Science.gov

Sample records for 2d gas chromatography

  1. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasek, Francis W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This review covers fundamental developments in gas chromatography during 1982 and 1983. Literature is considered under these headings: columns; liguid phases; solid supports; sorption processes and solvents; open tubular column gas chromatography; instrumentation; high-resolution columns and applications; other techniques; qualitative and…

  2. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cram, Stuart P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Selects fundamental developments in theory, methodology, and instrumentation in gas chromatography (GC). A special section reviews GC in the People's Republic of China. Over 1,000 references are cited. (CS)

  3. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.; Peterson, Devin G.; Reineccius, Gary A.

    The first publication on gas chromatography (GC) was in 1952 (1), while the first commercial instruments were manufactured in 1956. James and Martin (1) separated fatty acids by GC, collected the column effluent, and titrated the individual fatty acids for quantitation. GC has advanced greatly since that early work and is now considered to be a mature field that is approaching theoretical limitations.

  4. Characterization of Muscat wines aroma evolution using comprehensive gas chromatography followed by a post-analytic approach to 2D contour plots comparison.

    PubMed

    Bordiga, Matteo; Rinaldi, Maurizio; Locatelli, Monica; Piana, Gianluca; Travaglia, Fabiano; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the application of a headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method on the analysis of Muscat-based wines volatiles by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The aroma patterns were established for different samples of Asti Spumante and Moscato d'Asti wines, stored in bottles for 6 months at different temperatures. Wines stored at 5 °C for 6 months did not show significant changes in flavor; otherwise, the samples stored at 15 and 25 °C, showed a significant decrease in linalool, β-damascenone, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate levels. In these last samples, α-terpineol, hotrienol, nerol oxide, furanic linalool oxides A/B and rose oxide concentrations significantly increased. A mathematical approach was developed and applied to raw data exported after the chromatographic course, in order (i) to normalise different 2D chromatograms, permitting their direct comparison and (ii) to automatically identify and calculate from pixel-to-pixel re-designed 2D chromatograms any differences among key volatile compounds. PMID:23578615

  5. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.

    Gas chromatography (GC) has many applications in the analysis of food products. GC has been used for the determination of fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesterol, gases, water, alcohols, pesticides, flavor compounds, and many more. While GC has been used for other food components such as sugars, oligosaccharides, amino acids, peptides, and vitamins, these substances are more suited to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography. GC is ideally suited to the analysis of volatile substances that are thermally stable. Substances such as pesticides and flavor compounds that meet these criteria can be isolated from a food and directly injected into the GC. For compounds that are thermally unstable, too low in volatility, or yield poor chromatographic separation due to polarity, a derivatization step must be done before GC analysis. The two parts of the experiment described here include the analysis of alcohols that requires no derivatization step, and the analysis of fatty acids which requires derivatization. The experiments specify the use of capillary columns, but the first experiment includes conditions for a packed column.

  6. Qualitative Characterization of the Aqueous Fraction from Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Algae Using 2D Gas Chromatography with Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maddi, Balakrishna; Panisko, Ellen; Albrecht, Karl; Howe, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for identifying and quantifying chemical components in complex mixtures. It is often used to analyze gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, bio-diesel and the organic fraction of bio-crude/bio-oil. In most of those analyses, the first dimension of separation is non-polar, followed by a polar separation. The aqueous fractions of bio-crude and other aqueous samples from biofuels production have been examined with similar column combinations. However, sample preparation techniques such as derivatization, solvent extraction, and solid-phase extraction were necessary prior to analysis. In this study, aqueous fractions obtained from the hydrothermal liquefaction of algae were characterized by two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry without prior sample preparation techniques using a polar separation in the first dimension followed by a non-polar separation in the second. Two-dimensional plots from this analysis were compared with those obtained from the more traditional column configuration. Results from qualitative characterization of the aqueous fractions of algal bio-crude are discussed in detail. The advantages of using a polar separation followed by a non-polar separation for characterization of organics in aqueous samples by two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry are highlighted. PMID:27022829

  7. Evaluation of Comprehensive 2-D Gas Chromatography-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for 209 Chlorinated Biphenyl Congeners in Two Chromatographic Runs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research evaluates a recently developed comprehensive 2-D GC coupled with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer for the potential separation of 209 PCB congeners, using a sequence of 1-D and 2-D chromatographic modes. In two consecutive chromatographic runs, using a 40 m,...

