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Sample records for 2d electronic structure

  1. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  2. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  3. Local electronic structures and 2D topological phase transition of ultrathin Sb films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Park, Joonbum; Kim, Jun Sung; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Yeom, Han Woong

    We investigate local electronic structures of ultrathin Sb islands and their edges grown on Bi2Te2Se by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Sb islands of various thickness are grown with atomically well ordered edge structure over the 3 bilayers (BL). On the surfaces and edges of these islands, we clearly resolve edge-localized electronic states by STS measurements, which depend on the thickness. The DFT calculations identify that the strongly localized edge states of 4 and 5 BL films correspond to a quantum spin Hall (QSH) states while the edge states of 3 BL are trivial. Our experimental and theoretical results confirm the 2D topological phase transition of the ultrathin Sb films from trivial to QSH phase. Center for Artificial Low Dimensional Electronic Systems, Institute for Basic Science and Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea.

  4. Correlating Structural and Electronic Degrees of Freedom in 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, I.-Cheng; Zhang, Z.; Seyler, K. L.; Jones, A. M.; Clark, G.; Xiao, D.; Laanait, N.; Xu, X.; Wen, H.

    We have conducted a microscopic study of the interplay between structural and electronic degrees of freedom in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers, multilayers and heterostructures. Using the recently developed full field x-ray reflection interface microscopy with the photoluminescence microscopic probe capability at the Advanced Photon Source, we demonstrated the x-ray reflection imaging of a monolayer 2D material for the first time. The structural variation across an exfoliated WSe2 monolayer is quantified by interlayer spacing relative to the crystal substrate and the smoothness of the layer. This structural information is correlated with the electronic properties of TMDs characterized by the in-situ photoluminescence measurements. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-SC0012509. The use of Advanced Photon Source is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

    2009-09-25

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

  6. SPE-LEEM Studies on the Surface and Electronic Structure of 2-D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun; Jin, Wencan; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Sadowski, Jerzy; Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; van de Zande, Arend; Chenet, Daniel; Dadap, Jerry; Herman, Irving; Sutter, Petter; Hone, James; Osgood, Richard

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we studied the surface and electronic structure of monolayer and few-layer exfoliated MoS2 and WSe2, as well as chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown MoS2, using Spectroscopic Photoemission and Low Energy Electron Microscope (SPE-LEEM). LEEM measurements reveal that, unlike exfoliated MoS2, CVD-grown MoS2 exhibits grain-boundary alterations due to surface strain. However, LEEM and micro-probe low energy electron diffraction show that the quality of CVD-grown MoS2 is comparable to that of exfoliated MoS2. Micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurement on exfoliated MoS2 and WSe2 single-crystals provides direct evidence for the shifting of the valence band maximum from Γ to K, when the layer number is thinned down to one, as predicted by density functional theory. Our measurements of the k-space resolved electronic structure allow for further comparison with other theoretical predictions and with transport measurements. Session I and II

  7. Electronic structure of disordered CuPd alloys by positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Siegel, R.W.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.; Bansil, A.

    1988-01-01

    We report 2D-ACAR experiments and KKR CPA calculations on alpha-phase single-crystal Cu/sub 1-x/Pd/sub x/ in the range x less than or equal to 0.25. The flattening of the Fermi surface near (110) with increasing x predicted by theory is confirmed by our experimental results. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Theoretical predictions on the electronic structure and charge carrier mobility in 2D Phosphorus sheets

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Long, Mengqiu; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Hui; Gao, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure and carrier mobility of four types of phosphorous monolayer sheet (α-P, β-P,γ-P and δ-P) using density functional theory combined with Boltzmann transport method and relaxation time approximation. It is shown that α-P, β-P and γ-P are indirect gap semiconductors, while δ-P is a direct one. All four sheets have ultrahigh carrier mobility and show anisotropy in-plane. The highest mobility value is ~3 × 105 cm2V−1s−1, which is comparable to that of graphene. Because of the huge difference between the hole and electron mobilities, α-P, γ-P and δ-P sheets can be considered as n-type semiconductors, and β-P sheet can be considered as a p-type semiconductor. Our results suggest that phosphorous monolayer sheets can be considered as a new type of two dimensional materials for applications in optoelectronics and nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26035176

  9. Electronic Structure calculations in a 2D SixGe1-x alloy under an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilha, José. Eduardo; Pontes, Renato B.; Seixas, Leandro; da Silva, António J. R.; Fazzio, Adalberto

    2013-03-01

    The recent advances and promises in nanoscience and nanotechnology have been focused on hexagonal materials, mainly on carbon-based nanostructures. Recently, new candidates have been raised, where the greatest efforts are devoted to a new hexagonal and buckled material made of silicon, named Silicene. This new material presents an energy gap due to spin-orbit interaction of approximately 1.5 meV, where the measurement of quantum spin Hall effect(QSHE) can be made experimentally. Some investigations also show that the QSHE in 2D low-buckled hexagonal structures of germanium is present. Since the similarities, and at the same time the differences, between Si and Ge, over the years, have motivated a lot of investigations in these materials. In this work we performed systematic investigations on the electronic structure and band topology in both ordered and disordered SixGe1-x alloys monolayer with 2D honeycomb geometry by first-principles calculations. We show that an applied electric field can tune the gap size for both alloys. However, as a function of electric field, the disordered alloy presents a W-shaped behavior, similarly to the pure Si or Ge, whereas for the ordered alloy a V-shaped behavior is observed. This work is supported by CAPES, CNPq and FAPESP.

  10. 2D transition-metal diselenides: phase segregation, electronic structure, and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph

    2016-02-17

    Density-functional theory is used to investigate the phase-segregation behavior of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, which are of current interest as beyond-graphene materials for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. Our focus is on the behavior of W1-x V x Se2 monolayers, whose end members are semiconducting WSe2 and ferromagnetic VSe2. The energetics favors phase segregation, but the spinodal decomposition temperature is rather low, about 420 K. The addition of V leads to a transition from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a metallic ferromagnet, with a ferromagnetic moment of about 1.0 μ B per V atom. The transition is caused by a p-type doping mechanism, which shifts the Fermi level into the valence band. The finite-temperature structure and magnetism of the diselenide systems are discussed in terms of Onsager-type critical fluctuations and Bruggeman effective-medium behavior.

  11. 2D transition-metal diselenides: phase segregation, electronic structure, and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Density-functional theory is used to investigate the phase-segregation behavior of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, which are of current interest as beyond-graphene materials for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. Our focus is on the behavior of W1-x V x Se2 monolayers, whose end members are semiconducting WSe2 and ferromagnetic VSe2. The energetics favors phase segregation, but the spinodal decomposition temperature is rather low, about 420 K. The addition of V leads to a transition from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a metallic ferromagnet, with a ferromagnetic moment of about 1.0 μ B per V atom. The transition is caused by a p-type doping mechanism, which shifts the Fermi level into the valence band. The finite-temperature structure and magnetism of the diselenide systems are discussed in terms of Onsager-type critical fluctuations and Bruggeman effective-medium behavior.

  12. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(100) surface yield a 2D and not a 1D electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, R.; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Golden, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced nanowires do indeed host exotic, 1D (one-dimensional) metallic states. In light of this debate, we report here a thorough study of the electronic properties of high quality nanowires formed at the Au/Ge(100) surface. The high-resolution ARPES data show the low-lying Au-induced electronic states to possess a dispersion relation that depends on two orthogonal directions in k space. Comparison of the E (kx,ky) surface measured using high-resolution ARPES to tight-binding calculations yields hopping parameters in the two different directions that differ by approximately factor of two. Additionally, by pinpointing the Au-induced surface states in the first, second, and third surface Brillouin zones and analyzing their periodicity in k||, the nanowire propagation direction seen clearly in STM can be imported into the ARPES data. We find that the larger of the two hopping parameters corresponds, in fact, to the direction perpendicular to the nanowires (tperp). This proves that the Au-induced electron pockets possess a two-dimensional, closed Fermi surface, and this firmly places the Au/Ge(100) nanowire system outside potential hosts of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. We combine these ARPES data with scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of the spatially resolved electronic structure and find that the spatially straight—wirelike—conduction channels observed up to energies of order one electron volt below the Fermi level do not originate from the Au-induced states seen in the ARPES data. The former are rather more likely to be associated with bulk Ge states that are localized to the subsurface region. Despite our proof of the 2D (two-dimentional) nature of the Au

  13. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  14. SPE-LEEM Studies on the Surface and Electronic Structure of 2-D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po-Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Sadowski, Jerzy; Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; van de Zande, Arend; Chenet, Daniel; Dadap, Jerry; Herman, Irving; Sutter, Peter; Hone, James; Osgood, Richard

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we studied the surface and electronic structure of monolayer and few-layer exfoliated MoS2 and WSe2, as well as chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown MoS2, using Spectroscopic Photoemission and Low Energy Electron Microscope (SPE-LEEM). LEEM measurements reveal that, unlike exfoliated MoS2, CVD-grown MoS2 exhibits grain-boundary alterations due to surface strain. However, LEEM and micro-probe low energy electron diffraction show that the quality of CVD-grown MoS2 is comparable to that of exfoliated MoS2. Micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurement on exfoliated MoS2 and WSe2 single-crystals provides direct evidence for the shifting of the valence band maximum from Γ to K, when the layer number is thinned down to one, as predicted by density functional theory. Our measurements of the k-space resolved electronic structure allow for further comparison with other theoretical predictions and with transport measurements. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG 02-04-ER-46157, research carried out in part at the CFN and NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  15. Can fractional quantum Hall effect be due to the formation of coherent wave structures in a 2D electron gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Babur M.

    2016-05-01

    A microscopic theory of integer and fractional quantum Hall effects is presented here. In quantum density wave representation of charged particles, it is shown that, in a two-dimensional electron gas coherent structures form under the low temperature and high density conditions. With a sufficiently high applied magnetic field, the combined N particle quantum density wave exhibits collective periodic oscillations. As a result the corresponding quantum Hall voltage function shows a step-wise change in multiples of the ratio h/e2. At lower temperatures further subdivisions emerge in the Hall resistance, exhibiting the fractional quantum Hall effect.

  16. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  17. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  18. Electron dynamics and valley relaxation in 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-03-01

    Single layer transition metal dichalcogenides are 2D semiconducting systems with unique electronic band structure. Two-valley energy bands along with strong spin-orbital coupling lead to valley dependent career spin polarization, which is the basis for recently proposed valleytronic applications. Since the durations of valley population provide the time window in which valley specific processes take place, it is an essential parameter for developing valleytronic devices. These systems also exhibit unusually strong many body affects, such as strong exciton and trion binding, due to reduced dielectric screening of Coulomb interactions. But there is not much known about the impact of strong many particle correlations on spin and valley polarization dynamics. Here we report direct measurements of ultrafast valley specific relaxation dynamics in single layer MoS2 and WS2. We found that excitonic many body interactions significantly contribute to the relaxation process. Biexciton formation reveals hole valley spin relaxation time. Our results also suggest initial fast intervalley electron scattering and electron spin relaxation leads to loss of electron valley polarization, which then facilitates hole valley relaxation via excitonic spin exchange interaction.

  19. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  20. THz devices based on 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Huili Grace; Yan, Rusen; Song, Bo; Encomendero, Jimy; Jena, Debdeep

    2015-05-01

    In two-dimensional electron systems with mobility on the order of 1,000 - 10,000 cm2/Vs, the electron scattering time is about 1 ps. For the THz window of 0.3 - 3 THz, the THz photon energy is in the neighborhood of 1 meV, substantially smaller than the optical phonon energy of solids where these 2D electron systems resides. These properties make the 2D electron systems interesting as a platform to realize THz devices. In this paper, I will review 3 approaches investigated in the past few years in my group toward THz devices. The first approach is the conventional high electron mobility transistor based on GaN toward THz amplifiers. The second approach is to employ the tunable intraband absorption in 2D electron systems to realize THz modulators, where I will use graphene as a model material system. The third approach is to exploit plasma wave in these 2D electron systems that can be coupled with a negative differential conductance element for THz amplifiers/sources/detectors.

  1. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  2. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  3. Preparation of 2D crystals of membrane proteins for high-resolution electron crystallography data collection.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Pantelic, Radosav S; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Electron crystallography is a powerful technique for the structure determination of membrane proteins as well as soluble proteins. Sample preparation for 2D membrane protein crystals is a crucial step, as proteins have to be prepared for electron microscopy at close to native conditions. In this review, we discuss the factors of sample preparation that are key to elucidating the atomic structure of membrane proteins using electron crystallography.

  4. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  5. Nonlinear Heat Transfer 2d Structure

    1987-09-01

    DOT-BPMD is a general-purpose, finite-element, heat-transfer program used to predict thermal environments. The code considers linear and nonlinear transient or steady-state heat conduction in two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric representations of structures. Capabilities are provided for modeling anisotropic heterogeneous materials with temperature-dependent thermal properties and time-dependent temperature, heat flux, convection and radiation boundary conditions, together with time-dependent internal heat generation. DOT-BPMD may be used in the evaluation of steady-state geothermal gradients as well as in themore » transient heat conduction analysis of repository and waste package subsystems. Strengths of DOT-BPMD include its ability to account for a wide range of possible boundary conditions, nonlinear material properties, and its efficient equation solution algorithm. Limitations include the lack of a three-dimensional analysis capability, no radiative or convective internal heat transfer, and the need to maintain a constant time-step in each program execution.« less

  6. Engineering the Electronic Structure of 2D WS2 Nanosheets Using Co Incorporation as Cox W(1- x ) S2 for Conspicuously Enhanced Hydrogen Generation.

    PubMed

    Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Liu, Kaili; Xu, Kai; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhan, Xueying; Jiang, Chao; He, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), as one of potential electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), have been extensively studied. Such TMD-based ternary materials are believed to engender optimization of hydrogen adsorption free energy to thermoneutral value. Theoretically, cobalt is predicted to actively promote the catalytic activity of WS2 . However, experimentally it requires systematic approach to form Cox W(1- x ) S2 without any concomitant side phases that are detrimental for the intended purpose. This study reports a rational method to synthesize pure ternary Cox W(1- x ) S2 nanosheets for efficiently catalyzing HER. Benefiting from the modification in the electronic structure, the resultant material requires overpotential of 121 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) to achieve current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and shows Tafel slope of 67 mV dec(-1) . Furthermore, negligible loss of activity is observed over continues electrolysis of up to 2 h demonstrating its fair stability. The finding provides noticeable experimental support for other computational reports and paves the way for further works in the area of HER catalysis based on ternary materials. PMID:27322598

  7. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  8. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  9. 2D ice from first principles: structures and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Schusteritsch, Georg; Pickard, Chris J.; Salzmann, Christoph G.; Michaelides, Angelos

    Despite relevance to disparate areas such as cloud microphysics and tribology, major gaps in the understanding of the structures and phase transitions of low-dimensional water ice remain. Here we report a first principles study of confined 2D ice as a function of pressure. We find that at ambient pressure hexagonal and pentagonal monolayer structures are the two lowest enthalpy phases identified. Upon mild compression the pentagonal structure becomes the most stable and persists up to ca. 2 GPa at which point square and rhombic phases are stable. The square phase agrees with recent experimental observations of square ice confined within graphene sheets. We also find a double layer AA stacked square ice phase, which clarifies the difference between experimental observations and earlier force field simulations. This work provides a fresh perspective on 2D confined ice, highlighting the sensitivity of the structures observed to both the confining pressure and width.

  10. Synchronization of semiconductor laser arrays with 2D Bragg structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, V. R.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    A model of a planar semiconductor multi-channel laser is developed. In this model two-dimensional (2D) Bragg mirror structures are used for synchronizing radiation of multiple laser channels. Coupling of longitudinal and transverse waves can be mentioned as the distinguishing feature of these structures. Synchronization of 20 laser channels is demonstrated with a semi-classical approach based on Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  11. The NH2D hyperfine structure revealed by astrophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, F.; Coudert, L. H.; Punanova, A.; Harju, J.; Faure, A.; Roueff, E.; Sipilä, O.; Caselli, P.; Güsten, R.; Pon, A.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The 111-101 lines of ortho- and para-NH2D (o/p-NH2D) at 86 and 110 GHz, respectively, are commonly observed to provide constraints on the deuterium fractionation in the interstellar medium. In cold regions, the hyperfine structure that is due to the nitrogen (14N) nucleus is resolved. To date, this splitting is the only one that is taken into account in the NH2D column density estimates. Aims: We investigate how including the hyperfine splitting caused by the deuterium (D) nucleus affects the analysis of the rotational lines of NH2D. Methods: We present 30 m IRAM observations of the above mentioned lines and APEX o/p-NH2D observations of the 101-000 lines at 333 GHz. The hyperfine patterns of the observed lines were calculated taking into account the splitting induced by the D nucleus. The analysis then relies on line lists that either neglect or include the splitting induced by the D nucleus. Results: The hyperfine spectra are first analyzed with a line list that only includes the hyperfine splitting that is due to the 14N nucleus. We find inconsistencies between the line widths of the 101-000 and 111-101 lines, the latter being larger by a factor of ~1.6 ± 0.3. Such a large difference is unexpected because the two sets of lines probably originate from the same region. We next employed a newly computed line list for the o/p-NH2D transitions where the hyperfine structure induced by both nitrogen and deuterium nuclei was included. With this new line list, the analysis of the previous spectra leads to compatible line widths. Conclusions: Neglecting the hyperfine structure caused by D leads to overestimating the line widths of the o/p-NH2D lines at 3 mm. The error for a cold molecular core is about 50%. This error propagates directly to the column density estimate. We therefore recommend to take the hyperfine splittings caused by both the 14N and D nuclei into account in any analysis that relies on these lines. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM

  12. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  13. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  14. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K. Sanpei, A. Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  15. Wavelet characterization of 2D turbulence and intermittency in magnetized electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2016-06-01

    A study of the free relaxation of turbulence in a two-dimensional (2D) flow is presented, with a focus on the role of the initial vorticity conditions. Exploiting a well-known analogy with 2D inviscid incompressible fluids, the system investigated here is a magnetized pure electron plasma. The dynamics of this system are simulated by means of a 2D particle-in-cell code, starting from different spiral density (vorticity) distributions. A wavelet multiresolution analysis is adopted, which allows the coherent and incoherent parts of the flow to be separated. Comparison of the turbulent evolution in the different cases is based on the investigation of the time evolution of statistical properties, including the probability distribution functions and structure functions of the vorticity increments. It is also based on an analysis of the enstrophy evolution and its spectrum for the two components. In particular, while the statistical features assess the degree of flow intermittency, spectral analysis allows us not only to estimate the time required to reach a state of fully developed turbulence, but also estimate its dependence on the thickness of the initial spiral density distribution, accurately tracking the dynamics of both the coherent structures and the turbulent background. The results are compared with those relevant to annular initial vorticity distributions (Chen et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 495810511).

  16. Ultrafast tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in myoglobins revealed by UV 2D spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Consani, Cristina; Auböck, Gerald; van Mourik, Frank; Chergui, Majed

    2013-03-29

    Tryptophan is commonly used to study protein structure and dynamics, such as protein folding, as a donor in fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) studies. By using ultra-broadband ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy in the ultraviolet (UV) and transient absorption in the visible range, we have disentangled the excited state decay pathways of the tryptophan amino acid residues in ferric myoglobins (MbCN and metMb). Whereas the more distant tryptophan (Trp(7)) relaxes by energy transfer to the heme, Trp(14) excitation predominantly decays by electron transfer to the heme. The excited Trp(14)→heme electron transfer occurs in <40 picoseconds with a quantum yield of more than 60%, over an edge-to-edge distance below ~10 angstroms, outcompeting the FRET process. Our results raise the question of whether such electron transfer pathways occur in a larger class of proteins.

  17. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; de Vries, P. C.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.; García-Muñoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  18. Measurement of electrostatic potential variations between 2D materials using low-energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Barrera, Sergio; Mende, Patrick; Li, Jun; Feenstra, Randall; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Robinson, Joshua; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili

    Among the many properties that evolve as isolated 2D materials are brought together to form a heterostructure, rearrangement of charges between layers due to unintentional doping results in dipole fields at the interface, which critically affect the electronic properties of the structure. Here we report a method for directly measuring work function differences, and hence electrostatic potential variations, across the surface of 2D materials and heterostructures thereof using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Study of MoSe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on epitaxial graphene on SiC with LEEM reveals a large work function difference between the MoSe2 and the graphene, indicating charge transfer between the layers and a subsequent dipole layer. In addition to quantifying dipole effects between transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene, direct imaging of the surface, diffraction information, and the spectroscopic dependence of electron reflectivity will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  19. Maintaining the genuine structure of 2D materials and catalytic nanoparticles at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Calderon, H A; Kisielowski, C; Specht, P; Barton, B; Godinez-Salomon, F; Solorza-Feria, O

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of atomic resolution, low dose-rate electron microscopy allows investigating 2D materials as well as catalytic nano particles without compromising their structural integrity. For graphene and a variety of nanoparticle compositions, it is shown that a critical dose rate exists of <100 e(-)/Å(2) s at 80 keV of electron acceleration that allows maintaining the genuine object structures including their surfaces and edges even if particles are only 3 nm large or smaller. Moreover, it is demonstrated that electron beam-induced phonon excitation from outside the field of view contributes to a contrast degradation in recorded images. These degradation effects can be eliminated by delivering electrons onto the imaged area, only, by using a Nilsonian illumination scheme in combination with a suitable aperture at the electron gun/monochromator assembly.

  20. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Jr., Carlos M.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  1. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M., Jr.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  2. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  3. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  4. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films.

    PubMed

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J; Lewis, Emily A; Lucci, Felicia R; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope (125)I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual (125)I atoms into (125)Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic (125)I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies.

  5. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C.; Wang, L.; Xu, M.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  6. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y H; Yang, X Y; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  7. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  8. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-28

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ∼1000 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.

  9. Design of 2D chitosan scaffolds via electrochemical structuring

    PubMed Central

    Altomare, Lina; Guglielmo, Elena; Varoni, Elena Maria; Bertoldi, Serena; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; De Nardo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) is a versatile biopolymer whose morphological and chemico-physical properties can be designed for a variety of biomedical applications. Taking advantage of its electrolytic nature, cathodic polarization allows CS deposition on electrically conductive substrates, resulting in thin porous structures with tunable morphology. Here we propose an easy method to obtain CS membranes with highly oriented micro-channels for tissue engineering applications, relying on simple control of process parameters and cathodic substrate geometry.   Cathodic deposition was performed on two different aluminum grids in galvanostatic conditions at 6.25 mA cm−2 from CS solution [1g L−1] in acetic acid (pH 3.5). Self-standing thin scaffolds were cross linked either with genipin or epichlorohydrin, weighted, and observed by optical and electron microscopy. Swelling properties at pH 5 and pH 7.4 have been also investigated and tensile tests performed on swollen samples at room temperature. Finally, direct and indirect assays have been performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity at 24 and 72 h. Thin scaffolds with two different oriented porosities (1000µm and 500µm) have been successfully fabricated by electrochemical techniques. Both cross-linking agents did not affected the mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of the resulting structures. Depending on the pH, these structures show interesting swelling properties that can be exploited for drug delivery systems. Moreover, thanks to the possibility of controlling the porosity and the micro-channel orientation, they should be used for the regeneration of tissues requiring a preferential cells orientation, e.g., cardiac patches or ligament regeneration. PMID:25093705

  10. Electronic and geometrical properties of monoatomic and diatomic 2D honeycomb lattices. A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Ángela; Rey, Rafael; Fonseca, Karen; Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica Team

    Since the discovery of graphene by Geim and Novoselov at 2004, several analogous systems have been theoretically and experimentally studied, due to their technological interest. Both monoatomic lattices, such as silicine and germanene, and diatomic lattices (h-GaAs and h-GaN) have been studied. Using Density Functional Theory we obtain and confirm the chemical stability of these hexagonal 2D systems through the total energy curves as a function of interatomic distance. Unlike graphene, silicine and germanene, gapless materials, h-GaAs and h-GaN exhibit electronic gaps, different from that of the bulk, which could be interesting for the industry. On the other hand, the ab initio band structure calculations for graphene, silicene and germanene show a non-circular cross section around K points, at variance with the prediction of usual Tight-binding models. In fact, we have found that Dirac cones display a dihedral group symmetry. This implies that Fermi speed can change up to 30 % due to the orientation of the wave vector, for both electrons and holes. Traditional analytic studies use the Dirac equation for the electron dynamics at low energies. However, this equation assumes an isotropic, homogeneous and uniform space. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia. A. M. Rojas-Cuervo would also like to thank the Colciencias, Colombia.

  11. Membrane proteins: functional and structural studies using reconstituted proteoliposomes and 2-D crystals.

    PubMed

    Rigaud, J-L

    2002-07-01

    Reconstitution of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers is a powerful tool to analyze functional as well as structural areas of membrane protein research. First, the proper incorporation of a purified membrane protein into closed lipid vesicles, to produce proteoliposomes, allows the investigation of transport and/or catalytic properties of any membrane protein without interference by other membrane components. Second, the incorporation of a large amount of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers to grow crystals confined to two dimensions has recently opened a new way to solve their structure at high resolution using electron crystallography. However, reconstitution of membrane proteins into functional proteoliposomes or 2-D crystallization has been an empirical domain, which has been viewed for a long time more like "black magic" than science. Nevertheless, in the last ten years, important progress has been made in acquiring knowledge of lipid-protein-detergent interactions and has permitted to build upon a set of basic principles that has limited the empirical approach of reconstitution experiments. Reconstitution strategies have been improved and new strategies have been developed, facilitating the success rate of proteoliposome formation and 2-D crystallization. This review deals with the various strategies available to obtain proteoliposomes and 2-D crystals from detergent-solubilized proteins. It gives an overview of the methods that have been applied, which may be of help for reconstituting more proteins into lipid bilayers in a form suitable for functional studies at the molecular level and for high-resolution structural analysis.

  12. Spin-Orbit Interaction and Related Transport Phenomena in 2d Electron and Hole Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaetskii, A.

    Spin-orbit interaction is responsible for many physical phenomena which are under intensive study currently. Here we discuss several of them. The first phenomenon is the edge spin accumulation, which appears due to spin-orbit interaction in 2D mesoscopic structures in the presence of a charge current. We consider the case of a strong spin-orbit-related splitting of the electron spectrum, i.e. a spin precession length is small compared to the mean free path l. The structure can be either in a ballistic regime (when the mean free path is the largest scale in the problem) or quasi-ballistic regime (when l is much smaller than the sample size). We show how physics of edge spin accumulation in different situations should be understood from the point of view of unitarity of boundary scattering. Using transparent method of scattering states, we are able to explain some previous puzzling theoretical results. We clarify the important role of the form of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian, the role of the boundary conditions, etc., and reveal the wrong results obtained in the field by other researchers. The relation between the edge spin density and the bulk spin current in different regimes is discussed. The detailed comparison with the existing theoretical works is presented. Besides, we consider several new transport phenomena which appear in the presence of spin-orbit interaction, for example, magnetotransport phenomena in an external classical magnetic field. In particular, new mechanism of negative magneto-resistance appears which is due to destruction of spin fluxes by the magnetic field, and which can be really pronounced in 2D systems with strong scatterers.

  13. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  14. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  15. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-12

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  16. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  17. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  18. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yu; Voigt, Cooper A.; Kent, Paul R. C.; May, Steven J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-24

    In this paper, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M'2M"C2 and M'2M"2C3 – where M' and M" are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, andmore » Ti. The M' atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M" atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M' atomic layers sandwich the middle M"–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. Finally, this finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.« less

  19. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  20. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-01

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ~1000 cm2 V-1 s-1 even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor

  1. Scaling analysis of 2D fractal cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliecker, Gudrun

    2001-01-01

    The correlations between topological and metric properties of fractal tessellations are analysed. To this end, Sierpinski cellular structures are constructed for different geometries related to Sierpinski gaskets and to the Apollonian packing of discs. For these geometries, the properties of the distribution of the cells' areas and topologies can be derived analytically. In all cases, an algebraic increase of the cell's average area with its number of neighbours is obtained. This property, unknown from natural cellular structures, confirms previous observations in numerical studies of Voronoi tessellations generated by fractal point sets. In addition, a simple rigorous scaling resp. multiscaling properties relating the shapes and the sizes of the cells are found.

  2. A Bioactive Carbon Nanotube-Based Ink for Printing 2D and 3D Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Farzad, Raziyeh; Tamayol, Ali; Manoharan, Vijayan; Mostafalu, Pooria; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Akbari, Mohsen; Jung, Sung Mi; Kim, Duckjin; Comotto, Mattia; Annabi, Nasim; Al-Hazmi, Faten Ebrahim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The development of electrically conductive carbon nanotube-based inks is reported. Using these inks, 2D and 3D structures are printed on various flexible substrates such as paper, hydrogels, and elastomers. The printed patterns have mechanical and electrical properties that make them beneficial for various biological applications. PMID:26915715

  3. A Bioactive Carbon Nanotube-Based Ink for Printing 2D and 3D Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Farzad, Raziyeh; Tamayol, Ali; Manoharan, Vijayan; Mostafalu, Pooria; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Akbari, Mohsen; Jung, Sung Mi; Kim, Duckjin; Comotto, Mattia; Annabi, Nasim; Al-Hazmi, Faten Ebrahim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The development of electrically conductive carbon nanotube-based inks is reported. Using these inks, 2D and 3D structures are printed on various flexible substrates such as paper, hydrogels, and elastomers. The printed patterns have mechanical and electrical properties that make them beneficial for various biological applications.

  4. Metal Decoration Effects on the Gas-Sensing Properties of 2D Hybrid-Structures on Flexible Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byungjin; Yoon, Jongwon; Lim, Sung Kwan; Kim, Ah Ra; Choi, Sun-Young; Kim, Dong-Ho; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Hahm, Myung Gwan

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of metal decoration on the gas-sensing properties of a device with two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) flake channels and graphene electrodes. The 2D hybrid-structure device sensitively detected NO2 gas molecules (>1.2 ppm) as well as NH3 (>10 ppm). Metal nanoparticles (NPs) could tune the electronic properties of the 2D graphene/MoS2 device, increasing sensitivity to a specific gas molecule. For instance, palladium NPs accumulate hole carriers of graphene/MoS2, electronically sensitizing NH3 gas molecules. Contrarily, aluminum NPs deplete hole carriers, enhancing NO2 sensitivity. The synergistic combination of metal NPs and 2D hybrid layers could be also applied to a flexible gas sensor. There was no serious degradation in the sensing performance of metal-decorated MoS2 flexible devices before/after 5000 bending cycles. Thus, highly sensitive and endurable gas sensor could be achieved through the metal-decorated 2D hybrid-structure, offering a useful route to wearable electronic sensing platforms. PMID:26404279

  5. Speckle lithography for fabricating Gaussian, quasi-random 2D structures and black silicon structures.

    PubMed

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle pattern is a granular structure formed due to random coherent wavelet interference and generally considered as noise in optical systems including photolithography. Contrary to this, in this paper, we use the speckle pattern to generate predictable and controlled Gaussian random structures and quasi-random structures photo-lithographically. The random structures made using this proposed speckle lithography technique are quantified based on speckle statistics, radial distribution function (RDF) and fast Fourier transform (FFT). The control over the speckle size, density and speckle clustering facilitates the successful fabrication of black silicon with different surface structures. The controllability and tunability of randomness makes this technique a robust method for fabricating predictable 2D Gaussian random structures and black silicon structures. These structures can enhance the light trapping significantly in solar cells and hence enable improved energy harvesting. Further, this technique can enable efficient fabrication of disordered photonic structures and random media based devices.

  6. Speckle lithography for fabricating Gaussian, quasi-random 2D structures and black silicon structures

    PubMed Central

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle pattern is a granular structure formed due to random coherent wavelet interference and generally considered as noise in optical systems including photolithography. Contrary to this, in this paper, we use the speckle pattern to generate predictable and controlled Gaussian random structures and quasi-random structures photo-lithographically. The random structures made using this proposed speckle lithography technique are quantified based on speckle statistics, radial distribution function (RDF) and fast Fourier transform (FFT). The control over the speckle size, density and speckle clustering facilitates the successful fabrication of black silicon with different surface structures. The controllability and tunability of randomness makes this technique a robust method for fabricating predictable 2D Gaussian random structures and black silicon structures. These structures can enhance the light trapping significantly in solar cells and hence enable improved energy harvesting. Further, this technique can enable efficient fabrication of disordered photonic structures and random media based devices. PMID:26679513

  7. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, M. R.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.; Naguib, M.; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization methods, additional XRD patterns (Fig. S1) and INS spectra (Fig. S2-S4). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01462c

  8. Electron-impact excitation of the Rb 7 2S1/2, 8 2S1/2, 5 2D3/2, and 6 2D3/2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zuyi; Flynn, Connor; Redd, Aaron; Stumpf, Bernhard

    1993-03-01

    Electron-impact cross sections for excitation of the 7 2S1/2, 8 2S1/2, 5 2D3/2, and 6 2D3/2 states of rubidium have been measured from threshold to 1000 eV. The optical-excitation-function method has been employed in a crossed atom- and electron-beam apparatus. Relative, total (cascade including) experimental cross sections are made absolute by comparison with the known total cross section of the Rb D1 line. Total excitation cross sections are compared with theoretical calculations employing first Born approximation and theoretical branching ratios. Born cross sections for the 7 2S1/2 and 8 2S1/2 states are obtained from the literature, while Born cross sections for the 5 2D3/2, 6 2D3/2, and all cascading states are calculated in this paper. At high energies, the measured total 2D3/2 state cross sections show 1/E behavior and converge to first Born theory; for E>100 eV, experiment and theory agree within 6.7% for 5 2D3/2 and within 3.7% for 6 2D3/2. The total cross sections for the 2S1/2 states do not converge to Born theory even at 1000 eV, and it is shown that this cannot be attributed to cascading. At low energies, 2S1/2 and 2D3/2 state total excitation cross sections have similar shapes with sharply peaked maxima at about 0.9 eV above threshold. After cascading is corrected using first Born theory, estimated experimental cross sections for direct excitation of higher fine-structure states of rubidium are given.

  9. 2D PIC simulations for an EN discharge with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Michael A.; Kawamura, Emi; Lichtenberg, Allan J.

    2009-10-01

    We conducted 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for an electronegative (EN) discharge with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions, and compared the results to a previously developed 1D (radial) analytical model of an EN plasma with strongly magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions [1]. In both cases, there is a static uniform applied magnetic field in the axial direction. The 1D radial model mimics the wall losses of the particles in the axial direction by introducing a bulk loss frequency term νL. A special (desired) solution was found in which only positive and negative ions but no electrons escaped radially. The 2D PIC results show good agreement with the 1D model over a range of parameters and indicate that the analytical form of νL employed in [1] is reasonably accurate. However, for the PIC simulations, there is always a finite flux of electrons to the radial wall which is about 10 to 30% of the negative ion flux.[4pt] [1] G. Leray, P. Chabert, A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, J. Phys. D, accepted for publication 2009.

  10. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  11. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III-V, and II-VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain-low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  12. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side.

  13. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  14. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle.

    PubMed

    Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  15. Critical Behavior of a Strongly-Interacting 2D Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) electron systems that obey Fermi liquid theory at high electron densities are expected to undergo one or more transitions to spatially and/or spin-ordered phases as the density is decreased, ultimately forming a Wigner crystal in the dilute, strongly-interacting limit. Interesting, unexpected behavior is observed with decreasing electron density as the electrons' interactions become increasingly important relative to their kinetic energy: the resistivity undergoes a transition from metallic to insulating temperature dependence; the resistance increases sharply and then saturates abruptly with increasing in-plane magnetic field; a number of experiments indicate that the electrons' effective mass exhibits a substantial increase approaching a finite ``critical'' density. There has been a great deal of debate concerning the underlying physics in these systems, and many have questioned whether the change of the resistivity from metallic to insulating signals a phase transition or a crossover. In this talk, I will report measurements that show that with decreasing density ns, the thermopower S of a low-disorder 2D electron system in silicon exhibits a sharp increase by more than an order of magnitude, tending to a divergence at a finite, disorder-independent density nt, consistent with the critical form (- T / S) ~(ns -nt) x with x = 1 . 0 +/- 0 . 1 (T is the temperature). Unlike the resistivity which may not clearly distinguish between a transition and crossover behavior, the thermopower provides clear evidence that a true phase transition occurs with decreasing density to a new low-density phase. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-84ER45153, BSF grant 2006375, RFBR, RAS, and the Russian Ministry of Science.

  16. Spectroscopy of emergent states in strongly interacting 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirjibehedin, Cyrus Farokh

    In this dissertation I present my recent resonant inelastic light scattering studies of the remarkable emergent states formed by strongly interacting 2D electron systems. I describe the first experimental determinations of long wavelength, low energy dispersions in the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) regime. The demonstration of existence of well defined modes at small wavevectors for the nu = 1/3 state gives a measure of the macroscopic extent of the quantum fluid beyond the micron length scale. I report evidence of a novel splitting of modes and discuss interpretations of these modes as two-roton states. I report the first studies to probe the boundary between different FQH sequences that occurs at nu = 1/3. Evidence of the coexistence of excitations from both sequences at distinct energy scales is uncovered. The abrupt appearance of lower energy modes at nu ≲ 1/3 suggests a change in the quantum ground state on crossing the nu = 1/3 boundary. The coexistence of excitations indicates a layered set of excitations of different quasiparticle flavors from a single ground state. I discuss the resonant enhancements of light scattering for spin excitations at nu = 1/3, which are strongest near photoluminescence bands assigned in the literature to negatively charged excitons. The observed enhancement profiles are interpreted by scattering mechanisms with intermediate transitions to states with charged excitonic excitations. We fabricated the first ultra-low density quantum structures and were able to show that light scattering methods are sensitive enough to probe systems currently reaching as low as n = 7.7 x 108cm -2 at wavevectors large enough to show correlation and non-local effects. I find well-defined plasmons with dispersions that deviate from the long wavelength q limit, suggesting evidence of large correlation effects. I discuss the use of light scattering to measure the electron temperature through the anti-Stokes/Stokes scattering ratio, highlighting the

  17. The separation of overlapping transitions in β-carotene with broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, Tessa R.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Graham, Matthew W.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy is applied to β-carotene, revealing new insight into the excited state dynamics of carotenoids by exploring the full energetic range encompassing the S0→S2 and S1→S1n transitions at 77 K. Multiple signals are observed in the regime associated with the proposed S∗ state and isolated through separate analysis of rephasing and nonrephasing contributions. Peaks in rephasing pathways display dynamic lineshapes characteristic of coupling to high energy vibrational modes, and simulation with a simple model supports their assignment to impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. A signal persisting beyond 10 ps in the nonrephasing spectra is still under investigation.

  18. Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy reveals a carotenoid dark state in purple bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ostroumov, Evgeny E; Mulvaney, Rachel M; Cogdell, Richard J; Scholes, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Although the energy transfer processes in natural light-harvesting systems have been intensively studied for the past 60 years, certain details of the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. We performed broadband two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy measurements on light-harvesting proteins from purple bacteria and isolated carotenoids in order to characterize in more detail the excited-state manifold of carotenoids, which channel energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules. The data revealed a well-resolved signal consistent with a previously postulated carotenoid dark state, the presence of which was confirmed by global kinetic analysis. The results point to this state's role in mediating energy flow from carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll.

  19. Protein structure validation and identification from unassigned residual dipolar coupling data using 2D-PDPA.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Arjang; Mukhopadhyay, Rishi; Yandle, Ryan; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Homayoun

    2013-08-22

    More than 90% of protein structures submitted to the PDB each year are homologous to some previously characterized protein structure. The extensive resources that are required for structural characterization of proteins can be justified for the 10% of the novel structures, but not for the remaining 90%. This report presents the 2D-PDPA method, which utilizes unassigned residual dipolar coupling in order to address the economics of structure determination of routine proteins by reducing the data acquisition and processing time. 2D-PDPA has been demonstrated to successfully identify the correct structure of an array of proteins that range from 46 to 445 residues in size from a library of 619 decoy structures by using unassigned simulated RDC data. When using experimental data, 2D-PDPA successfully identified the correct NMR structures from the same library of decoy structures. In addition, the most homologous X-ray structure was also identified as the second best structural candidate. Finally, success of 2D-PDPA in identifying and evaluating the most appropriate structure from a set of computationally predicted structures in the case of a previously uncharacterized protein Pf2048.1 has been demonstrated. This protein exhibits less than 20% sequence identity to any protein with known structure and therefore presents a compelling and practical application of our proposed work.

