant due to the molecular rotation of OH{sup +}. The title reaction is of high importance to astrophysical models, and the temperature dependence of the rate coefficients determined here should now allow for better understanding of this reaction at temperatures more relevant to the interstellar medium.

  4. Electron temperature critical gradient and transport stiffness in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Petty, C. C.; White, A. E.; Holland, C.; Bravenec, R.; Austin, M. E.; Zeng, L.; Meneghini, O.

    2015-08-01

    In a continuing effort to validate turbulent transport models, the electron energy flux has been probed as a function of electron temperature gradient on the DIII-D tokamak. In the scan of gradient, a critical electron temperature gradient has been found in the electron heat fluxes and stiffness at various radii in L-mode plasmas. The TGLF reduced turbulent transport model (Staebler et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 055909) and full gyrokinetic GYRO model (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) recover the general trend of increasing electron energy flux with increasing electron temperature gradient scale length, but they do not predict the absolute level of transport at all radii and gradients. Comparing the experimental observations of incremental (heat pulse) diffusivity and stiffness to the models’ reveals that TGLF reproduces the trends in increasing diffusivity and stiffness with increasing electron temperature gradient scale length with a critical gradient behavior. The critical gradient of TGLF is found to have a dependence on q95, contrary to the independence of the experimental critical gradient from q95.

  5. Enhancement of Curie temperature of barium hexaferrite by dense electronic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manju; Kashyap, Subhash C.; Gupta, Hem C.; Dimri, Mukesh C.; Asokan, K.

    2014-07-15

    Curie temperature of polycrystalline barium hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}), prepared by conventional solid state technique, is anomalously and significantly enhanced (by nearly 15%) by energetic heavy ion irradiation (150 MeV, Ag{sup 12+}) at ambient temperature due to dense electronic excitations Moderate fluence (1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) induces structural defects giving rise to above enhancement. As established by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman studies, higher fluence (1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) has structurally transformed the sample to amorphous phase with marginal change in magnetization and Curie temperature.

  6. Validity of Eucken formula and Stokes’ viscosity relation in high-temperature electronically excited gases

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.; Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2014-12-09

    In the present work we evaluate the accuracy of the Eucken formula and Stokes’ viscosity relation in high temperature non-equilibrium air species with electronic excitation. The thermal conductivity coefficient calculated using the exact kinetic theory methods is compared with that obtained applying approximate formulas in the temperature range 200–20000 K. A modification of the Eucken formula providing a good agreement with exact calculations is proposed. It is shown that the Stokes viscosity relation is not valid in electronically excited monoatomic gases at temperatures higher than 2000 K.

  7. Microstructural stability of wrought, laser and electron beam glazed NARloy-Z alloy at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.; Jerman, G.; Bhat, B.; Poorman, R.

    1993-01-01

    Microstructure of wrought, laser, and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z(Cu-3 wt.% Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr) was investigated for thermal stability at elevated temperatures (539 to 760 C (1,100 to 1,400 F)) up to 94 h. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis were employed for studying microstructural evolution and kinetics of precipitation. Grain boundary precipitation and precipitate free zones (PFZ's) were observed in the wrought alloy after exposing to temperatures above 605 C (1,120 F). The fine-grained microstructure observed in the laser and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z was much more stable at elevated temperatures. Microstructural changes correlated well with hardness measurements.

  8. Role of lattice structure and low temperature resistivity in fast-electron-beam filamentation in carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, R. J.; Butler, N. M. H.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Rusby, D. R.; Scott, G. G.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Xu, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of low temperature (eV to tens-of-eV) electrical resistivity on the onset of the filamentation instability in fast-electron transport is investigated in targets comprising of layers of ordered (diamond) and disordered (vitreous) carbon. It is shown experimentally and numerically that the thickness of the disordered carbon layer influences the degree of filamentation of the fast-electron beam. Strong filamentation is produced if the thickness is of the order of 60 μm or greater, for an electron distribution driven by a sub-picosecond, mid-1020 Wcm-2 laser pulse. It is shown that the position of the vitreous carbon layer relative to the fast-electron source (where the beam current density and background temperature are highest) does not have a strong effect because the resistive filamentation growth rate is high in disordered carbon over a wide range of temperatures up to the Spitzer regime.