  8. Gas chromatography in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akapo, S. O.; Dimandja, J. M.; Kojiro, D. R.; Valentin, J. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    Gas chromatography has proven to be a very useful analytical technique for in situ analysis of extraterrestrial environments as demonstrated by its successful operation on spacecraft missions to Mars and Venus. The technique is also one of the six scientific instruments aboard the Huygens probe to explore Titan's atmosphere and surface. A review of gas chromatography in previous space missions and some recent developments in the current environment of fiscal constraints and payload size limitations are presented.

  9. Determination of phosphine and other fumigants in air samples by thermal desorption and 2D heart-cutting gas chromatography with synchronous SIM/Scan mass spectrometry and flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Fahrenholtz, Svea; Hühnerfuss, Heinrich; Baur, Xaver; Budnik, Lygia Therese

    2010-12-24

    Fumigants and volatile industrial chemicals are particularly hazardous to health when a freight container is fumigated or the contaminated material is introduced into its enclosed environment. Phosphine is now increasingly used as a fumigant, after bromomethane--the former fumigant of choice--has been banned by the Montreal Protocol. We have enhanced our previously established thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method by integrating a second gas chromatographic dimension and a flame photometric detector to allow the simultaneous detection of phosphine and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), providing a novel application. A thermal desorption system is coupled to a two dimensional gas chromatograph using both mass spectrometric and flame photometric detection (TD-2D-GC-MS/FPD). Additionally, the collection of mass spectrometric SIM and Scan data has been synchronised, so only a single analysis is now sufficient for qualitative scanning of the whole sample and for sensitive quantification. Though detection limits for the herewith described method are slightly higher than in the previous method, they are in the low μL m(-3) range, which is not only below the respective occupational exposure and intervention limits but also allows the detection of residual contamination after ventilation. The method was developed for the separation and identification of 44 volatile substances. For 12 of these compounds (bromomethane, iodomethane, dichloromethane, 1,2-dichlorethane, benzene, tetrachloromethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, toluene, trichloronitromethane, ethyl benzene, phosphine, carbon disulfide) the method was validated as we chose the target compounds due to their relevance in freight container handling. PMID:21084090

  10. Multiplex gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Jose R.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the multiplex gas chromatography (GC) technique, which is a possible candidate for chemical analysis of planetary atmospheres, are discussed. Particular attention is given to the chemical modulators developed by present investigators for multiplex GC, namely, the thermal-desorption, thermal-decomposition, and catalytic modulators, as well as to mechanical modulators. The basic technique of multiplex GC using chemical modulators and a mechanical modulator is demonstrated. It is shown that, with the chemical modulators, only one gas stream consisting of the carrier in combination with the components is being analyzed, resulting in a simplified instrument that requires relatively few consumables. The mechanical modulator demonstrated a direct application of multiplex GC for the analysis of gases in atmosphere of Titan at very low pressures.

  11. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyaev, Yurii V.; Chertova, Nadezhda V.; Psakhie, Sergei G.

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  12. Unitary quantum lattice gas representation of 2D quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Soe, Min

    2011-05-01

    Quantum vortex structures and energy cascades are examined for two dimensional quantum turbulence (2D QT) using a special unitary evolution algorithm. The qubit lattice gas (QLG) algorithm, is employed to simulate the weakly-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) governed by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation. A parameter regime is uncovered in which, as in 3D QT, there is a very short Poincare recurrence time. This short recurrence time is destroyed as the nonlinear interaction energy is increased. Energy cascades for 2D QT are considered to examine whether 2D QT exhibits the inverse cascades of 2D classical turbulence. In the parameter regime considered, the spectra analysis reveals no such dual cascades---dual cascades being a hallmark of 2D classical turbulence.

  13. Thermal modulation for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselbrink, Ernest F. (Inventor); Libardoni, Mark (Inventor); Stewart, Kristine (Inventor); Waite, J. Hunter (Inventor); Block, Bruce P. (Inventor); Sacks, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal modulator device for gas chromatography and associated methods. The thermal modulator device includes a recirculating fluid cooling member, an electrically conductive capillary in direct thermal contact with the cooling member, and a power supply electrically coupled to the capillary and operable for controlled resistive heating of the capillary. The capillary can include more than one separate thermally modulated sections.

