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Sample records for 2d electronic spectroscopy

  1. Imaging Excited State Dynamics with 2d Electronic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Gregory S.

    2012-06-01

    Excited states in the condensed phase have extremely high chemical potentials making them highly reactive and difficult to control. Yet in biology, excited state dynamics operate with exquisite precision driving solar light harvesting in photosynthetic complexes though excitonic transport and photochemistry through non-radiative relaxation to photochemical products. Optimized by evolution, these biological systems display manifestly quantum mechanical behaviors including coherent energy transfer, steering wavepacket trajectories through conical intersections and protection of long-lived quantum coherence. To image the underlying excited state dynamics, we have developed a new spectroscopic method allowing us to capture excitonic structure in real time. Through this method and other ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopies, we have captured coherent dynamics within photosynthetic antenna complexes. The data not only reveal how biological systems operate, but these same spectral signatures can be exploited to create new spectroscopic tools to elucidate the underlying Hamiltonian. New data on the role of the protein in photosynthetic systems indicates that the chromophores mix strongly with some bath modes within the system. The implications of this mixing for excitonic transport will be discussed along with prospects for transferring underlying design principles to synthetic systems.

  2. Broadband 2D Electronic Spectroscopy Reveals Coupling Between Dark 1Bu- State of Carotenoid and Qx State of Bacteriochlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, Evgeny E.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Mulvaney, Rachel M.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2013-03-01

    The study of LH2 protein of purple bacteria by broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy is presented. The dark 1Bu- carotenoid state is directly observed in 2D spectra and its role in carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interaction is discussed.

  3. Broadband 7-fs diffractive-optic-based 2D electronic spectroscopy using hollow-core fiber compression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonan; Dostál, Jakub; Brixner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate noncollinear coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy for which broadband pulses are generated in an argon-filled hollow-core fiber pumped by a 1-kHz Ti:Sapphire laser. Compression is achieved to 7 fs duration (TG-FROG) using dispersive mirrors. The hollow fiber provides a clean spatial profile and smooth spectral shape in the 500-700 nm region. The diffractive-optic-based design of the 2D spectrometer avoids directional filtering distortions and temporal broadening from time smearing. For demonstration we record data of cresyl-violet perchlorate in ethanol and use phasing to obtain broadband absorptive 2D spectra. The resulting quantum beating as a function of population time is consistent with literature data. PMID:27607681

  4. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  5. Melting Temperatures of 2D Electron Solids in the Lowest Landau Level from Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. P.; Ganapathy, S.; Lewis, R. M.; Engel, L. W.; Tsui, D. C.; Wang, Z. H.; Ye, P. D.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2005-03-01

    We studied the temperature(T) dependence of the microwave conductivity spectra of two dimensional electron systems in the high magnetic field (B) insulating phase (HBIP) for Landau filling factor ν<˜1/5. Such an insulating phase, believed to be a pinned electron solid, supports a characteristic pinning resonance in the conductivity spectrum. Two samples were studied. Sample 1 is a heterojunction with density n˜7x10^10 cm^ -2 and mobility μ˜5x10^6cm^2/Vs and has a single resonance in the HBIP. Sample 2 is a 65nm-wide QW with n˜6x10 ^10cm-2 and μ˜10x10^6cm^2/V and was recently found to have two resonances in the HBIP, interpreted as corresponding to two different solid phases, with one crossing over to the other as ν is reduced [1]. We studied the higher-T behavior of the resonances at many different combinations of n (through backgating) and B, and measured the characteristic temperatures Tc at which the resonances disappear. We foundTc is a non-increasing function of ν for either sample, although the function differs significantly for both samples. We interpret Tc as the melting temperature of the electron solid(s) to a quantum liquid, for which ν captures the importance of inter-electron quantum correlation. [1] Y.P. Chen et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 93, 206805 (2004)

  6. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang; Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H.

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  7. Applications of Ultrafast Terahertz Pulses for Intra-ExcitonicSpectroscopy of Quasi-2D Electron-Hole Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Carnahan, Marc A.; Hagele, Daniel; Chemla, D.S.

    2006-09-02

    Excitons are of fundamental interest and of importance foropto-electronic applications of bulk and nano-structured semiconductors.This paper discusses the utilization of ultrafast terahertz (THz) pulsesfor the study of characteristic low-energy excitations of photoexcitedquasi 2D electron-hole (e-h) gases. Optical-pump THz-probe spectroscopyat 250-kHz repetition rate is employed to detect characteristic THzsignatures of excitons and unbound e-h pairs in GaAs quantum wells.Exciton and free-carrier densities are extracted from the data using atwo-component model. We report the detailed THz response and pairdensities for different photoexcitation energies resonant to heavy-holeexcitons, light-hole excitons, or the continuum of unbound pairs. Suchexperiments can provide quantitative insights into wavelength, time, andtemperature dependence of the low-energy response and composition ofoptically excited e-h gases in low-dimensionalsemiconductors.

  8. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Morgan, Sarah E; Kehoe, Tom B; Wilson, Mark W B; Chin, Alex W; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems. PMID:26673260

  9. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Morgan, Sarah E.; Kehoe, Tom B.; Wilson, Mark W. B.; Chin, Alex W.; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  10. 2D 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benndorf, Christopher; Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP7 was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published 31P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the 31P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP7 decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP7 as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s2 lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF.

  11. Photocurrent spectroscopy of 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    Confocal photocurrent measurements provide a powerful means of studying many aspects of the optoelectronic and electrical properties of a 2D device or material. At a diffraction-limited point they can provide a detailed absorption spectrum, and they can probe local symmetry, ultrafast relaxation rates and processes, electron-electron interaction strengths, and transport coefficients. We illustrate this with several examples, once being the photo-Nernst effect. In gapless 2D materials, such as graphene, in a perpendicular magnetic field a photocurrent antisymmetric in the field is generated near to the free edges, with opposite sign at opposite edges. Its origin is the transverse thermoelectric current associated with the laser-induced electron temperature gradient. This effect provides an unambiguous demonstration of the Shockley-Ramo nature of long-range photocurrent generation in gapless materials. It also provides a means of investigating quasiparticle properties. For example, in the case of graphene on hBN, it can be used to probe the Lifshitz transition that occurs due to the minibands formed by the Moire superlattice. We also observe and discuss photocurrent generated in other semimetallic (WTe2) and semiconducting (WSe2) monolayers. Work supported by DoE BES and NSF EFRI grants.

  12. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  13. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  14. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  15. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  16. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  17. Broadband THz Spectroscopy of 2D Nanoscale Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Tripathi, Shivendra; Huang, Mengchen; Hsu, Jen-Feng; D'Urso, Brian; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) have attracted intense research interest in the past decade. Their unique electronic and optical properties offer the promise of novel optoelectronic applications in the terahertz regime. Recently, generation and detection of broadband terahertz (10 THz bandwidth) emission from 10-nm-scale LaAlO3/SrTiO3 nanostructures created by conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography has been demonstrated . This unprecedented control of THz emission at 10 nm length scales creates a pathway toward hybrid THz functionality in 2D-material/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. Here we report initial efforts in THz spectroscopy of 2D nanoscale materials with resolution comparable to the dimensions of the nanowire (10 nm). Systems under investigation include graphene, single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanoflakes. 1. Y. Ma, et al., Nano Lett. 13, 2884 (2013). We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: AFOSR (FA9550-12-1-0268 (JL, PRI), FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)), ONR (N00014-13-1-0806 (JL, CBE), N00014-15-1-2847 (JL)), NSF DMR-1124131 (JL, CBE) and DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  18. Electron momentum distribution and singlet-singlet annihilation in the organic anthracene molecular crystals using positron 2D-ACAR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Sellaiyan; Sivaji, Krishnan; Arulchakkaravarthi, Arjunan; Sankar, Sambasivam

    2014-08-14

    We present the mapping of electron momentum distribution (EMD) in a single crystal of anthracene by two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained on the basis of the crystallographic features of the material. The EMD spectra provide information about the positron states and their behavior and also about the hindrance of the positronium (Ps) formation in this material. The EMD has exhibited evidence for the absence of free volume defects. The characteristic EMD features regarding the delocalized electronic states are explained. Further, scintillation characteristics such as fluorescence and time-correlated single photon counting have also been studied. The emission peaks are attributed to vibrational bands of fluorescence emission from the singlet excitons and lifetime components are observed to be due to singlet fission and the singlet-singlet excitons annihilation. PMID:24963608

  19. Resonances of piezoelectric plate with embedded 2D electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, A. V.

    2009-02-01

    A thin GaAs/AlGaAs plate was studied by the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) in the temperature range 0.3-10 K and in magnetic fields of up to 18 T. The resonance frequencies and linewidths were measured. Quantum oscillations of both these values were observed and were associated with the quantum Hall effect occurred in the 2D electron system. For an analysis the sample was treated as a dielectric piezoelectric plate covered on one side by a film with a field dependent conductivity. Screening of the strain-driven electric field was changed due to the variation of the electron relaxation time in the vicinity of the metal-dielectric transitions caused by the magnetic field in the 2D system. The dielectric film does not affect properties of GaAs and thus the resonance frequencies are defined only by the elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric constants of GaAs. A metallic 2D sheet effectively screens the parallel electric field, so the ultrasound wave velocities and resonance frequencies decrease when the sheet conductivity increases. Oscillations of the resonance linewidth reflect the influence of the 2D system on the ultrasound attenuation, which is proportional to the linewidth. A metallic film as well as a dielectric one does not affect this attenuation but at some finite nonzero value of the conductivity the linewidth approaches a maximum. In high magnetic field each oscillation of the conductivity produces one oscillation of a resonance frequency and two linewidth peaks. The observed phenomena can be described by the relaxation type equations and the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy opens another opportunity for contactless studies on 2D electron systems.

  20. Electronic structure of charge-density-wave state in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze characterized by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on an angle-resolved-photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of layered quasi-two dimensional (2D) Molybdenum purple bronze KMo6O17 in order to study and characterizes the transition to a charge-density-wave (CDW) state. We have performed photoemission temperature dependent measurements cooling down from room temperature (RT) to 32 K, well below the Peierls transition for this material, with CDW transition temperature Tc =110 K. The spectra have been taken at a selected kF point of the Fermi surface (FS) that satisfies the nesting condition of the FS, looking for the characteristic pseudo-gap opening in this kind of materials. The pseudogap has been estimated and it result to be in agreement with our previous works. The shift to lower binding energy of crossing Fermi level ARPES feature have been also confirmed and studied as a function of temperature, showing a rough like BCS behaviour. Finally we have also focused on ARPES measurements along ΓM¯ high symmetry direction for both room and low temperature states finding some insight for ‘shadow’ or back folded bands indicating the new periodicity of real lattice after the CDW lattice distortion.

  1. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J.; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890.

  2. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J.; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry

    2015-06-07

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S{sub 2} of the Spx towards the Q{sub x} state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Q{sub x} to Q{sub y} within the B890.

  3. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890. PMID:26049453

  4. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  5. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet 2D fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-2D FS)

    PubMed Central

    Widom, Julia R.; Johnson, Neil P.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analog of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) – a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy – to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 Å ± 0.5 Å, twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5°), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes. PMID:24223491

  6. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  7. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  8. Materials for Flexible, Stretchable Electronics: Graphene and 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Choi, Kyoungjun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Yuna; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-07-01

    Recently, 2D materials have been intensively studied as emerging materials for future electronics, including flexible electronics, photonics, and electrochemical energy storage devices. Among representative 2D materials (such as graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides) that exhibit extraordinary properties, graphene stands out in the flexible electronics field due to its combination of high electron mobility, high thermal conductivity, high specific surface area, high optical transparency, excellent mechanical flexibility, and environmental stability. This review covers the synthesis, transfer, and characterization methods of graphene and 2D materials and graphene's application to flexible devices as well as comparison with other competing materials.

  9. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  10. Transient 2D IR spectroscopy of charge injection in dye-sensitized nanocrystalline thin films.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E; Paoprasert, Peerasak; Franking, Ryan A; Hamers, Robert J; Gopalan, Padma; Zanni, Martin T

    2009-12-23

    We use nonlinear 2D IR spectroscopy to study TiO(2) nanocrystalline thin films sensitized with a Re dye. We find that the free electron signal, which often obscures the vibrational features in the transient absorption spectrum, is not observed in the 2D IR spectra. Its absence allows the vibrational features of the dye to be much better resolved than with the typical IR absorption probe. We observe multiple absorption bands but no cross peaks in the 2D IR spectra, which indicates that the dyes have at least three conformations. Furthermore, by using a pulse sequence in which we initiate electron transfer in the middle of the infrared pulse train, we are able to assign the excited state features by correlating them to the ground state vibrational modes and determine that the three conformations have different time scales and cross sections for electron injection. 2D IR spectroscopy is proving to be very useful in disentangling overlapping structural distributions in biological and chemical physics processes. These experiments demonstrate that nonlinear infrared probes are also a powerful new tool for studying charge transfer at interfaces. PMID:19947603

  11. Two dimensional spectroscopy of Liquids in THz-domain: THz analogue of 2D Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, K.; Tanimura, Y.

    1998-03-01

    After the initial proposal(Y. Tanimura and S. Mukamel, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 9496 (1993)), the two dimensional Raman spectroscopy in the liquid phase has been received a considerable attention. Both experimental and theoretical activity of this field has been quite high. Since we have two controllable delay times, we can obtain more information than the lower-order experiments such as OKE. The new information includes that on heterogeneous distribution in liquids. Recently, it is found that the coupling between the modes in liquids can be investigated by the technique, both experimentally and theoretically(A. Tokmakoff, M.J. Lang, D.S. Larsen, G.R. Fleming, V. Chernyak, and S. Mukamel, Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press))^,(K. Okumura and Y. Tanimura, Chem. Phys. Lett. 278, 175 (1997)) In this talk, we will emphasize that we can perform the THz analogue of the 2D Raman spectroscopy if the THz short-pulse laser becomes available, which may not be in the far future. Theoretically, we can formulate this novel THz spectroscopy on the same footing as the 2D Raman spectroscopy. We will clarify new aspects of this technique comparing with the 2D Raman spectroscopy--- the reason it worth trying the tough experiment. See

  12. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  13. Electron-impact spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1990-01-01

    The methods of electron impact spectroscopy and cross section measurements are discussed and compared to optical spectroscopy. A brief summary of the status of this field and the available data is given.

  14. Universal Fabrication of 2D Electron Systems in Functional Oxides.

    PubMed

    Rödel, Tobias Chris; Fortuna, Franck; Sengupta, Shamashis; Frantzeskakis, Emmanouil; Fèvre, Patrick Le; Bertran, François; Mercey, Bernard; Matzen, Sylvia; Agnus, Guillaume; Maroutian, Thomas; Lecoeur, Philippe; Santander-Syro, Andrés Felipe

    2016-03-01

    2D electron systems (2DESs) in functional oxides are promising for applications, but their fabrication and use, essentially limited to SrTiO3 -based heterostructures, are hampered by the need for growing complex oxide overlayers thicker than 2 nm using evolved techniques. It is demonstrated that thermal deposition of a monolayer of an elementary reducing agent suffices to create 2DESs in numerous oxides. PMID:26753522

  15. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  16. Electron Energy Levels in the 1D-2D Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Michael; Sanjeev, Kumar; Thomas, Kalarikad; Creeth, Graham; English, David; Ritchie, David; Griffiths, Jonathan; Farrer, Ian; Jones, Geraint

    Using GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures we have investigated the behaviour of electron energy levels with relaxation of the potential confining a 2D electron gas into a 1D configuration. In the ballistic regime of transport, when the conductance shows quantized plateaux, different types of behaviour are found according to the spins of interacting levels, whether a magnetic field is applied and lifting of the momentum degeneracy with a source-drain voltage. We have observed both crossing and anti-crossing of levels and have investigated the manner in which they can be mutually converted. In the presence of a magnetic field levels can cross and lock together as the confinement is altered in a way which is characteristic of parallel channels. The overall behaviour is discussed in terms of electron interactions and the wavefunction flexibility allowed by the increasing two dimensionality of the electron distribution as the confinement is weakened. Work supported by UK EPSRC.

  17. Dye aggregation identified by vibrational coupling using 2D IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oudenhoven, Tracey A.; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Zanni, Martin T.; Joo, Yongho; Gopalan, Padma

    2015-06-07

    We report that a model dye, Re(CO){sub 3}(bypy)CO{sub 2}H, aggregates into clusters on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles regardless of our preparation conditions. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we have identified characteristic frequencies of monomers, dimers, and trimers. A comparison of 2D IR spectra in solution versus those deposited on TiO{sub 2} shows that the propensity to dimerize in solution leads to higher dimer formation on TiO{sub 2}, but that dimers are formed even if there are only monomers in solution. Aggregates cannot be washed off with standard protocols and are present even at submonolayer coverages. We observe cross peaks between aggregates of different sizes, primarily dimers and trimers, indicating that clusters consist of microdomains in close proximity. 2D IR spectroscopy is used to draw these conclusions from measurements of vibrational couplings, but if molecules are close enough to be vibrationally coupled, then they are also likely to be electronically coupled, which could alter charge transfer.

  18. Graphene as a platform to study 2D electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Kessler, Brian; Girit, Caglar; Zettl, Alex

    2010-03-01

    The easily accessible 2D electron gas in graphene provides an ideal platform on which to tune, via application of an electrostatic gate, the coupling between electronically ordered dopants deposited on its surface. To demonstrate this concept, we have measured arrays of superconducting clusters deposited on Graphene capable to induce via the proximity effect a gate-tunable superconducting transition. Using a simple fabrication procedure based on metal layer dewetting, doped graphene sheets can be decorated with a non percolating network on nanoscale tin clusters. This hybrid material displays a two-step superconducting transition. The higher transition step is gate independent and corresponds to the transition of the tin clusters to the superconducting state. The lower transition step towards a real zero resistance state exhibiting a well developped supercurrent, is strongly gate-tunable and is quantitatively described by Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless 2D vortex unbinding. Our simple self-assembly method and tunable coupling can readily be extended to other electronic order parameters such as ferro/antiferromagnetism, charge/spin density waves using similar decoration techniques. [1] B. M. Kessler, C.O. Girit, A. Zettl, and V. Bouchiat, Tunable Superconducting Phase Transition in Metal-Decorated Graphene Sheets submitted to PRL, arXiv:0907.3661

  19. Human erythrocytes analyzed by generalized 2D Raman correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Kozicki, Mateusz; Czepiel, Jacek; Łabanowska, Maria; Nowak, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Grzegorz; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Birczyńska, Malwina; Biesiada, Grażyna; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    The most numerous elements of the blood cells, erythrocytes, consist mainly of two components: homogeneous interior filled with hemoglobin and closure which is the cell membrane. To gain insight into their specific properties we studied the process of disintegration, considering these two constituents, and comparing the natural aging process of human healthy blood cells. MicroRaman spectra of hemoglobin within the single RBC were recorded using 514.5, and 785 nm laser lines. The generalized 2D correlation method was applied to analyze the collected spectra. The time passed from blood donation was regarded as an external perturbation. The time was no more than 40 days according to the current storage limit of blood banks, although, the average RBC life span is 120 days. An analysis of the prominent synchronous and asynchronous cross peaks allow us to get insight into the mechanism of hemoglobin decomposition. Appearing asynchronous cross-peaks point towards globin and heme separation from each other, while synchronous shows already broken globin into individual amino acids. Raman scattering analysis of hemoglobin “wrapping”, i.e. healthy erythrocyte ghosts, allows for the following peculiarity of their behavior. The increasing power of the excitation laser induced alterations in the assemblage of membrane lipids. 2D correlation maps, obtained with increasing laser power recognized as an external perturbation, allows for the consideration of alterations in the erythrocyte membrane structure and composition, which occurs first in the proteins. Cross-peaks were observed indicating an asynchronous correlation between the senescent-cell antigen (SCA) and heme or proteins vibrations. The EPR spectra of the whole blood was analyzed regarding time as an external stimulus. The 2D correlation spectra points towards participation of the selected metal ion centers in the disintegration process.

  20. Electron dynamics and valley relaxation in 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-03-01

    Single layer transition metal dichalcogenides are 2D semiconducting systems with unique electronic band structure. Two-valley energy bands along with strong spin-orbital coupling lead to valley dependent career spin polarization, which is the basis for recently proposed valleytronic applications. Since the durations of valley population provide the time window in which valley specific processes take place, it is an essential parameter for developing valleytronic devices. These systems also exhibit unusually strong many body affects, such as strong exciton and trion binding, due to reduced dielectric screening of Coulomb interactions. But there is not much known about the impact of strong many particle correlations on spin and valley polarization dynamics. Here we report direct measurements of ultrafast valley specific relaxation dynamics in single layer MoS2 and WS2. We found that excitonic many body interactions significantly contribute to the relaxation process. Biexciton formation reveals hole valley spin relaxation time. Our results also suggest initial fast intervalley electron scattering and electron spin relaxation leads to loss of electron valley polarization, which then facilitates hole valley relaxation via excitonic spin exchange interaction.

  1. Stray-light correction in 2D spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichenmaier, R.; Franz, M.

    2013-07-01

    Context. In solar physics, spectropolarimeters based on Fabry-Pérot interferometers are commonly used for high spatial resolution observations. In the data pipeline, corrections for scattered light may be performed on each narrow band image. Aims: We elaborate on the effects of stray-light corrections on Doppler maps. Methods: First, we demonstrate the basic correction effect in a simplified situation of two profiles that suffer from stray light. Then, we study the correction effects on velocity maps by transforming a Hinode SP map into a two-dimensional spectroscopic data set with i(x,y) at each wavelength point, which mimicks narrow band images. Velocity maps are inferred from line profiles of original and stray-light corrected data. Results: The correction of scattered light in narrow band images affects the inferred Doppler velocity maps: relative red shifts always become more red, and relative blue shifts become more blue. This trend is independent of whether downflows have dark or bright intensities. As a result, the effects of overcorrection produce both downflows and upflows. Conclusions: In 2D spectropolarimetry, corrections for scattered light can improve the image intensity and velocity contrast but inherently produce downflow signatures in the penumbra. Hence, such corrections are justified only if the properties of the stray light (seeing, telescope, and instrument) are well known.

  2. 2D XAFS-XEOL Spectroscopy - Some recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. J.; Smith, J. G.; Regier, T. Z.; Sham, T. K.

    2013-03-01

    The use of optical photons to measure the modulation of the absorption coefficient upon X-ray excitation, or optical XAFS, is of particular interest for application to the study of light emitting semiconducting nanomaterials due to the additional information that may be gained. The potential for site-selectivity, elemental and excitation energy specific luminescence decay channels, and surface vs. bulk effects all make the use of X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) desirable as a detection method. Previous experiments have made use of a monochromator to select the optical emission wavelength used to monitor optical XAFS. This method of detection suffers from the primary limitation of only being able to monitor the optical response at one emission wavelength. By combining the high resolution soft X-ray Spherical Grating Monochromator beam-line at the Canadian Light Source with an Ocean Optics QE 65000 fast CCD spectrophotometer and custom integration software we have developed a technique for collecting 2D XAFS-XEOL spectra, in which the excitation energy is scanned and a XEOL spectra is collected for every energy value. Herein we report the development of this technique and its capabilities using the study of the luminescence emitted from single crystal zinc oxide as an example.

  3. Probing Intermolecular Interactions in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with 2D IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krummel, Amber

    2014-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment and impact geochemical processes that are critical to sustainable energy resources. For example, asphaltenes exist naturally in geologic formations and their aggregates heavily impact the petroleum economy. Unfortunately, the chemical dynamics that drive asphaltene nanoaggregation processes are still poorly understood. Solvent dynamics and intermolecular interactions such as π-stacking interactions play integral roles in asphaltene nanoaggregation. Linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy including two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR), are well suited to explore these fundamental interactions. Teasing apart the vibrational characteristics in PAHs that model asphaltenic compounds represents an important step towards utilizing 2D IR spectroscopy to understand the intermolecular interactions that are prevalent in asphaltene nanoaggregation. A solar dye, N,N'-Dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide, is used in this work to model aphaltenes. Carbonyl and ring vibrations are used to probe the nanoaggregates of the model compounds. However, the characteristics of these normal modes change as a function of the size of the conjugated ring system. Thus, in order to fully understand the nature of these normal modes, we include a systematic study of a series of quinones. Our investigation employs a combination of 2DIR spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations to explore vibrational coupling in quinones and PAHs. We compare the calculated vibrational characteristics to those extracted from 2DIR spectra. ATK acknowledges the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for support of this research.

  4. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  5. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (νCN) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([FeIII(CN)6]3- dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN)5FeIICNRuIII(NH3)5]- dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific νCN modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a wide range of complex molecular, material, and biological systems.

  6. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  7. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  8. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  9. Probing dipole-dipole interaction in a rubidium gas via double-quantum 2D spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Cundiff, Steven T; Li, Hebin

    2016-07-01

    We have implemented double-quantum 2D spectroscopy on a rubidium vapor and shown that this technique provides sensitive and background-free detection of the dipole-dipole interaction. The 2D spectra include signals from both individual atoms and interatomic interactions, allowing quantitative studies of the interaction. A theoretical model based on the optical Bloch equations is used to reproduce the experimental spectrum and confirm the origin of double-quantum signals. PMID:27367074

  10. Accelerated 2D magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single spins using matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Scheuer, Jochen; Stark, Alexander; Kost, Matthias; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2015-01-01

    Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the major tools for analysing the chemical structure of organic molecules and proteins. Despite its power, this technique requires long measurement times, which, particularly in the recently emerging diamond based single molecule NMR, limits its application to stable samples. Here we demonstrate a method which allows to obtain the spectrum by collecting only a small fraction of the experimental data. Our method is based on matrix completion which can recover the full spectral information from randomly sampled data points. We confirm experimentally the applicability of this technique by performing two dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments on a two spin system consisting of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond coupled to a single 13C nuclear spin. The signal to noise ratio of the recovered 2D spectrum is compared to the Fourier transform of randomly subsampled data, where we observe a strong suppression of the noise when the matrix completion algorithm is applied. We show that the peaks in the spectrum can be obtained with only 10% of the total number of the data points. We believe that our results reported here can find an application in all types of two dimensional spectroscopy, as long as the measured matrices have a low rank. PMID:26631593

  11. Accelerated 2D magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single spins using matrix completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Stark, Alexander; Kost, Matthias; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2015-12-01

    Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the major tools for analysing the chemical structure of organic molecules and proteins. Despite its power, this technique requires long measurement times, which, particularly in the recently emerging diamond based single molecule NMR, limits its application to stable samples. Here we demonstrate a method which allows to obtain the spectrum by collecting only a small fraction of the experimental data. Our method is based on matrix completion which can recover the full spectral information from randomly sampled data points. We confirm experimentally the applicability of this technique by performing two dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments on a two spin system consisting of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond coupled to a single 13C nuclear spin. The signal to noise ratio of the recovered 2D spectrum is compared to the Fourier transform of randomly subsampled data, where we observe a strong suppression of the noise when the matrix completion algorithm is applied. We show that the peaks in the spectrum can be obtained with only 10% of the total number of the data points. We believe that our results reported here can find an application in all types of two dimensional spectroscopy, as long as the measured matrices have a low rank.

  12. Local electronic structures and 2D topological phase transition of ultrathin Sb films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Park, Joonbum; Kim, Jun Sung; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Yeom, Han Woong

    We investigate local electronic structures of ultrathin Sb islands and their edges grown on Bi2Te2Se by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Sb islands of various thickness are grown with atomically well ordered edge structure over the 3 bilayers (BL). On the surfaces and edges of these islands, we clearly resolve edge-localized electronic states by STS measurements, which depend on the thickness. The DFT calculations identify that the strongly localized edge states of 4 and 5 BL films correspond to a quantum spin Hall (QSH) states while the edge states of 3 BL are trivial. Our experimental and theoretical results confirm the 2D topological phase transition of the ultrathin Sb films from trivial to QSH phase. Center for Artificial Low Dimensional Electronic Systems, Institute for Basic Science and Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea.

  13. Electron spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The Surface Science Laboratories at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are equipped with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) facilities. These techniques provide information from the uppermost atomic layers of a sample, and are thus truly surface sensitive. XPS provides both elemental and chemical state information without restriction on the type of material that can be analyzed. The sample is placed into an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber and irradiated with x-rays which cause the ejection of photoelectrons from the sample surface. Since x-rays do not normally cause charging problems or beam damage, XPS is applicable to a wide range of samples including metals, polymers, catalysts, and fibers. AES uses a beam of high energy electrons as a surface probe. Following electronic rearrangements within excited atoms by this probe, Auger electrons characteristic of each element present are emitted from the sample. The main advantage of electron induced AES is that the electron beam can be focused down to a small diameter and localized analysis can be carried out. On the rastering of this beam synchronously with a video display using established scanning electron microscopy techniques, physical images and chemical distribution maps of the surface can be produced. Thus very small features, such as electronic circuit elements or corrosion pits in metals, can be investigated. Facilities are available on both XPS and AES instruments for depth-profiling of materials, using a beam of argon ions to sputter away consecutive layers of material to reveal sub-surface (and even semi-bulk) analyses.

  14. Nanowire Electron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian; Bronikowsky, Michael; Wong, Eric; VonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fablano

    2009-01-01

    Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy (NESS) has been proposed as the basis of a class of ultra-small, ultralow-power sensors that could be used to detect and identify chemical compounds present in extremely small quantities. State-of-the-art nanowire chemical sensors have already been demonstrated to be capable of detecting a variety of compounds in femtomolar quantities. However, to date, chemically specific sensing of molecules using these sensors has required the use of chemically functionalized nanowires with receptors tailored to individual molecules of interest. While potentially effective, this functionalization requires labor-intensive treatment of many nanowires to sense a broad spectrum of molecules. In contrast, NESS would eliminate the need for chemical functionalization of nanowires and would enable the use of the same sensor to detect and identify multiple compounds. NESS is analogous to Raman spectroscopy, the main difference being that in NESS, one would utilize inelastic scattering of electrons instead of photons to determine molecular vibrational energy levels. More specifically, in NESS, one would exploit inelastic scattering of electrons by low-lying vibrational quantum states of molecules attached to a nanowire or nanotube.

  15. Adding a dimension to the infrared spectra of interfaces using heterodyne detected 2D sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Mehlenbacher, Randy D.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten years, two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has become an important technique for studying molecular structures and dynamics. We report the implementation of heterodyne detected two-dimensional sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy, which is the analog of 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, but is selective to noncentrosymmetric systems such as interfaces. We implement the technique using mid-IR pulse shaping, which enables rapid scanning, phase cycling, and automatic phasing. Absorptive spectra are obtained, that have the highest frequency resolution possible, from which we extract the rephasing and nonrephasing signals that are sometimes preferred. Using this technique, we measure the vibrational mode of CO adsorbed on a polycrystalline Pt surface. The 2D spectrum reveals a significant inhomogenous contribution to the spectral line shape, which is quantified by simulations. This observation indicates that the surface conformation and environment of CO molecules is more complicated than the simple “atop” configuration assumed in previous work. Our method can be straightforwardly incorporated into many existing SFG spectrometers. The technique enables one to quantify inhomogeneity, vibrational couplings, spectral diffusion, chemical exchange, and many other properties analogous to 2D IR spectroscopy, but specifically for interfaces. PMID:22143772

  16. 2D Carbon Nanotube Network: A New material for Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, George

    2006-03-01

    This talk will focus on the electronic properties of two dimensional carbon nanotube networks, and on their application potential. Percolation issues, together with the frequency, and temperature dependent activity will be discussed. The network can be tuned from having semiconducting to metallic like behavior, and doping with electron withdrawing and donating species leads to networks with tailor-made electronic properties. The network is also highly transparent in the visible spectral range, this attribute -- together with simple room temperature fab processes -- opens up application opportunities in the area of electronics, opto-electronics, photovoltaics and sensors. Recent results on solar cells, OLEDs and smart windows will be reviewed. Field effect transistors that incorporate nanotube network conducting channels, together with complex functional devices that incorporate networks and functional molecules will also be discussed. Finally a comparison will be made with conventional and emerging materials that compete area of disposable, flexible and printable electronics.

  17. Structural dynamics inside a functionalized metal–organic framework probed by ultrafast 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fei, Honghan; Pullen, Sonja; Ott, Sascha; Cohen, Seth M.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The structural elasticity of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) is a key property for their functionality. Here, we show that 2D IR spectroscopy with pulse-shaping techniques can probe the ultrafast structural fluctuations of MOFs. 2D IR data, obtained from a vibrational probe attached to the linkers of UiO-66 MOF in low concentration, revealed that the structural fluctuations have time constants of 7 and 670 ps with no solvent. Filling the MOF pores with dimethylformamide (DMF) slows the structural fluctuations by reducing the ability of the MOF to undergo deformations, and the dynamics of the DMF molecules are also greatly restricted. Methodology advances were required to remove the severe light scattering caused by the macroscopic-sized MOF particles, eliminate interfering oscillatory components from the 2D IR data, and address Förster vibrational excitation transfer. PMID:25512539

  18. Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Daniel E.; Kwak, Kyungwon; Gengeliczki, Zsolt

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) chemical exchange spectroscopy. Phenylacetylene has two possible π hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution at room temperature. The OD stretch frequency of deuterated phenol is sensitive to which acceptor site it is bound. The appearance of off-diagonal peaks between the two vibrational frequencies in the 2D IR spectrum reports on the exchange process between the two competitive hydrogen bonding sites of phenol-phenylacetylene complexes in the neat phenylacetylene solvent. The chemical exchange process occurs in ∼5 ps, and is assigned to direct hydrogen bond migration along the phenylacetylene molecule. Other non-migration mechanisms are ruled out by performing 2D IR experiments on phenol dissolved in the phenylacetylene/carbon tetrachloride mixed solvent. The observation of direct hydrogen bond migration can have implications for macromolecular systems. PMID:20121275

  19. A salt-bridge structure in solution revealed by 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Domingos, Sérgio R; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Woutersen, Sander

    2014-08-14

    Salt bridges are important interactions for the stability of protein conformations, but up to now it has been difficult to determine salt-bridge geometries in solution. Here we characterize the spatial structure of a salt bridge between guanidinium (Gdm(+)) and acetate (Ac(-)) using two-dimensional vibrational (2D-IR) spectroscopy. We find that as a result of salt bridge formation there is a significant change in the infrared response of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), and cross peaks between them appear in the 2D-IR spectrum. From the 2D-IR spectrum we determine the relative orientation of the transition-dipole moments of the vibrational modes of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), as well as the coupling between them. PMID:24676430

  20. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  1. 2D fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring ion-exchange membrane based technologies - Reverse electrodialysis (RED).

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Sylwin; Galinha, Claudia F; Crespo, João G; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2016-01-01

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is one of the emerging, membrane-based technologies for harvesting salinity gradient energy. In RED process, fouling is an undesirable operation constraint since it leads to a decrease of the obtainable net power density due to increasing stack electric resistance and pressure drop. Therefore, early fouling detection is one of the main challenges for successful RED technology implementation. In the present study, two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy was used, for the first time, as a tool for fouling monitoring in RED. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) of ion-exchange membrane surfaces and of natural aqueous streams were acquired during one month of a RED stack operation. Fouling evolvement on the ion-exchange membrane surfaces was successfully followed by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy and quantified using principal components analysis (PCA). Additionally, the efficiency of cleaning strategy was assessed by measuring the membrane fluorescence emission intensity before and after cleaning. The anion-exchange membrane (AEM) surface in contact with river water showed to be significantly affected due to fouling by humic compounds, which were found to cross through the membrane from the lower salinity (river water) to higher salinity (sea water) stream. The results obtained show that the combined approach of using 2D fluorescence spectroscopy and PCA has a high potential for studying fouling development and membrane cleaning efficiency in ion exchange membrane processes. PMID:26497936

  2. Differentiation of enantiomers by 2D NMR spectroscopy at 1 T using residual dipolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Koos, Martin R M; Danieli, Ernesto; Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-06-01

    Differentiating enantiomers using 2D bench-top NMR spectroscopy. Spectrometers working with permanent magnets at 1 T field strength allow the acquisition of 2D data sets. In conjunction with previously reported chiral alignment media, this setup allows the measurement of enantiomeric excess via residual dipolar couplings in stretched gelatine as a result of the reduced line width obtained by 2D J-resolved spectroscopy. PMID:25773020

  3. Corbino Disk Viscometer for 2D Quantum Electron Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadin, Andrea; Vignale, Giovanni; Polini, Marco

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity of a variety of strongly interacting quantum fluids, ranging from ultracold atomic Fermi gases to quark-gluon plasmas, can be accurately measured. On the contrary, no experimental data exist, to the best of our knowledge, on the shear viscosity of two-dimensional quantum electron liquids hosted in a solid-state matrix. In this work we propose a Corbino disk device, which allows a determination of the viscosity of a quantum electron liquid from the dc potential difference that arises between the inner and the outer edge of the disk in response to an oscillating magnetic flux.

  4. Corbino disk viscometer for 2D quantum electron liquids.

    PubMed

    Tomadin, Andrea; Vignale, Giovanni; Polini, Marco

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity of a variety of strongly interacting quantum fluids, ranging from ultracold atomic Fermi gases to quark-gluon plasmas, can be accurately measured. On the contrary, no experimental data exist, to the best of our knowledge, on the shear viscosity of two-dimensional quantum electron liquids hosted in a solid-state matrix. In this work we propose a Corbino disk device, which allows a determination of the viscosity of a quantum electron liquid from the dc potential difference that arises between the inner and the outer edge of the disk in response to an oscillating magnetic flux. PMID:25526137

  5. Evaluation of 2D spatially selective MR spectroscopy using parallel excitation at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Martin; Darji, Niravkumar; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Background In this work, two-dimensional (2D) spatially selective magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was evaluated in both phantom and human brain using 8-channel parallel excitation (pTX) at 7 T and compared to standard STEAM. Materials and methods A 2D spiral excitation k-space trajectory was segmented into multiple individual segments to increase the bandwidth. pTX was used to decrease the number of segments by accelerating the trajectory. Different radio frequency (RF) shim settings were used for refocusing, water suppression and fat saturation pulses. Results Phantom experiments demonstrate that, although segmented 2D excitation provided excellent spatial selectivity and spectral quality, STEAM outperformed it in terms of outer volume suppression with 0.6% RMSD compared to 1.7%, 2.5%, 3.9% and 5.5% RMSDs for acceleration factors of R=1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Seven major metabolites [choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)] were detected with sufficient accuracy [Cramér-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) <20%] from the in vivo spectra of both methods. Conservative RF power limits resulted in reduced SNR for 2D selective MR spectra (SNR 131 and 82 for R=1 and 2, respectively) compared to the reference STEAM spectrum (SNR 199). Conclusions Single voxel spectra acquired using 2D selective MRS with and without pTX showed very good agreement with the reference STEAM spectrum. Efficient SAR management of the 2D selective MRS sequence would potentially improve the SNR of spectra. PMID:26029637

  6. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  7. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  8. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  9. Folding of a heterogeneous β-hairpin peptide from temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin C.; Peng, Chunte Sam; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We provide a time- and structure-resolved characterization of the folding of the heterogeneous β-hairpin peptide Tryptophan Zipper 2 (Trpzip2) using 2D IR spectroscopy. The amide I′ vibrations of three Trpzip2 isotopologues are used as a local probe of the midstrand contacts, β-turn, and overall β-sheet content. Our experiments distinguish between a folded state with a type I′ β-turn and a misfolded state with a bulged turn, providing evidence for distinct conformations of the peptide backbone. Transient 2D IR spectroscopy at 45 °C following a laser temperature jump tracks the nanosecond and microsecond kinetics of unfolding and the exchange between conformers. Hydrogen bonds to the peptide backbone are loosened rapidly compared with the 5-ns temperature jump. Subsequently, all relaxation kinetics are characterized by an observed 1.2 ± 0.2-μs exponential. Our time-dependent 2D IR spectra are explained in terms of folding of either native or nonnative contacts from a common compact disordered state. Conversion from the disordered state to the folded state is consistent with a zip-out folding mechanism. PMID:23382249

  10. 2D exchange 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) exchange 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to study the slow overall motion of the rod-shaped viruses M13 and tobacco mosaic virus in concentrated gels. Even for short mixing times, observed diagonal spectra differ remarkably from projection spectra and one-dimensional spectra. Our model readily explains this to be a consequence of the T2e anisotropy caused by slow overall rotation of the viruses about their length axis. 2D exchange spectra recorded for 30% (w/w) tobacco mosaic virus with mixing times < 1 s do not show any off-diagonal broadening, indicating that its overall motion occurs in the sub-Hz frequency range. In contrast, the exchange spectra obtained for 30% M13 show significant off-diagonal intensity for mixing times of 0.01 s and higher. A log-gaussian distribution around 25 Hz of overall diffusion coefficients mainly spread between 1 and 10(3) Hz faithfully reproduces the 2D exchange spectra of 30% M13 recorded at various mixing times in a consistent way. A small but notable change in diagonal spectra at increasing mixing time is not well accounted for by our model and is probably caused by 31P spin diffusion. PMID:7756532

  11. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Swisher, Christine; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate-lactate, pyruvate-alanine, and pyruvate-hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines.