  9. Improved electron and ion temperatures and application to the Nov-24-12 substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Improved energy equations have been implemented for both electrons and ions in the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM). The sources of the electron temperature include heating due to photoionization, elastic collisions with ions, elastic and inelastic collisions with neutrals, as well as energy fluxes from the magnetosphere. The sources of the ion temperature include elastic collisions with electrons, and energy exchanges with neutrals accounting for Joule heating and due to temperature difference. The model was constructed using a semi-implicit method on the thermal conduction and all of the temperature-dependent source terms [Huba and Joyce, 2000]. The Nov-24-2012 substorm is investigated using the improved model. The Joule heating and its effect on the ion and neutral temperatures in high-latitudes between the improved and basic models are compared. It is also shown that a decrease in the electron temperature exists in the region of the aurora oval with high electron densities. The partitioning of energy between different source terms and loss terms is investigated throughout the substorm and as a function of location.

  10. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. PMID:23831940

  11. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; McGuire, K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stauffer, F.J.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period.

  12. Sensitivity of Inferred Electron Temperature from X-ray Emission of NIF Cryogenic DT Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seeks to achieve thermonuclear ignition through inertial confinement fusion. The accurate assessment of the performance of each implosion experiment is a crucial step. Here we report on work to derive a reliable electron temperature for the cryogenic deuteriumtritium implosions completed on the NIF using the xray signal from the Ross filter diagnostic. These Xrays are dominated by bremsstrahlung emission. By fitting the xray signal measured through each of the individual Ross filters, the source bremsstrahlung spectrum can be inferred, and an electron temperature of the implosion hot spot inferred. Currently, each filter is weighted equally in this analysis. We present work quantifying the errors with such a technique and the results from investigating the contribution of each filter to the overall accuracy of the temperature inference. Using this research, we also compare the inferred electron temperature against other measured implosion quantities to develop a more complete understanding of the hotspot physics.

  13. Ion and electron temperatures in the SUMMA mirror device by emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.; Voss, D. E.; Reinmann, J. J.; Snyder, A.

    1974-01-01

    Ion and electron temperatures, and ion drift were measured in a superconducting magnetic mirror apparatus by observing the Doppler-broadened charge-exchange component of the 667.8 and 587.6 nanometer He lines in He plasma, and the H sub alpha and H sub beta lines in H2 plasma. The second moment of the line profiles was used as the parameter for determining ion temperature. Corrections for magnetic splitting, fine structure, monochromator slit function, and variation in charge-exchange cross section with energy are included. Electron temperatures were measured by the line ratio method for the corona model, and correlations of ion and electron temperatures with plasma parameters are presented.

  14. Atomic origin of high-temperature electron trapping in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xiao; Dhar, Sarit; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-04-06

    MOSFETs based on wide-band-gap semiconductors are suitable for operation at high temperature, at which additional atomic-scale processes that are benign at lower temperatures can get activated, resulting in device degradation. Recently, significant enhancement of electron trapping was observed under positive bias in SiC MOSFETs at temperatures higher than 150 °C. Here, we report first-principles calculations showing that the enhanced electron trapping is associated with thermally activated capturing of a second electron by an oxygen vacancy in SiO{sub 2} by which the vacancy transforms into a structure that comprises one Si dangling bond and a bond between a five-fold and a four-fold Si atoms. The results suggest a key role of oxygen vacancies and their structural reconfigurations in the reliability of high-temperature MOS devices.

  15. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyaev, Yurii V.; Chertova, Nadezhda V.; Psakhie, Sergei G.