  14. Thermal modulation for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselbrink, Ernest F. (Inventor); Libardoni, Mark (Inventor); Stewart, Kristine (Inventor); Waite, J. Hunter (Inventor); Block, Bruce P. (Inventor); Sacks, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal modulator device for gas chromatography and associated methods. The thermal modulator device includes a cooling member, an electrically conductive capillary in direct thermal contact with the cooling member, and a power supply electrically coupled to the capillary and operable for controlled resistive heating of the capillary.

  15. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis D.; Blair, Dianna S.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  16. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

    1999-07-13

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

  17. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  18. 2-D stationary gas dynamics in a barred galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.

    2015-06-01

    A code for solving the 2-D isothermal Euler equations of gas dynamics in a rotating disc is presented. The gravitational potential represents a weak bar and controls the flow. A damped Newton method solves the second-order upwind discretisation of the equations for a steady-state solution, using a consistent linearisation and a direct solver. Successive grid refinement, starting from a finite-volume grid with 8 by 8 cells, is applied to find solutions on subsequently finer meshes. On coarser meshes, a first-order spatial discretisation is used. The method obtains quadratic convergence once the solution approaches the steady state. The initial search is quick with the first-order scheme and slower with the second-order discretisation, up to 256 by 256 cells. Beyond, with 512 by 512 cells, the number of iterations becomes too large to be of practical use. Potential causes are discussed. The code can be applied as a tool for generating flow models if used on not too fine meshes.

  19. The 2-D Ion Chromatography Development and Application: Determination of Sulfate in Formation Water at Pre-Salt Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonietto, G. B.; Godoy, J. M.; Almeida, A. C.; Mendes, D.; Soluri, D.; Leite, R. S.; Chalom, M. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Formation water is the naturally-occurring water which is contained within the geological formation itself. The quantity and quality of the formation water can both be problematic. Over time, the water volume should decrease as the gas volumes increase. Formation water has been found to contain high levels of Cl, As, Fe, Ba, Mn, PAHs and may even contain naturally occurring radioactive materials. Chlorides in some cases have been found to be in excess of four-five times the level of concentrations found in the ocean. Within the management of well operation, there is sulfate between the analytes of greatest importance due to the potential for hydrogen sulphide formation and consequent corrosion of pipelines. As the concentration of sulfate in these waters can be less than n times that of chloride, a quantitative determination, using the technique of ion chromatography, constitutes an analytical challenge. This work aimed to develop and validate a method for the determination of sulphate ions in hyper-saline waters coming from the oil wells of the pre-salt, using 2D IC. In 2D IC the first column can be understood as a separating column, in which the species with retention times outside a preset range are discarded, while those belonging to this range are retained in a pre-concentrator column to further injecting a second column, the second dimension in which occurs the separation and quantification of the analytes of interest. As the chloride ions have a retention time lower than that of sulfate, a method was developed a for determining sulfate in very low range (mg L-1) by 2D IC, applicable to hypersaline waters, wherein the first dimension is used to the elimination of the matrix, ie, chloride ions, and the second dimension utilized in determining sulfate. For sulphate in a concentration range from 1.00 mg L-1 was obtained an accuracy of 1.0%. The accuracy of the method was tested by the standard addition method different samples of formation water in the pre

  20. Multielement detector for gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

    1988-11-01

    This report describes the results of a study to improve the capabilities of a gas chromatography-microwave-induced plasma (GC- MIP) detector system, determine the feasibility of empirical formula determination for simple mixtures containing elements of interest to fossil fuel analysis and, subsequently, explore applications for analysis of the complex mixtures associated with fossil fuels. The results of this study indicate that the GC-MIP system is useful as a specific-element detector that provides excellent elemental specificity for a number of elements of interest to the analysis of fossil fuels. It has reasonably good sensitivity for carbon, hydrogen, sulfur, and nickel, and better sensitivity for chlorine and fluorine. Sensitivity is poor for nitrogen and oxygen, however, probably because of undetected leaks or erosion of the plasma tube. The GC-MIP can also provide stoichiometric information about components of simple mixtures. If this powerful technique is to be available for complex mixtures, it will be necessary to greatly simplify the chromatograms by chemical fractionation. 38 refs., 46 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. PMID:25757823

  2. Crossover from 2D to 3D in a Weakly Interacting Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dyke, P.; Kuhnle, E. D.; Hu, H.; Mark, M.; Hoinka, S.; Lingham, M.; Hannaford, P.; Vale, C. J.; Whitlock, S.