  12. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Christine Leon; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate–lactate, pyruvate–alanine, and pyruvate–hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines. PMID:26117655

  13. Protein Dynamics Studied with Ultrafast 2D IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    THIELGES, MEGAN C.; FAYER, MICHAEL D.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Proteins, enzymes, and other biological molecules undergo structural dynamics as an intrinsic part of their biological functions. While many biological processes occur on the millisecond, second, and even longer time scales, the fundamental structural dynamics that eventually give rise to such processes occur on much faster time scales. Many decades ago, chemical kineticists focused on the inverse of the reaction rate constant as the important time scale for a chemical reaction. However, through transition state theory and a vast amount of experimental evidence, we now know that the key events in a chemical reaction can involve structural fluctuations that take a system of reactants to its transitions state, the crossing of a barrier, and the eventual relaxation to product states. Such dynamics occur on very fast time scales. Today researchers would like to investigate the fast structural fluctuations of biological molecules to gain an understanding of how biological processes proceed from simple structural changes in biomolecules to the final, complex biological function. The study of the fast structural dynamics of biological molecules requires experiments that operate on the appropriate time scales, and in this Account, we discuss the application of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy to the study of dynamics. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiment is akin to 2D NMR, but it operates on time scales many orders of magnitude faster. In the experiments, a particular vibrational oscillator serves as a vibrational dynamics probe. As the structure of the protein evolves in time, the structural changes are manifested as time dependent changes in the frequency of the vibrational dynamics probe. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiments can track the vibrational frequency evolution, which we then relate to the time evolution of the protein structure. In particular, we measured protein substate interconversion for mutants of

  14. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Jr., Carlos M.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  15. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  16. Water of Hydration Dynamics in Minerals Gypsum and Bassanite: Ultrafast 2D IR Spectroscopy of Rocks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chang; Nishida, Jun; Yuan, Rongfeng; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Water of hydration plays an important role in minerals, determining their crystal structures and physical properties. Here ultrafast nonlinear infrared (IR) techniques, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) spectroscopies, were used to measure the dynamics and disorder of water of hydration in two minerals, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O). 2D IR spectra revealed that water arrangement in freshly precipitated gypsum contained a small amount of inhomogeneity. Following annealing at 348 K, water molecules became highly ordered; the 2D IR spectrum became homogeneously broadened (motional narrowed). PSPP measurements observed only inertial orientational relaxation. In contrast, water in bassanite's tubular channels is dynamically disordered. 2D IR spectra showed a significant amount of inhomogeneous broadening caused by a range of water configurations. At 298 K, water dynamics cause spectral diffusion that sampled a portion of the inhomogeneous line width on the time scale of ∼30 ps, while the rest of inhomogeneity is static on the time scale of the measurements. At higher temperature, the dynamics become faster. Spectral diffusion accelerates, and a portion of the lower temperature spectral diffusion became motionally narrowed. At sufficiently high temperature, all of the dynamics that produced spectral diffusion at lower temperatures became motionally narrowed, and only homogeneous broadening and static inhomogeneity were observed. Water angular motions in bassanite exhibit temperature-dependent diffusive orientational relaxation in a restricted cone of angles. The experiments were made possible by eliminating the vast amount of scattered light produced by the granulated powder samples using phase cycling methods. PMID:27385320

  17. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Lecture: 2D IR Spectroscopy of Peptide Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-02-01

    Descriptions of protein and peptide conformation are colored by the methods we use to study them. Protein x-ray and NMR structures often lead to impressions of rigid or well-defined conformations, even though these are dynamic molecules. The conformational fluctuations and disorder of proteins and peptides is more difficult to quantify. This presentation will describe an approach toward characterizing and quantifying structural heterogeneity and disorder in peptides using 2D IR spectroscopy. Using amide I vibrational spectroscopy, isotope labeling strategies, and computational modeling based on molecular dynamics simulations and Markov state models allows us to characterize distinct peptide conformers and conformational variation. The examples illustrated include the beta-hairpin tripzip2 and elastin-like peptides.

  18. Center Line Slope Analysis in Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Center line slope (CLS) analysis in 2D infrared spectroscopy has been extensively used to extract frequency–frequency correlation functions of vibrational transitions. We apply this concept to 2D electronic spectroscopy, where CLS is a measure of electronic gap fluctuations. The two domains, infrared and electronic, possess differences: In the infrared, the frequency fluctuations are classical, often slow and Gaussian. In contrast, electronic spectra are subject to fast spectral diffusion and affected by underdamped vibrational wavepackets in addition to Stokes shift. All these effects result in non-Gaussian peak profiles. Here, we extend CLS-analysis beyond Gaussian line shapes and test the developed methodology on a solvated molecule, zinc phthalocyanine. We find that CLS facilitates the interpretation of 2D electronic spectra by reducing their complexity to one dimension. In this way, CLS provides a highly sensitive measure of model parameters describing electronic–vibrational and electronic–solvent interaction. PMID:26463085

  19. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  20. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  1. 2D-Spectroscopy of Two SBS Galaxies with Star Formation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, Susanna

    2007-08-01

    About 500 SBS-galaxies in the selected fields were classified using a scheme, adapted to slit spectroscopic data obtained for them. Continuing the investigation of these objects as the members of subclasses of objects with nuclear and starforming activity, we are using 2D - spectroscopy, allowing to extend in understanding of the details of morphology, dynamic and kinematic processes and physical nature, by which the differences and similarities in subclasses are caused. This work presents a detailed study of two starforming galaxies in different stages of activity, both consisting of HII-regions, SBS 1202+583 and SBS 1533+574. Observations have been carried out with multipupil spectrographs VAGR at 2.6m and MPFS at 6m telescopes.

  2. Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Wong, Eric W. (Inventor); von Allmen, Paul (Inventor); Oyafuso, Fabiano A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and devices for spectroscopic identification of molecules using nanoscale wires are disclosed. According to one of the methods, nanoscale wires are provided, electrons are injected into the nanoscale wire; and inelastic electron scattering is measured via excitation of low-lying vibrational energy levels of molecules bound to the nanoscale wire.

  3. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  4. Water dynamics in salt solutions studied with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Michael D; Moilanen, David E; Wong, Daryl; Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Fenn, Emily E; Park, Sungnam

    2009-09-15

    Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species. Many of these species are charged. In the ocean, water interacts with dissolved salts. In biological systems, water interacts with dissolved salts as well as charged amino acids, the zwitterionic head groups of membranes, and other biological groups that carry charges. Water plays a central role in a vast number of chemical processes because of its dynamic hydrogen-bond network. A water molecule can form up to four hydrogen bonds in an approximately tetrahedral arrangement. These hydrogen bonds are continually being broken, and new bonds are being formed on a picosecond time scale. The ability of the hydrogen-bond network of water to rapidly reconfigure enables water to accommodate and facilitate chemical processes. Therefore, the influence of charged species on water hydrogen-bond dynamics is important. Recent advances in ultrafast coherent infrared spectroscopy have greatly expanded our understanding of water dynamics. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is providing new observables that yield direct information on the fast dynamics of molecules in their ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions. The 2D IR vibrational echoes are akin to 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) but operate on time scales that are many orders of magnitude shorter. In a 2D IR vibrational echo experiment (see the Conspectus figure), three IR pulses are tuned to the vibrational frequency of interest, which in this case is the frequency of the hydroxyl stretching mode of water. The first two pulses "label" the initial molecular structures by their vibrational frequencies. The system evolves between pulses two and three, and the third pulse stimulates the emission of the vibrational echo pulse, which is the signal. The vibrational echo pulse is heterodyne, detected by combining it

  5. Multidimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of Photochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Nuernberger, Patrick; Ruetzel, Stefan; Brixner, Tobias

    2015-09-21

    Coherent multidimensional electronic spectroscopy can be employed to unravel various channels in molecular chemical reactions. This approach is thus not limited to analysis of energy transfer or charge transfer (i.e. processes from photophysics), but can also be employed in situations where the investigated system undergoes permanent structural changes (i.e. in photochemistry). Photochemical model reactions are discussed by using the example of merocyanine/spiropyran-based molecular switches, which show a rich variety of reaction channels, in particular ring opening and ring closing, cis-trans isomerization, coherent vibrational wave-packet motion, radical ion formation, and population relaxation. Using pump-probe, pump-repump-probe, coherent two-dimensional and three-dimensional, triggered-exchange 2D, and quantum-control spectroscopy, we gain intuitive pictures on which product emerges from which reactant and which reactive molecular modes are associated. PMID:26382095

  6. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  7. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  8. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Thomas A A; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-07-15

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic-vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics. PMID:24927586

  9. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy using incoherent light: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Daniel B; Howey, Dylan J; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2013-07-25

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I((4)) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and new opportunities. PMID:23176195

  10. Cross-peak-specific two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Read, Elizabeth L.; Engel, Gregory S.; Calhoun, Tessa R.; Mančal, Tomáš; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Blankenship, Robert E.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2007-01-01

    Intermolecular electronic coupling dictates the optical properties of molecular aggregate systems. Of particular interest are photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes that absorb sunlight then efficiently direct energy toward the photosynthetic reaction center. Two-dimensional (2D) ultrafast spectroscopy has been used widely in the infrared (IR) and increasingly in the visible to probe excitonic couplings and observe dynamics, but the off-diagonal spectral signatures of coupling are often obscured by broad diagonal peaks, especially in the visible regime. Rotating the polarizations of the laser pulses exciting the sample can highlight certain spectral features, and the use of polarized pulse sequences to elucidate cross-peaks in 2D spectra has been demonstrated in the IR for vibrational transitions. Here we develop 2D electronic spectroscopy using cross-peak-specific pulse polarization conditions in an investigation of the Fenna–Matthews–Olson light harvesting complex from green photosynthetic bacteria. Our measurements successfully highlight off-diagonal features of the 2D spectra and, in combination with an analysis based on the signs of features arising from particular energy level pathways and theoretical simulation, we characterize the dominant response pathways responsible for the spectral features. Cross-peak-specific 2D electronic spectroscopy provides insight into the interchromophore couplings, as well as into the energetic pathways giving rise to the signal. With femtosecond resolution, we also observe dynamical processes that depend on these couplings and interactions with the protein environment. PMID:17548830

  11. Acid epimerization of 20-keto pregnane glycosides is determined by 2D-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    García, Víctor P

    2011-05-01

    Carbohydrates influence many essential biological events such as apoptosis, differentiation, tumor metastasis, cancer, neurobiology, immunology, development, host-pathogen interactions, diabetes, signal transduction, protein folding, and many other contexts. We now report on the structure determination of pregnane glycosides isolated from the aerial parts of Ceropegia fusca Bolle (Asclepiadaceae). The observation of cicatrizant, vulnerary and cytostatic activities in some humans and animals of Ceropegia fusca Bolle, a species endemic to the Canary Islands, encouraged us to begin a pharmacological study to determine their exact therapeutic properties. High resolution (1)H-NMR spectra of pregnane glycosides very often display well-resolved signals that can be used as starting points in several selective NMR experiments to study scalar (J coupling), and dipolar (NOE) interactions. ROESY is especially suited for molecules such that ωτ(c) ~ 1, where τ(c) are the motional correlation times and ω is the angular frequency. In these cases the NOE is nearly zero, while the rotating-frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) is always positive and increases monotonically for increasing values of τ(c). The ROESY shows dipolar interactions cross peaks even in medium-sized molecules which are helpful in unambiguous assignment of all the interglycosidic linkages. Selective excitation was carried out using a double pulsed-field gradient spin-echo sequence (DPFGSE) in which 180° Gaussian pulses are sandwiched between sine shaped z-gradients. Scalar interactions were studied by homonuclear DPFGSE-COSY and DPFGSE-TOCSY experiments, while DPFGSE-ROESY was used to monitor the spatial environment of the selectively excited proton. Dipolar interactions between nuclei close in space can be detected by the 1D GROESY experiment, which is a one-dimensional counterpart of the 2D ROESY method. The C-12 and C-17 configurations were determined by ROESY experiments. PMID:21431831

  12. Experimental implementations of 2D IR spectroscopy through a horizontal pulse shaper design and a focal plane array detector.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Serrano, Arnaldo L; Oudenhoven, Tracey A; Ostrander, Joshua S; Eklund, Elliot C; Blair, Alexander F; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-02-01

    Aided by advances in optical engineering, two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) has developed into a promising method for probing structural dynamics in biophysics and material science. We report two new advances for 2D IR spectrometers. First, we report a fully reflective and totally horizontal pulse shaper, which significantly simplifies alignment. Second, we demonstrate the applicability of mid-IR focal plane arrays (FPAs) as suitable detectors in 2D IR experiments. FPAs have more pixels than conventional linear arrays and can be used to multiplex optical detection. We simultaneously measure the spectra of a reference beam, which improves the signal-to-noise by a factor of 4; and two additional beams that are orthogonally polarized probe pulses for 2D IR anisotropy experiments. PMID:26907414

  13. Positron spectroscopy of 2D materials using an advanced high intensity positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, A.; Chirayath, V.; Lim, Z.; Gladen, R.; Chrysler, M.; Fairchild, A.; Koymen, A.; Weiss, A.

    An advanced high intensity variable energy positron beam(~1eV to 20keV) has been designed, tested and utilized for the first coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) measurements on 6-8 layers graphene on polycrystalline Cu sample. The system is capable of simultaneous Positron annihilation induced Auger electron Spectroscopy (PAES) and CDB measurements giving it unparalleled sensitivity to chemical structure at external surfaces, interfaces and internal pore surfaces. The system has a 3m flight path up to a micro channel plate (MCP) for the Auger electrons emitted from the sample. This gives a superior energy resolution for PAES. A solid rare gas(Neon) moderator was used for the generation of the monoenergetic positron beam. The positrons were successfully transported to the sample chamber using axial magnetic field generated with a series of Helmholtz coils. We will discuss the PAES and coincidence Doppler broadening measurements on graphene -Cu sample and present an analysis of the gamma spectra which indicates that a fraction of the positrons implanted at energies 7-60eV can become trapped at the graphene/metal interface. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR 1508719 and DMR 1338130.

  14. Applications of 2D IR spectroscopy to peptides, proteins, and hydrogen-bond dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Sam; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2010-01-01

    Following a survey of 2D IR principles this Feature Article describes recent experiments on the hydrogen-bond dynamics of small ions, amide-I modes, nitrile probes, peptides, reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and amyloid fibrils. PMID:19351162

  15. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the principal computational approaches and their accuracy for the study of electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules. We include a number of examples from our work that illustrate the range of application. We show how full configuration interaction benchmark calculations were instrumental in improving the understanding of the computational requirements for obtaining accurate results for diatomic spectroscopy. With this understanding it is now possible to compute radiative lifetimes accurate to within 10% for systems involving first- and second-row atoms. We consider the determination of the infrared vibrational transition probabilities for the ground states of SiO and NO, based on a globally accurate dipole moment function. We show how we were able to assign the a(sup "5)II state of CO as the upper state in the recently observed emission bands of CO in an Ar matrix. We next discuss the assignment of the photoelectron detachment spectra of NO and the alkali oxide negative ions. We then present several examples illustrating the state-of-the-art in determining radiative lifetimes for valence-valence and valence-Rydberg transitions. We next compare the molecular spectroscopy of the valence isoelectronic B2, Al2, and AlB molecules. The final examples consider systems involving transition metal atoms, which illustrate the difficulty in describing states with different numbers of d electrons.

  16. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K. Sanpei, A. Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  17. The performance of 2D array detectors for light sheet based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand Pratap; Krieger, Jan Wolfgang; Buchholz, Jan; Charbon, Edoardo; Langowski, Jörg; Wohland, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    Single plane illumination microscopy based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SPIM-FCS) is a new method for imaging FCS in 3D samples, providing diffusion coefficients, transport, flow velocities and concentrations in an imaging mode. SPIM-FCS records correlation functions over a whole plane in a sample, which requires array detectors for recording the fluorescence signal. Several types of image sensors are suitable for FCS. They differ in properties such as effective area per pixel, quantum efficiency, noise level and read-out speed. Here we compare the performance of several low light array detectors based on three different technologies: (1) Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays, (2) passive-pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and (3) active-pixel scientific-grade complementary metal oxide semiconductor cameras (sCMOS). We discuss the influence of the detector characteristics on the effective FCS observation volume, and demonstrate that light sheet based SPIM-FCS provides absolute diffusion coefficients. This is verified by parallel measurements with confocal FCS, single particle tracking (SPT), and the determination of concentration gradients in space and time. While EMCCD cameras have a temporal resolution in the millisecond range, sCMOS cameras and SPAD arrays can extend the time resolution of SPIM-FCS down to 10 μs or lower. PMID:23571955

  18. Stereochemistry of 16a-hydroxyfriedelin and 3-Oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene established by 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Silva de Miranda, Roqueline Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Salomão Bento Vasconcelos; de Fátima Silva, Grácia Divina; Vieira Filho, Sidney Augusto; Knupp, Vagner Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Friedelin (1), 3beta-friedelinol (2), 28-hydroxyfriedelin (3), 16alpha-hydroxyfriedelin (4), 30-hydroxyfriedelin (5) and 16alpha,28-dihydroxyfriedelin (6) were isolated through fractionation of the hexane extract obtained from branches of Salacia elliptica. After a week in CDCl(3) solution, 16alpha-hydroxyfriedelin (4) reacted turning into 3-oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene (7). This is the first report of a dehydration followed by a Nametkin rearrangement of a pentacyclic triterpene in CDCl(3) solution occurring in the NMR tube. These seven pentacyclic triterpenes was identified through NMR spectroscopy and the stereochemistry of compound 4 and 7 was established by 2D NMR (NOESY) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It is also the first time that all the (13)C-NMR and 2D NMR spectral data are reported for compounds 4 and 7. PMID:19214150

  19. Pair interaction energy for a 12-electron 2D square Quantum Dot.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissenbaum, Daniel; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Bansil, Arun

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated a system of 12 electrons enclosed in a 2D square well representing a quantum dot. We employ a Jastrow-type wavefunction with Slater determinants and optimize the Jastrow parameter using the variational Monte Carlo method. We use the Metropolis algorithm to select a large distribution of configuration points and to perform a relatively noiseless calculation of the radial distribution function and to obtain insight into the contrast between the Fermi hole for the same-spin electrons and the Coulomb hole for the opposite-spin electrons. The calculated pair interaction energy provides a handle for constructing a model Hamiltonian useful for the study of spontaneous spin magnetization of the system. Work supported in part by the USDOE.

  20. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  1. Investigation on the conformations of AOT in water-in-oil microemulsions using 2D-ATR-FTIR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zuliang; Wu, Peiyi

    2008-07-01

    The carbonyl groups of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in the water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions of AOT/tetrachloromethane/water were investigated by using two-dimensional attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (2D-ATR-FTIR) correlation spectroscopy under a perturbation of temperature. The results of a traditional curve fitting method were compared with the 2D correlation spectra results. The peaks at 1718 and 1736 cm -1 were assigned to different carbonyl groups in trans conformation and gauche conformation of AOT molecules, respectively. With the increase of temperature, the trans conformation increased quickly at the lower temperature below 35 °C and decreased slowly at the higher temperature. The special phenomenon owed to the composition and decomposition of the hydrogen bonding between water of the inner polar core and carbonyl groups of AOT molecules. Two new peaks at 1707 and 1747 cm -1 in the 2D correlation spectra implied the process of the transition of AOT molecule conformation and the deviation of correlation coefficients of curve fitting method. 2D-ATR-FTIR correlation spectroscopy exhibited the superiority over the traditional curve fitting method.

  2. Simple fully reflective method of scatter reduction in 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spector, Ivan C; Olson, Courtney M; Huber, Christopher J; Massari, Aaron M

    2015-04-15

    A fully reflective two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) setup is described that enables efficient cancellation of scattered light from multiple pulses in the phase-matched direction. The local oscillator pulse and the pulse that stimulates the vibrational echo signal are synchronously modulated (or fibrillated) in time maintaining their phase relationships with the echo wavepacket. The modification is cost-effective and can be easily implemented on existing 2D-IR instruments, and it avoids the addition of dispersive elements into the beam paths. The fibrillation results in a decrease of waiting-time resolution of only tens of femtoseconds and has no impact on the spectral lineshape, making it a general improvement for 2D-IR spectrometers even for weakly or non-scattering samples. PMID:25872090

  3. Measurement of electrostatic potential variations between 2D materials using low-energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Barrera, Sergio; Mende, Patrick; Li, Jun; Feenstra, Randall; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Robinson, Joshua; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili

    Among the many properties that evolve as isolated 2D materials are brought together to form a heterostructure, rearrangement of charges between layers due to unintentional doping results in dipole fields at the interface, which critically affect the electronic properties of the structure. Here we report a method for directly measuring work function differences, and hence electrostatic potential variations, across the surface of 2D materials and heterostructures thereof using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Study of MoSe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on epitaxial graphene on SiC with LEEM reveals a large work function difference between the MoSe2 and the graphene, indicating charge transfer between the layers and a subsequent dipole layer. In addition to quantifying dipole effects between transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene, direct imaging of the surface, diffraction information, and the spectroscopic dependence of electron reflectivity will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  4. Wavelet characterization of 2D turbulence and intermittency in magnetized electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2016-06-01

    A study of the free relaxation of turbulence in a two-dimensional (2D) flow is presented, with a focus on the role of the initial vorticity conditions. Exploiting a well-known analogy with 2D inviscid incompressible fluids, the system investigated here is a magnetized pure electron plasma. The dynamics of this system are simulated by means of a 2D particle-in-cell code, starting from different spiral density (vorticity) distributions. A wavelet multiresolution analysis is adopted, which allows the coherent and incoherent parts of the flow to be separated. Comparison of the turbulent evolution in the different cases is based on the investigation of the time evolution of statistical properties, including the probability distribution functions and structure functions of the vorticity increments. It is also based on an analysis of the enstrophy evolution and its spectrum for the two components. In particular, while the statistical features assess the degree of flow intermittency, spectral analysis allows us not only to estimate the time required to reach a state of fully developed turbulence, but also estimate its dependence on the thickness of the initial spiral density distribution, accurately tracking the dynamics of both the coherent structures and the turbulent background. The results are compared with those relevant to annular initial vorticity distributions (Chen et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 495810511).

  5. Optical and Electronic Properties of 2D Graphitic Carbon-Nitride and Carbon Enriched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therrien, Joel; Li, Yancen; Schmidt, Daniel; Masaki, Michael; Syed, Abdulmannan

    The two-dimensional form of graphitic carbon-nitride (gCN) has been successfully synthesized using a simple CVD process. In it's pure form, the carbon to nitrogen ratio is 0.75. By adding a carbon bearing gas to the growth environment, the C/N ratio can be increased, ultimately reaching the pure carbon form: graphene. Unlike attempts at making a 2D alloy system out of BCN, the CN system does not suffer from phase segregation and thus forms a homogeneous alloy. The synthesis approach and electronic and optical properties will be presented for the pure gCN and a selection of alloy compositions.

  6. Electron phase coherent effects in nanostructures and coupled 2D systems

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Klem, J.F.; Sherwin, M.E.; Harff, N.E.; Eiles, T.M.; Wendt, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ``Electron Phase Coherent Effects in Nanostructures and Coupled 2D Systems.`` The goal of this project was to discover and characterize novel quantum transport phenomena in small semiconductor structures at low temperatures. Included is a description of the purpose of the research, the various approaches used, and a detailed qualitative description of the numerous new results obtained. The first appendix gives a detailed listing of publications, presentations, patent applications, awards received, and various other measures of the LDRD project success. Subsequent appendices consist of reprinted versions of several specific,`` scientific journal publications resulting from this LDRD project.

  7. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  8. Observation of kinetic networks of hydrogen-bond exchange using 2D IR echo spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yung Sam; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    The ultrafast H-bond motion in acetonitrile/methanol and of methanol and water around a dicarbonyl (piperidone) dominates the mechanism of vibrational coherence transfer in linear and 2D IR echo spectra. Multiple state coherence transfer and energy transfer are seen at and between the two carbonyl groups of the piperidone in both water and methanol.

  9. 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy: A sensitive test of polarizable water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In a recent paper, the experimental 2D-Raman-THz response of liquid water at ambient conditions has been presented [J. Savolainen, S. Ahmed, and P. Hamm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 20402 (2013)]. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed with the goal to reproduce the experimental results. To that end, the molecular response functions are calculated in a first step, and are then convoluted with the laser pulses in order to enable a direct comparison with the experimental results. The molecular dynamics simulation are performed with several different water models: TIP4P/2005, SWM4-NDP, and TL4P. As polarizability is essential to describe the 2D-Raman-THz response, the TIP4P/2005 water molecules are amended with either an isotropic or a anisotropic polarizability a posteriori after the molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast, SWM4-NDP and TL4P are intrinsically polarizable, and hence the 2D-Raman-THz response can be calculated in a self-consistent way, using the same force field as during the molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the 2D-Raman-THz response depends extremely sensitively on details of the water model, and in particular on details of the description of polarizability. Despite the limited time resolution of the experiment, it could easily distinguish between various water models. Albeit not perfect, the overall best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for the TL4P water model.

  10. 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy: A sensitive test of polarizable water models

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Peter

    2014-11-14

    In a recent paper, the experimental 2D-Raman-THz response of liquid water at ambient conditions has been presented [J. Savolainen, S. Ahmed, and P. Hamm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 20402 (2013)]. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed with the goal to reproduce the experimental results. To that end, the molecular response functions are calculated in a first step, and are then convoluted with the laser pulses in order to enable a direct comparison with the experimental results. The molecular dynamics simulation are performed with several different water models: TIP4P/2005, SWM4-NDP, and TL4P. As polarizability is essential to describe the 2D-Raman-THz response, the TIP4P/2005 water molecules are amended with either an isotropic or a anisotropic polarizability a posteriori after the molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast, SWM4-NDP and TL4P are intrinsically polarizable, and hence the 2D-Raman-THz response can be calculated in a self-consistent way, using the same force field as during the molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the 2D-Raman-THz response depends extremely sensitively on details of the water model, and in particular on details of the description of polarizability. Despite the limited time resolution of the experiment, it could easily distinguish between various water models. Albeit not perfect, the overall best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for the TL4P water model.

  11. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams. PMID:26170552

  12. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, S. A.; Das, K. J. Maria; Raj, D. Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams. PMID:26170552

  13. Neutrino-electron Scattering in 2-D Models of Supernova Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeNisco, K. R.; Swesty, F. D.; Myra, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from 2-D supernova simulations which include the effects of neutrino-electron scattering. The importance of neutrino-electron scattering in stellar collapse has been known for two decades. Yet it has often been neglected in multidimensional simulations due to the difficulty of implementing it consistently. The inclusion of this process is numerically challenging because of the extremely short scattering timescales involved. The stiffness resulting from this short timescale precludes an explicit numerical treatment of this phenomenon, such as those that have recently been utilized in some 2-D models. We describe our fully-implicit treatment of this process and present our initial results. This work was performed at the State University of New York at Stony Brook as part of the TeraScale Supernova Initiative, and is funded by SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER41185 from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science High-Energy, Nuclear, and Advanced Scientific Computing Research Programs. We gratefully acknowledge support of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) for computational and consulting support.

  14. Correlating Structural and Electronic Degrees of Freedom in 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, I.-Cheng; Zhang, Z.; Seyler, K. L.; Jones, A. M.; Clark, G.; Xiao, D.; Laanait, N.; Xu, X.; Wen, H.

    We have conducted a microscopic study of the interplay between structural and electronic degrees of freedom in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers, multilayers and heterostructures. Using the recently developed full field x-ray reflection interface microscopy with the photoluminescence microscopic probe capability at the Advanced Photon Source, we demonstrated the x-ray reflection imaging of a monolayer 2D material for the first time. The structural variation across an exfoliated WSe2 monolayer is quantified by interlayer spacing relative to the crystal substrate and the smoothness of the layer. This structural information is correlated with the electronic properties of TMDs characterized by the in-situ photoluminescence measurements. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-SC0012509. The use of Advanced Photon Source is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. In vivo 1D and 2D correlation MR spectroscopy of the soleus muscle at 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Saadallah; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Wald, Lawrence L.; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    2010-05-01

    AimThis study aims to (1) undertake and analyse 1D and 2D MR correlation spectroscopy from human soleus muscle in vivo at 7T, and (2) determine T1 and T2 relaxation time constants at 7T field strength due to their importance in sequence design and spectral quantitation. MethodSix healthy, male volunteers were consented and scanned on a 7T whole-body scanner (Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany). Experiments were undertaken using a 28 cm diameter detunable birdcage coil for signal excitation and an 8.5 cm diameter surface coil for signal reception. The relaxation time constants, T1 and T2 were recorded using a STEAM sequence, using the 'progressive saturation' method for the T1 and multiple echo times for T2. The 2D L-Correlated SpectroscopY (L-COSY) method was employed with 64 increments (0.4 ms increment size) and eight averages per scan, with a total time of 17 min. ResultsT1 and T2 values for the metabolites of interest were determined. The L-COSY spectra obtained from the soleus muscle provided information on lipid content and chemical structure not available, in vivo, at lower field strengths. All molecular fragments within multiple lipid compartments were chemically shifted by 0.20-0.26 ppm at this field strength. 1D and 2D L-COSY spectra were assigned and proton connectivities were confirmed with the 2D method. ConclusionIn vivo 1D and 2D spectroscopic examination of muscle can be successfully recorded at 7T and is now available to assess lipid alterations as well as other metabolites present with disease. T1 and T2 values were also determined in soleus muscle of male healthy volunteers.

  16. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  17. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films.

    PubMed

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J; Lewis, Emily A; Lucci, Felicia R; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope (125)I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual (125)I atoms into (125)Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic (125)I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies. PMID:26076306

  18. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J.; Lewis, Emily A.; Lucci, Felicia R.; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope 125I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual 125I atoms into 125Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic 125I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies.

  19. Recovering the Fermi surface with 2D-ACAR spectroscopy in samples with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugdale, S. B.; Laverock, J.

    2014-04-01

    When two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) experiments are performed in metals containing defects, conventional analysis in which the measured momentum distribution is folded back into the first Brillouin zone is rendered ineffective due to the contribution from positrons annihilating from the defect. However, by working with the radial anisotropy of the spectrum, it is shown that an image of the Fermi surface can be recovered since the defect contribution is essentially isotropic.

  20. Interrogating Fiber Formation Kinetics with Automated 2D-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasfeld, David B.; Ling, Yun L.; Shim, Sang-Hee; Zanni, Martin T.

    A new method for collecting 2D-IR spectra that utilizes both a pump-probe beam geometry and a mid-IR pulse shaper is used to gain a fuller understanding of fiber formation in the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP). We extract structural kinetics in order to better understand aggregation in hIAPP, the protein component of the amyloid fibers found to inhibit insulin production in type II diabetes patients.

  1. Ultrabroadband two-quantum two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellen, Tobias A.; Bizimana, Laurie A.; Carbery, William P.; Breen, Ilana; Turner, Daniel B.

    2016-08-01

    A recent theoretical study proposed that two-quantum (2Q) two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy should be a background-free probe of post-Hartree-Fock electronic correlations. Testing this theoretical prediction requires an instrument capable of not only detecting multiple transitions among molecular excited states but also distinguishing molecular 2Q signals from nonresonant response. Herein we describe a 2Q 2D spectrometer with a spectral range of 300 nm that is passively phase stable and uses only beamsplitters and mirrors. We developed and implemented a dual-chopping balanced-detection method to resolve the weak molecular 2Q signals. Experiments performed on cresyl violet perchlorate and rhodamine 6G revealed distinct 2Q signals convolved with nonresonant response. Density functional theory computations helped reveal the molecular origin of these signals. The experimental and computational results demonstrate that 2Q electronic spectra can provide a singular probe of highly excited electronic states.

  2. A new sequence for shaped voxel spectroscopy in the human brain using 2D spatially selective excitation and parallel transmission.

    PubMed

    Waxmann, Patrick; Mekle, Ralf; Schubert, Florian; Brühl, Rüdiger; Kuehne, Andre; Lindel, Tomasz D; Seifert, Frank; Speck, Oliver; Ittermann, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Spatially selective excitation in two dimensions (2D-SSE) utilizing parallel transmission was applied as a means to acquire signal from voxels adapted to the anatomy of interest for in vivo (1) H MR spectroscopy. A novel method to select spectroscopy voxels with arbitrary shapes in two dimensions was investigated. An on-off scheme with an adiabatic slice selective inversion pulse preceding a 2D-SSE pulse together with a segmented inward spiral excitation k-space trajectory enabled rapid free induction decay acquisitions. Performance of the sequence was evaluated in simulations, phantom experiments, and in vivo measurements at 3 T. High spatial fidelity of the excitation profile was achieved for different target shapes and with little off-resonance deterioration. Metabolite concentrations in human brain determined with the new sequence were quantified with Cramér-Rao lower bounds less than 20%. They were in the physiological range and did not deviate systematically from results acquired with a conventional SPECIAL sequence. In conclusion, a new approach for shaped voxel MRS in the human brain is presented, which complements existing sequences. Simulations show that 2D-SSE pulses yield reduced chemical shift artifact when compared with conventional localization methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27254102

  3. Phase Diagram of Bilayer 2D Electron Systems at νT = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Alexandre

    2009-03-01

    Bilayer 2D electron systems at total filling fraction νT = 1 and small interlayer spacing can support a strongly correlated phase which exhibits spontaneous interlayer phase coherence and may be described as an excitonic Bose condensate. We use electron interlayer tunnelling and transport to explore the phase diagram of bilayer 2D electron systems at νT = 1, and find that phase transitions between the excitonic νT = 1 phase and bilayer states which lack significant interlayer correlations can be induced in three different ways: by increasing the effective interlayer spacing, d/l, the temperature, T, or the charge imbalance, δν=ν1-ν2. First, for the balanced (δν = 0) system we find that the amplitude of the resonant tunneling in the coherent νT = 1 phase obeys an empirical power law scaling versus d/l at various T, and the layer separation where the tunneling disappears scales linearly with T. Our results [1] offer strong evidence that a finite temperature phase transition separates the balanced interlayer coherent phase from incoherent phases which lack strong interlayer correlations. Secondly, we observe [2] that close to the phase boundary the coherent νT = 1 phase can be absent at δν = 0, present at intermediate δν, and absent again at large δν, thus indicating an intricate phase competition between it and incoherent quasi-independent layer states. Lastly, at δν = 1/3 we report [2] the observation of a direct phase transition between the coherent νT = 1 bilayer integer quantum Hall phase and the pair of single layer fractional quantized Hall states at ν1 = 2/3 and ν2 = 1/3.[4pt] [1] A.R. Champagne, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 096801 (2008).[0pt] [2] A.R. Champagne, et al, Phys. Rev. B 78, 205310 (2008)

  4. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  5. XAFS data acquisition with 2D-detectors: Transmission mode XAFS and grazing incidence EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Gasse, J.-C.; Bögel, R.; Wagner, R.; Frahm, R.

    2016-05-01

    XAFS-experiments in transmission and reflection modes have been performed using a Pilatus 100K pixel detector. Transmission mode XAFS spectra from a Co metal foil and Co3O4 were recorded to evaluate the data quality offered by this 2D-detector. Furthermore, the pixel detector was also used to measure reflection mode grazing incidence EXAFS data. Using different regions of interest in the collected scattering patterns, we will show that the diffuse scattering can be separated for the different contributing surfaces and interfaces, allowing simultaneous investigations of surfaces and buried interfaces within multi-layered samples.

  6. Observation and theory of reorientation-induced spectral diffusion in polarization-selective 2D IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Patrick L.; Nishida, Jun; Giammanco, Chiara H.; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D.

    2015-05-01

    In nearly all applications of ultrafast multidimensional infrared spectroscopy, the spectral degrees of freedom (e.g., transition frequency) and the orientation of the transition dipole are assumed to be decoupled. We present experimental results which confirm that frequency fluctuations can be caused by rotational motion and observed under appropriate conditions. A theory of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) observable under various polarization conditions is introduced, and model calculations are found to reproduce the qualitative trends in FFCF rates. The FFCF determined with polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy is a direct reporter of the frequency-rotational coupling. For the solute methanol in a room temperature ionic liquid, the FFCF of the hydroxyl (O-D) stretch decays due to spectral diffusion with different rates depending on the polarization of the excitation pulses. The 2D IR vibrational echo pulse sequence consists of three excitation pulses that generate the vibrational echo, a fourth pulse. A faster FFCF decay is observed when the first two excitation pulses are polarized perpendicular to the third pulse and the echo, , than in the standard all parallel configuration, , in which all four pulses have the same polarization. The 2D IR experiment with polarizations ("polarization grating" configuration) gives a FFCF that decays even more slowly than in the configuration. Polarization-selective 2D IR spectra of bulk water do not exhibit polarization-dependent FFCF decays; spectral diffusion is effectively decoupled from reorientation in the water system.

  7. Observation and theory of reorientation-induced spectral diffusion in polarization-selective 2D IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Patrick L; Nishida, Jun; Giammanco, Chiara H; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2015-05-14

    In nearly all applications of ultrafast multidimensional infrared spectroscopy, the spectral degrees of freedom (e.g., transition frequency) and the orientation of the transition dipole are assumed to be decoupled. We present experimental results which confirm that frequency fluctuations can be caused by rotational motion and observed under appropriate conditions. A theory of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) observable under various polarization conditions is introduced, and model calculations are found to reproduce the qualitative trends in FFCF rates. The FFCF determined with polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy is a direct reporter of the frequency-rotational coupling. For the solute methanol in a room temperature ionic liquid, the FFCF of the hydroxyl (O-D) stretch decays due to spectral diffusion with different rates depending on the polarization of the excitation pulses. The 2D IR vibrational echo pulse sequence consists of three excitation pulses that generate the vibrational echo, a fourth pulse. A faster FFCF decay is observed when the first two excitation pulses are polarized perpendicular to the third pulse and the echo, 〈XXY Y〉, than in the standard all parallel configuration, 〈XXXX〉, in which all four pulses have the same polarization. The 2D IR experiment with polarizations 〈XY XY〉 ("polarization grating" configuration) gives a FFCF that decays even more slowly than in the 〈XXXX〉 configuration. Polarization-selective 2D IR spectra of bulk water do not exhibit polarization-dependent FFCF decays; spectral diffusion is effectively decoupled from reorientation in the water system. PMID:25978898

  8. Dynamical symmetry breaking in a 2D electron gas with a spectral node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    We study a disordered 2D electron gas with a spectral node in a vicinity of the node. After identifying the fundamental dynamical symmetries of this system, the spontaneous breaking of the latter by a Grassmann field is studied within a nonlinear sigma model approach. This allows us to reduce the average two-particle Green's function to a diffusion propagator with a random diffusion coefficient. The latter has non-degenerate saddle points and is treated by the conventional self-consistent Born approximation. This leads to a renormalized chemical potential and a renormalized diffusion coefficient, where the DC conductivity increases linearly with the density of quasiparticles. Applied to the special case of Dirac fermions, our approach provides a comprehensive description of the minimal conductivity at the Dirac node as well as for the V-shape conductivity inside the bands.

  9. 2D MEMS scanning for LIDAR with sub-Nyquist sampling, electronics, and measurement procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Thorsten; Janes, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Electrostatic driven 2D MEMS scanners resonantly oscillate in both axes leading to Lissajous trajectories of a digitally modulated laser beam reflected from the micro mirror. A solid angle of about 0.02 is scanned by a 658nm laser beam with a maximum repetition rate of 350MHz digital pulses. Reflected light is detected by an APD with a bandwidth of 80MHz. The phase difference between the scanned laser light and the light reflected from an obstacle is analyzed by sub-Nyquist sampling. The FPGA-based electronics and software for the evaluation of distance and velocity of objects within the scanning range are presented. Furthermore, the measures to optimize the Lidar accuracy of about 1mm and the dynamic range of up to 2m are examined. First measurements demonstrating the capability of the system and the evaluation algorithms are discussed.

  10. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo–Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near {{e}2}/π h .

  11. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near [Formula: see text]. PMID:27270084

  12. Two-dimensional Electronic Double-Quantum Coherence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongho; Mukamel, Shaul

    2009-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The theory of electronic structure of many-electron systems like molecules is extraordinarily complicated. A lot can be learned by considering how electron density is distributed, on average, in the average field of the other electrons in the system. That is, mean field theory. However, to describe quantitatively chemical bonds, reactions, and spectroscopy requires consideration of the way that electrons avoid each other by the way they move; this is called electron correlation (or in physics, the many-body problem for fermions). While great progress has been made in theory, there is a need for incisive experimental tests that can be undertaken for large molecular systems in the condensed phase. Here we report a two-dimensional (2D) optical coherent spectroscopy that correlates the double excited electronic states to constituent single excited states. The technique, termed two-dimensional double-coherence spectroscopy (2D-DQCS), makes use of multiple, time-ordered ultrashort coherent optical pulses to create double- and single-quantum coherences over time intervals between the pulses. The resulting two-dimensional electronic spectrum maps the energy correlation between the first excited state and two-photon allowed double-quantum states. The principle of the experiment is that when the energy of the double-quantum state, viewed in simple models as a double HOMO to LUMO excitation, equals twice that of a single excitation, then no signal is radiated. However, electron-electron interactions—a combination of exchange interactions and electron correlation—in real systems generates a signal that reveals precisely how the energy of the double-quantum resonance differs from twice the single-quantum resonance. The energy shift measured in this experiment reveals how the second excitation is perturbed by both the presence of the first excitation and the way that the other electrons in the system have responded to the presence of that first excitation. We

  13. Electronic and geometrical properties of monoatomic and diatomic 2D honeycomb lattices. A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Ángela; Rey, Rafael; Fonseca, Karen; Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica Team

    Since the discovery of graphene by Geim and Novoselov at 2004, several analogous systems have been theoretically and experimentally studied, due to their technological interest. Both monoatomic lattices, such as silicine and germanene, and diatomic lattices (h-GaAs and h-GaN) have been studied. Using Density Functional Theory we obtain and confirm the chemical stability of these hexagonal 2D systems through the total energy curves as a function of interatomic distance. Unlike graphene, silicine and germanene, gapless materials, h-GaAs and h-GaN exhibit electronic gaps, different from that of the bulk, which could be interesting for the industry. On the other hand, the ab initio band structure calculations for graphene, silicene and germanene show a non-circular cross section around K points, at variance with the prediction of usual Tight-binding models. In fact, we have found that Dirac cones display a dihedral group symmetry. This implies that Fermi speed can change up to 30 % due to the orientation of the wave vector, for both electrons and holes. Traditional analytic studies use the Dirac equation for the electron dynamics at low energies. However, this equation assumes an isotropic, homogeneous and uniform space. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia. A. M. Rojas-Cuervo would also like to thank the Colciencias, Colombia.

  14. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  15. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-15

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  16. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges.

    PubMed

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria. PMID:25554272

  17. Studies of Photosynthetic Energy and Charge Transfer by Two-dimensional Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer

    2010-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy has recently emerged as a powerful tool for the study of energy transfer in complex condensed-phase systems. Its experimental implementation is challenging but can be greatly simplified by implementing a pump-probe geometry, where the two phase-stable collinear pump pulses are created with an acousto-optic pulse-shaper. This approach also allows the use of a continuum probe pulse, expanding the available frequency range of the detection axis and allowing studies of energy transfer and electronic coupling over a broad range of frequencies. We discuss several benefits of 2D electronic spectroscopy and present 2D data on the D1-D2 reaction center complex of Photosystem II from spinach. We discuss the ability of 2D spectroscopy to distinguish between current models of energy and charge transfer in this system.