  20. Protein structure validation and identification from unassigned residual dipolar coupling data using 2D-PDPA.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Arjang; Mukhopadhyay, Rishi; Yandle, Ryan; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Homayoun

    2013-01-01

    More than 90% of protein structures submitted to the PDB each year are homologous to some previously characterized protein structure. The extensive resources that are required for structural characterization of proteins can be justified for the 10% of the novel structures, but not for the remaining 90%. This report presents the 2D-PDPA method, which utilizes unassigned residual dipolar coupling in order to address the economics of structure determination of routine proteins by reducing the data acquisition and processing time. 2D-PDPA has been demonstrated to successfully identify the correct structure of an array of proteins that range from 46 to 445 residues in size from a library of 619 decoy structures by using unassigned simulated RDC data. When using experimental data, 2D-PDPA successfully identified the correct NMR structures from the same library of decoy structures. In addition, the most homologous X-ray structure was also identified as the second best structural candidate. Finally, success of 2D-PDPA in identifying and evaluating the most appropriate structure from a set of computationally predicted structures in the case of a previously uncharacterized protein Pf2048.1 has been demonstrated. This protein exhibits less than 20% sequence identity to any protein with known structure and therefore presents a compelling and practical application of our proposed work. PMID:23973992

  1. Protein Structure Validation and Identification from Unassigned Residual Dipolar Coupling Data Using 2D-PDPA

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Arjang; Mukhopadhyay, Rishi; Yandle, Ryan; Prestegard, James H.; Valafar, Homayoun

    2014-01-01

    More than 90% of protein structures submitted to the PDB each year are homologous to some previously characterized protein structure. The extensive resources that are required for structural characterization of proteins can be justified for the 10% of the novel structures, but not for the remaining 90%. This report presents the 2D-PDPA method, which utilizes unassigned residual dipolar coupling in order to address the economics of structure determination of routine proteins by reducing the data acquisition and processing time. 2D-PDPA has been demonstrated to successfully identify the correct structure of an array of proteins that range from 46 to 445 residues in size from a library of 619 decoy structures by using unassigned simulated RDC data. When using experimental data, 2D-PDPA successfully identified the correct NMR structures from the same library of decoy structures. In addition, the most homologous X-ray structure was also identified as the second best structural candidate. Finally, success of 2D-PDPA in identifying and evaluating the most appropriate structure from a set of computationally predicted structures in the case of a previously uncharacterized protein Pf2048.1 has been demonstrated. This protein exhibits less than 20% sequence identity to any protein with known structure and therefore presents a compelling and practical application of our proposed work. PMID:23973992

  2. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  3. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, S. A.; Das, K. J. Maria; Raj, D. Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams. PMID:26170552

  4. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams.

  5. Dynamics of the Rydberg electron in H*+D2-->D*+HD reactive collisions.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael Y; Skodje, Rex T

    2007-03-14

    Experimental crossed-beam studies carried out previously have indicated that the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom-molecule reaction H*+D2-->D*+HD are very similar to those of the corresponding ion-molecule reaction H++D2-->D++HD. The equivalence of the cross sections for these related systems would open up a new approach to the experimental study of ion-molecule reactions. However, a recent experimental and theoretical study has brought to light some important qualitative differences between the Rydberg-atom reaction and the ion-molecule reaction; in particular, the experimental cross section for the Rydberg-atom reaction exhibits a higher degree of forward-backward scattering asymmetry than predicted by a quasiclassical trajectory study of the ion-molecule reaction. In this paper, the authors consider the dynamics of the Rydberg-electron over the course of a reactive collision and the implications of these dynamics for the Rydberg-atom-molecule crossed-beam experiment. Using an approach based on perturbation theory, they estimate the attenuation of the experimental signal due to the Rydberg-electron dynamics as a function of the scattering angle. They show that at least part of the experimental asymmetry can be ascribed to this angle dependent attenuation. Their results offer general insight into the practical aspects of the experimental study of ion-molecule reactions by means of their Rydberg-atom counterparts. PMID:17362067

  6. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  7. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  8. Topological evolutionary computing in the optimal design of 2D and 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burczynski, T.; Poteralski, A.; Szczepanik, M.

    2007-10-01

    An application of evolutionary algorithms and the finite-element method to the topology optimization of 2D structures (plane stress, bending plates, and shells) and 3D structures is described. The basis of the topological evolutionary optimization is the direct control of the density material distribution (or thickness for 2D structures) by the evolutionary algorithm. The structures are optimized for stress, mass, and compliance criteria. The numerical examples demonstrate that this method is an effective technique for solving problems in computer-aided optimal design.

  9. Laser fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A I; Kiyan, R; Chichkov, B N

    2010-09-27

    A novel method for fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays is proposed. This technique is based on laser-induced transfer of molten metal nanodroplets from thin metal films. Metal nanoparticles are produced by solidification of these nanodroplets. The size of the transferred nanoparticles can be controllably changed in the range from 180 nm to 1500 nm. Several examples of complex 2D and 3D microstructures generated form gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. PMID:20941016

  10. A series of 2D metal-quinolone complexes: Syntheses, structures, and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiang-Hong; Xiao, Dong-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Sun, Dian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhong-Li; Luo, Qun-Li; Wang, En-Bo

    2013-02-15

    Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes, namely [Cd(cfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (1), [M(norfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Cd (2) and Mn (3)), [Mn{sub 2}(cfH)(odpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (4), [Co{sub 2}(norfH)(bpta)({mu}{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) and [Co{sub 3}(saraH){sub 2}(Hbpta){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O (6) (cfH=ciprofloxacin, norfH=norfloxacin, saraH=sarafloxacin, bpdc=4,4 Prime -biphenyldicarboxylate, odpa=4,4 Prime -oxydiphthalate, bpta=3,3 Prime ,4,4 Prime -biphenyltetracarboxylate) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1-3 consist of 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Compounds 4 and 5 display 2D structures based on tetranuclear manganese or cobalt clusters with (3,6)-connected kgd topology. Compound 6 exhibits a 2D bilayer structure, which represents the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. By inspection of the structures of 1-6, it is believed that the long aromatic polycarboxylate ligands are important for the formation of 2D metal-quinolone complexes. The magnetic properties of compounds 3-6 was studied, indicating the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of compounds 1-2 are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes have been prepared by self-assemblies of the quinolones and metal salts in the presence of long aromatic polycarboxylates. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-3 consist of novel 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 4 and 5 are two novel 2D layers based on tetranuclear Mn or Co clusters with kgd topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 6 is the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-6 represent six unusual

  11. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  12. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Leonid S.

    2012-04-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10-19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW.

  13. 2D and 3D multipactor modeling in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an RF electric field under vacuum conditions. MP is a severe problem in modern rf systems and, therefore, theoretical and experimental studies of MP are of great interest to the researchers working in various areas of physics and engineering. In this work we present results of MP studies in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. First, we show simulation results obtained with the use of the 2D self-consistent MP model (O. V. Sinitsyn, et. al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 16, 073102 (2009)) and compare those to experimental ones obtained during recent extensive studies of DLA structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs (C. Jing, et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., vol. 38, pp. 1354-1360 (2010)). Then we present some new results of 3D analysis of MP which include studies of particle trajectories and studies of MP development at the early stage.

  14. Quantum Hall effect: The resistivity of a 2D electron gas—a thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2005-09-01

    Based on a thermodynamic approach, we have calculated the resistivity of a 2D electron gas, assumed dissipationless in a strong quantum limit. Standard measurements, with extra current leads, define the resistivity caused by a combination of Peltier and Seebeck effects. The current causes heating (cooling) at the first (second) sample contacts, due to the Peltier effect. The contact temperatures are different. The measured voltage is equal to the Peltier effect-induced thermoemf which is linear in current. As a result, the resistivity is non-zero as I→0. The resistivity is a universal function of magnetic field and temperature, expressed in fundamental units h/e2. The universal features of magnetotransport data observed in the experiment confirm our predictions.

  15. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near {{e}2}/π h .

  16. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near [Formula: see text]. PMID:27270084

  17. Weak-localization approach to a 2D electron gas with a spectral node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, K.; Sinner, A.

    2015-07-01

    We study a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and a spectral node within the weak-localization approach and compare its results with those of Gaussian fluctuations around the self-consistent Born approximation. The appearance of diffusive modes depends on the type of disorder. In particular, we find for a random gap a diffusive mode only from ladder contributions, whereas for a random scalar potential the diffusive mode is created by ladder and by maximally crossed contributions. The ladder (maximally crossed) contributions correspond to fermionic (bosonic) Gaussian fluctuations. We calculate the conductivity corrections from the density-density Kubo formula and find a good agreement with the experimentally observed V-shape conductivity of graphene.

  18. 2D MEMS scanning for LIDAR with sub-Nyquist sampling, electronics, and measurement procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Thorsten; Janes, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Electrostatic driven 2D MEMS scanners resonantly oscillate in both axes leading to Lissajous trajectories of a digitally modulated laser beam reflected from the micro mirror. A solid angle of about 0.02 is scanned by a 658nm laser beam with a maximum repetition rate of 350MHz digital pulses. Reflected light is detected by an APD with a bandwidth of 80MHz. The phase difference between the scanned laser light and the light reflected from an obstacle is analyzed by sub-Nyquist sampling. The FPGA-based electronics and software for the evaluation of distance and velocity of objects within the scanning range are presented. Furthermore, the measures to optimize the Lidar accuracy of about 1mm and the dynamic range of up to 2m are examined. First measurements demonstrating the capability of the system and the evaluation algorithms are discussed.

  19. Designing 2D arrays for SHM of planar structures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring structural integrity of large planar structures that aims at detecting and localizing impact or damage at any point of the structure requires normally a relatively dense network of uniformly distributed ultrasonic sensors. 2-D ultrasonic phased arrays, due to their beam-steering capability and all azimuth angle coverage are a very promising tool for structural health monitoring (SHM) of plate-like structures using Lamb waves (LW). Linear phased arrays that have been proposed for that purpose, produce mirrored image characterized by azimuth dependent resolution, which prevents unequivocal damage localization. 2D arrays do not have this drawback and they are even capable of mode selectivity when generating and receiving LWs. Performance of 2D arrays depends on their topology as well as the number of elements (transducers) used and their spacing in terms of wavelength. In this paper we propose a consistent methodology for three-step: theoretical, numerical and experimental investigation of a diversity of 2D array topologies in SHM applications. In the first step, the theoretical evaluation is performed using frequency-dependent structure transfer function (STF). STF that defines linear propagation of different LWs modes through the dispersive medium enables theoretical investigation of the particular array performance for a predefined tone-burst excitation signal. A dedicated software tool has been developed for the numerical evaluation of 2D array directional characteristics (beampattern) in a specific structure. The simulations are performed using local interaction simulation approach (LISA), implemented using NVIDIA CUDA graphical computation unit (GPU), which enables time-efficient 3D simulations of LWs propagation. Beampatterns of a 2D array can be to some extend evaluated analytically and using numerical simulations; in most cases, however, they require experimental verification. Using scanning laser vibrometer is proposed for that purpose, in a setup

  20. Beyond Graphene: Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Defective 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Humberto

    One of the challenges in the production of 2-D materials is the synthesis of defect free systems which can achieve the desired properties for novel applications. However, the reality so far indicates that we need to deal with defective systems and understand their main features in order to perform defect engineering in such a way that we can engineer a new material. In this talk I discuss first, the introduction of defects in a hierarchic way starting from 2-D graphene to form giant Schwarzites or graphene foams, which also can exhibit further defects, thus we can have several levels of defectiveness. In this context, it will be shown that giant Schwarzites, depending on their symmetry, can exhibit Dirac-Fermion behavior and further, possess protected topological states as shown by other authors. Regarding the mechanical properties of these systems, it is possible to tune the Poisson Ratio by the addition of defects, thus shedding light to the explanation of the almost zero Poisson ratios in experimentally obtained graphene foams. Second, the idea of Haeckelites, a planar sp2 graphene-like structure with heptagons and pentagons, can be extended to transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with square and octagonal-like defects, finding semi-metallic behaviors with Dirac-Fermions, and even topological insulating properties. National Science Foundation (EFRI-1433311).

  1. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  2. Electron transfer and ionic displacements at the origin of the 2D electron gas at the LAO/STO interface: direct measurements with atomic-column spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Cantoni, Claudia; Gazquez, Jaume; Miletto Granozio, Fabio; Oxley, Mark P; Varela, Maria; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J; Aruta, Carmela; di Uccio, Umberto Scotti; Perna, Paolo; Maccariello, Davide

    2012-08-01

    Using state-of-the-art, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with atomic-scale spatial resolution, experimental evidence for an intrinsic electronic reconstruction at the LAO/STO interface is shown. Simultaneous measurements of interfacial electron density and system polarization are crucial for establishing the highly debated origin of the 2D electron gas.

  3. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfven Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, Ben; Classen, I.G.J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W.; Luhmann, N.C.; Nazikian, Raffi; Park, H.K.; Spong, Donald A; Van Zeeland, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfven eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  4. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: Electronic versus vibrational coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Plenio, M. B.; Almeida, J.; Huelga, S. F.

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  5. Mercury (I) nitroprusside: A 2D structure supported on homometallic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Reguera, L.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Reguera, E.

    2015-01-15

    The pentacyanonitrosylferrate complex anion, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2−}, forms an insoluble solid with Hg(I) ion, of formula unit Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, whose crystal structure and related properties are unknown. This contribution reports the preparation of that compound by the precipitation method and its structural study from X-ray powder patterns complemented with spectroscopic information from IR, Raman, and UV–vis techniques. The crystal structure was solved ab initio and then refined using the Rietveld method. The solid crystallizes with a triclinic unit cell, in the P−1 space group, with cell parameters a=10.1202(12), b=10.1000(13), c=7.4704(11) Å; α=110.664(10), β=110.114(10), γ=104.724(8) °. Within the unit cell, two formula units are accommodated (Z=2). It adopts a layered structure related with the coordination of the equatorial CN groups at their N end to the Hg atoms while the axial CN ligand remains unlinked. Within the layers neighboring Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] building units remain linked through four relatively strong Hg–Hg interactions, with an interatomic distance of 2.549(3) Å. The charge donation from the equatorial CN groups through their 5σ orbitals results into an increase for the electron density on the Hg atoms, which strengths the Hg–Hg bond. In the Raman spectrum, that metal–metal bond is detected as a stretching vibration band at 167 cm{sup −1}. The available free volume between neighboring layers accommodates two water molecules, which are stabilized within the framework through hydrogen bonds with the N end of the unlinked axial CN group. The removal of these weakly bonded water molecules results in structural disorder for the material 3D framework. - Graphical abstract: Assembling of Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] units through Hg–Hg interactions. - Highlights: • Homometallic Hg–Hg interactions in metal nitroprusside. • 2D structure supported on metal–metal interactions. • Crystal

  6. Destabilization of 2D magnetic current sheets by resonance with bouncing electron - a new theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Gabriel; Louarn, Philippe; Tur, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons. The geometry is clearly 2D and uses Harris sheet profile. Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasi neutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. The present talk will focus on the main results of this theory. The electrostatic version of the model may be applied to the near-Earth environment (8-12 R_{E}) where beta is rather low. It is showed that inclusion of bouncing electron motion may enhance strongly the growth rate of the classical drift wave instability. This model could thus explain the generation of strong parallel electric fields in the ionosphere and the formation of aurora beads with wavelength of a few hundreds of km. In the electromagnetic version, it is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (B_{z} > 0.1 B _{lobes}) undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in B_{z}/B _{lobes}, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few

  7. Oxide 2D electron gases as a route for high carrier densities on (001) Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kornblum, Lior; Jin, Eric N.; Kumah, Divine P.; Walker, Fred J.; Ernst, Alexis T.; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2015-05-18

    Two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) formed at the interfaces of oxide heterostructures draw considerable interest owing to their unique physics and potential applications. Growing such heterostructures on conventional semiconductors has the potential to integrate their functionality with semiconductor device technology. We demonstrate 2DEGs on a conventional semiconductor by growing GdTiO{sub 3}-SrTiO{sub 3} on silicon. Structural analysis confirms the epitaxial growth of heterostructures with abrupt interfaces and a high degree of crystallinity. Transport measurements show the conduction to be an interface effect, ∼9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} electrons per interface. Good agreement is demonstrated between the electronic behavior of structures grown on Si and on an oxide substrate, validating the robustness of this approach to bridge between lab-scale samples to a scalable, technologically relevant materials system.

  8. Dynamic polarization of graphene by moving external charges: Comparison with 2D electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka, D.; Radović, I.; Mišković, Z. L.

    2011-06-01

    We calculate the stopping and image forces on a point charge moving over a single-layer graphene grown on an SiC substrate, and compare them with forces arising when a charge moves over a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in an Ag monolayer on a Si substrate. Given that both these systems constitute a one-atom thick 2DEG, major differences are found in the velocity and distance dependencies of the two forces owing to different electronic structures of the respective 2DEG. Within the massless Dirac fermion picture of graphene's π electron bands, the inter-band single particle excitations are found to affect the stopping and image forces at high speeds in a substantial way, whereas such excitations are absent in the 2DEG of the metallic layer described by a single parabolic band.

  9. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  10. A deformed shape monitoring model for building structures based on a 2D laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Bub Ryur; Lee, Hong Min; Kim, Yousok; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    High-rise buildings subjected to lateral loads such as wind and earthquake loads must be checked not to exceed the limits on the maximum lateral displacement or the maximum inter-story drift ratios. In this paper, a sensing model for deformed shapes of a building structure in motion is presented. The deformed shape sensing model based on a 2D scanner consists of five modules: (1) module for acquiring coordinate information of a point in a building; (2) module for coordinate transformation and data arrangement for generation of time history of the point; (3) module for smoothing by adjacent averaging technique; (4) module for generation of the displacement history for each story and deformed shape of a building, and (5) module for evaluation of the serviceability of a building. The feasibility of the sensing model based on a 2D laser scanner is tested through free vibration tests of a three-story steel frame structure with a relatively high slenderness ratio of 5.0. Free vibration responses measured from both laser displacement sensors and a 2D laser scanner are compared. In the experimentation, the deformed shapes were obtained from three different methods: the model based on the 2D laser scanner, the direct measurement based on laser displacement sensors, and the numerical method using acceleration data and the displacements from GPS. As a result, it is confirmed that the deformed shape measurement model based on a 2D laser scanner can be a promising alternative for high-rise buildings where installation of laser displacement sensors is impossible.

  11. The influence of pressure on the structure of a 2D uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor C.; Ross, Nancy L.; Surbella, Robert G.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2014-10-15

    We report the first quantitative analysis of the structural evolution of a uranyl bearing coordination polymer in response to pressure. The material that is central to this study, (UO{sub 2})(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CO{sub 2}H) (1), is constructed from rigid 2D inorganic layers comprising edge sharing UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids cross-linked by [PO{sub 3}(COOH)]{sup 2−} anions. Strong hydrogen bonding interactions exist between the pendent carboxylic acid groups on adjacent layers. Under pressure, 1 exhibits compressional behaviour primarily in the direction perpendicular to the inorganic layers, which is aided by a reduction in the interlayer distance and shifting of the layers with respect to each other. The bulk modulus for the 2D compound 1 is unexpectedly high [18.1(1) GPa] and is within the range reported for 3D CPs assembled from Zn{sup II} cations and inflexible imidazolate anions, and is at the lower end of the range of moduli observed for aluminosilicate zeolites (19–59 GPa). - Graphical Abstract: The compression mechanism and elastic constants for a 2D Uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound are reported. - Highlights: • The response to pressure of a uranium carboxyphosphonoate compound has been studied. • High-pressure single-crystal XRD data for this 2D uranium compound were collected. • Elastic constants for this material have been determined. • The compression mechanism for the compound has been elucidated.

  12. Photo-electroactive ternary chalcogenido-indate-stannates with a unique 2-D porous structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Pu, Ya-Yang; Zhao, Xiao-Wei; Qian, Li-Wen; Bian, Guo-Qing; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2015-03-14

    A lot of ternary In-Sb-Q (Q = S, Se) chalcogenido-metalates with amines or complex cations have been recently reported for their diverse structures, however, such a type of In-Sn-Q chalcogenido-metalate has been rarely announced. Herein, we report a series of 2-D In-Sn-Q compounds prepared using a metal-phenanthroline cationic template, [M(Phen)3](In2Sn2Q8)·(amine)·nH2O (M = Ni(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); amine = cyclohexylamine (Cha) or 1,6-diaminohexane (Dah); Q = S or Se). Their anions are isostructural and a 2-D porous network with large 16-tetrahedron-rings. The 2-D network joint of In-Sn-Q is a (In/Sn)3Q3 six-membered ring, which is different from the Sn3Q4 pseudosemicube of most 2-D Sn-Q binary compounds. The materials exhibit photocurrent response properties measured using a photo-electrochemical cell. The result shows that (1) the selenides exhibit more intense photocurrents than the sulfides and (2) the current intensity is related to the metal-phenanthroline cations. PMID:25653182

  13. Kohn-Sham Band Structure Benchmark Including Spin-Orbit Coupling for 2D and 3D Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, William; Blum, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Accurate electronic band structures serve as a primary indicator of the suitability of a material for a given application, e.g., as electronic or catalytic materials. Computed band structures, however, are subject to a host of approximations, some of which are more obvious (e.g., the treatment of the exchange-correlation of self-energy) and others less obvious (e.g., the treatment of core, semicore, or valence electrons, handling of relativistic effects, or the accuracy of the underlying basis set used). We here provide a set of accurate Kohn-Sham band structure benchmarks, using the numeric atom-centered all-electron electronic structure code FHI-aims combined with the ``traditional'' PBE functional and the hybrid HSE functional, to calculate core, valence, and low-lying conduction bands of a set of 2D and 3D materials. Benchmarks are provided with and without effects of spin-orbit coupling, using quasi-degenerate perturbation theory to predict spin-orbit splittings. This work is funded by Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft.

  14. Free-standing silicene obtained by cooling from 2D liquid Si: structure and thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoang, Vo; Thi Cam Mi, Huynh

    2014-12-01

    The structure and various thermodynamic properties of free-standing silicene have been studied by computer simulation. Models are obtained by cooling from buckling two-dimensional (2D) liquid Si via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential. The temperature dependence of total energy, heat capacity, mean ring size and mean coordination number shows that silicenization of 2D liquid Si exhibits a first-order-like behavior. The evolution of radial distribution function upon cooling from the melt also shows that solidification occurs in the system. The final configuration of silicene is analyzed via coordination, bond-angle, interatomic distance and ring distributions or distribution of buckling in the system. 2D visualization of atomic configurations clearly demonstrated that silicene obtained ‘naturally’ by cooling from the melt exhibits various structural previously unreported behaviors. We find the formation of polycrystalline silicene with clear grain boundaries containing various defects including various vacancies, Stone-Wales defects or skew rings and multimembered rings unlike those proposed in the literature. However, atoms in the obtained silicene are mostly involved in six-fold rings, forming a buckling honeycomb structure like that found in practice. We find that buckling is not unique for all atoms in the models although the majority of atoms reveal buckling of the most stable low-buckling silicene found in the literature. The buckling distribution is broad and symmetric. Our comprehensive MD simulation of a relatively large silicene model containing 104 atoms and obtained ‘naturally’ by cooling from the melt provides original insights into the structure and thermodynamics of this important 2D material.

  15. Hydrogen-bond-assisted "gold cold fusion" for fabrication of 2D web structures.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Saikat; Shundo, Atsuomi; Acharya, Somobrata; Hill, Jonathan P; Ji, Qingmin; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2009-07-01

    Keeping their cool: Fabrication of a 2D weblike nanonetwork of gold was successfully demonstrated through a two-step procedure including complexation of gold precursors to a weblike supramolecular assembly of surfactant followed by in situ reduction of the precursors to gold. Molecular assemblies stabilized by hydrogen bonding provided a sound template, leading to the highly integrated structure of gold through room-temperature (cold) nanostructure fusion.

  16. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  17. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets.

  18. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets. PMID:26824922

  19. Imaging Meso-Scale Structures in TEXTOR with 2D-ECE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Spakman, G. W.; van der Pol, M. J.; Domier, C. W.; Donne, A. J. H.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Westerhof, E.; Jakubowski, M. W.; TEXTOR Team

    The detection and control of instabilities in a tokamak is one of the exciting challenges in fusion research on the way to a reactor. Thanks to a combination of an innovative 2D temperature imaging technique (ECEI), a versatile ECRH/ECCD system and a unique possibility to externally induce tearing modes in the plasma, TEXTOR is able to make pioneering contributions in this field. This paper focuses on two meso-scale phenomena in tokamaks: m = 2 tearing modes and magnetic structures in the stochastic boundary. In these cases the 2D-ECEI diagnostic can resolve features not attainable before. In addition the possibility to use the diagnostic for fluctuation measurements is addressed.

  20. 2D-CELL: image processing software for extraction and analysis of 2-dimensional cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, F.; Telley, H.; Leibling, Th. M.; Mocellin, A.

    1992-01-01

    2D-CELL is a software package for the processing and analyzing of photographic images of cellular structures in a largely interactive way. Starting from a binary digitized image, the programs extract the line network (skeleton) of the structure and determine the graph representation that best models it. Provision is made for manually correcting defects such as incorrect node positions or dangling bonds. Then a suitable algorithm retrieves polygonal contours which define individual cells — local boundary curvatures are neglected for simplicity. Using elementary analytical geometry relations, a range of metric and topological parameters describing the population are then computed, organized into statistical distributions and graphically displayed.

  1. Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke; Upadhya, Prashanth C.; Morales, Eugenia T.; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Lin, Yong

    2009-09-01

    The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

  2. pH-induced structural changes of ovalbumin studied by 2D correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Daehoon; Ryu, Soo Ryeon; Park, Yeonju; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Bogusława; Jung, Young Mee

    2014-07-01

    The secondary structural changes of pH-induced ovalbumin during the transition from native state into intermediate state were studied with the use of 2D correlation spectroscopy and principal component analysis. 2D correlation spectra constructed from the pH-dependent IR spectra of ovalbumin solution revealed the following scenario of the intensity changes with pH decrease. When pH decreased from 5.5 and 3.6 intensity of components attributed to the β-turns, the α-helical elements, and native β-sheets increased. It was caused by protonation induced changes in environment of these elements. When the protonation of the acidic groups were finalized the system adopted the intermediate structure. It was accompanied by weak structural changes that mainly included the β-turns and the α-helices. In extreme acidic conditions at pH below pH 2 the intermediate structure was no longer stable and oligomers rich in the β-sheet structure were formed.

  3. Stable and high-power few cycle supercontinuum for 2D ultrabroadband electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spokoyny, Boris; Koh, Christine J; Harel, Elad

    2015-03-15

    Broadband supercontinuum (SC) pulses in the few cycle regime are a promising source for spectroscopic and imaging applications. However, SC sources are plagued by poor stability, greatly limiting their utility in phase-resolved nonlinear experiments such as 2D photon echo spectroscopy (2D PES). Here, we generated SC by two-stage filamentation in argon and air starting from 100 fs input pulses, which are sufficiently high-power and stable to record time-resolved 2D PE spectra in a single laser shot. We obtain a total power of 400 μJ/pulse in the visible spectral range of 500-850 nm and, after compression, yield pulses with duration of 6 fs according to transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) measurements. We demonstrate the method on the laser dye, Cresyl Violet, and observe coherent oscillations indicative of nuclear wavepacket dynamics.

  4. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 2: STEALTH 2D/WHAMSE 2D single-phse fluid and elastic structure studies. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Silling, S.A.; Belytschko, T.

    1981-03-01

    This report, the second in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the second step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid/structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The second step in the methodology considers enhancements and special modifications to the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program and the 2D WHAMSE computer program. The 2D STEALTH-HYDRO enhancements consist of a fluid-fluid coupling control-volume model and an orifice control-volume model. The enhancements to 2D WHAMSE include elimination of the implicit integration routines, material models, and structural elements not required for the hydroloads application. In addition the logic for coupling the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program to the 2D WHAMSE computer program is discussed.

  5. 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface: a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yue; Wang, Shiqiang; Yin, Xianpeng; Liang, Yun; Dong, Hao; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-07-01

    -micron bowls on a flat gold surface was proposed, prepared, and theoretically and experimentally characterized. This hybrid structure supports two types of modes: surface plasmon polaritons bound at the metallic surface and waveguided mode of light confined in the cavity of bowls. Optical responses of this hybrid structure as well as the spatial electric field distribution of each mode are found to be strongly dependent on the structural parameters of this system, and thus could be widely modified on demand. Importantly, compared to the widely studied hybrid systems, namely the flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres, the waveguided mode with strong field enhancement appearing in the cavities of bowls is more facilely accessible and thus suitable for practical use. For demonstration, a 2D-ordered silica sub-micron bowl array deposited on a flat gold surface was fabricated and used as a regenerable platform for fluorescence enhancement by simply accommodating emitters in bowls. All the simulation and experiment results indicate that the 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface should be a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic system with great potential for applications such as sensors or tunable emitting devices if appropriate periods and materials are employed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02898e

  6. Synthesis, structure and luminescence property of 2D lanthanide complexes with 3-fluorophthalate and oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Yu-E; Li, Xia; Song, Shuang

    2012-12-15

    Complexes [Ln{sub 2}(fpht){sub 2}(ox)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (Ln=Sm 1, Eu 2, Tb 3 and Dy 4; fpht=3-fluorophthalate and ox=oxalate) have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The four complexes possess similar 2D framework structures constructed from Ln-fpht double-stranded helices and ox linkages. Complexes 2 and 3 display the characteristic emission {sup 5}D{sub 0}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} (J=0-4) transitions of Eu(III) ion and {sup 5}D{sub 4}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} (J=6-3) transitions of Tb(III) ion, respectively. The emission decay curves reveal a monoexponential behavior yielding the lifetime values of 0.266{+-}0.002 ms for 2 and 0.733{+-}0.002 ms for 3. The emission spectrum of 1 shows three weak bands corresponding to the characteristic emission {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 7/2} and {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 9/2} transitions of Sm(III) ion. The emission spectrum of 4 displays a broad band centered at 438 nm, which comes from the {pi}{sup Low-Asterisk }-{pi} transition of the ligand. - Graphical abstract: Complexes [Ln{sub 2}(fpht){sub 2}(ox)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (fpht=3-fluorophthalate, ox=oxalate) possess 2D structures. Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes show the characteristic fluorescent emission of the Ln(III). Dy(III) complex displays ligand-based luminescent behavior. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Ln{sub 2}(fpht){sub 2}(ox)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (fpht=3-fluorophthalate; ox=oxalate) show 2D structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 2D structures are constructed from Ln-fpht double-stranded helices and ox linkage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes show the characteristic emission of the Ln(III) ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dy(III) complex displays ligand-based luminescent behavior.

  7. Insights into the growth of bismuth nanoparticles on 2D structured BiOCl photocatalysts: an in situ TEM investigation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Shuangbao; Qi, Qi; Gondal, Mohammed A; Rashid, Siddique G; Gao, Si; Yang, Deyuan; Shen, Kai; Xu, Qingyu; Wang, Peng

    2015-09-28

    The synthetic techniques for novel photocatalytic crystals had evolved by a trial-and-error process that spanned more than two decades, and an insight into the photocatalytic crystal growth process is a challenging area and prerequisite for achieving an excellent photoactivity. Bismuth nanoparticle based hybrids, such as Bi/BiOCl composites, have recently been investigated as highly efficient photocatalytic systems because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of nanostructured bismuth. In this work, the observation towards the formation and growth of bismuth nanoparticles onto 2D structured BiOCl photocatalysts has been performed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) directly in real time. The growth of bismuth nanoparticles on BiOCl nanosheets can be emulated and speeded up driven by the electron beam (e(-) beam) in TEM. The crystallinity, growth and the elemental evolution during the formation of bismuth nanoparticles have also been probed in this work.

  8. Broadband 7-fs diffractive-optic-based 2D electronic spectroscopy using hollow-core fiber compression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonan; Dostál, Jakub; Brixner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate noncollinear coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy for which broadband pulses are generated in an argon-filled hollow-core fiber pumped by a 1-kHz Ti:Sapphire laser. Compression is achieved to 7 fs duration (TG-FROG) using dispersive mirrors. The hollow fiber provides a clean spatial profile and smooth spectral shape in the 500-700 nm region. The diffractive-optic-based design of the 2D spectrometer avoids directional filtering distortions and temporal broadening from time smearing. For demonstration we record data of cresyl-violet perchlorate in ethanol and use phasing to obtain broadband absorptive 2D spectra. The resulting quantum beating as a function of population time is consistent with literature data. PMID:27607681

  9. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene).

    PubMed

    Mashtalir, O; Lukatskaya, M R; Kolesnikov, A I; Raymundo-Piñero, E; Naguib, M; Barsoum, M W; Gogotsi, Y

    2016-04-28

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g(-1) in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  10. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  11. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Raymundo-Pinero, E.; Naguib, Michael; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-03-25

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. Furthermore, the hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g–1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  12. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  13. Modeling of 2D photonic bandgap structures using a triangular mesh finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2001-10-01

    A numerical model is presented for computing the out-of- plane losses of a general class of row-defect waveguides formed by the superposition of a 2D photonic crystal onto a slab confinement structure. The usefulness of this model is demonstrated here by calculating the propagation loss of a single-row-defect waveguide composed of hexagonal air holes etched into two different slab structures. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple coupled-mode-theory picture in which loss is due to coupling by the waveguide corrugation between the fundamental and certain radiative slab modes. These calculations show that low-loss photonic crystal waveguides should be possible by carefully engineering the radiation modes of the slab waveguide.

  14. A simple configuration for fabrication of 2D and 3D photonic quasicrystals with complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, XiaoHong; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Wei; Jiang, LiuDi

    2016-06-01

    A simple method using a single-prism common-path interferometer is presented for the fabrication of complex quasicrystals in sub-micrometer scales. Multiple types of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) quasicrystalline structures are designed and their diffraction patterns are obtained by using Fourier Transform method. Multi-fold rotational symmetries are demonstrated and compared. By using this method, a wide range of quasicrystals types can be produced with arbitrary complexities and rotational symmetries. The transmittance studies of 12-fold and 18-fold structures also reveal the existence of complete photonic bandgaps, which also demonstrates increased symmetry and significantly improved characteristics of photonic band-gaps.

  15. Layer-by-Layer Assembled 2D Montmorillonite Dielectrics for Solution-Processed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Xiaolong; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Jariwala, Deep; Beck, Megan E; Huang, Wei; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembled 2D montmorillonite nanosheets are shown to be high-performance, solution-processed dielectrics. These scalable and spatially uniform sub-10 nm thick dielectrics yield high areal capacitances of ≈600 nF cm(-2) and low leakage currents down to 6 × 10(-9) A cm(-2) that enable low voltage operation of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube and n-type indium gallium zinc oxide field-effect transistors. PMID:26514248

  16. The influence of pressure on the structure of a 2D uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Elinor C.; Ross, Nancy L.; Surbella, Robert G.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2014-10-01

    We report the first quantitative analysis of the structural evolution of a uranyl bearing coordination polymer in response to pressure. The material that is central to this study, (UO2)(O3PCH2CO2H) (1), is constructed from rigid 2D inorganic layers comprising edge sharing UO7 pentagonal bipyramids cross-linked by [PO3(COOH)]2- anions. Strong hydrogen bonding interactions exist between the pendent carboxylic acid groups on adjacent layers. Under pressure, 1 exhibits compressional behaviour primarily in the direction perpendicular to the inorganic layers, which is aided by a reduction in the interlayer distance and shifting of the layers with respect to each other. The bulk modulus for the 2D compound 1 is unexpectedly high [18.1(1) GPa] and is within the range reported for 3D CPs assembled from ZnII cations and inflexible imidazolate anions, and is at the lower end of the range of moduli observed for aluminosilicate zeolites (19-59 GPa).

  17. Structure and interaction in 2D assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Wang. S.; Masafumi, F.; Checco, A.; Zhongwei, N.; Wang, Q.

    2009-08-27

    We created two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) and characterized their structures using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray scattering. The TMVs were adsorbed on an oppositely charged, fluid lipid monolayer supported by a solid substrate and submerged in a buffer solution. The lipid monolayer confined the viral particles within a plane, while providing them with lateral mobility so that overall the TMV assembly behaved like a 2D liquid. We controlled the inter-particle interaction by adjusting the chemical condition in the buffer to induce ordered TMV assemblies. We found that the presence of the lipid layer was essential for forming ordered TMV assemblies. Packed TMV assemblies formed on the lipid layer, with an average inter-particle spacing of 42 nm. By introducing Ca2+ ions into the buffer solution, we were able to improve the in-plane order within the TMV assemblies and reduce the average inter-particle spacing to 20 nm, compared to the TMV diameter of 18 nm. Quantitative analysis of the X-ray scattering data shows that the structural order within the TMV assemblies prepared under a Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer solution is consistent with purely repulsive, electrostatic inter-particle interaction. In contrast, the structural order within Ca{sup 2+}-induced TMV assemblies is consistent with the behavior of a fluid of sticky rods, implying the presence of a strong attraction between TMVs. In addition to the screening of Coulomb repulsion, this behavior is likely the result of counterion-induced as well as membrane-mediated attractions.

  18. Structure and Interaction in 2D Assemblies of Tobacco Mosaic Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuto, M.; Yang, L.; Wang, S.; Fukuto, M.; Checco, A.; Niu, Z.; Wang, Q.

    2009-12-07

    We created two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) and characterized their structures using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray scattering. The TMVs were adsorbed on an oppositely charged, fluid lipid monolayer supported by a solid substrate and submerged in a buffer solution. The lipid monolayer confined the viral particles within a plane, while providing them with lateral mobility so that overall the TMV assembly behaved like a 2D liquid. We controlled the inter-particle interaction by adjusting the chemical condition in the buffer to induce ordered TMV assemblies. We found that the presence of the lipid layer was essential for forming ordered TMV assemblies. Packed TMV assemblies formed on the lipid layer, with an average inter-particle spacing of 42 nm. By introducing Ca{sup 2+} ions into the buffer solution, we were able to improve the in-plane order within the TMV assemblies and reduce the average inter-particle spacing to 20 nm, compared to the TMV diameter of 18 nm. Quantitative analysis of the X-ray scattering data shows that the structural order within the TMV assemblies prepared under a Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer solution is consistent with purely repulsive, electrostatic inter-particle interaction. In contrast, the structural order within Ca{sup 2+}-induced TMV assemblies is consistent with the behavior of a fluid of sticky rods, implying the presence of a strong attraction between TMVs. In addition to the screening of Coulomb repulsion, this behavior is likely the result of counterion-induced as well as membrane-mediated attractions.