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  16. Arbitrary amplitude kinetic Alfven solitary waves in two temperature electron superthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Singh Saini, Nareshpal; Ghai, Yashika

    2016-07-01

    Through various satellite missions it is observed that superthermal velocity distribution for particles is more appropriate for describing space and astrophysical plasmas. So it is appropriate to use superthermal distribution, which in the limiting case when spectral index κ is very large ( i.e. κ→∞), shifts to Maxwellian distribution. Two temperature electron plasmas have been observed in auroral regions by FAST satellite mission, and also by GEOTAIL and POLAR satellite in the magnetosphere. Kinetic Alfven waves arise when finite Larmor radius effect modifies the dispersion relation or characteristic perpendicular wavelength is comparable to electron inertial length. We have studied the kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) in a plasma comprising of positively charged ions, superthermal hot electrons and Maxwellian distributed cold electrons. Sagdeev pseudo-potential has been employed to derive an energy balance equation. The critical Mach number has been determined from the expression of Sagdeev pseudo-potential to see the existence of solitary structures. It is observed that sub-Alfvenic compressive solitons and super-Alfvenic rarefactive solitons exist in this plasma model. It is also observed that various parameters such as superthermality of hot electrons, relative concentration of cold and hot electron species, Mach number, plasma beta, ion to cold electron temperature ratio and ion to hot electron temperature ratio have significant effect on the amplitude and width of the KAWs. Findings of this investigation may be useful to understand the dynamics of coherent non-linear structures (i.e. KAWs) in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  17. Packaging Technology Developed for High-Temperature SiC Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Lei, Jih-Fen

    2000-01-01

    A ceramic- and thick-film-materials-based prototype electronic package designed for silicon carbide (SiC) high-temperature sensors and electronics has been successfully tested at 500 C in an oxygen-containing air environment for 500 hours. This package was designed, fabricated, assembled, and electronically evaluated at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field with an in-house-fabricated SiC semiconductor test chip. High-temperature electronics and sensors are necessary for harsh-environment space and aeronautical applications, such as space missions to the inner solar system or the emission control electronics and sensors in aeronautical engines. Single-crystal SiC has such excellent physical and chemical material properties that SiC-based semiconductor electronics can operate at temperatures over 600 C, which is significantly higher than the limit for Si-based semiconductor devices. SiC semiconductor chips were recently demonstrated to be operable at temperatures as high as 600 C, but only in the probe station environment because suitable packaging technology for sensors and electronics at temperatures of 500 C and beyond did not exist. Thus, packaging technology for SiC-based sensors and electronics is immediately needed for both application and commercialization of high-temperature SiC sensors and electronics. In response to this need, researchers at Glenn designed, fabricated, and assembled a prototype electronic package for high-temperature electronics, sensors, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using aluminum nitride (AlN) substrate and gold (Au) thick-film materials. This prototype package successfully survived a soak test at 500 C in air for 500 hours. Packaging components tested included thick-film high-temperature metallization, internal wire bonds, external lead bonds, and a SiC diode chip die-attachment. Each test loop, which was composed of thick-film printed wire, wire bond, and lead bond was subjected to a 50-mA direct current for 250

  18. Electron temperature in the cusp as measured with the SCIFER-2 sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, E. J.; Lessard, M. R.; Sigernes, F.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Oksavik, K.; Kintner, P. M.; Lynch, K. A.; Huang, D. H.; Zhang, B. C.; Yang, H. G.; Ogawa, Y.

    2012-06-01

    It is expected that energy deposited by soft auroral electron precipitation in the ionosphere should result in heating of ionospheric electrons in that location, and this heating is an important step in the ion outflow process. We present coordinated observations from the SCIFER-2 sounding rocket in the cusp region overflying optical observing sites in Svalbard. The rocket payload included a sensor which is designed to measure the temperature of thermal electrons. We show that elevated electron temperatures measured in situ are correlated with electron precipitation as inferred from auroral emissions during the 60-120 s preceding the passage of the rocket. This integrated “cooking time” is an important factor in determining the origin and resulting flux of outflowing ions.

  19. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    PubMed

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  20. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.