  18. [Analysis of streamer properties and emission spectroscopy of 2-D OH distribution of pulsed corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Gao, Xiang; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Xuan, Jian-Yong; Jiang, Jian-Ping; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2011-11-01

    Streamer plays a key role in the process of OH radical generation. The propagation of primary and secondary streamers of positive wire-plate pulsed corona discharge was observed using a short gate ICCD in air environment. The influence of the applied voltage on the properties was investigated. It was shown that the primary streamer propagation velocity, electric coverage and length of secondary streamer increased significantly with increasing the applied voltage. Then 2-D OH distribution was investigated by the emission spectrum. With the analysis of the OH emission spectra, the distribution of OH radicals showed a trend of decreasing from the wire electrode to its circumambience. Compared with the streamer propagation trace, the authors found that OH radical distribution and streamer are in the same area. Both OH radical concentration and the intensity of streamer decreased when far away from the wire electrode. PMID:22242481

  19. 2D spectroscopy of galaxies with star formation regions. Study of SBS 1533+574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.; Dodonov, S. N.; Movsessian, T. A.

    2006-10-01

    A preliminary analysis is given of 2D spectroscopic data on the galaxy SBS 1533+574(AB) obtained using the multipupil spectrographs on the 2.6-m telescope at the BAO (VAGR) and the 6-m telescope at the SAO (MPFS). The two components of the galaxy are star formation regions in different stages. The component SBS 1533+574B is known to be a BCDG. The plots of the intensity distribution of the radiation in the recombination lines of hydrogen and the forbidden lines of gases with a low degree of ionization obtained here make it possible to compare the basic characteristics of the HII-zones and the surrounding shell. The velocity distribution over the field of the galaxy is indicative of a common rotation of the system and of an intrinsic rotation of the components which is more distinct for component B.

  20. Communication: two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J

    2013-06-14

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15,000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm(2). PMID:23781772

  1. Communication: Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): Simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15 000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm2.

  2. Communication: Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): Simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15, 000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm2.

  3. Study on antibacterial alginate-stabilized copper nanoparticles by FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Visurraga, Judith; Daza, Carla; Pozo, Claudio; Becerra, Abraham; von Plessing, Carlos; García, Apolinaria

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to clarify the intermolecular interaction between antibacterial copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and to process the spectra applying two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation analysis. To our knowledge, the addition of NaAlg as a stabilizer of copper nanoparticles has not been previously reported. It is expected that the obtained results will provide valuable additional information on: (1) the influence of reducing agent ratio on the formation of copper nanoparticles in order to design functional nanomaterials with increased antibacterial activity, and (2) structural changes related to the incorporation of Cu NPs into the polymer matrix. Methods Cu NPs were prepared by microwave heating using ascorbic acid as reducing agent and NaAlg as stabilizing agent. The characterization of synthesized Cu NPs by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and semiquantitative analysis of the weight percentage composition indicated that the average particle sizes of Cu NPs are about 3–10 nm, they are spherical in shape, and consist of zerovalent Cu and Cu2O. Also, crystallite size and relative particle size of stabilized Cu NPs were calculated by XRD using Scherrer’s formula and FT from the X-ray diffraction data. Thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), FT-IR, second-derivative spectra, and 2D-IR correlation analysis were applied to studying the stabilization mechanism of Cu NPs by NaAlg molecules. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of stabilized Cu NPs against five bacterial strains (Staphylococccus aureus ATCC 6538P, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and O157: H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 13311 and 14028) were evaluated with macrodilution

  4. Kinetic electron bounce instability in a 2D current sheet - Implication for substorm dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, G.; Tur, A.; Louarn, P.

    2013-12-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic ballooning-type instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons in a 2D current sheet. Tur et al. 2010 and Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Here, we generalize the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period. The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. It is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (Bz > 0.1 Blobes) undamped and stable modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength (in y) of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in epsilon=Bz/Blobes < 0.05 typically, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few tens of seconds. The free energy contained in the electron bouncing motion could thus trigger and drive an electromagnetic instability able to disrupt the cross-tail current in a few seconds. The role of the temperature ratio Te/Ti is also evaluated.

  5. PAC spectroscopy of electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.A.; Wang, Ruiping; Schwenker, R.; Evenson, W.E.; Rasera, R.L.; Sommers, J.A.

    1991-12-31

    Dilute indium dopants in cerium oxides and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} have been studied by{sup 111}In/Cd Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. By controlling oxygen vacancy concentration in the cerium oxides through doping or high-temperature vacuum annealing, we have found that indium always forms a defect complex unless the sample is doped to reduce greatly the oxygen vacancy concentration. Three different vacancy-associated complexes are found with concentrations that depend on doping and oxygen stoichiometry. Another defect complex occurs in samples having negligible vacancy concentration. At low temperatures, evidence is found of interaction with an electronic hole trapped by {sup 111}Cd after the radioactive decay of the {sup 111}In parent. In YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} the indium substitutes preferentially at the Y site but has measurable probability of substitution in at least one of the two copper sites. A symmetry change near 650 {degree}C is consistent with the well-documented orthorhombic/tetragonal transition for samples in air or oxygen.

  6. PAC spectroscopy of electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.A.; Wang, Ruiping; Schwenker, R. . Dept. of Physics); Evenson, W.E. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Rasera, R.L. . Dept. of Physics); Sommers, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Dilute indium dopants in cerium oxides and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} have been studied by{sup 111}In/Cd Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. By controlling oxygen vacancy concentration in the cerium oxides through doping or high-temperature vacuum annealing, we have found that indium always forms a defect complex unless the sample is doped to reduce greatly the oxygen vacancy concentration. Three different vacancy-associated complexes are found with concentrations that depend on doping and oxygen stoichiometry. Another defect complex occurs in samples having negligible vacancy concentration. At low temperatures, evidence is found of interaction with an electronic hole trapped by {sup 111}Cd after the radioactive decay of the {sup 111}In parent. In YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} the indium substitutes preferentially at the Y site but has measurable probability of substitution in at least one of the two copper sites. A symmetry change near 650 {degree}C is consistent with the well-documented orthorhombic/tetragonal transition for samples in air or oxygen.

  7. Deconvolution of 2D coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy using the Richardson Lucy algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. D.; Zhou, T. J.; Cheung, C. K.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.; Ng, M. K.

    2006-05-01

    Coincident Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (CDBS) measurements are popular in positron solid-state studies of materials. By utilizing the instrumental resolution function obtained from a gamma line close in energy to the 511 keV annihilation line, it is possible to significantly enhance the quality of the CDBS spectra using deconvolution algorithms. In this paper, we compare two algorithms, namely the Non-Negativity Least Squares (NNLS) regularized method and the Richardson-Lucy (RL) algorithm. The latter, which is based on the method of maximum likelihood, is found to give superior results to the regularized least-squares algorithm and with significantly less computer processing time.

  8. Direct MD Simulations of Terahertz Absorption and 2D Spectroscopy Applied to Explosive Crystals.

    PubMed

    Katz, G; Zybin, S; Goddard, W A; Zeiri, Y; Kosloff, R

    2014-03-01

    A direct molecular dynamics simulation of the THz spectrum of a molecular crystal is presented. A time-dependent electric field is added to a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal slab. The absorption spectrum is composed from the energy dissipated calculated from a series of applied pulses characterized by a carrier frequency. The spectrum of crystalline cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) were simulated with the ReaxFF force field. The proposed direct method avoids the linear response and harmonic approximations. A multidimensional extension of the spectroscopy is suggested and simulated based on the nonlinear response to a single polarized pulse of radiation in the perpendicular polarization direction. PMID:26274066

  9. Spin-Orbit Interaction and Related Transport Phenomena in 2d Electron and Hole Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaetskii, A.

    Spin-orbit interaction is responsible for many physical phenomena which are under intensive study currently. Here we discuss several of them. The first phenomenon is the edge spin accumulation, which appears due to spin-orbit interaction in 2D mesoscopic structures in the presence of a charge current. We consider the case of a strong spin-orbit-related splitting of the electron spectrum, i.e. a spin precession length is small compared to the mean free path l. The structure can be either in a ballistic regime (when the mean free path is the largest scale in the problem) or quasi-ballistic regime (when l is much smaller than the sample size). We show how physics of edge spin accumulation in different situations should be understood from the point of view of unitarity of boundary scattering. Using transparent method of scattering states, we are able to explain some previous puzzling theoretical results. We clarify the important role of the form of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian, the role of the boundary conditions, etc., and reveal the wrong results obtained in the field by other researchers. The relation between the edge spin density and the bulk spin current in different regimes is discussed. The detailed comparison with the existing theoretical works is presented. Besides, we consider several new transport phenomena which appear in the presence of spin-orbit interaction, for example, magnetotransport phenomena in an external classical magnetic field. In particular, new mechanism of negative magneto-resistance appears which is due to destruction of spin fluxes by the magnetic field, and which can be really pronounced in 2D systems with strong scatterers.

  10. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  11. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  12. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulkmore » IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.« less

  13. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulk IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.

  14. Interactions in two-component liposomes studied by 2D correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawska, Agnieszka; Cieślik-Boczula, Katarzyna; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Bogusława

    2010-06-01

    The effect of dipping amphiphilic ICPANs (1-Alkylaminium, N-[2-[3-[3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-1-oxopropoxy]ethyl]-N,N-dimethyl-, bromide) homologues, characterized by varying alkyl chain length ( n = 8, 10, 12, and 16), into large multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was studied. Attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy combined with 31P-NMR enabled observing a cut-off effect for the longest homologue. By employing two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) for monitoring spectral changes induced by the heating process, detailed information about structural changes was obtained. They confirmed the substantial reorganization in the structure of the interfacial region in the ICPAN-C16/DPPC vesicles compared with the shorter homologues, where mainly the alkyl chains experience significant trans-to-gauche reorganization. Absorbance changes around 1400 cm -1 assigned to the symmetric deformation mode δsym ( +N(CH 3) 3) are a good marker of changes in vesicle shape and are sensitive to the percentage of DPPC molecules directly interacting with the surface of the ATR crystal. This study clearly demonstrates the potential of 2DCOS in investigating interactions in two-component liposomes.

  15. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-27

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications. PMID:27023758

  16. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications.

  17. Rapid identification of Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii by FTIR and 2D correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang-Da; Xu, Chang-Hua; Li, Ming-Yu; Huang, An-Min; Sun, Su-Qin

    2014-07-01

    Since Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii, which are of precious Rosewood, are very similar in their appearance and anatomy characteristics, cheaper Hongmu D. louvelii is often illegally used to impersonate valuable P. santalinus, especially in Chinese furniture manufacture. In order to develop a rapid and effective method for easy confused wood furniture differentiation, we applied tri-step identification method, i.e., conventional infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2DCOS-IR) spectroscopy to investigate P. santalinus and D. louvelii furniture. According to FT-IR and SD-IR spectra, it has been found two unconditional stable difference at 848 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 and relative stable differences at 1735 cm-1, 1623 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, 1602 cm-1, 1509 cm-1, 1456 cm-1, 1200 cm-1, 1158 cm-1, 1055 cm-1, 1034 cm-1 and 895 cm-1 between D. louvelii and P. santalinus IR spectra. The stable discrepancy indicates that the category of extractives is different between the two species. Besides, the relative stable differences imply that the content of holocellulose in P. santalinus is more than that of D. louvelii, whereas the quantity of extractives in D. louvelii is higher. Furthermore, evident differences have been observed in their 2DCOS-IR spectra of 1550-1415 cm-1 and 1325-1030 cm-1. P. santalinus has two strong auto-peaks at 1459 cm-1 and 1467 cm-1, three mid-strong auto-peaks at 1518 cm-1, 1089 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1 and five weak auto-peaks at 1432 cm-1, 1437 cm-1, 1046 cm-1, 1056 cm-1 and 1307 cm-1 while D. louvelii has four strong auto-peaks at 1465 cm-1, 1523 cm-1, 1084 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1, four mid-strong auto-peaks at 1430 cm-1, 1499 cm-1, 1505 cm-1 and 1056 cm-1 and two auto-peaks at 1540 cm-1 and 1284 cm-1. This study has proved that FT-IR integrated with 2DCOS-IR could be applicable for precious wood furniture authentication in a direct, rapid and holistic manner.

  18. Interactions of sialic acid with phosphatidylcholine liposomes studied by 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Timoszyk, Anna; Latanowicz, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex systems which have attracted scientific interest for a long time and for various reasons. The sialic acid-liposome interactions at the molecular level depend on their hydro-lipophilic characteristics. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes of conformation of the phospholipid (1,2-Diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and sialic acid (2,8-(N-acetylneuraminic acid)) molecules and the type of interactions induced by the sialic acid molecules on membrane-like systems (liposomes) by 2D NMR (TOCSY, HETCOR, ROESY). The nature of the interaction of sialic acid with the model membrane depends on the structure of the phospholipid headgroups and the hydration of membrane. In ROESY spectra was observed the absence of dipole-dipole couplings within the choline head, between headgroups and glycerol, and between glycerol and fatty acid chains. It indicates an increase of the membrane dynamics in the presence of sialic acid. Moreover, the conformation of sialic acid molecule is changed in the presence of liposomes, which depends on stereochemistry of the chemical groups of the carbon atoms C7 and C8, and oxygen O8. The observed differences between the ROESY spectra of free and liposome bound sialic acid may be a consequence of a changed orientation of the pyranose ring from trans to gauche in the presence of liposomes. The sialic acid penetrate into the phospholipid bilayer to a sufficient depth to allow the dipole interaction. The present result that the correlation signal was found only between the methyl protons from the acetyl group of sialic acid and the methylene tail of phospholipid molecule in the ROESY spectrum indicates that the opposite end of the sialic acid molecule stays in the aqueous phase without interacting with membrane molecules. PMID:24364043

  19. Energy flow between spectral components in 2D Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batignani, G.; Fumero, G.; Mukamel, S.; Scopigno, T.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical description of non resonant impulsive Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy in a multimode harmonic model. In this technique an ultrashort actinic pulse creates coherences of low frequency modes and is followed by a pair of a narrowband Raman and broadband probe pulse. Using Closed-Time-Path-Loop (CTPL) diagrams, the response on both the red and the blue sides of the broadband pulse with respect to the narrowband Raman pulse is calculated, the process couples high and low frequency modes which share the same ground state. The transmitted intensity oscillates between the red and the blue side, while the total number of photons is conserved. The total energy of the probe signal is periodically modulated in time by the coherence created in the low frequency modes. PMID:25802897

  20. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  1. 2D turbulence imaging in DIII-D via beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fenzi, C.; Fonck, R. J.; Jakubowski, M.; Mc Kee, G. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations have been performed in DIII-D using the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. The 32 spatial channels are arranged to image a 5x6cm{sup 2} (radialxpoloidal) region in the plasma cross section, at a nominal 1 cm spatial resolution and separation. The typical decorrelation time, poloidal and radial correlation lengths, as well as a time-averaged flow field plot are obtained from spatial and temporal correlation analyses. A biorthogonal decomposition algorithm is applied to expand the data set into a set of modes that are orthogonal in time and in space, thus providing a simultaneous analysis of the space and time dependencies of fluctuation data.

  2. 2D-IR spectroscopy of hydrogen-bond-mediated vibrational excitation transfer.

    PubMed

    Chuntonov, Lev

    2016-05-18

    Vibrational excitation transfer along the hydrogen-bond-mediated pathways in the complex of methyl acetate (MA) and 4-cyanophenol (4CP) was studied by dual-frequency femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. We excited the energy-donating ester carbonyl stretching vibrational mode and followed the transfer to the energy-accepting benzene ring and cyano stretching vibrations. The complexes with no, one, and two hydrogen-bonded 4CP molecules were studied. Vibrational relaxation of the carbonyl mode is more efficient in both hydrogen-bonded complexes as compared with free MA molecules. The inter-molecular transport in a hydrogen-bonded complex involving a single 4CP molecule is slower than that in a complex with two 4CP molecules. In the former, vibrational relaxation leads to local heating, as shown by the spectroscopy of the carbonyl mode, whereas the local heating is suppressed in the latter because the excitation redistribution is more efficient. At early times, the transfer to the benzene ring is governed by its direct coupling with the energy-donating carbonyl mode, whereas at later times intermediate states are involved. The transfer to a more distant site of the cyano group in 4CP involves intermediate states at all times, since no direct coupling between the energy-donating and accepting modes was observed. We anticipate that our findings will be of importance for spectroscopic studies of bio-molecular structures and dynamics, and inter- and intra-molecular signaling pathways, and for developing molecular networking applications. PMID:27145861

  3. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yu; Voigt, Cooper A.; Kent, Paul R. C.; May, Steven J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-24

    In this paper, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M'2M"C2 and M'2M"2C3 – where M' and M" are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, andmore » Ti. The M' atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M" atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M' atomic layers sandwich the middle M"–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. Finally, this finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.« less

  4. Strongly Metallic Electron and Hole 2D Transport in an Ambipolar Si-Vacuum Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Binhui; Yazdanpanah, M. M.; Kane, B. E.; Hwang, E. H.; Das Sarma, S.

    2015-07-01

    We report experiment and theory on an ambipolar gate-controlled Si(111)-vacuum field effect transistor where we study electron and hole (low-temperature 2D) transport in the same device simply by changing the external gate voltage to tune the system from being a 2D electron system at positive gate voltage to a 2D hole system at negative gate voltage. The electron (hole) conductivity manifests strong (moderate) metallic temperature dependence with the conductivity decreasing by a factor of 8 (2) between 0.3 K and 4.2 K with the peak electron mobility (˜18 m2/V s ) being roughly 20 times larger than the peak hole mobility (in the same sample). Our theory explains the data well using random phase approximation screening of background Coulomb disorder, establishing that the observed metallicity is a direct consequence of the strong temperature dependence of the effective screened disorder.

  5. Destabilization of 2D magnetic current sheets by resonance with bouncing electron - a new theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Gabriel; Louarn, Philippe; Tur, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons. The geometry is clearly 2D and uses Harris sheet profile. Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasi neutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. The present talk will focus on the main results of this theory. The electrostatic version of the model may be applied to the near-Earth environment (8-12 R_{E}) where beta is rather low. It is showed that inclusion of bouncing electron motion may enhance strongly the growth rate of the classical drift wave instability. This model could thus explain the generation of strong parallel electric fields in the ionosphere and the formation of aurora beads with wavelength of a few hundreds of km. In the electromagnetic version, it is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (B_{z} > 0.1 B _{lobes}) undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in B_{z}/B _{lobes}, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few

  6. Hemispherical Analyser with 2-D PSD for Zero-degree Auger Projectile Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benis, E. P.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Aliabadi, H.; Richard, P.

    Details of a new high gain zero-degree Auger projectile electron spectrograph using a hemispherical analyser and a 2-dimensional position sensitive detector (PSD) with multichannel plates and a resistive anode encoder are presented. A four-element lens mounted at the entrance of the analyser, provides a virtual slit for the incoming electrons by focusing them while at the same time decelerating them to improve their energy resolution. Electrons enter through an aperture at a position R0 which is displaced (along the energy dispersion axis) with respect to the commonly used central entrance position at 1/2 (R1+R2). The analyser has an acceptance energy range of 20% and an energy resolution of 0.9%. An ion-optics trajectory simulation indicates improved focusing properties for this off-center position thus avoiding the need for cumbersome fringing field correction schemes. Test measurements of high resolution projectile Auger spectra produced in 21.7 MeV collisions of F8+ and F7+ projectiles with H2 and He are presented.

  7. Structural Disorder of Folded Proteins: Isotope-Edited 2D IR Spectroscopy and Markov State Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The conformational heterogeneity of the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 (NTL91-39) in its folded state is investigated using isotope-edited two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. Backbone carbonyls are isotope-labeled (13C=18O) at five selected positions (V3, V9, V9G13, G16, and G24) to provide a set of localized spectroscopic probes of the structure and solvent exposure at these positions. Structural interpretation of the amide I line shapes is enabled by spectral simulations carried out on structures extracted from a recent Markov state model. The V3 label spectrum indicates that the β-sheet contacts between strands I and II are well folded with minimal disorder. The V9 and V9G13 label spectra, which directly probe the hydrogen-bond contacts across the β-turn, show significant disorder, indicating that molecular dynamics simulations tend to overstabilize ideally folded β-turn structures in NTL91-39. In addition, G24-label spectra provide evidence for a partially disordered α-helix backbone that participates in hydrogen bonding with the surrounding water. PMID:25863066

  8. Quantitative nanoscale visualization of heterogeneous electron transfer rates in 2D carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Güell, Aleix G; Ebejer, Neil; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-07-17

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable interest for electrochemical, electrocatalytic, and sensing applications, yet there remains uncertainty concerning the intrinsic electrochemical (EC) activity. In this study, we use scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) to determine local heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) kinetics in a random 2D network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on an Si/SiO(2) substrate. The high spatial resolution of SECCM, which employs a mobile nanoscale EC cell as a probe for imaging, enables us to sample the responses of individual portions of a wide range of SWNTs within this complex arrangement. Using two redox processes, the oxidation of ferrocenylmethyl trimethylammonium and the reduction of ruthenium (III) hexaamine, we have obtained conclusive evidence for the high intrinsic EC activity of the sidewalls of the large majority of SWNTs in networks. Moreover, we show that the ends of SWNTs and the points where two SWNTs cross do not show appreciably different HET kinetics relative to the sidewall. Using finite element method modeling, we deduce standard rate constants for the two redox couples and demonstrate that HET based solely on characteristic defects in the SWNT side wall is highly unlikely. This is further confirmed by the analysis of individual line profiles taken as the SECCM probe scans over an SWNT. More generally, the studies herein demonstrate SECCM to be a powerful and versatile method for activity mapping of complex electrode materials under conditions of high mass transport, where kinetic assignments can be made with confidence. PMID:22635266

  9. Combined analysis of C-18 unsaturated fatty acids using natural abundance deuterium 2D NMR spectroscopy in chiral oriented solvents.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Baillif, Vincent; Billault, Isabelle

    2008-04-15

    The quantitative determination of isotopic (2H/1H)i ratios at natural abundance using the SNIF-NMR protocol is a well-known method for understanding the enzymatic biosynthesis of metabolites. However, this approach is not always successful for analyzing large solutes and, specifically, is inadequate for prochiral molecules such as complete essential unsaturated fatty acids. To overcome these analytical limitations, we use the natural abundance deuterium 2D NMR (NAD 2D NMR) spectroscopy on solutes embedded in polypeptide chiral liquid crystals. This approach, recently explored for measuring (2H/1H)i ratios of small analytes (Lesot, P.; Aroulanda, C.; Billault, I. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 2827-2835), is a powerful way to separate the 2H signals of all nonequivalent enantioisotopomers on the basis both of the 2H quadrupolar interactions and of the 2H chemical shift. Two significant advances over our previous work are presented here and allow the complete isotopic analysis of four mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters: methyl oleate (1), methyl linoleate (2), methyl linolenate (3), and methyl vernoleate (4). The first consists of using NMR spectrometers operating at higher magnetic field strength (14.1 T) and equipped with a selective cryoprobe optimized for deuterium nuclei. The second is the development of Q-COSY Fz 2D NMR experiments able to produce phased 2H 2D maps after a double Fourier transformation. This combination of modern hardware and efficient NMR sequences provides a unique tool to analyze the (2H/1H)i ratios of large prochiral molecules (C-18) dissolved in organic solutions of poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) and requires smaller amounts of solute than previous study on fatty acids. For each compound (1-4), all 2H quadrupolar doublets visible in the 2D spectra have been assigned on the basis of 2H chemical shifts, isotopic data obtained from isotropic quantitative NAD NMR, and by an interspectral comparison of the anisotropic NAD spectra of four

  10. Electron-beam induced photoresist shrinkage influence on 2D profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Allgair, John; Aguilar, Daniel Bellido; Tileli, Vasiliki; Thiel, Bradley; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-Zvi, Mayaan; Adan, Ofer; Chirko, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle in keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 32 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques will be used, including immersion ArF (iArF) lithography and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print smaller feature widths and pitches. Also, such smaller feature sizes will require thinner layers of photoresists, such as under 100 nm. In previous papers, we focused on ArF and iArF photoresist shrinkage. We evaluated the magnitude of shrinkage for both R&D and mature resists as a function of chemical formulation, lithographic sensitivity, scanning electron microscope (SEM) beam condition, and feature size. Shrinkage results were determined by the well accepted methodology described in ISMI's CD-SEM Unified Specification. A model for resist shrinkage, while derived elsewhere, was presented, that can be used to curve-fit to the shrinkage data resulting from multiple repeated measurements of resist features. Parameters in the curve-fit allow for metrics quantifying total shrinkage, shrinkage rate, and initial critical dimension (CD) before e-beam exposure. With these parameters and exhaustive measurements, a fundamental understanding of the phenomenology of the shrinkage trends was achieved, including how the shrinkage behaves differently for different sized features. This work was extended in yet another paper in which we presented a 1-D model for resist shrinkage that can be used to curve-fit to shrinkage curves. Calibration of parameters to describe the photoresist material and the electron beam were all that were required to fit the model to real shrinkage data, as long as the photoresist was thick enough that the beam could not penetrate the entire layer of resist. In this paper, we extend this work yet again to a 2-D model of a trapezoidal photoresist profile. This model thus

  11. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  12. Conformational studies of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, K.; Stawikowski, M.; Ślusarz, R.; Sikorska, E.; Lesner, A.; Łęgowska, A.; Rolka, K.

    2015-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 is the smallest and the most potent among BBI inhibitors. It is also an interesting object for SAR studies since it is cyclic 14 amino acid molecule which additionally contains disulfide bridge. We showed that elimination of head-to-tail cycliztion did not influence its activity. Moreover peptoid monomers of Nlys and Nphe introduced in the substrate specificity P1 position of monocyclic SFTI-1 preserved trypsin and chymotripsin inhibitory activity respectively and made P1-P1‧ bond proteolytically stable. These findings motivated us to perform conformational analysis of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations. Obtained structure occurred to be in a good agreement with published structures for wild-type SFTI-1, its monocyclic analog with disulfide bridge only as well as one containing Nlys peptoid monomer in P1 position.

  13. Rapid discrimination of extracts of Chinese propolis and poplar buds by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Wen; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhao, Jing; Li, Yi; Zhou, Qun

    2008-07-01

    The extract of Chinese propolis (ECP) has recently been adulterated with that of poplar buds (EPB), because most of ECP is derived from the poplar plant, and ECP and EPB have almost identical chemical compositions. It is very difficult to differentiate them by using the chromatographic methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). Therefore, how to effectively discriminate these two mixtures is a problem to be solved urgently. In this paper, a rapid method for discriminating ECP and EPB was established by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra combined with the two-dimensional infrared correlation (2D IR) analysis. Forty-three ECP and five EPB samples collected from different areas of China were analyzed by the FT-IR spectroscopy. All the ECP and EPB samples tested show similar IR spectral profiles. The significant differences between ECP and EPB appear in the region of 3000-2800 cm -1 of the spectra. Based on such differences, the two species were successfully classified with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) pattern recognition technique. Furthermore, these differences were well validated by a series of temperature-dependent dynamic FT-IR spectra and the corresponding 2D IR plots. The results indicate that the differences in these two natural products are caused by the amounts of long-chain alkyl compounds (including long-chain alkanes, long-chain alkyl esters and long chain alkyl alcohols) in them, rather than the flavonoid compounds, generally recognized as the bioactive substances of propolis. There are much more long-chain alkyl compounds in ECP than those in EPB, and the carbon atoms of the compounds in ECP remain in an order Z-shaped array, but those in EPB are disorder. It suggests that FT-IR and 2D IR spectroscopy can provide a valuable method for the rapid differentiation of similar natural products, ECP and EPB. The IR spectra could directly reflect the integrated chemical

  14. Structural modifications of Tilia cordata wood during heat treatment investigated by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Froidevaux, Julien; Navi, Parviz; Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela

    2013-02-01

    It is known that heat treatment of wood combined with a low percent of relative humidity causes transformations in the chemical composition of it. The modifications and/or degradation of wood components occur by hydrolysis, oxidation, and decarboxylation reactions. The aim of this study was to give better insights on wood chemical modifications during wood heat treatment under low temperature at about 140 °C and 10% percentage of relative humidity, by infrared, principal component analysis and two dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy. For this purpose, hardwood samples of lime (Tilia cordata) were investigated and analysed. The infrared spectra of treated samples were compared with the reference ones, the most important differences being observed in the "fingerprint" region. Due to the complexity of this region, which have contributions from all the wood constituents the chemical changes during hydro-thermal treatment were examined in detail using principal component analysis and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. By hydro-thermal treatment of wood results the formation of acetic acid, which catalyse the hydrolysis reactions of hemicelluloses and amorphous cellulose. The cleavage of the β-O-4 linkages and splitting of the aliphatic methoxyl chains from the aromatic lignin ring was also observed. For the first treatment interval, a higher extent of carbohydrates degradation was observed, then an increase of the extent of the lignin degradation also took place.

  15. Excitons and exciton-phonon interactions in 2D MoS2 , WS2 and WSe2 studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, Marcos; Del Corro, Elena; Carvalho, Bruno; Malard, Leandro; Alves, Juliana; Fantini, Cristiano; Terrones, Humberto; Elias, Ana Laura; Terrones, Mauricio

    The 2D materials exhibit a very strong exciton binding energy, and the exciton-phonon coupling plays an important role in their optical properties. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a very useful tool to provide information about excitons and their couplings with phonons. We will present in this work a RRS study of different samples of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS2, WS2 and WSe2) with one, two and three layers (1L, 2L, 3L) and bulk samples, using more than 30 different laser excitation lines covering the visible range. We have observed that all Raman features are enhanced by resonances with excitonic transitions. From the laser energy dependence of the Raman excitation profile (REP) we obtained the energies of the excitonic states and their dependence with the number of atomic layers.. In the case of MoS2, we observed that the electron-phonon coupling is symmetry dependent, and our results provide experimental evidence of the C exciton recently predicted theoretically. The RRS results WSe2 show that the Raman modes are enhanced by the excited excitonic states and we will present the dependence of the excited states energies on the number of layers.

  16. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 2: 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Ashish P.; Pacheco, Carlos; Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyl groups are abundant in natural organic molecules (NOM) and play a major role in their reactivity. The structural environments of carboxyl groups in IHSS soil and river humic samples were investigated using 2D NMR (heteronuclear and homonuclear correlation) spectroscopy. Based on the 1H- 13C heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy results, the carboxyl environments in NOM were categorized as Type I (unsubstituted and alkyl-substituted aliphatic/alicyclic), Type II (functionalized carbon substituted), Type IIIa, b (heteroatom and olefin substituted), and Type IVa, b (5-membered heterocyclic aromatic and 6-membered aromatic). The most intense signal in the HMBC spectra comes from the Type I carboxyl groups, including the 2JCH and 3JCH couplings of unsubstituted aliphatic and alicyclic acids, though this spectral region also includes the 3JCH couplings of Type II and III structures. Type II and III carboxyls have small but detectable 2JCH correlations in all NOM samples except for the Suwannee River humic acid. Signals from carboxyls bonded to 5-membered aromatic heterocyclic fragments (Type IVa) are observed in the soil HA and Suwannee River FA, while correlations to 6-membered aromatics (Type IVb) are only observed in Suwannee River HA. In general, aromatic carboxylic acids may be present at concentrations lower than previously imagined in these samples. Vibrational spectroscopy results for these NOM samples, described in an accompanying paper [Hay M. B. and Myneni S. C. B. (2007) Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press)], suggest that Type II and Type III carboxylic acids with α substituents (e.g., -OH, -OR, or -CO 2H) constitute the majority of carboxyl structures in all humic substances examined. Furoic and salicylic acid structures (Type IV) are also feasible fragments, albeit as minor constituents. The

  17. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic–vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic–vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics. PMID:24927586

  18. Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke; Upadhya, Prashanth C.; Morales, Eugenia T.; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Lin, Yong

    2009-09-01

    The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

  19. Studying Protein-Protein Binding through T-Jump Induced Dissociation: Transient 2D IR Spectroscopy of Insulin Dimer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Xing; Jones, Kevin C; Fitzpatrick, Ann; Peng, Chunte Sam; Feng, Chi-Jui; Baiz, Carlos R; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-06-16

    Insulin homodimer associates through the coupled folding and binding of two partially disordered monomers. We aim to understand this dynamics by observing insulin dimer dissociation initiated with a nanosecond temperature jump using transient two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of amide I vibrations. With the help of equilibrium FTIR and 2D IR spectra, and through a systematic study of the dependence of dissociation kinetics on temperature and insulin concentration, we are able to decompose and analyze the spectral evolution associated with different secondary structures. We find that the dissociation under all conditions is characterized by two processes whose influence on the kinetics varies with temperature: the unfolding of the β sheet at the dimer interface observed as exponential kinetics between 250 and 1000 μs and nonexponential kinetics between 5 and 150 μs that we attribute to monomer disordering. Microscopic reversibility arguments lead us to conclude that dimer association requires significant conformational changes within the monomer in concert with the folding of the interfacial β sheet. While our data indicates a more complex kinetics, we apply a two-state model to the β-sheet unfolding kinetics to extract thermodynamic parameters and kinetic rate constants. The association rate constant, ka (23 °C) = 8.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 0, 20% EtOD), is approximately 3 orders of magnitude slower than the calculated diffusion limited association rate, which is explained by the significant destabilizing effect of ethanol on the dimer state and the highly positive charge of the monomers at this pH. PMID:27203447

  20. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-21

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp(2) honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ∼1000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices. PMID:27072060

  1. Electronic structure of disordered CuPd alloys by positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Siegel, R.W.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.; Bansil, A.

    1988-01-01

    We report 2D-ACAR experiments and KKR CPA calculations on alpha-phase single-crystal Cu/sub 1-x/Pd/sub x/ in the range x less than or equal to 0.25. The flattening of the Fermi surface near (110) with increasing x predicted by theory is confirmed by our experimental results. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  2. A Bioactive Carbon Nanotube-Based Ink for Printing 2D and 3D Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Farzad, Raziyeh; Tamayol, Ali; Manoharan, Vijayan; Mostafalu, Pooria; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Akbari, Mohsen; Jung, Sung Mi; Kim, Duckjin; Comotto, Mattia; Annabi, Nasim; Al-Hazmi, Faten Ebrahim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The development of electrically conductive carbon nanotube-based inks is reported. Using these inks, 2D and 3D structures are printed on various flexible substrates such as paper, hydrogels, and elastomers. The printed patterns have mechanical and electrical properties that make them beneficial for various biological applications. PMID:26915715

  3. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  4. [Identification and analysis of genuine and false Flos Rosae Rugosae by FTIR and 2D correlation IR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Cai, Fang; Sun, Su-qin; Yan, Wen-rong; Niu, Shi-jie; Li, Xian-en

    2009-09-01

    The genuine and false Flos Rosae Rugosae (Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora) were examined in terms of their differences by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) combined with two-dimensional (2D) correlation IR spectroscopy. The three species were shown very similar in FTIR spectra. The peak of 1318 cm(-1) of genuine Flos Rosae Rugosae is not obvious but this peak could be found sharp in Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora. Generally, the second derivative IR spectrum can clearly enhance the spectral resolution. Flos Rosae Rugosae and Flos rosae Chinensis have aromatic compounds distinct fingerprint characteristics at 1 617 and 1 618 cm(-1), respectively. Nevertheless, FlosRosa multiflora has the peak at 1612 cm(-1). There is a discrepancy of 5 to 6 cm(-1). FlosRosa multiflora has glucide's distinct fingerprint characteristics at 1 044 cm(-1), but Flos Rosae Rugosae and Flos Rosae Chinensis don't. The second derivative infrared spectra indicated different fingerprint characteristics. Three of them showed aromatic compounds with autopeaks at 1620, 1560 and 1460 cm(-1). Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora have the shoulder peak at 1660 cm(-1). In the range of 850-1250 cm(-1), three of them are distinct different, Flos Rosae Rugosae has the strongest autopeak, Flos Rosae Chinensis has the feeble autopeak and Flos Rosa multiflora has no autopeak at 1050 cm(-1). In third-step identification, the different contents of aromatic compounds and glucide in Flos Rosae Rugosae, Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora were revealed. It is proved that the method is fast and effective for distinguishing and analyzing genuine Flos Rosae Rugosae and false Flos Rosae Rugosae (Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora). PMID:19950645

  5. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results. PMID:24188921

  6. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of beta-carotene.

    PubMed

    Christensson, Niklas; Milota, Franz; Nemeth, Alexandra; Sperling, Jaroslaw; Kauffmann, Harald F; Pullerits, Tönu; Hauer, Jürgen

    2009-12-24

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D) has been applied to beta-carotene in solution to shine new light on the ultrafast energy dissipation network in carotenoids. The ability of 2D to relieve spectral congestion provides new experimental grounds for resolving the rise of the excited state absorption signal between 18,000 and 19,000 cm(-1). In this spectral region, the pump-probe signals from ground state bleach and stimulated emission overlap strongly. Combined modeling of the time-evolution of 2D spectra as well as comparison to published pump-probe data allow us to draw conclusions on both the electronic structure of beta-carotene as well as the spectral densities giving rise to the observed optical lineshapes. To account for the experimental observations on all time scales, we need to include a transition in the visible spectral range from the first optically allowed excited state (S(2)-->S(n2)). We present data from frequency resolved transient grating and pump-probe experiments confirming the importance of this transition. Furthermore, we investigate the role and nature of the S* state, controversially debated in numerous previous studies. On the basis of the analysis of Feynman diagrams, we show that the properties of S*-related signals in chi(3) techniques like pump-probe and 2D can only be accounted for if S* is an excited electronic state. Against this background, we discuss a new interpretation of pump-deplete-probe and intensity-dependent pump-probe experiments. PMID:19954155

  7. Electron spectroscopy of the diamond surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1981-01-01

    The diamond surface is studied by ionization loss spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. For surfaces heated to temperatures not exceeding 900 C, the band gap was found to be devoid of empty states in the absence of electron beam effects. The incident electron beam generates empty states in the band gap and loss of structure in the valence band for these surfaces. A cross section of 1.4 x 10 to the -19th sq cm was obtained for this effect. For surfaces heated to temperatures exceeding 900 C the spectra were identical to those from surfaces modified by the electron beam. The diamond surface undergoes a thermal conversion in its electronic structure at about 900 C.

  8. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky; Kas, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Reshetnyak, Igor; Guzzo, Matteo; Giorgetti, Christine; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Rehr, J. J.; Reining, Lucia

    2015-11-01

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green's function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green's function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  9. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Guzzo, Matteo; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  10. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky; Kas, J J; Sponza, Lorenzo; Reshetnyak, Igor; Guzzo, Matteo; Giorgetti, Christine; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Rehr, J J; Reining, Lucia

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green's function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green's function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case. PMID:26567648

  11. Effect of the Nuclear Hyperfine Field on the 2D Electron Conductivity in the Quantum Hall Regime

    SciTech Connect

    VITKALOV,S.A.; BOWERS,C.R.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.

    2000-07-13

    The effect of the nuclear hyperfine interaction on the dc conductivity of 2D electrons under quantum Hall effect conditions at filling factor v= 1 is observed for the first time. The local hyperfine field enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization is monitored via the Overhauser shift of the 2D conduction electron spin resonance in AlGaAs/GaAs multiquantum-well samples. The experimentally observed change in the dc conductivity resulting from dynamic nuclear polarization is in agreement with a thermal activation model incorporating the Zeeman energy change due to the hyperfine interaction. The relaxation decay time of the dc conductivity is, within experimental error, the same as the relaxation time of the nuclear spin polarization determined from the Overhauser shift. These findings unequivocally establish the nuclear spin origins of the observed conductivity change.

  12. Temperature-dependent quantum electron transport in 2D point contacts.

    PubMed

    Krishtop, T V; Nagaev, K E

    2013-02-01

    We consider the transmission of electrons through a two-dimensional ballistic point contact in the low-conductance regime near the pinch-off region. The scattering of electrons by Friedel oscillations of charge density results in a contribution to the conductance proportional to the temperature. The sign of this linear term depends on the range of the electron-electron interaction and appears to be negative for the relevant experimental parameters. PMID:23288558

  13. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Alex; Koymen, A. R.; Mehl, David; Jensen, K. O.; Lei, Chun; Lee, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Weiss et al. have demonstrated that it is possible to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons using a low energy (less than 30eV) beam of positrons. This mechanism makes possible a new electron spectroscopy, Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The probability of exciting an Auger transition is proportional to the overlap of the positron wavefunction with atomic core levels. Since the Auger electron energy provides a signature of the atomic species making the transition, PAES makes it possible to determine the overlap of the positron wavefunction with a particular element. PAES may therefore provide a means of detecting positron-atom complexes. Measurements of PAES intensities from clean and adsorbate covered Cu surfaces are presented which indicate that approx. 5 percent of positrons injected into CU at 25eV produce core annihilations that result in Auger transitions.

  14. Exact ground state for the four-electron problem in a 2D finite honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trencsényi, Réka; Glukhov, Konstantin; Gulácsi, Zsolt

    2014-07-01

    Working in a subspace with dimensionality much smaller than the dimension of the full Hilbert space, we deduce exact four-particle ground states in 2D samples containing hexagonal repeat units and described by Hubbard type of models. The procedure identifies first a small subspace ? in which the ground state ? is placed, than deduces ? by exact diagonalization in ?. The small subspace is obtained by the repeated application of the Hamiltonian ? on a carefully chosen starting wave vector describing the most interacting particle configuration, and the wave vectors resulting from the application of ?, till the obtained system of equations closes in itself. The procedure which can be applied in principle at fixed but arbitrary system size and number of particles is interesting on its own since it provides exact information for the numerical approximation techniques which use a similar strategy, but apply non-complete basis for ?. The diagonalization inside ? provides an incomplete image of the low lying part of the excitation spectrum, but provides the exact ?. Once the exact ground state is obtained, its properties can be easily analysed. The ? is found always as a singlet state whose energy, interestingly, saturates in the ? limit. The unapproximated results show that the emergence probabilities of different particle configurations in the ground state presents 'Zittern' (trembling) characteristics which are absent in 2D square Hubbard systems. Consequently, the manifestation of the local Coulomb repulsion in 2D square and honeycomb types of systems presents differences, which can be a real source in the differences in the many-body behaviour.