  19. Growth of Large and Highly Ordered 2D Crystals of a K+ Channel, Structural Role of Lipidic Environment

    PubMed Central

    De Zorzi, Rita; Nicholson, William V.; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Erne-Brand, Françoise; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    2D crystallography has proven to be an excellent technique to determine the 3D structure of membrane proteins. Compared to 3D crystallography, it has the advantage of visualizing the protein in an environment closer to the native one. However, producing good 2D crystals is still a challenge and little statistical knowledge can be gained from literature. Here, we present a thorough screening of 2D crystallization conditions for a prokaryotic inwardly rectifying potassium channel (>130 different conditions). Key parameters leading to very large and well-organized 2D crystals are discussed. In addition, the problem of formation of multilayers during the growth of 2D crystals is also addressed. An intermediate resolution projection map of KirBac3.1 at 6 Å is presented, which sheds (to our knowledge) new light on the structure of this channel in a lipid environment. PMID:23870261

  20. Binary and ternary recombination of H2D(+) and HD2(+) ions with electrons at 80 K.

    PubMed

    Dohnal, Petr; Kálosi, Ábel; Plašil, Radek; Roučka, Štěpán; Kovalenko, Artem; Rednyk, Serhiy; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosík, Juraj

    2016-08-24

    The recombination of deuterated trihydrogen cations with electrons has been studied in afterglow plasmas containing mixtures of helium, argon, hydrogen and deuterium. By monitoring the fractional abundances of H3(+), H2D(+), HD2(+) and D3(+) as a function of the [D2]/[H2] ratio using infrared absorption observed in a cavity ring down absorption spectrometer (CRDS), it was possible to deduce effective recombination rate coefficients for H2D(+) and HD2(+) ions at a temperature of 80 K. From pressure dependences of the measured effective recombination rate coefficients the binary and the ternary recombination rate coefficients for both ions have been determined. The inferred binary and ternary recombination rate coefficients are: αbinH2D(80 K) = (7.1 ± 4.2) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), αbinHD2(80 K) = (8.7 ± 2.5) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), KH2D(80 K) = (1.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1) and KHD2(80 K) = (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1). PMID:27506912

  1. Increasing the lego of 2D electronics materials: silicene and germanene, graphene's new synthetic cousins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Guy; Salomon, Eric; Angot, Thierry; Eugenia Dávila, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The realization of the first Field Effect Transistors operating at room temperature, based on a single layer silicene channel, open up highly promising perspectives, e.g., typically, for applications in digital electronics. Here, we describe recent results on the growth, characterization and electronic properties of novel synthetic two-dimensional materials beyond graphene, namely silicene and germanene, its silicon and germanium counterparts.

  2. Enantiomeric Excess-Tuned 2D Structural Transition: From Heterochiral to Homochiral Supramolecular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Lin; Sun, Bing; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-07-12

    Spontaneous resolution of enantiomers is an intriguing and important phenomenon in surface chirality studies. Herein, we report on a two-dimensional (2D) structural transition from the heterochiral to homochiral assembly tuned by changing the enantiomeric excess (ee) of enantiomers in the solution phase. Enantiomers cocrystallize as racemates on the surface when the ee of the R-enantiomer (or S-enantiomer) remains below a critical value, whereas chiral segregation is achieved, and globally homochiral surfaces composed of exclusively one enantiomer are obtained as the critical ee is exceeded. The heterochiral-homochiral transition is ascribed to the formation of energetically unfavored homochiral molecular dimers under the control of the majority-rules principle at high ee values. Such results present an intriguing phenomenon in chiral ordering at surfaces, promising a new enlightenment toward understanding chiral resolution and the evolution of chirality. PMID:27287273

  3. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  4. Ray tracing of Electron Bernstein Waves in 2D for C-2 Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, E.; Kruszelnicki, J.; Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu.; TAE Team

    2013-10-01

    Ray propagation in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ECRF) has been studied for simulated two dimensional equilibria on the C-2 device. Studies have been performed using the Genray ray tracing code, with modifications to allow ray trajectories on open magnetic flux surfaces. Primary studies are focused on Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) coupling mechanisms to study the potential for microwave heating of Field Reversed Configurations (FRC).

  5. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

    2005-06-01

    increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

  6. Recent Advances In 2D-Band Structure Imaging By k-PEEM and Prospects For Technological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, C.; Renault, O.; Rotella, H.; Barrett, N.; Chabli, A.

    2011-11-01

    The imaging of surfaces using the PhotoElectron Emission Microscopy (PEEM) technique has recently received considerable interest, mainly thanks to the use of high brilliance synchrotron radiation which facilitates the study of surface properties and chemical selectivity. By inserting a transfer lens in the optical column of a high transmission and full energy-filtering PEEM, it is possible to image the back focal plane, named k-PEEM imaging mode. Hence, the corresponding image shows the angular distribution of the emitted photoelectrons for a given kinetic energy. By varying the kinetic energy, the complete energy filtering provides full 2D cuts of the band structure in reciprocal space. In this paper, we present the principles and the capabilities of this new imaging mode, and compare it to the standard ARPES technique. Then, we present results obtained on a model sample: Ag(100), and on a technological sample, epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001), highlighting the potential of this new imaging mode for the spatially resolved characterization of the electronic structure of monocrystalline materials in devices.

  7. 2-D Finite Difference Modeling of the D'' Structure Beneath the Eastern Cocos Plate: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, D. V.; Song, T. A.; Sun, D.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of phase transition from Perovskite (Pv) to Post-Perovskite (PPv) at depth nears the lowermost mantle has revealed a new view of the earth's D'' layer (Oganov et al. 2004; Murakami et al. 2004). Hernlund et al. (2004) recently pusposed that, depending on the geotherm at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a double-crossing of the phase boundary by the geotherm at two different depths may also occur. To explore these new findings, we adopt 2-D finite difference scheme (Helmberger and Vidale, 1988) to model wave propagation in rapidly varying structure. We collect broadband waveform data recorded by several Passcal experiments, such as La Ristra transect and CDROM transect in the southwest US to constrain the lateral variations in D'' structure. These data provide fairly dense sampling (~ 20 km) in the lowermost mantle beneath the eastern Cocos plate. Since the source-receiver paths are mostly in the same azimuth, we make 2-D cross-sections from global tomography model (Grand, 2002) and compute finite difference synthetics. We modify the lowermost mantle below 2500 km with constraints from transverse-component waveform data at epicentral distances of 70-82 degrees in the time window between S and ScS, essentially foward modeling waveforms. Assuming a velocity jump of 3 % at D'', our preferred model shows that the D'' topography deepens from the north to the south by about 120 km over a lateral distance of 300 km. Such large topography jumps have been proposed by Thomas et al. (2004) using data recorded by TriNet. In addition, there is a negative velocity jump (-3 %) 100 km above the CMB in the south. This simple model compare favorably with results from a study by Sun, Song and Helmberger (2005), who follow Sidorin et al. (1999) approach and produce a thermodynamically consistent velocity model with Pv-PPv phase boundary. It appears that much of this complexity exists in Grand's tomographic maps with rapid variation in velocities just above the D''. We also

  8. A review of MBE grown 0D, 1D and 2D quantum structures in a nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Mata, Maria; Zhou, Xiang; Furtmayr, Florian; Teubert, Jörg; Gradecak, Silvija; Eickhoff, Martin; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Arbiol, Jordi

    2013-05-01

    We review different strategies to achieve a three-dimensional energy bandgap modulation in a nanowire (NW) by the introduction of self-assembled 0D, 1D and 2D quantum structures, quantum dots (QDs), quantum wires (QWRs) and quantum wells (QWs). Starting with the well-known axial, radial (coaxial/prismatic) or polytypic quantum wells in GaN/AlN, GaAs/AlAs or wurtzite/zinc-blende systems, respectively, we move to more sophisticated structures by lowering their dimensionality. New recent approaches developed for the self-assembly of GaN quantum wires and InAs or AlGaAs quantum dots on single nanowire templates are reported and discussed. Aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microcopy is presented as a powerful tool to determine the structure and morphology at the atomic scale allowing for the creation of 3D atomic models that can help us to understand the enhanced optical properties of these advanced quantum structures.

  9. Self-Assembly of Graphene Single Crystals with Uniform Size and Orientation: The First 2D Super-Ordered Structure.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mengqi; Wang, Lingxiang; Liu, Jinxin; Zhang, Tao; Xue, Haifeng; Xiao, Yao; Qin, Zhihui; Fu, Lei

    2016-06-29

    The challenges facing the rapid developments of highly integrated electronics, photonics, and microelectromechanical systems suggest that effective fabrication technologies are urgently needed to produce ordered structures using components with high performance potential. Inspired by the spontaneous organization of molecular units into ordered structures by noncovalent interactions, we succeed for the first time in synthesizing a two-dimensional superordered structure (2DSOS). As demonstrated by graphene, the 2DSOS was prepared via self-assembly of high-quality graphene single crystals under mutual electrostatic force between the adjacent crystals assisted by airflow-induced hydrodynamic forces at the liquid metal surface. The as-obtained 2DSOS exhibits tunable periodicity in the crystal space and outstanding uniformity in size and orientation. Moreover, the intrinsic property of each building block is preserved. With simplicity, scalability, and continuously adjustable feature size, the presented approach may open new territory for the precise assembly of 2D atomic crystals and facilitate its application in structurally derived integrated systems. PMID:27313075

  10. Hydrothermal Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Electrochemical Behavior of 2d Hybrid Coordination Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Weiqiang; Zhu, Lin; Shi, Weidong; Chen, Fuxiao; Bai, Hongye; Song, Shuyan; Yan, Yongsheng

    2013-06-01

    A novel metal-organic coordination polymer [Cu(phen)(L)0.5(H2O)]n (H4L = (N,N‧-5,5‧-bis(isophthalic acid)-p-xylylenediamine, and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystallographic data show that the title compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/n with a = 10.682(2), b = 15.682(3), c = 11.909(2) Å, β = 91.39(3)°, V = 1994.3(7) Å3, C24H17CuN3O5, Mr = 490.95, Dc = 1.635 g/cm3, F(000) = 1004, Z = 4, μ(MoKα) = 1.141 mm-1, the final R = 0.0418 and wR = 0.0983 for 3578 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). The structural analyses reveal that the title compound exhibits shows a 2D layer structure, which are further linked by hydrogen bonding interactions to form a three-dimensional supramolecular network. In addition, the thermal stability and electrochemical behavior of title compound has been studied. CCDC: 900413.

  11. An interpolating 2D pixel readout structure for synchrotron X-ray diffraction in protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besch, H. J.; Junk, M.; Meißner, W.; Sarvestani, A.; Stiehler, R.; Walenta, A. H.

    1997-02-01

    The high rates available now at synchrotron beam lines ask for detectors allowing online measurements with good spatial resolution and a precise intensity measurement. For this purpose gaseous detectors operating in the single photon counting mode are well suited. An interpolating 2D pixel readout structure will be presented. It has been tested as backplane of a MSGC or a CAT-detector (recently developed by the group of M. Lemonnier at LURE), and it operates on the principle of resistive charge partition, allowing asynchronous readout. A resolution of 200 μm is reached. Under similar conditions the energy resolution from the signals of the readout structure presented is nearly the same as that of standard readout. In combination with a CAT an energy resolution of 20% is reached. A prototype of 64 channels with a sensitive area of 14 mm × 14 mm was tested at the synchrotron at LURE (Orsay). Diffraction patterns from a collagenase protein crystal were measured and rocking curves were obtained with an angular resolution of 1.5 × 10 -5.

  12. Identifying Key Structural Features and Spatial Relationships in Archean Microbialites Using 2D and 3D Visualization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, E. W.; Sumner, D. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Microbialites in the 2521 ± 3 Ma Gamohaan Formation, South Africa, have several different end-member morphologies which show distinct growth structures and spatial relationships. We characterized several growth structures and spatial relationships in two samples (DK20 and 2_06) using a combination of 2D and 3D analytical techniques. There are two main goals in studying complicated microbialites with a combination of 2D and 3D methods. First, one can better understand microbialite growth by identifying important structures and structural relationships. Once structures are identified, the order in which the structures formed and how they are related can be inferred from observations of crosscutting relationships. Second, it is important to use both 2D and 3D methods to correlate 3D observations with those in 2D that are more common in the field. Combining analysis provides significantly more insight into the 3D morphology of microbial structures. In our studies, 2D analysis consisted of describing polished slabs and serial sections created by grinding down the rock 100 microns at a time. 3D analysis was performed on serial sections visualized in 3D using Vrui and 3DVisualizer software developed at KeckCAVES, UCD (http://keckcaves.org). Data were visualized on a laptop and in an immersive cave system. Both samples contain microbial laminae and more vertically orients microbial "walls" called supports. The relationships between these features created voids now filled with herringbone and blocky calcite crystals. DK20, a classic plumose structure, contains two types of support structures. Both are 1st order structures (1st order structures with organic inclusions and 1st without organic inclusions) interpreted as planar features based on 2D analysis. In the 2D analysis the 1st order structures show v branching relationships as well as single cuspate relationships (two 1st order structures with inclusions merging upward), and single tented relationships (three supports

  13. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  14. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  15. Guided Lamb wave based 2-D spiral phased array for structural health monitoring of thin panel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byungseok

    2011-12-01

    In almost all industries of mechanical, aerospace, and civil engineering fields, structural health monitoring (SHM) technology is essentially required for providing the reliable information of structural integrity of safety-critical structures, which can help reduce the risk of unexpected and sometimes catastrophic failures, and also offer cost-effective inspection and maintenance of the structures. State of the art SHM research on structural damage diagnosis is focused on developing global and real-time technologies to identify the existence, location, extent, and type of damage. In order to detect and monitor the structural damage in plate-like structures, SHM technology based on guided Lamb wave (GLW) interrogation is becoming more attractive due to its potential benefits such as large inspection area coverage in short time, simple inspection mechanism, and sensitivity to small damage. However, the GLW method has a few critical issues such as dispersion nature, mode conversion and separation, and multiple-mode existence. Phased array technique widely used in all aspects of civil, military, science, and medical industry fields may be employed to resolve the drawbacks of the GLW method. The GLW-based phased array approach is able to effectively examine and analyze complicated structural vibration responses in thin plate structures. Because the phased sensor array operates as a spatial filter for the GLW signals, the array signal processing method can enhance a desired signal component at a specific direction while eliminating other signal components from other directions. This dissertation presents the development, the experimental validation, and the damage detection applications of an innovative signal processing algorithm based on two-dimensional (2-D) spiral phased array in conjunction with the GLW interrogation technique. It starts with general backgrounds of SHM and the associated technology including the GLW interrogation method. Then, it is focused on the

  16. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B-Y; Ni, G X; Pan, C; Fei, Z; Cheng, B; Lau, C N; Bockrath, M; Basov, D N; Fogler, M M

    2016-08-19

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept. PMID:27588873

  17. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Ni, G. X.; Pan, C.; Fei, Z.; Cheng, B.; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  18. A Study of Two Dimensional Electron Gas Using 2D Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Carl; Paul, Jagannath; Karaiskaj, Denis

    2015-03-01

    The dephasing of FES was measured in a symmetrically modulation doped 12 nm single quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas system using time integrated four wave mixing (TIFWM) and a two dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy (2DFTS). At high in-well carrier densities of ~4 x 1011 cm-2, many body effects that are prevalent and measurable with non-linear optical spectroscopy. Effects of exciton-exciton and exciton-phonon scattering events, exciton populations, and biexciton formation are detectable at these carrier concentrations. Homogeneous linewidths obtained from 2DFT and TIFWM yield a zero Kelvin linewidth of 1.42 meV and an acoustic phonon scattering coefficient of 158 μ eV/K. These observations indicate a rapid increase in homogeneous linewidth with increased temperature. NSF REU Grant # DMR-1263066: REU Site in Applied Physics at USF.

  19. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  20. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  1. Characterization of saturated MHD instabilities through 2D electron temperature profile reconstruction from 1D ECE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sertoli, M.; Horváth, L.; Pokol, G. I.; Igochine, V.; Barrera, L.

    2013-05-01

    A new method for the reconstruction of two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature profiles in the presence of saturated magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) modes from the one-dimensional (1D) electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic is presented. The analysis relies on harmonic decomposition of the electron temperature oscillations through short time Fourier transforms and requires rigid poloidal mode rotation as the only assumption. The method is applicable to any magnetic perturbation as long as the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers m and n are known. Its application to the case of a (m, n) = (1, 1) internal kink mode on ASDEX Upgrade is presented and a new way to estimate the mode displacement is explained. For such modes, it is shown that the higher order harmonics usually visible in the ECE spectrogram arise also for the pure m = n = 1 mode and that they cannot be directly associated with m = n > 1 magnetic perturbations. This method opens up new possibilities for electron heat transport studies in the presence of saturated MHD modes and a way to disentangle the impurity density contributions from electron temperature effects in the analysis of the soft x-ray data.

  2. 2D and 3D GPR imaging of structural ceilings in historic and existing constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, Camilla

    2014-05-01

    GPR applications in civil engineering are to date quite diversified. With respect to civil constructions and monumental buildings, detection of voids, cavities, layering in structural elements, variation of geometry, of moisture content, of materials, areas of decay, defects, cracks have been reported in timber, concrete and masonry elements. Nonetheless, many more fields of investigation remain unexplored. This contribution gives an account of a variety of examples of structural ceilings investigation by GPR radar in reflection mode, either as 2D or 3D data acquisition and visualisation. Ceilings have a pre-eminent role in buildings as they contribute to a good structural behaviour of the construction. Primarily, the following functions can be listed for ceilings: a) they carry vertical dead and live loads on floors and distribute such loads to the vertical walls; b) they oppose to external horizontal forces such as wind loads and earthquakes helping to transfer such forces from the loaded element to the other walls; c) they contribute to create the box skeleton and behaviour of a building, connecting the different load bearing walls and reducing the slenderness and flexural instability of such walls. Therefore, knowing how ceilings are made in specific buildings is of paramount importance for architects and structural engineers. According to the type of building and age of construction, ceilings may present very different solutions and materials. Moreover, in existing constructions, ceilings may have been substituted, modified or strengthened due to material decay or to change of use of the building. These alterations may often go unrecorded in technical documentation or technical drawings may be unavailable. In many cases, the position, orientation and number of the load carrying elements in ceilings may be hidden or not be in sight, due for example to the presence of false ceilings or to technical plants. GPR radar can constitute a very useful tool for

  3. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  4. Structural and Functional Analysis of JMJD2D Reveals Molecular Basis for Site-Specific Demethylation among JMJD2 Demethylases

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Swathi; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-01-08

    We found that JMJD2 lysine demethylases (KDMs) participate in diverse genomic processes. Most JMJD2 homologs display dual selectivity toward H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, with the exception of JMJD2D, which is specific for H3K9me3. Here, we report the crystal structures of the JMJD2D•2-oxoglutarate•H3K9me3 ternary complex and JMJD2D apoenzyme. Utilizing structural alignments with JMJD2A, molecular docking, and kinetic analysis with an array of histone peptide substrates, we elucidate the specific signatures that permit efficient recognition of H3K9me3 by JMJD2A and JMJD2D, and the residues in JMJD2D that occlude H3K36me3 demethylation. Surprisingly, these results reveal that JMJD2A and JMJD2D exhibit subtle yet important differences in H3K9me3 recognition, despite the overall similarity in the substrate-binding conformation. Further, we show that H3T11 phosphorylation abrogates demethylation by JMJD2 KDMs. These studies reveal the molecular basis for JMJD2 site specificity and provide a framework for structure-based design of selective inhibitors of JMJD2 KDMs implicated in disease.

  5. Two 2D silver(I) coordination polymers derived from mixed ligands: Syntheses, structures, photoluminescent and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Jing; Sun, Di; Li, Yun-Hua; Hao, Hong-Jun; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2011-07-01

    Two isomers of the aminobenzonitrile were reacted with Ag 2O and phthalic acid under ultrasonic condition, yielding two coordination polymers (CPs) of the formula [Ag 2( o-abn)(pa)] n ( 1) and [Ag 4( m-abn)(pa) 2] n ( 2). They have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectrum and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both complexes 1 and 2 are 2D sheet structures which contain two different Ag(I) aggregates, 1D silver helical chain and 2D silver sheet for 1 and 2, respectively. The o-abn in 1 adopts a rare tridentate μ 3- N, N' N' mode to bridge the neighboring 1D silver chains to form a 2D coordination network, while the m-abn ligand just acts as a monodentate N-donor in 2 and does not contribute to the extension of the 2D silver sheet to the higher dimensionality. As the change of the relative position of amino and cyano groups of the aminobenzonitrile ligand, the dimensionality of the Ag(I) aggregates in 1 and 2 increases from 1D to 2D, which indicates that the relative positions of amino and cyano groups of aminobenzonitrile play an important role in the formation of the diverse Ag(I) aggregates, as a consequence, different 2D coordination networks are produced. Additionally, results about emissive behaviors and thermal stabilities of them are discussed.

  6. Conductance based characterization of structure and hopping site density in 2D molecule-nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    McCold, Cliff E; Fu, Qiang; Howe, Jane Y; Hihath, Joshua

    2015-09-28

    Composite molecule-nanoparticle hybrid systems have recently emerged as important materials for applications ranging from chemical sensing to nanoscale electronics. However, creating reproducible and repeatable composite materials with precise properties has remained one of the primary challenges to the implementation of these technologies. Understanding the sources of variation that dominate the assembly and transport behavior is essential for the advancement of nanoparticle-array based devices. In this work, we use a combination of charge-transport measurements, electron microscopy, and optical characterization techniques to determine the role of morphology and structure on the charge transport properties of 2-dimensional monolayer arrays of molecularly-interlinked Au nanoparticles. Using these techniques we are able to determine the role of both assembly-dependent and particle-dependent defects on the conductivities of the films. These results demonstrate that assembly processes dominate the dispersion of conductance values, while nanoparticle and ligand features dictate the mean value of the conductance. By performing a systematic study of the conductance of these arrays as a function of nanoparticle size we are able to extract the carrier mobility for specific molecular ligands. We show that nanoparticle polydispersity correlates with the void density in the array, and that because of this correlation it is possible to accurately determine the void density within the array directly from conductance measurements. These results demonstrate that conductance-based measurements can be used to accurately and non-destructively determine the morphological and structural properties of these hybrid arrays, and thus provide a characterization platform that helps move 2-dimensional nanoparticle arrays toward robust and reproducible electronic systems.

  7. A Stochastic Hill Climbing Approach for Simultaneous 2D Alignment and Clustering of Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Bonnet, Frederic; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2016-06-01

    A critical step in the analysis of novel cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle datasets is the identification of homogeneous subsets of images. Methods for solving this problem are important for data quality assessment, ab initio 3D reconstruction, and analysis of population diversity due to the heterogeneous nature of macromolecules. Here we formulate a stochastic algorithm for identification of homogeneous subsets of images. The purpose of the method is to generate improved 2D class averages that can be used to produce a reliable 3D starting model in a rapid and unbiased fashion. We show that our method overcomes inherent limitations of widely used clustering approaches and proceed to test the approach on six publicly available experimental cryo-EM datasets. We conclude that, in each instance, ab initio 3D reconstructions of quality suitable for initialization of high-resolution refinement are produced from the cluster centers. PMID:27184214

  8. Kondo effect at low electron density and high particle-hole asymmetry in 1D, 2D, and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, Rok; Horvat, Alen

    2016-09-01

    Using the perturbative scaling equations and the numerical renormalization group, we study the characteristic energy scales in the Kondo impurity problem as a function of the exchange coupling constant J and the conduction-band electron density. We discuss the relation between the energy gain (impurity binding energy) Δ E and the Kondo temperature TK. We find that the two are proportional only for large values of J , whereas in the weak-coupling limit the energy gain is quadratic in J , while the Kondo temperature is exponentially small. The exact relation between the two quantities depends on the detailed form of the density of states of the band. In the limit of low electron density the Kondo screening is affected by the strong particle-hole asymmetry due to the presence of the band-edge van Hove singularities. We consider the cases of one- (1D), two- (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) tight-binding lattices (linear chain, square lattice, cubic lattice) with inverse-square-root, step-function, and square-root onsets of the density of states that are characteristic of the respective dimensionalities. We always find two different regimes depending on whether TK is higher or lower than μ , the chemical potential measured from the bottom of the band. For 2D and 3D, we find a sigmoidal crossover between the large-J and small-J asymptotics in Δ E and a clear separation between Δ E and TK for TK<μ . For 1D, there is, in addition, a sizable intermediate-J regime where the Kondo temperature is quadratic in J due to the diverging density of states at the band edge. Furthermore, we find that in 1D the particle-hole asymmetry leads to a large decrease of TK compared to the standard result obtained by approximating the density of states to be constant (flat-band approximation), while in 3D the opposite is the case; this is due to the nontrivial interplay of the exchange and potential scattering renormalization in the presence of particle-hole asymmetry. The 2D square

  9. Mercury (I) nitroprusside: A 2D structure supported on homometallic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Reguera, L.; Lemus-Santana, A. A.; Reguera, E.

    2015-01-01

    The pentacyanonitrosylferrate complex anion, [Fe(CN)5NO]2-, forms an insoluble solid with Hg(I) ion, of formula unit Hg2[Fe(CN)5NO]·2H2O, whose crystal structure and related properties are unknown. This contribution reports the preparation of that compound by the precipitation method and its structural study from X-ray powder patterns complemented with spectroscopic information from IR, Raman, and UV-vis techniques. The crystal structure was solved ab initio and then refined using the Rietveld method. The solid crystallizes with a triclinic unit cell, in the P-1 space group, with cell parameters a=10.1202(12), b=10.1000(13), c=7.4704(11) Å; α=110.664(10), β=110.114(10), γ=104.724(8) °. Within the unit cell, two formula units are accommodated (Z=2). It adopts a layered structure related with the coordination of the equatorial CN groups at their N end to the Hg atoms while the axial CN ligand remains unlinked. Within the layers neighboring Hg2[Fe(CN)5NO] building units remain linked through four relatively strong Hg-Hg interactions, with an interatomic distance of 2.549(3) Å. The charge donation from the equatorial CN groups through their 5σ orbitals results into an increase for the electron density on the Hg atoms, which strengths the Hg-Hg bond. In the Raman spectrum, that metal-metal bond is detected as a stretching vibration band at 167 cm-1. The available free volume between neighboring layers accommodates two water molecules, which are stabilized within the framework through hydrogen bonds with the N end of the unlinked axial CN group. The removal of these weakly bonded water molecules results in structural disorder for the material 3D framework.

  10. Structure and properties of phosphorene-like IV-VI 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhinan; Wang, Bo; Ou, Liangkai; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    Because of the excellent physical and chemical properties of phosphorene, phosphorene and phosphorene-like materials have attracted extensive attention. Since phosphorus belongs to group V, some group IV-VI compounds could also form phosphorene-like configurations. In this work, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS monolayers were constructed to investigate the structural and electronic properties by employing first-principles computations. Phonon spectra suggest that these monolayers are dynamically stable and could be realized in experiments. These monolayers are all semiconductors with the band gaps of 2.26 ∼ 4.13 eV. Based on the monolayers, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS bilayers were also constructed. The band gaps of these bilayers are smaller than those of the corresponding monolayers. Moreover, the optical properties of these monolayers and bilayers were calculated, and the results indicate that the SnO, GeS and SnS bilayers exhibit obvious optical absorption in the visible spectrum. All the results suggest that phosphorene-like IV-VI materials are promising candidates for electronic and optical devices.

  11. Structure and properties of phosphorene-like IV-VI 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhinan; Wang, Bo; Ou, Liangkai; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-14

    Because of the excellent physical and chemical properties of phosphorene, phosphorene and phosphorene-like materials have attracted extensive attention. Since phosphorus belongs to group V, some group IV-VI compounds could also form phosphorene-like configurations. In this work, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS monolayers were constructed to investigate the structural and electronic properties by employing first-principles computations. Phonon spectra suggest that these monolayers are dynamically stable and could be realized in experiments. These monolayers are all semiconductors with the band gaps of 2.26 ∼ 4.13 eV. Based on the monolayers, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS bilayers were also constructed. The band gaps of these bilayers are smaller than those of the corresponding monolayers. Moreover, the optical properties of these monolayers and bilayers were calculated, and the results indicate that the SnO, GeS and SnS bilayers exhibit obvious optical absorption in the visible spectrum. All the results suggest that phosphorene-like IV-VI materials are promising candidates for electronic and optical devices.

  12. Structure and properties of phosphorene-like IV-VI 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhinan; Wang, Bo; Ou, Liangkai; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-14

    Because of the excellent physical and chemical properties of phosphorene, phosphorene and phosphorene-like materials have attracted extensive attention. Since phosphorus belongs to group V, some group IV-VI compounds could also form phosphorene-like configurations. In this work, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS monolayers were constructed to investigate the structural and electronic properties by employing first-principles computations. Phonon spectra suggest that these monolayers are dynamically stable and could be realized in experiments. These monolayers are all semiconductors with the band gaps of 2.26 ∼ 4.13 eV. Based on the monolayers, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS bilayers were also constructed. The band gaps of these bilayers are smaller than those of the corresponding monolayers. Moreover, the optical properties of these monolayers and bilayers were calculated, and the results indicate that the SnO, GeS and SnS bilayers exhibit obvious optical absorption in the visible spectrum. All the results suggest that phosphorene-like IV-VI materials are promising candidates for electronic and optical devices. PMID:27608201

  13. Structure, Density and Velocity Fluctuations in Quasi-2D non-Brownian Suspensions of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, Florence; Lhuillier, Daniel; Martin, Jérôme; Salin, Dominique

    1999-11-01

    Non-brownian sedimenting suspensions exhibit density and velocity fluctuations. We have performed experiments on a quasi-2D counter-flow stabilized suspension of 2000 spherical particles, namely a liquid-solid fluidized bed in a Hele-Shaw cell. This 2D suspension displays a uniform concentration but the particle radial distribution function and the fluctuations of the particle number in a sub-volume of the suspension suggest that the micostructure is homogeneous but not random. We have also measured the velocity fluctuations of a test-particle and the fluctuation of the mean particle velocity in a sub-volume. It happens that the relation between velocity and concentration fluctuation in a sub-volume can be deduced from a balance between buoyancy and parietal friction forces.

  14. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian J.; Dennis, Robert V.; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-03-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  15. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Brian J; Dennis, Robert V; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-04-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  16. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Miriam M; Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-06-01

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Qy band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240-270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet-singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  17. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang; Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H.

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  18. Designing molecular structure to achieve ductile fracture behavior in a stiff and strong 2D polymer, ``graphylene''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoz-Rosado, E.; Beaudet, T. D.; Balu, R.; Wetzel, E. D.

    2016-05-01

    As the simplest two-dimensional (2D) polymer, graphene has immensely high intrinsic strength and elastic stiffness but has limited toughness due to brittle fracture. We use atomistic simulations to explore a new class of graphene/polyethylene hybrid 2D polymer, ``graphylene'', that exhibits ductile fracture mechanisms and has a higher fracture toughness and flaw tolerance than graphene. A specific configuration of this 2D polymer hybrid, denoted ``GrE-2'' for the two-carbon-long ethylene chains connecting benzene rings in the inherent framework, is prioritized for study. MD simulations of crack propagation show that the energy release rate to propagate a crack in GrE-2 is twice that of graphene. We also demonstrate that GrE-2 exhibits delocalized failure and other energy-dissipating fracture mechanisms such as crack branching and bridging. These results demonstrate that 2D polymers can be uniquely tailored to achieve a balance of fracture toughness with mechanical stiffness and strength.As the simplest two-dimensional (2D) polymer, graphene has immensely high intrinsic strength and elastic stiffness but has limited toughness due to brittle fracture. We use atomistic simulations to explore a new class of graphene/polyethylene hybrid 2D polymer, ``graphylene'', that exhibits ductile fracture mechanisms and has a higher fracture toughness and flaw tolerance than graphene. A specific configuration of this 2D polymer hybrid, denoted ``GrE-2'' for the two-carbon-long ethylene chains connecting benzene rings in the inherent framework, is prioritized for study. MD simulations of crack propagation show that the energy release rate to propagate a crack in GrE-2 is twice that of graphene. We also demonstrate that GrE-2 exhibits delocalized failure and other energy-dissipating fracture mechanisms such as crack branching and bridging. These results demonstrate that 2D polymers can be uniquely tailored to achieve a balance of fracture toughness with mechanical stiffness and

  19. Fast ion induced shearing of 2D Alfvén eigenmodes measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Tobias, B J; Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Heidbrink, W W; Luhmann, N C; Nazikian, R; Park, H K; Spong, D A; Van Zeeland, M A

    2011-02-18

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  20. A novel 2-D transition metal cyanide membrane: Modeling, structural, magnetic, and functional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Marcus

    A novel 2-dimensional crystalline material composed of cyanide-bridged metal nanosheets with a square planar framework has been prepared. This material, similar to Hofmann clathrates, has a variety of interesting properties. The material is crystalline and possesses characteristics that include magnetic properties, electronic properties and useful structural features. They have recently been exfoliated into individual crystalline sheets. These sheets show a strong potential for use as ion selective membranes. Performance improvements in water purification and desalination by reverse osmosis methods owing to their single atom thickness is possible. A series of dynamic molecular simulations has provided an understanding of the mechanism for water permeability and salt rejection. Energy profiles for the passage of water and ionic species through the porous areas of these nanosheets have been built and reported. Performance estimates of the efficacy of this novel material for use as an ion selective membrane such as an improved desalination RO membrane are presented. Experiments in synthesis and exfoliation of this class of cyanide-bridged transition metal complex were conducted and the results are presented. A preliminary investigation into the magnetic properties of these materials is included.

  1. Epitaxial MoS2/GaN structures to enable vertical 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructure devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmetov, D.; Zhang, K.; Stan, G.; Kalanyan, B.; Eichfeld, S.; Burke, R.; Shah, P.; O'Regan, T.; Crowne, F.; Birdwell, A. G.; Robinson, J.; Davydov, A.; Ivanov, T.

    MoS2/GaN structures are investigated as a building block for vertical 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructure devices that utilize a 3D substrate (GaN) as an active component of the semiconductor device without the need of mechanical transfer of the 2D layer. Our CVD-grown monolayer MoS2 has been shown to be epitaxially aligned to the GaN lattice which is a pre-requisite for high quality 2D/3D interfaces desired for efficient vertical transport and large area growth. The MoS2 coverage is nearly 50 % including isolated triangles and monolayer islands. The GaN template is a double-layer grown by MOCVD on sapphire and allows for measurement of transport perpendicular to the 2D layer. Photoluminescence, Raman, XPS, Kelvin force probe microscopy, and SEM analysis identified high quality monolayer MoS2. The MoS2/GaN structures electrically conduct in the out-of-plane direction and across the van der Waals gap, as measured with conducting AFM (CAFM). The CAFM current maps and I-V characteristics are analyzed to estimate the MoS2/GaN contact resistivity to be less than 4 Ω-cm2 and current spreading in the MoS2 monolayer to be approx. 1 μm in diameter. Epitaxial MoS2/GaN heterostructures present a promising platform for the design of energy-efficient, high-speed vertical devices incorporating 2D layered materials with 3D semiconductors.

  2. Hybrid platforms of graphane-graphene 2D structures: prototypes for atomically precise nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Mota, F de B; Rivelino, R; Medeiros, P V C; Mascarenhas, A J S; de Castilho, C M C

    2014-11-21

    First-principles calculations demonstrate that line/ribbon defects, resulting from a controlled dehydrogenation in graphane, lead to the formation of low-dimensional electron-rich tracks in a monolayer. The present simulations point out that hybrid graphane-graphene nanostructures exhibit important elements, greatly required for the fabrication of efficient electronic circuits at the atomic level. PMID:25285905

  3. Image restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model and structure curve construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Petrosov, S. P.; Svirin, I.; Agaian, S.; Egiazarian, K.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper an image inpainting approach based on the construction of a composite curve for the restoration of the edges of objects in an image using the concepts of parametric and geometric continuity is presented. It is shown that this approach allows to restore the curved edges and provide more flexibility for curve design in damaged image by interpolating the boundaries of objects by cubic splines. After edge restoration stage, a texture restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model is carried out. The image intensity is locally modeled by a first spatial autoregressive model with support in a strongly causal prediction region on the plane. Model parameters are estimated by Yule-Walker method. Several examples considered in this paper show the effectiveness of the proposed approach for large objects removal as well as recovery of small regions on several test images.

  4. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Herwig; Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance Ron,dyn vs. the breakdown voltage Vbd. In literature, it has been shown that with a high Vbd, Ron,dyn is deteriorated. The impairment of Ron,dyn is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  5. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  6. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Island, Joshua O; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M; Ares, José R; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S J; Ferrer, Isabel J; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  7. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  8. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-03-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance.

  9. 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface: a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yue; Wang, Shiqiang; Yin, Xianpeng; Liang, Yun; Dong, Hao; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-07-21

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a flat gold surface was proposed, prepared, and theoretically and experimentally characterized. This hybrid structure supports two types of modes: surface plasmon polaritons bound at the metallic surface and waveguided mode of light confined in the cavity of bowls. Optical responses of this hybrid structure as well as the spatial electric field distribution of each mode are found to be strongly dependent on the structural parameters of this system, and thus could be widely modified on demand. Importantly, compared to the widely studied hybrid systems, namely the flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres, the waveguided mode with strong field enhancement appearing in the cavities of bowls is more facilely accessible and thus suitable for practical use. For demonstration, a 2D-ordered silica sub-micron bowl array deposited on a flat gold surface was fabricated and used as a regenerable platform for fluorescence enhancement by simply accommodating emitters in bowls. All the simulation and experiment results indicate that the 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface should be a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic system with great potential for applications such as sensors or tunable emitting devices if appropriate periods and materials are employed.

  10. The use of 2D fingerprint methods to support the assessment of structural similarity in orphan drug legislation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the European Union, medicines are authorised for some rare disease only if they are judged to be dissimilar to authorised orphan drugs for that disease. This paper describes the use of 2D fingerprints to show the extent of the relationship between computed levels of structural similarity for pairs of molecules and expert judgments of the similarities of those pairs. The resulting relationship can be used to provide input to the assessment of new active compounds for which orphan drug authorisation is being sought. Results 143 experts provided judgments of the similarity or dissimilarity of 100 pairs of drug-like molecules from the DrugBank 3.0 database. The similarities of these pairs were also computed using BCI, Daylight, ECFC4, ECFP4, MDL and Unity 2D fingerprints. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated a strong relationship between the human and computed similarity assessments, with the resulting regression models having significant predictive power in experiments using data from submissions of orphan drug medicines to the European Medicines Agency. The BCI fingerprints performed best overall on the DrugBank dataset while the BCI, Daylight, ECFP4 and Unity fingerprints performed comparably on the European Medicines Agency dataset. Conclusions Measures of structural similarity based on 2D fingerprints can provide a useful source of information for the assessment of orphan drug status by regulatory authorities. PMID:24485002

  11. Cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids with structural diversity: from 3D, 2D, to 2D/1D and enhanced lithium-storage performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiyu; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Chen, Xuguang; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Ding, Liangxin; Wu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Metal oxide nanohybrids with uniform dimensions and controlled architectures possess unique compositional and structural superiorities, and thus harbor promising potential for a series of applications in energy, catalysis, and sensing systems. Herein, we propose a facile, general, and scalable cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived thermal-oxidation route for the construction of main-group metal and transition-metal heterometallic oxide nanohybrids with controlled constituents and architectures. The formation of Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been demonstrated as an example by using cyano-bridged Sn(iv)-Fe(ii) bimetallic coordination polymer hydrogels (i.e., SnCl4-K4Fe(CN)6 cyanogels, Sn-Fe cyanogels) as precursors. The physicochemical properties of Sn-Fe cyanogels with different Sn/Fe ratios have been systematically examined, and it is found that perfect Sn-Fe cyanogels without unbridged Sn(iv) or Fe(ii) can be formed with Sn/Fe ratios from 2 : 1 to 1 : 2. More importantly, the simple adjustment of Sn/Fe ratios in the Sn-Fe cyanogel precursors can realize flexible dimensional control of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids, and 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures, 2D SnO2-Fe2O3 nanosheets, and 3D SnO2-Fe2O3 networks have been synthesized using the Sn-Fe 1 : 2, Sn-Fe 1 : 1, and Sn-Fe 2 : 1 cyanogels as precursors, respectively. To demonstrate their compositional/structural superiorities and potential applications, the lithium-storage utilization of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been selected as an objective application, and the nanohybrids exhibit Sn/Fe ratio-dependent lithium-storage performance. As a representative example, the 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures manifest markedly enhanced Li-storage performance in terms of reversible capacities and cycling stability in comparison with their constituent units, i.e., bare SnO2 nanosheets and Fe2O3 nanorods. The proposed cyanogel-derived thermal-oxidation strategy could open up new

  12. Micro PIV measurements of turbulent flow over 2D structured roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenberger, Joel; Perlin, Marc

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the turbulent boundary layer over surfaces with 2D spanwise square and triangular protrusions having nominal heights of 100 - 300 microns for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ~ 1500 through Reτ ~ 4500 using a high speed, high magnification imaging system. Micro PIV analysis gives finely resolved velocity fields of the flow (on the order of 10 microns between vectors) enabling a detailed look at the inner region as well as the flow in the immediate vicinity of the roughness elements. Additionally, planar PIV with lower resolution is performed to capture the remainder of the boundary layer to the freestream flow. Varying the streamwise distance between individual roughness elements from one to ten times the nominal heights allows investigation of k-type and d-type roughness in both the transitionally rough and fully rough regimes. Preliminary results show a shift in the mean velocity profile similar to the results of previous studies. Turbulent statistics will be presented also. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of NAVSEA which funded this project through the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC).

  13. Electronic structures and optical properties of two-dimensional ScN and YN nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian; Li, Xi-Bo; Zhang, Hui; Yin, Wen-Jin; Liu, Li-Min E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Peng, Ping E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn

    2014-03-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit different electronic properties than their bulk materials. Here, we present a systematic study of 2D tetragonal materials of ScN and YN using density functional theory calculations. Several thermodynamically stable 2D tetragonal structures were determined, and such novel tetragonal structures have good electronic and optical properties. Both bulk ScN and YN are indirect band gap semiconductors while the electronic structures of 2D ScN and YN are indirect gap semiconductors, with band gaps of 0.62–2.21 eV. The calculated optical spectra suggest that 2D tetragonal ScN and YN nanosheets have high visible light absorption efficiency. These electronic properties indicate that 2D ScN and YN have great potential for applications in photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Asymmetric Poly(styrene-b-1,4-isoprene) Diblock Copolymer under 1D and 2D Nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe K; Elmahdy, Mahdy M; Mapesa, Emmanuel U; Zhang, Jianqi; Böhlmann, Winfried; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Papadakis, Christine M; Kremer, Friedrich

    2015-06-17

    The impact of 1- and 2-dimensional (2D) confinement on the structure and dynamics of poly(styrene-b-1,4-isoprene) P(S-b-I) diblock copolymer is investigated by a combination of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS), and Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS). 1D confinement is achieved by spin coating the P(S-b-I) to form nanometric thin films on silicon substrates, while in the 2D confinement, the copolymer is infiltrated into cylindrical anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanopores. After dissolving the AAO matrix having mean pore diameter of 150 nm, the SEM images of the exposed P(S-b-I) show straight nanorods. For the thin films, GISAXS and AFM reveal hexagonally packed cylinders of PS in a PI matrix. Three dielectrically active relaxation modes assigned to the two segmental modes of the styrene and isoprene blocks and the normal mode of the latter are studied selectively by BDS. The dynamic glass transition, related to the segmental modes of the styrene and isoprene blocks, is independent of the dimensionality and the finite sizes (down to 18 nm) of confinement, but the normal mode is influenced by both factors with 2D geometrical constraints exerting greater impact. This reflects the considerable difference in the length scales on which the two kinds of fluctuations take place. PMID:25660102

  15. An algorithm for computing the 2D structure of fast rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, Michel; Espinosa Lara, Francisco; Putigny, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Stars may be understood as self-gravitating masses of a compressible fluid whose radiative cooling is compensated by nuclear reactions or gravitational contraction. The understanding of their time evolution requires the use of detailed models that account for a complex microphysics including that of opacities, equation of state and nuclear reactions. The present stellar models are essentially one-dimensional, namely spherically symmetric. However, the interpretation of recent data like the surface abundances of elements or the distribution of internal rotation have reached the limits of validity of one-dimensional models because of their very simplified representation of large-scale fluid flows. In this article, we describe the ESTER code, which is the first code able to compute in a consistent way a two-dimensional model of a fast rotating star including its large-scale flows. Compared to classical 1D stellar evolution codes, many numerical innovations have been introduced to deal with this complex problem. First, the spectral discretization based on spherical harmonics and Chebyshev polynomials is used to represent the 2D axisymmetric fields. A nonlinear mapping maps the spheroidal star and allows a smooth spectral representation of the fields. The properties of Picard and Newton iterations for solving the nonlinear partial differential equations of the problem are discussed. It turns out that the Picard scheme is efficient on the computation of the simple polytropic stars, but Newton algorithm is unsurpassed when stellar models include complex microphysics. Finally, we discuss the numerical efficiency of our solver of Newton iterations. This linear solver combines the iterative Conjugate Gradient Squared algorithm together with an LU-factorization serving as a preconditioner of the Jacobian matrix.

  16. Analysis of simple 2-D and 3-D metal structures subjected to fragment impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witmer, E. A.; Stagliano, T. R.; Spilker, R. L.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical methods were developed for predicting the large-deflection elastic-plastic transient structural responses of metal containment or deflector (C/D) structures to cope with rotor burst fragment impact attack. For two-dimensional C/D structures both, finite element and finite difference analysis methods were employed to analyze structural response produced by either prescribed transient loads or fragment impact. For the latter category, two time-wise step-by-step analysis procedures were devised to predict the structural responses resulting from a succession of fragment impacts: the collision force method (CFM) which utilizes an approximate prediction of the force applied to the attacked structure during fragment impact, and the collision imparted velocity method (CIVM) in which the impact-induced velocity increment acquired by a region of the impacted structure near the impact point is computed. The merits and limitations of these approaches are discussed. For the analysis of 3-d responses of C/D structures, only the CIVM approach was investigated.

  17. 2D networks of rhombic-shaped fused dehydrobenzo[12]annulenes: structural variations under concentration control.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Kazukuni; Okuhata, Satoshi; Adisoejoso, Jinne; Lei, Shengbin; Fujita, Takumi; De Feyter, Steven; Tobe, Yoshito

    2009-12-01

    A series of alkyl- and alkoxy-substituted rhombic-shaped bisDBA derivatives 1a-d, 2a, and 2b were synthesized for the purpose of the formation of porous networks at the 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB)/graphite interface. Depending on the alkyl-chain length and the solute concentration, bisDBAs exhibit five network structures, three porous structures (porous A, B, and C), and two nonporous structures (nonporous D and E), which are attributed to their rhombic core shape and the position of the substituents. BisDBAs 1a and 1b with the shorter alkyl chains favorably form a porous structure, whereas bisDBAs 1c and 1d with the longer alkyl chains are prone to form nonporous structures. However, upon dilution, nonporous structures are typically transformed into porous ones, a trend that can be understood by the effect of surface coverage, molecular density, and intermolecular interactions on the system's enthalpy. Furthermore, porous structures are stabilized by the coadsorption of solvent molecules. The most intriguing porous structure, the Kagome pattern, was formed for all compounds at least to some extent, and the size of its triangular and hexagonal pores could be tuned by the alkyl-chain length. The present study proves that the concentration control is a powerful and general tool for the construction of porous networks at the liquid-solid interface.

  18. Self-assembly of 2D sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene composites for high-performance lithium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Songmei Wang, Bo; Li, Bin; Liu, Jianhua; Yu, Mei; Wu, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • MFO/GN composites were synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach. • The MFO microspheres are sandwiched between the graphene layers. • Each MFO microsphere is an interstitial cluster of nanoparticles. • The MFO/GN electrode exhibits an enhanced cyclability for Li-ion batteries anodes. - Abstract: In this study, two-dimensional (2D) sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene (MFO/GN) composites are synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach, using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as cationic surfactant. As a consequence, the nanocomposites of MFO/GN self-assembled into a 2D sandwich structure, in which the interstitial cluster structure of microsphere-type MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is sandwiched between the graphene layers. This special structure of the MFO/GN composites used as anodes for lithium-ion batteries will be favorable for the maximum accessible surface of electroactive materials, fast diffusion of lithium ions and migration of electron, and elastomeric space to accommodate volume changes during the discharge–charge processes. The as-synthesized MFO/GN composites deliver a high specific reversible capacity of 987.95 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 200 mA g{sup −1}, a good capacity retention of 69.27% after 80 cycles and excellent rate performance for lithium storage.

  19. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ran; Chai, Xiaochuan; Mei, Hongxin; Zhang, Hanhui; Chen, Yiping; Sun, Yanqiong

    2010-07-01

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H 2L 1(HL 1) 2(H 2O) 2]·2H 2O 1, [Ni 2(4,4'-bipy)(L 2)(OH)(H 2O) 2]·3H 2O 2, Mn(phen) 2(H 2L 1) 23 and Mn(phen)(HL 2) 4 (H 3L 1= p-H 2O 3PCH 2-C 6H 4-COOH, H 3L 2= m-H 2O 3PCH 2-C 6H 4-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni 4 cluster units are connected by pairs of H 3L 2 ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R 22(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H 3L 2 ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H 3L 1 and H 3L 2 ligands in the compounds more efficiently.

  20. 2-D Structure of the A Region of Xist RNA and Its Implication for PRC2 Association

    PubMed Central

    Maenner, Sylvain; Blaud, Magali; Fouillen, Laetitia; Savoye, Anne; Marchand, Virginie; Dubois, Agnès; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Clerc, Philippe; Avner, Philip; Visvikis, Athanase; Branlant, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    In placental mammals, inactivation of one of the X chromosomes in female cells ensures sex chromosome dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding Xist RNA is crucial to this process and accumulates on the future inactive X chromosome. The most conserved Xist RNA region, the A region, contains eight or nine repeats separated by U-rich spacers. It is implicated in the recruitment of late inactivated X genes to the silencing compartment and likely in the recruitment of complex PRC2. Little is known about the structure of the A region and more generally about Xist RNA structure. Knowledge of its structure is restricted to an NMR study of a single A repeat element. Our study is the first experimental analysis of the structure of the entire A region in solution. By the use of chemical and enzymatic probes and FRET experiments, using oligonucleotides carrying fluorescent dyes, we resolved problems linked to sequence redundancies and established a 2-D structure for the A region that contains two long stem-loop structures each including four repeats. Interactions formed between repeats and between repeats and spacers stabilize these structures. Conservation of the spacer terminal sequences allows formation of such structures in all sequenced Xist RNAs. By combination of RNP affinity chromatography, immunoprecipitation assays, mass spectrometry, and Western blot analysis, we demonstrate that the A region can associate with components of the PRC2 complex in mouse ES cell nuclear extracts. Whilst a single four-repeat motif is able to associate with components of this complex, recruitment of Suz12 is clearly more efficient when the entire A region is present. Our data with their emphasis on the importance of inter-repeat pairing change fundamentally our conception of the 2-D structure of the A region of Xist RNA and support its possible implication in recruitment of the PRC2 complex. PMID:20052282

  1. Three 2D Ag(I)-framework isomers with helical structures controlled by the chirality of camphor-10-sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng

    2011-02-28

    Three 2D Ag(I)-framework isomers were constructed from enantiopure camphor-10-sulfonic acids or racemic camphor-10-sulfonic acids, together with achiral 4-aminobenzoic acids. In complex 1, (+)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids bridge the single left-handed helices that are made up of Ag ions and 4-aminobenzoic acids, generating a homochiral 2D layer. In such a structure, the interweaving of triple left-handed homohelices was also found. It is worth noting that the helicity of complex 2 could be controlled by the handedness of the camphor-10-sulfonic acid. In complex 2, there are right-handed helical structures, including single right-handed and triple right-handed helical structures connected by (-)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids. For a comparative study, (±)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids were utilized to synthesize complex 3, in which equal numbers of right-handed or left-handed double-helical chains are created. All the complexes were characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure determination, powder X-ray diffraction, IR, TGA and element analysis. Circular dichroism spectra of complexes 1 and 2 were been studied to confirm the fact that enantiopure bridging ligands do not racemize. PMID:21264423

  2. Three 2D Ag(I)-framework isomers with helical structures controlled by the chirality of camphor-10-sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng

    2011-02-28

    Three 2D Ag(I)-framework isomers were constructed from enantiopure camphor-10-sulfonic acids or racemic camphor-10-sulfonic acids, together with achiral 4-aminobenzoic acids. In complex 1, (+)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids bridge the single left-handed helices that are made up of Ag ions and 4-aminobenzoic acids, generating a homochiral 2D layer. In such a structure, the interweaving of triple left-handed homohelices was also found. It is worth noting that the helicity of complex 2 could be controlled by the handedness of the camphor-10-sulfonic acid. In complex 2, there are right-handed helical structures, including single right-handed and triple right-handed helical structures connected by (-)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids. For a comparative study, (±)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids were utilized to synthesize complex 3, in which equal numbers of right-handed or left-handed double-helical chains are created. All the complexes were characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure determination, powder X-ray diffraction, IR, TGA and element analysis. Circular dichroism spectra of complexes 1 and 2 were been studied to confirm the fact that enantiopure bridging ligands do not racemize.

  3. Toward predicting vertical detachment energies for superhalogen anions exclusively from 2-D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorska, Celina

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the multiple linear regression (MLR) method was applied for quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) modeling and predicting vertical detachment energy of superhalogen anions with descriptors calculated from the molecular structure for the first time. The square of the correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.975), the cross-validated correlation coefficient (QCV2 = 0.859), and the square of correlation coefficients of the test set (QEXT2 = 0.960) demonstrated the reliability of the model. Since the developed QSPR model does not require 3-D structure generation and thus structure optimization with extensive quantum mechanical calculations it can be further used for relatively fast designing of new superhalogen anions.

  4. 2D and 3D reconstruction and geomechanical characterization of kilometre-scale complex folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Villa, Alberto; Bistacchi, Andrea; Iudica, Gaetano

    2015-04-01

    The geometrical, structural and geomechanical characterization of large-scale folded structures in sedimentary rocks is an important issue for different geological and geo-hazard applications (e.g. hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoir exploitation, natural rock slope stability, mining, and tunnelling). Fold geometry controls topography and the spatial distribution of rock types with different strength and permeability. Fold-related fracture systems condition the fracture intensity, degree of freedom, and overall strength of rock masses. Nevertheless, scale issues and limited accessibility or partial exposure of structures often hamper a complete characterization of these complex structures. During the last years, advances in remote survey techniques as terrestrial Lidar (TLS) allowed significant improvements in the geometrical and geological characterization of large or inaccessible outcrops. However, sound methods relating structures to rock mass geomechanical properties are yet to be developed. Here we present results obtained by integrating remote survey and field assessment techniques to characterize a folded sedimentary succession exposed in unreachable vertical rock walls. The study area is located in the frontal part of the Southern Alps near Bergamo, Italy. We analysed large-scale detachment folds developed in the Upper Triassic sedimentary cover in the Zu Limestone. Folds are parallel and disharmonic, with regular wavelengths and amplitudes of about 200-250 m. We used a Riegl VZ-1000 long-range laser scanner to obtain points clouds with nominal spacings between 5 cm and 20 cm from 9 scan positions characterized by range between 350 m and 1300 m. We fixed shadowing and occlusion effects related to fold structure exposure by filling point clouds with data collected by terrestrial digital photogrammetry (TDP). In addition, we carried out field surveys of fold-related brittle structures and their geomechanical attributes at key locations. We classified cloud

  5. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications.

  6. Learning the 3-D structure of objects from 2-D views depends on shape, not format

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Moqian; Yamins, Daniel; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2016-01-01

    Humans can learn to recognize new objects just from observing example views. However, it is unknown what structural information enables this learning. To address this question, we manipulated the amount of structural information given to subjects during unsupervised learning by varying the format of the trained views. We then tested how format affected participants' ability to discriminate similar objects across views that were rotated 90° apart. We found that, after training, participants' performance increased and generalized to new views in the same format. Surprisingly, the improvement was similar across line drawings, shape from shading, and shape from shading + stereo even though the latter two formats provide richer depth information compared to line drawings. In contrast, participants' improvement was significantly lower when training used silhouettes, suggesting that silhouettes do not have enough information to generate a robust 3-D structure. To test whether the learned object representations were format-specific or format-invariant, we examined if learning novel objects from example views transfers across formats. We found that learning objects from example line drawings transferred to shape from shading and vice versa. These results have important implications for theories of object recognition because they suggest that (a) learning the 3-D structure of objects does not require rich structural cues during training as long as shape information of internal and external features is provided and (b) learning generates shape-based object representations independent of the training format. PMID:27153196

  7. Formation of 2D nanoparticles with block structure in simultaneous electric explosion of conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhevich, Dmitrij S. E-mail: kost@ispms.ru; Zolnikov, Konstantin P. E-mail: kost@ispms.ru; Abdrashitov, Andrei V.; Lerner, Marat I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2014-11-14

    A molecular dynamics simulation of nanoparticle formation in simultaneous electric explosion of conductors is performed. Interatomic interaction is described using potentials calculated in the framework of the embedded atom method. High-rate heating results in failure of the conductors with the formation of nanoparticles. The influence of the heating rate, temperature distribution over the specimen cross-section and the distance between simultaneously exploded conductors on the structure of formed nanoparticles is studied. The calculation results show that the electric explosion of conductors allows the formation of nanoparticles with block structure.

  8. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  9. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  10. Reverse modeling of 2D and 3D diapiric salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, N.; Kaus, B.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical forward modeling of salt diapirs formed by two different processes (differential loading and buoyancy driven) has been widely performed with numerical codes in many studies, whereas works focusing on the dynamic retro-deformation of such structures remain scarce. Buoyancy driven diapirs, in which the density difference between salt and overburden induces upward motion of salt, have been successfully retro-deformed in two and three dimensions using simple rheologies for the salt and overburden (e.g., Kaus & Podladchikov 2001). However, retro-deformation of down-building diapirs (syndepositional process in which salt structures grow while sediments are being deposited) using mechanical codes has only been done in two dimensions (e.g., Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001), even though the importance of three-dimensionality in salt diapirism is accepted. We have used the two-dimensional visco-elasto-plastic finite element code MILAMIN_VEP to perform both forward and backward simulations and to check the validity of a reversed time step method (Kaus & Podladchikov 2001 and Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001) for a wide range of parameters, variable sedimentation rates, and for non-linear rheologies. Forward simulations are run until the salt layer is exhausted and then a reverse time step is applied in order to retro-deform the model. Down-building process was mimicked using a fast-erosion condition at the surface, which keeps it flat and redistributes material at every time step. Initially, we have tested our method by retro-deforming salt structures that develop from an interface that is sinusoidally perturbed. More realistic simulations were performed by starting with randomly perturbed salt interface and using different rheological parameters for the salt and the overburden as well as variable sedimentation rates. Once the method has been proved successful for different parameters in two dimensions, the finite differences parallel code LaMEM has also been used to dynamically

  11. Strain-Gated Field Effect Transistor of a MoS2-ZnO 2D-1D Hybrid Structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Libo; Xue, Fei; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Xin; Wang, Longfei; Kou, Jinzong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is an exciting material due to its unique electrical, optical, and piezoelectric properties. Owing to an intrinsic band gap of 1.2-1.9 eV, monolayer or a-few-layer MoS2 is used for fabricating field effect transistors (FETs) with high electron mobility and on/off ratio. However, the traditional FETs are controlled by an externally supplied gate voltage, which may not be sensitive enough to directly interface with a mechanical stimulus for applications in electronic skin. Here we report a type of top-pressure/force-gated field effect transistors (PGFETs) based on a hybrid structure of a 2D MoS2 flake and 1D ZnO nanowire (NW) array. Once an external pressure is applied, the piezoelectric polarization charges created at the tips of ZnO NWs grown on MoS2 act as a gate voltage to tune/control the source-drain transport property in MoS2. At a 6.25 MPa applied stimulus on a packaged device, the source-drain current can be tuned for ∼25%, equivalent to the results of applying an extra -5 V back gate voltage. Another type of PGFET with a dielectric layer (Al2O3) sandwiched between MoS2 and ZnO also shows consistent results. A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the received data. This study sets the foundation for applying the 2D material-based FETs in the field of artificial intelligence.

  12. Strain-Gated Field Effect Transistor of a MoS2-ZnO 2D-1D Hybrid Structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Libo; Xue, Fei; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Xin; Wang, Longfei; Kou, Jinzong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is an exciting material due to its unique electrical, optical, and piezoelectric properties. Owing to an intrinsic band gap of 1.2-1.9 eV, monolayer or a-few-layer MoS2 is used for fabricating field effect transistors (FETs) with high electron mobility and on/off ratio. However, the traditional FETs are controlled by an externally supplied gate voltage, which may not be sensitive enough to directly interface with a mechanical stimulus for applications in electronic skin. Here we report a type of top-pressure/force-gated field effect transistors (PGFETs) based on a hybrid structure of a 2D MoS2 flake and 1D ZnO nanowire (NW) array. Once an external pressure is applied, the piezoelectric polarization charges created at the tips of ZnO NWs grown on MoS2 act as a gate voltage to tune/control the source-drain transport property in MoS2. At a 6.25 MPa applied stimulus on a packaged device, the source-drain current can be tuned for ∼25%, equivalent to the results of applying an extra -5 V back gate voltage. Another type of PGFET with a dielectric layer (Al2O3) sandwiched between MoS2 and ZnO also shows consistent results. A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the received data. This study sets the foundation for applying the 2D material-based FETs in the field of artificial intelligence. PMID:26695840

  13. Investigation of 2D laterally dispersive photonic crystal structures : LDRD 33602 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Wendt, Joel Robert; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Guo, Junpeng; Peters, David William; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2003-12-01

    Artificially structured photonic lattice materials are commonly investigated for their unique ability to block and guide light. However, an exciting aspect of photonic lattices which has received relatively little attention is the extremely high refractive index dispersion within the range of frequencies capable of propagating within the photonic lattice material. In fact, it has been proposed that a negative refractive index may be realized with the correct photonic lattice configuration. This report summarizes our investigation, both numerically and experimentally, into the design and performance of such photonic lattice materials intended to optimize the dispersion of refractive index in order to realize new classes of photonic devices.

  14. Pore formation by antimicrobial peptides: structural tendencies in bulk and quasi-2D membrane systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Yang, Lihua; Davis, Matthew; Som, A.; Tew, G.; Wong, Gerard

    2007-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are cationic, amphiphilic structures that are key components of innate immunity. A prototypical family of synthetic analogs are the phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomers (AMOs), which have hydrophobic alkyl chains connected to cationic hydrophilic regions. Synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) shows that when AMO is mixed with concentrated model membranes, initially in the form of Small Unilamellar Vesicles, the sample forms the inverted hexagonal phase. This is a 3-dimensional phase characterized by a regular array of size-defined water channels. We demonstrate how this structural tendency is expressed when AMOs interact with dilute model membranes in the form of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs). Using confocal microscopy, we see that applying AMO to the GUVs causes small encapsulated molecules to be released while large molecules are retained, indicating that size-defined pores have been created. Examining the partial release of polydisperse intermediately-sized molecules allows a closer measurement of the pore size, and there are indications that this single-vesicle microscopy will allow elucidation of the kinetics of the pore-forming process.

  15. Two novel 2D lanthanide sulfate frameworks: Syntheses, structures, and luminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Fu-Li; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Zhang, Xiang-Fei; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Guang-Xiu; Zhai, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Two novel lanthanide-sulfate compounds, [Ln2(SO4)3(H2O)8] (Ln = Tb (1) and Dy (2)), have been synthesized under hydrothermal reactions. X-ray crystal structure analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are isomorphous and crystallize in monoclinic C2/c pace group, showing a layered structure. The layers bear a rare quasi-honeycomb metal arrangement, which is fastened by μ3 = η1:η1:η1 and μ2 = η1:η1 sulfates. If assigning the μ3 = η1:η1:η1 sulfate as a 3-connected node and the Ln3+ ion as a 4-connected node, the network can be rationalized as a binodal (3,4)-connected V2O5 topology with a Schäfli symbol of (42·63·8) (42·6). In addition, the infrared, thermogravimetric analysis and luminescent properties were also studied. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit outstanding thermal stability and characteristic terbium and dysprosium luminescence.

  16. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions.

    PubMed

    Renosh, P R; Schmitt, Francois G; Loisel, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled synoptically over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST), rarely studied. The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. For that purpose, we show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG) of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF) can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics.

  17. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions

    PubMed Central

    Renosh, P. R.; Schmitt, Francois G.; Loisel, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled synoptically over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST), rarely studied. The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. For that purpose, we show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG) of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF) can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics. PMID:26017551

  18. Self-assembly of 2D-->2D interpenetrating coordination polymers showing polyrotaxane- and polycatenane-like motifs: influence of various ligands on topological structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ya-Qian; Li, Shun-Li; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Du, Dong-Ying; Wang, Xin-Long; Su, Zhong-Min; Fu, Qiang

    2008-11-17

    A series of mixed-ligand coordination complexes, namely, [Cd 2(bimb) 2(L (1)) 2] ( 1), [Cd(bpimb) 0.5(L (2))(H 2O)] ( 2), [Zn 5(bpib) 2(L (3)) 4(OH) 2(H 2O) 2] ( 3), [Zn(bpib) 0.5(L (4))] ( 4), and [Cd(bib)(L (4))] ( 5), where bimb = 1,4-bis((1 H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene, bpimb = 1,4-bis((2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene, bpib = 1,4-bis(2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-imidazol-1-yl)butane, bib = 1,4-bis(1 H-imidazol-1-yl)butane, H 2L (1) = 4-((4-(dihydroxymethyl)phenoxy)methyl)benzoic acid, H 2L (2) = 4,4'-methylenebis(oxy)dibenzoic acid, H 2L (3) = 3,3'-methylenebis(oxy)dibenzoic acid, and H 2L (4) = 4,4'-(2,2'-oxybis(ethane-2,1-diyl)bis(oxy))dibenzoic acid, have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. In 1, (L (1)) (2-) anions link the metal-neutral ligand subunits to generate a 2-fold parallel interpenetrating net with the 6 (3) topology. In 2- 4, neutral ligands connect the various metal-carboxylic ligand subunits to give a 2-fold parallel interpenetrating net with (4,4) topology in 2, a 2-fold parallel interpenetrating net with (3,6)-connected topology in 3, and a 3-fold parallel interpenetrating net with (4,4) topology in 4. Compounds 1- 4 display both polyrotaxane and polycatenane characters. Compound 5 is a 5-fold parallel interpenetrating net with (4,4) topology. By careful inspection of these structures, we find that different topological structures showing both polyrotaxane and polycatenane characters have been achieved with increase of the carboxylic ligand length. It is believed that various carboxylic ligands and N-donor ligands with different coordination modes and conformations are important for the formation of the different structures. In addition, the luminescent properties of these compounds are discussed.

  19. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  20. Algorithms for the automatic generation of 2-D structured multi-block grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Thilo; Weinerfelt, Per; Jenssen, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    Two different approaches to the fully automatic generation of structured multi-block grids in two dimensions are presented. The work aims to simplify the user interactivity necessary for the definition of a multiple block grid topology. The first approach is based on an advancing front method commonly used for the generation of unstructured grids. The original algorithm has been modified toward the generation of large quadrilateral elements. The second method is based on the divide-and-conquer paradigm with the global domain recursively partitioned into sub-domains. For either method each of the resulting blocks is then meshed using transfinite interpolation and elliptic smoothing. The applicability of these methods to practical problems is demonstrated for typical geometries of fluid dynamics.

  1. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Ran; Chai Xiaochuan; Mei Hongxin; Zhang Hanhui; Chen Yiping; Sun Yanqiong

    2010-07-15

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H{sub 2}L{sup 1}(HL{sup 1}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O 1, [Ni{sub 2}(4,4'-bipy)(L{sup 2})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O 2, Mn(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}L{sup 1}){sub 2}3 and Mn(phen)(HL{sup 2}) 4 (H{sub 3}L{sup 1}=p-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, H{sub 3}L{sup 2}=m-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni{sub 4} cluster units are connected by pairs of H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R{sub 2}{sup 2}(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H{sub 3}L{sup 1} and H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands in the compounds more efficiently. - Graphical abstract: A series of divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The figure displays 2D sheet structure with large windows in compound 2.

  2. The effect of electron-hole scattering on transport properties of a 2D semimetal in the HgTe quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Entin, M. V.; Magarill, L. I.; Olshanetsky, E. B. Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2013-11-15

    The influence of e-h scattering on the conductivity and magnetotransport of 2D semimetallic HgTe is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The presence of e-h scattering leads to the friction between electrons and holes resulting in a large temperature-dependent contribution to the transport coefficients. The coefficient of friction between electrons and holes is determined. The comparison of experimental data with the theory shows that the interaction between electrons and holes based on the long-range Coulomb potential strongly underestimates the e-h friction. The experimental results are in agreement with the model of strong short-range e-h interaction.

  3. Unusual Domain Structure and Filamentary Superfluidity for 2D Hard-Core Bosons in Insulating Charge-Ordered Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Yu. D.; Moskvin, A. S.; Rybakov, F. N.; Borisov, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    We made use of a special algorithm for compute unified device architecture for NVIDIA graphics cards, a nonlinear conjugate-gradient method to minimize energy functional, and Monte-Carlo technique to directly observe the forming of the ground state configuration for the 2D hard-core bosons by lowering the temperature and its evolution with deviation away from half-filling. The novel technique allowed us to examine earlier implications and uncover novel features of the phase transitions, in particular, look upon the nucleation of the odd domain structure, emergence of filamentary superfluidity nucleated at the antiphase domain walls of the charge-ordered phase, and nucleation and evolution of different topological structures.

  4. Bifurcations of edge states—topologically protected and non-protected—in continuous 2D honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, C. L.; Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Edge states are time-harmonic solutions to energy-conserving wave equations, which are propagating parallel to a line-defect or ‘edge’ and are localized transverse to it. This paper summarizes and extends the authors’ work on the bifurcation of topologically protected edge states in continuous two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures. We consider a family of Schrödinger Hamiltonians consisting of a bulk honeycomb potential and a perturbing edge potential. The edge potential interpolates between two different periodic structures via a domain wall. We begin by reviewing our recent bifurcation theory of edge states for continuous 2D honeycomb structures (http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06111). The topologically protected edge state bifurcation is seeded by the zero-energy eigenstate of a one-dimensional Dirac operator. We contrast these protected bifurcations with (more common) non-protected bifurcations from spectral band edges, which are induced by bound states of an effective Schrödinger operator. Numerical simulations for honeycomb structures of varying contrasts and ‘rational edges’ (zigzag, armchair and others), support the following scenario: (a) for low contrast, under a sign condition on a distinguished Fourier coefficient of the bulk honeycomb potential, there exist topologically protected edge states localized transverse to zigzag edges. Otherwise, and for general edges, we expect long lived edge quasi-modes which slowly leak energy into the bulk. (b) For an arbitrary rational edge, there is a threshold in the medium-contrast (depending on the choice of edge) above which there exist topologically protected edge states. In the special case of the armchair edge, there are two families of protected edge states; for each parallel quasimomentum (the quantum number associated with translation invariance) there are edge states which propagate in opposite directions along the armchair edge.

  5. Synthesis of 2D/2D Structured Mesoporous Co3O4 Nanosheet/N-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Composites as a Highly Stable Negative Electrode for Lithium Battery Applications.

    PubMed

    Sennu, Palanichamy; Kim, Hyo Sang; An, Jae Youn; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Lee, Yun-Sung

    2015-08-01

    Mesoporous Co3O4 nanosheets (Co3 O4 -NS) and nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO) are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal approach, and the N-rGO/Co3O4 -NS composite is formulated through an infiltration procedure. Eventually, the obtained composites are subjected to various characterization techniques, such as XRD, Raman spectroscopy, surface area analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and TEM. The lithium-storage properties of N-rGO/Co3O4 -NS composites are evaluated in a half-cell assembly to ascertain their suitability as a negative electrode for lithium-ion battery applications. The 2D/2D nanostructured mesoporous N-rGO/Co3O4 -NS composite delivered a reversible capacity of about 1305 and 1501 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 80 mA g(-1) for the 1st and 50th cycles, respectively. Furthermore, excellent cyclability, rate capability, and capacity retention characteristics are noted for the N-rGO/Co3O4 -NS composite. This improved performance is mainly related to the existence of mesoporosity and a sheet-like 2D hierarchical morphology, which translates into extra space for lithium storage and a reduced electron pathway. Also, the presence of N-rGO and carbon shells in Co3O4 -NS should not be excluded from such exceptional performance, which serves as a reliable conductive channel for electrons and act as synergistically to accommodate volume expansion upon redox reactions. Ex-situ TEM, impedance spectroscopy, and XPS, are also conducted to corroborate the significance of the 2D morphology towards sustained lithium storage.

  6. An unambiguous identification of 2D electron gas features in the photoluminescence spectrum of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Sharma, T. K.

    2016-07-01

    A fast and non-destructive method for probing the true signatures of 2D electron gas (2DEG) states in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is presented. Two broad features superimposed with interference oscillations are observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The two features are identified as the ground and excited 2DEG states which are confirmed by comparing the PL spectra of as-grown and top barrier layer etched samples. Broad PL features disappear at a certain temperature along with the associated interference oscillations. Furthermore, the two broad PL features depicts specific temperature and excitation intensity dependencies which make them easily distinguishable from the bandedge excitonic or defect related PL features. The presence of strong interference oscillations associated with the 2DEG PL features is explained by considering the localized generation of PL signal at the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Finally, a large value of the polarization induced electric field of ~1.01 MV cm-1 is reported from PL measurements for AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures. It became possible only when the true identification of 2DEG features was made possible by the proposed method.

  7. Dihydrofolate reductase: Sequential resonance assignments using 2D and 3D NMR and secondary structure determination in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.D.; Birdsall, B.; Jimenez-Barbero, J.; Polshakov, V.I.; McCormick, J.E.; Feeney, J.; Frenkiel, T.A.; Bauer, C.J. ); Roberts, G.C.K. )

    1991-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR techniques have been used to make sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}H resonance assignments for most of the residues of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a monomeric protein of molecular mass 18,300 Da. A uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled sample of the protein was prepared and its complex with methotrexate (MTX) studied by 3D {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H nuclear Overhauserheteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC), Harmann-Hahn-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC), and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiments. These experiments overcame most of the spectral overlap problems caused by chemical shift degeneracies in 2D spectra and allowed the {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H through-space and through-bond connectivities to be identified unambiguously, leading to the resonance assignments. The novel HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment allows NOE cross peaks to be detected between NH protons even when their {sup 1}H chemical shifts are degenerate as long as the amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts are nondegenerate. The 3D experiments, in combination with conventional 2D NOESY, COSY, and HOHAHA experiments on unlabelled and selectively deuterated DHFR, provide backbone assignments for 146 of the 162 residues and side-chain assignments for 104 residues of the protein. Data from the NOE-based experiments and identification of the slowly exchanging amide protons provide detailed information about the secondary structure of the binary complex of the protein with methotrexate.

  8. MIA-QSAR: a simple 2D image-based approach for quantitative structure activity relationship analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Matheus P.; Brown, Steven D.; Martins, José A.

    2005-03-01

    An accessible and quite simple QSAR method, based on 2D image analysis, is reported. A case study is carried out in order to compare this model with a previously reported sophisticated methodology. A well known set of ( S)- N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-6-methoxybenzamides, compounds with affinity to the dopamine D 2 receptor subtype, was divided in 40 calibration compounds and 18 test compounds and the descriptors were generated from pixels of 2D structures of each compound, which can be drawn with aid of any appropriate program. Bilinear (conventional) PLS was utilized as the regression method and leave-one-out cross-validation was performed using the NIPALS algorithm. The good predicted Q2 value obtained for the series of test compounds (0.58), together with the similar prediction quality obtained to other data sets (nAChR ligands, HIV protease inhibitors, COX-2 inhibitors and anxiolytic agents), suggests that the model is robust and seems to be as applicable as more complex methods.

  9. Computation of self-field hysteresis losses in conductors with helicoidal structure using a 2D finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenvall, A.; Siahrang, M.; Grilli, F.; Sirois, F.

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that twisting current-carrying conductors helps to reduce their coupling losses. However, the impact of twisting on self-field hysteresis losses has not been as extensively investigated as that on the reduction of coupling losses. This is mostly because the reduction of coupling losses has been an important issue to tackle in the past, and it is not possible to consider twisting within the classical two-dimensional (2D) approaches for the computation of self-field hysteresis losses. Recently, numerical codes considering the effect of twisting in continuous symmetries have appeared. For general three-dimensional (3D) simulations, one issue is that no robust, widely accepted and easy to obtain model for expressing the relationship between the current density and the electric field is available. On the other hand, we can consider that in these helicoidal structures currents flow only along the helicoidal trajectories. This approach allows one to use the scalar power-law for superconductor resistivity and makes the eddy current approach to a solution of a hysteresis loss problem feasible. In this paper we use the finite element method to solve the eddy current model in helicoidal structures in 2D domains utilizing the helicoidal symmetry. The developed tool uses the full 3D geometry but allows discretization which takes advantage of the helicoidal symmetry to reduce the computational domain to a 2D one. We utilize in this tool the non-linear power law for modelling the resistivity in the superconducting regions and study how the self-field losses are influenced by the twisting of a 10-filament wire. Additionally, in the case of high aspect ratio tapes, we compare the results computed with the new tool and a one-dimensional program based on the integral equation method and developed for simulating single layer power cables made of ReBCO coated conductors. Finally, we discuss modelling issues and present open questions related to helicoidal structures

  10. A hybrid wave-mode formulation for the vibro-acoustic analysis of 2D periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz, C.; Zhou, C.; Ichchou, M. N.; Lainé, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of vibrational analysis of 2D periodic waveguides, Floquet-Bloch theorem is widely applied for the determination of wave dispersion characteristics. In this context, the Wave Finite Element Method (WFEM) combines Periodic Structure Theory (PST) with standard FE packages, enabling wave dispersion analysis of waveguides involving structurally realistic unit-cells. For such applications, the computational efficiency of the WFEM depends on the choice of the formulation and can lead to numerical issues, worsen by extensive computational cost. This paper presents a coupled wave-mode approach for the determination of wave dispersion characteristics in structurally advanced periodic structures. It combines two scales of model order reduction. At the unit-cell's scale, Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) provides the displacement field associated with local resonances of the periodic structure, while the free wave propagation is considered using a spectral problem projection on a reduced set of shape functions associated with propagating waves, thus providing considerable reduction of the computational cost. An application is provided for a bi-directionally stiffened panel and the influence of reduction parameters is discussed, as well as the robustness of the numerical results.

  11. Simultaneous image segmentation and medial structure estimation: application to 2D and 3D vessel tree extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makram-Ebeid, Sherif; Stawiaski, Jean; Pizaine, Guillaume

    2011-03-01

    We propose a variational approach which combines automatic segmentation and medial structure extraction in a single computationally efficient algorithm. In this paper, we apply our approach to the analysis of vessels in 2D X-ray angiography and 3D X-ray rotational angiography of the brain. Other variational methods proposed in the literature encode the medial structure of vessel trees as a skeleton with associated vessel radii. In contrast, our method provides a dense smooth level set map which sign provides the segmentation. The ridges of this map define the segmented regions skeleton. The differential structure of the smooth map (in particular the Hessian) allows the discrimination between tubular and other structures. In 3D, both circular and non-circular tubular cross-sections and tubular branching can be handled conveniently. This algorithm allows accurate segmentation of complex vessel structures. It also provides key tools for extracting anatomically labeled vessel tree graphs and for dealing with challenging issues like kissing vessel discrimination and separation of entangled 3D vessel trees.

  12. Exploring the Structure and Chemical Activity of 2-D Gold Islands on Graphene Moire/Ru(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Semidey-Flecha, Lymarie; Liu, L.; Zhou, Zihao; Goodman, D. Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Au deposited on Ru(0001)-supported extended, continuous graphene moiré forms large 2-D islands at room temperature that are several nanometers in diameter but only 0.55 nm in height, in the apparent absence of typical binding sites such as defects and adsorbates. These Au islands conform to the corrugation of the underlying graphene and display commensurate moiré patterns. Several extended Au structure models on graphene/Ru(0001) are examined using density functional theory calculations. Close-packed Au overlayers are energetically more stable, but all interact weakly with the support. Preliminary tests found the Au islands/graphene/Ru(0001) surface to be active for CO oxidation at cryogenic temperature, which suggests that the Au itself is the locus of catalytic activity.