  15. Layer-by-Layer Assembled 2D Montmorillonite Dielectrics for Solution-Processed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Xiaolong; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Jariwala, Deep; Beck, Megan E; Huang, Wei; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembled 2D montmorillonite nanosheets are shown to be high-performance, solution-processed dielectrics. These scalable and spatially uniform sub-10 nm thick dielectrics yield high areal capacitances of ≈600 nF cm(-2) and low leakage currents down to 6 × 10(-9) A cm(-2) that enable low voltage operation of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube and n-type indium gallium zinc oxide field-effect transistors. PMID:26514248

  16. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-01

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ~1000 cm2 V-1 s-1 even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor

  17. Beyond Graphene: Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Defective 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Humberto

    One of the challenges in the production of 2-D materials is the synthesis of defect free systems which can achieve the desired properties for novel applications. However, the reality so far indicates that we need to deal with defective systems and understand their main features in order to perform defect engineering in such a way that we can engineer a new material. In this talk I discuss first, the introduction of defects in a hierarchic way starting from 2-D graphene to form giant Schwarzites or graphene foams, which also can exhibit further defects, thus we can have several levels of defectiveness. In this context, it will be shown that giant Schwarzites, depending on their symmetry, can exhibit Dirac-Fermion behavior and further, possess protected topological states as shown by other authors. Regarding the mechanical properties of these systems, it is possible to tune the Poisson Ratio by the addition of defects, thus shedding light to the explanation of the almost zero Poisson ratios in experimentally obtained graphene foams. Second, the idea of Haeckelites, a planar sp2 graphene-like structure with heptagons and pentagons, can be extended to transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with square and octagonal-like defects, finding semi-metallic behaviors with Dirac-Fermions, and even topological insulating properties. National Science Foundation (EFRI-1433311).

  18. Dynamics-based selective 2D (1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of (1)H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials. PMID:26026440

  19. Binary and ternary recombination of H2D(+) and HD2(+) ions with electrons at 80 K.

    PubMed

    Dohnal, Petr; Kálosi, Ábel; Plašil, Radek; Roučka, Štěpán; Kovalenko, Artem; Rednyk, Serhiy; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosík, Juraj

    2016-08-24

    The recombination of deuterated trihydrogen cations with electrons has been studied in afterglow plasmas containing mixtures of helium, argon, hydrogen and deuterium. By monitoring the fractional abundances of H3(+), H2D(+), HD2(+) and D3(+) as a function of the [D2]/[H2] ratio using infrared absorption observed in a cavity ring down absorption spectrometer (CRDS), it was possible to deduce effective recombination rate coefficients for H2D(+) and HD2(+) ions at a temperature of 80 K. From pressure dependences of the measured effective recombination rate coefficients the binary and the ternary recombination rate coefficients for both ions have been determined. The inferred binary and ternary recombination rate coefficients are: αbinH2D(80 K) = (7.1 ± 4.2) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), αbinHD2(80 K) = (8.7 ± 2.5) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), KH2D(80 K) = (1.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1) and KHD2(80 K) = (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1). PMID:27506912

  20. Electron Momentum Distribution Mapping of Trans-Stilbene Projected to [101] by Positron 2D-ACAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, S.; Sivaji, K.; Smith, S. V.

    Electron momentum distribution (EMD) on trans-stilbene single crystal projected along [101] direction has been studied by using positron two dimensional -angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained with respect to the molecular arrangement in the plane. The EMD features reflected the delocalized electronic states in [101] direction. The results of EMD mapping did not show a characteristic ellipsoidal distribution at lower momentum region (LMR) as observed in trans-stilbene projected to [010] direction at room temperature. The LMR region exhibits a hexagonal contour projected to [101] direction.

  1. Two-dimensional sum-frequency generation (2D SFG) spectroscopy: Summary of principles and its application to amyloid fiber monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Ho, Jia-Jung; Serrano, Arnaldo L.; Skoff, David R.; Zhang, Tianqi; Zanni, Martin T.

    2015-01-01

    By adding a mid-infrared pulse shaper to a sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectrometer, we have built a 2D SFG spectrometer capable of measuring spectra analogous to 2D IR spectra but with monolayer sensitivity and SFG selection rules. In this paper, we describe the experimental apparatus and provide an introduction to 2D SFG spectroscopy to help the reader interpret 2D SFG spectra. The main aim of this manuscript is to report 2D SFG spectra of the amyloid forming peptide FGAIL. FGAIL is a critical segment of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) that aggregates in people with type 2 diabetes. FGAIL is catalyzed into amyloid fibers by many types of surfaces. Here, we study the structure of FGAIL upon deposition onto a gold surface covered with a self-assembled monolayer of methyl 4-mercaptobenzoate (MMB) that produces an ester coating. FGAIL deposited on bare gold does not form ordered layers. The measured 2D SFG spectrum is consistent with amyloid fiber formation, exhibiting both the parallel (a+) and perpendicular (a−) symmetry modes associated with amyloid β-sheets. Cross peaks are observed between the ester stretches of the coating and the FGAIL peptides. Simulations are presented for two possible structures of FGAIL amyloid β-sheets that illustrates the sensitivity of the 2D SFG spectra to structure and orientation. These results provide some of the first molecular insights into surface catalyzed amyloid fiber structure. PMID:25611039

  2. Increasing the lego of 2D electronics materials: silicene and germanene, graphene's new synthetic cousins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Guy; Salomon, Eric; Angot, Thierry; Eugenia Dávila, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The realization of the first Field Effect Transistors operating at room temperature, based on a single layer silicene channel, open up highly promising perspectives, e.g., typically, for applications in digital electronics. Here, we describe recent results on the growth, characterization and electronic properties of novel synthetic two-dimensional materials beyond graphene, namely silicene and germanene, its silicon and germanium counterparts.

  3. High-resolution mapping of 1D and 2D dose distributions using X-band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kolbun, N; Adolfsson, E; Gustafsson, H; Lund, E

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) was performed to visualise 2D dose distributions of homogenously irradiated potassium dithionate tablets and to demonstrate determination of 1D dose profiles along the height of the tablets. Mathematical correction was applied for each relative dose profile in order to take into account the inhomogeneous response of the resonator using X-band EPRI. The dose profiles are presented with the spatial resolution of 0.6 mm from the acquired 2D images; this value is limited by pixel size, and 1D dose profiles from 1D imaging with spatial resolution of 0.3 mm limited by the intrinsic line-width of potassium dithionate. In this paper, dose profiles from 2D reconstructed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) images using the Xepr software package by Bruker are focussed. The conclusion is that using potassium dithionate, the resolution 0.3 mm is sufficient for mapping steep dose gradients if the dosemeters are covering only ±2 mm around the centre of the resonator. PMID:24748487

  4. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  5. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  6. Quantification of transition dipole strengths using 1D and 2D spectroscopy for the identification of molecular structures via exciton delocalization: Application to α-helices

    PubMed Central

    Grechko, Maksim; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrational and electronic transition dipole strengths are often good probes of molecular structures, especially in excitonically coupled systems of chromophores. One cannot determine transition dipole strengths using linear spectroscopy unless the concentration is known, which in many cases it is not. In this paper, we report a simple method for measuring transition dipole moments from linear absorption and 2D IR spectra that does not require knowledge of concentrations. Our method is tested on several model compounds and applied to the amide I′ band of a polypeptide in its random coil and α-helical conformation as modulated by the solution temperature. It is often difficult to confidently assign polypeptide and protein secondary structures to random coil or α-helix by linear spectroscopy alone, because they absorb in the same frequency range. We find that the transition dipole strength of the random coil state is 0.12 ± 0.013 D2, which is similar to a single peptide unit, indicating that the vibrational mode of random coil is localized on a single peptide unit. In an α-helix, the lower bound of transition dipole strength is 0.26 ± 0.03 D2. When taking into account the angle of the amide I′ transition dipole vector with respect to the helix axis, our measurements indicate that the amide I′ vibrational mode is delocalized across a minimum of 3.5 residues in an α-helix. Thus, one can confidently assign secondary structure based on exciton delocalization through its effect on the transition dipole strength. Our method will be especially useful for kinetically evolving systems, systems with overlapping molecular conformations, and other situations in which concentrations are difficult to determine. PMID:23163364

  7. Quantification of transition dipole strengths using 1D and 2D spectroscopy for the identification of molecular structures via exciton delocalization: Application to α-helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechko, Maksim; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-11-01

    Vibrational and electronic transition dipole strengths are often good probes of molecular structures, especially in excitonically coupled systems of chromophores. One cannot determine transition dipole strengths using linear spectroscopy unless the concentration is known, which in many cases it is not. In this paper, we report a simple method for measuring transition dipole moments from linear absorption and 2D IR spectra that does not require knowledge of concentrations. Our method is tested on several model compounds and applied to the amide I' band of a polypeptide in its random coil and α-helical conformation as modulated by the solution temperature. It is often difficult to confidently assign polypeptide and protein secondary structures to random coil or α-helix by linear spectroscopy alone, because they absorb in the same frequency range. We find that the transition dipole strength of the random coil state is 0.12 ± 0.013 D2, which is similar to a single peptide unit, indicating that the vibrational mode of random coil is localized on a single peptide unit. In an α-helix, the lower bound of transition dipole strength is 0.26 ± 0.03 D2. When taking into account the angle of the amide I' transition dipole vector with respect to the helix axis, our measurements indicate that the amide I' vibrational mode is delocalized across a minimum of 3.5 residues in an α-helix. Thus, one can confidently assign secondary structure based on exciton delocalization through its effect on the transition dipole strength. Our method will be especially useful for kinetically evolving systems, systems with overlapping molecular conformations, and other situations in which concentrations are difficult to determine.

  8. Oxide 2D electron gases as a route for high carrier densities on (001) Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kornblum, Lior; Jin, Eric N.; Kumah, Divine P.; Walker, Fred J.; Ernst, Alexis T.; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2015-05-18

    Two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) formed at the interfaces of oxide heterostructures draw considerable interest owing to their unique physics and potential applications. Growing such heterostructures on conventional semiconductors has the potential to integrate their functionality with semiconductor device technology. We demonstrate 2DEGs on a conventional semiconductor by growing GdTiO{sub 3}-SrTiO{sub 3} on silicon. Structural analysis confirms the epitaxial growth of heterostructures with abrupt interfaces and a high degree of crystallinity. Transport measurements show the conduction to be an interface effect, ∼9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} electrons per interface. Good agreement is demonstrated between the electronic behavior of structures grown on Si and on an oxide substrate, validating the robustness of this approach to bridge between lab-scale samples to a scalable, technologically relevant materials system.

  9. Interlayer tunneling studies of highly imbalanced bilayer 2D electron systems at νT= 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, A. R.; Eisenstein, J. P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2007-03-01

    When the separation between two parallel 2-dimensional electron systems (2DES) becomes comparable to the average distance between electrons within a single layer, the system can support a quantum Hall state with total filling factor νT=1. This state can be described as a Bose condensate of excitons. Previous studies [1] have shown that close to the νT=1 phase boundary, a small imbalance in the number of electrons in each layer can strengthen the condensate. We report on interlayer tunneling measurements of the effect of large imbalances as a function of the interlayer spacing. We explore the possibility of competing order between the excitonic state and the (1/3, 2/3) fractional states in the individual layers. This work was supported by the NSF and the DOE. [1] I. B. Spielman, et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 081303 (2004).

  10. Anomalous giant piezoresistance in AlAs 2D electron systems with antidot lattices.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, O; Gokmen, T; Shkolnikov, Y P; De Poortere, E P; Shayegan, M

    2008-01-25

    An AlAs two-dimensional electron system patterned with an antidot lattice exhibits a giant piezoresistance effect at low temperatures, with a sign opposite to the piezoresistance observed in the unpatterned region. We suggest that the origin of this anomalous giant piezoresistance is the nonuniform strain in the antidot lattice and the exclusion of electrons occupying the two conduction-band valleys from different regions of the sample. This is analogous to the well-known giant magnetoresistance effect, with valley playing the role of spin and strain the role of magnetic field. PMID:18233015

  11. Electron energy loss spectroscopy in advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) with an electron energy loss spectrometer (EELS) yields a powerful tool for the microcharacterization of materials. However, the application of this technique to advanced materials problems can only be fully appreciated when the information obtained using EELS is related to that obtained from other analytical spectroscopies. In this chapter, we briefly discuss the relative performance of X-ray, Auger and Photoelectron Spectroscopies with EELS pointing out the limitations and merits of each. This comparison is followed by examples of the application of EELS to investigations involving high {Tc} superconductors, artificial metallic superlattices, amorphous magnetic materials and the characterization of metallic hydride phases. 14 refs., 22 figs.

  12. A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

    2009-09-25

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

  13. Electron-positron momentum density distribution of Gd from 2D ACAR data via Maximum Entropy and Cormack's methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylak, M.; Kontrym-Sznajd, G.; Dobrzyński, L.

    2011-08-01

    A successful application of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to the reconstruction of electron-positron momentum density distribution in gadolinium out of the experimental of 2D ACAR data is presented. Formally, the algorithm used was prepared for two-dimensional reconstructions from line integrals. For the first time the results of MEM, applied to such data, are compared in detail with the ones obtained by means of Cormack's method. It is also shown how the experimental uncertainties may influence the results of the latter analysis. Preliminary calculations, using WIEN2k code, of band structure and Fermi surface have been done as well.

  14. Temperature and Pinning Effects on Driving a 2D Electron System on a Helium Film: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasceno, Pablo F.; Dasilva, Cláudio José; Rino, José Pedro; Cândido, Ladir

    2010-07-01

    Using numerical simulations we investigated the dynamic response to an externally driven force of a classical two-dimensional (2D) electron system on a helium film at finite temperatures. A potential barrier located at the center of the system behaves as a pinning center that results in an insulator state below a threshold driving force. We have found that the current-voltage characteristic obeys the scaling relation I= f ξ , with ξ ranging from ˜(1.0-1.7) for different pinning strengths and temperatures. Our results may be used to understand the spread range of ξ in experiments with typical characteristic of plastic depinning.

  15. Photoionizaton electronic spectroscopy of AgK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, C. S.; Robbins, D. L.; Pilgrim, J. S.; Duncan, M. A.

    1993-05-01

    An electronic spectrum is observed for the new heteronuclear metal dimer, AgK. Two electronic states are observed with origins near 315 nm. Spectra are detected for three isotopomers with mass-resolved one-color two-photon photoionization spectroscopy (R2PI). The vibrational bands in the more intense state (ω e = 85.8 cm -1) have rotational structure consistent with a 1Σ + → 1Π transition. This structure is red-shaded, consistent with an excited state having a significantly longer bond (3.02 Å) than the ground state (2.40 Å). The possible importance of ionic bonding is discussed.

  16. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations. Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.

  17. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations.more » Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.« less

  18. Collisional electron spectroscopy method for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanova, M. S.; Pramatarov, P. M.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Peyeva, R. A.; Patrikov, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, based on identification of gas impurities by registration of groups of nonlocal fast electrons released by Penning ionization of the impurity particles by helium metastable atoms, is verified experimentally. Detection and identification of atoms and molecules of gas impurities in helium at pressures of 14 - 90 Torr with small admixtures of Ar, Kr, CO2, and N2 are carried out. The nonlocal negative glow plasma of short dc microdischarge is used as most suitable medium. Records of the energy spectra of penning electrons are performed by means of an additional electrode - sensor, located at the boundary of the discharge volume. Maxima appear in the electron energy spectra at the characteristic energies corresponding to Penning ionization of the impurity particles by helium metastable atoms.

  19. Selective MBE growth of nonalloyed ohmic contacts to 2D electron gas in high-electron-mobility transistors based on GaN/AlGaN heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiboroda, I. O.; Andreev, A. A.; Perminov, P. A.; Fedorov, Yu. V.; Zanaveskin, M. L.

    2014-06-01

    Specific features of how nonalloyed ohmic contacts to the 2D conducting channel of high-electron-mobility transistors based on AlGaN/(AlN)/GaN heterostructures are fabricated via deposition of heavily doped n +-GaN through a SiO2 mask by ammonia molecular-beam epitaxy have been studied. The technique developed makes it possible to obtain specific resistances of contacts to the 2D gas as low as 0.11 Ω mm on various types of Ga-face nitride heterostructures, which are several times lower than the resistance of conventional alloyed ohmic contacts.

  20. Effective mass from microwave photoresistance in high-mobility 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zudov, Michael; Hatke, Anthony; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    We have performed microwave photoresistance measurements in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells and investigated the value of the effective mass. Surprisingly, the effective mass, obtained from the period of microwave-induced resistance oscillations, is found to be considerably lower than the band mass in GaAs. This finding provides evidence for electron-electron interactions which can be probed by microwave photoresistance in very high Landau levels. In contrast, the measured magneto-plasmon dispersion revealed an effective mass which is close to the band mass, in accord with previous studies. The work at Minnesota and Purdue was supported by the DOE Grant Nos. DE-SC002567 and DE-SC0006671, respectively. The work at Princeton was partially funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Foundation and the NSF MRSEC Program..

  1. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  2. Electronic and optical spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiner, Michael J.

    Electronic transport through molecules has been intensively studied in recent years, due to scientific interest in fundamental questions about charge transport and the technological promise of nanoscale circuitry. A wide range of range of experimental platforms have been developed to electronically probe both single molecules and molecular monolayers. However, it remains challenging to fabricate reliable electronic contacts to molecules, and the vast majority of molecular electronic architectures are not amenable to standard characterization techniques, such as optical spectroscopy. Thus the field of molecular electronics has been hampered with problems of reproducibility, and many fundamental questions about electronic transport remain unanswered. This thesis describes four significant contributions towards the fabrication and characterization of molecular electronic devices: (1) The development of a new method for creating robust, large area junctions where the electronic transport is through a single monolayer of molecules. This method utilizes atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow an ultrathin oxide layer on top of a molecular monolayer, which protects the molecules against subsequent processing. (2) A new method for rapid imaging and analysis of single defects in molecular monolayers. This method also electrically passivates defects as it labels them. (3) Hot carrier spectroscopy of molecular junctions. Using optically excited hot carriers, we demonstrate the ability to probe the energy level lineup inside buried molecular junctions. (4) Efficient coupling of optical fields to metal-insulator-metal (MIM) surface plasmon modes. We show both theoretical and experimental work illustrating the ability to create very intense optical fields inside MIM systems. The intense fields generated in this manner have natural extensions to a variety of applications, such as photon assisted tunneling in molecular junctions, optical modulators, and ultrafast optoelectronic

  3. Discrimination of adulterated milk based on two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) combined with kernel orthogonal projection to latent structure (K-OPLS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Renjie; Liu, Rong; Xu, Kexin; Yang, Yanrong

    2013-12-01

    A new method for discrimination analysis of adulterated milk and pure milk is proposed by combining two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) with kernel orthogonal projection to latent structure (K-OPLS). Three adulteration types of milk with urea, melamine, and glucose were prepared, respectively. The synchronous 2D spectra of adulterated milk and pure milk samples were calculated. Based on the characteristics of 2D correlation spectra of adulterated milk and pure milk, a discriminant model of urea-tainted milk, melamine-tainted milk, glucose-tainted milk, and pure milk was built by K-OPLS. The classification accuracy rates of unknown samples were 85.7, 92.3, 100, and 87.5%, respectively. The results show that this method has great potential in the rapid discrimination analysis of adulterated milk and pure milk. PMID:24359648

  4. Residue-Specific Structural Kinetics of Proteins through the Union of Isotope Labeling, Mid-IR Pulse Shaping, and Coherent 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a methodology for studying protein kinetics using a rapid-scan technology for collecting 2D IR spectra. In conjunction with isotope labeling, 2D IR spectroscopy is able to probe the secondary structure and environment of individual residues in polypeptides and proteins. It is particularly useful for membrane and aggregate proteins. Our rapid-scan technology relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that computer generates the pulse shapes, much like in an NMR spectrometer. With this device, data collection is faster, easier, and more accurate. We describe our 2D IR spectrometer, as well as protocols for 13C=18O isotope labeling, and then illustrate the technique with an application to the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide form type 2 diabetes. PMID:20472067

  5. Negative huge magnetoresistance in high-mobility 2D electron gases: DC-current dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iñarrea, J.; Bockhorn, L.; Haug, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases with very high mobility show a huge or giant negative magnetoresistance at low temperatures and low magnetic fields. We present an experimental and theoretical work on the influence of the applied current on the negative huge magnetoresistance of these systems. We obtain an unexpected and strong nonlinear behavior consisting in an increase of the negative huge magnetoresistance with increasing current, in other words, for increasing current the magnetoresistance collapses at small magnetic fields. This nonlinearity is explained by the subtle interplay of elastic scattering within Landau levels and between Landau levels.

  6. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B-Y; Ni, G X; Pan, C; Fei, Z; Cheng, B; Lau, C N; Bockrath, M; Basov, D N; Fogler, M M

    2016-08-19

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept. PMID:27588873

  7. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Ni, G. X.; Pan, C.; Fei, Z.; Cheng, B.; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  8. Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy using an octave-spanning mid-IR probe.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, James D; Courtney, Trevor L; Balasubramanian, Madhumitha; Khalil, Munira

    2016-06-15

    The development of coherent Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2D EV) spectroscopy with acousto-optic pulse-shaper-generated near-UV pump pulses and an octave-spanning broadband mid-IR probe pulse is detailed. A 2D EV spectrum of a silicon wafer demonstrates the full experimental capability of this experiment, and a 2D EV spectrum of dissolved hexacyanoferrate establishes the viability of our 2D EV experiment for studying condensed phase molecular ensembles. PMID:27304316

  9. Theoretical predictions on the electronic structure and charge carrier mobility in 2D Phosphorus sheets

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Long, Mengqiu; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Hui; Gao, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure and carrier mobility of four types of phosphorous monolayer sheet (α-P, β-P,γ-P and δ-P) using density functional theory combined with Boltzmann transport method and relaxation time approximation. It is shown that α-P, β-P and γ-P are indirect gap semiconductors, while δ-P is a direct one. All four sheets have ultrahigh carrier mobility and show anisotropy in-plane. The highest mobility value is ~3 × 105 cm2V−1s−1, which is comparable to that of graphene. Because of the huge difference between the hole and electron mobilities, α-P, γ-P and δ-P sheets can be considered as n-type semiconductors, and β-P sheet can be considered as a p-type semiconductor. Our results suggest that phosphorous monolayer sheets can be considered as a new type of two dimensional materials for applications in optoelectronics and nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26035176

  10. The structure of salt bridges between Arg+ and Glu- in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu-) and arginine (Arg+) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu- and Arg+, which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu-⋯Arg+ salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  11. Measured branching ratios for O II2D and 2P transitions in the wavelength range 530 to 800 A. [airglow spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.; Cunningham, A. J.; Christensen, A. B.

    1981-01-01

    Branching ratios for four sets of extreme ultraviolet transitions terminating on the 2D0 and 2P0 metastable levels of ionized oxygen have been measured. The emissions were excited in both an open window hollow cathode and a capillary discharge lamp, and the branching ratios were derived from the observed intensity ratios of the multiplet pairs. The results are in good agreement with theoretical values and compare favorably, within experimental uncertainties, with line ratios obtained by EUV spectroscopy of the airglow.

  12. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  13. Iterative Stable Alignment and Clustering of 2D Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengfan; Fang, Jia; Chittuluru, Johnathan; Asturias, Francisco J.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of homogeneous subsets of images in a macromolecular electron microscopy (EM) image data set is a critical step in single-particle analysis. The task is handled by iterative algorithms, whose performance is compromised by the compounded limitations of image alignment and K-means clustering. Here we describe an approach, iterative stable alignment and clustering (ISAC) that, relying on a new clustering method and on the concepts of stability and reproducibility, can extract validated, homogeneous subsets of images. ISAC requires only a small number of simple parameters and, with minimal human intervention, can eliminate bias from two-dimensional image clustering and maximize the quality of group averages that can be used for ab initio three-dimensional structural determination and analysis of macromolecular conformational variability. Repeated testing of the stability and reproducibility of a solution within ISAC eliminates heterogeneous or incorrect classes and introduces critical validation to the process of EM image clustering. PMID:22325773

  14. Simulating electron energy loss spectroscopy with the MNPBEM toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Within the MNPBEM toolbox, we show how to simulate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of plasmonic nanoparticles using a boundary element method approach. The methodology underlying our approach closely follows the concepts developed by García de Abajo and coworkers (Garcia de Abajo, 2010). We introduce two classes eelsret and eelsstat that allow in combination with our recently developed MNPBEM toolbox for a simple, robust, and efficient computation of EEL spectra and maps. The classes are accompanied by a number of demo programs for EELS simulation of metallic nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanotriangles, and for electron trajectories passing by or penetrating through the metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss how to compute electric fields induced by the electron beam and cathodoluminescence. Catalogue identifier: AEKJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 38886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1222650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Computer: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Operating system: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). RAM:≥1 GB Classification: 18. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 370 External routines: MESH2D available at www.mathworks.com Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for plasmonic nanoparticles. Solution method: Boundary element method using electromagnetic potentials. Reasons for new version: The new version of the toolbox includes two additional classes for the simulation of electron energy

  15. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nenov, Artur Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco E-mail: marco.garavelli@ens-lyon.fr

    2015-06-07

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040–1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  16. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nenov, Artur; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040-1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  17. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenov, Artur; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040-1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  18. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  19. Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy of Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.; Asnin, Vladimir M.; Petukhov, Andre G.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the secondary electron emission spectroscopy study of hydrogenated diamond surfaces for single crystals and chemical vapor-deposited polycrystalline films. One-electron calculations of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces having various hydrogen coverages are presented, the major features of the experimental spectra are explained, and a theoretical model for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces is proposed. An energy shift and a change in the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence (KVV) Auger spectra were observed for diamond surfaces after exposure to an electron beam or by annealing at temperatures higher than 950 C. This change is related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by hydrogen desorption from the surface. A strong negative electron affinity (NEA) effect, which appeared as a large, narrow peak in the low-energy portion of the spectrum of the secondary electron energy distribution, was also observed on the diamond surfaces. A fine structure in this peak, which was found for the first time, reflected the energy structure of the bottom of the conduction band. Further, the breakup of the bulk excitons at the surface during secondary electron emission was attributed to one of the features of this structure. The study demonstrated that the NEA type depends on the extent of hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface, changing from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surface.

  20. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy signatures of the glass transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lewis, K. L. .. M.; Myers, J. A.; Fuller, F.; Tekavec, P. F.; Ogilvie, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of solvation dynamics. Using a pump–probe geometry with a pulse shaper [ Optics Express 15 (2007), 16681-16689; Optics Express 16 (2008), 17420-17428], we present temperature dependent 2D spectra of laser dyes dissolved in glass-forming solvents. At low waiting times, the system has not yet relaxed, resulting in a spectrum that is elongated along the diagonal. At longer times, the system loses its memory of the initial excitation frequency, and the 2D spectrum rounds out. As the temperature is lowered, the time scale of this relaxation grows, and the elongation persists for longermore » waiting times. This can be measured in the ratio of the diagonal width to the anti-diagonal width; the behavior of this ratio is representative of the frequency–frequency correlation function [ Optics Letters 31 (2006), 3354–3356]. Near the glass transition temperature, the relaxation behavior changes. Understanding this change is important for interpreting temperature-dependent dynamics of biological systems.« less

  1. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy based on conventional optics and fast dual chopper data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Heisler, Ismael A. Moca, Roberta; Meech, Stephen R.; Camargo, Franco V. A.

    2014-06-15

    We report an improved experimental scheme for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) based solely on conventional optical components and fast data acquisition. This is accomplished by working with two choppers synchronized to a 10 kHz repetition rate amplified laser system. We demonstrate how scattering and pump-probe contributions can be removed during 2D measurements and how the pump probe and local oscillator spectra can be generated and saved simultaneously with each population time measurement. As an example the 2D-ES spectra for cresyl violet were obtained. The resulting 2D spectra show a significant oscillating signal during population evolution time which can be assigned to an intramolecular vibrational mode.

  2. Hartree-Fock Solutions of 2d Interacting Tight-Binding Electrons: Mott Properties and Room Temperature Superconductivity Indications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, A.; March, N. H.; Cabo-Bizet, A.

    2014-12-01

    Former results for a tight-binding (TB) model of CuO planes in La2CuO4 are reinterpreted here to underline their wider implications. It is noted that physical systems being appropriately described by the TB model can exhibit the main strongly correlated electron system (SCES) properties, when they are solved in the HF approximation, by also allowing crystal symmetry breaking effects and noncollinear spin orientations of the HF orbitals. It is argued how a simple 2D square lattice system of Coulomb interacting electrons can exhibit insulator gaps and pseudogap states, and quantum phase transitions as illustrated by the mentioned former works. A discussion is also presented here indicating the possibility of attaining room temperature superconductivity, by means of a surface coating with water molecules of cleaved planes of graphite, being orthogonal to its c-axis. The possibility that 2D arrays of quantum dots can give rise to the same effect is also proposed to consideration. The analysis also furnishes theoretical insight to solve the Mott-Slater debate, at least for the La2CuO4 and TMO band structures. The idea is to apply a properly noncollinear GW scheme to the electronic structure calculation of these materials. The fact is that the GW approach can be viewed as a HF procedure in which the screening polarization is also determined. This directly indicates the possibility of predicting the assumed dielectric constant in the previous works. Thus, the results seem to identify that the main correlation properties in these materials are determined by screening. Finally, the conclusions also seem to be of help for the description of the experimental observations of metal-insulator transitions and Mott properties in atoms trapped in planar photonic lattices.

  3. Electronic structural Moiré pattern effects on MoS2/MoSe2 2D heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun; Li, Jingbo; Li, Shu-Shen; Xia, Jian-Bai; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of MoS2/MoSe2 bilayers are calculated using first-principles methods. It is found that the interlayer van der Waals interaction is not strong enough to form a lattice-matched coherent heterostructure. Instead, a nanometer-scale Moiré pattern structure will be formed. By analyzing the electronic structures of different stacking configurations, we predict that the valence-band maximum (VBM) state will come from the Γ point due to interlayer electronic coupling. This is confirmed by a direct calculation of a Moiré pattern supercell containing 6630 atoms using the linear scaling three-dimensional fragment method. The VBM state is found to be strongly localized, while the conduction band minimum (CBM) state is only weakly localized, and it comes from the MoS2 layer at the K point. We predict such wave function localization can be a general feature for many two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals heterostructures and can have major impacts on the carrier mobility and other electronic and optical properties. PMID:24079953

  4. Magneto-transport characteristics of a 2D electron system driven to negative magneto-conductivity by microwave photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ramesh; Kriisa, A.

    2015-03-01

    Negative diagonal magneto-conductivity/resistivity is a spectacular- and thought provoking- property of driven, far-from-equilibrium, low dimensional electronic systems. The physical response of this exotic electronic state is not yet fully understood since it is rarely encountered in experiment. The microwave-radiation-induced zero-resistance state in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system is believed to be an example where negative magneto-conductivity/resistivity is responsible for the observed phenomena. Here, we examine the magneto-transport characteristics of this negative conductivity/resistivity state in the microwave photo-excited two-dimensional electron system (2DES) through a numerical solution of the associated boundary value problem. The results suggest, surprisingly, that a bare negative diagonal conductivity/resistivity state in the 2DES under photo-excitation should yield a positive diagonal resistance with a concomitant sign reversal in the Hall voltage. Transport measurements are supported by the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Material Sciences and Engineering Division under DE-SC0001762. Additional support by the ARO under W911NF-07-01-015.

  5. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: Electronic versus vibrational coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Plenio, M. B.; Almeida, J.; Huelga, S. F.

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  6. Orbital dependent Rashba splitting and electron-phonon coupling of 2D Bi phase on Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiani, Pierluigi; Lisi, Simone; Betti, Maria Grazia; Ibrahimi, Amina Taleb; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Chiodo, Letizia

    2013-11-14

    A monolayer of bismuth deposited on the Cu(100) surface forms a highly ordered c(2×2) reconstructed phase. The low energy single particle excitations of the c(2×2) Bi/Cu(100) present Bi-induced states with a parabolic dispersion in the energy region close to the Fermi level, as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic state dispersion, the charge density localization, and the spin-orbit coupling have been investigated combining photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, unraveling a two-dimensional Bi phase with charge density well localized at the interface. The Bi-induced states present a Rashba splitting, when the charge density is strongly localized in the Bi plane. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the spectral density close to the Fermi level has been evaluated. Dispersive electronic states offer a large number of decay channels for transitions coupled to phonons and the strength of the electron-phonon coupling for the Bi/Cu(100) system is shown to be stronger than for Bi surfaces and to depend on the electronic state symmetry and localization.

  7. 2D IR spectroscopy at 100 kHz utilizing a Mid-IR OPCPA laser source.

    PubMed

    Luther, Bradley M; Tracy, Kathryn M; Gerrity, Michael; Brown, Susannah; Krummel, Amber T

    2016-02-22

    We present a 100 kHz 2D IR spectrometer. The system utilizes a ytterbium all normal dispersion fiber oscillator as a common source for the pump and seed beams of a MgO:PPLN OPCPA. The 1030 nm OPCPA pump is generated by amplification of the oscillator in cryocooled Yb:YAG amplifiers, while the 1.68 μm seed is generated in a OPO pumped by the oscillator. The OPCPA outputs are used in a ZGP DFG stage to generate 4.65 μm pulses. A mid-IR pulse shaper delivers pulse pairs to a 2D IR spectrometer allowing for data collection at 100 kHz. PMID:26907062

  8. Terahertz Spectroscopy of the Bending Vibrations of Acetylene 12C2H2 and 12C2D2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, B.; Pearson, J.

    2009-12-01

    Several fundamental interstellar molecules, e.g., C2H2, CH4 and C3, are completely symmetric molecules and feature no permanent dipole moment and no pure rotation spectrum. As a result they have only previously been observed in the infrared. However, directly observing them with the rest of the molecular column especially when the source is spatially resolved would be very valuable in understanding chemical evolution. Vibrational difference bands provide a means to detect symmetric molecules with microwave precision using terahertz techniques. Herschel, SOFIA and ALMA have the potential to identify a number of vibrational difference bands of light symmetric species. This paper reports laboratory results on 12C2H2 and 12C2D2. Symmetric acetylene isotopologues have two bending modes, the trans bending and the cis bending. Their difference bands are allowed and occur in the microwave, terahertz, and far-infrared wavelengths, with band origins at 3500 GHz for 12C2H2 and 900 GHz for 12C2D2. Twenty 12C2H2 P branch high-J transitions and two hundred and fifty-one 12C2D2 P Q and R branch transitions have been measured in the 0.2 - 1.6 THz region with precision of 50 to 100 kHz. These lines were modeled together with prior data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for 12C2H2 and 12C2D2 with the combined data set, and new frequency and intensity predictions were made to support astrophysics applications. The research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. S. Y. was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program, administrated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  9. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  10. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ran; Chai, Xiaochuan; Mei, Hongxin; Zhang, Hanhui; Chen, Yiping; Sun, Yanqiong

    2010-07-01

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H 2L 1(HL 1) 2(H 2O) 2]·2H 2O 1, [Ni 2(4,4'-bipy)(L 2)(OH)(H 2O) 2]·3H 2O 2, Mn(phen) 2(H 2L 1) 23 and Mn(phen)(HL 2) 4 (H 3L 1= p-H 2O 3PCH 2-C 6H 4-COOH, H 3L 2= m-H 2O 3PCH 2-C 6H 4-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni 4 cluster units are connected by pairs of H 3L 2 ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R 22(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H 3L 2 ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H 3L 1 and H 3L 2 ligands in the compounds more efficiently.

  11. Electronic band structure and charge density wave transition in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Guyot, H.; Laubschat, C.; Molodtsov, S. L.; Asensio, M. C.

    2008-03-01

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission of quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze has been performed in the range from room temperature to 130 K, slightly above the charge density wave (CDW) transition (Tc = 110 K), and down to 35 K (well below Tc). In this paper we report a detailed study of how electronic band structure is affected by this transition driven by the hidden nesting scenario. The expected spectroscopic fingerprints of the CDW phase transition have been found and discussed according to the hidden one dimension and the development of a quasi-commensurate CDW. The excellent agreement between theory and our experimental results makes of potassium purple bronze a reference system for studying this type of instabilities.

  12. A Stochastic Hill Climbing Approach for Simultaneous 2D Alignment and Clustering of Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Bonnet, Frederic; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2016-06-01

    A critical step in the analysis of novel cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle datasets is the identification of homogeneous subsets of images. Methods for solving this problem are important for data quality assessment, ab initio 3D reconstruction, and analysis of population diversity due to the heterogeneous nature of macromolecules. Here we formulate a stochastic algorithm for identification of homogeneous subsets of images. The purpose of the method is to generate improved 2D class averages that can be used to produce a reliable 3D starting model in a rapid and unbiased fashion. We show that our method overcomes inherent limitations of widely used clustering approaches and proceed to test the approach on six publicly available experimental cryo-EM datasets. We conclude that, in each instance, ab initio 3D reconstructions of quality suitable for initialization of high-resolution refinement are produced from the cluster centers. PMID:27184214

  13. Unraveling the dynamics and structure of functionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold using 2D IR spectroscopy and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chang; Yuan, Rongfeng; Pfalzgraff, William C; Nishida, Jun; Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    Functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are the focus of ongoing investigations because they can be chemically tuned to control their structure and dynamics for a wide variety of applications, including electrochemistry, catalysis, and as models of biological interfaces. Here we combine reflection 2D infrared vibrational echo spectroscopy (R-2D IR) and molecular dynamics simulations to determine the relationship between the structures of functionalized alkanethiol SAMs on gold surfaces and their underlying molecular motions on timescales of tens to hundreds of picoseconds. We find that at higher head group density, the monolayers have more disorder in the alkyl chain packing and faster dynamics. The dynamics of alkanethiol SAMs on gold are much slower than the dynamics of alkylsiloxane SAMs on silica. Using the simulations, we assess how the different molecular motions of the alkyl chain monolayers give rise to the dynamics observed in the experiments. PMID:27044113

  14. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Ran; Chai Xiaochuan; Mei Hongxin; Zhang Hanhui; Chen Yiping; Sun Yanqiong

    2010-07-15

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H{sub 2}L{sup 1}(HL{sup 1}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O 1, [Ni{sub 2}(4,4'-bipy)(L{sup 2})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O 2, Mn(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}L{sup 1}){sub 2}3 and Mn(phen)(HL{sup 2}) 4 (H{sub 3}L{sup 1}=p-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, H{sub 3}L{sup 2}=m-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni{sub 4} cluster units are connected by pairs of H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R{sub 2}{sup 2}(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H{sub 3}L{sup 1} and H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands in the compounds more efficiently. - Graphical abstract: A series of divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The figure displays 2D sheet structure with large windows in compound 2.

  15. Unraveling the heterogeneity in N butyl-N-methylpiperidinium trifluromethanesulfonimide ionic liquid by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Neha; Saha, Satyen

    2014-06-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids are one of the most exciting classes of materials in the last decade. In particular piperidinium (PIP) cation based ionic liquid (IL) (such as PIP14NTf2) have found application in electrochemistry/batteries. In this Letter, 2D NMR (NOESY and HOESY) is employed for studying the interactions present between cations and anions. HOESY spectrum shows that fluorine of NTf2 unusually interacts with all proton of the cation (PIP14). Combined HOESY and NOESY indicate that NTf2 anion is distributed heterogeneously in liquid. Existence of micro heterogeneity in this important class of IL is proposed.

  16. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Island, Joshua O; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M; Ares, José R; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S J; Ferrer, Isabel J; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  17. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  18. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-03-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance.