  13. An analysis of electrochemical energy storage using electrodes fabricated from atomically thin 2D structures of MoS2, graphene and MoS2/graphene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffstutler, Jacob D.

    The behavior of 2D materials has become of great interest in the wake of development of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and the discovery of monolayer graphene by Geim and Novoselov. This study aims to analyze the response variance of 2D electrode materials for EDLCs prepared through the liquid-phase exfoliation method when subjected to differing conditions. Once exfoliated, samples are tested with a series of structural characterization methods, including tunneling electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A new ionic liquid for EDLC use, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate is compared in performance to 6M potassium hydroxide aqueous electrolyte. Devices composed of liquid-phase exfoliated graphene / MoS2 composites are analyzed by concentration for ideal performance. Device performance under cold extreme temperatures for the ionic fluid is presented as well. A brief overview of by-layer analysis of graphene electrode materials is presented as-is. All samples were tested with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, with good capacitive results. The evolution of electrochemical behavior through the altered parameters is tracked as well.

  14. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions, methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, F. G.; Pannimpullath Remanan, R.; Loisel, H.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST). The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. We show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG) of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF) can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics. After this methodological study, some applications are presented: the nonlinear moment function ζ(q) is fitted using the lognormal model with 2 parameters, the Hurst index H and the intermittency μ. The values of H and μ are discussed for 4 different parameters (Chl-a, SST, Rrs-443 and Rrs-555) and for different locations, chosen among different contrasted regions of the ocean, characterized by high spatial heterogeneity in Chl-a and SST.

  15. Structure and Coordination Determination of Peptide-metal Complexes Using 1D and 2D 1H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Shoshan, Michal S.; Tshuva, Edit Y.; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Copper (I) binding by metallochaperone transport proteins prevents copper oxidation and release of the toxic ions that may participate in harmful redox reactions. The Cu (I) complex of the peptide model of a Cu (I) binding metallochaperone protein, which includes the sequence MTCSGCSRPG (underlined is conserved), was determined in solution under inert conditions by NMR spectroscopy. NMR is a widely accepted technique for the determination of solution structures of proteins and peptides. Due to difficulty in crystallization to provide single crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography, the NMR technique is extremely valuable, especially as it provides information on the solution state rather than the solid state. Herein we describe all steps that are required for full three-dimensional structure determinations by NMR. The protocol includes sample preparation in an NMR tube, 1D and 2D data collection and processing, peak assignment and integration, molecular mechanics calculations, and structure analysis. Importantly, the analysis was first conducted without any preset metal-ligand bonds, to assure a reliable structure determination in an unbiased manner. PMID:24378924

  16. Time-dependent resonant UHF CI approach for the photo-induced dynamics of the multi-electron system confined in 2D QD

    SciTech Connect

    Okunishi, Takuma; Clark, Richard; Takeda, Kyozaburo; Kusakabe, Kouichi; Tomita, Norikazu

    2013-12-04

    We extend the static multi-reference description (resonant UHF) to the dynamic system in order to include the correlation effect over time, and simplify the TD Schrödinger equation (TD-CI) into a time-developed rate equation where the TD external field Ĥ′(t) is then incorporated directly in the Hamiltonian without any approximations. We apply this TD-CI method to the two-electron ground state of a 2D quantum dot (QD) under photon injection and study the resulting two-electron Rabi oscillation.

  17. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  18. Imaging 2D structures by the CSAMT method: application to the Pantano di S. Gregorio Magno faulted basin (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiano, Antonio; Di Giuseppe, Maria Giulia; Petrillo, Zaccaria; Patella, Domenico

    2009-06-01

    A controlled source audiofrequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) survey has been undertaken in the Pantano di San Gregorio Magno faulted basin, an earthquake prone area of Southern Apennines in Italy. A dataset from 11 soundings, distributed along a nearly N-S 780 m long profile, was acquired in the basin's easternmost area, where the fewest data are available as to the faulting shallow features. A preliminary skew analysis allowed a prevailing 2D nature of the dataset to be ascertained. Then, using a single-site multi-frequency approach, Dantzig's simplex algorithm was introduced for the first time to estimate the CSAMT decomposition parameters. The simplex algorithm, freely available online, proved to be fast and efficient. By this approach, the TM and TE mode field diagrams were obtained and a N35°W ± 10° 2D strike mean direction was estimated along the profile, in substantial agreement with the fault traces within the basin. A 2D inversion of the apparent resistivity and phase curves at seven almost noise-free sites distributed along the central portion of the profile was finally elaborated, reinforced by a sensitivity analysis, which allowed the best resolved portion of the model to be imaged from the first few meters of depth down to a mean depth of 300 m b.g.l. From the inverted section, the following features have been outlined: (i) a cover layer with resistivity in the range 3-30 Ω m ascribed to the Quaternary lacustrine clayey deposits filling the basin, down to an average depth of about 35 m b.g.l., underlain by a structure with resistivity over 50 Ω m up to about 600 Ω m, ascribed to the Mesozoic carbonate bedrock; (ii) a system of two normal faults within the carbonate basement, extending down to the maximum best resolved depth of the order of 300 m b.g.l.; (iii) two wedge-shaped domains separating the opposite blocks of the faults with resistivity ranging between 30 Ω m and 50 Ω m and horizontal extent of the order of some tens of metres, likely

  19. Anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Li-Wei; Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair; Wang, Chih-Min; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Sheng-Long; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2016-07-01

    A Cd(II)-organic framework {[Cd2(tpim)4(SO4)(H2O)2]·(SO4)·21H2O}n (1) was synthesized by reacting CdSO4·8/3H2O and 2,4,5-tri(4-pyridyl)imidazole (tpim) under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 adopts a layered structure in which the [Cd(tpim)2]n chains are linked by sulfate anions. These 2D layers are further packed into a 3D supramolecular framework via π-π interactions. The structure contains two types of SO42- anions, i.e., bridging SO42- and free SO42- anions, the latter of which are included in the large channels of the framework. Compound 1 exhibits interesting anion exchange behavior. In the presence of SCN- anions, both the bridging and free SO42- anions in 1 were completely exchanged by SCN- ligands to form a 1D species [Cd(tpim)2(SCN)2] (1A), in which the SCN- moieties function as a monodentate ligand. On the other hand, when compound 1 was ion exchanged with N3- anions in aqueous solution, the bridging SO42- moieties remained intact, and only the free guest SO42- were replaced by N3- anions. The gas adsorption behavior of the activated compound 1 was also investigated.

  20. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  1. High resolution spectroscopy of the Cs2 D 1Sigma u + -X 1Sigma g + transition and hyperfine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Usui, Takashi; Kumauchi, Takahiro; Baba, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi; Katô, Hajime

    1993-02-01

    The Doppler-free high resolution laser spectroscopy of Cs2 D 1Σu+-X 1Σg+ transition is extended up to v'=65. By comparing the spectral linewidth and the time-resolved fluorescence intensity, the line broadening observed for transitions to the D 1Σu+(v'=63,J'≤70) levels is identified as the lifetime broadening originating from the predissociation. Line splittings are observed for the D 1Σu+(v'=46,J'≥95)-X 1Σg+(v`= 1,J`) transitions and are identified as the hyperfine splitting due to a magnetic dipole interaction between nuclear spin and electron. The hyperfine splitting is attributed to mixing of the (2) 3Πu state, whose wave function changes from Hund's case (a) to case (b) at large J. The dependence of the electric dipole transition moment on the internuclear distance for the D 1Σu+-X 1Σg+ transition is determined by comparing the observed and calculated line intensities of the dispersed fluorescence.

  2. 3D spin-flop transition in enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Xia, Z-C; Wei, M; Yang, J-H; Chen, B; Huang, S; Shang, C; Wu, H; Zhang, X-X; Huang, J-W; Ouyang, Z-W

    2016-10-01

    The enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2 has been successfully fabricated, which exhibits field-induced 3D spin-flop phase transitions. In the case of the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis (B//c), the applied magnetic field induces the evolution of the noncollinear helical magnetic coupling into a ferromagnetic (FM) state with all the magnetization of the Co ion parallel to the c-axis. A striking variation of the field-induced strain within the ab-plane is noticed in the magnetic field region of 20-30 T. In the case of the magnetic field perpendicular to the c-axis (B  ⊥  c), the inter-layer helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling may transform to an initial canted AFM coupling, and then part of it transforms to an intermediate metamagnetic phase with the alignment of two-up-one-down Co magnetic moments and finally to an ultimate FM coupling in higher magnetic fields. The robust noncollinear AFM magnetic coupling is completely destroyed above 30 T. In combination with the measurements of magnetization, magnetoresistance and field-induced strain, a complete magnetic phase diagram of the TlCo2Se2 single crystal has been depicted, demonstrating complex magnetic structures even though the crystal geometry itself gives no indication of the magnetic frustration. PMID:27485370

  3. 3D spin-flop transition in enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z.; Xia, Z.-C.; Wei, M.; Yang, J.-H.; Chen, B.; Huang, S.; Shang, C.; Wu, H.; Zhang, X.-X.; Huang, J.-W.; Ouyang, Z.-W.

    2016-10-01

    The enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2 has been successfully fabricated, which exhibits field-induced 3D spin-flop phase transitions. In the case of the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis (B//c), the applied magnetic field induces the evolution of the noncollinear helical magnetic coupling into a ferromagnetic (FM) state with all the magnetization of the Co ion parallel to the c-axis. A striking variation of the field-induced strain within the ab-plane is noticed in the magnetic field region of 20-30 T. In the case of the magnetic field perpendicular to the c-axis (B  ⊥  c), the inter-layer helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling may transform to an initial canted AFM coupling, and then part of it transforms to an intermediate metamagnetic phase with the alignment of two-up-one-down Co magnetic moments and finally to an ultimate FM coupling in higher magnetic fields. The robust noncollinear AFM magnetic coupling is completely destroyed above 30 T. In combination with the measurements of magnetization, magnetoresistance and field-induced strain, a complete magnetic phase diagram of the TlCo2Se2 single crystal has been depicted, demonstrating complex magnetic structures even though the crystal geometry itself gives no indication of the magnetic frustration.

  4. Atomic structures and electronic properties of phosphorene grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Si; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Yizhen; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is one main type of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, and has significant impact on the physical properties of 2D materials. Phosphorene, a recently synthesized 2D semiconductor, possesses a puckered honeycomb lattice and outstanding electronic properties. It is very interesting to know the possible GBs present in this novel material, and how their properties differ from those in the other 2D materials. Based on first-principles calculations, we explore the atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of phosphorene GBs. A total of 19 GBs are predicted and found to be energetically stable with formation energies much lower than those in graphene. These GBs do not severely affect the electronic properties of phosphorene: the band gap of perfect phosphorene is preserved, and the electron mobilities are only moderately reduced in these defective systems. Our theoretical results provide vital guidance for experimental tailoring the electronic properties of phosphorene as well as the device applications using phosphorene materials.

  5. Large structure rearrangement of colicin ia channel domain after membrane binding from 2D 13C spin diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenbin; Yao, Xiaolan; Hong, Mei

    2005-05-01

    One of the main mechanisms of membrane protein folding is by spontaneous insertion into the lipid bilayer from the aqueous environment. The bacterial toxin, colicin Ia, is one such protein. To shed light on the conformational changes involved in this dramatic transfer from the polar to the hydrophobic milieu, we carried out 2D magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR experiments on the water-soluble and membrane-bound states of the channel-forming domain of colicin Ia. Proton-driven (13)C spin diffusion spectra of selectively (13)C-labeled protein show unequivocal attenuation of cross-peaks after membrane binding. This attenuation can be assigned to distance increases but not reduction of the diffusion coefficient. Analysis of the statistics of the interhelical and intrahelical (13)C-(13)C distances in the soluble protein structure indicates that the observed cross-peak reduction is well correlated with a high percentage of short interhelical contacts in the soluble protein. This suggests that colicin Ia channel domain becomes open and extended upon membrane binding, thus lengthening interhelical distances. In comparison, cross-peaks with similar intensities between the two states are dominated by intrahelical contacts in the soluble state. This suggests that the membrane-bound structure of colicin Ia channel domain may be described as a "molten globule", in which the helical secondary structure is retained while the tertiary structure is unfolded. This study demonstrates that (13)C spin diffusion NMR is a valuable tool for obtaining qualitative long-range distance constraints on membrane protein folding. PMID:15853348

  6. Structure of the HCMV UL16-MICB complex elucidates select binding of a viral immunoevasin to diverse NKG2D ligands.

    PubMed

    Müller, Steffen; Zocher, Georg; Steinle, Alexander; Stehle, Thilo

    2010-01-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D promotes elimination of infected or malignant cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes through engagement of stress-induced MHC class I-related ligands. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded immunoevasin UL16 subverts NKG2D-mediated immune responses by retaining a select group of diverse NKG2D ligands inside the cell. We report here the crystal structure of UL16 in complex with the NKG2D ligand MICB at 1.8 A resolution, revealing the molecular basis for the promiscuous, but highly selective, binding of UL16 to unrelated NKG2D ligands. The immunoglobulin-like UL16 protein utilizes a three-stranded beta-sheet to engage the alpha-helical surface of the MHC class I-like MICB platform domain. Intriguingly, residues at the center of this beta-sheet mimic a central binding motif employed by the structurally unrelated C-type lectin-like NKG2D to facilitate engagement of diverse NKG2D ligands. Using surface plasmon resonance, we find that UL16 binds MICB, ULBP1, and ULBP2 with similar affinities that lie in the nanomolar range (12-66 nM). The ability of UL16 to bind its ligands depends critically on the presence of a glutamine (MICB) or closely related glutamate (ULBP1 and ULBP2) at position 169. An arginine residue at this position however, as found for example in MICA or ULBP3, would cause steric clashes with UL16 residues. The inability of UL16 to bind MICA and ULBP3 can therefore be attributed to single substitutions at key NKG2D ligand locations. This indicates that selective pressure exerted by viral immunoevasins such as UL16 contributed to the diversification of NKG2D ligands.

  7. Structure of the HCMV UL16-MICB complex elucidates select binding of a viral immunoevasin to diverse NKG2D ligands.

    PubMed

    Müller, Steffen; Zocher, Georg; Steinle, Alexander; Stehle, Thilo

    2010-01-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D promotes elimination of infected or malignant cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes through engagement of stress-induced MHC class I-related ligands. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded immunoevasin UL16 subverts NKG2D-mediated immune responses by retaining a select group of diverse NKG2D ligands inside the cell. We report here the crystal structure of UL16 in complex with the NKG2D ligand MICB at 1.8 A resolution, revealing the molecular basis for the promiscuous, but highly selective, binding of UL16 to unrelated NKG2D ligands. The immunoglobulin-like UL16 protein utilizes a three-stranded beta-sheet to engage the alpha-helical surface of the MHC class I-like MICB platform domain. Intriguingly, residues at the center of this beta-sheet mimic a central binding motif employed by the structurally unrelated C-type lectin-like NKG2D to facilitate engagement of diverse NKG2D ligands. Using surface plasmon resonance, we find that UL16 binds MICB, ULBP1, and ULBP2 with similar affinities that lie in the nanomolar range (12-66 nM). The ability of UL16 to bind its ligands depends critically on the presence of a glutamine (MICB) or closely related glutamate (ULBP1 and ULBP2) at position 169. An arginine residue at this position however, as found for example in MICA or ULBP3, would cause steric clashes with UL16 residues. The inability of UL16 to bind MICA and ULBP3 can therefore be attributed to single substitutions at key NKG2D ligand locations. This indicates that selective pressure exerted by viral immunoevasins such as UL16 contributed to the diversification of NKG2D ligands. PMID:20090832

  8. Orbital dependent Rashba splitting and electron-phonon coupling of 2D Bi phase on Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiani, Pierluigi; Lisi, Simone; Betti, Maria Grazia; Ibrahimi, Amina Taleb; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Chiodo, Letizia

    2013-11-14

    A monolayer of bismuth deposited on the Cu(100) surface forms a highly ordered c(2×2) reconstructed phase. The low energy single particle excitations of the c(2×2) Bi/Cu(100) present Bi-induced states with a parabolic dispersion in the energy region close to the Fermi level, as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic state dispersion, the charge density localization, and the spin-orbit coupling have been investigated combining photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, unraveling a two-dimensional Bi phase with charge density well localized at the interface. The Bi-induced states present a Rashba splitting, when the charge density is strongly localized in the Bi plane. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the spectral density close to the Fermi level has been evaluated. Dispersive electronic states offer a large number of decay channels for transitions coupled to phonons and the strength of the electron-phonon coupling for the Bi/Cu(100) system is shown to be stronger than for Bi surfaces and to depend on the electronic state symmetry and localization.

  9. Analysis of bell-shape negative giant-magnetoresistance in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron systems using multi-conduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaraweera, Rasanga; Liu, Han-Chun; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh

    Recent advancements in the growth techniques of the GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) routinely yield high quality heterostructures with enhanced physical and electrical properties, including devices with 2D electron mobilities well above 107 cm2/Vs. These improvements have opened new pathways to study interesting physical phenomena associated with the 2D electron system. Negative giant-magnetoresistance (GMR) is one such phenomenon which can observed in the high mobility 2DES. However, the negative GMR in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2DES is still not fully understood. In this contribution, we present an experimental study of the bell-shape negative GMR in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs devices and quantitatively analyze the results utilizing the multi-conduction model. The multi-conduction model includes interesting physical characteristics such as negative diagonal conductivity, non-vanishing off-diagonal conductivity, etc. The aim of the study is to examine GMR over a wider experimental parameter space and determine whether the multi-conduction model serves to describe the experimental results.

  10. 2D double-layer-tube-shaped structure Bi2S3/ZnS heterojunction with enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoming; Wang, Zihang; Fu, Feng; Li, Xiang; Li, Wenhong

    2015-10-01

    Bi2S3/ZnS heterojunction with 2D double-layer-tube-shaped structures was prepared by the facile synthesis method. The corresponding relationship was obtained among loaded content to phase, morphology, and optical absorption property of Bi2S3/ZnS composite. The results shown that Bi2S3 loaded could evidently change the crystallinity of ZnS, enhance the optical absorption ability for visible light of ZnS, and improve the morphologies and microstructure of ZnS. The photocatalytic activities of the Bi2S3/ZnS sample were evaluated for the photodegradation of phenol and desulfurization of thiophene under visible light irradiation. The results showed that Bi2S3 loaded greatly improved the photocatalytic activity of ZnS, and the content of loaded Bi2S3 had an impact on the catalytic activity of ZnS. Moreover, the mechanism of enhanced photocatalytic activity was also investigated by analysis of relative band positions of Bi2S3 and ZnS, and photo-generated hole was main active radicals during photocatalytic oxidation process.

  11. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Morgan, Sarah E; Kehoe, Tom B; Wilson, Mark W B; Chin, Alex W; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  12. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Morgan, Sarah E.; Kehoe, Tom B.; Wilson, Mark W. B.; Chin, Alex W.; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  13. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 2: 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Ashish P.; Pacheco, Carlos; Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyl groups are abundant in natural organic molecules (NOM) and play a major role in their reactivity. The structural environments of carboxyl groups in IHSS soil and river humic samples were investigated using 2D NMR (heteronuclear and homonuclear correlation) spectroscopy. Based on the 1H- 13C heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy results, the carboxyl environments in NOM were categorized as Type I (unsubstituted and alkyl-substituted aliphatic/alicyclic), Type II (functionalized carbon substituted), Type IIIa, b (heteroatom and olefin substituted), and Type IVa, b (5-membered heterocyclic aromatic and 6-membered aromatic). The most intense signal in the HMBC spectra comes from the Type I carboxyl groups, including the 2JCH and 3JCH couplings of unsubstituted aliphatic and alicyclic acids, though this spectral region also includes the 3JCH couplings of Type II and III structures. Type II and III carboxyls have small but detectable 2JCH correlations in all NOM samples except for the Suwannee River humic acid. Signals from carboxyls bonded to 5-membered aromatic heterocyclic fragments (Type IVa) are observed in the soil HA and Suwannee River FA, while correlations to 6-membered aromatics (Type IVb) are only observed in Suwannee River HA. In general, aromatic carboxylic acids may be present at concentrations lower than previously imagined in these samples. Vibrational spectroscopy results for these NOM samples, described in an accompanying paper [Hay M. B. and Myneni S. C. B. (2007) Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press)], suggest that Type II and Type III carboxylic acids with α substituents (e.g., -OH, -OR, or -CO 2H) constitute the majority of carboxyl structures in all humic substances examined. Furoic and salicylic acid structures (Type IV) are also feasible fragments, albeit as minor constituents. The

  14. Synthesis and Crystal Structures of Zirconium Phosphate Fluorides with New 2D and 3D Structure Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wloka, Martin; Troyanov, Sergei I.; Kemnitz, Erhard

    2000-01-01

    Three new zirconium phosphate fluorides, [amH2]0.5 [Zr2(PO4)(HPO4)2F2]·0.5H2O (1), [amH2]1.5[Zr3(PO4)3F6]·1.5H2O (2) (am=trans-1,4-diaminocyclohexane for 1 and 2), and [amH2]0.5[Zr3(PO4)3(HPO4)F2]·1.5H2O (am=2,2-dimethyl-1,3-diaminopropane) (3), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and structurally characterized. Zr is octahedrally coordinated in all three structures. In 1, the octahedra consist of ZrO6 and ZrO4F2 units. Compound 2 is made exclusively of ZrO4F2. In 3, there are three different types of Zr-octahedra, namely, ZrO6, ZrO5F, and ZrO4F2. The Zr octahedra and PO4 tetrahedra are connected via non-OH oxygen atoms. In 1 and 2, all F atoms are terminal, whereas in 3, one of the two F atoms bridges between the ZrO5F and ZrO4F2 octahedra. In structures 1 and 2 with higher F/Zr ratios, two-dimensional inorganic networks exist. The inorganic sheets are connected by the protonated templates via N-H···F and in 1 additionally by O-H···F hydrogen bonds. In 3, the lower F/Zr ratio results in the formation of a three-dimensional inorganic framework with characteristic 'double' channels in which the highly disordered templates are located. The existence of several structure types in the ZrPOF-n family is discussed on the basis of different template geometry and F/Zr ratios.

  15. Large-area 2D periodic crystalline silicon nanodome arrays on nanoimprinted glass exhibiting photonic band structure effects.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Lockau, D; Sontheimer, T; Schubert-Bischoff, P; Rudigier-Voigt, E; Bockmeyer, M; Schmidt, F; Rech, B

    2012-04-01

    Two-dimensional silicon nanodome arrays are prepared on large areas up to 50 cm² exhibiting photonic band structure effects in the near-infrared and visible wavelength region by downscaling a recently developed fabrication method based on nanoimprint-patterned glass, high-rate electron-beam evaporation of silicon, self-organized solid phase crystallization and wet-chemical etching. The silicon nanodomes, arranged in square lattice geometry with 300 nm lattice constant, are optically characterized by angular resolved reflection measurements, allowing the partial determination of the photonic band structure. This experimentally determined band structure agrees well with the outcome of three-dimensional optical finite-element simulations. A 16% photonic bandgap is predicted for an optimized geometry of the silicon nanodome arrays. By variation of the duration of the selective etching step, the geometry as well as the optical properties of the periodic silicon nanodome arrays can be controlled systematically.

  16. Dissipative dynamics within the electronic friction approach: the femtosecond laser desorption of H2/D2 from Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    Füchsel, Gernot; Klamroth, Tillmann; Monturet, Serge; Saalfrank, Peter

    2011-05-21

    An electronic friction approach based on Langevin dynamics is used to describe the multidimensional (six-dimensional) dynamics of femtosecond laser induced desorption of H(2) and D(2) from a H(D)-covered Ru(0001) surface. The paper extends previous reduced-dimensional models, using a similar approach. In the present treatment forces and frictional coefficients are calculated from periodic density functional theory (DFT) and essentially parameter-free, while the action of femtosecond laser pulses on the metal surface is treated by using the two-temperature model. Our calculations shed light on the performance and validity of various adiabatic, non-adiabatic, and Arrhenius/Kramers type kinetic models to describe hot-electron mediated photoreactions at metal surfaces. The multidimensional frictional dynamics are able to reproduce and explain known experimental facts, such as strong isotope effects, scaling of properties with laser fluence, and non-equipartitioning of vibrational, rotational, and translational energies of desorbing species. Further, detailed predictions regarding translations are made, and the question for the controllability of photoreactions at surfaces with the help of vibrational preexcitation is addressed.

  17. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  18. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H2, D2, and O2: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. M.; Krynski, Kamil; Streeter, Zachary; Findley, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V0(ρ) for H2, D2, and O2 from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V0(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O2) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H2 and D2). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V0(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths.

  19. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  20. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  1. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  2. Electronic structure of acceptor-donor complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoro, E.; Ohama, Y.; Hayafuji, Y.

    2003-10-01

    The electronic structure of trimer acceptor-donor complexes in silicon Si clusters is studied using the ab initio discrete variational-Xα molecular-orbital (MO) method. The trimer complexes In2D (D=phosphorus P, arsenic As, antimony Sb, or bismuth Bi) consist of two indium In acceptor elements and a centered donor element D from the group V elements. Calculations are performed under the assumption that the three atoms are arranged in the nearest neighbor substitutional trimer configuration. Results indicate that the trimer complexes act as shallower acceptors having smaller ionization activation energies than In acceptor. The potential of In2D as an acceptor in Si is then discussed and In2D is proposed as a promising acceptor for the formation of channels and source/drains in ultralarge scaled integration.

  3. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J.; Batson, Philip E.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ~-0.1 V and ~50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  4. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  5. Magnetic interactions in transition metal ions. Part I. Electronic configurations d2, d3, and d4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yoshihisa; Tokushima, Takashi; Horikawa, Yuka; Takahashi, Osamu; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Oshima, Masaharu; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Shin, Shik

    2013-11-01

    High-resolution O 1s resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of liquid H2O, D2O, and HDO, obtained by excitation near the preedge resonance show, in the elastic line region, well-separated multiple vibrational structures corresponding to the internal OH stretch vibration in the ground state of water. The energy of the first-order vibrational excitation is strongly blueshifted with respect to the main band in the infrared or Raman spectra of water, indicating that water molecules with a highly weakened or broken donating hydrogen bond are correlated with the preedge structure in the x-ray absorption spectrum. The vibrational profile of preedge excited HDO water is well fitted with 50%±20% greater OH-stretch contribution compared to OD, which strongly supports a preference for OH being the weakened or broken H-bond in agreement with the well-known picture that D2O makes stronger H-bonds than H2O. Accompanying path-integral molecular dynamics simulations show that this is particularly the case for strongly asymmetrically H-bonded molecules, i.e., those that are selected by preedge excitation.

  6. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER. PMID:27295098

  7. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  8. Self assembly of sandwich-layered 2D silver(I) coordination polymers stabilized by argentophilic interactions: Synthesis, crystal structures and ab initio intramolecular energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorlu, Yunus; Can, Hatice

    2014-11-01

    Two different two-dimensional silver(I) coordination polymers, namely {[Ag2(dcpa)}n (1) and {[Ag2(ma)]}n (2), where dcpa = 4,5-dichlorophthalate; ma = maleate, were synthesized and structurally analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Complexes 1 and 2 represent 2D coordination polymer with metal-organic sandwich type. Two independent Ag(I) ions in both complexes are linked to constructed 2D layer by μ8-η3:η2:η2:η1 (for complex 1) and μ8-η3:η3:η2:η2 (for complex 2) carboxylate bridging fashions. The 2D layers of 1 are further extended into a three-dimensional (3D) supramolecular network by weak Cl⋯Cl interactions while 2D layers of 2 are linked by weak CH⋯O interactions into a 3D supramolecular framework. These two complexes exhibit considerable short Ag-Ag argentophilic interactions. The long-range corrected density functional theory (DFT) method was used to investigate intramolecular energetics, which are responsible for these 2D structures. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis with long-range corrected DFT method assists to understand these intramolecular interactions.

  9. Fitting of Diverging Thermoelectric Power in a Strongly Interacting 2D Electron System of Si-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tak

    2013-03-01

    The diverging-effective mass (DEM) in a metallic system is evidence of strong correlation between fermions in strongly correlated systems. The identification of the DEM still remains to be revealed The effective mass, m* =mo/(1-ρ4) where ρ is band filling helps clarify the diverging thermoelectric power, S, measured in inhomogeneous Si-MOSFET systems. As a carrier density ns decreases, S increases rapidly This is regarded as the metal-insulator transition (MIT) near nc ~ 79x10-1cm-2, where nc is about 0.02% to nSi ~ 3.4x10-14cm-2 in Si. This can be solved in assuming that ρ = nc/ns increases as ns decreases. nc is an excited(doped) carrier density in the semiconductor induced by gate and can be also regarded as a metallic carrier density, that is, nc ≡ nseminon = nmetal. ns is given as ntot ≡ ns = nc + nseminon where nseminon is a carrier density in a nonmetallic phase. The carrier density measured by Hall effect is the sum of carriers both induced by gate field and generated by MIT. Moreover, a larger metallic phase is not made due to a conducting path in the field-effect structure after a metallic phase is formed. Thus, increasing ns indicates increasing nnon; this corresponds to an over-doping to increase inhomogeneity. It's fitting is given from S = (απ3 kB2T/3e)(1/EF)= (α 8π3kB2T/3h2)(m*/e*nc) =So(1/ ρ) (1/(1-ρ4)) , where e* = ρ e, ρ = nc/ns, T =0.8K, m* =mo/(1-ρ4), α = 0.6, and So = (α 8π3kB2T/3h2)(mo/enc) ~12.36 are used. The data S are closely fitted by m*

  10. Electronic band structure of surface-doped black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jimin; Ryu, Sae Hee; Sohn, Yeongsup; Kim, Keun Su

    2015-03-01

    There are rapidly growing interests in the study of few-layer black phosphorus owing to its promising device characteristics that may impact our future electronics technology. The low-energy band structure of black phosphorus has been widely predicted to be controllable by external perturbations, such as strain and doping. In this work, we attempt to control the electronic band structure of black phosphorous by in-situ surface deposition of alkali-metal atoms. We found that surface doping induces steep band bending towards the bulk, leading to the emergence of new 2D electronic states that are confined within only few phosphorene layers of black phosphorus. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we directly measured the electronic band structure and its evolution as a function of dopant density. Supported by IBS.

  11. Quantification of transition dipole strengths using 1D and 2D spectroscopy for the identification of molecular structures via exciton delocalization: Application to α-helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechko, Maksim; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-11-01

    Vibrational and electronic transition dipole strengths are often good probes of molecular structures, especially in excitonically coupled systems of chromophores. One cannot determine transition dipole strengths using linear spectroscopy unless the concentration is known, which in many cases it is not. In this paper, we report a simple method for measuring transition dipole moments from linear absorption and 2D IR spectra that does not require knowledge of concentrations. Our method is tested on several model compounds and applied to the amide I' band of a polypeptide in its random coil and α-helical conformation as modulated by the solution temperature. It is often difficult to confidently assign polypeptide and protein secondary structures to random coil or α-helix by linear spectroscopy alone, because they absorb in the same frequency range. We find that the transition dipole strength of the random coil state is 0.12 ± 0.013 D2, which is similar to a single peptide unit, indicating that the vibrational mode of random coil is localized on a single peptide unit. In an α-helix, the lower bound of transition dipole strength is 0.26 ± 0.03 D2. When taking into account the angle of the amide I' transition dipole vector with respect to the helix axis, our measurements indicate that the amide I' vibrational mode is delocalized across a minimum of 3.5 residues in an α-helix. Thus, one can confidently assign secondary structure based on exciton delocalization through its effect on the transition dipole strength. Our method will be especially useful for kinetically evolving systems, systems with overlapping molecular conformations, and other situations in which concentrations are difficult to determine.

  12. Electronic structure of Calcium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of crystal and electronic structures of CaB6 within a screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA). Our ab initio total energy calculations show that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of >1.2 eV, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We show a very sensitive band gap dependence on the crystal internal parameter, which might partially explain the scatter of previous theoretical results. Our calculation demonstrates that it is essential to study this system simultaneously for both crystal structures and electronic properties, and that the sX-LDA provides an ideal method for this problem.

  13. ZnO Nanorods on a LaAlO3 -SrTiO3 Interface: Hybrid 1D-2D Diodes with Engineered Electronic Properties.

    PubMed

    Bera, Ashok; Lin, Weinan; Yao, Yingbang; Ding, Junfeng; Lourembam, James; Wu, Tom

    2016-02-10

    Integrating nanomaterials with different dimensionalities and properties is a versatile approach toward realizing new functionalities in advanced devices. Here, a novel diode-type heterostructure is reported consisting of 1D semiconducting ZnO nanorods and 2D metallic LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. Tunable insulator-to-metal transitions, absent in the individual components, are observed as a result of the competing temperature-dependent conduction mechanisms. Detailed transport analysis reveals direct tunneling at low bias, Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward bias, and Zener breakdown at high reverse bias. Our results highlight the rich electronic properties of such artificial diodes with hybrid dimensionalities, and the design principle may be generalized to other nanomaterials.

  14. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  15. Electron Coherence in Mesoscopic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, Alex; Glazman, Leonid

    2011-03-20

    The recent rapid progress in nanofabrication and experimental techniques made it possible to investigate a variety of meso-- and nano--scale systems, which were unavailable only a few years ago. Examples include fabrication of high-quality quantum wires in semiconductor heterostructures, of nanoscale hybrid superconductor--normal metal structures, and of a variety of novel (and much smaller) quantum dot and q-bit designs. These technological advances have led to formulation of a number of condensed matter theory problems which are equally important for applications and for the fundamental science. The present proposal aims at filling the exposed gaps in knowledge and at facilitating further development of experimental and theoretical physics of nanoscale structures. Specifically, the two PIs address the following issues: (i) The theory of interacting electrons in a quantum wire which accounts adequately for the non-linear dispersion relation of the electrons. The existing approaches rely on models with {\\em linearized} electron spectrum, which fall short of addressing a growing list of experimentally relevant phenomena. (ii) Dynamics of hybrid normal--superconducting systems. A reliable treatment of dissipative phenomena in such structures is not developed as of yet, while rapid progress in fabrication makes finding the proper theoretical treatment methods highly desirable. (iii)~The fundamental limits on relaxation times of a superconducting charge q-bit. The latter is one of the most advanced scalable realizations of a quantum computing device. (iv)~The dynamics and relaxation times of a spin of an electron in a small semiconductor quantum dot. Besides the fundamental importance, these structures are also valuable candidates for quantum computing applications.

  16. Residue-Specific Structural Kinetics of Proteins through the Union of Isotope Labeling, Mid-IR Pulse Shaping, and Coherent 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a methodology for studying protein kinetics using a rapid-scan technology for collecting 2D IR spectra. In conjunction with isotope labeling, 2D IR spectroscopy is able to probe the secondary structure and environment of individual residues in polypeptides and proteins. It is particularly useful for membrane and aggregate proteins. Our rapid-scan technology relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that computer generates the pulse shapes, much like in an NMR spectrometer. With this device, data collection is faster, easier, and more accurate. We describe our 2D IR spectrometer, as well as protocols for 13C=18O isotope labeling, and then illustrate the technique with an application to the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide form type 2 diabetes. PMID:20472067

  17. Controlled Confinement of Half-metallic 2D Electron Gas in BaTiO3/Ba2FeReO6/BaTiO3 Heterostructures: A First-principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Baidya, Santu; Waghmare, Umesh; Paramekanti, Arun

    Using density functional theory calculations, we establish that the half-metallicity of bulk Ba2FeReO6 survives down i to 1 nm thickness in BaTiO3/Ba2FeReO6/BaTiO3 heterostructures grown along the (001) and (111) directions. The confinement of the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas in this quantum well structure arises from the suppressed hybridization between Re/Fe d states and unoccupied Ti d states, and it is further strengthened by polar fields for the (111) direction. This mechanism, distinct from the polar catastrophe, leads to an order of magnitude stronger confinement of the 2D electron gas than that at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. We further show low-energy bands of (111) heterostructure display nontrivial topological character. Our work opens up the possibility of realizing ultra-thin spintronic devices. Journal Ref: Phys. Rev. B 92, 161106(R) (2015) S.B. and T.S.D thank Department of Science and Technology, India for the support through Thematic Unit of Excellence. AP was supported by NSERC (Canada).

  18. 2D modeling of DC potential structures induced by RF sheaths with transverse currents in front of ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2005-09-26

    Understanding DC potential generation in front of ICRF antennas is crucial for long pulse high RF power systems. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. To reach this goal, near RF parallel electric fields have to be computed in 3D and integrated along open magnetic field lines to yield a 2D RF potential map in a transverse plane. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. As RF potentials are spatially inhomogeneous, transverse polarization currents are created, modifying RF and DC maps. Such modifications are quantified on a 'test map' having initially a Gaussian shape and assuming that the map remains Gaussian near its summit,the time behavior of the peak can be estimated analytically in presence of polarization current as a function of its width r0 and amplitude {phi}0 (normalized to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature). A 'peaking factor' is built from the DC peak potential normalized to {phi}0, and validated with a 2D fluid code and a 2D PIC code (XOOPIC). In an unexpected way transverse currents can increase this factor. Realistic situations of a Tore Supra antenna are also studied, with self-consistent near fields provided by ICANT code. Basic processes will be detailed and an evaluation of the 'peaking factor' for ITER will be presented for a given configuration.

  19. Electronic Structure of Few-Electron Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popsueva, V.; Hansen, J. P.; Caillat, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a study of strongly correlated few-electron quantum dots, exploring the spectra of various few-electron quantum dot molecules: a double (diatomic) structure a quadruple two-electron quantum dot, and a three-electron double dot. Electron energy spectra are computed for different values of dot separation. All spectra show clear band structures and can be understood from asymptotical properties of the system.

  20. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  1. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  2. The structure of salt bridges between Arg(+) and Glu(-) in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu(-)) and arginine (Arg(+)) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu(-) and Arg(+), which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu(-)⋯Arg(+) salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  3. Two 2D Cd(II) coordination polymers based on asymmetrical Schiff-base ligand: Synthesis, crystal structures and luminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Dong-Bin; Li, Meng-Meng; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Rui-Min

    2013-02-01

    Two new two-dimensional coordination polymers [Cd3L2(SCN)6]n (1) and [CdLI2]n (2) have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, TG technique, XRPD and complete single crystal structure analysis, where L is 4-(pyridine-2-yl)methyleneamino-1,2,4-trizaole. Asymmetrical Schiff-base ligand L with five- and six-membered N-containing heterocyclic rings acts as a tridentate bridging ligand to bind two Cd(II) centers through one terminal Ntriazolyl and one pyridylimine chelate unit in 1 and 2. For polymer 1, tridentate bridging ligands link Cd-(1,3-μ-SCN-) 1D inorganic chains to form a 2D layer network. The existence of Csbnd H⋯π and πsbnd π stacking interactions between 2D hybrid layers further gives rise to a 3D supramolecular network. In comparison with 1, polymer 2 shows a 2D layer network containing hexanuclear macrometallacyclic units. The 2D layers are staggered together through the combination of Csbnd H⋯π and πsbnd π stacking interactions and forming a 3D supramolecular structure. The luminescent properties of the polymers 1 and 2 were investigated in the solid state at room temperature.

  4. The structure of salt bridges between Arg+ and Glu- in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu-) and arginine (Arg+) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu- and Arg+, which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu-⋯Arg+ salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  5. The impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping for 2-D and 3-D porous media: Comparison with percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Ataei-Dadavi, Iman; Mohammadian, Sadjad; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-11-01

    We study the impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping of nonwetting gas phase during imbibition with water for capillary numbers between 10-7 and 5 × 10-5, within glass beads, natural sands, glass beads monolayers, and 2-D micromodels. The materials exhibit different roughness of the pore-solid interface. We found that glass beads and natural sands, which exhibit nearly the same grain size distribution, pore size distribution, and connectivity, showed a significant difference of the trapped gas phase of about 15%. This difference can be explained by the microstructure of the pore-solid interface. Based on the visualization of the trapping dynamics within glass beads monolayers and 2-D micromodels, we could show that bypass trapping controls the trapping process in glass beads monolayers, while snap-off trapping controls the trapping process in 2-D micromodels. We conclude that these different trapping processes are the reason for the different trapping efficiency, when comparing glass beads packs with natural sand packs. Moreover, for small capillary numbers of 10-6, we found that the cluster size distribution of trapped gas clusters of all 2-D and 3-D porous media can be described by a universal power law behavior predicted from percolation theory. This cannot be expected a priori for 2-D porous media, because bicontinuity of the two bulk phases is violated. Obviously, bicontinuity holds for the thin-film water phase and the bulk gas phase. The snap-off trapping process leads to ordinary bond percolation in front of the advancing bulk water phase and is the reason for the observed universal power law behavior in 2-D micromodels with rough surfaces.

  6. revealing H{sub 2}D{sup +} depletion and compact structure in starless and protostellar cores with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R. K.; Di Francesco, J.; Bourke, T. L.; Caselli, P.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Pineda, J. E.; Wong, M.

    2014-12-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the submillimeter dust continuum and H{sub 2}D{sup +} 1{sub 10}-1{sub 11} emission toward two evolved, potentially protostellar cores within the Ophiuchus molecular cloud, Oph A SM1 and SM1N. The data reveal small-scale condensations within both cores, with mass upper limits of M ≲ 0.02 M {sub ☉} (∼20 M {sub Jup}). The SM1 condensation is consistent with a nearly symmetric Gaussian source with a width of only 37 AU. The SM1N condensation is elongated and extends 500 AU along its major axis. No evidence for substructure is seen in either source. A Jeans analysis indicates that these sources are unlikely to fragment, suggesting that both will form single stars. H{sub 2}D{sup +} is only detected toward SM1N, offset from the continuum peak by ∼150-200 AU. This offset may be due to either heating from an undetected, young, low-luminosity protostellar source or first hydrostatic core, or HD (and consequently H{sub 2}D{sup +}) depletion in the cold center of the condensation. We propose that SM1 is protostellar and that the condensation detected by ALMA is a warm (T ∼ 30-50 K) accretion disk. The less concentrated emission of the SM1N condensation suggests that it is still starless, but we cannot rule out the presence of a low-luminosity source, perhaps surrounded by a pseudodisk. These data observationally reveal the earliest stages of the formation of circumstellar accretion regions and agree with theoretical predictions that disk formation can occur very early in the star formation process, coeval with or just after the formation of a first hydrostatic core or protostar.

  7. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  8. Hamiltonian structure of Dubrovin{close_quote}s equation of associativity in 2-d topological field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, C.A.; Nutku, Y.

    1996-12-01

    mA third order Monge-Amp{grave e}re type equation of associativity that Dubrovin has obtained in 2-d topological field theory is formulated in terms of a variational principle subject to second class constraints. Using Dirac{close_quote}s theory of constraints this degenerate Lagrangian system is cast into Hamiltonian form and the Hamiltonian operator is obtained from the Dirac bracket. There is a new type of Kac-Moody algebra that corresponds to this Hamiltonian operator. In particular, it is not a W-algebra. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Synthesis and structure of a 2D → 3D framework with coexistence of hydrogen bonds and polythreading character

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming-Dao Zhuang, Qi-Fan; Xu, Jing; Cao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    The title complex, ([Co(BPPA)(5-OH-bdc)] · (H{sub 2}O)){sub n} was prepared under hydrothermal conditions based on two ligands, namely, bis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)amine (BPPA) and 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (5-OH-H{sub 2}bdc). 5-OH-bdc{sup 2–} anions coordinated to Co atoms to give layers in crystal. BPPA ligands coordinate to Co atoms and thread into the adjacent layers. There are hydrogen bonds between adjacent layers, giving rise to a 2D → 3D framework.

  10. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  11. QCD prediction of jet structure in 2D trigger-associated momentum correlations and implications for multiple parton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, Thomas A.

    2015-03-01

    The expression "multiple parton interactions" (MPI) denotes a conjectured QCD mechanism representing contributions from secondary (semi)hard parton scattering to the transverse azimuth region (TR) of jet-triggered p-p collisions. MPI is an object of underlying-event (UE) studies that consider variation of TR nch or pt yields relative to a trigger condition (leading hadron or jet pt). An alternative approach is 2D trigger-associated (TA) correlations on hadron transverse momentum pt or rapidity yt in which all hadrons from all p-p events are included. Based on a two-component (soft+hard) model (TCM) of TA correlations a jet-related TA hard component is isolated. Contributions to the hard component from the triggered dijet and from secondary dijets (MPI) can be distinguished, including their azimuth dependence relative to the trigger direction. Measured e+-e- and p-p¯ fragmentation functions and a minimum-bias jet spectrum from 200 GeV p-p¯ collisions are convoluted to predict the 2D hard component of TA correlations as a function of p-p collision multiplicity. The agreement between QCD predictions and TA correlation data is quantitative, confirming a dijet interpretation for the TCM hard component. The TA azimuth dependence is inconsistent with conventional UE assumptions.

  12. Synthesizing 2D and 3D Selenidostannates in Ionic Liquids: The Synergistic Structure-Directing Effects of Ionic Liquids and Metal-Amine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng-Feng; Shen, Nan-Nan; Li, Jian-Rong; Hao, Min-Ting; Wang, Zi; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2016-05-20

    Presented are the ionothermal syntheses, characterizations, and properties of a series of two- and three-dimensional selenidostannate compounds synergistically directed by metal-amine complex (MAC) cations and ionic liquids (ILs) of [Bmmim]Cl (Bmmim=1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium). Four selenidostannates, namely, 2D-(Bmmim)3 [Ni(en)3 ]2 [Sn9 Se21 ]Cl (1, en=ethylenediamine), 2D-(Bmmim)8 [Ni2 (teta)2 (μ-teta)]Sn18 Se42 (2, teta=triethylenetetramine), 2D-(Bmmim)4 [Ni(tepa)Cl]2 [Ni(tepa)Sn12 Se28 ] (3, tepa=tetraethylenepentamine), and 3D-(Bmmim)2 [Ni(1,2-pda)3 ]Sn8 Se18 (4, 1,2-pda=1,2-diaminopropane), were obtained. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compounds 1 and 2 possess a lamellar anionic [Sn3 Se7 ]n (2n-) structure comprising distinct eight-membered ring units, whereas 3 features a MAC-decorated anionic [Ni(tepa)Sn12 Se28 ]n (6n-) layered structure. In contrast to 1-3, compound 4 exhibits a 3D open framework of anionic [Sn4 Se9 ]n (2n-) . The structural variation from 1 to 4 clearly indicates that on the basis of the synergistic structure-directing ability of the MACs and ILs, variation of the organic polyamine ligand has a significant impact on the formation of selenidostannates. PMID:27037731

  13. Efficient decoding of 2D structured illumination with linear phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Gomella, Andrew A; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging.

  14. Two-dimensional (2D) infrared correlation study of the structural characterization of a surface immobilized polypeptide film stimulated by pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Boknam; Son, Seok Ho; Kwak, Young Jun; Jung, Young Mee; Lee, Seung Woo

    2016-11-01

    The pH-induced structural changes to surface immobilized poly (L-glutamic acid) (PLGA) films were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis. Significant spectral changes were observed in the FTIR spectra of the surface immobilized PLGA film between pH 6 and 7. The 2D correlation spectra constructed from the pH-dependent FTIR spectra of the surface immobilized PLGA films revealed the spectral changes induced by the alternations of the protonation state of the carboxylic acid group in the PLGA side chain. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, weak spectral changes in the secondary structure of the PLGA main chain were induced by deprotonation of the carboxylic acid side group.

  15. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; Wang, Y; Ristic, Z; Bruno, F Y; de la Torre, A; Riccò, S; Plumb, N C; Shi, M; Hlawenka, P; Sánchez-Barriga, J; Varykhalov, A; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Diebold, U; Mesot, J; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Radovic, M; Baumberger, F

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs. PMID:27064529

  16. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; Wang, Y; Ristic, Z; Bruno, F Y; de la Torre, A; Riccò, S; Plumb, N C; Shi, M; Hlawenka, P; Sánchez-Barriga, J; Varykhalov, A; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Diebold, U; Mesot, J; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Radovic, M; Baumberger, F

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  17. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; McKeown Walker, S.; Tamai, A.; Wang, Y.; Ristic, Z.; Bruno, F. Y.; de la Torre, A.; Riccò, S.; Plumb, N. C.; Shi, M.; Hlawenka, P.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Varykhalov, A.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; King, P. D. C.; Meevasana, W.; Diebold, U.; Mesot, J.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Radovic, M.; Baumberger, F.

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  18. Bulk anisotropic excitons in type-II semiconductors built with 1D and 2D low-dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyotecatl, H. A.; Del Castillo-Mussot, M.; Reyes, J. A.; Vazquez, G. J.; Montemayor-Aldrete, J. A.; Reyes-Esqueda, J. A.; Cocoletzi, G. H.

    2005-08-01

    We used a simple variational approach to account for the difference in the electron and hole effective masses in Wannier-Mott excitons in type-II semiconducting heterostructures in which the electron is constrained in an one-dimensional quantum wire (1DQW) and the hole is in a two-dimensional quantum layer (2DQL) perpendicular to the wire or viceversa. The resulting Schrodinger equation is similar to that of a 3D bulk exciton because the number of free (nonconfined) variables is three; two coming from the 2DQL and one from the 1DQW. In this system the effective electron-hole interaction depends on the confinement potentials.

  19. A Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Imidazole-5-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists Combining 2D and 3D QSAR Methods.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh C

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were performed for correlating the chemical composition of imidazole-5-carboxylic acid analogs and their angiotensin II [Formula: see text] receptor antagonist activity using partial least squares and k-nearest neighbor, respectively. For comparing the three different feature selection methods of 2D-QSAR, k-nearest neighbor models were used in conjunction with simulated annealing (SA), genetic algorithm and stepwise coupled with partial least square (PLS) showed variation in biological activity. The statistically significant best 2D-QSAR model having good predictive ability with statistical values of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] was developed by SA-partial least square with the descriptors like [Formula: see text]count, 5Chain count, SdsCHE-index, and H-acceptor count, showing that increase in the values of these descriptors is beneficial to the activity. The 3D-QSAR studies were performed using the SA-PLS. A leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient [Formula: see text] and predicate activity [Formula: see text] = 0.7226 were obtained. The information rendered by QSAR models may lead to a better understanding of structural requirements of substituted imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives and also aid in designing novel potent antihypertensive molecules.

  20. Structural modifications of Tilia cordata wood during heat treatment investigated by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Froidevaux, Julien; Navi, Parviz; Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela

    2013-02-01

    It is known that heat treatment of wood combined with a low percent of relative humidity causes transformations in the chemical composition of it. The modifications and/or degradation of wood components occur by hydrolysis, oxidation, and decarboxylation reactions. The aim of this study was to give better insights on wood chemical modifications during wood heat treatment under low temperature at about 140 °C and 10% percentage of relative humidity, by infrared, principal component analysis and two dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy. For this purpose, hardwood samples of lime (Tilia cordata) were investigated and analysed. The infrared spectra of treated samples were compared with the reference ones, the most important differences being observed in the "fingerprint" region. Due to the complexity of this region, which have contributions from all the wood constituents the chemical changes during hydro-thermal treatment were examined in detail using principal component analysis and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. By hydro-thermal treatment of wood results the formation of acetic acid, which catalyse the hydrolysis reactions of hemicelluloses and amorphous cellulose. The cleavage of the β-O-4 linkages and splitting of the aliphatic methoxyl chains from the aromatic lignin ring was also observed. For the first treatment interval, a higher extent of carbohydrates degradation was observed, then an increase of the extent of the lignin degradation also took place.

  1. Electronic structure of aluminum nitride: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Loughin, S.; French, R.H. ); Ching, W.Y.; Xu, Y.N. ); Slack, G.A. )

    1993-08-30

    We report the results of a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) study of single crystal and polycrystalline AlN over the range 4--40 eV and compare these with theoretical optical properties calculated from first principles using an orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals in the local density approximation. The electronic structure of AlN has a two-dimensional (2D) character indicated by logarithmic divergences at 8.7 and 14 eV. These mark the centers of two sets of 2D critical points which are associated with N 2[ital p][r arrow]Al 3[ital s] transitions and Al=N[r arrow]Al 3[ital p] transitions, respectively. A third feature is centered at 33 eV and associated with N 2[ital s][r arrow]Al 3[ital d] transitions.

  2. Synthesis and structure elucidation of a series of pyranochromene chalcones and flavanones using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Sunayna S; Koorbanally, Neil A

    2014-06-01

    A series of novel pyranochromene chalcones and corresponding flavanones were synthesized. This is the first report on the confirmation of the absolute configuration of chromene-based flavanones using X-ray crystallography. These compounds were characterized by 2D NMR spectroscopy, and their assignments are reported herein. The 3D structure of the chalcone 3b and flavanone 4g was determined by X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the flavanone was confirmed to be in the S configuration at C-2.

  3. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques.

  4. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. PMID:22998590

  5. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc ~ 3 K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc ~ 2.5 K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excited topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. Our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials. PMID:26936229

  6. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M. Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; et al

    2016-03-03

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc~3K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc~2.5K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excitedmore » topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. In conclusion, our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials.« less

  7. Geometric Bioinspired Networks for Recognition of 2-D and 3-D Low-Level Structures and Transformations.

    PubMed

    Bayro-Corrochano, Eduardo; Vazquez-Santacruz, Eduardo; Moya-Sanchez, Eduardo; Castillo-Munis, Efrain

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the design of radial basis function geometric bioinspired networks and their applications. Until now, the design of neural networks has been inspired by the biological models of neural networks but mostly using vector calculus and linear algebra. However, these designs have never shown the role of geometric computing. The question is how biological neural networks handle complex geometric representations involving Lie group operations like rotations. Even though the actual artificial neural networks are biologically inspired, they are just models which cannot reproduce a plausible biological process. Until now researchers have not shown how, using these models, one can incorporate them into the processing of geometric computing. Here, for the first time in the artificial neural networks domain, we address this issue by designing a kind of geometric RBF using the geometric algebra framework. As a result, using our artificial networks, we show how geometric computing can be carried out by the artificial neural networks. Such geometric neural networks have a great potential in robot vision. This is the most important aspect of this contribution to propose artificial geometric neural networks for challenging tasks in perception and action. In our experimental analysis, we show the applicability of our geometric designs, and present interesting experiments using 2-D data of real images and 3-D screw axis data. In general, our models should be used to process different types of inputs, such as visual cues, touch (texture, elasticity, temperature), taste, and sound. One important task of a perception-action system is to fuse a variety of cues coming from the environment and relate them via a sensor-motor manifold with motor modules to carry out diverse reasoned actions. PMID:26340785

  8. Geometric Bioinspired Networks for Recognition of 2-D and 3-D Low-Level Structures and Transformations.

    PubMed

    Bayro-Corrochano, Eduardo; Vazquez-Santacruz, Eduardo; Moya-Sanchez, Eduardo; Castillo-Munis, Efrain

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the design of radial basis function geometric bioinspired networks and their applications. Until now, the design of neural networks has been inspired by the biological models of neural networks but mostly using vector calculus and linear algebra. However, these designs have never shown the role of geometric computing. The question is how biological neural networks handle complex geometric representations involving Lie group operations like rotations. Even though the actual artificial neural networks are biologically inspired, they are just models which cannot reproduce a plausible biological process. Until now researchers have not shown how, using these models, one can incorporate them into the processing of geometric computing. Here, for the first time in the artificial neural networks domain, we address this issue by designing a kind of geometric RBF using the geometric algebra framework. As a result, using our artificial networks, we show how geometric computing can be carried out by the artificial neural networks. Such geometric neural networks have a great potential in robot vision. This is the most important aspect of this contribution to propose artificial geometric neural networks for challenging tasks in perception and action. In our experimental analysis, we show the applicability of our geometric designs, and present interesting experiments using 2-D data of real images and 3-D screw axis data. In general, our models should be used to process different types of inputs, such as visual cues, touch (texture, elasticity, temperature), taste, and sound. One important task of a perception-action system is to fuse a variety of cues coming from the environment and relate them via a sensor-motor manifold with motor modules to carry out diverse reasoned actions.

  9. Entropy-controlled 2D supramolecular structures of N,N'-bis(n-alkyl)naphthalenediimides on a HOPG surface.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yusuke; Nagata, Toshi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi; Ohta, Masahiro; Kokawa, Ryohei; Ogawa, Takuji

    2012-05-22

    The two-dimensional supramolecular structures of a series of N,N'-bis(n-alkyl)naphthalenediimides (NDIs), whose chain lengths span from C3 to C18, at a liquid-HOPG surface interface, studied by STM and FM-AFM, are assigned with the help of molecular dynamics/molecular mechanics calculations to demonstrate that the C3- and C4-NDIs show lamellar structures, the C4- to C12-NDIs show honeycomb (KAGOME) structures, and the C14- to C18-NDIs show lamellar structures again. The change in supramolecular structure depending on chain length can be explained semiquantitatively by the balance of entropy and enthalpy terms to show the importance of "self-avoiding walk" of the alkyl chain in entropy terms.

  10. Structure-Activity Relationships and Pharmacophore Model of a Non-Competitive Pyrazoline Containing Class of GluN2C/GluN2D Selective Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Timothy M.; Khatri, Alpa; Vance, Katie M.; Slabber, Cathryn; Bacsa, John; Snyder, James P.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and structure-activity relationship for a class of pyrazoline-containing dihydroquinolone negative allosteric modulators of the NMDA receptor that show strong subunit-selectivity for GluN2C- and GluN2D-containing receptors over GluN2A-and GluN2B-containing receptors. Several members of this class inhibit NMDA receptor responses in the nanomolar range, and are more than 50-fold selective over GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptors, as well as AMPA, kainate, GABA, glycine, nicotinic, serotonin, and purinergic receptors. Analysis of the purified enantiomers of one of the more potent and selective compounds shows that the S-enantiomer is both more potent and more selective than the R-enantiomer. The S-enantiomer had an IC50 value of 0.17–0.22 µM at GluN2D- and GluN2C-containing receptors, respectively, and showed over 70-fold selectivity over other NMDA receptor subunits. The subunit-selectivity of this class of compounds should be useful in defining the role of GluN2C- and GluN2D-containing receptors in specific brain circuits in both physiological and patho-physiological conditions. PMID:23909910

  11. Effects of Pauli, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on electronic states in 2D circular hydrogenic anti-dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuali, Z.; Golshan, M. M.; Davatolhagh, S.

    2016-09-01

    The present work is concerned with a report on the effects of Pauli, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) on the energy levels of a 2D circular hydrogenic quantum anti-dot(QAD). To pursue this aim, we first present a brief review on the analytical solutions to the Schrödinger equation of electronic states in a quantum anti-dot when a hydrogenic donor is placed at the center, revealing the degeneracies involved in the ground, first and second excited states. We then proceed by adding the aforementioned spin-orbit interactions to the Hamiltonian and treat them as perturbation, thereby, calculating the energy shifts to the first three states. As we show, the Rashba spin-orbit interaction gives rise to a shift in the energies of the ground and second excited states, while it partially lifts the degeneracy of the first excited state. Our calculations also indicate that the Dresselhaus effect, while keeping the degeneracy of the ground and second excited states intact, removes the degeneracy of the first excited state in the opposite sense. The Pauli spin-orbit interaction, on the other hand, is diagonal in the appropriate bases, and thus its effect is readily calculated. The results show that degeneracy of ℓ = 0 (prevailing in the ground and second excited state) remains but the degeneracy of ℓ = 1 (prevailing in the first excited state) is again partially lifted. Moreover, we present the energy corrections due to the three spin-orbit interactions as functions of anti-dot's radius, Rashba and Dresselhaus strengths discussing how they affect the corresponding states. The material presented in the article conceives the possibility of generating spin currents in the hydrogenic circular anti-dots.

  12. Band structure of a 2D photonic crystal based on ferrofluids of Co(1-x)Znx Fe2O4 nanoparticles under perpendicular applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Javier; Gonzalez, Luz Esther; Quinonez, Mario; Porras, Nelson; Zambrano, Gustavo; Gomez, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Using a ferrfluid of cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles Co(1 - x)ZnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid and suspended in ethanol, we have fabricated a 2D photonic crystal (PC) by the application of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the ferrofluid. The 2D PC is made by rods of nanoparticles organized in a hexagonal structure. By means of the plane-wave expansion method, we study its photonic band structure (PBS) which depends on the effective permittivity and on the area ratio of the liquid phase. Additionaly, taking into account the Maxwell-Garnett theory we calculated the effective permittivity of the rods. We have found that the effective refractive index of the ferrofluid increases with its magnetization. Using these results we calculate the band structure of the photonic crystal at different applied magnetic fields, finding that the increase of the applied magnetic field shifts the band structure to lower frequencies with the appearance of more band gaps. Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali, Colombia

  13. Molecular phylogenetics in 2D: ITS2 rRNA evolution and sequence-structure barcode from Veneridae to Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Daniele; Mariottini, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed the nuclear ITS2 rRNA primary sequence and secondary structure in Veneridae and comparatively with 20 Bivalvia taxa to test the phylogenetic resolution of this marker and its suitability for molecular diagnosis at different taxonomic levels. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian trees based on primary sequences were congruent with (profile-) neighbor-joining trees based on a combined model of sequence-structure evolution. ITS2 showed higher resolution below the subfamily level, providing a phylogenetic signal comparable to (mitochondrial/nuclear) gene fragments 2-5 times longer. Structural elements of the ITS2 folding, such as specific mismatch pairing and compensatory base changes, provided further support for the monophyly of some groups and for their phylogenetic relationships. Veneridae ITS2 folding is structured in six domains (DI-VI) and shows five striking sequence-structure features. Two of them, the Basal and Apical STEMs, are common to Bivalvia, while the presence of both the Branched STEM and the Y/R stretches occurs in five superfamilies of the two Heterodonta orders Myoida and Veneroida, thus questioning their reciprocal monophyly. Our results validated the ITS2 as a suitable marker for venerids phylogenetics and taxonomy, and underlined the significance of including secondary structure information for both applications at several systematic levels within bivalves.

  14. A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu{sup II}-azido layers: Structure, magnetic properties and effects of 'Non-innocent' reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xue-Miao; Guo, Qian; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Fu-Chen

    2012-12-15

    A novel copper-azido coordination polymer, [Cu{sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 3}(L)]{sub n} (1, HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction with 'Non-innocent' reagent in the aqueous solution. In the reaction system, Cu{sup II} ions are avoided to reduce to Cu{sup I} ions due to the existence of Nd{sup III}. It is found that the complex is a 3D structure based on two double EO azido bridged trimmers and octahedron Cu{sup II} ions, in which the azide ligands take on EO and {mu}{sub 1,1,3} mode to form Cu{sup II}-azido 2D layers, furthermore L ligands pillar 2D layers into an infinite 3D framework with the Schlaefli symbol of {l_brace}4;6{sup 2}{r_brace}4{l_brace}4{sup 2};6{sup 12};8{sup 10};10{sup 4}{r_brace}{l_brace}4{sup 2};6{sup 4}{r_brace}. Magnetic studies revealed that the interactions between the Cu{sup II} ions in the trimmer are ferromagnetic for the Cu-N-Cu angle nearly 98 Degree-Sign , while the interactions between the trimmer and octahedron Cu{sup II} ion are antiferromgantic and result in an antiferromagnetic state. - Graphical abstract: A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu{sup II}-azido layers, [Cu{sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 3}(L)]{sub n} (HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), was synthesized by hydrothermal reaction and exhibit interesting structure and magnetic properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Non-innocent' reagents plays a key role in the process of formation of this complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D layer is formed only by Cu{sup II} ions and azido ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrazine-2-carboxylate ligands reinforce 2D layers and pillar them into an infinite 3D framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic study indicates that alternating FM-AF coupling exists in the complex.

  15. 2D dual permeability modeling of flow and transport in a two-scale structured lignitic mine soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Vogel, T.; Maurer, T.; Buczko, U.

    2009-04-01

    Two-dimensional single- and dual-permeability simulations are used to analyze water and solute fluxes in heterogeneous lignitic mine soil at a forest-reclaimed mine spoil heap. The soil heterogeneity on this experimental site "Bärenbrücker Höhe" resulted from inclined dumping structures and sediment mixtures that consist of sand with lignitic dust and embedded lignitic fragments. Observations on undisturbed field suction-cell lysimeters including tracer experiments revealed funneling-type preferential flow with lateral water and bromide movement along inclined sediment structures. The spatial distribution of soil structures and fragment distributions was acquired by a digital camera and identified by a supervised classification of the digital profile image. First, a classical single-domain modeling approach was used, with spatially variable scaling factors inferred from image analyses. In the next step, a two-continuum scenario was constructed to examine additional effects of nonequilibrium on the flow regime. The scaling factors used for the preferential flow domain are here obtained from the gradient of the grayscale images. So far, the single domain scenarios failed to predict the bromide leaching patterns although water effluent could be described. Dual-permeability model allows the incorporation of structural effects and can be used as a tool to further testing other approaches that account for structure effects. The numerical study suggests that additional experiments are required to obtain better understanding of the highly complex transport processes on this experimental site.

  16. Finite Element Method for Analysis of Band Structures of 2D Phononic Crystals with Archimedean-like tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianbao; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, a finite element method based on the ABAQUS code and user subroutine is presented to evaluate the propagation of acoustic waves in the two-dimensional phononic crystals with Archimedean-like tilings. Two systems composed of cylinder scatters embedded in a host in Ladybug and Bathroom lattices are considered. Complete and accurate band structures and transmission spectra are obtained to identify the band gaps and eigenmodes. We found that Archimedean-like structures can have some advantages over the traditional square lattice regarding the completeness of the gap and its position and width. Also, due to the same square primitive unit cell and the first Brillouin zone, the two square-like lattices have similar acoustic response in lower bands. The results indicate that the finite element method is precise for the band structure computation of the complex phononic crystals with Archimedean tilings.

  17. Structure and Magnetic Ordering of a 2-D MnII(TCNE)I(OH2) (TCNE = tetracyanoethylene) Organic-based Magnet (Tc = 171 K)

    SciTech Connect

    S Lapidus; A McConnell; P Stephens; J Miller

    2011-12-31

    Mn{sup II}(TCNE)I(OH{sub 2}) was isolated from the reaction of tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and MnI{sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, and has a 2-D structure possessing an unusual, asymmetric bonded {mu}{sub 4}-[TCNE]{sup {sm_bullet}-}. Direct antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = 5/2 Mn{sup II} and S = 1/2 [TCNE]{sup {sm_bullet}-} leads to magnetic ordering as a canted antiferromagnet at a T{sub c} of 171 K.

  18. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  19. Solution structure of GCCAAT recognition motif by 2D NMR, spectral simulation, molecular modeling, and distance geometry calculations.

    PubMed

    Nibedita, R; Kumar, R A; Majumdar, A; Hosur, R V; Govil, G; Majumder, K; Chauhan, V S

    1993-09-01

    Solution conformation of a self-complementary 14-mer DNA duplex (d-GGATTGGCCAATCC) containing the GCCAAT recognition motif of several transcription factors has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Complete resonance assignment of all the protons (except H5',H5'' protons) has been obtained following standard procedures based on two-dimensional NMR techniques. Three-bond coupling constants have been determined by spectral simulation procedures. New strategies have been described and employed for quantifying NOE intensities from the structural point of view. Approximate ranges of gamma torsion angles have been obtained from a selective NOESY experiment, by estimating the J(4'-5'), J(4'-5''), or their sum in the H1'-H4' cross peaks of the spectrum. Likewise, ranges of epsilon torsion angles have been obtained by monitoring the H3' multiplicities in the H8/H6-H3' cross peaks in selective NOESY spectra. With the help of such a total of 73 coupling constraints, 79 NOE intensity constraints, and 108 H-bond constraints, model building has been carried out to obtain a structure which satisfies the constraints. Starting from such a structure, an expanded distance constraint set has been created which has been used for the distance geometry calculations using the program TANDY. In the best structure thus derived, interesting irregularities similar to a BI-BII transition have been observed in the center. The molecule exhibits a bend. The overall base stacking is different from that in either B- or A-DNA models. The base pairs are tilted with respect to the local helix axes. The observed structural features are likely to have important implications for the recognition mechanism of the GCCAAT motif.

  20. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, K J; Yang, Y; Schmidt-Rohr, K; Hong, Mei

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D (13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, or 3D (15)N-(13)C-(13)C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40-60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO-Cα-Cβ or N-Cα-Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination.

  1. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  2. Ag (I)-based 2D metal frameworks with helical structures decorated by the homochiral camphor-10-sulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jun; Pan, Daocheng; Xu, Guohai

    2010-12-01

    Two two-dimension homochiral Ag (I) metal frameworks constructed from enantiopure camphor-10-sulfonic acid and hexamethylenetetramine have been synthesized at the room temperature. These two complexes with (6, 3) topology decorated by the homochiral camphor-10-sulfonic acid possess the unique helical structures. The result of Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy confirms that the bulk materials are homochiral and also indicates the handedness of the single crystals can be controlled by the chirality of the camphor-10-sulfonic acid.

  3. Separation of experimental 2D IR frequency-frequency correlation functions into structural and reorientation-induced contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Patrick L.; Nishida, Jun; Fayer, Michael D.

    2015-09-01

    A vibrational transition frequency can couple to its environment through a directional vector interaction. In such cases, reorientation of the vibrational transition dipole (molecular orientational relaxation) and its frequency fluctuations can be strongly coupled. It was recently shown [Kramer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 184505 (2015)] that differing frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) decays, due to reorientation-induced spectral diffusion (RISD), are observed with different two-dimensional infrared polarization configurations when such strong coupling is present. The FFC functional forms were derived for the situation in which all spectral diffusion is due to reorientational motion. We extend the previous theory to include vibrational frequency evolution (spectral diffusion) caused by structural fluctuations of the medium. Model systems with diffusive reorientation and several regimes of structural spectral diffusion rates are analyzed for first order Stark effect interactions. Additionally, the transition dipole reorientational motion in complex environments is frequently not completely diffusive. Several periods of restricted angular motion (wobbling-in-a-cone) may precede the final diffusive orientational randomization. The polarization-weighted FFCF decays are presented in this case of restricted transition dipole wobbling. With these extensions to the polarization-dependent FFCF expressions, the structural spectral diffusion dynamics of methanol in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate can be separated quantitatively from RISD using the experimental center line slope data. In addition, prior results on the spectral diffusion of water, methanol, and ethanol in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide are re-examined to elucidate the influence of reorientation on the data, which were interpreted in terms of structural fluctuations.

  4. Quantitative Subsurface Atomic Structure Fingerprint for 2D Materials and Heterostructures by First-Principles-Calibrated Contact-Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Parlak, Zehra; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J; Blum, Volker; Zauscher, Stefan

    2016-07-26

    Interfaces and subsurface layers are critical for the performance of devices made of 2D materials and heterostructures. Facile, nondestructive, and quantitative ways to characterize the structure of atomically thin, layered materials are thus essential to ensure control of the resultant properties. Here, we show that contact-resonance atomic force microscopy-which is exquisitely sensitive to stiffness changes that arise from even a single atomic layer of a van der Waals-adhered material-is a powerful experimental tool to address this challenge. A combined density functional theory and continuum modeling approach is introduced that yields sub-surface-sensitive, nanomechanical fingerprints associated with specific, well-defined structure models of individual surface domains. Where such models are known, this information can be correlated with experimentally obtained contact-resonance frequency maps to reveal the (sub)surface structure of different domains on the sample. PMID:27263541

  5. A time series generalized functional model based method for vibration-based damage precise localization in structures consisting of 1D, 2D, and 3D elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, C. S.; Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage precise localization via data-based, time series type, methods for structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements. A Generalized Functional Model Based method is postulated based on an expanded Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled ARX (VFP-ARX) model form, capable of accounting for an arbitrary structural topology. The FP model's operating parameter vector elements are properly constrained to reflect any given topology. Damage localization is based on operating parameter vector estimation within the specified topology, so that the location estimate and its uncertainty bounds are statistically optimal. The method's effectiveness is experimentally demonstrated through damage precise localization on a laboratory spatial truss structure using various damage scenarios and a single pair of random excitation - vibration response signals in a low and limited frequency bandwidth.

  6. Quantitative Subsurface Atomic Structure Fingerprint for 2D Materials and Heterostructures by First-Principles-Calibrated Contact-Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Parlak, Zehra; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J; Blum, Volker; Zauscher, Stefan

    2016-07-26

    Interfaces and subsurface layers are critical for the performance of devices made of 2D materials and heterostructures. Facile, nondestructive, and quantitative ways to characterize the structure of atomically thin, layered materials are thus essential to ensure control of the resultant properties. Here, we show that contact-resonance atomic force microscopy-which is exquisitely sensitive to stiffness changes that arise from even a single atomic layer of a van der Waals-adhered material-is a powerful experimental tool to address this challenge. A combined density functional theory and continuum modeling approach is introduced that yields sub-surface-sensitive, nanomechanical fingerprints associated with specific, well-defined structure models of individual surface domains. Where such models are known, this information can be correlated with experimentally obtained contact-resonance frequency maps to reveal the (sub)surface structure of different domains on the sample.

  7. Thermopower enhancement by fractional layer control in 2D oxide superlattices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Seok; Ohta, Hiromichi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-10-22

    Precise tuning of the 2D carrier density by using fractional δ-doping of d electrons improves the thermoelectric properties of oxide heterostructures. This promising result can be attributed to the anisotropic band structure in the 2D system, indicating that δ-doped oxide superlattices are good candidates for advanced thermoelectrics.

  8. Synthesis and structure of a 2D Zn complex with mixed ligands stacked in offset ABAB manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ling; Wang, Yan-Qing; Ni, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The title complex, {[Zn(ODIB)1/2( bpdc)]·2DMF} n was prepared under hydrothermal conditions (dimethylformamide and water) based on two ligands, namely, 1,1'-oxy-bis[3,5-diimidazolyl-benzene] (ODIB) and biphenyldicarboxylic acid (H2 bpdc). ODIB ligands link Zn cations to give layers in crystal. bpdc 2- anions coordinate to Zn atoms, however, their introduction does not increase the dimension of the structure. Each layer is partially passes through the adjacent layers in the offset ABAB manner.

  9. High Pressure Study of Delocalized Polarons in 2-D Lamellar Structure of Regio-Regular Poly(3-alkylthiophene) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, C. P.; Jiang, X. M.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2001-03-01

    The long-lived photoexcitations in poly(3-alkylthiophene) [P3AT] having a high head-to-tail ratio, the so called regio-regular (RR) P3AT, have been extensively studied by the photoinduced absorption (PA) spectroscopy using a FTIR spectrometer. In particular, delocalized polarons with DP1 (low energy) and DP2 (high energy) PA bands were observed in the self-assembled two-dimensional lamellar structure of RR P3AT films.(R. Osterbacka et al, Science, 287), p839 (2000) DP1 with a peak at ~0.1 eV is expected to red-shift as the interlayer distance decreases. This was indirectly confirmed before in the experiments by observing a red-shift in DP1 band as the aklyl sidegroup of the P3AT polymer decreases from dodecyl to hexyl.^2 In the present work we have succeeded, for the first time, to measure infrared PA spectra down to 400 cm-1 under high hydrostatic pressure up to 50 kbar with a diamond anvil cell. This technique was applied to RR P3AT in order to test the effect of the change in the interlayer distance for the same alkyl sidegroup, which is induced by the high pressure. We found that the first moment of the DP1 band red-shifts as the pressure increases. This result is in agreement with the delocalized polaron model in the lamellar structure.

  10. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  11. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  12. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-J CO rotational lines is a powerful tool for assessing the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-J (Ju> 14) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new Herschel/HIFI and archival PACS observations of 12CO, 13CO, and [C ii] emission in four Herbig AeBe disks (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and three T Tauri disks (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya). In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all the other systems, the Herschel CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyzed simultaneously assuming power-law temperature and column density profiles, using the velocity profile to locate the emission in the disk. The temperature profile varies substantially from disk to disk. In particular, Tgas in the disk surface layers can differ by up to an order of magnitude among the four Herbig AeBe systems; HD 100546 is the hottest and HD 163296 the coldest disk in the sample. Clear evidence of a warm disk layer where Tgas>Tdust is found in all the Herbig Ae disks. The observed CO fluxes and line profiles are compared to predictions of physical-chemical models. The primary parameters affecting the disk temperature structure are the flaring angle, the gas-to-dust mass ratio, the scale height, and the dust settling.

  13. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  14. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Feng; Chen, YiPing; You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)₃]₃[CoW₁₂O₄₀]·9H₂O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)₃]₂[FeW₁₂O₄₀]·H₃O·H₂O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)₃]²⁺ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm⁻¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  15. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  16. Crystal structure and antiferromagnetic ordering of quasi-2D [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]TaF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine).

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; McDonald, R. D.; Singleton, J.; Materials Science Division; Eastern Washington Univ.; LANL

    2010-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction at 90 and 295 K. Copper(II) ions are coordinated to four bridging pyz ligands to form square layers in the ab-plane. Bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} ligands join the layers together along the c-axis to afford a tetragonal, three-dimensional (3D) framework that contains Taf{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every cavity. At 295 K, the pyz rings lie exactly perpendicular to the layers and cooling to 90 K induces a canting of those rings. Magnetically, the compound exhibits 2D antiferromagnetic correlations within the 2D layers with an exchange interaction of -13.1(1) K. Weak interlayer interactions, as mediated by Cu-F-H-F-Cu, leads to long-range magnetic order below 4.2 K. Pulsed-field magnetization data at 0.5 K show a concave curvature with increasing B and reveal a saturation magnetization at 35.4 T.

  17. Hyperfine structure and lifetime measurements in the 4s2nd 2D3/2 Rydberg sequence of Ga I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunqing; Tian, Yanshan; Yu, Qi; Bai, Wanshuang; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-05-01

    The hyperfine structure (HFS) constants of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=6-18) Rydberg sequence and the 4s26p 2P3/2 level for two isotopes of 69Ga and 71Ga atoms were measured by means of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique and the quantum beat method. The observed hyperfine quantum beat spectra were analyzed and the magnetic-dipole HFS constants A as well as the electric-quadrupole HFS constants B of these levels were obtained by Fourier transform and a program for multiple regression analysis. Also using TR-LIF method radiative lifetimes of the above sequence states were determined at room temperature. The measured lifetime values range from 69 to 2279 ns with uncertainties no more than 10%. To our knowledge, the HFS constants of this Rydberg sequence and the lifetimes of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=10-18) levels are reported for the first time. Good agreement between our results and the previous is achieved.

  18. Electronic structures of endohedral fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Changming; Hettich, R.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Ying, Z.C.; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Fullerenes with different elements trapped inside the cage have been the subject of active research both experimentally and theoretically ever since the initial discovery of C{sub 60}. La@C{sub n}, were the first endohedral fullerenes produced both in gas phase and in macroscopic quantities. Early electron spin resonance investigation of La@C{sub 82} by R.D. Johnson, et.al indicated that La transfer nearly all of the three valence electrons to the fullerene cage, forming a La{sup 3+}@C{sub 82}{sup 3-} complex. Theoretical calculations also have shown that La transfers its valence electrons to the fullerene cage in molecules of La@C{sub n}. Investigations with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy by L. Wang, et.al. indicated that attaching a potassium atom outside the C{sub 60} cage lowers the electron affinity (EA) while trapping Ca atom inside the C{sub 60} sphere increases the EA compared with parent C{sub 60} molecule. These results indicate that metallofullerenes appear to have substantially lower ionization potentials (IP) and higher EA than empty fullerenes.

  19. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Investigate the Influences of Amino Acid Mutations on Protein Three-Dimensional Structures of Cytochrome P450 2D6.1, 2, 10, 14A, 51, and 62.