  19. Ultrafast spectroscopy of correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Benjamin Andrew

    This dissertation attempts to illuminate and expand our understanding of charge dynamics in a number of different semiconductor materials, in particular the behavior of electron-hole pairs which are correlated via the long-range Coulomb interaction. Terahertz spectroscopy gives us direct access to probe the fundamental excitations of quasiparticles in a wide range of materials systems. By probing the low-energy excitations of materials on short time scales, one can learn a great deal about their quasiparticles and dynamics as well as explore new tools for their manipulation. Carriers in semiconductors, existing either as bound electron-hole pairs or "free" carriers (or both), are particularly amenable to this avenue of study. The internal structure of excitons in semiconductors lies energetically in the far- to mid-infrared. Free carriers moving under the influence of a free-space electric field reveal much about themselves. By exploiting this unique window, one can both characterize and manipulate these systems in novel ways, as well as seek to understand the physics of new materials. I study the ferromagnetic semiconductor gallium manganese phosphide (GaMnP) to better understand the role of charge carriers in the origins of ferromagnetism. By applying the tools of terahertz spectroscopy, I am able to make contact free measurements of hole populations in a novel GaMnP film. I exploit THz spectroscopy to provide a direct gauge of bound and unbound pair densities in gallium arsenide quantum wells, enabling the observation of the excitonic fine structure as it evolves under high-density conditions. And finally I have observed for the first time stimulated emission of far-infrared radiation from internal transitions in excitons in the semiconductor Cu 2O. Broadband THz spectroscopy is employed to directly map out the ultrafast dynamics, spectral positions, and line broadenings of intra-excitonic transitions. This work has opened up new possibilities for the quantum

  20. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) variable selection for near-infrared microscopy discrimination of meat and bone meal in compound feed.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chengxu; Chen, Longjian; Yang, Zengling; Liu, Xian; Han, Lujia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a novel method for combining auto-peak and cross-peak information for sensitive variable selection in synchronous two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS). This variable selection method is then applied to the case of near-infrared (NIR) microscopy discrimination of meat and bone meal (MBM). This is of important practical value because MBM is currently banned in ruminate animal compound feed. For the 2D-COS analysis, a set of NIR spectroscopy data of compound feed samples (adulterated with varying concentrations of MBM) was pretreated using standard normal variate and detrending (SNVD) and then mapped to the 2D-COS synchronous matrix. For the auto-peak analysis, 12 main sensitive variables were identified at 6852, 6388, 6320, 5788, 5600, 5244, 4900, 4768, 4572, 4336, 4256, and 4192 cm(-1). All these variables were assigned their specific spectral structure and chemical component. For the cross-peak analysis, these variables were divided into two groups, each group containing the six sensitive variables. This grouping resulted in a correlation between the spectral variables that was in accordance with the chemical-component content of the MBM and compound feed. These sensitive variables were then used to build a NIR microscopy discrimination model, which yielded a 97% correct classification. Moreover, this method detected the presence of MBM when its concentration was less than 1% in an adulterated compound feed sample. The concentration-dependent 2D-COS-based variable selection method developed in this study has the unique advantages of (1) introducing an interpretive aspect into variable selection, (2) substantially reducing the complexity of the computations, (3) enabling the transferability of the results to discriminant analysis, and (4) enabling the efficient compression of spectral data. PMID:25061786

  1. 2D IR Spectroscopy using Four-Wave Mixing, Pulse Shaping, and IR Upconversion: A Quantitative Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rock, William; Li, Yun-Liang; Pagano, Philip; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to major changes in the apparatuses used to collect 2D IR spectra. Pulse shaping offers several advantages including rapid data collection, inherent phase stability, and phase cycling capabilities. Visible array detection via upconversion allows the use of visible detectors that are cheaper, faster, more sensitive, and less noisy than IR detectors. However, despite these advantages, many researchers are reluctant to implement these technologies. Here we present a quantitative study of the S/N of 2D IR spectra collected with a traditional four-wave mixing (FWM) apparatus, with a pulse shaping apparatus, and with visible detection via upconversion to address the question of whether or not weak chromophores at low concentrations are still accessible with such an apparatus. We find that the enhanced averaging capability of the pulse shaping apparatus enables the detection of small signals that would be challenging to measure even with the traditional FWM apparatus, and we demonstrate this ability on a sample of cyanylated dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). PMID:23687988

  2. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  3. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Global Analysis of the Bending Vibrations of ^{12}C_2H_2 and ^{12}C_2D_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian J.; Pearson, John C.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Lattanzi, Valerio; Walters, Adam

    2009-06-01

    Symmetric molecules have no permanent dipole moment and are undetectable by rotational spectroscopy. Their interstellar observations have previously been limited to mid-infrared vibration-rotation spectroscopy. Although relatively weak, vibrational difference bands provide a means for detection of non polar molecules by terahertz techniques with microwave precision. Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA have the potential to identify a number of difference bands of light symmetric species, e.g., C_2H_2, CH_4 and C_3. This paper reports the results of the laboratory study on ^{12}C_2H_2 and ^{12}C_2D_2. The symmetric isotopomers of acetylene have two bending modes, the trans bending ν_4 (^1{π}_g), and the cis bending ν_5 (^1{π}_u). For ^{12}C_2H_2, the two bending modes occur at 612 and 729 cm^{-1}, respectively. For ^{12}C_2D_2, the two bending modes occur at 511 and 538 cm^{-1}. The ν_5-ν_4 difference bands are allowed and occur in the microwave, terahertz, and far-infrared wavelengths, with band origins at 117 cm^{-1} (3500 GHz) for ^{12}C_2H_2 and 27 cm^{-1} (900 GHz) for ^{12}C_2D_2. Two hundred and fifty-one ^{12}C_2D_2 transitions, which are from ν_5-ν_4, (ν_5+ν_4)-2ν_4 and 2ν_5-(ν_5+ν_4) bands, have been measured in the 0.2-1.6 THz region, and 202 of them were observed for the first time. The precision of these measurements is estimated to be from 50 kHz to 100 kHz. A multistate analysis was carried out for the bending vibrational modes ν_4 and ν_5 of ^{12}C_2D_2, which includes the lines observed in this work and prior microwave, far-infrared and infrared data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for ^{12}C_2D_2 by adding the new measurements to the old data set which had only 10 lines with microwave measurement precision. The experiments on ^{12}C_2H_2 are in progress and ten P branch lines have been observed. We will present the ^{12}C_2H_2 results to date.

  4. Effective Mass and g-factor of 2D Electrons in a HgTe Quantum Well from THz Photoresponse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Stier, A. V.; Zhang, H. D.; Bruene, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L.; McCombe, B. D.

    2013-03-01

    There is current interest in HgTe because of its interesting ``inverted'' band structure and large spin-orbit interaction, and because it is a topological insulator under quantum confinement, Well-widths close to that at which the band structure goes from the ``inverted'' to the normal structure are of particular interest. We have used photoresponse excited by several lines from an optically pumped THz laser and magnetotransport measurements to determine the cyclotron effective mass and g-factor of 2D electrons in the gamma_6 conduction band of a high quality HgTe quantum well (ns = 1.55 x 1012 cm-2; 6 nm well) at low temperatures. One of the two samples studied was gated, which allowed density to be varied by over 30%. We find m* =0.039me and g = -18 at the highest density from fits to the PR with the field normal to the plane of the QW, and separately from CR transmission measurements and tilted field experiments. We will also discuss electron spin resonance measurements near filling factors 7 and 9. Supported in part by NSF DMR 1008138

  5. Novel quantum Monte Carlo methods for spin-orbit Hamiltonians: 2D interacting electron gas with the Rashba interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shi; Zhu, Minyi; Hu, Shuming; Mitas, Lubos

    2013-03-01

    Very recently, a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method was proposed for Rashba spin-orbit operators which expands the applicability of QMC to systems with variable spins. It is based on incorporating the spin-orbit into the Green's function and thus samples (ie, rotates) the spinors in the antisymmetric part of the trial function [1]. Here we propose a new alternative for both variational and diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms for calculations of systems with variable spins. Specifically, we introduce a new spin representation which allows us to sample the spin configurations efficiently and without introducing additional fluctuations. We develop the corresponding Green's function which treats the electron spin as a dynamical variable and we use the fixed-phase approximation to eliminate the negative probabilities. The trial wave function is a Slater determinant of spinors and spin-indepedent Jastrow correlations. The method also has the zero variance property. We benchmark the method on the 2D electron gas with the Rashba interaction and we find very good overall agreement with previously obtained results. Research supported by NSF and ARO.

  6. Polarization shaping in the mid-IR and polarization-based balanced heterodyne detection with application to 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Strasfeld, David B.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate amplitude, phase and polarization shaping of femtosecond mid-IR pulses using a germanium acousto-optical modulator by independently shaping the frequency-dependent amplitudes and phases of two orthogonally polarized pulses which are then collinearly overlapped using a wire-grid polarizer. We use a feedback loop to set and stabilize the relative phase of the orthogonal pulses. We have also used a wire-grid polarizer to implement polarization-based balanced heterodyne detection for improved signal-to-noise of 2D IR spectra collected in a pump-probe geometry. Applications include coherent control of molecular vibrations and improvements in multidimensional IR spectroscopy. PMID:19687931

  7. Fast detection of choline-containing metabolites in liver using 2D 1H- 14N three-bond correlation (HN3BC) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xi-an; Li, Ning; Mao, Jiezhen; Li, Qiurong; Xiao, Nan; Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Xu-xia; Liu, Maili

    2012-01-01

    Detection and quantification of total choline-containing metabolites (CCMs) in tissues by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has received considerable attention as a biomarker of cancer. Tissue CCMs are mainly choline (Cho), phosphocholine (PCho), and glycerophosphocholine (GPCho). Because the methyl 1H resonances of tissue CCMs exhibit small chemical shift differences and overlap significantly in 1D 1H MRS, quantification of individual components is precluded. Development of a MRS method capably of resolving individual components of tissue CCMs would be a significant advance. Herein, a modification of the 2D 1H- 14N HSQC technique is targeted on the two methylene 1H in the CH 2O group ( 3J1H14N = 2.7 Hz) and applied to ex vivo mouse and human liver samples at physiological temperature (37 °C). Specifically, the 1H- 14N HSQC technique is modified into a 2D 1H- 14N three-bond correlation (HN3BC) experiment, which selectively detects the 1H of CH 2O coupled to 14N in CCMs. Separate signals from Cho, PCho, and GPCho components are resolved with high detection sensitivity. A 2D HN3BC spectrum can be recorded from mouse liver in only 1.5 min and from human carcinoma liver tissue in less than 3 min with effective sample volume of 0.2 ml at 14.1 T.

  8. Evaluation on intrinsic quality of licorice influenced by environmental factors by using FTIR combined with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying-qun; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Yan-ling; Sun, Su-qin; Chen, Shi-lin; Zhao, Run-huai; Zhou, Qun; Noda, Isao

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the intrinsic quality of licorice influenced by environmental factors, the spectral comparison of licorice from two typical ecological habitats was conducted by using FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy. There were differences in the peak intensities of 1155, 1076 and 1048 cm -1 of FTIR profiles. The difference was amplified by the second derivative spectrum for the peak intensities at 1370, 1365 and 1317 cm -1 and the peak shape in 958-920 cm -1 and 1050-988 cm -1. The synchronous 2D-IR spectra within the range of 860-1300 cm -1 were classified into type I and type II and their frequency in the two groups was noticeably different. Although the chemical compounds of licorice samples from two areas were generally similar, the contents of starch, calcium oxalate, and some chemical compounds containing alcohol hydroxyl group were different, indicating the influence of precipitation and temperature. This study demonstrates that the systematical analysis of FTIR, the second derivative spectrum and 2D-IR can effectively determine the differences in licorice samples from different ecological habitats.

  9. A Practical Deconvolution Computation Algorithm to Extract 1D Spectra from 2D Images of Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangwei, Li; Haotong, Zhang; Zhongrui, Bai

    2015-06-01

    Bolton & Schlegel presented a promising deconvolution method to extract one-dimensional (1D) spectra from a two-dimensional (2D) optical fiber spectral CCD (charge-coupled device) image. The method could eliminate the PSF (point-spread function) difference between fibers, extract spectra to the photo noise level, as well as improve the resolution. But the method is limited by its huge computation requirement and thus can not be implemented in actual data reduction. In this article, we develop a practical computation method to solve the computation problem. The new computation method can deconvolve a 2D fiber spectral image of any size with actual PSFs, which may vary with positions. Our method does not require large amounts of memory and can extract a 4 k × 4 k noise-free CCD image with 250 fibers in 2 hr. To make our method more practical, we further consider the influence of noise, which is thought to be an intrinsic ill-posed problem in deconvolution algorithms. We modify our method with a Tikhonov regularization item to depress the method induced noise. We do a series of simulations to test how our method performs under more real situations with Poisson noise and extreme cross talk. Compared with the results of traditional extraction methods, i.e., the Aperture Extraction Method and the Profile Fitting Method, our method has the least residual and influence by cross talk. For the noise-added image, the computation speed does not depend very much on fiber distance, the signal-to-noise ratio converges in 2-4 iterations, and the computation times are about 3.5 hr for the extreme fiber distance and about 2 hr for nonextreme cases. A better balance between the computation time and result precision could be achieved by setting the precision threshold similar to the noise level. Finally, we apply our method to real LAMOST (Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope; a.k.a. Guo Shou Jing Telescope) data. We find that the 1D spectrum extracted by our

  10. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(100) surface yield a 2D and not a 1D electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, R.; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Golden, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced nanowires do indeed host exotic, 1D (one-dimensional) metallic states. In light of this debate, we report here a thorough study of the electronic properties of high quality nanowires formed at the Au/Ge(100) surface. The high-resolution ARPES data show the low-lying Au-induced electronic states to possess a dispersion relation that depends on two orthogonal directions in k space. Comparison of the E (kx,ky) surface measured using high-resolution ARPES to tight-binding calculations yields hopping parameters in the two different directions that differ by approximately factor of two. Additionally, by pinpointing the Au-induced surface states in the first, second, and third surface Brillouin zones and analyzing their periodicity in k||, the nanowire propagation direction seen clearly in STM can be imported into the ARPES data. We find that the larger of the two hopping parameters corresponds, in fact, to the direction perpendicular to the nanowires (tperp). This proves that the Au-induced electron pockets possess a two-dimensional, closed Fermi surface, and this firmly places the Au/Ge(100) nanowire system outside potential hosts of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. We combine these ARPES data with scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of the spatially resolved electronic structure and find that the spatially straight—wirelike—conduction channels observed up to energies of order one electron volt below the Fermi level do not originate from the Au-induced states seen in the ARPES data. The former are rather more likely to be associated with bulk Ge states that are localized to the subsurface region. Despite our proof of the 2D (two-dimentional) nature of the Au

  11. Rapid-Pulsing Artifact-Free Double-Quantum-Filtered Homonuclear Spectroscopy. The 2D-INADEQUATE Experiment Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdonneau, Maryse; Ancian, Bernard

    1998-06-01

    Rapid pulsing artifacts are observed in the conventional phase-cycled carbon-13 2D INADEQUATE experiment. By using the product operator formalism, it is shown that they result from the effects of imperfect 90° and 180° excitation pulses on the most abundant molecules containing only one isolated carbon-13 nucleus. The labeled longitudinal magnetization remaining at the end of one scan is recycled by the subsequent acquisition, giving rise to multiple-quantum (p= 0, ±1, ±2, …) artifacts in theF1dimension. By considering pairs of scans instead of single scans, a new phase cycle is proposed. It is based on a scheme for compensating for imperfections in the excitation cluster by a proper combination of the pulse phases in two consecutive scans. Because the artifacts are 90° out of phase compared to the desired signal, a concomitant rearrangement of the receiver phase achieves suppression of all unwanted signals. Experiments are presented on menthol dissolved in CDCl3as a test compound. Improvements in spectrum quality as well as increased sensitivity are discussed.

  12. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Feng; Chen, YiPing; You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)₃]₃[CoW₁₂O₄₀]·9H₂O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)₃]₂[FeW₁₂O₄₀]·H₃O·H₂O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)₃]²⁺ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm⁻¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  13. Increase of spin dephasing times in a 2D electron system with degree of initial spin polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, D.; Korn, T.; Schulz, R.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Schüller, C.

    2008-03-01

    We report on time-resolved Faraday/Kerr rotation measurements on a high-mobility 2D electron system. A variable initial spin polarization is created in the sample by a circularly polarized pump pulse, and the spin polarization is tracked by measuring the Faraday/Kerr rotation of a time-delayed probe pulse. By varying the pump intensity, the initial spin polarization is changed from the low-polarization limit to a polarization degree of several percent. The observed spin dephasing time increases from less than 20 ps to more than 200 ps as the initial spin polarization is increased. To exclude sample heating effects, additional measurements with constant pump intensity and variable degree of circular polarization are performed. The results confirm the theoretical prediction by Weng and Wu [Phys. Rev. B 68 (2003) 075312] that the spin dephasing strongly depends on the initial spin polarization degree. The microscopic origin for this is the Hartree-Fock term in the Coulomb interaction, which acts as an effective out-of plane magnetic field.

  14. Photoluminescence and the gallium problem for highest-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs-based 2d electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schläpfer, F.; Dietsche, W.; Reichl, C.; Faelt, S.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-05-01

    The quest for extremely high mobilities of 2d electron gases in MBE-grown heterostructures is hampered by the available purity of the starting materials, particularly of the gallium. Here we compare the role of different Ga lots having nominally the highest possible quality on the mobility and the photoluminescence (PL) of modulation doped single interface structures and find significant differences. A weak exciton PL reveals that the purity of the Ga is insufficient. No high mobility can be reached with such a lot with a reasonable effort. On the other hand, a strong exciton PL indicates a high initial Ga purity, allowing to reach mobilities of 15 million (single interface) or 28 million cm2/V s (doped quantum wells) in our MBE systems. We discuss possible origins of the inconsistent Ga quality. Furthermore, we compare samples grown in different MBE systems over a period of several years and find that mobility and PL are correlated if similar structures and growth procedures are used.

  15. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R.; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  16. Complete momentum and energy resolved TOF electron spectrometerfor time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, G.; Tremsin, A.; Siegmund, O.; Chen, Y.; Shen, Z.X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-08-12

    Over the last decade, high-resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a tool of choice for studying the electronic structure of solids, in particular, strongly correlated complex materials such as cuprate superconductors. In this paper we present the design of a novel time-of-flight based electron analyzer with capability of 2D in momentum space (kx and ky) and all energies (calculated from time of flight) in the third dimension. This analyzer will utilize an improved version of a 2D delay linedetector capable of imaging with<35 mm (700x700 pixels) spatial resolution and better than 120 ps FWHM timing resolution. Electron optics concepts and optimization procedure are considered for achieving an energy resolution less than 1 meV and an angular resolution better than 0.11.

  17. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  18. Solvation of fluoro-acetonitrile in water by 2D-IR spectroscopy: A combined experimental-computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Cazade, Pierre-André; Das, Akshaya K.; Tran, Halina; Kläsi, Felix; Hamm, Peter; Bereau, Tristan; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-06-07

    The solvent dynamics around fluorinated acetonitrile is characterized by 2-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and atomistic simulations. The lineshape of the linear infrared spectrum is better captured by semiempirical (density functional tight binding) mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics simulations, whereas force field simulations with multipolar interactions yield lineshapes that are significantly too narrow. For the solvent dynamics, a relatively slow time scale of 2 ps is found from the experiments and supported by the mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics simulations. With multipolar force fields fitted to the available thermodynamical data, the time scale is considerably faster—on the 0.5 ps time scale. The simulations provide evidence for a well established CF–HOH hydrogen bond (population of 25%) which is found from the radial distribution function g(r) from both, force field and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

  19. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization and their ratio monitored using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremme, W.; Krueger, A.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2011-09-01

    The composition and emission rates of volcanic gas plumes provide insight of the geologic internal activity, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol formation and radiative processes around it. Observations are necessary for public security and the aviation industry. Ground-based thermal emission infrared spectroscopy, which uses the radiation of the volcanic gas itself, allows for continuously monitoring during day and night from a save distance. We present measurements on Popocatépetl volcano based on thermal emission spectroscopy during different campaigns between 2006-2009 using a Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS). The experimental set-up, measurement geometries and analytical algorithms are described. The equipment was operated from a safe distance of 12 km from the volcano at two different spectral resolutions: 0.5 and 4 cm-1. The 2-dimensional scanning capability of the instrument allows for an on-line visualization of the volcanic SO2 plume, animation and determination of its propagation speed. SiF4 was also identified in the infrared spectra recorded at both resolutions. The SiF4/SO2 molecular ratio can be calculated from each image and used as a highly useful parameter to follow changes in volcanic activity. A small Vulcanian eruption was monitored during the night of 16 to 17 November 2008 which was confirmed from the strong ash emission registered around 01:00 a.m. LST (Local Standard Time) and a pronounced SO2 cloud was registered. Enhanced SiF4/SO2 ratios were observed before and after the eruption. A validation of the results from thermal emission measurements with those from absorption spectra of the moon taken at the same time, as well as an error analysis, are presented. The inferred propagation speed from sequential imagees is used to calculate the emission rates at different distances from the crater.

  20. An Ion’s Perspective on the Molecular Motions of Nano-confined Water: A 2D IR Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhat K; Kuroda, Daniel G.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    The vibrational population relaxation and the hydration shell dynamics of the symmetric tricyanomethanide (TCM) anion is investigated in AOT reverse micelle as a function of the water pool radius. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy in combination with linear absorption and ultrafast IR pump-probe spectroscopy is utilized in this study. Spectroscopic measurements show that the anion has two bands in the 2160 – 2175 cm−1 region, each with its own spectroscopic signatures. Analysis of the vibrational dynamics shows that the two vibrational bands are consistent with the anion located either at the interface or in the water pool. The sensitivity of the TCM anion to the environment allows us to unequivocally monitor the vibrational and hydration dynamics of the anion in those two different environments. TCM anion located at the interface does not show any significant variation of the vibrational dynamics with the water pool size. On the contrary, the TCM anion inside the water pool exhibits a large and non-linear variation of the vibrational lifetime and the frequency-frequency correlation time with the pool radius. Moreover for the solvated anion in water pools of 49 Å in radius (W0=30), the vibrational lifetime reaches the values observed for the anion in bulk water while the frequency-frequency correlation time shows a characteristic time higher than that observed in the bulk. In addition, for the first time a model is developed and used to explain the observed non-linear variation of the spectroscopic observables with the pool size. This model attributes the changes in the vibrational dynamics of the TCM anion in the water pool to the slow and radius dependent water dynamics present in the confined environment of a reverse micelle. PMID:23855349

  1. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  2. Modelling Time-Resolved Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of the Primary Photoisomerization Event in Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra (ES) tracking the evolution of the excited state manifolds of the retinal chromophore have been simulated along the photoisomerization pathway in bovine rhodopsin, using a state-of-the-art hybrid QM/MM approach based on multiconfigurational methods. Simulations of broadband 2D spectra provide a useful picture of the overall detectable 2D signals from the near-infrared (NIR) to the near-ultraviolet (UV). Evolution of the stimulated emission (SE) and excited state absorption (ESA) 2D signals indicates that the S1 → SN (with N ≥ 2) ESAs feature a substantial blue-shift only after bond inversion and partial rotation along the cis → trans isomerization angle, while the SE rapidly red-shifts during the photoinduced skeletal relaxation of the polyene chain. Different combinations of pulse frequencies are proposed in order to follow the evolution of specific ESA signals. These include a two-color 2DVis/NIR setup especially suited for tracking the evolution of the S1 → S2 transitions that can be used to discriminate between different photochemical mechanisms of retinal photoisomerization as a function of the environment. The reported results are consistent with the available time-resolved pump–probe experimental data, and may be used for the design of more elaborate transient 2D electronic spectroscopy techniques. PMID:24794143

  3. Surface sensitivity of elastic peak electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.

    2016-08-01

    New theoretical model describing the sampling depth of elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) has been proposed. Surface sensitivity of this technique can be generally identified with the maximum depth reached by trajectories of elastically backscattered electrons. A parameter called the penetration depth distribution function (PDDF) has been proposed for this description. Two further parameters are descendant from this definition: the mean penetration depth (MPD) and the information depth (ID). From the proposed theory, relatively simple analytical expressions describing the above parameters can be derived. Although the Monte Carlo simulations can be effectively used to estimate the sampling depth of EPES, this approach may require a considerable amount of computations. In contrast, the analytical model proposed here (AN) is very fast and provides the parameters PDDF, MPD and ID that very well compare with results of MC simulations. As follows from detailed comparisons performed for four elements (Al, Ni, Pd and Au), the AN model practically reproduced complicated emission angle dependences of the MPDs and the IDs, correctly indicating numerous maximum and minimum positions. In the energy range from 200 eV to 5 keV, the averaged percentage differences between MPDs obtained from the MC and the AN models were close to 4%. An important conclusion resulting from the present studies refers to the procedure of determination of the inelastic mean free path (IMFP) from EPES. Frequently, the analyzed sample is deposited as a thin overlayer on a smooth substrate. From an analysis of the presently obtained IDs, is follows that 99% of trajectories in analyzed experimental configurations reaches depth not exceeding 2.39 in units of IMFP. Thus, one can postulate that a safe minimum thickness of an overlayer should be larger than about 3 IMFPs. For example, the minimum thickness of an Al overlayer shoud be about 8 nm at 5000 eV.

  4. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  5. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals.

    PubMed

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  6. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  7. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process. PMID:26728791

  8. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  9. Analytical contribution of NAD 2D-NMR spectroscopy in polypeptide mesophases to the investigation of triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Serhan, Zeinab; Aroulanda, Christie; Billault, Isabelle

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we report and discuss on the use and limitations of the natural abundance deuterium two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in polypeptide chiral and achiral aligning media in the studies of homogenous triglycerides at 14.1 T. As illustrative examples, two triglycerides with short and long alkyl chains were investigated: the 1,3-di(butanoyloxy)propan-2-yl butanoate or tributyrin (TB) and the 1,3-di(tetradecanoyloxy)propan-2-yl tetradecanoate or trimyristin (TM). If both flexible compounds are theoretically of C(s) symmetry on average, according to the Altmann's definition (Proc. Roy. Soc., 1967, A298, 184.), the analysis of spectral data in terms of enantiotopic and diastereotopic discriminations shows noticeable differences related to their orientational ordering behavior inside the mesophases. Although from NMR analysis viewpoint, TB behaves as a C(s) symmetry molecule as expected, the NMR results obtained for TM suggest a behavior that could be formally predicted for a C(3v) symmetry molecule on average. This conclusion was nicely supported by the comparison with the tri-n-propylorthoformate, a real C(3v) symmetry solute on average on the NMR timescale. This difference of effective orientational behavior could originate from the difference of size and shape between lateral and central alkyl chains of the solute molecule. PMID:23280656

  10. Coherent pump pulses in Double Electron Electron Resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tait, Claudia E; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-07-21

    The recent introduction of shaped pulses to Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy has led to significant enhancements in sensitivity through increased excitation bandwidths and improved control over spin dynamics. The application of DEER has so far relied on the presence of an incoherent pump channel to average out most undesired coherent effects of the pump pulse(s) on the observer spins. However, in fully coherent EPR spectrometers that are increasingly used to generate shaped pulses, the presence of coherent pump pulses means that these effects need to be explicitly considered. In this paper, we examine the effects of coherent rectangular and sech/tanh pump pulses in DEER experiments with up to three pump pulses. We show that, even in the absence of significant overlap of the observer and pump pulse excitation bandwidths, coherence transfer pathways involving both types of pulses generate spin echoes of considerable intensity. These echoes introduce artefacts, which, if not identified and removed, can easily lead to misinterpretation. We demonstrate that the observed echoes can be quantitatively modelled using a simple spin quantum dynamics approach that includes instrumental transfer functions. Based on an analysis of the echo crossing artefacts, we propose efficient phase cycling schemes for their suppression. This enables the use of advanced DEER experiments, characterized by high sensitivity and increased accuracy for long-distance measurements, on novel fully coherent EPR spectrometers. PMID:27339858

  11. Probing environment fluctuations by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular systems at temperatures below 5 K

    SciTech Connect

    Rancova, Olga; Abramavicius, Darius; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic and room temperatures reveals excitation energy relaxation and transport, as well as vibrational dynamics, in molecular systems. These phenomena are related to the spectral densities of nuclear degrees of freedom, which are directly accessible by means of hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing approaches at low temperatures (few K). The 2D spectroscopy, in principle, should reveal more details about the fluctuating environment than the 1D approaches due to peak extension into extra dimension. By studying the spectral line shapes of a dimeric aggregate at low temperature, we demonstrate that 2D spectra have the potential to reveal the fluctuation spectral densities for different electronic states, the interstate correlation of static disorder and, finally, the time scales of spectral diffusion with high resolution.

  12. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a ``background corrected`` experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  13. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a background corrected'' experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  14. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Wang, Jun; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2014-06-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  15. Near-infrared (NIR) imaging analysis of polylactic acid (PLA) nanocomposite by multiple-perturbation two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Murakami, Takurou N.; Nishida, Masakazu; Kanematsu, Wataru; Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    Multiple-perturbation two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy was applied to sets of near-infrared (NIR) imaging data of polylactic acid (PLA) nanocomposite samples undergoing UV degradation. Incorporation of clay nanoparticles substantially lowers the surface free energy barrier for the nucleation of PLA and eventually increases the frequency of the spontaneous nucleation of PLA crystals. Thus, when exposed to external stimuli such as UV light, PLA nanocomposite may show different structure alternation depending on the clay dispersion. Multiple-perturbation 2D correlation analysis of the PLA nanocomposite samples revealed different spatial variation between crystalline and amorphous structure of PLA, and the phenomenon especially becomes acute in the region where the clay particles are coagulated. The incorporation of the clay leads to the cleavage-induced crystallization of PLA when the sample is subjected to the UV light. The additional development of the ordered crystalline structure then works favorably to restrict the initial degradation of the polymer, providing the delay in the weight loss of the PLA.

  16. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Gai, Feng E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin

    2014-06-21

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  17. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Wang, Jun; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs. PMID:24952572

  18. A Strongly Absorbing Class of Non-Natural Labels for Probing Protein Electrostatics and Solvation with FTIR and 2D IR Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Skoff, David R.; Moran, Sean D.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-natural infrared probes is reported that consist of a metal-tricarbonyl modified with a -(CH2)n- linker and cysteine-specific leaving group. They can be site-specifically attached to proteins using mutagenesis and similar protocols for EPR spin labels, which have the same leaving group. We characterize the label’s frequencies and lifetimes using 2D IR spectroscopy in solvents of varying dielectric. The frequency range spans 10 cm−1, and the variation in lifetimes ranges from 6 to 19 ps, indicating that these probes are very sensitive to their environments. Also, we attached probes with -(CH2)-, -(CH2)3-, -(CH2)4- linkers to ubiquitin at positions 6 and 63 and collected spectra in aqueous buffer. The frequencies and lifetimes were correlated for 3C and 4C linkers, as they were in the solvents, but did not correlate for the 1C linker. We concluded that lifetime measures solvation, whereas frequency reflects the electrostatics of the environment, which in the case of the 1C linker is a measure of the protein electrostatic field. We also labeled V71C α-synuclein in buffer and membrane-bound. Unlike most other infrared labels, this label has extremely-strong cross-sections and so can be measured with 2D IR spectroscopy at sub-millimolar concentrations. We expect that these labels will find use in studying the structure and dynamics of membrane-bound, aggregated, and kinetically-evolving proteins for which high signal-to-noise at low protein concentrations is imperative. PMID:23537223

  19. Electron impact spectroscopy. [for atom and molecule quantum state investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of electron impact spectroscopy are discussed, comparing the electron spectroscopy techniques with those of the optical spectroscopy. The main advantage of the electron spectroscopy is to be found in the elimination of optical selection rules in excitation processes and the ability to scan the spectrum from the infrared to the X-ray region. The range of the method is indicated through a review of several examples, including electron impact excitation of Ba and rotational excitation of H2. The sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by vibrational excitation spectrum of N2. It is shown that the application of the method to the inner-shell excitation allows to obtain information about molecular species which are not commonly available, while spectroscopy of negative ions yields information about their energy and symmetry properties. However, the techniques are still under development and more data are expected to become available in the coming years.

  20. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    discussed process, back-ET in a porphyrin-Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) dyad, demonstrates that formation of a hot product accelerates highly exergonic ET in the Marcus inverted region. Overall, it follows that ET can be accelerated by enhancing the electronic interaction and by vibrational excitation of the reacting system and its medium, stressing the importance of quantum nuclear dynamics in ET reactivity. These effects are experimentally accessible by time-resolved vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman) in combination with quantum chemical calculations. It is suggested that structural dynamics play different mechanistic roles in light-triggered ET involving electronically excited donors or acceptors than in ground-state processes. While TRIR spectroscopy is well suitable to elucidate ET processes on a molecular-level, transient 2D-IR techniques combining optical and two IR (or terahertz) laser pulses present future opportunities for investigating, driving, and controlling ET. PMID:25699661

  1. High-throughput critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) measurement of two-dimensional (2D) structures using scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullam, Jennifer; Boye, Carol; Standaert, Theodorus; Gaudiello, John; Tomlinson, Derek; Xiao, Hong; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we tested a novel methodology of measuring critical dimension (CD) uniformity, or CDU, with electron beam (e-beam) hotspot inspection and measurement systems developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). The systems were used to take images of two-dimensional (2D) array patterns and measure CDU values in a custom designated fashion. Because this methodology combined imaging of scanning micro scope (SEM) and CD value averaging over a large array pattern of optical CD, or OCD, it can measure CDU of 2D arrays with high accuracy, high repeatability and high throughput.

  2. Electronic Transport Properties of New 2-D Materials GeH and NaSn2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Cultrara, Nicholas; Arguilla, Maxx; Goldberger, Joshua; Heremans, Joseph

    2-D materials potentially have superior thermoelectric properties compared to traditional 3-D materials due to their layered structure. Here we present electrical and thermoelectric transport properties of 2 types of 2-D materials, GeH and NaSn2As2. GeH is a graphane analog which is prepared using chemical exfoliation of CaGe2 crystals. Intrinsic GeH is proven to be a highly resistive material at room temperature. Resistance and Seebeck coefficient of Ga doped GeH are measured in a cryostat with a gating voltage varying from -100V to 100V. NaSn2As2 is another 2-D system, with Na atom embedded between nearly-2D Sn-As layers. Unlike GeH, NaSn2As2 is a metal based of Hall measurements, with p-type behavior, and with van der Pauw resistances on the order of 5m Ω/square. Thermoelectric transport properties of NaSn2As2 will be reported. This work is support by the NSF EFRI-2DARE project EFRI-1433467.

  3. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  4. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 2: Wind propagation and emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.; Stremme, W.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2013-01-01

    A technique for measuring two-dimensional (2-D) plumes of volcanic gases with thermal emission spectroscopy was described in Part 1 by Stremme et al. (2012a). In that paper the instrumental aspects as well as retrieval strategies for obtaining the slant column images of SO2 and SiF4, as well as animations of particular events observed at the Popocatépetl volcano, were presented. This work focuses on the procedures for determining the propagation speed of the gases and estimating an emission rate from the given image sequences. A 2-D column density distribution of a volcanic gas, available as time-consecutive frames, provides information of a projected wind field and the average velocity at which the volcanic plume is propagating. This information is valuable since the largest uncertainties when calculating emission rates of the gases using remote sensing techniques arise from propagation velocities which are often inadequately assumed. The presented reconstruction method solves the equation of continuity as an ill-posed problem using mainly a Tikhonov-like regularisation. It is observed from the available data sets that if the main direction of propagation is perpendicular to the line-of-sight, the algorithm works well for SO2, which has the strongest signals, and also for SiF4 in some favourable cases. Due to the similarity of the algorithm used here with the reconstruction methods used for profile retrievals based on optimal estimation theory, diagnostic tools like the averaging kernels can be calculated in an analogous manner and the information can be quantified as degrees of freedom. Thus, it is shown that the combination of wind field and column distribution of the gas plume can provide the emission rate of the volcano both during day and night.

  5. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 2: Wind propagation and emission fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.; Stremme, W.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2012-07-01

    The technique for measuring two-dimensional (2-D) plumes of volcanic gases with thermal emission spectroscopy was described in Part 1 by Stremme et al. (2012). In that paper the instrumental aspects as well as retrieval strategies for obtaining the slant column images of SO2 and SiF4, as well as animations of particular events observed at the Popocatépetl volcano, were presented. This work focuses on the procedures for determining the propagation speed of the gases and estimating an emission flux from the given image sequences. A 2-D column density distribution of a volcanic gas, available as time-consecutive frames, provides information of a wind-field and the average velocity at which the volcanic plume is propagating. The presented reconstruction method solves the equation of continuity as an ill-posed problem using mainly a Tikhonov-like regularization. It is observed from the available data sets that if the main direction of propagation is perpendicular to the line-of-sight, the algorithm works well for SO2 which has the strongest signals, and also for SiF4 in some favourable cases. Due to the similarity of the algorithm used here with the reconstruction methods used for profile retrievals based on optimal estimation theory, diagnostic tools like the averaging kernels can be calculated analogously and the information can be quantified as degrees of freedom. Thus, it is shown that the combination of wind-field and column distribution of the gas plume can provide the emission flux of the volcano both during day and night.

  6. Single-Electron Detection and Spectroscopy via Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation.

    PubMed

    Asner, D M; Bradley, R F; de Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Fernandes, J L; Fertl, M; Finn, E C; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Jones, A M; Kofron, J N; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; McBride, E L; Miller, M L; Mohanmurthy, P; Monreal, B; Oblath, N S; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Rysewyk, D; Sternberg, M G; Tedeschi, J R; Thümmler, T; VanDevender, B A; Woods, N L

    2015-04-24

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Although first derived in 1904, cyclotron radiation from a single electron orbiting in a magnetic field has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radio-frequency spectrometer. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay end point, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments. PMID:25955048

  7. The effect of electron-hole scattering on transport properties of a 2D semimetal in the HgTe quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Entin, M. V.; Magarill, L. I.; Olshanetsky, E. B. Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2013-11-15

    The influence of e-h scattering on the conductivity and magnetotransport of 2D semimetallic HgTe is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The presence of e-h scattering leads to the friction between electrons and holes resulting in a large temperature-dependent contribution to the transport coefficients. The coefficient of friction between electrons and holes is determined. The comparison of experimental data with the theory shows that the interaction between electrons and holes based on the long-range Coulomb potential strongly underestimates the e-h friction. The experimental results are in agreement with the model of strong short-range e-h interaction.

  8. PM2D code simulation of electronic dynamics and electro-magnetic fields generation by ultra-short laser pulses interaction with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, I. A.; Lykov, V. A.

    1997-04-15

    The results of numerical simulation of fast electrons motion and generated electro-magnetic fields at the picosecond pulse laser interaction with flat target are presented. The calculations were performed with PM2D code, where relativistic equation of electron motion joint with Maxwell equations is solved by particle method in cells. The efficiency of fast electrons energy conversion to the transverse electromagnetic wave of picosecond duration can reach the value 10{sup -4} for the intensity of ultrashort laser pulse at the target 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}.

  9. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicholas H C; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A A; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale. PMID:26429003

  10. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  11. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  12. Parallel β-sheet vibrational couplings revealed by 2D IR spectroscopy of an isotopically labeled macrocycle: Quantitative benchmark for the interpretation of amyloid and protein infrared spectra

    PubMed Central

    Woys, Ann Marie; Almeida, Aaron M.; Wang, Lu; Chiu, Chi Cheng; McGovern, Michael; de Pablo, Juan J.; Skinner, James L.; Gellman, Samuel H.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is playing an important role in the elucidation of amyloid fiber formation, but the coupling models that link spectra to structure are not well tested for parallel β-sheets. Using a synthetic macrocycle that enforces a two stranded parallel β-sheet conformation, we measured the lifetimes and frequency for six combinations of doubly 13C=18O labeled amide I modes using 2D IR spectroscopy. The average vibrational lifetime of the isotope labeled residues was 550 fs. The frequen cies of the labels ranged from 1585 to 1595 cm−1, with the largest frequency shift occurring for in-register amino acids. The 2D IR spectra of the coupled isotope labels were calculated from molecular dynamics simulations of a series of macrocycle structures generated from replica exchange dynamics to fully sample the conformational distribution. The models used to simulate the spectra include through-space coupling, through-bond coupling, and local frequency shifts caused by environment electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. The calculated spectra predict the linewidths and frequencies nearly quantitatively. Historically, the characteristic features of β-sheet infrared spectra have been attributed to through-space couplings such as transition dipole coupling. We find that frequency shifts of the local carbonyl groups due to nearest neighbor couplings and environmental factors are more important, while the through space couplings dictate the spectral intensities. As a result, the characteristic absorption spectra empirically used for decades to assign parallel β-sheet secondary structure arises because of a redistribution of oscillator strength, but the through-space couplings do not themselves dramatically alter the frequency distribution of eigenstates much more than already exists in random coil structures. Moreover, solvent exposed residues have amide I bands with >20 cm−1 linewidth. Narrower linewidths indicate that the amide I backbone is solvent protected

  13. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  14. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  15. Interplay of Ion-Water and Water-Water Interactions within the Hydration Shells of Nitrate and Carbonate Directly Probed with 2D IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Joseph A; Carpenter, William; De Marco, Luigi; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-08-01

    The long-range influence of ions in solution on the water hydrogen-bond (H-bond) network remains a topic of vigorous debate. Recent spectroscopic and theoretical studies have, for the most part, reached the consensus that weakly coordinating ions only affect water molecules in the first hydration shell. Here, we apply ultrafast broadband two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy to aqueous nitrate and carbonate in neat H2O to study the solvation structure and dynamics of ions on opposite ends of the Hofmeister series. By exciting both the water OH stretches and ion stretches and probing the associated cross-peaks between them, we are afforded a comprehensive view into the complex nature of ion hydration. We show in aqueous nitrate that weak ion-water H-bonding leads to water-water interactions in the ion solvation shells dominating the dynamics. In contrast, the carbonate CO stretches show significant mixing with the water OH stretches due to strong ion-water H-bonding such that the water and ion modes are intimately correlated. Further, the excitonic nature of vibrations in neat H2O, which spans multiple water molecules, is an important factor in describing ion hydration. We attribute these complex dynamics to the likely presence of intermediate-range effects influenced by waters beyond the first solvation shell. PMID:27404015

  16. The pH-Dependent Picosecond Structural Dynamics in the Distal Pocket of Nitrophorin 4 Investigated by 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mark; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Montfort, William R.; Khalil, Munira

    2013-01-01

    Nitrophorin 4 (NP4) belongs to a family of pH-sensitive, nitric oxide (NO) transporter proteins which undergo a large structural change from a closed to an open conformation at high pH to allow for NO delivery. Measuring the pH-dependent structural dynamics in NP4–NO around the ligand binding site is crucial for developing a mechanistic understanding of NO binding and release. In this study we use coherent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy to measure picosecond structural dynamics sampled by the nitrosyl stretch in NP4–NO as a function of pH at room temperature. Our results show that both the closed and open conformers of the protein are present at low (pD 5.1) and high (pD 7.9) pH conditions. The closed and open conformers are characterized by two frequencies of the nitrosyl stretching vibration labeled A0 and A1, respectively. Analysis of the 2D IR lineshapes reveals that at pD 5.1, the closed conformer experiences structural fluctuations arising from solvation dynamics on a ∼3 ps timescale. At pD 7.9, both the open and closed conformers exhibit fluctuations on a ∼1 ps timescale. At both pD conditions, the closed conformers maintain a static distribution of structures within the experimental time window of 100 ps. This is in contrast to the open conformer, which is able to interconvert among its sub-states on a ∼100 ps timescale. Our results directly measure the timescales of solvation dynamics in the distal pocket, the flexibility of the open conformation at high pH, and the rigidity of the closed conformers at both pH conditions. We discuss how the pH dependent equilibrium structural fluctuations of the nitrosyl ligand measured in this study are related to the uptake and delivery of nitric oxide in Nitrophorin 4. PMID:23885811

  17. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-01

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond 13C/1H and 13C/13C chemical shift correlations, the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment also provides a COSY-type 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices (1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different 13C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D 1H/13C/1H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological

  18. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-21

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond (13)C/(1)H and (13)C/(13)C chemical shift correlations, the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment also provides a COSY-type (1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices ((1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different (13)C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of

  19. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of Light-Harvesting Complex II at Ambient Temperature: A Joint Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong-Guang; Stevens, Amy L; Nalbach, Peter; Thorwart, Michael; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-09-10

    We have performed broad-band two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) at ambient temperature. We found that electronic dephasing occurs within ∼60 fs and inhomogeneous broadening is approximately 120 cm(-1). A three-dimensional global fit analysis allows us to identify several time scales in the dynamics of the 2D spectra ranging from 100 fs to ∼10 ps and to uncover the energy-transfer pathways in LHCII. In particular, the energy transfer between the chlorophyll b and chlorophyll a pools occurs within ∼1.1 ps. Retrieved 2D decay-associated spectra also uncover the spectral positions of corresponding diagonal peaks in the 2D spectra. Residuals in the decay traces exhibit periodic modulations with different oscillation periods. However, only one of them can be associated with the excitonic cross-peaks in the 2D spectrum, while the remaining ones are presumably of vibrational origin. For the interpretation of the spectroscopic data, we have applied a refined exciton model for LHCII. It reproduces the linear absorption, circular dichroism, and 2D spectra at different waiting times. Several components of the energy transport are revealed from theoretical simulations that agree well with the experimental observations. PMID:26301382

  20. Growth and Characterization of Silicon at the 2D Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannix, Andrew; Kiraly, Brian; Hersam, Mark; Guisinger, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Because bulk silicon has dominated the development of microelectronics over the past 50 years, the recent interest in two-dimensional (2D) materials (e.g., graphene, MoS2, phosphorene, etc.) naturally raises questions regarding the growth and properties of silicon at the 2D limit. Utilizing atomic-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we have investigated the 2D limits of silicon growth on Ag(111). In agreement with previous reports of sp2-bonded silicene phases, we observe the temperature-dependent evolution of ordered 2D phases. However, we attribute these to apparent Ag-Si surface alloys. At sufficiently high silicon coverage, we observe the precipitation of crystalline, sp3-bonded Si(111) domains. These domains are capped with a √3 honeycomb phase that is indistinguishable from the silver-induced √3 honeycomb-chained-trimer reconstruction on bulk Si(111). Further ex-situcharacterization with Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that these sheets are ultrathin sheets of bulk-like, (111) oriented, sp3 silicon. Even at the 2D limit, scanning tunneling spectroscopy shows that these silicon nanosheets exhibit semiconducting electronic characteristics.