    PubMed

    Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Kometani, Masaharu; Watanabe, Yurie; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Oda, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    Many natural mutants of the drug metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 have been reported. Because the enzymatic activities of many mutants are different from that of the wild type, the genetic polymorphism of CYP2D6 plays an important role in drug metabolism. In this study, the molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type and mutants of CYP2D6, CYP2D6.1, 2, 10, 14A, 51, and 62 were performed, and the predictions of static and dynamic structures within them were conducted. In the mutant CYP2D6.10, 14A, and 61, dynamic properties of the F-G loop, which is one of the components of the active site access channel of CYP2D6, were different from that of the wild type. The F-G loop acted as the "hatch" of the channel, which was closed in those mutants. The structure of CYP2D6.51 was not converged by the simulation, which indicated that the three-dimensional structure of CYP2D6.51 was largely different from that of the wild type. In addition, the intramolecular interaction network of CYP2D6.10, 14A, and 61 was different from that of the wild type, and it is considered that these structural changes are the reason for the decrease or loss of enzymatic activities. On the other hand, the static and dynamic properties of CYP2D6.2, whose activity was normal, were not considerably different from those of the wild type.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Investigate the Influences of Amino Acid Mutations on Protein Three-Dimensional Structures of Cytochrome P450 2D6.1, 2, 10, 14A, 51, and 62

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yurie; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Oda, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    Many natural mutants of the drug metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 have been reported. Because the enzymatic activities of many mutants are different from that of the wild type, the genetic polymorphism of CYP2D6 plays an important role in drug metabolism. In this study, the molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type and mutants of CYP2D6, CYP2D6.1, 2, 10, 14A, 51, and 62 were performed, and the predictions of static and dynamic structures within them were conducted. In the mutant CYP2D6.10, 14A, and 61, dynamic properties of the F-G loop, which is one of the components of the active site access channel of CYP2D6, were different from that of the wild type. The F-G loop acted as the “hatch” of the channel, which was closed in those mutants. The structure of CYP2D6.51 was not converged by the simulation, which indicated that the three-dimensional structure of CYP2D6.51 was largely different from that of the wild type. In addition, the intramolecular interaction network of CYP2D6.10, 14A, and 61 was different from that of the wild type, and it is considered that these structural changes are the reason for the decrease or loss of enzymatic activities. On the other hand, the static and dynamic properties of CYP2D6.2, whose activity was normal, were not considerably different from those of the wild type. PMID:27046024

  2. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  3. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  4. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  5. Crystal structure and temperature-dependent fluorescent property of a 2D cadmium (II) complex based on 3,6-dibromobenzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Guo, Yu; Wei, Yan-Hui; Guo, Jie; Wang, Xing-Po; Sun, Dao-Feng

    2013-04-01

    A new cadmium (II) organic coordination polymers [Cd(dbtec)0.5(H2O)3]·H2O (1), has been constructed based on 3,6-dibromobenzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (H4dbtec), and characterized by elemental analysis (EA), infrared spectroscopy (IR), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In 1, μ2-η1:η1 and μ4-η2:η2 dbtec ligands link four hepta-coordinated CdII ions to form a 2D 44 topological layer structure, which is further connected into an interesting 3D network by hydrogen bond and Br⋯O halogen bond. Moreover, the thermal stabilities, solid ultraviolet spectroscopy and temperature-dependent fluorescent properties of 1 were investigated.

  6. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  7. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  8. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  9. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  10. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  11. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  12. Structural requirements of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolones as potential antimalarials from 2D and 3D QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Li, Shuyan; Bai, Chongliang; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-07-01

    Malaria is a fatal tropical and subtropical disease caused by the protozoal species Plasmodium. Many commonly available antimalarial drugs and therapies are becoming ineffective because of the emergence of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, which drives the need for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Recently, a series of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolone analogs, derived from the famous compound endochin, were reported as promising candidates for orally efficacious antimalarials. In this study, to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these quinolones and investigate the structural requirements for antimalarial activity, the 2D multiple linear regressions (MLR) method and 3D comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods are employed to evolve different QSAR models. All these models give satisfactory results with highly accurate fitting and strong external predictive abilities for chemicals not used in model development. Furthermore, the contour maps from 3D models can provide an intuitive understanding of the key structure features responsible for the antimalarial activities. In conclusion, we summarize the detailed position-specific structural requirements of these derivatives accordingly. All these results are helpful for the rational design of new compounds with higher antimalarial bioactivities.

  13. Investigation of 2D photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator for CWDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar; Dusad, Lalit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the design & performance of two dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter is investigated using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator. In this paper, Photonic Crystal (PhC) based on square lattice periodic arrays of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in air structure have been investigated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and photonic band gap is being calculated using Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method. The PhC designs have been optimized for telecommunication wavelength λ= 1571 nm by varying the rods lattice constant. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20, with lattice constant 0.540 nm it illustrates that the arrangement of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in the structure which gives the overall size of the device around 11.4 µm × 10.8 µm. The designed filter gives good dropping efficiency using 3.298, refractive index. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm2.

  14. Phosphorene Nanoribbons: Electronic Structure and Electric Field Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanikahnoj, Sina; Knezevic, Irena

    Phosphorene, a newcomer among the 2D van der Waals materials, has attracted the attention of many scientists due to its promising electronic properties. Monolayer phosphorene has a direct band gap of 2 eV located at the Gamma point of the Brillouin zone. Increasing the number of layers reduces the bandgap due to the van der Waals interaction. The direct nature of the bandgap makes phosphorene particularly favorable for electronic transport and optoelectronic applications. While multilayer phosphorene sheets have been studied, the electronic properties of their 1D counterparts are still unexplored. An accurate tight-binding model was recently proposed for multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons. Employing this model along with the non-equilibrium Green's function method, we calculate the band structure and electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons. We show that, depending on the edge termination, phosphorene nanoribbons can be metallic or semiconducting. Our analysis also shows that the electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons are highly tunable by in-plane and out-of-plane electric fields. In metallic ribbons, the conductance can be switched off by a threshold electric field, similar to field effect devices. Support by the NSF through the University of Wisconsin MRSEC Seed (NSF Award DMR-1121288).

  15. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  16. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  17. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  18. Stability, electronic structure and reactivity of the polymerized fullerite forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Tomanek, D.

    2000-12-01

    A study of band structure, stability and electron density distribution from selected crystal orbitals of polymerized C60 forms was carried out. Linear chain, tetragonal and hexagonal layers, and three-dimensional (3D) polymer with a simple cubic lattice were calculated using an empirical tight-binding method. The hopping parameters were chosen to fit a theoretical X-ray emission spectrum of C60 to the experimental one. Our results indicate that all calculated polymers are semiconductors with the smallest energy gap for hexagonal structure. Though the molecules C60 are linked by strong covalent bonds, the crystal orbitals characterized by the electron density localization on an individual carbon cage are separated in the electronic structure of polymers. The suggestions about reactivity of the 1D and 2D tetragonal polymers were made from the analyses of crystal orbitals accompanied with the highest occupied (HO) and lowest unoccupied (LU) bands. The polymerized C60 forms were found to be less stable than an icosahedral fullerene molecule.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. PMID:25475529

  1. Detection of multi-scale secondary flow structures using anisotropic 2D Ricker wavelets in a bent tube model for curved arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesniak, Daniel H.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    Interpretation of complex flow patterns observed in this study of a model curved artery required characterization of multiple, low-circulation secondary flow structures that were observed during the late systolic deceleration and diastolic phases under physiological inflow conditions. Phase-locked, planar vorticity PIV data were acquired at various cross-sectional locations of the 180-degree bent tube model. High circulation, deformed Dean- and Lyne-type vortices were observed during early stages of deceleration, while several smaller scale, highly deformed, low-circulation vortical patterns appeared in the core and near-wall regions during late systolic deceleration and diastolic phases. Due to the multiplicity of vortical scales and shapes, anisotropic 2D Ricker wavelets were used for coherent structure detection in a continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2). Our bio-inspired study is geared towards understanding whether optimizing the shape of the wavelet kernel will enable better resolution of several low-circulation, multi-scale secondary flow morphologies and whether new insights into the dynamics of arterial secondary flow structures can accordingly be gained. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  2. Evaluating the structural identifiability of the parameters of the EBPR sub-model in ASM2d by the differential algebra method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Daijun; Li, Zhenliang; Cai, Qing

    2010-05-01

    The calibration of ASMs is a prerequisite for their application to simulation of a wastewater treatment plant. This work should be made based on the evaluation of structural identifiability of model parameters. An EBPR sub-model including denitrification phosphorus removal has been incorporated in ASM2d. Yet no report is presented on the structural identifiability of the parameters in the EBPR sub-model. In this paper, the differential algebra approach was used to address this issue. The results showed that the structural identifiability of parameters in the EBPR sub-model could be improved by increasing the measured variables. The reduction factor eta(NO)(3) was identifiable when combined data of aerobic process and anoxic process were assumed. For K(PP), X(PAO) and q(PHA) of the anaerobic process to be uniquely identifiable, one of them is needed to be determined by other ways. Likewise, if prior information on one of the parameters, K(PHA), X(PAO) and q(PP) of the aerobic process, is known, all the parameters are identifiable. The above results could be of interest to the parameter estimation of the EBPR sub-model. The algorithm proposed in the paper is also suitable for other sub-models of ASMs.

  3. 2D magnetotelluric imaging of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, Yangtze metallogenic belt, eastern China: An insight into the crustal structure and tectonic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangbin; Yan, Jiayong

    2016-08-01

    Two parallel NW-trending magnetotelluric (MT) profiles were placed perpendicularly to the main structures of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, one of the seven ore districts in the middle-lower Yangtze River metallogenic belt of eastern China. In October-December 2013, the MT data acquisition was carried out at 117 sites with 0.5-1 km site spacing. The MT data has a good quality in the frequency range between 320 and 0.01 Hz. The dimensionality analysis and 2D resistivity inversion results indicate that: (1) the deep of the ore district with three-dimensional structural characteristics, but two-dimensional structural characteristics for shallow; (2) there is a clear correlation between resistivity and the main geological units of the ore district, as well as correlation with mapped surface faults; (3) the Gandan deep fault (GDF) and Jiangnan deep fault (JNF) extend from the surface to 10 km deep, with dip of NW45°, and dip angles larger than 60°. A series of NE-trending acidic intrusive rocks were controlled by the GDF.

  4. A molecular dynamics study on the structural and electronic properties of two-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, Cherno Baba; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Our previous study on one-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster (α-B12) based chain [Bulletin of APS Annual Meeting, p265 (2013)] and ring structures has prompted us to study the two-dimensional (2D) α-B12 based structures. Recently, we have carried out a systematic molecular dynamics study on the structural stabilities and electronic properties of the 2D α-B12 based structures using the SCED-LCAO method [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. We have considered several types of symmetry for these 2D structures such as δ3, δ4, δ6 (flat triangular), and α' types. We have found that the optimized structures are energetically in the order of δ6 < α' < δ3 < δ4 which is different from the energy order of α'< δ6 < δ4 < δ3 found in the 2D boron monolayer sheets [ACS Nano 6, 7443 (2012)]. A detailed discussion of this study will be presented. The first author acknowledges the McSweeny Fellowship for supporting his research in this work.

  5. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  6. Bifurcation structure of the special class of nonstationary regimes emerging in the 2D inertially coupled, unit-cell model: Analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorotnikov, K.; Starosvetsky, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Present work is devoted to the analytical investigation of the bifurcation structure of special class of nonstationary low-energy regimes emerging in the locally resonant unit-cell model. System under consideration comprises an outer mass with internal rotator and subject to the 2D, nonlinear local potential. These regimes are characterized by the slow, purely rotational motion of the rotator synchronized with the periodic energy beats between the axial and the lateral vibrations of the outer element. Thus the angular speed of the rotator and the beating frequency of the outer element satisfy the 1:2 resonance condition. In the present study these regimes are referred to as regimes of synchronous nonlinear beats (RSNB). Using the regular muti-scale analysis in the limit of low energy excitation we derive the slow-flow model. To showcase the evolution of RSNBs we used the special Poincaré map technique applied on the slow-flow model. Results of the Poincaré sections unveiled some interesting local bifurcations undergone by these regimes. Further analysis of the slow-flow model enabled us to describe the RSNBs analytically as well as exposed their entire bifurcation structure. The bifurcation analysis has shown the coexistence of several branches of RSNBs corresponding to the regimes of weak and strong, two-dimensional, recurrent energy channeling. We substantiate the results of the analytical study with numerical simulations of the full model and find them to be in the very good agreement.

  7. A deterministic solver for the transport of the AlGaN/GaN 2D electron gas including hot-phonon and degeneracy effects

    SciTech Connect

    Galler, M. . E-mail: galler@itp.tu-graz.ac.at; Schuerrer, F. . E-mail: schuerrer@itp.tu-graz.ac.at

    2005-12-10

    The transport of the two-dimensional electron gas formed at an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure in the presence of strain polarization fields is investigated. For this purpose, we develop a deterministic multigroup model to the Boltzmann transport equations. The envelope wave functions for the confined electrons are calculated using a self-consistent Poisson-Schroedinger solver. The electron gas degeneracy and hot phonons are included in our transport equations. Numerical results are given for the dependence of macroscopic quantities on the electric field strength and on time and for the electron and phonon distribution functions. We compare our results to those of Monte Carlo simulations and with experiments.

  8. Efficacy of very fast simulated annealing global optimization method for interpretation of self-potential anomaly by different forward formulation over 2D inclined sheet type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, A.; Sharma, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    best result without any ambiguity and smaller uncertainty. Keywords: SP anomaly, inclined sheet, 2D structure, forward problems, VFSA Optimization,

  9. Basement and Basin Structures of the Northwest Paraná Basin, Brazil: Illuminated by Matched-Filter Analysis and 2D Modeling of Gravity and Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto, J. B.; Blakely, R. J.; Vidotti, R. M.; Fuck, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The South American Platform includes two major geological components with common structural roots: the Transbrasiliano Lineament (LTB) and the Paraná Basin. Important relationships between the two components occur within the northwest Paraná Basin and concealed beneath sedimentary cover. We integrated all available airborne magnetic and gravity surveys and ground-based gravity data to produce consistent, digital magnetic and Bouguer anomaly maps. Data-processing and modeling techniques then were used in order to reveal principal crustal compartments and basin-basement structures at various depths. Three large magnetic discontinuities delineate crustal compartments in the area with N30°E, N60°E, and N70°E strike, from east to west, respectively. These magnetic lineaments bound regions with distinct gravity anomaly character. Robust matched-filter analysis applied to magnetic and gravity data yielded important depth estimates: (i) 2.5 km to the top of the Paraná Basin Neoproterozoic basement; (ii) 4-6 km to the top of a second group of basement units; (iii) 20 km, possibly associated with the upper-lower crust interface; and (iv) 33-39 and 43 km related to crustal thicknesses west and southeast of a major N30°E trending lineament, respectively. The 2D joint modeling of gravity and magnetic data sheds light on the asymmetric geometry of the basement beneath the Paraná basin, with at least three half-grabens formed by LTB reactivated structures. The central region of the study area is characterized by thinner crust and higher crustal weakness, where important structures have developed in the Mesozoic, including NW trending reactivations, linked to crustal uplift and evolution of small NE-aligned Cretaceous basins. Important depocenters occur to the north and east of the study area, with N70ºE and N30°E - NS strike, respectively.

  10. Effect of strong phonon-phonon coupling on the temperature dependent structural stability and frequency shift of 2D hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Anees, P; Valsakumar, M C; Panigrahi, B K

    2016-01-28

    The temperature dependent structural stability, frequency shift and linewidth of 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are studied using a combination of lattice dynamics (LD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The in-plane lattice parameter shows a negative thermal expansion in the whole computed temperature range (0-2000 K). When the in-plane lattice parameter falls below the equilibrium value, the quasi-harmonic bending (ZA) mode frequency becomes imaginary along the Γ-M direction in the Brillouin zone, leading to a structural instability of the 2D sheet. The ZA mode is seen to be stabilized in the dispersion obtained from MD simulations, due to the automatic incorporation of higher order phonon scattering processes in MD, which are absent in a quasi-harmonic dispersion. The mode resolved phonon spectra computed with a quasi-harmonic method predict a blueshift of the longitudinal and transverse (LO/TO) optic mode frequencies with an increase in temperature. On the other hand, both canonical (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensembles predict a redshift with an increase in temperature, which is more prominent in the NVT ensemble. The strong phonon-phonon coupling dominates over the thermal contraction effect and leads to a redshift in LO/TO mode frequency in the NPT ensemble simulations. The out-of-plane (ZO) optic mode quasi-harmonic frequencies are redshifted due to a membrane effect. The phonon-phonon coupling effects in the NVT and NPT ensemble simulations lead to a further reduction in the ZO mode frequencies. The linewidth of the LO/TO and ZO mode frequencies increases in a monotonic fashion. The temperature dependence of acoustic modes is also analyzed. The quasi-harmonic calculations predict a redshift of ZA mode, and at the same time the TA (transverse acoustic) and LA (longitudinal acoustic) mode frequencies are blueshifted. The strong phonon-phonon coupling in MD simulations causes a redshift of the LA and TA mode frequencies, while the ZA mode

  11. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases.

  12. The structure and stratigraphy of the sedimentary succession in the Swedish sector of the Baltic Basin: New insights from vintage 2D marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopher, Daniel; Erlström, Mikael; Bell, Nicholas; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present five interpreted regional seismic profiles, describing the full sedimentary sequence across the Swedish sector of the Baltic Sea. The data for the study are part of an extensive and largely unpublished 2D seismic dataset acquired between 1970 and 1990 by the Swedish Oil Prospecting Company (OPAB). The Baltic Basin is an intracratonic basin located in northern Europe. Most of the Swedish sector of the basin constitutes the NW flank of a broad synclinal depression, the Baltic Basin. In the SW of the Swedish sector lies the Hanö Bay Basin, formed by subsidence associated with inversion of the Tornquist Zone during the Late Cretaceous. The geological history presented here is broadly consistent with previously published works. We observe an area between the Hanö Bay and the Baltic Basin where the Palaeozoic strata has been affected by transpression and subsequent inversion, associated with the Tornquist Zone during the late Carboniferous-Early Permian and Late Cretaceous, respectively. We propose that the Christiansø High was a structural low during the Late Jurassic, which was later inverted in the Late Cretaceous. We suggest that a fan shaped feature in the seismic data, adjacent to the Christiansø Fault within the Hanö Bay Basin, represents rapidly deposited, coarse-grained sediments eroded from the inverted Christiansø High during the Late Cretaceous. We identify a number of faults within the deeper part of the Baltic Basin, which we also interpret to be transpressional in nature, formed during the Caledonian Orogeny in the Late Silurian-Early Devonian. East of Gotland a number of sedimentary structures consisting of Silurian carbonate reefs and Ordovician carbonate mounds, as well as a large Quaternary glacial feature are observed. Finally, we use the seismic interpretation to infer the structural and stratigraphic history of the Baltic and Hanö Bay basins within the Swedish sector.

  13. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-15

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, ([Ni(btec)(Himb){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Cd(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)(H{sub 2}O)]·1.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), and ([Zn(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (H{sub 4}btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (5{sup 3}·6{sup 2}·7)(5{sup 2}·6{sup 4}). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·6{sup 4}·8)(4{sup 2}·6{sup 2}·8{sup 2}). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three new 1D to 3D complexes with different structural and topological motifs have been obtained by modifying the central metal ions. Additionally, their IR, TG analyses and fluorescent properties are also investigated. - Highlights: • Three complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands. • The complexes are characterized by IR, luminescence and TGA techniques. • Benzenetetracarboxylates display different coordination modes in complexes 1–3. • Changing the metal ions can result in complexes with completely different structures.

  14. Preparation of cultured cells using high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution for subsequent 2D or 3D visualization in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Philippa C

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an invaluable technique used for imaging the ultrastructure of samples and it is particularly useful when determining virus-host interactions at a cellular level. The environment inside a TEM is not favorable for biological material (high vacuum and high energy electrons). Also biological samples have little or no intrinsic electron contrast, and rarely do they naturally exist in very thin sheets, as is required for optimum resolution in the TEM. To prepare these samples for imaging in the TEM therefore requires extensive processing which can alter the ultrastructure of the material. Here we describe a method which aims to minimize preparation artifacts by freezing the samples at high pressure to instantaneously preserve ultrastructural detail, then rapidly substituting the ice and infiltrating with resin to provide a firm matrix which can be cut into thin sections for imaging. Thicker sections of this material can also be imaged and reconstructed into 3D volumes using electron tomography.

  15. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-01

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, {[Ni(btec)(Himb)2(H2O)2]·6H2O}n (1), {[Cd(btec)0.5(imb)(H2O)]·1.5H2O}n (2), and {[Zn(btec)0.5(imb)]·H2O}n (3) (H4btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (53·62·7)(52·64). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·64·8)(42·62·82). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature.

  16. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  17. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  18. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-07-03

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach.

  19. 2D Modelling of the Gorkha earthquake through the joint exploitation of Sentinel 1-A DInSAR measurements and geological, structural and seismological information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Vincenzo; Castaldo, Raffaele; Solaro, Giuseppe; De Luca, Claudio; Pepe, Susi; Bonano, Manuela; Casu, Francesco; Zinno, Ivana; Manunta, Michele; Lanari, Riccardo; Tizzani, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    A Mw 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal on 25 April 2015 at 06:11:26 UTC, killing more than 9,000 people, injuring more than 23,000 and producing extensive damages. The main seismic event, known as the Gorkha earthquake, had its epicenter localized at ~82 km NW of the Kathmandu city and the hypocenter at a depth of approximately 15 km. After the main shock event, about 100 aftershocks occurred during the following months, propagating toward the south-east direction; in particular, the most energetic shocks were the Mw 6.7 and Mw 7.3 occurred on 26 April and 12 May, respectively. In this study, we model the causative fault of the earthquake by jointly exploiting surface deformation retrieved by the DInSAR measurements collected through the Sentinel 1-A (S1A) space-borne sensor and the available geological, structural and seismological information. We first exploit the analytical solution performing a back-analysis of the ground deformation detected by the first co-seismic S1A interferogram, computed by exploiting the 17/04/2015 and 29/04/2015 SAR acquisitions and encompassing the main earthquake and some aftershocks, to search for the location and geometry of the fault plane. Starting from these findings and by benefiting from the available geological, structural and seismological data, we carry out a Finite Element (FE)-based 2D modelling of the causative fault, in order to evaluate the impact of the geological structures activated during the seismic event on the distribution of the ground deformation field. The obtained results show that the causative fault has a rather complex compressive structure, dipping northward, formed by segments with different dip angles: 6° the deep segment and 60° the shallower one. Therefore, although the hypocenters of the main shock and most of the more energetic aftershocks are located along the deeper plane, corresponding to a segment of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), the FE solution also indicates the contribution of the shallower

  20. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  1. Structural and electronic properties for atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties for different groups of atomic clusters by doing a global search on the potential energy surface using the Taboo Search in Descriptors Space (TSDS) method and calculating the energies with Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT). Our goal was to find the structural and electronic principles for predicting the structure and stability of clusters. For Ben (n = 3--20), we have found that the evolution of geometric and electronic properties with size reflects a change in the nature of the bonding from van der Waals to metallic and then bulk-like. The cluster sizes with extra stability agree well with the predictions of the jellium model. In the 4d series of transition metal (TM) clusters, as the d-type bonding becomes more important, the preferred geometric structure changes from icosahedral (Y, Zr), to distorted compact structures (Nb, Mo), and FCC or simple cubic crystal fragments (Tc, Ru, Rh) due to the localized nature of the d-type orbital. Analysis of relative isomer energies and their electronic density of states suggest that these clusters tend to follow a maximum hardness principle (MHP). For A4B12 clusters (A is divalent, B is monovalent), we found unusually large (on average 1.95 eV) HOMO-LUMO gap values. This shows the extra stability at an electronic closed shell (20 electrons) predicted by the jellium model. The importance of symmetry, closed electronic and ionic shells in stability is shown by the relative stability of homotops of Mg4Ag12 which also provides support for the hypothesis that clusters that satisfy more than one stability criterion ("double magic") should be particularly stable.

  2. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  3. Electronic structure of disordered conjugated polymers: Polythiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-11-26

    Electronic structure of disordered semiconducting conjugated polymers was studied. Atomic structure was found from a classical molecular dynamics simulation and the charge patching method was used to calculate the electronic structure with the accuracy similar to the one of density functional theory in local density approximation. The total density of states, the local density of states at different points in the system and the wavefunctions of several states around the gap were calculated in the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and polythiophene (PT) systems to gain insight into the origin of disorder in the system, the degree of carrier localization and the role of chain interactions. The results indicated that disorder in the electronic structure of alkyl substituted polythiophenes comes from disorder in the conformation of individualchains, while in the case of polythiophene there is an additional contribution due to disorder in the electronic coupling between the chains. Each of the first several wavefunctions in the conduction and valence band of P3HT is localized over several rings of a single chain. It was shown that the localization can be caused in principle both by ring torsions and chain bending, however the effect of ring torsions is much stronger. PT wavefunctions are more complicated due to larger interchain electronic coupling and are not necessarily localized on a single chain.

  4. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  5. Three- to two-dimensional transition of the electronic structure in CaFe2As2: a parent compound for an iron arsenic high-temperature superconductor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Kondo, Takeshi; Ni, Ni; Palczewski, A D; Bostwick, A; Samolyuk, G D; Khasanov, R; Shi, M; Rotenberg, E; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C; Kaminski, A

    2009-04-24

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the electronic properties of CaFe2As2-parent compound of a pnictide superconductor. We find that the structural and magnetic transition is accompanied by a three- to two-dimensional (3D-2D) crossover in the electronic structure. Above the transition temperature (T_{s}) Fermi surfaces around Gamma and X points are cylindrical and quasi 2D. Below T_{s}, the Gamma pocket forms a 3D ellipsoid, while the X pocket remains quasi 2D. This finding strongly suggests that low dimensionality plays an important role in understanding the superconducting mechanism in pnictides. PMID:19518747

  6. Electronic structure of Si/disilicide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Asano, Setsuro

    1990-01-01

    Using supercells, the electronic structures of Si(111)/CoSi2 and Si(111)/NiSi2 interfaces are studied by the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method (LMTO-ASA). Schottky barrier heights (SBH's) are strongly correlated with the interface atomic structures and are determined mainly by interface bonding states and the screening effect of the semiconductor. Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are metal wave function tails caused by the Schottky barriers.

  7. Electronic structure of Si/disilicide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Asano, Setsuro

    1989-11-01

    Using supercells, the electronic structures of Si(111)/CoSi 2 and Si(111)/NiSi 2 interfaces are studied by the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method (LMTO-ASA). Schottky barrier heights (SBH's) are strongly correlated with the interface atomic structures and are determined mainly by interface bonding states and the screening effect of the semiconductor. Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are metal wave function tails caused by the Schottky barriers.

  8. Crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P. Avilov, A. S.; Lepeshov, G. G.

    2008-05-15

    A procedure of crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data is described. The electron diffraction data on polycrystalline films are processed taking into account possible overlap of reflections and two-beam interaction. The diffraction from individual single crystals in an electron microscope equipped with a precession attachment is described using the Bloch-wave method, which takes into account multibeam scattering, and a special approach taking into consideration the specific features of the diffraction geometry in the precession technique. Investigations were performed on LiF, NaF, CaF{sub 2}, and Si crystals. A method for reducing experimental data, which allows joint electron and X-ray diffraction study, is proposed.

  9. HOTCFGM-2D: A Coupled Higher-Order Theory for Cylindrical Structural Components with Bi-Directionally Components with Bi-Directionally Graded Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this two-year project was to develop and deliver to the NASA-Glenn Research Center a two-dimensional higher-order theory, and related computer codes, for the analysis and design of cylindrical functionally graded materials/structural components for use in advanced aircraft engines (e.g., combustor linings, rotor disks, heat shields, brisk blades). To satisfy this objective, two-dimensional version of the higher-order theory, HOTCFGM-2D, and four computer codes based on this theory, for the analysis and design of structural components functionally graded in the radial and circumferential directions were developed in the cylindrical coordinate system r-Theta-z. This version of the higher-order theory is a significant generalization of the one-dimensional theory, HOTCFGM-1D, developed during the FY97 for the analysis and design of cylindrical structural components with radially graded microstructures. The generalized theory is applicable to thin multi-phased composite shells/cylinders subjected to steady-state thermomechanical, transient thermal and inertial loading applied uniformly along the axial direction such that the overall deformation is characterized by a constant average axial strain. The reinforcement phases are uniformly distributed in the axial direction, and arbitrarily distributed in the radial and circumferential direction, thereby allowing functional grading of the internal reinforcement in the r-Theta plane. The four computer codes fgmc3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmp3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmgvips3dq.cylindrical.f, and fgmc3dq.cylindrical.transient.f are research-oriented codes for investigating the effect of functionally graded architectures, as well as the properties of the multi-phase reinforcement, in thin shells subjected to thermomechanical and inertial loading, on the internal temperature, stress and (inelastic) strain fields. The reinforcement distribution in the radial and circumferential directions is specified by the user. The thermal

  10. Fine-scale thermohaline ocean structure retrieved with 2-D prestack full-waveform inversion of multichannel seismic data: Application to the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagnino, D.; Sallarès, V.; Biescas, B.; Ranero, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of 2-D time-domain, adjoint-state acoustic full-waveform inversion (FWI) to retrieve high-resolution models of ocean physical parameters such as sound speed, temperature and salinity. The proposed method is first described and then applied to prestack multichannel seismic (MCS) data acquired in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia) in 2007 in the framework of the Geophysical Oceanography project. The inversion strategy flow includes specifically designed data preconditioning for acoustic noise reduction, followed by the inversion of sound speed in the shotgather domain. We show that the final sound speed model has a horizontal resolution of ˜ 70 m, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the initial model constructed with coincident eXpendable Bathy Thermograph (XBT) data, and close to the theoretical resolution of O(λ). Temperature (T) and salinity (S) are retrieved with the same lateral resolution as sound speed by combining the inverted sound speed model with the thermodynamic equation of seawater and a local, depth-dependent T-S relation derived from regional conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) measurements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) database. The comparison of the inverted T and S models with XBT and CTD casts deployed simultaneously to the MCS acquisition shows that the thermohaline contrasts are resolved with an accuracy of 0.18oC for temperature and 0.08 PSU for salinity. The combination of oceanographic and MCS data into a common, pseudo-automatic inversion scheme allows to quantitatively resolve submeso-scale features that ought to be incorporated into larger-scale ocean models of oceans structure and circulation.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of a new metal organic framework structure with a 2D porous system: (H 2NEt 2) 2[Zn 3(BDC) 4]ṡ3DEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemmi, Enrica; Bein, Thomas; Stock, Norbert

    2006-03-01

    A new open-framework zinc terephthalate (H 2NEt 2) 2[Zn 3(BDC) 4]ṡ3DEF (BDC = 1,4-benzendicarboxylate, DEF=N,N-diethylformamide) was obtained under slightly acidic condition by reacting 1,4-benzendicarboxylic acid (H 2BDC) with ZnO in a DEF solution. The structure was obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction and consists of trimetallic zinc building units, that are interconnected by eight BDC units each (crystal data: monoclinic, C2/c, a=3337.24(5), b=983.17(2), c=1819.67(2) pm, β=92.455(1, V=5965.0(2)×10 pm, Z=4, R=0.0395, wR=0.0843 for 4533 reflections I>2σ(I)). Six BDC ions together with the trimetallic zinc units form a two-dimensional (3,6)-net while the other two BDC unit pillar these layers. Thus a three-dimensional anionic framework with a 2D pore system is formed. The pore space is occupied by solvent molecules (DEF) and diethylammonium ions, produced by in situ hydrolysis of DEF. These are interconnected as well as connected to the framework by hydrogen-bonds. The TG investigation in combination with powder X-ray diffraction and vibrational-spectroscopy show a two-step loss of the pore filling molecules as well as one H 2BDC molecule leading to crystalline phases which are stable up to 250 and 400 °C, respectively. In addition, 13C MAS-NMR data of the title compound is presented.

  12. Electronic and crystallographic structure of apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderín, L.; Stott, M. J.; Rubio, A.

    2003-04-01

    An ab initio study of four different stoichiometric apatites (oxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, and chlorapatite) is presented. The calculations were performed using density-functional theory with the local-density approximation for exchange and correlation, and a full relaxation of the electronic structure, the atomic arrangement, and the unit cell. Hexagonal unit cells were obtained for all four apatites, and the calculated atomic arrangements are in close agreement with observation in those cases for which the structure is firmly established. A zero-temperature structure is predicted for oxyapatite, and two possible configurations were found for the Cl- ions in chlorapatite. The possibility of the monoclinic structure in hydroxyapatite and chlorapatite was also studied but no indication of greater stability with respect to the hexagonal structure was found. A relationship between the structure of the apatites and that of pure calcium is discussed.

  13. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, optical properties and DFT studies of a new 2D layered iodide bridged Pb(II) coordination polymer with 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Saghatforoush, Lotfali Bakhtiari, Akbar; Gheleji, Hojjat

    2015-01-15

    The synthesis of two dimensional (2D) coordination polymer [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} (dpp=2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) is reported. As determined by X-ray diffraction of a twinned crystal, the dpp ligand simultaneously adopts a bis–bidentate and bis–monodentate coordination mode in the crystal structure of compound. The electronic band structure along with density of states (DOS) calculated by the DFT method indicates that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. According to the DFT calculations, the observed emission of the compound at 600 nm in solid phase could be attributed to arise from an excited LLCT state (dpp-π{sup ⁎} [C-2p and N-2p states, CBs] to I-6p state [VBs]). The linear optical properties of the compound are also calculated by DFT method. The structure of the compound in solution phase is discussed based on the measured {sup 1}H NMR and fluorescence spectra in DMSO. TGA studies indicate that the compound is thermally stable up to 210 °C. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure and emission spectra of [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} is presented. The electronic band structure and linear optical properties of the compound are calculated by the DFT method. - Highlights: • Two dimensional [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} has been prepared. • The structure of the compound is determined by XRD of a twinned crystal. • DFT calculations indicate that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. • As shown by DFT calculations, the emission band of the compound is LLCT. • Solution phase structure of compound is explored by {sup 1}H NMR and emission spectra.

  14. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  15. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices.

  16. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  17. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C. M. Krynski, Kamil; Streeter, Zachary; Findley, G. L.

    2015-12-14

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V{sub 0}(ρ) for H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V{sub 0}(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O{sub 2}) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V{sub 0}(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths.

  18. Small-angle shubnikov-de haas measurements in a 2D electron system: the effect of a strong In-plane magnetic field

    PubMed

    Vitkalov; Zheng; Mertes; Sarachik; Klapwijk

    2000-09-01

    Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of 2 increase of the frequency of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at H>H(sat). This signals the onset of full spin polarization above H(sat), the parallel field above which the resistivity saturates to a constant value. For H

  19. A quantum dynamical comparison of the electronic couplings derived from quantum electrodynamics and Förster theory: application to 2D molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, James E.; Jones, Garth A.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate under what circumstances Förster theory of electronic (resonance) energy transfer breaks down in molecular aggregates. This is achieved by simulating the dynamics of exciton diffusion, on the femtosecond timescale, in molecular aggregates using the Liouville-von Neumann equation of motion. Specifically the focus of this work is the investigation of both spatial and temporal deviations between exciton dynamics driven by electronic couplings calculated from Förster theory and those calculated from quantum electrodynamics. The quantum electrodynamics (QED) derived couplings contain medium- and far-zone terms that do not exist in Förster theory. The results of the simulations indicate that Förster coupling is valid when the dipole centres are within a few nanometres of one another. However, as the distance between the dipole centres increases from 2 nm to 10 nm, the intermediate- and far-zone coupling terms play non-negligible roles and Förster theory begins to break down. Interestingly, the simulations illustrate how contributions to the exciton dynamics from the intermediate- and far-zone coupling terms of QED are quickly washed-out by the near-zone mechanism of Förster theory for lattices comprising closely packed molecules. On the other hand, in the case of sparsely packed arrays, the exciton dynamics resulting from the different theories diverge within the 100 fs lifetime of the trajectories. These results could have implications for the application of spectroscopic ruler techniques as well as design principles relating to energy harvesting materials.

  20. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  1. Electronic structure calculations on helical conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Juan D; Serna, Andrei; Guerra, Doris; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2010-10-21

    We present a study of the electronic structure and derived properties of polyfurane (PFu), polypyrrol (PPy), and polythiophene (PTh). Two spatial arrangements are considered: trans chain (tc-PFu, tc-PPy, tc-PTh) and cis α-helical (α-PFu, α-PPy, α-PTh). Even at the small sizes considered here, helical conformations appear to be stable. Band gaps of pure, undoped oligomers fall into the semiconductor range. Density of states (DOS) analysis suggest dense valence and conduction bands. Bond length alternation analysis predicts almost complete delocalization of the π clouds in all spatial arrangements. Doping with electron donors or electron-withdrawing impurities reduces all band gaps close to the metallic regime in addition to increasing the DOS for the valence and conduction bands.

  2. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  3. Functionalized 2D atomic sheets with new properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2011-03-01

    Due to the unique atomic structure and novel physical and chemical properties, graphene has sparked tremendous theoretical and experimental efforts to explore other 2D atomic sheets like B-N, Al-N, and Zn-O, where the two components offer much more complexities and flexibilities in surface modifications. Using First principles calculations based on density functional theory, we have systematically studied the semi- and fully-decorated 2D sheets with H and F and Cl. We have found that the electronic structures and magnetic properties can be effectively tuned, and the system can be a direct or an indirect semiconductor or even a half-metal, and the system can be made ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, or magnetically degenerate depending upon how the surface is functionalized. Discussions are made for the possible device applications.

  4. First 2D-ACAR Measurements on Cu with the new Spectrometer at TUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. A.; Böni, P.; Ceeh, H.; Leitner, M.; Hugenschmidt, Ch

    2013-06-01

    The two-dimensional measurement of the angular correlation of the positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) is a powerful tool to investigate the electronic structure of materials. Here we report on the first results obtained with the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Technische Universitat München (TUM). To get experience in processing and interpreting 2D-ACAR data, first measurements were made on copper. The obtained data are treated with standard procedures and compared to theoretical calculations. It is shown that the measurements are in good agreement with the calculations and that the Fermi surface can be entirely reconstructed using three projections only.

  5. Positron beam optics for the 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the NEPOMUC beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, H.; Weber, J. A.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Leitner, M.; Boni, P.

    2014-04-01

    In the last year a conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer has been set up and brought to operation at TUM. Once the NEPOMUC beamline is extended to the new experimental hall at the research reactor FRM-II the conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer will be upgraded with a second sample chamber in order to be integrated to the NEPOMUC beamline facility. This spectrometer will add a complete new quality to 2D-ACAR experiments as it allows to track the evolution of the electronic structure from the surface to the bulk. We present the design features of the positron beam optics and the sample environment.

  6. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  7. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890. PMID:26049453

  8. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  9. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890.

  10. Microwave polarization angle study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system under dc current bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad-Zahir; Liu, Han-Chun; Heimbeck, Martin S.; Everitt, Henry O.; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh G.

    Microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations followed by the vanishing resistance states are a prime representation of non-equilibrium transport phenomena in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES). The effect of a dc current bias on the nonlinear response of 2DES with microwave polarization angle under magnetic field is a subject of interest. Here, we have studied the effect of various dc current bias on microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in a high mobility 2DES. Further, we systematically investigate the effect of the microwave polarization angle on the magneto-resistance oscillations at two different frequencies 152.78 GHz and 185.76 GHz. This study aims to better understand the effects of both dc current and microwave polarization angle in the GaAs/AlGaAs system, both of which modify the observed magneto-transport properties DOE-BES, Mat'l. Sci. & Eng. Div., DE-SC0001762; ARO W911NF-14-2-0076; ARO W911NF-15-1-0433.

  11. Study of microwave reflection in the regime of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriisa, Annika; Liu, H.-C.; Samaraweera, R. L.; Heimbeck, M. S.; Everitt, H. O.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R. G.