  1. PHOTOELECTRON AND AUGER ELECTRON ASYMMETRIES: ALIGNMENT OF Xe{sup +}({sup 2}D{sub 5/2}) BY PHOTOIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S. H.; Kobrin, P. H.; Truesdale, C. M.; Lindle, D.; Owaki, S.; Shirley, D. A.

    1980-12-01

    Angular distributions of photoelectrons from the Xe 4d subshell, and N{sub 4,5}oo Auger electrons, have been measured using synchrotron radiation. The 4d asymmetry parameter exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. The Auger electrons show large asymmetries due to alignment of Xe{sup +} by photoionization.

  2. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges for detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different than those for transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems. PMID:20304044

  3. X-ray and Electron Spectroscopy of Water.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Harada, Yoshihisa; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Besley, Nicholas A; Winter, Bernd; Rehr, John J; Pettersson, Lars G M; Nilsson, Anders

    2016-07-13

    Here we present an overview of recent developments of X-ray and electron spectroscopy to probe water at different temperatures. Photon-induced ionization followed by detection of electrons from either the O 1s level or the valence band is the basis of photoelectron spectroscopy. Excitation between the O 1s and the unoccupied states or occupied states is utilized in X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. These techniques probe the electronic structure of the liquid phase and show sensitivity to the local hydrogen-bonding structure. Both experimental aspects related to the measurements and theoretical simulations to assist in the interpretation are discussed in detail. Different model systems are presented such as the different bulk phases of ice and various adsorbed monolayer structures on metal surfaces. PMID:27244473

  4. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis: Sample analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure conditions in atomic oxygen (ESCA) was performed on an SSL-100/206 Small Spot Spectrometer. All data were taken with the use of a low voltage electron flood gun and a charge neutralization screen to minimize charging effects on the data. The X-ray spot size and electron flood gun voltage used are recorded on the individual spectra as are the instrumental resolutions. Two types of spectra were obtained for each specimen: (1) general surveys, and (2) high resolution spectra. The two types of data reduction performed are: (1) semiquantitative compositional analysis, and (2) peak fitting. The materials analyzed are: (1) kapton 4, 5, and 6, (2) HDPE 19, 20, and 21, and (3) PVDF 4, 5, and 6.

  5. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M.A.; Spence, D.; Boesten, L.; Tanaka, H.

    1988-04-01

    Electron energy loss spectra of disilane have been recorded over an excitation energy range of 20 eV employing electrons of 20 and 200 eV incident energy for scattering angles of 0/sup 0/--90/sup 0/. Every transition detected except one appears at an energy consistent with the first observed members of Rydberg series converging to one of four possible ion states. The first two observed transitions belong to (2a/sub 1//sub g/)/sup 2/..-->../sup 1//sup ,//sup 3/(2a/sub 1//sub g/,4s) dipole forbidden channels appearing at excitation energies of )similarreverse arrowto)6.3 and 7.05 eV for the triplet and singlet, respectively. Evidence is presented for the identification of additional forbidden transitions as well as possible low-lying valence transition

  6. Dynamics-based selective 2D {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of {sup 1}H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials.

  7. A zero-equation turbulent electron transport model for cross-field migration and its implementation in a 2-D hybrid plasma Hall thruster simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Mark; Young, Chris; Cha, Eusnun; Fernandez, Eduardo; Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory Collaboration; Eckerd College Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple, zero-equation turbulence model for electron transport across the magnetic field of a plasma Hall thruster and integrate this model into 2-D hybrid particle-in-cell simulations of a 72 mm diameter laboratory thruster operating at 400 W. The turbulent transport model is based on the assumption that the primary means of electron energy dissipation is the turbulent eddy cascade in the electron fluid to smaller scales. Implementing the model into 2-D hybrid simulations is relatively straightforward and leverages the existing framework for solving the electron fluid equations. We find that the model captures the strong axial variation in the mobility seen in experiments. In particular, it predicts the existence of a strong transport barrier which anchors the region of plasma acceleration. The model also captures the time-averaged experimental discharge current and its fluctuations due to ionization instabilities. We observe quantitative agreement with recent laser induced fluorescence measurements of time-averaged xenon ion and neutral velocities along the channel centerline. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  8. A single electron tunneling force spectroscopy study of dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Dustin W.

    Single electron tunneling force microscopy has been developed over the last decade as a tool to manipulate the occupation and probe the properties of trap states in completely non conducting materials. The technique has been advanced through the efforts of several generations of graduate students in the Clayton Williams research group. Previous graduate students have demonstrated that the single electron tunneling force microscopy technique can repeatably facilitate single electron tunneling between a metallic tip and an electron trap state in a completely non conducting, dielectric material. Also the single electron tunneling force spectroscopy technique has been shown to make these measurements with atomic scale resolution. As solid state device technology rushes toward higher power and increasingly smaller devices single electron tunneling force microscopy is uniquely positioned to identify the properties of trap states in dielectric materials with atomic scale resolution. The main thrust of this work has been concerned with demonstrating a repeatable spectroscopic method which can be used to reliably measure the energy of electron and hole traps due to defect states in dielectric materials. The single electron tunneling force spectroscopy technique was used to make spectroscopic measurements at several places on the surface of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and hafnium oxide films. The spectra measured were compared to known trap states in both the theoretical and experimental literature. The data show that the density of trap states is not spatially homogeneous, but varies from measurement to measurement. Most of the defect states identified by the single electron tunneling force spectroscopy technique correspond nicely with trap state energies found in either the experimental or theoretical literature. However, several states, not found in the literature, have also been identified by the scanning electron tunneling force spectroscopy technique. Additionally

  9. Electronic and Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Green, Alistair M.; Tame-Reyes, Victor; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-06-01

    Electronic and photoelectron spectra of toluene are presented and discussed. The utilization of a recently reported scheme for assigning the normal vibrations of substituted benzenes allows these spectra to be compared to those of other molecules with unprecedented clarity. Changes in vibrational activity within a series of substituted benzene molecules will be discussed, specifically the increased rate of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution observed in molecules where the substituent is a methyl group. A. M. Gardner and T. G. Wright, J. Chem. Phys., 135, 114305 (2011)

  10. Time resolved, 2-D hard X-ray imaging of relativistic electron-beam target interactions on ETA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, C.E.; Sampayan, S.; Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Houck, T.; Weir, J.; Trimble, D.; Krogh, M.

    1998-11-01

    Advanced radiographic applications require a constant source size less than 1 mm. To study the time history of a relativistic electron beam as it interacts with a bremsstrahlung converter, one of the diagnostics they use is a multi-frame time-resolved hard x-ray camera. They are performing experiments on the ETA-II accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate details of the electron beam/converter interactions. The camera they are using contains 6 time-resolved images, each image is a 5 ns frame. By starting each successive frame 10 ns after the previous frame, they create a 6-frame movie from the hard x-rays produced from the interaction of the 50-ns electron beam pulse.

  11. Pulse-shaping assisted multidimensional coherent electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Yuseff; Frei, Franziska; Cannizzo, Andrea Feurer, Thomas

    2015-06-07

    Understanding nuclear and electronic dynamics of molecular systems has advanced considerably by probing their nonlinear responses with a suitable sequence of pulses. Moreover, the ability to control crucial parameters of the excitation pulses, such as duration, sequence, frequency, polarization, slowly varying envelope, or carrier phase, has led to a variety of advanced time-resolved spectroscopic methodologies. Recently, two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with ultrashort pulses has become a more and more popular tool since it allows to obtain information on energy and coherence transfer phenomena, line broadening mechanisms, or the presence of quantum coherences in molecular complexes. Here, we present a high fidelity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy setup designed for molecular systems in solution. It incorporates the versatility of pulse-shaping methods to achieve full control on the amplitude and phase of the individual exciting and probing pulses. Selective and precise amplitude- and phase-modulation is shown and applied to investigate electronic dynamics in several reference molecular systems.

  12. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2005-08-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  13. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    1996-05-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  14. Engineering the electronic and magnetic properties of d(0) 2D dichalcogenide materials through vacancy doping and lattice strains.

    PubMed

    Ao, L; Pham, A; Xiao, H Y; Zu, X T; Li, S

    2016-03-14

    We have systematically investigated the effects of different vacancy defects in 2D d(0) materials SnS2 and ZrS2 using first principles calculations. The theoretical results show that the single cation vacancy and the vacancy complex like V-SnS6 can induce large magnetic moments (3-4 μB) in these single layer materials. Other defects, such as V-SnS3, V-S, V-ZrS3 and V-ZrS6, can result in n-type conductivity. In addition, the ab initio studies also reveal that the magnetic and conductive properties from the cation vacancy and the defect complex V-SnS6 can be modified using the compressive/tensile strain of the in-plane lattices. Specifically, the V-Zr doped ZrS2 monolayer can be tuned from a ferromagnetic semiconductor to a metallic/half-metallic material with decreasing/increasing magnetic moments depending on the external compressive/tensile strains. On the other hand, the semiconducting and magnetic properties of V-Sn doped SnS2 is preserved under different lattice compression and tension. For the defect complex like V-SnS6, only the lattice compression can tune the magnetic moments in SnS2. As a result, by manipulating the fabrication parameters, the magnetic and conductive properties of SnS2 and ZrS2 can be tuned without the need for chemical doping. PMID:26888010

  15. Analysis of bell-shape negative giant-magnetoresistance in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron systems using multi-conduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaraweera, Rasanga; Liu, Han-Chun; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh

    Recent advancements in the growth techniques of the GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) routinely yield high quality heterostructures with enhanced physical and electrical properties, including devices with 2D electron mobilities well above 107 cm2/Vs. These improvements have opened new pathways to study interesting physical phenomena associated with the 2D electron system. Negative giant-magnetoresistance (GMR) is one such phenomenon which can observed in the high mobility 2DES. However, the negative GMR in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2DES is still not fully understood. In this contribution, we present an experimental study of the bell-shape negative GMR in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs devices and quantitatively analyze the results utilizing the multi-conduction model. The multi-conduction model includes interesting physical characteristics such as negative diagonal conductivity, non-vanishing off-diagonal conductivity, etc. The aim of the study is to examine GMR over a wider experimental parameter space and determine whether the multi-conduction model serves to describe the experimental results.

  16. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  17. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of a Chiral Plasmonic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, G. W.; Karimullah, A.; Williamson, SDR; Kadodwala, M.; MacLaren, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the plasmonic excitations within a nanopatterned gold chiral biosensor element, measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy, is presented. We discuss aspects of data acquisition, processing, analysis and simulation. The localised surface plasmonic resonance modes in the structure are extracted using non-negative matrix factorisation and we use simulations to correlate notable deviations from the idealised spectrum to nanometric fabrication imperfections. The methodology presented has wide applicability to a variety of metamaterials.

  18. Theoretical study of the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure of thin films of 3 C, 2 H, and 2 D silicon carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzubov, A. A.; Eliseeva, N. S.; Krasnov, P. O.; Tomilin, F. N.; Fedorov, A. S.; Tolstaya, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    Silicon carbide is among the most common materials used in semiconductor engineering. Silicon carbide thin films are attractive from the standpoint of designing devices based on heterojunctions. This is due to a characteristic feature of this compound, such as polytypism, leading to the difference in the physical properties and also hampering the preparation of high-quality material samples. In this work, the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure of thin films based on the polytypes 3 C, 2 H, and 2 D with a thickness of a few nanometers have been studied.

  19. Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, H. W.; Graves, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is described. Tunnel junctions were fabricated, the tunneling spectra of several molecules absorbed on the surface of aluminum oxide measured, and mode assignments made for several of the prominent peaks in spectra using results obtained from optical…

  20. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  1. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  2. New attosecond spectroscopies for correlation-induced electron hole dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbukh, Vitali

    2014-05-01

    In this talk I will present two of our recent ideas for new attosecond time-resolved measurements of electron hole dynamics: 1. Single-photon laser enabled Auger decay (spLEAD) spectroscopy and 2. High-harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy of Auger-type transitions. Unlike the well-known attosecond streaking, the proposed spectroscopies do not rely on photo- or secondary electron emission and are applicable to ultrafast electronic processes involving bound-bound transitions, such as electron correlation-driven charge migration. We simulate the new attosecond spectroscopies using both model and ab initio methods. Specific applications include hole migration in glycine, atomic Auger and Coster-Kronig decays as well as quasi-exponential dynamics of molecular orbital breakdown in trans-butadiene and propanal. The author acknowledges the financial support of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC, UK) through the Career Acceleration Fellowship (Award No. EP/H003657/1) and the Programme Grant on Attosecond Dynamics (Award No. EP/I032517).

  3. The perspectives of femtosecond imaging and spectroscopy of complex materials using electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Chong-Yu; Duxbury, Phiilp M.; Berz, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of various electronic and structural phases that are close in free-energy is a hallmark in strongly correlated electron systems with emergent properties, such as metal-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, and high-temperature superconductivity. The cooperative phase transitions from one functional state to another can involve entanglements between the electronically and structurally ordered states, hence deciphering the fundamental mechanisms is generally difficult and remains very active in condensed matter physics and functional materials research. We outline the recent ultrafast characterizations of 2D charge-density wave materials, including the nonequilibrium electron dynamics unveiled by ultrafast optical spectroscopy-based techniques sensitive to the electronic order parameter. We also describe the most recent findings from ultrafast electron crystallography, which provide structural aspects to correlate lattice dynamics with electronic evolutions to address the two sides of a coin in the ultrafast switching of a cooperative state. Combining these results brings forth new perspectives and a fuller picture in understanding lightmatter interactions and various switching mechanisms in cooperative systems with many potential applications. We also discuss the prospects of implementing new ultrafast electron imaging as a local probe incorporated with femtosecond select-area diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy to provide a full scope of resolution to tackle the more challenging complex phase transitions on the femtosecond-nanometer scale all at once based on a recent understanding of the spacespace- charge-driven emittance limitation on the ultimate performance of these devices. The projection shows promising parameter space for conducting ultrafast electron micordiffraction at close to single-shot level, which is supported by the latest experimental characterization of such a system.

  4. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging. PMID:27149617

  5. Can fractional quantum Hall effect be due to the formation of coherent wave structures in a 2D electron gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Babur M.

    2016-05-01

    A microscopic theory of integer and fractional quantum Hall effects is presented here. In quantum density wave representation of charged particles, it is shown that, in a two-dimensional electron gas coherent structures form under the low temperature and high density conditions. With a sufficiently high applied magnetic field, the combined N particle quantum density wave exhibits collective periodic oscillations. As a result the corresponding quantum Hall voltage function shows a step-wise change in multiples of the ratio h/e2. At lower temperatures further subdivisions emerge in the Hall resistance, exhibiting the fractional quantum Hall effect.

  6. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  7. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Kersting, R.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.

    2015-03-02

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  8. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  9. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy of phycobiliproteins from cryptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    We describe new spectroscopic measurements which reveal additional information regarding the observed quantum coherences in proteins extracted from photosynthetic algae. The proteins we investigate are the phycobiliproteins phycoerythrin 545 and phycocyanin 645. Two new avenues have been explored. We describe how changes to the chemical and biological environment impact the quantum coherence present in the 2D electronic correlation spectrum. We also use new multidimensional spectroscopic techniques to reveal insights into the nature of the quantum coherence and the nature of the participating states.

  10. Analysis of 2D THz-Raman spectroscopy using a non-Markovian Brownian oscillator model with nonlinear system-bath interactions.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tatsushi; Ito, Hironobu; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-06-01

    We explore and describe the roles of inter-molecular vibrations employing a Brownian oscillator (BO) model with linear-linear (LL) and square-linear (SL) system-bath interactions, which we use to analyze two-dimensional (2D) THz-Raman spectra obtained by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In addition to linear infrared absorption (1D IR), we calculated 2D Raman-THz-THz, THz-Raman-THz, and THz-THz-Raman signals for liquid formamide, water, and methanol using an equilibrium non-equilibrium hybrid MD simulation. The calculated 1D IR and 2D THz-Raman signals are compared with results obtained from the LL+SL BO model applied through use of hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations with non-perturbative and non-Markovian noise. We find that all of the qualitative features of the 2D profiles of the signals obtained from the MD simulations are reproduced with the LL+SL BO model, indicating that this model captures the essential features of the inter-molecular motion. We analyze the fitted 2D profiles in terms of anharmonicity, nonlinear polarizability, and dephasing time. The origins of the echo peaks of the librational motion and the elongated peaks parallel to the probe direction are elucidated using optical Liouville paths. PMID:26049441

  11. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER. PMID:27295098

  12. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  13. Electron Spectroscopy and Computational Studies of Dimethyl Methylphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Head, Ashley R; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Trotochaud, Lena; Eichhorn, Bryan; Kuklja, Maija M; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-03-31

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) is one of the most widely used molecules to simulate chemical warfare agents in adsorption experiments. However, the details of the electronic structure of the isolated molecule have not yet been reported. We have directly probed the occupied valence and core levels using gas phase photoelectron spectroscopy and the unoccupied states using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study the electronic structure, assign the spectral features, and visualize the molecular orbitals. Comparison with parent molecules shows that valence and core-level binding energies of DMMP follow trends of functional group substitution on the P center. The photoelectron and NEXAFS spectra of the isolated molecule will serve as a reference in studies of DMMP adsorbed on surfaces. PMID:26977778

  14. On the electronic configuration in Pu: spectroscopy and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Moore, K T; Schwartz, A J; Chung, B W; Wall, M; Wills, J M; Eriksson, O; Haire, R; Kutepov, A L

    2006-10-11

    Photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations within the mixed-level and magnetic models, together with canonical band theory have been used to study the electron configuration in Pu. These methods suggest a 5f{sup n} configuration for Pu of 5 {le} n < 6, with n {ne} 6, contrary to what has recently been suggested in several publications. We show that the n = 6 picture is inconsistent with the usual interpretation of photoemission and x-ray absorption spectra. Instead, these spectra support the traditional conjecture of a 5f{sup 5} configuration in Pu as is obtained by density-functional theory. We further argue, based on 5f-band filling, that an n = 6 hypothesis is incompatible with the position of Pu in the actinide series and its monoclinic ground-state phase.

  15. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-01

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials. PMID:26646862

  16. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  17. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  18. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loïc; Veith, Gabriel M; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Unocic, Kinga A; Sacci, Robert L; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. This is significant as the use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. We discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies. PMID:26404766

  19. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  20. Probing Battery Chemistry with Liquid Cell Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. The use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, we discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  1. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  2. Characterizing Localized Surface Plasmons Using Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherqui, Charles; Thakkar, Niket; Li, Guoliang; Camden, Jon P.; Masiello, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) offers a window to view nanoscale properties and processes. When performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope, EELS can simultaneously render images of nanoscale objects with subnanometer spatial resolution and correlate them with spectroscopic information at a spectral resolution of ˜10-100 meV. Consequently, EELS is a near-perfect tool for understanding the optical and electronic properties of individual plasmonic metal nanoparticles and few-nanoparticle assemblies, which are significant in a wide range of fields. This review presents an overview of basic plasmonics and EELS theory and highlights several recent noteworthy experiments involving the interrogation of plasmonic metal nanoparticle systems using electron beams.

  3. Quantum dynamics and electronic spectroscopy within the framework of wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2013-03-01

    This paper serves as a first-time report on formulating important aspects of electronic spectroscopy and quantum dynamics in condensed harmonic systems using the framework of wavelets, and a stepping stone to our future work on developing anharmonic wavelets. The Morlet wavelet is taken to be the mother wavelet for the initial state of the system of interest. This work reports daughter wavelets that may be used to study spectroscopy and dynamics of harmonic systems. These wavelets are shown to arise naturally upon optical electronic transition of the system of interest. Natural birth of basis (daughter) wavelets emerging on exciting an electronic two-level system coupled, both linearly and quadratically, to harmonic phonons is discussed. It is shown that this takes place through using the unitary dilation and translation operators, which happen to be part of the time evolution operator of the final electronic state. The corresponding optical autocorrelation function and linear absorption spectra are calculated to test the applicability and correctness of the herein results. The link between basis wavelets and the Liouville space generating function is established. An anharmonic mother wavelet is also proposed in the case of anharmonic electron-phonon coupling. A brief description of deriving anharmonic wavelets and the corresponding anharmonic Liouville space generating function is explored. In conclusion, a mother wavelet (be it harmonic or anharmonic) which accounts for Duschinsky mixing is suggested.

  4. DNA Electronic Fingerprints by Local Spectroscopy on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balatsky, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Working and scalable alternatives to the conventional chemical methods of DNA sequencing that are based on electronic/ionic signatures would revolutionize the field of sequencing. The approach of a single molecule imaging and spectroscopy with unprecedented resolution, achieved by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS) and nanopore electronics could enable this revolution. We use the data from our group and others in applying this local scanning tunneling microscopy and illustrate possibilities of electronic sequencing of freeze dried deposits on graphene. We will present two types of calculated fingerprints: first in Local Density of States (LDOS) of DNA nucleotide bases (A,C,G,T) deposited on graphene. Significant base-dependent features in the LDOS in an energy range within few eV of the Fermi level were found in our calculations. These features can serve as electronic fingerprints for the identification of individual bases in STS. In the second approach we present calculated base dependent electronic transverse conductance as DNA translocates through the graphene nanopore. Thus we argue that the fingerprints of DNA-graphene hybrid structures may provide an alternative route to DNA sequencing using STS. Work supported by US DOE, NORDITA.

  5. GEL-STATE NMR OF BALL-MILLED WHOLE CELL WALLS IN DMSO-d6 USING 2D SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell walls were used for obtaining 2D solution-state NMR spectra without actual solubilization or structural modification. Ball-milled whole cell walls were swelled directly in the NMR tube with DMSO-d6 where they formed a gel. There are relatively few gel-state NMR studies. Most have involved...

  6. Synthesis and Resolution of the Atropisomeric 1,1'-Bi-2-Naphthol: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.

    2004-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is presented. It is seen that the experiment regarding the synthesis and resolution of 1,1'-Bi-2-naphtol presents a good experiment for teaching organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy and provides a strategy for obtaining enantiopure compounds from achiral starting materials.

  7. Rovibrational constants of the ground state and v9 = 1 state of 13C2D4 by high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Gabona, M. G.; Woo, J. Q.; Ng, L. L.; Wong, Andy; McNaughton, Don

    2016-03-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) rovibrational spectrum of the b-type ν9 band of 13C2D4 was recorded at a unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1 in the 2230-2450 cm-1 region. By assigning and fitting a total of 1171 rotationally resolved infrared transitions of the ν9 band and using the Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, rovibrational constants for the upper state (v9 = 1) up to five quartic centrifugal distortion terms were derived for the first time. The root-mean-square (rms) deviation of the infrared fit was 0.00043 cm-1. The ground state constants of 13C2D4 were determined with higher accuracy than previously by fitting 1485 ground state combination-differences (GSCDs) from the present and previous infrared measurements, with rms deviation of 0.00034 cm-1. The band center of ν9 band of 13C2D4 was determined to be at 2324.3593 cm-1. The equilibrium state rovibrational constants up to all 5 quartic terms were derived from theoretical harmonic calculations at three levels of theory: B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, MP2/cc-pVTZ, and CCSD/cc-pVTZ using the principal axis coordinate system. These constants agreed reasonably well with the ground state constants of 13C2D4 derived from the present experimental GSCD fit. Furthermore, all 3 rotational constants of the upper state (v9 = 1) and of the ground state of 13C2D4 were obtained from anharmonic calculations using B3LYP and MP2 levels with the cc-pVTZ basis set. The calculated rotational constants were found to agree with those derived experimentally within 0.40%.

  8. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  9. Off-axis electron holography with a dual-lens imaging system and its usefulness in 2-D potential mapping of semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Kawasaki, M; Bruley, J; Gribelyuk, M; Domenicucci, A; Gaudiello, J

    2004-11-01

    A variable magnification electron holography, applicable for two-dimensional (2-D) potential mapping of semiconductor devices, employing a dual-lens imaging system is described. Imaging operation consists of a virtual image formed by the objective lens (OL) and a real image formed in a fixed imaging plane by the objective minilens. Wide variations in field of view (100-900 nm) and fringe spacing (0.7-6 nm) were obtained using a fixed biprism voltage by varying the total magnification of the dual OL system. The dual-lens system allows fringe width and spacing relative to the object to be varied roughly independently from the fringe contrast, resulting in enhanced resolution and sensitivity. The achievable fringe width and spacing cover the targets needed for devices in the semiconductor technology road map from the 350 to 45 nm node. Two-D potential maps for CMOS devices with 220 and 70 nm gate lengths were obtained. PMID:15450653

  10. Giant piezoresistance of p-type nano-thick silicon induced by interface electron trapping instead of 2D quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Li, Xinxin

    2011-01-01

    The p-type silicon giant piezoresistive coefficient is measured in top-down fabricated nano-thickness single-crystalline-silicon strain-gauge resistors with a macro-cantilever bending experiment. For relatively thicker samples, the variation of piezoresistive coefficient in terms of silicon thickness obeys the reported 2D quantum confinement effect. For ultra-thin samples, however, the variation deviates from the quantum-effect prediction but increases the value by at least one order of magnitude (compared to the conventional piezoresistance of bulk silicon) and the value can change its sign (e.g. from positive to negative). A stress-enhanced Si/SiO(2) interface electron-trapping effect model is proposed to explain the 'abnormal' giant piezoresistance that should be originated from the carrier-concentration change effect instead of the conventional equivalent mobility change effect for bulk silicon piezoresistors. An interface state modification experiment gives preliminary proof of our analysis. PMID:21135460

  11. The Integer and Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in the Lowest Landau Level of Valley Degenerate 2D Electrons on Hydrogen Terminated Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kott, Tomasz M.; Hu, Binhui; Brown, S. H.; Kane, B. E.

    2013-03-01

    We report low temperature magnetotransport measurements on a high mobility (μ = 325 000 cm2/Vsec) 2D electron system on a H-terminated Si(111) surface. In Si(111), there are six degenerate, anisotropic valleys which can affect the magnetotransport in unexpected ways. While low magnetic field data indeed show a six-fold valley degenerate system, we observe the integral quantum Hall effect at all filling factors ν <= 6 , indicating a magnetic-field-induced breaking of the valley degeneracy. Additionally, we find that ν = 2 develops in an unusually narrow temperature range, which might indicate the existence of a novel broken-symmetry valley phase. Finally, we observe an extended, exclusively even numerator, fractional quantum Hall hierarchy surrounding ν = 3 / 2 with denominators up to 15. This hierarchy is consistent with two-fold valley-degenerate composite fermions. We determine activation energies and provide the first estimate the composite fermion mass in a multi-valley system.

  12. Electronic Structure and Fermi Surface of the Quaternary Intermetallic Borocarbide Superconductor YNi2B2C from 2D-ACAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, A. S.

    We measured the angular momentum density distribution of YNi2B2C to acquire information about its electronic structure. The measurements were performed using the full-scale utility of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The measured spectra clarified that Ni (3d) like state, predominantly, affected the Fermi surface of YNi2B2C. Further, s- and p-like-states enhanced its superconducting properties. The Fermi surface of YNi2B2C. was reconstructed using Fourier transformation followed by the LCW (Loucks, Crisp and West) folding procedure. It showed a large and complex surface similar to that of the high temperature superconductors HTS, with anisotropic properties. It also disclosed the effect of d-like state. Nevertheless, the current Fermi surface could deliver the needed topological information to isolate its features. The general layouts of this Fermi surface are; two large electron surfaces running along Γ-Z direction; as well as an additional large electron surface centered on X point; beside one hole surface centered on 100 point. This Fermi surface was interpreted in view of the earlier results.

  13. Development of electron energy-loss spectroscopy for nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Wang, Zhiwei; Fu, Xin; Xie, Lin; Sun, Yuekui; Gao, Shangpeng; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Xuerang; Xu, Chen

    2008-08-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has been well established in providing the composition and chemical bonding information of materials, particularly for light elements. Its potential for structural determination has long been known but has yet to be fully explored. With the convergence of rapid development in computing power and improvement in the efficiency of the material specific electronic structure simulation, plus the recent breakthrough in the development of C(s)-corrected electron microscopy, the reconstruction of the local three dimensional structure of nanomaterial using EELS in conjunction with advanced structural imaging and diffraction techniques is becoming increasingly feasible. In this paper, we will review from our own examples the progress in EELS instrumentation, methods and simulation to illustrate the progress that has been made. They include the density-function-theory-based ab initio spectroscopic simulation for standard-less fingerprint applications for metastable polymorph identification, magic angle electron energy-loss spectroscopy as well as recent results from the dual-detectors EELS system which allows the energy instability of the spectrometer to be analyzed in real-time and eventually compensated on-line. PMID:18166483

  14. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  15. Simulations of the Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of the Photosystem II Reaction Center

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, K. L. M.; Fuller, F. D.; Myers, J. A.; Yocum, C. F.; Mukamel, S.; Abramavicius, D.; Ogilvie, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    We report simulations of the two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the Qy band of the D1-D2-Cyt b559 photosystem II reaction center at 77 K. We base the simulations on an existing Hamiltonian that was derived by simultaneous fitting to a wide range of linear spectroscopic measurements and described within modified Redfield theory. The model obtains reasonable agreement with most aspects of the two-dimensional spectra, including the overall peak shapes and excited state absorption features. It does not reproduce the rapid equilibration from high energy to low energy excitonic states evident by a strong cross-peak below the diagonal. We explore modifications to the model to incorporate new structural data and improve agreement with the two-dimensional spectra. We find that strengthening the system–bath coupling and lowering the degree of disorder significantly improves agreement with the cross-peak feature, while lessening agreement with the relative diagonal/antidiagonal width of the 2D spectra. We conclude that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy provides a sensitive test of excitonic models of the photosystem II reaction center and discuss avenues for further refinement of such models. PMID:23210463

  16. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  17. Positron-Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy using Electron Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Butterling, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    2015-06-01

    A new type of an intense source of positrons for materials research has been set up at the superconducting electron linear. The source employs hard X-rays from electron- bremsstrahlung production generating energetic electron-positron pairs inside the sample under investigation. CW-operation allows performing experiments with significantly reduced pile-up artefacts in the detectors compared to pulsed mode operation in conventional accelerators. The high-resolution timing of the accelerator with bunch lengths below 10 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) allows positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) measurements with high time resolution. A single-component annihilation lifetime of Kaptonhas been measured as (381.3 ± 0.3) ps. Employing segmented detectors for the detection of both annihilation photons allows for the first time to perform a 4D tomographic reconstruction of the annihilation sites including the annihilation lifetime.

  18. Modeling ellipsometry and electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Keenan A.; Miskovic, Zoran L.; Diebold, Alain C.; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-03-31

    Recent studies of electronic excitations in graphene by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have revealed massive high-frequency peaks assigned to the π and σ+π plasmons [1], which were semi-quantitatively modeled with a two-dimensional, two-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model [2]. On the other hand, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) of graphene covers the region of nearly constant absorbance due to graphene’s universal optical conductivity at infrared frequencies, which is not clearly resolved by EELS, and goes up to cover the π-plasmon peak at ultraviolet frequencies [3]. To attempt to model both the SE and EELS, we amend the HD model by including a low-frequency contribution of graphene’s inter-band transitions, while monitoring the fulfillment of the f-sum rule [4] up to frequencies that cover excitations of all valence electrons.

  19. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    PubMed Central

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons. In this method, we demonstrate the single-atom detection of lithium, fluorine, sodium and chlorine with near-atomic precision, which is limited by the incident probe size, signal delocalization and atomic movement in nanospace. Moreover, chemical shifts of lithium K-edge have been successfully identified with various atomic configurations in one-dimensional lithium compounds. PMID:26228378

  20. Valence Electronic Structure of Aqueous Solutions: Insights from Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Bradforth, Stephen E.

    2016-05-01

    The valence orbital electron binding energies of water and of embedded solutes are crucial quantities for understanding chemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution, including oxidation/reduction, transition-metal coordination, and radiation chemistry. Their experimental determination based on liquid-photoelectron spectroscopy using soft X-rays is described, and we provide an overview of valence photoelectron spectroscopy studies reported to date. We discuss principal experimental aspects and several theoretical approaches to compute the measured binding energies of the least tightly bound molecular orbitals. Solutes studied are presented chronologically, from simple electrolytes, via transition-metal ion solutions and several organic and inorganic molecules, to biologically relevant molecules, including aqueous nucleotides and their components. In addition to the lowest vertical ionization energies, the measured valence photoelectron spectra also provide information on adiabatic ionization energies and reorganization energies for the oxidation (ionization) half-reaction. For solutes with low solubility, resonantly enhanced ionization provides a promising alternative pathway.

  1. Valence Electronic Structure of Aqueous Solutions: Insights from Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Bradforth, Stephen E

    2016-05-27

    The valence orbital electron binding energies of water and of embedded solutes are crucial quantities for understanding chemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution, including oxidation/reduction, transition-metal coordination, and radiation chemistry. Their experimental determination based on liquid-photoelectron spectroscopy using soft X-rays is described, and we provide an overview of valence photoelectron spectroscopy studies reported to date. We discuss principal experimental aspects and several theoretical approaches to compute the measured binding energies of the least tightly bound molecular orbitals. Solutes studied are presented chronologically, from simple electrolytes, via transition-metal ion solutions and several organic and inorganic molecules, to biologically relevant molecules, including aqueous nucleotides and their components. In addition to the lowest vertical ionization energies, the measured valence photoelectron spectra also provide information on adiabatic ionization energies and reorganization energies for the oxidation (ionization) half-reaction. For solutes with low solubility, resonantly enhanced ionization provides a promising alternative pathway. PMID:27023757

  2. Scanning-probe Single-electron Capacitance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kathleen A.; Romanowich, Megan E.; Gasseller, Morewell; Kuljanishvili, Irma; Ashoori, Raymond; Tessmer, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The integration of low-temperature scanning-probe techniques and single-electron capacitance spectroscopy represents a powerful tool to study the electronic quantum structure of small systems - including individual atomic dopants in semiconductors. Here we present a capacitance-based method, known as Subsurface Charge Accumulation (SCA) imaging, which is capable of resolving single-electron charging while achieving sufficient spatial resolution to image individual atomic dopants. The use of a capacitance technique enables observation of subsurface features, such as dopants buried many nanometers beneath the surface of a semiconductor material1,2,3. In principle, this technique can be applied to any system to resolve electron motion below an insulating surface. As in other electric-field-sensitive scanned-probe techniques4, the lateral spatial resolution of the measurement depends in part on the radius of curvature of the probe tip. Using tips with a small radius of curvature can enable spatial resolution of a few tens of nanometers. This fine spatial resolution allows investigations of small numbers (down to one) of subsurface dopants1,2. The charge resolution depends greatly on the sensitivity of the charge detection circuitry; using high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) in such circuits at cryogenic temperatures enables a sensitivity of approximately 0.01 electrons/Hz½ at 0.3 K 5. PMID:23929222

  3. Electronic structures and magnetic stabilities of 2D Mn-doped GaAs nanosheets: The role of long-range exchange interactions and doping strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Mu; Xiang, Gang Zhang, Xi

    2014-08-28

    We investigate the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn atoms doped two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal GaAs nanosheets (GaAsNSs) using both first-principle calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. The first-principle molecular dynamics is first used to test the structural stability of Mn-doped GaAsNS ((Ga,Mn)AsNS). The analysis of spin-resolved electronic structures and determination of magnetic exchange interactions based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveals the existence of long-range exchange interaction in the system. Finally, Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation is employed to estimate Curie temperatures (T{sub C}s) of (Ga,Mn)AsNSs with different doping concentrations by different doping strategies. The results indicate that a T{sub C} up to 82 K can be obtained in regularly-doped (Ga,Mn)AsNSs and doping strategies have prominent impact on T{sub C}s of the systems, which emphasizes the importance of both long-range interactions and doping strategies in reduced dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs)

  4. Broadband Transient Absorption and Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of Methylene Blue.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jacob C; Rafiq, Shahnawaz; Oblinsky, Daniel G; Cassette, Elsa; Jumper, Chanelle C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2015-08-27

    Broadband transient absorption and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) studies of methylene blue in aqueous solution are reported. By isolating the coherent oscillations of the nonlinear signal amplitude and Fourier transforming with respect to the population time, we analyzed a significant number of coherences in the frequency domain and compared them with predictions of the vibronic spectrum from density function theory (DFT) calculations. We show here that such a comparison enables reliable assignments of vibrational coherences to particular vibrational modes, with their constituent combination bands and overtones also being identified via Franck–Condon analysis aided by DFT. Evaluation of the Fourier transform (FT) spectrum of transient absorption recorded to picosecond population times, in coincidence with 2D oscillation maps that disperse the FT spectrum into the additional excitation axis, is shown to be a complementary approach toward detailed coherence determination. Using the Franck–Condon overlap integrals determined from DFT calculations, we modeled 2D oscillation maps up to two vibrational quanta in the ground and excited state (six-level model), showing agreement with experiment. This semiquantitative analysis is used to interpret the geometry change upon photoexcitation as an expansion of the central sulfur/nitrogen containing ring due to the increased antibonding character in the excited state. PMID:26274093

  5. 2012 ELECTRONIC SPECTROSCOPY & DYNAMICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 22-27, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Bern

    2012-07-27

    Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, coherent electronic energy transport in biology, excited state theory and dynamics, excitonics, electronic spectroscopy of cold and ultracold molecules, and the spectroscopy of nanostructures. Several sessions will highlight innovative techniques such as time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy, frequency combs, and liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy that have forged stimulating new connections between gas-phase and condensed-phase work.

  6. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of local "spin accumulation" devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkey, Holly N.; Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the origin of purported "spin accumulation" signals observed in local "three-terminal" (3T) measurements of ferromagnet/insulator/n-Si tunnel junctions using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Voltage bias and magnetic field dependences of the IET spectra were found to account for the dominant contribution to 3T magnetoresistance, thus indicating that it arises from inelastic tunneling through impurities and defects at junction interfaces and within the barrier, rather than from spin accumulation due to pure elastic tunneling into bulk Si as has been previously assumed.

  7. Tomography of Particle Plasmon Fields from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörl, Anton; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2013-08-01

    We theoretically investigate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of metallic nanoparticles in the optical frequency domain. Using a quasistatic approximation scheme together with a plasmon eigenmode expansion, we show that EELS can be rephrased in terms of a tomography problem. For selected single and coupled nanoparticles we extract the three-dimensional plasmon fields from a collection of rotated EELS maps. Our results pave the way for a fully three-dimensional plasmon-field tomography and establish EELS as a quantitative measurement device for plasmonics.

  8. 8th international conference on electronic spectroscopy and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2000-10-16

    Gathering from 33 countries around the world, 408 registrants and a number of local drop-in participants descended on the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from Monday, August 7 through Saturday, August 12, 2000 for the Eighth International Conference on Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy (ICESS8). At the conference, participants benefited from an extensive scientific program comprising more than 100 oral presentations (plenary lectures and invited and contributed talks) and 330 poster presentations, as well as ample time for socializing and a tour of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the nearby Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  9. Raman enhancement by graphene-Ga2O3 2D bilayer film

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    2D β-Ga2O3 flakes on a continuous 2D graphene film were prepared by a one-step chemical vapor deposition on liquid gallium surface. The composite was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results indicate that Ga2O3 flakes grew on the surface of graphene film during the cooling process. In particular, tenfold enhancement of graphene Raman scattering signal was detected on Ga2O3 flakes, and XPS indicates the C-O bonding between graphene and Ga2O3. The mechanism of Raman enhancement was discussed. The 2D Ga2O3-2D graphene structure may possess potential applications. PMID:24472433

  10. Project 8: Single-Electron Spectroscopy via Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Viveiros, Luiz; Project 8 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Project 8 experiment seeks to determine the neutrino mass via the precise measurement of the electron energy in beta decays. We have developed a novel technique called Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy (CRES), which allows single electron detection and characterization through the measurement of cyclotron radiation emitted by magnetically-trapped electrons produced by a gaseous radioactive source. The advantages of this technique include scalability, excellent energy resolution, and low backgrounds. A prototype using a waveguide-coupled 83mKr source in a 1 T magnetic field was constructed, and used to demonstrate the viability of this technique. We have recently reported the first observation and measurement of single-electron cyclotron radiation, emitted by the internal conversion electrons (at 17 . 8keV and 30 . 4keV) released in the decay of 83mKr. We present the latest results of the ongoing prototype run, with a focus on signal detection and analysis techniques leading to an improved energy resolution of O (1eV) .

  11. In situ electron energy-loss spectroscopy in liquids.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Megan E; Yu, Yingchao; Gao, Jie; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2013-08-01

    In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the liquid cell holder shadows the detector and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS in the study of chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap, and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio regime as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in an aqueous solution. The potential for the use of valence EELS to understand in situ STEM reactions is demonstrated for beam-induced deposition of metallic copper: as copper clusters grow, EELS develops low-loss peaks corresponding to metallic copper. From these techniques, in situ imaging and valence EELS offer insights into the local electronic structure of nanoparticles and chemical reactions. PMID:23721691

  12. Mid-infrared pulse shaping permits the pathway of amyloid aggregation to be determined with rapid-scan 2D IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanni, Martin

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a means for rapidly acquiring 2D IR spectra in a continuous fashion to monitoring protein kinetics. Our method relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that generates precise pulse trains for collecting 2D IR spectra. The phase, amplitude and now the polarization of the pulse trains can be automatically generated without optical alignment, which produces higher accuracy spectra in a much easier fashion than with standard 4-wave mixing. Using this new technology as well as site-specific isotope labeling, we have measured the development of secondary structures for six residues during the aggregation process of the 37-residue polypeptide associated with type 2 diabetes, the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also called amylin. By monitoring the kinetics at six different labeled sites, we find that the peptides initially develop well ordered structures near the ordered loop of the fibrils, followed by formation of the two parallel β-sheets with the N-terminal β-sheet likely forming before the C-terminal sheet. This experimental approach provides residue-by-residue details on the aggregation pathway of hIAPP fibril formation as well as a general methodology for studying other amyloid forming proteins without the use of structure perturbing labels. Moreover, this approach is also applicable to membrane catalyzed amyloid formation, and experiments along these lines will be presented as well.

  13. 2D kinematic characterization of a representative sample of local (U)LIRGs. A `kinemetry' analysis based on VIMOS/VLT with integral field spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellocchi, E.; Arribas, S.; Colina, L.; Ascasibar, Y.; Díaz-Beltrán, A.; García Benito, R.; Galbany, L.

    2016-06-01

    The 2D kinematic characterization of a sample of 38 (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies [(U)LIRGs] systems (51 individual galaxies) at low redshift (=0.022) is carried out with the VIMOS/VLT. The sample encompass a wide variety of morphological types (from isolated disks for low-luminosity LIRGs to a majority of merger remnants for ULIRGs) and nuclear excitations (HII, Seyfert and LINER). Studying the characteristics of (U)LIRGs at low-z allow us a better understanding of the interrelated physical processes involved, and the implications for high-z objects. We present the 2D kinematic properties of the ionized gas phase (Hα) for the whole sample, for which relatively high linear resolution and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio can be achieved (Bellocchi+2013). Then, we discussed the results obtained when applying the "kinemetry" method (Krajnovic+2006), along with the kinematic criteria used by Shapiro+2008 ("unweighted") and Bellocchi+2012 ("weighted") to distinguish between "rotation-dominated disks" and "major mergers", considering the asymmetries in both the velocity field (v) and velocity dispersion (σ) maps (Bellocchi+2016).

  14. Hyperfine structure and lifetime measurements in the 4s2nd 2D3/2 Rydberg sequence of Ga I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunqing; Tian, Yanshan; Yu, Qi; Bai, Wanshuang; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-05-01

    The hyperfine structure (HFS) constants of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=6-18) Rydberg sequence and the 4s26p 2P3/2 level for two isotopes of 69Ga and 71Ga atoms were measured by means of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique and the quantum beat method. The observed hyperfine quantum beat spectra were analyzed and the magnetic-dipole HFS constants A as well as the electric-quadrupole HFS constants B of these levels were obtained by Fourier transform and a program for multiple regression analysis. Also using TR-LIF method radiative lifetimes of the above sequence states were determined at room temperature. The measured lifetime values range from 69 to 2279 ns with uncertainties no more than 10%. To our knowledge, the HFS constants of this Rydberg sequence and the lifetimes of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=10-18) levels are reported for the first time. Good agreement between our results and the previous is achieved.

  15. Angle resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, U.; Preisinger, A.; Schattschneider, P.; Varga, P.

    We report on angle resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in reflection mode with low primary energy on a graphite single crystal. Measurements with primary electron energy of 175 eV have been performed in off-Bragg-reflex geometry in two different directions within the (0001) surface plane of the graphite single crystal. In addition, EELS measurements in specular reflection mode with different primary energies and angles of incidence were done in order to distinguish between surface and bulk plasmon losses. The energy losses and the transferred momenta of the losses have been analyzed. The results are compared with the loss functions for bulk and surface excitations calculated from the dielectric function ɛ(ω, q) obtained from TEELS-data (EELS in transmission mode) [Springer Tracts Mod. Phys. 54 (1970) 77].

  16. Data processing for atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Paul; Hovden, Robert; Mundy, Julia A; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A

    2012-08-01

    The high beam current and subangstrom resolution of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes has enabled electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping with atomic resolution. These spectral maps are often dose limited and spatially oversampled, leading to low counts/channel and are thus highly sensitive to errors in background estimation. However, by taking advantage of redundancy in the dataset map, one can improve background estimation and increase chemical sensitivity. We consider two such approaches--linear combination of power laws and local background averaging--that reduce background error and improve signal extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) can also be used to analyze spectrum images, but the poor peak-to-background ratio in EELS can lead to serious artifacts if raw EELS data are PCA filtered. We identify common artifacts and discuss alternative approaches. These algorithms are implemented within the Cornell Spectrum Imager, an open source software package for spectroscopic analysis. PMID:22697429

  17. Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) study of atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, J. G.; Seals, R. D.; Wightman, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The results of analyses by ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) on several Nuclepore filters which were exposed during air pollution studies are presented along with correlative measurements by Neutron Activation Analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Samples were exposed during air pollution studies at Norfolk, Virginia and the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It was demonstrated that with the ESCA technique it was possible to identify the chemical (bonding) state of elements contained in the atmospheric particulate matter collected on Nuclepore filters. Sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, chlorine, alkali, and alkaline earth metal species were identified in the Norfolk samples. ESCA binding energy data for aluminum indicated that three chemically different types of aluminum are present in the launch and background samples from NASA-KSC.

  18. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; McKeown Walker, S.; Tamai, A.; Wang, Y.; Ristic, Z.; Bruno, F. Y.; de la Torre, A.; Riccò, S.; Plumb, N. C.; Shi, M.; Hlawenka, P.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Varykhalov, A.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; King, P. D. C.; Meevasana, W.; Diebold, U.; Mesot, J.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Radovic, M.; Baumberger, F.

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  19. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; Wang, Y; Ristic, Z; Bruno, F Y; de la Torre, A; Riccò, S; Plumb, N C; Shi, M; Hlawenka, P; Sánchez-Barriga, J; Varykhalov, A; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Diebold, U; Mesot, J; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Radovic, M; Baumberger, F

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs. PMID:27064529

  20. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  1. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  2. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate themore » slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions« less

  3. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions

  4. Development of an (e,2e) electron momentum spectroscopy apparatus using an ultrashort pulsed electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Oishi, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Takahashi, M.

    2013-06-15

    An (e,2e) apparatus for electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) has been developed, which employs an ultrashort-pulsed incident electron beam with a repetition rate of 5 kHz and a pulse duration in the order of a picosecond. Its instrumental design and technical details are reported, involving demonstration of a new method for finding time-zero. Furthermore, EMS data for the neutral Ne atom in the ground state measured by using the pulsed electron beam are presented to illustrate the potential abilities of the apparatus for ultrafast molecular dynamics, such as by combining EMS with the pump-and-probe technique.

  5. Inexpensive electronics and software for photon statistics and correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gamari, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Dianwen; Buckman, Richard E.; Milas, Peker; Denker, John S.; Chen, Hui; Li, Hongmin; Goldner, Lori S.

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule-sensitive microscopy and spectroscopy are transforming biophysics and materials science laboratories. Techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are now commonly available in research laboratories but are as yet infrequently available in teaching laboratories. We describe inexpensive electronics and open-source software that bridges this gap, making state-of-the-art research capabilities accessible to undergraduates interested in biophysics. We include a discussion of the intensity correlation function relevant to FCS and how it can be determined from photon arrival times. We demonstrate the system with a measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of a protein using FCS that is suitable for the undergraduate teaching laboratory. The FPGA-based electronics, which are easy to construct, are suitable for more advanced measurements as well, and several applications are described. As implemented, the system has 8 ns timing resolution, can control up to four laser sources, and can collect information from as many as four photon-counting detectors. PMID:26924846

  6. Inexpensive electronics and software for photon statistics and correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamari, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Dianwen; Buckman, Richard E.; Milas, Peker; Denker, John S.; Chen, Hui; Li, Hongmin; Goldner, Lori S.

    2014-07-01

    Single-molecule-sensitive microscopy and spectroscopy are transforming biophysics and materials science laboratories. Techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are now commonly available in research laboratories but are as yet infrequently available in teaching laboratories. We describe inexpensive electronics and open-source software that bridges this gap, making state-of-the-art research capabilities accessible to undergraduates interested in biophysics. We include a discussion of the intensity correlation function relevant to FCS and how it can be determined from photon arrival times. We demonstrate the system with a measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of a protein using FCS that is suitable for the undergraduate teaching laboratory. The FPGA-based electronics, which are easy to construct, are suitable for more advanced measurements as well, and several applications are described. As implemented, the system has 8 ns timing resolution, can control up to four laser sources, and can collect information from as many as four photon-counting detectors.

  7. Contrasting 1D tunnel-structured and 2D layered polymorphs of V2O5: relating crystal structure and bonding to band gaps and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Tolhurst, Thomas M; Leedahl, Brett; Andrews, Justin L; Marley, Peter M; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Moewes, Alexander

    2016-06-21

    New V2O5 polymorphs have risen to prominence as a result of their open framework structures, cation intercalation properties, tunable electronic structures, and wide range of applications. The application of these materials and the design of new, useful polymorphs requires understanding their defining structure-property relationships. We present a characterization of the band gap and electronic structure of nanowires of the novel ζ-phase and the orthorhombic α-phase of V2O5 using X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The band gap is found to decrease from 1.90 ± 0.20 eV in the α-phase to 1.50 ± 0.20 eV in the ζ-phase, accompanied by the loss of the α-phase's characteristic split-off dxy band in the ζ-phase. States of dxy origin continue to dominate the conduction band edge in the new polymorph but the inequivalence of the vanadium atoms and the increased local symmetry of [VO6] octahedra results in these states overlapping with the rest of the V 3d conduction band. ζ-V2O5 exhibits anisotropic conductivity along the b direction, defining a 1D tunnel, in contrast to α-V2O5 where the anisotropic conductivity is along the ab layers. We explain the structural origins of the differences in electronic properties that exist between the α- and ζ-phase. PMID:27230816

  8. Study of the cyclodextrin and its complexation with 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid through photophysical properties and 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalin, T.; Srinivasan, K.; Sivakumar, K.

    2014-02-01

    The host-guest inclusion complex formation of 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid (2,4-DNB) with nano-hydrophobic cavity of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in solution phase were studied by UV-visible spectrophotometer and electrochemical method (cyclic voltammetry, CV). The prototropic behaviors of 2,4-DNB with and without β-CD and the ground state acidity constant (pKa) of host-guest inclusion complex (2,4-DNB-β-CD) was studied. The binding constant of the inclusion complex at 303 K was calculated using Benesi-Hildebrand plot. The solid inclusion complex formation between β-CD and 2,4-DNB was confirmed by 1H NMR, 2D 1H NMR (ROESY), FT-IR, XRD and SEM analysis. A schematic representation of this inclusion process is proposed by molecular docking studies using the patch dock server.

  9. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO2 in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide's point of view.

    PubMed

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A; Krisher, Cullen S; Lambrecht, Daniel S; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-01

    The CO2ν3 asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO2 is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C4C1im][X], where [X](-) is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF6 (-)), tetrafluoroborate (BF4 (-)), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf2N(-)), triflate (TfO(-)), trifluoroacetate (TFA(-)), dicyanamide (DCA(-)), and thiocyanate (SCN(-))). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν3 center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO2 and from CO2 to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO2, which in turn changes the ν3 frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν2 and ν3 normal modes of CO2. Thermal fluctuations in the ν2 population stochastically modulate the ν3 frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO2. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO2 are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations. PMID:26049445

  10. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO2 in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide's point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J.; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A.; Krisher, Cullen S.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-01

    The CO2ν3 asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO2 is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C4C1im][X], where [X]- is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF 6- ), tetrafluoroborate (BF 4- ), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf2N-), triflate (TfO-), trifluoroacetate (TFA-), dicyanamide (DCA-), and thiocyanate (SCN-)). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν3 center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO2 and from CO2 to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO2, which in turn changes the ν3 frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν2 and ν3 normal modes of CO2. Thermal fluctuations in the ν2 population stochastically modulate the ν3 frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO2. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO2 are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  11. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO{sub 2} in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide’s point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J.; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A.; Krisher, Cullen S.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-07

    The CO{sub 2}ν{sub 3} asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO{sub 2} is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C{sub 4}C{sub 1}im][X], where [X]{sup −} is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF{sub 6}{sup −}), tetrafluoroborate (BF{sub 4}{sup −}), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf{sub 2}N{sup −}), triflate (TfO{sup −}), trifluoroacetate (TFA{sup −}), dicyanamide (DCA{sup −}), and thiocyanate (SCN{sup −})). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν{sub 3} center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO{sub 2} and from CO{sub 2} to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO{sub 2}, which in turn changes the ν{sub 3} frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν{sub 2} and ν{sub 3} normal modes of CO{sub 2}. Thermal fluctuations in the ν{sub 2} population stochastically modulate the ν{sub 3} frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO{sub 2}. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO{sub 2} are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  12. Unveiling nanometric plasmons optical properties with advanced electron spectroscopy in the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kociak, Mathieu

    Since the pioneering work of Yamamoto, the use of electron spectroscopy such as Cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) in a Scanning (Transmission) Electron Microscope (STEM) has considerably helped improving our understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles. The resemblance of spectroscopic signals from electron and pure optical techniques leads to the intuition that both types of techniques are very close, an idea theoretically discussed by F.J. Garcia de Abajo and coworkers. However, it is also quite intuitive that CL and EELS should be different. For example, EELS helps detecting any sort of modes while CL can only detect radiative ones. On the other hand, even between optical spectroscopy techniques, clear differences such as energy shifts or spectral shapes changes are expected in the case of plasmons. The lack of adapted instrumentation capable of performing combined EELS and CL, as well as theoretical developments allowing to account for the generic difference between EELS and CL and their optical counterparts impeached a comprehensive understanding of plasmons physics with the otherwise amazing electron spectroscopies. In this talk, I will present recent experimental results showing combined EELS and CL spectral mapping of plasmonic properties for nanoparticles with several shapes (triangles, cubes, stars...) and composition (gold, silver, aluminum...). Helped with different theoretical tools, I will try to show how these results can be related to their optical counterparts (extinction, scattering), and what type of physical insights can be gained from these combined measurements. Finally, if time allows, pointing the weaknesses of state-of-the-art CL and EELS (in terms of spectral range and/or spectral resolution), I will present EELS results obtained on highly monochromated electron beams that could cope with these limitations

  13. An unambiguous identification of 2D electron gas features in the photoluminescence spectrum of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Sharma, T. K.

    2016-07-01

    A fast and non-destructive method for probing the true signatures of 2D electron gas (2DEG) states in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is presented. Two broad features superimposed with interference oscillations are observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The two features are identified as the ground and excited 2DEG states which are confirmed by comparing the PL spectra of as-grown and top barrier layer etched samples. Broad PL features disappear at a certain temperature along with the associated interference oscillations. Furthermore, the two broad PL features depicts specific temperature and excitation intensity dependencies which make them easily distinguishable from the bandedge excitonic or defect related PL features. The presence of strong interference oscillations associated with the 2DEG PL features is explained by considering the localized generation of PL signal at the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Finally, a large value of the polarization induced electric field of ~1.01 MV cm‑1 is reported from PL measurements for AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures. It became possible only when the true identification of 2DEG features was made possible by the proposed method.

  14. Acentric 2-D Ensembles of D-br-A Electron-Transfer Chromophores via Vectorial Orientation within Amphiphilic n-Helix Bundle Peptides for Photovoltaic Device Applications

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jaseung; Park, Jaehong; Tronin, Andrey; Zhang, Ruili; Krishnan, Venkata; Strzalka, Joseph; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Fry, H. Christopher; Therien, Michael J.; Blasie, J. Kent

    2012-01-01

    We show that simply designed amphiphilic 4-helix bundle peptides can be utilized to vectorially-orient a linearly-extended Donor-bridge-Acceptor (D-br-A) electron transfer (ET) chromophore within its core. The bundle’s interior is shown to provide a unique solvation environment for the D-br-A assembly not accessible in conventional solvents, and thereby control the magnitudes of both light-induced ET and thermal charge recombination rate constants. The amphiphilicity of the bundle’s exterior was employed to vectorially-orient the peptide-chromophore complex at a liquid-gas interface, and its ends tailored for subsequent covalent attachment to an inorganic surface, via a “directed assembly” approach. Structural data, combined with evaluation of the excited state dynamics exhibited by these peptide-chromophore complexes, demonstrates that densely-packed, acentrically ordered 2-D monolayer ensembles of such complexes at high in-plane chromophore densities approaching 1/200Å2 offer unique potential as active layers in binary heterojucntion photovoltaic devices. PMID:22242787

  15. Uranium trioxide behavior during electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2015-03-01

    A sample of uranium trioxide (UO3) was produced by focused ion beam (~10 μm×~10 μm×<0.5 μm) for transmission electron and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy examinations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The EEL spectra were recorded as a function of the thickness for the P and O edges in the low energy range 0-350 eV and were compared to spectra of UO3 small grains attached to a TEM grid. The EEL spectrum was studied through a range of thicknesses going from ~60 to ~260 nm. The EEL spectra recorded for UO3 are compared with those recorded for UO2. The reduction of UO3 into U4O9 and/or UO2 is readily observed apparently during the TEM investigations and as confirmed by electron diffraction (eD). This redox effect is similar to that known for other redox sensitive oxides. Recommendations are suggested to avoid sample decomposition.

  16. Atomic Physics with Accelerators: Projectile Electron Spectroscopy (APAPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Laoutaris, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.; Mertzimekis, T.; Andrianis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Benis, E. P.; Sulik, B.; Valastyán, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The new research initiative APAPES (http://apapes.physics.uoc.gr/) has already established a new experimental station with a beam line dedicated for atomic collisions physics research, at the 5 MV TANDEM accelerator of the National Research Centre "Demokritos" in Athens, Greece. A complete zero-degree Auger projectile spectroscopy (ZAPS) apparatus has been put together to perform high resolution studies of electrons emitted in ion-atom collisions. A single stage hemispherical spectrometer with a 2-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) combined with a doubly-differentially pumped gas target will be used to perform a systematic isoelectronic investigation of K-Auger spectra emitted from collisions of preexcited and ground state He-like ions with gas targets using novel techniques. Our intention is to provide a more thorough understanding of cascade feeding of the 1s2s2p 4P metastable states produced by electron capture in collisions of He-like ions with gas targets and further elucidate their role in the non-statistical production of excited three-electron 1s2s2p states by electron capture, recently a field of conflicting interpretations awaiting further resolution. At the moment, the apparatus is being completed and the spectrometer will soon be fully operational. Here we present the project progress and the recent high resolution spectrum obtained in collisions of 12 MeV C4+ on a Neon gas target.

  17. Nanogap structures: combining enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electronic transport.

    PubMed

    Natelson, Douglas; Li, Yajing; Herzog, Joseph B

    2013-04-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an experimental tool for accessing vibrational and chemical information, down to the single molecule level. SERS typically relies on plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures to concentrate the incident radiation and to provide an enhanced photon density of states to couple emitted radiation to the far field. Many common SERS platforms involve metal nanoparticles to generate the required electromagnetic enhancements. Here we concentrate on an alternative approach, in which the relevant plasmon excitations are supported at a truly nanoscale gap between extended electrodes, rather than discrete subwavelength nanoparticles. The ability to fabricate precise gaps on demand, and in some cases to tune the gap size in situ, combined with the additional capability of simultaneous electronic transport measurements of the nanogap, provides access to information not previously available in standard SERS. We summarize the rich plasmonic physics at work in these extended systems and highlight the recent state of the art including tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and the application of mechanical break junctions and electromigrated junctions. We describe in detail how we have performed in situ gap-enhanced Raman measurements of molecular-scale junctions while simultaneously subjecting these structures to electronic transport. These extended electrode structures allow us to study the pumping of vibrational modes by the flow of tunneling electrons, as well as the shifting of vibrational energies due to the applied bias. These experiments extend SERS into a tool for examining fundamental processes of dissipation, and provide insight into the mechanisms behind SERS spectral diffusion. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions. PMID:23385304

  18. Oxygen diffusion from anodic surface oxide films on titanium subhydride studies by auger electron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. S.; Wittberg, T. N.; Wolf, J. D.; Keil, R. G.

    TiH sub x (0.5 less than x less than 1.7) samples were prepared from titanium foil in order to study the diffusion of oxygen in the titanium subhydride. An anodic oxide, 1000A thick, was grown on the titanium subhydride foils in an agueous saturated solution of ammonium tetraborate. These anodized samples were then heat treated at temperatures between 500 and 600(0)C and changes in the profile of oxygen concentration as a function of depth were monitored using auger electron spectroscopy. From this data then it was possible to calculate the diffusivity of oxygen in the titanium subhydride. It was also found that electron energy loss spectroscopy could be used to determine the titanium subhydride stoichiometry in the near-surface region. This was done by measuring the energy of the bulk plasmon loss peak, which for TiH sub x, varies linearly with hydrogen content. The amount of dehydriding which occurred following a given heat treatment could be determined from profiles of the plasmon loss energy as a function of depth. A sample of anodized TiH0 87 was studied in some detail. Significant dehydriding of this sample for heat treatment times of less than one hour only occured at temperatures above 550(0)C.

  19. A Laser Absorption Spectroscopy System for 2D Mapping of CO2 Over Large Spatial Areas for Monitoring, Reporting and Verification of Ground Carbon Storage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, J. T.; Braun, M.; Blume, N.; McGregor, D.; Zaccheo, T. S.; Pernini, T.; Botos, C.

    2014-12-01

    We will present the development of the Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE). GreenLITE consists of two laser based transceivers and a number of retro-reflectors to measure differential transmission (DT) of a number of overlapping chords in a plane over the site being monitored. The transceivers use the Intensity Modulated Continuous Wave (IM-CW) approach, which is a technique that allows simultaneous transmission/reception of multiple fixed wavelength lasers and a lock-in, or matched filter, to measure amplitude and phase of the different wavelengths in the digital domain. The technique was developed by Exelis and has been evaluated using an airborne demonstrator for the past 10 years by NASA Langley Research Center. The method has demonstrated high accuracy and high precision measurements as compared to an in situ monitor tracable to WMO standards, agreeing to 0.65 ppm +/-1.7 ppm. The GreenLITE system is coupled to a cloud-based data storage and processing system that takes the measured chord data, along with auxiliary data to retrieve an average CO2 concentration per chord and which combines the chords to provide an estimate of the spatial distribution of CO2 concentration in the plane. A web-based interface allows users to view real-time CO2 concentrations and 2D concentration maps of the area being monitored. The 2D maps can be differenced as a function of time for an estimate of the flux across the plane measured by the system. The system is designed to operate autonomously from semi-remote locations with a very low maintenance cycle. Initial instrument tests, conducted in June, showed signal to noise in the measured ratio of >3000 for 10 s averages. Additional local field testing and a quantifiable field testing at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) site in Bozeman, MT are planned for this fall. We will present details on the instrument and software tools that have been developed, along with results from the local

  20. Investigation of solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film on LiCoO2 cathode in fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-containing electrolyte by 2D correlation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonju; Shin, Su Hyun; Hwang, Hoon; Lee, Sung Man; Kim, Sung Phil; Choi, Hyun Chul; Jung, Young Mee

    2014-07-01

    The effects of fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) on the electrochemical performance of the LiCoO2 cathode were investigated by galvanostatic charge-discharge testing and cyclic voltammetry (CV). It was found that FEC has a positive effect on cycling stability and also improves cell performance. We also studied solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film on the LiCoO2 cathode, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and 2D correlation spectroscopy. The 2D correlation XPS spectra showed that, initially, the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) binder and electrolyte components are decomposed, after which SEI components are formed on the LiCoO2 cathode surface. In the FEC-containing electrolyte, the polycarbonate components are more abundant than in the FEC-free electrolyte. The formed carbonates in SEI film can act as Li+-conducting materials in reducing the electrode/electrolyte interfacial impedance. This hypothesis is supported by the results of an electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS) analysis.

  1. Femtosecond Hydrogen Bond Dynamics of Bulk-like and Bound Water at Positively and Negatively Charged Lipid Interfaces Revealed by 2D HD-VSFG Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Chandra; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-08-26

    Interfacial water in the vicinity of lipids plays an important role in many biological processes, such as drug delivery, ion transportation, and lipid fusion. Hence, molecular-level elucidation of the properties of water at lipid interfaces is of the utmost importance. We report the two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) study of the OH stretch of HOD at charged lipid interfaces, which shows that the hydrogen bond dynamics of interfacial water differ drastically, depending on the lipids. The data indicate that the spectral diffusion of the OH stretch at a positively charged lipid interface is dominated by the ultrafast (<∼100 fs) component, followed by the minor sub-picosecond slow dynamics, while the dynamics at a negatively charged lipid interface exhibit sub-picosecond dynamics almost exclusively, implying that fast hydrogen bond fluctuation is prohibited. These results reveal that the ultrafast hydrogen bond dynamics at the positively charged lipid-water interface are attributable to the bulk-like property of interfacial water, whereas the slow dynamics at the negatively charged lipid interface are due to bound water, which is hydrogen-bonded to the hydrophilic head group. PMID:27482947

  2. Spatially 2D-selective RF excitations using the PROPELLER trajectory: basic principles and application to MR spectroscopy of irregularly shaped single voxel.

    PubMed

    Busch, Martin G; Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    Spatially two-dimensional selective radio frequency (2DRF) excitations are able to excite arbitrarily-shaped profiles in their excitation plane and, hence, can be used to minimize partial volume effects in single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In this study, 2DRF excitations based on the PROPELLER trajectory which consists of blades of parallel lines that are rotated against each other, are presented. Because the k-space center is covered with each segment, the trajectory yields a high signal efficiency which, e.g., is considerably improved compared to a segmented blipped-planar approach. It is shown that a sampling density correction based on the PROPELLER trajectory's Voronoi diagram suppresses unwanted side excitations. Off-resonance effects like chemical-shift displacement artifacts, can be minimized by applying nonselective refocusing radio frequency pulses between the lines of a blade. With half-Fourier segments, the 2DRF's echo time contribution can be shortened considerably. Thus, robust 2DRF excitations capable of exciting high-resolution profiles at short echo times with high signal efficiency are obtained. Their applicability to MR spectroscopy of an arbitrarily-shaped single voxel is demonstrated in a two-bottle phantom and in the human brain in vivo on a 3 T whole-body MR system. PMID:21465546

  3. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface-preparation contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, D.; Stephens, R. M.; Outlaw, R. A.; Hopson, P.

    1990-01-01

    There are many cleaning techniques that are presently being employed for surface preparation of materials that are subsequently exposed to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Unfortunately, there are virtually no comparative measurements which establish the residual contaminant level of each method. In this report, eleven different cleaning methods, ranging from only detergent cleaning to electrochemical polishing, were applied to identical samples of 347 stainless steel. Two surface conditions, a standard machined surface and a mechanically polished surface, were studied. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) within a UHV environment was then used to detect the types of contaminants and the magnitudes found on the sample surfaces. It was found that the electrochemical polishing gave the least contaminated surface of all metals studied and that mechanically polished surfaces were significantly cleaner than the as-machined surfaces for any given cleaning method. Furthermore, it was also found that the residual contaminations left by methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, and freon finishing rinses are almost the same.

  4. Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher L.; Oliver, Frederick W.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Meteorites provide a wealth of information about the solar system's formation, since they have similar building blocks as the Earth's crust but have been virtually unaltered since their formation. Some stony meteorites contain minerals and silicate inclusions, called chondrules, in the matrix. Utilizing Moessbauer spectroscopy, we identified minerals in the Murchison meteorite, a carbonaceous chondritic meteorite, by the gamma ray resonance lines observed. Absorption patterns of the spectra were found due to the minerals olivine and phyllosilicate. We used a scanning electron microscope to describe the structure of the chondrules in the Murchison meteorite. The chondrules were found to be deformed due to weathering of the meteorite. Diameters varied in size from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Further enhancement of the microscopic imagery using a digital image processor was used to describe the physical characteristics of the inclusions.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of fluoropolymer conformal coatings on electronic boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodošek, Mirjana; Perše, Lidija Slemenik; Mihelčič, Mohor; Koželj, Matjaž; Orel, Boris; Bengű, Başak; Sunetci, Onder; Pori, Pauli; Vuk, Angela Šurca

    2014-09-01

    Fluoropolymer conformal coatings were applied to electronic boards (EBs) and cured at room temperature or 80°C. The coatings were first deposited on model substrate, i.e. aluminium alloy AA 2024 and tested for their anticorrosion properties with a potentiodynamic polarisation technique. The cathodic current densities ranged from 10-9-10-10 A/cm2, approaching the lower current limit after the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles into the formulation. Application of fluoropolymer-based formulation was performed via spray-coating deposition. Examination of the coverage of EBs under UV light, which is commonly used in industry, revealed that some components might not be entirely covered. In the search for other possible analytical tools of coverage with protective coatings, optical microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy were investigated.

  6. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface-preparation contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; Stephens, R. M.; Outlaw, R. A.; Hopson, P.

    1990-02-01

    There are many cleaning techniques that are presently being employed for surface preparation of materials that are subsequently exposed to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Unfortunately, there are virtually no comparative measurements which establish the residual contaminant level of each method. In this report, eleven different cleaning methods, ranging from only detergent cleaning to electrochemical polishing, were applied to identical samples of 347 stainless steel. Two surface conditions, a standard machined surface and a mechanically polished surface, were studied. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) within a UHV environment was then used to detect the types of contaminants and the magnitudes found on the sample surfaces. It was found that the electrochemical polishing gave the least contaminated surface of all metals studied and that mechanically polished surfaces were significantly cleaner than the as-machined surfaces for any given cleaning method. Furthermore, it was also found that the residual contaminations left by methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, and freon finishing rinses are almost the same.

  7. Tracking conformational dynamics of polypeptides by non-linear electronic spectroscopy of aromatic residues: a first principles simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Beccara, Silvio a; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The ability of non-linear electronic spectroscopy to track folding/unfolding processes of proteins in solution by monitoring aromatic interactions is investigated by first-principle simulations of two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of a model peptide. A dominant reaction pathway approach is employed to determine the unfolding pathway of a tetrapeptide, connecting the initial folded configuration with stacked aromatic side chains and the final unfolded state with distant non-interacting aromatic residues. π-stacking and excitonic coupling effects are included via ab-initio simulations based on multiconfigurational methods within a hybrid QM/MM scheme. We show that linear absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet (UV) is unable to resolve the unstacking dynamics characterized by the three-step process: T-shaped→twisted offset stacking→unstacking. Conversely, pump-probe spectroscopy can be used to resolve aromatic interactions by probing in the visible (Vis) the excited state absorptions (ESA) that involve charge transfer (CT) states. 2DUV spectroscopy offers the highest sensitivity to the unfolding process, providing the disentanglement of ESA signals belonging to different aromatic chromophores and high correlation between the conformational dynamics and the quartic splitting. PMID:25145908

  8. Effects of Pauli, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on electronic states in 2D circular hydrogenic anti-dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuali, Z.; Golshan, M. M.; Davatolhagh, S.

    2016-09-01

    The present work is concerned with a report on the effects of Pauli, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) on the energy levels of a 2D circular hydrogenic quantum anti-dot(QAD). To pursue this aim, we first present a brief review on the analytical solutions to the Schrödinger equation of electronic states in a quantum anti-dot when a hydrogenic donor is placed at the center, revealing the degeneracies involved in the ground, first and second excited states. We then proceed by adding the aforementioned spin-orbit interactions to the Hamiltonian and treat them as perturbation, thereby, calculating the energy shifts to the first three states. As we show, the Rashba spin-orbit interaction gives rise to a shift in the energies of the ground and second excited states, while it partially lifts the degeneracy of the first excited state. Our calculations also indicate that the Dresselhaus effect, while keeping the degeneracy of the ground and second excited states intact, removes the degeneracy of the first excited state in the opposite sense. The Pauli spin-orbit interaction, on the other hand, is diagonal in the appropriate bases, and thus its effect is readily calculated. The results show that degeneracy of ℓ = 0 (prevailing in the ground and second excited state) remains but the degeneracy of ℓ = 1 (prevailing in the first excited state) is again partially lifted. Moreover, we present the energy corrections due to the three spin-orbit interactions as functions of anti-dot's radius, Rashba and Dresselhaus strengths discussing how they affect the corresponding states. The material presented in the article conceives the possibility of generating spin currents in the hydrogenic circular anti-dots.

  9. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 1: Slant-columns and their ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremme, W.; Krueger, A.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2012-02-01

    The composition and emission rates of volcanic gas plumes provide insight of the geologic internal activity, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol formation and radiative processes around it. Observations are necessary for public security and the aviation industry. Ground-based thermal emission infrared spectroscopy, which uses the radiation of the volcanic gas itself, allows for continuously monitoring during day and night from a safe distance. We present measurements on Popocatépetl volcano based on thermal emission spectroscopy during different campaigns between 2006-2009 using a Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS). The experimental set-up, measurement geometries and analytical algorithms are described. The equipment was operated from a safe distance of 12 km from the volcano at two different spectral resolutions: 0.5 and 4 cm-1. The 2-dimensional scanning capability of the instrument allows for an on-line visualization of the volcanic SO2 plume and its animation. SiF4 was also identified in the infrared spectra recorded at both resolutions. The SiF4/SO2 molecular ratio can be calculated from each image and used as a highly useful parameter to follow changes in volcanic activity. A small Vulcanian eruption was monitored during the night of 16 to 17 November 2008 and strong ash emission together with a pronounced SO2 cloud was registered around 01:00 a.m. LST (Local Standard Time). Enhanced SiF4/SO2 ratios were observed before and after the eruption. A validation of the results from thermal emission measurements with those from absorption spectra of the moon taken at the same time, as well as an error analysis, are presented. The inferred propagation speed from sequential images is used in a subsequent paper (Part 2) to calculate the emission rates at different distances from the crater.

  10. Electron spectroscopy studies of strongly correlated vanadium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Sung-Kwan

    The electronic structure of strongly correlated vanadium compounds has been investigated using electron spectroscopy as the main experimental tool. The underlying theme of the thesis is to examine exotic ground states and phase transitions which result from the competition between localized and delocalized characters of 3d electrons, the interactions among different degrees of freedom, and the effect of confining geometries such as low-dimensionality and geometrical frustration. (V1-xMx) 2O3 (M=Cr, Ti) is a paradigm Mott-Hubbard (MH) metal-insulator transition system. High-photon-energy bulk-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy (PES) shows a prominent quasi-particle (QP) peak at the Fermi energy ( EF) in the paramagnetic metal phase. The peak is in a good general agreement with theoretical predictions from the local density approximation of band theory combined with dynamical mean-field theory (LDA+DMFT). This is the first observation of such a QP peak after continuing efforts for more than 20 years. The observation was enabled by using a new bulk-sensitive PES technique. PES spectra of the PI Phase (V0.972Cr0.028 )2O3, taken at unusually high temperatures ( T) up to 800 K, show that with increasing T the MH gap is filled by a transfer of incoherent spectral weight from the high binding energy region, in qualitative agreement with high-T LDA+DMFT calculations. This reveals an important yet often-ignored aspect of the Mott insulator in contrast to the behavior of a band insulator, where increasing T creates electron-hole excitations across a rigid gap. Angle-resolved PES (ARPES) spectra of quasi-one-dimensional beta'-Cu xV2O5 (x = 0.33 - 0.65) and BaVS3 in the metallic phase show dispersing bands along, but not perpendicular to the chain direction. No distinct Fermi edge is observed even in the metallic phase spectra of either material. For beta'-Cu xV2O5 we infer that electrons are distributed in a 1:2 ratio into two of the three species of vanadium oxide chains

  11. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimberg, Victor; Rohringer, Nina

    2016-05-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear, and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules, and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator setup to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, which uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, which serves as a seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limited spectral coherence of the XFEL radiation defines the energy resolution in this process and stimulated RIXS spectra of high resolution can be obtained by covariance analysis of the transmitted spectra. We present a detailed feasibility study and predict signal strengths for realistic XFEL parameters for the CO molecule resonantly pumped at the [Formula: see text] transition. Our theoretical model describes the evolution of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the transmitted x-ray radiation, by solving the equation of motion for the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the system self consistently with the propagation by Maxwell equations. PMID:26958585

  12. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimberg, Victor; Rohringer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear, and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules, and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator setup to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, which uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, which serves as a seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limited spectral coherence of the XFEL radiation defines the energy resolution in this process and stimulated RIXS spectra of high resolution can be obtained by covariance analysis of the transmitted spectra. We present a detailed feasibility study and predict signal strengths for realistic XFEL parameters for the CO molecule resonantly pumped at the O1s→π* transition. Our theoretical model describes the evolution of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the transmitted x-ray radiation, by solving the equation of motion for the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the system self consistently with the propagation by Maxwell equations. PMID:26958585

  13. Electronic structure of Fe-based amorphous alloys studied using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. J.; Gu, X. J.; Poon, S. J.; Shiflet, G. J.

    2008-01-01

    The local atomic electronic structures of Fe-Mo-C-B metallic glasses are investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The fracture behavior of this Fe-based amorphous alloy system undergoes the transition from being ductile to exhibiting brittleness when alloyed with Cr or Er atoms. In addition, the glass-forming ability is also enhanced. This plastic-to-brittle transition is suggested to correlate with the change of local atomic short-range order or bonding configurations. Therefore, the bonding configuration of Fe-Mo-C-B-Er(Cr) amorphous alloys is investigated by studying the electronic structure of Fe and C atoms using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. It is shown that the normalized EELS white line intensities of Fe-L2,3 edges decrease slightly with an increasing amount of Er additions, while no noticeable difference is obtained with Cr additions. As for the C K edge, a prominent change of edge shape is observed for both alloy systems, where the first peak corresponding to a 1s→1π* transition increases with increasing Er and Cr additions. Accordingly, it is concluded that changes in the local atomic and electronic structure occur around Fe and C atoms when Er and Cr are introduced into the alloys. Furthermore, it is pointed out that the formation of Er-C and Cr-C carbide like local order inferred from the observed C K edge spectra can provide a plausible explanation for the plastic-to-brittle transition observed in these Fe-based amorphous alloys. In spite of the complexity of electronic and atomic structure in this multicomponent Fe-based metallic glass system, this study could serve as a starting point for providing a qualitative interpretation between electronic structure and plasticity in the Fe-Mo-C-B amorphous alloy system. Complimentary techniques, such as x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscope are also employed, providing a more complete structural characterization.

  14. Optoelectronics of supported and suspended 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotin, Kirill

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional semiconductors, materials such monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are characterized by strong spin-orbit and electron-electron interactions. However, both electronic and optoelectronic properties of these materials are dominated by disorder-related scattering. In this talk, we investigate approaches to reduce scattering and explore physical phenomena arising in intrinsic 2D semiconductors. First, we discuss fabrication of pristine suspended monolayer MoS2 and use photocurrent spectroscopy measurements to study excitons in this material. We observe band-edge and van Hove singularity excitons and estimate their binding energies. Furthermore, we study dissociation of these excitons and uncover the mechanism of their contribution to photoresponse of MoS2. Second, we study strain-induced modification of bandstructures of 2D semiconductors. With increasing strain, we find large and controllable band gap reduction of both single- and bi-layer MoS2. We also detect experimental signatures consistent with strain-induced transition from direct to indirect band gap in monolayer MoS2. Finally, we fabricate heterostructures of dissimilar 2D semiconductors and study their photoresponse. For closely spaced 2D semiconductors we detect charge transfer, while for separation larger than 10nm we observe Forster-like energy transfer between excitations in different layers.