    Microwave-induced zero-resistance-states in the photo-excited GaAs/AlGaAs system evolve from the minima of microwave photo-excited ``quarter-cycle shifted'' magnetoresistance oscillations. Such magnetoresistance oscillations are known to exhibit nodes at cyclotron resonance (hf = ℏωc) and cyclotron resonance harmonics (hf = nℏωc). Further, the effective mass extracted from the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations is known to differ from the canonical effective mass ratio for electrons in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. In an effort to reconcile this difference, we have looked for cyclotron resonance in the microwave reflection from the high mobility 2DES and attempted to correlate the observations with observed oscillatory magnetoresistance over the 30 <= f <= 330 GHz band. The results of such a study will be reported here. DOE-BES, Mat'l. Sci. & Eng. Div., DE-SC0001762; ARO W911NF-14-2-0076; ARO W911NF-15-1-0433.

  12. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  13. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J.; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry

    2015-06-07

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S{sub 2} of the Spx towards the Q{sub x} state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Q{sub x} to Q{sub y} within the B890.

  14. Electronic structure studies of topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuyun

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac fermions are a new class of topological quantum materials. In 3D Dirac semimetals, the conduction and valence bands touch each other at discrete points in the momentum space and show linear dispersions along all momentum directions, forming 3D Dirac cones which are protected by the crystal symmetry. Here I will present our recent studies of the electronic structures of novel materials which host 3D Dirac fermions by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  15. Structure and Electronic Properties of Polycrystalline Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, AL

    2013-07-07

    We present an overview of the theoretical approaches that can be employed to model polycrystalline oxides along with a discussion of their limitations and associated challenges. We then present results for two metal oxide materials, MgO and HfO2, where theory and experiment have come together to provide insight into the structure and electronic properties of grain boundaries. Finally, we conclude with a discussion and outlook.

  16. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  17. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphite intercalation compounds, fullerenes, and ultrathin graphite films exhibit many exotic phenomena such as superconductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect. These findings have caused renewed interest in the electronic structure of ultrathin layers of graphene: a single honeycomb carbon layer that is the building block for these materials. There is a strong motivation to incorporate graphene multilayers into atomic-scale devices, spurred on by rapid progress in their fabrication and manipulation. We have synthesized bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and characterized their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands [1]. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic scale electronic devices. [1] T. Ohta, A. Bostwick, T. Seyller, K. Horn, E. Rotenberg, Science, 313, 951 (2006).

  18. Smart electronics and MEMS for aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, smart electronics and MEMS are employed to sense and control the drag in aircraft structures. The sensors are fabricated with interdigital transducers printed on a piezoelectric polymer. They in turn are mounted onto an ultra thin Penn State's novel RF antenna (Patent field). The sensor are designed to measure both pressure and shear of the fluid flow on aerospace structures. The wave form measurements may be monitored at a remote location either at the cockpit or elsewhere via the antennas in the sensors and an outside antenna. The integrated MEMS actuators which comprise of cantilever-, diaphram- and microbridge-based MEMS with suitable smart electronics etched onto the structure are controlled by the built-in antennas through feedback and feedforward control architecture. The integration of such materials and smart electronics into the skin of airfoil is ideal for sensing and controlling drag. The basic idea of this concept involves detection of the point of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and transmitting acoustical energy into the boundary layer so that the low energy fluid particles accelerate in the transverse direction and mix with the high energy flow outside of the boundary layer. 3D microriblets can be fabricated using stereo lithography and UV curable conducting polymers. The control of drag using these active microriblets are outlined.

  19. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  20. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  1. Imidization induced structural changes of 6FDA-ODA poly(amic acid) by two-dimensional (2D) infrared correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyemi; Chae, Boknam; Im, Ji Hyuk; Jung, Young Mee; Lee, Seung Woo

    2014-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) gradient mapping method and 2D correlation analysis of in situ FTIR spectra were used to probe the thermal imidization-induced spectral changes in 6FDA-ODA poly(amic acid) (PAA) films prepared by a reaction of 4,4‧-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic anhydride (6FDA) and 4,4‧-oxydianiline (ODA) in N,N‧-dimethylacetamide. Large spectral changes in the in situ FTIR spectra of 6FDA-ODA PAA film were observed in the range, 130-230 °C. The thermal imidization of 6FDA-ODA PAA films strongly affects the spectral changes in amic acid groups in the PAA unit. The spectral change in the amic acid groups occurred before those of the imide ring. The cyclic anhydrides, isoimdes and intermolecular links are present together with the imide ring in the thermally-cured 6FDA-ODA PAA films.

  2. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  3. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  4. NUBOW-2D Inelastic

    2002-01-31

    This program solves the two-dimensional mechanical equilbrium configuration of a core restraint system, which is subjected to radial temperature and flux gradients, on a time increment basis. At each time increment, the code calculates the irradiation creep and swelling strains for each duct from user-specified creep and swelling correlations. Using the calculated thermal bowing, inelastic bowing and the duct dilation, the corresponding equilibrium forces, beam deflections, total beam displacements, and structural reactivity changes are calculated.

  5. Tuning the electronic structures and magnetism of two-dimensional porous C2N via transition metal embedding.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Xia, Congxin; Xiong, Wenqi; Zhao, Xu; Wang, Tianxing; Jia, Yu

    2016-08-10

    Based on first-principles calculations, the electronic structures and magnetism are investigated in 3d transition metal (TM)-embedded porous two-dimensional (2D) C2N monolayers. Numerical results indicate that except Mn and Co atoms, other TM atoms can be embedded stably in the 2D C2N monolayer. Moreover, the magnetic moments of the TM-embedded C2N monolayer depend highly on the atomic number of the TM atoms. The Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni atom-embedded C2N monolayers possess a ferromagnetic ground state, while embedding Cu can induce paramagnetic characteristics in the 2D C2N monolayer. Meanwhile, the Zn-embedded C2N monolayer exhibits a nonmagnetic ground state. These results indicate that the magnetism of 2D C2N monolayers can be tuned via embedding TM atoms. PMID:27476579

  6. Tuning the electronic structures and magnetism of two-dimensional porous C2N via transition metal embedding.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Xia, Congxin; Xiong, Wenqi; Zhao, Xu; Wang, Tianxing; Jia, Yu

    2016-08-10

    Based on first-principles calculations, the electronic structures and magnetism are investigated in 3d transition metal (TM)-embedded porous two-dimensional (2D) C2N monolayers. Numerical results indicate that except Mn and Co atoms, other TM atoms can be embedded stably in the 2D C2N monolayer. Moreover, the magnetic moments of the TM-embedded C2N monolayer depend highly on the atomic number of the TM atoms. The Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni atom-embedded C2N monolayers possess a ferromagnetic ground state, while embedding Cu can induce paramagnetic characteristics in the 2D C2N monolayer. Meanwhile, the Zn-embedded C2N monolayer exhibits a nonmagnetic ground state. These results indicate that the magnetism of 2D C2N monolayers can be tuned via embedding TM atoms.

  7. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  8. Electronic structure and bonding in crystalline peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Königstein, Markus; Sokol, Alexei A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1999-08-01

    Hartree-Fock and density-functional PW91 theories as realized in the CRYSTAL95 code have been applied to investigate the structural and electronic properties of Ba, Sr, and Ca peroxide materials with the calcium carbide crystal structure, results for which are compared with those for the corresponding oxides. Special attention is paid to the stabilization of the peroxide molecular ion O2-2 in the ionic environment provided by the lattice, and to chemical bonding effects. In order to describe the covalent bonding within the O2-2 ion and the polarization of the O- ion in the crystal electrostatic field, it is essential to include an account of the effects of electron correlation. The PW91 density functional has allowed us to reproduce the crystallographic parameters within a 3% error. The chemical bonding within the peroxide molecular ion has a complex nature with a balance between the weak covalent bond of σz type and the strong electrostatic repulsion of the closed-shell electron groups occupying O 2s and O 2px and 2py states. Compression of the peroxide ion in the ionic crystals gives rise to an excessive overlap of the O 2s closed shells of the two O- ions of a peroxide molecular ion O2-2, which in turn determines the antibonding character of the interaction and chemical bonding in the O2-2 molecular ion.

  9. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  10. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  11. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  12. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  13. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  14. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  15. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  16. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Zachary

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  17. Structural, electronic, and magnetic characteristics of Np2Co17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, I.; Hen, A.; Orion, I.; Colineau, E.; Eloirdi, R.; Griveau, J.-C.; Gaczyński, P.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Sanchez, J.-P.; Winterrose, M. L.; Magnani, N.; Shick, A. B.; Caciuffo, R.

    2012-01-01

    A previously unknown neptunium-transition-metal binary compound Np2Co17 has been synthesized and characterized by means of powder x-ray diffraction, 237Np Mössbauer spectroscopy, superconducting-quantum-interference-device magnetometry, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The compound crystallizes in a Th2Ni17-type hexagonal structure with room-temperature lattice parameters a=8.3107(1) Å and c=8.1058(1) Å. Magnetization curves indicate the occurrence of ferromagnetic order below TC>350 K. Mössbauer spectra suggest a Np3+ oxidation state and give an ordered moment of μNp=1.57(4) μB and μNp=1.63(4) μB for the Np atoms located, respectively, at the 2b and 2d crystallographic positions of the P63/mmc space group. Combining these values with a sum-rule analysis of the XMCD spectra measured at the neptunium M4,5 absorption edges, one obtains the spin and orbital contributions to the site-averaged Np moment [μS=-1.88(9) μB, μL=3.48(9) μB]. The ratio between the expectation value of the magnetic-dipole moment and the spin magnetic moment (mmd/μS=+1.36) is positive as predicted for localized 5f electrons and lies between the values calculated in intermediate-coupling (IC) and jj approximations. The expectation value of the angular part of the spin-orbit-interaction operator is in excellent agreement with the IC estimate. The ordered moment averaged over the four inequivalent Co sites, as obtained from the saturation value of the magnetization, is μCo≃1.6 μB. The experimental results are discussed against the predictions of first-principles electronic-structure calculations based on the spin-polarized local-spin-density approximation plus the Hubbard interaction.

  18. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  19. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ∼ 104 at 488 nm and ∼ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  20. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ˜ 104 at 488 nm and ˜ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  1. Doped penta-graphene and hydrogenation of its related structures: a structural and electronic DFT-D study.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Briones, J J; Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of penta-graphene (penta-C), an irregular pentagonal two-dimensional (2D) structure, has been predicted recently. In this communication we carried out a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) study of the penta-C doped with Si, Ge and Sn atoms and its related hydrogenated penta-C structures (H-penta-C-X). We predict various new structures as thermally stable based on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations. Moreover, their dynamical stability is attested by phonon dispersions spectra. In general, we found that the bandgap value of doped structures reduces, while H-penta-C-X show large bandgap values. This feature can be exploited for potential uses of hydrogenated doped-penta-C structures as dielectric layers in electronic devices.

  2. Doped penta-graphene and hydrogenation of its related structures: a structural and electronic DFT-D study.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Briones, J J; Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of penta-graphene (penta-C), an irregular pentagonal two-dimensional (2D) structure, has been predicted recently. In this communication we carried out a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) study of the penta-C doped with Si, Ge and Sn atoms and its related hydrogenated penta-C structures (H-penta-C-X). We predict various new structures as thermally stable based on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations. Moreover, their dynamical stability is attested by phonon dispersions spectra. In general, we found that the bandgap value of doped structures reduces, while H-penta-C-X show large bandgap values. This feature can be exploited for potential uses of hydrogenated doped-penta-C structures as dielectric layers in electronic devices. PMID:27220553

  3. Synthesis, magnetic properties, and magnetic structure of a natrochalcite structural variant, KM(II)2D3O2(MoO4)2 (M = Mn, Fe, or Co).

    PubMed

    Maalej, Wassim; Vilminot, Serge; André, Gilles; Damay, Françoise; Elaoud, Zakaria; Mhiri, Tahar; Kurmoo, Mohamedally

    2011-04-18

    We report the syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of KMn(2)(H(3)O(2))(MoO(4))(2) (MnH), KMn(2)(D(3)O(2))(MoO(4))(2) (MnD), KFe(2)(H(3)O(2))(MoO(4))(2) (FeH), KFe(2)(D(3)O(2))(MoO(4))(2) (FeD), KCo(2)(H(3)O(2))(MoO(4))(2) (CoH), and KCo(2)(D(3)O(2))(MoO(4))(2) (CoD), and the magnetic structures of MnD and FeD. They belong to the structural variant (space group I2/m) of the mineral natrochalcite NaCu(2)(H(3)O(2))(SO(4))(2) (space group C2/m) where the diagonal within the ac-plane of the latter become one axis of the former. The structure of MnD, obtained from Rietveld refinement of a high-resolution neutron pattern taken at 300 K, consists of chains of edge-sharing octahedra bridged by MoO(4) and D(3)O(2) to form layers, which are connected to K through the oxygen atoms to form the three-dimensional (3D)-network. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the other two compounds were found to belong to the same space group with similar parameters. The magnetic susceptibilities of MnH and FeH exhibit long-range ordering of the moments at a Néel temperature of 8 and 11 K, respectively, which are accompanied by additional strong Bragg reflections in the neutron diffraction in the ordered state, consistent with antiferromagnetism. Analyses of the neutron data for MnD and FeD reveal the presence of both long- and short-range orderings and commensurate magnetic structures with a propagation vector of (½, 0, ½). The moments are antiferromagnetically ordered within the chains with alternation between chains to generate four nonequivalent nuclear unit cells. For MnD the moments are perpendicular to the chain axis (b-axis) while for FeD they are parallel to the b-axis. The overall total is a fully compensated magnetic structure with zero moment in each case. Surprisingly, for KCo(2)(D(3)O(2))(MoO(4))(2) neither additional peaks nor increase of the nuclear peaks' intensities were observed in the neutron diffraction patterns below the magnetic anomaly at 12

  4. An ab initio study on atomic and electronic structures of two-dimensional Al3Ti at Al/TiB2 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, H.

    2016-09-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of a two-dimentional (2D) Al3Ti layer at Al/TiB2 interface has been investigated using first-principle calculations. The result reveals the 2D-Al3Ti adopts the structure of bulk Al3Ti. There exists a strong Ti(3d)–Al(3p) hybridization between Ti and Al atoms of the 2D-Al3Ti, as well as between surface Ti atoms of TiB2 and Al atoms of 2D-Al3Ti. It leads to a stronger covalent Ti–Al bonding at the Al/2D–Al3Ti/TiB2 interface than at the Al/TiB2 interface, which is responsible for the stability of 2D-Al3Ti.

  5. The CECAM Electronic Structure Library: community-driven development of software libraries for electronic structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael

    The CECAM Electronic Structure Library (ESL) is a community-driven effort to segregate shared pieces of software as libraries that could be contributed and used by the community. Besides allowing to share the burden of developing and maintaining complex pieces of software, these can also become a target for re-coding by software engineers as hardware evolves, ensuring that electronic structure codes remain at the forefront of HPC trends. In a series of workshops hosted at the CECAM HQ in Lausanne, the tools and infrastructure for the project were prepared, and the first contributions were included and made available online (http://esl.cecam.org). In this talk I will present the different aspects and aims of the ESL and how these can be useful for the electronic structure community.

  6. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  7. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  8. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Chung, B.W.; Wall, M.A.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Butterfield, M.T.; Teslich, Jr., N.E.; Bliss, R.A.; Morton, S.A.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.; van der Laan, G.; Kutepov, A.L.

    2008-10-30

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

  9. Towards scalable electronic structure calculations for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W.A.; Szotek, Z.; Temmermann, W.M.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to calculating the properties of large systems within the local density approximation (LDA) that offers the promise of scalability on massively parallel supercomputers is outlined. The electronic structure problem is formulated in real space using multiple scattering theory. The standard LDA algorithm is divided into two parts. Firstly, finding the self-consistent field (SCF) electron density, Secondly, calculating the energy corresponding to the SCF density. We show, at least for metals and alloys, that the former problem is easily solved using real space methods. For the second we take advantage of the variational properties of a generalized Harris-Foulkes free energy functional, a new conduction band Fermi function, and a fictitious finite electron temperature that again allow us to use real-space methods. Using a compute-node {R_arrow} atom equivalence the new method is naturally highly parallel and leads to O(N) scaling where N is the number of atoms making up the system. We show scaling data gathered on the Intel XP/S 35 Paragon for systems up to 512-atoms/simulation cell. To demonstrate that we can achieve metallurgical-precision, we apply the new method to the calculation the energies of disordered CuO{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5} alloys using a large random sample.

  10. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  11. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  12. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  13. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  14. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  15. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  16. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  17. Orbital-dependent Electron-Hole Interaction in Graphene and Associated Multi-Layer Structures.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tianqi; Su, Haibin

    2015-01-01

    We develop an orbital-dependent potential to describe electron-hole interaction in materials with structural 2D character, i.e. quasi-2D materials. The modulated orbital-dependent potentials are also constructed with non-local screening, multi-layer screening, and finite gap due to the coupling with substrates. We apply the excitonic Hamiltonian in coordinate-space with developed effective electron-hole interacting potentials to compute excitons' binding strength at M (π band) and Γ (σ band) points in graphene and its associated multi-layer forms. The orbital-dependent potential provides a range-separated property for regulating both long- and short-range interactions. This accounts for the existence of the resonant π exciton in single- and bi-layer graphenes. The remarkable strong electron-hole interaction in σ orbitals plays a decisive role in the existence of σ exciton in graphene stack at room temperature. The interplay between gap-opening and screening from substrates shed a light on the weak dependence of σ exciton binding energy on the thickness of graphene stacks. Moreover, the analysis of non-hydrogenic exciton spectrum in quasi-2D systems clearly demonstrates the remarkable comparable contribution of orbital dependent potential with respect to non-local screening process. The understanding of orbital-dependent potential developed in this work is potentially applicable for a wide range of materials with low dimension. PMID:26610715

  18. Orbital-dependent Electron-Hole Interaction in Graphene and Associated Multi-Layer Structures

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Tianqi; Su, Haibin

    2015-01-01

    We develop an orbital-dependent potential to describe electron-hole interaction in materials with structural 2D character, i.e. quasi-2D materials. The modulated orbital-dependent potentials are also constructed with non-local screening, multi-layer screening, and finite gap due to the coupling with substrates. We apply the excitonic Hamiltonian in coordinate-space with developed effective electron-hole interacting potentials to compute excitons’ binding strength at M (π band) and Γ (σ band) points in graphene and its associated multi-layer forms. The orbital-dependent potential provides a range-separated property for regulating both long- and short-range interactions. This accounts for the existence of the resonant π exciton in single- and bi-layer graphenes. The remarkable strong electron-hole interaction in σ orbitals plays a decisive role in the existence of σ exciton in graphene stack at room temperature. The interplay between gap-opening and screening from substrates shed a light on the weak dependence of σ exciton binding energy on the thickness of graphene stacks. Moreover, the analysis of non-hydrogenic exciton spectrum in quasi-2D systems clearly demonstrates the remarkable comparable contribution of orbital dependent potential with respect to non-local screening process. The understanding of orbital-dependent potential developed in this work is potentially applicable for a wide range of materials with low dimension. PMID:26610715

  19. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  20. Pentacene Derivatives: Electronic Structure and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netusil, Ross; Ilie, Carolina; Kane, Thorin; Damkaci, Fehmi

    2013-03-01

    The variation in composition and structure of the substituent groups of pentacene compounds promises a broad range of electronic structures and behaviors and provides a vast and alluring field of inquiry with avenues of exploration. These include the development of synthetic schema, the process of design for novel derivatives and, in order to identify those hypothesized compounds which demonstrate the desired behavior, the identification and refinement of computational tools that make accurate predictions about the electronic behavior of theoretical compounds. Two computational techniques and six pentacene derivatives are here examined. One technique was used to predict the vibrational spectra of the compounds, in order to both acquire data about the optical conductivity of the compounds and to establish a pool of theoretical data against which experimental data will be compared. The molecular orbital energy level diagram of the same six compounds was derived using a second approach, with the same goals of discerning between valid and invalid predictive schema by comparison with pending experimental data and between hypothesized compounds which show promise and those which present little potential for use in organic semiconductor technology.

  1. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann`s criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site ``local`` chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  2. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann's criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site local'' chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  3. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  4. Synthesis, structure and temperature-depended 2D IR correlation spectroscopy of an organo-bismuth benzoate with 1,10-phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan-Qiong; Zhong, Jie-Cen; Liu, Le-Hui; Qiu, Xing-Tai; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2016-11-01

    An organo-bismuth benzoate with phen as auxiliary ligand, [Bi(phen)(C6H5COO)(C6H4COO)] (1) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized from bismuth nitrate, 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid with phen as auxiliary ligand and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, PXRD, IR spectra, TG analyses, temperature-depended 2D-IR COS (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Interestingly, benzoate anions in 1 came from the desulfuration reaction of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 is a discrete organo-bismuth compound with benzoate and phen ligands. The offset face-to-face π-π stacking interactions and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the isolate complex into a 3D supramolecular network. The temperature-depended 2D-IR COS indicates that the stretching vibrations of Cdbnd C/Cdbnd N of aromatic rings and Cdbnd O bonds are sensitive to the temperature change.

  5. Synthesis, structure and properties of one novel 2D Mn-heterocyclic carboxylic acid complex [Mn(TPA)Cl(H 2O)] n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Hui-Min

    2011-04-01

    A novel 2D layer complex [Mn(TPA)Cl(H 2O)] n ( 1) has been synthesized by two methods through the reaction of MnCl 2 and TPC or TPA under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, infrared spectrometry (IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), where heterocyclic carboxylic acid ligand TPA = 2-(5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl)acetic acid, TPC = 2-(5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl)acetonitrile. The distorted octahedral Mn(II) centers are bridged by carboxylic O atoms resulting in the formation of a 1D chain. Then the 1D chains are connected with each other through TPA ligands into a 2D (3,3)-connected topology framework. The H-bonding interactions extend the complex into a three-dimensional network, and such weak interactions further stabilized the complex. Furthermore, solid-state fluorescence spectrum of complex 1 exhibits intense broad emissions at 396 nm at room temperature, which is red-shifted by 21 nm relative to that of free ligand TPA.

  6. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  7. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  8. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    PubMed

    Lasala, R; Coudray, N; Abdine, A; Zhang, Z; Lopez-Redondo, M; Kirshenbaum, R; Alexopoulos, J; Zolnai, Z; Stokes, D L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I

    2015-02-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization.

  9. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Lasala, R.; Coudray, N.; Abdine, A.; Zhang, Z.; Lopez-Redondo, M.; Kirshenbaum, R.; Alexopoulos, J.; Zolnai, Z.; Stokes, D.L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1,300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization. PMID:25478971

  10. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    PubMed

    Lasala, R; Coudray, N; Abdine, A; Zhang, Z; Lopez-Redondo, M; Kirshenbaum, R; Alexopoulos, J; Zolnai, Z; Stokes, D L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I

    2015-02-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization. PMID:25478971

  11. A novel copper(II) complex constructed with mixed ligands of biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid (H 2bpdc) and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (Dpq): Synthesis, structure, electrochemistry and electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, HongYan; Wang, XiuLi; Hu, HaiLiang; Chen, BaoKuan; Liu, GuoCheng

    2009-03-01

    A novel metal-organic framework [Cu 2(bpdc) 2(Dpq) 2(H 2O)]·H 2O ( 1) has been obtained from hydrothermal reaction of copper chloride with the mixed ligands [biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid (H 2bpdc) and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (Dpq)], and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TG and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The unique feature is that there simultaneously exist two kinds of one-dimensional (1-D) zigzag polymeric chains in complex 1. Moreover, the 1-D polymeric chains are ultimately packed into a three-dimensional (3-D) supramolecular framework through two different hydrogen bonding interactions. The adjacent different chains are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonding interactions, and the same kind chains are further connected through C-H⋯π stacking interactions. Additionally, the complex 1 was used as solid bulk-modifier to fabricate renewable carbon paste electrode (Cu-CPE) by the direct mixing method. The electrochemical behavior and electrocatalysis of Cu-CPE have been studied in detail. The results indicate that Cu-CPE give one-electron quasi-reversible redox waves in potential range of 400 to -300 mV due to the metal copper ion Cu(II)/Cu(I). The Cu-CPE showed good electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of the bromate, nitrite and hydrogen peroxide. The electrocatalytic reduction peak currents of KBrO 3, KNO 2 and H 2O 2 showed a linear dependence on their concentrations. All of the results revealed that the Cu-CPE had a good reproducibility, remarkable long-term stability and especially good surface renewability by simple mechanical polishing in the event of surface fouling, which is important for practical application.

  12. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  13. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  14. Study of electronic structures of solids with strongly interacting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yen-Sheng

    This work contains studies of two classes of perovskite transition metal oxides. The first class is the layered perovskite cuprates and the related nickelate. The second class is the three dimensional perovskite manganites. Both model and ab initio calculations are carried out for the two classes of systems. The dissertation is therefore divided into the following four parts. The first part is about the 3-band Hubbard model. The model is commonly used for describing the electronic properties of the important CuO2 layers in the crystals of high-Tc superconducting cuprates, such as doped La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O 7. The straightforward perturbation expansion on the model taking tpd/ɛpd (~0.36 for the cuprates) as the small parameter does not converge. In this work, I show that there exist canonical transformations on the model Hamiltonian such that the perturbation expansion based on the transformed Hamiltonians converges. In the second part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for La2NiO4 and La2CuO4. The results predict correctly that these two materials are antiferromagnetic insulators, in contrast to the wrong predictions made by the density functional calculations using the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The spin form factors of the materials are also calculated. The results agree with previous theoretical works using an embedded cluster model. The calculated spin form factor of La2CuO4 is consistent with the few experimental data currently available, while the results for La2NiO4 show a large discrepancy between theory and experiment. We question the accuracy of the experimental results of La2NiO4 and call for more experiments to settle the issue. In the third part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for LaMnO3. Our main focus is on the magnetic and orbital orderings, the effect of the crystal distortion from the cubic perovskite structure, and the analysis of the projected density of states. In addition, we also find

  15. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet 2D fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-2D FS)

    PubMed Central

    Widom, Julia R.; Johnson, Neil P.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analog of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) – a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy – to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 Å ± 0.5 Å, twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5°), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes. PMID:24223491

  16. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  17. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  18. Flatbands in 2D boroxine-linked covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ning; Zhang, Xin-Ran; Wang, Shu-Fang; Fu, Guang-Sheng; Wang, Jiang-Long

    2016-01-14

    Density functional calculations have been performed to analyze the electronic and mechanical properties of a number of 2D boroxine-linked covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which are experimentally fabricated from di-borate aromatic molecules. Furthermore, the band structures are surprising and show flat-band characteristics which are mainly attributed to the delocalized π-conjugated electrons around the phenyl rings and can be better understood within aromaticity theories. Next, the effects of branch sizes and hydrostatic strains on their band structures are systematically considered within generalized gradient approximations. It is found that their band gaps will start to saturate when the branch size reaches 9. For boroxine-linked COFs with only one benzene ring in the branch, the band gap is robust under compressive strain while it decreases with the tensile strain increasing. When the branch size is equal or greater than 2, their band gaps will monotonously increase with the strain increasing in the range of [-1.0, 2.0] Å. All boroxine-linked COFs are semiconductors with controllable band gaps, depending on the branch length and the applied strain. In comparison with other 2D materials, such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride, and even γ-graphyne, all boroxine-linked COFs are much softer and even more stable. That is, they can maintain the planar features under a larger compressive strain, which means that they are good candidates in flexible electronics. PMID:26662215

  19. Flatbands in 2D boroxine-linked covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ning; Zhang, Xin-Ran; Wang, Shu-Fang; Fu, Guang-Sheng; Wang, Jiang-Long

    2016-01-14

    Density functional calculations have been performed to analyze the electronic and mechanical properties of a number of 2D boroxine-linked covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which are experimentally fabricated from di-borate aromatic molecules. Furthermore, the band structures are surprising and show flat-band characteristics which are mainly attributed to the delocalized π-conjugated electrons around the phenyl rings and can be better understood within aromaticity theories. Next, the effects of branch sizes and hydrostatic strains on their band structures are systematically considered within generalized gradient approximations. It is found that their band gaps will start to saturate when the branch size reaches 9. For boroxine-linked COFs with only one benzene ring in the branch, the band gap is robust under compressive strain while it decreases with the tensile strain increasing. When the branch size is equal or greater than 2, their band gaps will monotonously increase with the strain increasing in the range of [-1.0, 2.0] Å. All boroxine-linked COFs are semiconductors with controllable band gaps, depending on the branch length and the applied strain. In comparison with other 2D materials, such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride, and even γ-graphyne, all boroxine-linked COFs are much softer and even more stable. That is, they can maintain the planar features under a larger compressive strain, which means that they are good candidates in flexible electronics.

  20. Effect of random structure on permeability and heat transfer characteristics for flow in 2D porous medium based on MRT lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, PeiPei; Wen, Zhi; Dou, RuiFeng; Liu, Xunliang

    2016-08-01

    Flow and heat transfer through a 2D random porous medium are studied by using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). For the random porous medium, the influence of disordered cylinder arrangement on permeability and Nusselt number are investigated. Results indicate that the permeability and Nusselt number for different cylinder locations are unequal even with the same number and size of cylinders. New correlations for the permeability and coefficient b‧Den of the Forchheimer equation are proposed for random porous medium composed of Gaussian distributed circular cylinders. Furthermore, a general set of heat transfer correlations is proposed and compared with existing experimental data and empirical correlations. Our results show that the Nu number increases with the increase of the porosity, hence heat transfer is found to be accurate considering the effect of porosity.

  1. Electronic Structure Calculations of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Steve; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    Exotic systems like Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) are attracting more attention based on their properties and possible interactions. Abundance of HCIs in the solar wind and their interaction with the upper atmosphere puts them in the attention of astro- and atmospheric physicists. Also, their unique properties originating in the high charge make them an excellent candidate for precision measurements and the next generation of atomic clocks. For a better understanding of the dynamics of processes involving HCIs a combined theoretical and experimental effort is needed to study their basic properties and interactions. Both theory and experiment need to be combined due to the extreme nature of these systems. We present preliminary insight into electronic structure of light HCIs, their interactions with neutral atoms and dynamics of charge transfer processes.

  2. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yi E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn; Wang, Yanli E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  3. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2014-02-01

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  4. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  5. Electronic Structure of Ethynyl Substituted Cyclobutadienes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Frank Lee Emmert, III; Thompson, Stephanie J.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the effects of ethynyl substitution on the electronic structure of cyclobutadiene. These species are involved in Bergman Cyclization reactionsand are possible intermediates in the formation of fullerenes and graphite sheets. Prediction of the electronic energy of cyclobutadiene is challenging for single-reference ab initio methods such as HF, MP2 or DFT because of Jahn-Teller distortions and the diradical character of the singlet state. We determined the vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet energy splittings, the natural charges and spin densities in substituted cyclobutadienes, using the equations of motion spin flip coupled cluster with single and double excitations (EOM-SF-CCSD) method that accurately describes diradical states. The adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps decrease upon substituent addition, but the singlet state is always lower in energy. However, we found that the results are affected by spin-contamination of the reference state and deteriorate when an unrestricted HF reference is employed. O. L. Chapman, C. L. McIntosh, J. Pacansky, "Cyclobutadiene" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1973, 95, (2), 614-617. N. S. Goroff, "Mechanism of Fullerene Formation." Acc. Chem. Res. 1996, 29, (2), 77-83. L.V. Slipchenko and A.I. Krylov, "Singlet-triplet gaps in diradicals by the Spin-Flip approach: A benchmark study", J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 117, 4694-4708.

  6. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  7. Silicene oxides: formation, structures and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Pi, Xiaodong; Ni, Zhenyi; Liu, Yong; Lin, Shisheng; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Deren

    2013-12-16

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been critical to the success of all types of silicon materials, which are the cornerstones of modern silicon technologies. For the recent experimentally obtained two-dimensional silicene, oxidation should also be addressed to enable the development of silicene-based devices. Here we focus on silicene oxides (SOs) that result from the partial or full oxidation of silicene in the framework of density functional theory. It is found that the formation of SOs greatly depends on oxidation conditions, which concern the oxidizing agents of oxygen and hydroxyl. The honeycomb lattice of silicene may be preserved, distorted or destroyed after oxidation. The charge state of Si in partially oxidized silicene ranges from +1 to +3, while that in fully oxidized silicene is +4. Metals, semimetals, semiconductors and insulators can all be found among the SOs, which show a wide spectrum of electronic structures. Our work indicates that the oxidation of silicene should be exquisitely controlled to obtain specific SOs with desired electronic properties.

  8. Tuning two-dimensional band structure of Cu(111) surface-state electrons that interplay with artificial supramolecular architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyong; Wang, Weihua; Tan, Liang Z.; Li, Xing Guang; Shi, Zilang; Kuang, Guowen; Liu, Pei Nian; Louie, Steven G.; Lin, Nian

    2013-12-01

    We report on the modulation of two-dimensional (2D) bands of Cu(111) surface-state electrons by three isostructural supramolecular honeycomb architectures with different periodicity or constituent molecules. Using Fourier-transformed scanning tunneling spectroscopy and model calculations, we resolved the 2D band structures and found that the intrinsic surface-state band is split into discrete bands. The band characteristics including band gap, band bottom, and bandwidth are controlled by the network unit cell size and the nature of the molecule-surface interaction. In particular, Dirac cones emerge where the second and third bands meet at the K points of the Brillouin zone of the supramolecular lattice.

  9. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  10. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  11. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  12. Mapping multidimensional electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics with single-element detection and compressive sensing

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Spokoyny, Boris; Ray, Supratim; Sarvari, Fahad; Harel, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing allows signals to be efficiently captured by exploiting their inherent sparsity. Here we implement sparse sampling to capture the electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems using phase-resolved 2D coherent spectroscopy. Until now, 2D spectroscopy has been hampered by its reliance on array detectors that operate in limited spectral regions. Combining spatial encoding of the nonlinear optical response and rapid signal modulation allows retrieval of state-resolved correlation maps in a photosynthetic protein and carbocyanine dye. We report complete Hadamard reconstruction of the signals and compression factors as high as 10, in good agreement with array-detected spectra. Single-point array reconstruction by spatial encoding (SPARSE) Spectroscopy reduces acquisition times by about an order of magnitude, with further speed improvements enabled by fast scanning of a digital micromirror device. We envision unprecedented applications for coherent spectroscopy using frequency combs and super-continua in diverse spectral regions. PMID:26804546

  13. Mapping multidimensional electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics with single-element detection and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Spokoyny, Boris; Ray, Supratim; Sarvari, Fahad; Harel, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing allows signals to be efficiently captured by exploiting their inherent sparsity. Here we implement sparse sampling to capture the electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems using phase-resolved 2D coherent spectroscopy. Until now, 2D spectroscopy has been hampered by its reliance on array detectors that operate in limited spectral regions. Combining spatial encoding of the nonlinear optical response and rapid signal modulation allows retrieval of state-resolved correlation maps in a photosynthetic protein and carbocyanine dye. We report complete Hadamard reconstruction of the signals and compression factors as high as 10, in good agreement with array-detected spectra. Single-point array reconstruction by spatial encoding (SPARSE) Spectroscopy reduces acquisition times by about an order of magnitude, with further speed improvements enabled by fast scanning of a digital micromirror device. We envision unprecedented applications for coherent spectroscopy using frequency combs and super-continua in diverse spectral regions.

  14. Mapping multidimensional electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics with single-element detection and compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Spokoyny, Boris; Ray, Supratim; Sarvari, Fahad; Harel, Elad

    2016-01-25

    Compressive sensing allows signals to be efficiently captured by exploiting their inherent sparsity. Here we implement sparse sampling to capture the electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems using phase-resolved 2D coherent spectroscopy. Until now, 2D spectroscopy has been hampered by its reliance on array detectors that operate in limited spectral regions. Combining spatial encoding of the nonlinear optical response and rapid signal modulation allows retrieval of state-resolved correlation maps in a photosynthetic protein and carbocyanine dye. We report complete Hadamard reconstruction of the signals and compression factors as high as 10, in good agreement with array-detected spectra. Single-point array reconstruction by spatial encoding (SPARSE) Spectroscopy reduces acquisition times by about an order of magnitude, with further speed improvements enabled by fast scanning of a digital micromirror device. We envision unprecedented applications for coherent spectroscopy using frequency combs and super-continua in diverse spectral regions.

  15. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  16. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  17. Seismic Velocity Structure Across the Quebrada and Gofar Oceanic Transform Faults from 2D Refraction Tomography - A Comparison of Faults with High and Low Seismic Slip Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2009-12-01

    We perform two 2-D tomographic inversions using data collected as a part of the Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar (QDG) Transform Fault Active/Passive Experiment. The QDG transform faults are located in the southern Pacific Ocean and offset the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at approximately 4° south. In the spring of 2008, two ~100 km refraction profiles were collected, each using 8 short period Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) from OBSIP and over 900 shots from the RV Marcus Langseth, across the easternmost segments of the Quebrada and Gofar transform faults. The two refraction profiles are modeled using a 2-D tomographic code that allows joint inversion of the Pg, PmP, and Pn arrivals (Korenaga et al., 2000). Variations in crustal velocity and thickness, as well as the width and depth extent of a significant low velocity zone within and below the transform valley provide some insight into the material properties of each of the fault-zones. Reduced seismic velocities that are 0.5 to over 1.0 km/s slower than velocities associated with the oceanic crust outside the fault zone may indicate the highly fractured fault zone lithology. The low velocity zone associated with the Quebrada fault also extends to the south of the active fault zone, beneath a fossil fault trace. Because Gofar is offset by an intratransform spreading center, we are able to compare ‘normal’ oceanic crust produced at the EPR to the south of the fault with crust associated with the ~15 km intratransform spreading center to the north. These two high slip rate (14 cm/yr) faults look similar morphologically and demonstrate comparable microseismicity characteristics, however their abilities to generate large earthquakes differ significantly. Gofar generates large earthquakes (Mw ~6) regularly every few years, but in the past 24 years only one large (Mw 5.6) event has been reliably located on Quebrada. The contrasting seismic behavior of these faults represents the range of behavior observed in the global

  18. Existence regimes for the formation of nonlinear dissipative structures in inhomogeneous magnetoplasmas with non-Maxwellian electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Zahoor, Sara; Gul-e-Ali, Ahmad, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear dissipative structures are studied in one and two dimensions in nonuniform magnetized plasmas with non-Maxwellian electrons. The dissipation is incorporated in the system through ion-neutral collisions. Employing the drift approximation, nonlinear drift waves are derived in 1D, whereas coupled drift-ion acoustic waves are derived in 2D in the weak nonlinearity limit. It is found that the ratio of the diamagnetic drift velocity to the velocity of nonlinear structure determines the nature (compressive or rarefactive) of the shock structure. The upper and lower bounds for velocity of the nonlinear shock structures are also found. It is noticed that the existence regimes for the drift shock waves in one and two dimensions for Cairns distributed electrons are very distinct from those with kappa distributed electrons. Interestingly, it is found that both compressive and rarefactive shock structures could be obtained for the one dimensional drift waves with kappa distributed electrons.

  19. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  20. 2D quasi-planar or 3D structures? A comparison between CrBn(n = 2 - 10) wheel-like clusters and their corresponding 3D pyramidal clusters, and their hydrogen storage capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, E. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated stable structures for a transition metal atom-boron (CrB) wheel-like clusters and compared them with their corresponding 3D counterparts by means of density functional theory (DFT). In addition, hydrogen storage capability of the wheel-like system was investigated. All simulations were performed at the B3LYP/TZVP level of theory. We set out a complete route to the formation of CrB wheel-like clusters. Our results showed that, some of the clusters, investigated in this work (CrBn; n = 4, 6, 7, 8), either prefer to be in a 3D geometry rather than 2D quasi-planar or planar geometry. However, hydrogen doping has an interesting effect on both 2D quasi-planar and 3D geometries of this system. Simply it transforms the 3D structure, first, into a 2D quasi-planar, then a planar geometry. Furthermore, our results show that H-cluster interaction is too high for reversible hydrogen storage for these clusters.