  15. Electronic spectroscopy of ytterbium in a neon matrix.

    PubMed

    Lambo, R; Buchachenko, A A; Wu, L; Tan, Y; Wang, J; Sun, Y R; Liu, A-W; Hu, S-M

    2012-11-28

    The low-lying electronic states of Yb isolated in a solid Ne matrix are characterized through absorption and emission spectroscopy. The absorption spectra of matrix isolated Yb while pumped into its triplet states have been recorded for the first time and the 6s6p (3)P(J) → 5d6s (3)D(1, 2) transition frequencies obtained. Under matrix conditions, the structure of these states is found to be qualitatively the same as in the free atom, but the intersystem crossing rate is observed to be several orders of magnitude greater. A proposed explanation for this is curve crossings between the bound potential energy surface correlated to the 6s6p (1)P(1) state and the potential energy surfaces correlated to the 5d6s (3)D(1, 2) states in isolation. The potentials of the Yb·Ne dimer in its lowest electronic states are computed ab initio and used in a pairwise cluster model to explicitly demonstrate these curve crossings. PMID:23206011

  16. Hydrogen bonding induced distortion of CO3 units and kinetic stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate: results from 2D (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Kaseman, Derrick C; Colas, Bruno; Jacob, Dorrit E; Clark, Simon M

    2016-07-27

    Systematic correlation in alkaline-earth carbonate compounds between the deviation of the CO3 units from the perfect D3h symmetry and their (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters is established. The (13)C NMR CSA parameters of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are measured using two-dimensional (13)C phase adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) NMR spectroscopy and are analyzed on the basis of this correlation. The results indicate a distortion of the CO3 units in ACC in the form of an in-plane displacement of the C atom away from the centroid of the O3 triangle, resulting from hydrogen bonding with the surrounding H2O molecules, without significant out-of-plane displacement. Similar distortion for all C atoms in the structure of ACC suggests a uniform spatial disposition of H2O molecules around the CO3 units forming a hydrogen-bonded amorphous network. This amorphous network is stabilized against crystallization by steric frustration, while additives such as Mg presumably provide further stabilization by increasing the energy of dehydration. PMID:27276013

  17. Intercalation complex of imidazoacridinone C-1311, a potential anticancer drug, with DNA helix d(CGATCG)2: stereostructural studies by 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Tomasz; Czub, Jacek; Sowiński, Paweł; Mazerski, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Imidazoacridinone C-1311 (Symadex®) is a powerful antitumor agent, which successfully made its way through the Phase I clinical trials and has been recommended for Phase II few a years ago. It has been shown experimentally that during the initial stage of its action C-1311 forms a relatively stable intercalation complex with DNA, yet it has shown no base-sequence specificity while binding to DNA. In this paper, the d(CGATCG)2:C-1311 intercalation complex has been studied by means of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, yielding a full assignment of the resonance lines observed in (1)H NMR spectra. The observation of the intermolecular NOE contacts between C-1311 and DNA allowed locating the ligand between the guanine and adenine moieties. Formation of a symmetric complex was pointed out on the basis of the lack of a second set of the (1)H resonances. The resulting stereostructure of the complex was then improved by means of molecular dynamics, using the CHARMM force field and GROMACS software. To this end, distance restraints derived from the NOESY cross-peak volumes were applied to the atomistic model of the d(CGATCG)2:C-1311 complex. Obtained results are in full agreement with biochemical data on the mechanism of action of C-1311, in particular with the previously postulated post-intercalation enzymatic activation of the studied drug. PMID:26211888

  18. Structural studies of an arabinan from the stems of Ephedra sinica by methylation analysis and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Liang, Jun; Yang, Bing-You; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2015-05-01

    Plant arabinan has important biological activity. In this study, a water-soluble arabinan (Mw∼6.15kDa) isolated from the stems of Ephedra sinica was found to consist of (1→5)-Araƒ, (1→3,5)-Araƒ, T-Araƒ, (1→3)-Araƒ and (1→2,5)-Araƒ residues at proportions of 10:2:3:2:1. A tentative structure was proposed by methylation analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT-135, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and ROESY) and literature. The structure proposed includes a branched (1→5)-α-Araf backbone where branching occurs at the O-2 and O-3 positions of the residues with 7.7% and 15.4% of the 1,5-linked α-Araf substituted at the O-2 and O-3 positions. The presence of a branched structure was further observed by atomic force microscopy. This polymer was characterized as having a much longer linear (1→5)-α-Araf backbone as a repeating unit. In particular, the presence of α-Araf→3)-α-Araf-(1→3)-α-Araf-(1→ attached at the O-2 is a new finding. This study may facilitate a deeper understanding of structure-activity relationships of biological polysaccharides from the stems of E. sinica. PMID:25659720

  19. Growth of 2D black phosphorus film from chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joshua B.; Hagaman, Daniel; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorene, a novel 2D material isolated from bulk black phosphorus (BP), is an intrinsic p-type material with a variable bandgap for a variety of applications. However, these applications are limited by the inability to isolate large films of phosphorene. Here we present an in situ chemical vapor deposition type approach that demonstrates progress towards growth of large area 2D BP with average areas >3 μm2 and thicknesses representing samples around four layers and thicker samples with average areas >100 μm2. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have confirmed successful growth of 2D BP from red phosphorus.

  20. Growth of 2D black phosphorus film from chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua B; Hagaman, Daniel; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2016-05-27

    Phosphorene, a novel 2D material isolated from bulk black phosphorus (BP), is an intrinsic p-type material with a variable bandgap for a variety of applications. However, these applications are limited by the inability to isolate large films of phosphorene. Here we present an in situ chemical vapor deposition type approach that demonstrates progress towards growth of large area 2D BP with average areas >3 μm2 and thicknesses representing samples around four layers and thicker samples with average areas >100 μm2. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have confirmed successful growth of 2D BP from red phosphorus. PMID:27087456

  1. Charge-density-wave partial gap opening in quasi-2D KMo 6O 17 purple bronze studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Pantin, V.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    Low dimensional (LD) metallic oxides have been a subject of continuous interest in the last two decades, mainly due to the electronic instabilities that they present at low temperatures. In particular, charge density waves (CDW) instabilities associated with a strong electron-phonon interaction have been found in Molybdenum metallic oxides such as KMo 6O 17 purple bronze. We report an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study from room temperature (RT) to T ˜40 K well below the Peierls transition temperature for this material, with CDW transition temperature TCDW ˜120 K. We have focused on photoemission spectra along ΓM high symmetry direction as well as photoemission measurements were taken as a function of temperature at one representative kF point in the Brillouin zone in order to look for the characteristic gap opening after the phase transition. We found out a pseudogap opening and a decrease in the density of states near the Fermi energy, EF, consistent with the partial removal of the nested portions of the Fermi surface (FS) at temperature below the CDW transition. In order to elucidate possible Fermi liquid (FL) or non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behaviour we have compared the ARPES data with that one reported on quasi-1D K 0.3MoO 3 blue bronze.

  2. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Nitroxide-Labeled Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Paula B.; Puett, David

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly conserved calcium-binding protein consisting of two homologous domains, each of which contains two EF-hands, that is known to bind well over 300 proteins and peptides. In most cases the (Ca2+)4-form of CaM leads to the activation of a key regulatory enzyme or protein in a myriad of biological processes. Using the nitroxide spin-labeling reagent, 3-(2-iodoacetamido)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyl oxyl, bovine brain CaM was modified at 2-3 methionines with retention of activity as judged by the activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the spectral changes upon addition of Ca2+ to the apo-form of spin-labeled protein. A significant loss of spectral intensity, arising primarily from reductions in the heights of the low, intermediate, and high field peaks, accompanied Ca2+ binding. The midpoint of the Ca2+-mediated transition determined by EPR occurred at a higher Ca2+ concentration than that measured with circular dichroic spectroscopy and enzyme activation. Recent data have indicated that the transition from the apo-state of CaM to the fully saturated form, [Ca2+)4-CaM], contains a compact intermediate corresponding to [Ca2+)2-CaM], and the present results suggest that the spin probes are reporting on Ca2+ binding to the last two sites in the N-terminal domain, i.e. for the [Ca2+)2-CaM] → [Ca2+)4-CaM] transition in which the compact structure becomes more extended. EPR of CaM, spin-labeled at methionines, offers a different approach for studying Ca2+-mediated conformational changes and may emerge as a useful technique for monitoring interactions with target proteins. PMID:24718677

  4. Measurement of electronic structure at nanoscale solid-solid interfaces by surface-sensitive electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-Q.; Henrich, Victor E.; Altman, Eric I.

    2008-01-07

    We explore the use of electron spectroscopy that samples the near-surface region of a crystal to study the electronic structure at the buried interfaces between two dissimilar transition-metal oxides. The interface is probed by comparing experimental ultraviolet photoelectron spectra to model spectra and by taking sequential differences between the experimental spectra as one oxide is grown on another. Using (100) Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NiO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CoO interfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy, we show that there is a much higher density of electronic states at the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CoO interface than at the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NiO interface. The origin of this difference is discussed.

  5. Identification of Serine Conformers by Matrix-Isolation IR Spectroscopy Aided by Near-Infrared Laser-Induced Conformational Change, 2D Correlation Analysis, and Quantum Mechanical Anharmonic Computations.

    PubMed

    Najbauer, Eszter E; Bazsó, Gábor; Apóstolo, Rui; Fausto, Rui; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Tarczay, György

    2015-08-20

    The conformers of α-serine were investigated by matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy combined with NIR laser irradiation. This method, aided by 2D correlation analysis, enabled unambiguously grouping the spectral lines to individual conformers. On the basis of comparison of at least nine experimentally observed vibrational transitions of each conformer with empirically scaled (SQM) and anharmonic (GVPT2) computed IR spectra, six conformers were identified. In addition, the presence of at least one more conformer in Ar matrix was proved, and a short-lived conformer with a half-life of (3.7 ± 0.5) × 10(3) s in N2 matrix was generated by NIR irradiation. The analysis of the NIR laser-induced conversions revealed that the excitation of the stretching overtone of both the side chain and the carboxylic OH groups can effectively promote conformational changes, but remarkably different paths were observed for the two kinds of excitations. PMID:26201050

  6. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of the methyl radical isotopomers, CH3, CH2D, CHD2 and CD3: synergy between VUV synchrotron radiation experiments and explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Cunha de Miranda, Bárbara K; Alcaraz, Christian; Elhanine, Mohamed; Noller, Bastian; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo; Garcia, Gustavo A; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Gans, Bérenger; Mendes, Luiz A Vieira; Boyé-Péronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Zabka, Jan; Botschwina, Peter

    2010-04-15

    Threshold photoelectron spectra (TPES) of the isotopomers of the methyl radical (CH(3), CH(2)D, CHD(2), and CD(3)) have been recorded in the 9.5-10.5 eV VUV photon energy range using third generation synchrotron radiation to investigate the vibrational spectroscopy of the corresponding cations at a 7-11 meV resolution. A threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) spectrometer based on velocity map imaging and Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight has been used to simultaneously record the TPES of several radical species produced in a Ar-seeded beam by dc flash-pyrolysis of nitromethane (CH(x)D(y)NO(2), x + y = 3). Vibrational bands belonging to the symmetric stretching and out-of-plane bending modes have been observed and P, Q, and R branches have been identified in the analysis of the rotational profiles. Vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), in conjunction with near-equilibrium potential energy surfaces calculated by the explicitly correlated coupled cluster method CCSD(T*)-F12a, is used to calculate vibrational frequencies for the four radical isotopomers and the corresponding cations. Agreement with data from high-resolution IR spectroscopy is very good and a large number of predictions is made. In particular, the calculated wavenumbers for the out-of-plane bending vibrations, nu(2)(CH(3)(+)) = 1404 cm(-1), nu(4)(CH(2)D(+)) = 1308 cm(-1), nu(4)(CHD(2)(+)) = 1205 cm(-1), and nu(2)(CD(3)(+)) = 1090 cm(-1), should be accurate to ca. 2 cm(-1). Additionally, computed Franck-Condon factors are used to estimate the importance of autoionization relative to direct ionization. The chosen models globally account for the observed transitions, but in contrast to PES spectroscopy, evidence for rotational and vibrational autoionization is found. It is shown that state-selected methyl cations can be produced by TPEPICO spectroscopy for ion-molecule reaction studies, which are very important for the understanding of the planetary ionosphere chemistry. PMID:20218643

  7. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  8. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Kundu, A. K.; Patel, R.; Solanki, G. K.; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ-Z, Γ-Y and Γ-T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ-Z direction, at a binding energy of -0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4pz orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ-T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation-anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV-VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis.

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using a direct current-SQUID magnetometer directly coupled to an electron spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Hiraku; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Zhu, Xiaobo; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate electron spin polarization detection and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using a direct current superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) magnetometer. Our target electron spin ensemble is directly bonded to the dc-SQUID magnetometer that detects electron spin polarization induced by an external magnetic field or EPR in a micrometer-sized area. The minimum distinguishable number of polarized spins and sensing volume of the electron spin polarization detection and the EPR spectroscopy are estimated to be ˜106 and ˜10-10 cm3 (˜0.1 pl), respectively.

  10. Electronic spectroscopy and computational studies of glutathionylco(III)balamin.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Azaria S; Likhtina, Iya V; Znamenskiy, Vasiliy S; Birke, Ronald L

    2012-06-28

    We have studied glutathionylcobalamin (GS-Cbl) by optical spectroscopy and with density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) electronic structure methods of truncated geometric models. We examined the geometric structure of the models by comparison of DFT calculations with recent high-resolution experimental X-ray structure data ( Hannibal, L. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 9921) for GS-Cbl, and we examined the TD-DFT excitation simulations by comparison of the models with measured optical spectra. The calculations employed the B3LYP hybrid functional and the nonhybrid BP86 functional in both vacuum and water (conductor polarized continuum model (cpcm)) with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. The optimized geometric structure calculations for six truncated models were made by varying the chemical structure, solvent model, and the two DFT functionals. All showed similar geometry. Charge decomposition analysis (CDA) and extended charge decomposition analysis (ECDA), especially with BP86 shows the similar charge transfer nature of the Co-S bond in GS-Cbl and the Co-C bond in CH(3)Cbl. Mayer and Wiberg bond orders illustrate the similar covalent nature of the two bonds. Finally, absolute optical spectral simulation calculations were compared with the experimental UV-visible extinction spectrum and the electronic circular dichroism (ECD) differential extinction spectrum. The BP86 method shows more spectral features, and the best fit was found for a GS-Cbl model with 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole at the BP86/6-311G(d,p) level with a water cpcm solvent model. The excited state transitions were investigated with Martin's natural transition orbitals (NTOs). The BP86 calculations also showed π bonding interactions between Co and the axial S of the GS- ligand in the molecular orbitals (MOs) and NTOs. PMID:22568547

  11. Electron spin resonance scanning probe spectroscopy for ultrasensitive biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jason P; Ryan, Jason T; Shrestha, Pragya R; Liu, Zhanglong; Vaz, Canute; Kim, Ji-Hong; Georgiou, Vasileia; Cheung, Kin P

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy's affinity for detecting paramagnetic free radicals, or spins, has been increasingly employed to examine a large variety of biochemical interactions. Such paramagnetic species are broadly found in nature and can be intrinsic (defects in solid-state materials systems, electron/hole pairs, stable radicals in proteins) or, more often, purposefully introduced into the material of interest (doping/attachment of paramagnetic spin labels to biomolecules of interest). Using ESR to trace the reactionary path of paramagnetic spins or spin-active proxy molecules provides detailed information about the reaction's transient species and the label's local environment. For many biochemical systems, like those involving membrane proteins, synthesizing the necessary quantity of spin-labeled biomolecules (typically 50 pmol to 100 pmol) is quite challenging and often limits the possible biochemical reactions available for investigation. Quite simply, ESR is too insensitive. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach that greatly enhances ESR's sensitivity (>20000× improvement) by developing a near-field, nonresonant, X-band ESR spectrometric method. Sensitivity improvement is confirmed via measurement of 140 amol of the most common nitroxide spin label in a ≈593 fL liquid cell at ambient temperature and pressure. This experimental approach eliminates many of the typical ESR sample restrictions imposed by conventional resonator-based ESR detection and renders the technique feasible for spatially resolved measurements on a wider variety of biochemical samples. Thus, our approach broadens the pool of possible biochemical and structural biology studies, as well as greatly enhances the analytical power of existing ESR applications. PMID:25867553

  12. May Auger electron spectroscopy provide surface structural information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M.; Soria, F.

    1986-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of Auger electron spectroscopy peak energies, lineshapes and heights allows to determine the chemical composition of the surface layer, and in binary (111) semiconductors even the composition of the outermost surface bilayer, if the composition of a standard surface is known. Surface structural information can also be obtained by the interaction of these surfaces with some gases used as markers, when the gas absorption proceeds by an over/underlayer mechanism, as it happens in the initial stages of the interaction of oxygen with differently prepared GaAs(111) surfaces. Thus, we have been able to confirm the structure of the (111) 2 × 2 Ga surface, and to determine the oxygen absorption sites and occupation sequence, by comparison of the experimental intensities with calculations which model the surface structure and absorption sites. This formalism has also been applied to ( overline1overline1overline1) 1 × 1 facetted surfaces, where very different absorption behaviour is seen for surfaces prepared at different ion energies, but annealed at the same temperature.

  13. Compact design for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Wang, Peng; Shen, Xiong; Yan, Tian-Min; Zhang, Yizhu; Liu, Jun

    2016-03-01

    We present a passively phase-stabilized two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) with a compact size, and the ease of implementation and maintenance. Our design relies on a mask beam-splitter with four holes to form non-collinear box geometry, and a homebuilt stacked retroreflector, which introduces the phase-locked pulse sequence, remedying the instability of commonly used translation stages. The minimized size of the setup suppresses the influences of optical path-length fluctuations during measurements, improving the phase stability and precise timing of pulse sequences. In our 2DES, only few conventional optical components are used, which make this sophisticated instrumentation convenient to establish and particularly easy to conduct alignment. In data analysis, the self-referencing spectral interferometry (SRSI) method is first introduced to extract the complex-valued signal from spectral interferometry in 2DES. The alternative algorithm achieves the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and considerable reduction of data acquisition time. The new setup is suitable over a tunable range of spectroscopic wavelength, from ultraviolet (UV) to the near-infrared (NIR) regime, and for ultra-broadband bandwidth, few-cycle laser pulses.

  14. 2003 Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics - July 6-11, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot Bernstein

    2004-09-10

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2003 Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics - July 6-11, 2003 was held at Bates College, Lewiston, Maine, July 6-11, 2003. The Conference was well-attended with 103 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, ''free time'' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  15. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  16. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  17. Diffusive and inelastic scattering in ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy and ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.; Turner, B.R.; Schowalter, L.J.

    1993-07-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) of Au/Si(001) n type was done to study whether elastic scattering in the Au overlayer is dominant. It was found that there is no dependence of the BEEM current on the relative gradient of the Au surface with respect to the Si interface, and this demonstrates that significant elastic scattering must occur in the Au overlayer. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) was also done, and, rather than using the conventional direct-current BEES, alternating-current (ac) BEES was done on Au/Si and also on Au/PtSi/Si(001) n type. The technique of ac BEES was found to give linear threshold for the Schottky barrier, and it also clearly showed the onset of electron-hole pair creation and other inelastic scattering events. The study of device quality PtSi in Au/PtSi/Si(001) yielded an attenuation length of 4 nm for electrons of energy 1 eV above the PtSi Fermi energy. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  19. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  20. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy: A powerful technique for elucidating rovibronic structure in electronic transitions of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Alexander, Ula N.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate the power of high resolution, two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) spectroscopy for observing rovibronic transitions of polyatomic molecules. The technique involves scanning a tunable laser over absorption features in the electronic spectrum while monitoring a segment, in our case 100 cm-1 wide, of the dispersed fluorescence spectrum. 2D-LIF images separate features that overlap in the usual laser induced fluorescence spectrum. The technique is illustrated by application to the S1-S0 transition in fluorobenzene. Images of room temperature samples show that overlap of rotational contours by sequence band structure is minimized with 2D-LIF allowing a much larger range of rotational transitions to be observed and high precision rotational constants to be extracted. A significant advantage of 2D-LIF imaging is that the rotational contours separate into their constituent branches and these can be targeted to determine the three rotational constants individually. The rotational constants determined are an order of magnitude more precise than those extracted from the analysis of the rotational contour and we find the previously determined values to be in error by as much as 5% [G. H. Kirby, Mol. Phys. 19, 289 (1970), 10.1080/00268977000101291]. Comparison with earlier ab initio calculations of the S0 and S1 geometries [I. Pugliesi, N. M. Tonge, and M. C. R. Cockett, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104303 (2008), 10.1063/1.2970092] reveals that the CCSD/6-311G** and RI-CC2/def2-TZVPP levels of theory predict the rotational constants, and hence geometries, with comparable accuracy. Two ground state Fermi resonances were identified by the distinctive patterns that such resonances produce in the images. 2D-LIF imaging is demonstrated to be a sensitive method capable of detecting weak spectral features, particularly those that are otherwise hidden beneath stronger bands. The sensitivity is demonstrated by observation of the three isotopomers of fluorobenzene

  1. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  2. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with amore » theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.« less

  3. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with a theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.

  4. Temporally resolved characterization of shock-heated foam target with Al absorption spectroscopy for fast electron transport study

    SciTech Connect

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N.; Regan, S. P.; Anderson, K.; Betti, R.; Hund, J.; Paguio, R. R.; Saito, K. M.; Stephens, R. B.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Wilks, S. C.

    2012-09-15

    The CH foam plasma produced by a laser-driven shock wave has been characterized by a temporally resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy technique. A 200 mg/cm{sup 3} foam target with Al dopant was developed for this experiment, which used an OMEGA EP [D. D. Meyerhofer et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032010 (2010)] long pulse beam with an energy of 1.2 kJ and 3.5 ns pulselength. The plasma temperatures were inferred with the accuracy of 5 eV from the fits to the measurements using an atomic physics code. The results show that the inferred temperature is sustained at 40-45 eV between 6 and 7 ns and decreases to 25 eV at 8 ns. 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations show a good agreement with the measurements. Application of the shock-heated foam plasma platform toward fast electron transport experiments is discussed.

  5. Directional Auger electron spectroscopy (DAES) and directional elastic peak electron spectroscopy (DEPES) in the investigation of the crystalline structure of surface layers: the Ag/Cu(111) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mróz, S.; Nowicki, M.

    1993-11-01

    Dependence of the Auger signal (directional Auger electron spectroscopy — DAES) and the elastically scattered electron intensity (directional elastic peak electron spectroscopy — DEPES) on the direction of the primary electron beam ( E = 600-1500 eV) was measured using a retarding field analyser (LEED optics) for the Cu(111) face, both clean and covered with silver up to 12 ML. Well-developed maxima of DAES and DEPES signals appear when the primary beam is parallel to one of the close-packed rows of atoms in the sample surface layer, while the angular distribution of the emitted electrons is averaged over the large acceptance angle of the RFA and does not influence appreciably the DAES and DEPES profiles. From the positions of the maxima mentioned above the atomic structure of a few surface layers can be determined. The silver layer was found to be rotated for 60° with respect to the Cu(111) substrate.

  6. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  7. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, F; Lange, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J; Brunger, M J; Neves, R F C; Lopes, M C A; de Oliveira, E M; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Blanco, F; García, G; Lima, M A P; Jones, D B

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range. PMID:26472380

  8. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  9. Oxygen diffusion from anodic surface oxide films on titanium subhydride studied by auger electron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.S.; Wittberg, T.N.; Wolf, J.D.; Keil, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    In the present study, TiH/sub x/ (0.5 < x < 1.7) samples were prepared from titanium foil in order to study the diffusion of oxygen in the titanium subhydride. An anodic oxide, 1000A thick, was grown on the titanium subhydride foils in an aqueous saturated solution of ammonium tetraborate. These anodized samples were then heat treated at temperatures between 500 and 600/sup 0/C and changes in the profile of oxygen concentration as a function of depth were monitored using AES. From this data then it was possible to calculate the diffusivity of oxygen in the titanium subhydride. It was also found that electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) could be used to determine the titanium subhydride stoichiometry in the near-surface region. This was done by measuring the energy of the bulk plasmon loss peak, which for TiH/sub x/, varies linearly with hydrogen content. The amount of dehydriding which had occurred following a given heat treatment could be determined from profiles of the plasmon loss energy as a function of depth. A sample of anodized TiH/sub 0/ /sub 87/ was studied in some detail. Significant dehydriding of this sample for heat treatment times of less than one hour, only occurred at temperatures above 550/sup 0/C. Likewise, oxide dissolution was only significant at temperatures greater than 550/sup 0/C. In general, for the heat treatment parameters which were chosen, the diffusivity of oxygen in TiH/sub 0/ /sub 87/ was about an order of magnitude lower than that for oxygen in titanium.

  10. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  11. Electron beam imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic nanoantenna resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesseur, E. J. R.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoantennas are metal structures that provide strong optical coupling between a nanoscale volume and the far field. This coupling is mediated by surface plasmons, oscillations of the free electrons in the metal. Increasing the control over the resonant plasmonic field distribution opens up a wide range of applications of nanoantennas operating both in receiving and transmitting mode. This thesis presents how the dispersion and confinement of surface plasmons in nanoantennas are resolved and further engineered. Fabrication of nanostructures is done using focused ion beam milling (FIB) in metallic surfaces. We demonstrate that patterning in single-crystal substrates allows us to precisely control the geometry in which plasmons are confined. The nanoscale properties of the resonant plasmonic fields are resolved using a new technique developed in this thesis: angle- and polarization controlled cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging spectroscopy. The use of a tightly focused electron beam allows us to probe the optical antenna properties with deep subwavelength resolution. We show using this technique that nanoantennas consisting of 500-1200 nm long polycrystalline Au nanowires support standing plasmon waves. We directly observe the plasmon wavelengths which we use to derive the dispersion relation of guided nanowire plasmons. A 590-nm-long ridge-shaped nanoantenna was fabricated using FIB milling on a single-crystal Au substrate, demonstrating a level of control over the fabrication impossible with polycrystalline metals. CL experiments show that the ridge supports multiple-order resonances. The confinement of surface plasmons to the ridge is confirmed by boundary-element-method (BEM) calculations. The resonant modes in plasmonic whispering gallery cavities consisting of a FIB-fabricated circular groove are resolved. We find an excellent agreement between boundary element method calculations and the measured CL emission from the ring-shaped cavities. The calculations show

  12. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine–C{sub 60} bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Friedrich; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-11-14

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C{sub 60} (MnPc:C{sub 60}) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C{sub 60}. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C{sub 60} bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C{sub 60} to MnPc thin films.

  13. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine-C60 bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Herzig, Melanie; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Knupfer, Martin; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C60 (MnPc:C60) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C60. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C60 bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C60 to MnPc thin films.

  14. Applications of infrared free electron lasers in picosecond and nonlinear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, W. S.; Benson, S. V.; Madey, J. M. J.; Etemad, S.; Baker, G. L.; Rothberg, L.; Roberson, M.; Austin, R. H.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper we describe two different types of spectroscopic experiments that exploit the characteristics of the infrared FEL, Mark III, for studies of condensed matter: - the spectrum of χ(3)(-3ω; ω, ω, ω) in polyacetylene: an application of the free electron laser in nonlinear optical spectroscopy, and - a dynamical test of Davydov-like solitons in acetanilide using a picosecond free electron laser. These two studies highlight the unique contributions FELs can make to condensed-matter spectroscopy.

  15. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    emergence and switching between domains with different lattice orientations, and the temporal fluctuation of these domains is filmed. These observations pave the way to the control of a large 2D array of skyrmions.

  16. Revealing the electronic structure of the iron pnictides with electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, J. C.; Zhou, W.; Chisholm, M. F.; Prange, M. P.; Sefat, A. S.; McGuire, M. A.; Sales, B. C.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pantelides, S. T.

    2011-03-01

    We report electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) studies of the parent compounds (LnFeAsO, Ln=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd) using scanning transmission electron microscopy. We find that all the studied LnFeAsO present a Fe L-edge fine structure closer to that of metallic iron than iron oxides. We observe a direct correlation between the Fe valence state (obtained from EELS) and TC , i.e. the smaller the calculated Fe valence state, the larger is the TC for that compound. We also find an anomalous crystallographic orientation-dependence of the Ln M45 edge fine structure. In particular, we find difference in the apparent crystal field splitting of Ce and Gd f- bands when the spectra are collected parallel and perpendicular to the c-axis. This research was partially supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-0938330 (JCI, WZ), by ORNL's Shared Research Equipment (SHaRE) User Facility, which is sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy (JCI) and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, U.S. Department of Energy (MC, ASS, MAM, BCS & SJP), DOE grant DE- F002-09ER46554 (MP, STP), and by the McMinn Endowment (STP) at Vanderbilt University.

  17. Difference Between Far-Infrared Photoconductivity Spectroscopy and Absorption Spectroscopy: Theoretical Evidence of the Electron Reservoir Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Tadashi; Fujita, Maho; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiraiwa, Nobuyoshi; Fukuda, Taturo; Koizumi, Hideki; Zhang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    The intriguing difference between far-infrared photoconductivity spectroscopy and absorption spectroscopy in the measurement of the magnetoplasmon frequency in GaAs quantum wells reported by Holland et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 186804 (2004)] remains unexplained to date. This Letter provides a consistent mechanism to solve this puzzle. The mechanism is based on the electron reservoir model for the integer quantum Hall effect in graphene [Phys. Lett. A 376, 616 (2012)]. We predict sharp kinks to appear in the magnetic induction dependence of the magnetoplasmon frequency at very low temperatures such as 14 mK in the same GaAs quantum well sample used by Holland et al..

  18. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  19. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  20. The application of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and electron microprobe analysis to the study of dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Hagni, A.M.; Hagni, R.D. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    Over 500,000 tons of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is generated each year in the US. The mineralogy and characterization of this dust is being studied to determine the phases and relationships of the valuable zinc, the hazardous lead, cadmium, and chromium, and the deleterious chlorine and fluorine. EAF dust averages 15--20% zinc and is therefore a potential source for 100,000 tons of zinc per year. The major mineralogical phases of EAF dust are franklinite (ZnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), magnetite (FeFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), jacobsite (MnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), solid solutions between franklinite-magnetite-jacobsite, and zincite (ZnO). Franklinite, magnetite, and jacobsite solid solutions commonly are cruciform or dendritic crystals in a Ca-Fe-Si matrix and contain up to 5% chromium. Magnetite also occurs as spheres partially oxidized to hematite (Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]) along its octahedral planes. The dust particles are predominantly in the form of spheres and broken spheres, ranging in size from 200 [mu]m to less than 1 [mu]m. Although many spheres are in the size ranges of 40--50 [mu]m and 10--20 [mu]m, most are less than 1 [mu]m in diameter. Automated scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) probed 118 particles in search of chlorine phases. Chlorine-bearing lime (CaO) was identified by that SEM study. In addition, chlorine is present as hydrophylite (CaCl[sub 2]) and sylvite (KCl). Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used to sputter the outer 180[angstrom] layer of the dust particles to search for the possible presence of cotunnite (PbCl[sub 2]) coatings, but none were detected. Minor phases detected include chalcopyrite (CuFeS[sub 2]), sphalerite (ZnS), pyrite (FeS[sub 2]), and coke.

  1. Electronic and optical properties of selected polymers studied by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Tougaard, Sven

    2012-03-01

    We have determined the electronic and optical properties of six polymers: Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyester (PET), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyamide (PA6) for energy losses from 0 to 70 eV by analysis of reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. We found that the surface was easily damaged by the incident electron beam, in particular for energies above 500 eV. The damage results in new peaks in the bandgap region and the polymers become metallic. Great care was exerted to determine experimental conditions under which these effects are minimized. The REELS spectra were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons with the QUASES-XS-REELS software to determine the effective inelastic-scattering cross sections. From these cross sections, we found that the band gaps for PMMA, PE, PVC, PET, PPY, and PA6 are 5.0 eV, 7.5 eV, 7.0 eV, 3.0 eV, 3.5 eV, and 5.1 eV, respectively. Quantitative analysis of the experimental cross sections was carried out by using the QUEELS-ɛ(k,ω)-REELS software to determine the dielectric function and optical properties. This is done by comparing the experimental REELS inelastic electron-scattering cross-section with a simulated cross section in which the only input is Im(-1/ɛ). The dielectric function is expressed as a sum of oscillators and the oscillator parameters are determined. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical cross section is achieved for all polymers. From Im(-1/ɛ), the real and imaginary parts of ɛ (ω), the refractive index, and the extinction coefficient were determined for all polymers in the energy range ћω = 0 to 70 eV. An oscillator is clearly observed for PPY, PET, and PA6 at ˜ 6.7 eV, which corresponds to the π plasmon. This oscillator is not found for PMMA, PE, and PVC. A set of oscillators in the 20-30 eV energy range corresponding to the σ+π plasmon is found for all polymers.

  2. Soft x-ray spectroscopy for probing electronic and chemical states of battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanli, Yang; Ruimin, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The formidable challenge of developing high-performance battery system stems from the complication of battery operations, both mechanically and electronically. In the electrodes and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces, chemical reactions take place with evolving electron states. In addition to the extensive studies of material synthesis, electrochemical, structural, and mechanical properties, soft x-ray spectroscopy provides unique opportunities for revealing the critical electron states in batteries. This review discusses some of the recent soft x-ray spectroscopic results on battery binder, transition-metal based positive electrodes, and the solid-electrolyte-interphase. By virtue of soft x-ray’s sensitivity to electron states, the electronic property, the redox during electrochemical operations, and the chemical species of the interphases could be fingerprinted by soft x-ray spectroscopy. Understanding and innovating battery technologies need a multimodal approach, and soft x-ray spectroscopy is one of the incisive tools to probe the chemical and physical evolutions in batteries.

  3. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  4. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-02-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics.

  5. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics. PMID:26846617

  6. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics. PMID:26846617

  7. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  8. Theoretical studies of electron transfer and optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesner, R. A.

    Progress was made in three areas. First, we have made major strides in developing our PSGVB electronic structure code including high level electron correlation methods needed to treat complex structures like semiconductor clusters. Secondly, we have developed a one-electron pseudopotential model for semiconductor clusters which reproduces the experimental bandgap as a function of cluster size without adjustable parameters. We are currently using the model to calculate absorption spectra as opposed to just the bandgap via a dispersed polaron formalism. Finally, we have developed two novel quantum dynamical methods, one involving surface hopping and the second utilizing Redfield theory. These methods will be applied to calculation of the relaxation of an excited electron in a semiconductor cluster and also to electron transfer through DNA.

  9. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Levine, M.A.; Schneider, M.B.; Scofield, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy: double photoionization from molecular inner-shell orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikosaka, Y.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Nakano, M.; Ito, K.

    2014-04-01

    We have studied double photoionization from molecular inner-shell orbitals and investigated the properties of the resultant double core-hole states in molecules, by multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy with a magnetic bottle electron spectrometer. A brief summary of our previous studies is presented.

  11. Copper/oxide interface formation: a vibrational and electronic investigation by electron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conard, T.; Ghijsen, J.; Vohs, J. M.; Thiry, P. A.; Caudano, R.; Johnson, R. L.

    1992-04-01

    In this study, we deposited copper on a MgO(100) surface at room temperature (using a Knudsen cell) and studied the interface formation using electron spectroscopy. The evolution of the AES peak intensities showed that copper grows on MgO(100) in the Stranski-Krastanov mode. In HREELS experiments, the intensity and the position of the energy loss corresponding to the MgO surface optical phonon at 80.7 meV, both decrease with increasing Cu coverage. These results agree with theoretical spectra simulated from the dielectric theory by considering a Cu 2O overlayer on a semi-infinite MgO crystal substrate at the beginning of the growth. From the HREELS data, both the formation of a homogeneous Cu metallic overlayer or a CuO overlayer on MgO can be ruled out. The synchrotron-radiation (SR) photoemission measurements were performed in the vicinity of the Cu3p3d resonance. The positions of the Cu resonance peaks as a function of Cu coverage on MgO show that at low coverage the difference in energy between the main Cu 3d peak and the resonance peak is close to that found in Cu 2O and at higher coverage close to metallic copper indicating the formation of an interacting phase at the beginning followed by the growth of metallic copper.

  12. The Electron-Phonon Interaction as Studied by Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Lynch

    2004-09-30

    With recent advances in energy and angle resolution, the effects of electron-phonon interactions are manifest in many valence-band photoelectron spectra (PES) for states near the Fermi level in metals.

  13. Temperature-driven disorder-order transitions in 2D copper-intercalated MoO3 revealed using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Bryan W.; Chung, Frank R.; Wang, Mengjing; LaGrange, Thomas; Koski, Kristie J.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate two different classes of disorder-order phase transitions in two-dimensional layered nanomaterial MoO3 intercalated with ˜9-15 atomic percent zero-valent copper using conventional in situ electron diffraction and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Heating to ˜325 °C on a time scale of minutes produces a superlattice consistent with the formation of a charge density wave stabilized by nanometer-scale ordering of the copper intercalant. Unlike conventional purely electronic charge-density-wave states which form, reform, and disappear on picosecond scales as the temperature is changed, once it forms the observed structure in Cu-MoO3 is stable indefinitely over a very large temperature range (30 °C to the decomposition temperature of 450 °C). Nanosecond-scale heating to ˜380-400 °C produced a completely different structure, replacing the disordered as-fabricated Cu-MoO3 with a much more crystallographically ordered metastable state that, according to a precession electron diffraction reconstruction, resembles the original MoO3 lattice apart from an asymmetric distortion that appears to expand parts of the van der Waals gaps to accommodate the copper intercalant. Control experiments in Cu-free material exhibited neither transformation, thus it appears the copper is a necessary part of the phase dynamics. This work shows how the combination of high-density metal atom intercalation and heat treatment over a wide range of time scales can produce nanomaterials of high crystalline quality in unique structural states that cannot be accessed through other methods.

  14. High resolution threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Ajello, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system is provided for determining the stable energy levels of a species ion, of an atomic, molecular, or radical type, by application of ionizing energy of a predetermined level, such as through photoionization. The system adds a trapping gas to the gaseous species to provide a technique for detection of the energy levels. The electrons emitted from ionized species are captured by the trapping gas, only if the electrons have substantially zero kinetic energy. If the electrons have nearly zero energy, they are absorbed by the trapping gas to produce negative ions of the trapping gas that can be detected by a mass spectrometer. The applied energies (i.e. light frequencies) at which large quantities of trapping gas ions are detected, are the stable energy levels of the positive ion of the species. SF6 and CFCl3 have the narrowest acceptance bands, so that when they are used as the trapping gas, they bind electrons only when the electrons have very close to zero kinetic energy.

  15. Innovations in X-ray-induced electron emission spectroscopy (XIEES)

    SciTech Connect

    Pogrebitsky, K. Ju. Sharkov, M. D.

    2010-06-15

    Currently, a pressing need has arisen for controlling the local atomic and electron structure of materials irrespective of their aggregate state. Efficient approaches to the studies of short-range order are based on phenomena accompanied by interference of secondary electrons excited by primary X-ray radiation. The set of such approaches are commonly referred to as the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) methods. In reality, the XAFS methods are based on the use of synchrotron radiation and applied to structural studies in two modes of measurements, transmission analysis and recording of secondary effects. Only two such effects-specifically, the X-ray fluorescence an d X-ray-induced electron emission effect-are commonly discussed. Access to synchrotron accelerators is problematic for most researchers, so a demand is created for designing laboratory systems that make direct access possible. Since the power of laboratory systems is much lower than that of synchrotrons, it is essential to use much more efficient detectors of secondary electrons. In addition, it is of interest to analyze energy characteristics with a high spatial resolution. Channel multipliers and multichannel boards are incapable of providing such a possibility. For this reason, an improved electron detector has been developed to analyze the photoemission effect in an accelerating field.

  16. Observation of conformers with laser electronic spectroscopy in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philis, John G.; Kosmidis, Constantine E.; Tsekeris, Pericles

    1998-07-01

    We discuss the ability and effectiveness of electronic spectroscopy to reveal rotational isomerism by presenting some examples of the S1 implied by S0 electronic spectra of non-rigid molecules. One or two photon electronic spectra have multiple features when the molecule has more than one conformational preference. Torsional bands showing up in the spectrum complicate the assignment of conformers. Hole burning experiments give definite conclusions on the existence of rotational isomerism and an example from the literature is given.

  17. Magnetization detecting electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using a dc-SQUID directly coupled to an electron spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Hiraku; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Zhu, Xiaobo; Munro, William; Nemoto, Kae; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro

    Electron parametric resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely-used tool to characterize materials containing unpaired electrons. In the case of conventional EPR spectrometers, the resonance is detected as a change of microwave transmittance of a cavity. In our method, on the other hand, magnetization of the sample induced by the resonance is detected by a direct current superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) magnetometer, which is bonded to the sample. Here, we report detection of electron spin polarization and EPR spectroscopy using a micrometer-sized dc-SQUID magnetometer. We measure temperature and in-plane magnetic field dependence of spin polarization ratio and it has good agreement to the hyperbolic tangent law. We also successfully demonstrate EPR spectroscopy by applying a continuous microwave signal to the sample with a on-chip microstrip. We estimate the sensing volume and the minimum distinguishable number of electron spins to be ~ 10-10 cm3 (~ 0.1 pl) and ~ 106, respectively. This result paves the way towards realizing highly sensitive EPR spectroscopy in nanometer-sized area. This work was supported by Commissioned Research of NICT and in part by MEXT KAKENHI (Grant No. 15648489 and 15H05869).

  18. Fundamental studies of X-ray and secondary electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulapudi, Satya Prasad

    Microanalysis of submicron particles in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is only possible by using low incident electron beam energies due to smaller interaction volume and suppressed beam induced charging. Such low beam energies must use L- and M-lines rather than the familiar K-lines. The information about the fundamental parameters of X-ray emission and transport at low energies is limited, so the use of L- and M-lines is problematic. The rate of generation of X-rays from an element irradiated at some energy E depends on the product of the ionization cross-section sigma(E) and the fluorescent yield o. Unfortunately neither of these quantities is well established independently, especially outside of the K-series of lines. Therefore the absolute X-ray generation efficiencies (photons/electron) were directly measured and parameterized for a wide range of K, L , and M lines from different elements. It is anticipated that a complete set of such data would be of great value in applications such as spectrum simulation and standardless analysis. Secondary electron spectra have been collected from both pure elements and from compounds examined under conditions approximating those found in a scanning electron microscope. Despite the presence of substantial surface contamination these spectra are found to be reproducible and characteristic of the underlying material. Typically the peak in such spectra is found to be at an energy of about 5 eV, and 50% of the total secondary electron emission falls within the range 0--12 eV. These data may be of value for the design of detectors for scanning microscopy and might have applications for microanalysis.

  19. Orientation-dependent C-60 electronic structures revealed byphotoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Choi, H.J.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L.; Goldoni, A.; Parmigiani, F.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.

    2008-01-17

    We observe, with angle-resolved photoemission, a dramaticchange in the electronic structure of two C60 monolayers, deposited,respectively, on Ag (111) and (100) substrates, and similarly doped withpotassium to half filling of the C60 lowest unoccupied molecular orbital.The Fermi surface symmetry, the bandwidth, and the curvature of thedispersion at gamma point are different. Orient ations of the C60molecules on the two substrates are known to be the main structuraldifference between the two monolayers, and we present new band-structurecalculations for some of these orientations. We conclude thatorientations play a key role in the electronic structure offullerides.

  20. Spin-orbit coupling in tungsten by spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarin, S.; Artamonov, O. M.; Sergeant, A. D.; Kirschner, J.; Morozov, A.; Williams, J. F.

    2004-08-01

    We present experimental results on low-energy spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy of W(100) and W(110). A combination of a coincidence technique with the time-of-flight energy analysis was used to record angular and energy distributions of correlated electron pairs excited by spin-polarized low-energy primary electrons from a single crystal of tungsten. These distributions depend strongly on the polarization and the angle of incidence of the incident electron beam. Experimental data are discussed in terms of the symmetry properties, spin-dependent scattering dynamics, and spin-resolved electronic structure of the sample.