    2011-03-11

    We have studied the transition from two to three dimensions in a low temperature weakly interacting {sup 6}Li Fermi gas. Below a critical atom number N{sub 2D} only the lowest transverse vibrational state of a highly anisotropic oblate trapping potential is occupied and the gas is two dimensional. Above N{sub 2D} the Fermi gas enters the quasi-2D regime where shell structure associated with the filling of individual transverse oscillator states is apparent. This dimensional crossover is demonstrated through measurements of the cloud size and aspect ratio versus atom number.

  3. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  4. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  5. Soil moisture by extraction and gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merek, E. L.; Carle, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    To determine moisture content of soils rapidly and conveniently extract moisture with methanol and determine water content of methanol extract by gas chromatography. Moisture content of sample is calculated from weight of water and methanol in aliquot and weight of methanol added to sample.

  6. APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY IN FOOD ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas chromatography (GC) is used widely in applications involving food analysis. Typical applications pertain to the quantitative and/or qualitative analysis of food composition, natural products, food additives, flavor and aroma components, a variety of transformation products, and contaminants suc...

  7. Non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Patrick R.; Wheeler, David R.

    2007-09-25

    A non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column comprises a planar substrate having a plurality of through holes, a top lid and a bottom lid bonded to opposite surfaces of the planar substrate, and inlet and outlet ports for injection of a sample gas and elution of separated analytes. A plurality of such planar substrates can be aligned and stacked to provide a longer column length having a small footprint. Furthermore, two or more separate channels can enable multi-channel or multi-dimensional gas chromatography. The through holes preferably have a circular cross section and can be coated with a stationary phase material or packed with a porous packing material. Importantly, uniform stationary phase coatings can be obtained and band broadening can be minimized with the circular channels. A heating or cooling element can be disposed on at least one of the lids to enable temperature programming of the column.

  8. Flow field thermal gradient gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boeker, Peter; Leppert, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Negative temperature gradients along the gas chromatographic separation column can maximize the separation capabilities for gas chromatography by peak focusing and also lead to lower elution temperatures. Unfortunately, so far a smooth thermal gradient over a several meters long separation column could only be realized by costly and complicated manual setups. Here we describe a simple, yet flexible method for the generation of negative thermal gradients using standard and easily exchangeable separation columns. The measurements made with a first prototype reveal promising new properties of the optimized separation process. The negative thermal gradient and the superposition of temperature programming result in a quasi-parallel separation of components each moving simultaneously near their lowered specific equilibrium temperatures through the column. Therefore, this gradient separation process is better suited for thermally labile molecules such as explosives and natural or aroma components. High-temperature GC methods also benefit from reduced elution temperatures. Even for short columns very high peak capacities can be obtained. In addition, the gradient separation is particularly beneficial for very fast separations below 1 min overall retention time. Very fast measurements of explosives prove the benefits of using negative thermal gradients. The new concept can greatly reduce the cycle time of high-resolution gas chromatography and can be integrated into hyphenated or comprehensive gas chromatography setups. PMID:26235451

  9. Finite Temperature Response of a 2D Dipolar Bose Gas at Different Dipolar Tilt Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Pengtao; Quader, Khandker

    We calculate finite temperature (T) response of a 2D Bose gas, subject to dipolar interaction, within the random phase approximation (RPA). We evaluate the appropriate 2D finite-T pair bubble diagram needed in RPA, and explore ranges of density and temperature for various dipolar tilt angles. We find the system to exhibit a collapse transition and a finite momentum instability, signaling a density wave or striped phase. We construct phase diagrams depicting these instabilities and resulting phases, including a normal Bose gas phase. We also consider the finite-T response of a quasi-2D dipolar Bose gas. We discuss how our results may apply to ultracold dense Bose gas of polar molecules, such as 41K87Rb, that has been realized experimentally. Acknowledge partial support from Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter (ICAM).

  10. Improved Thermal Modulator for Gas Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselbrink, Ernest Frederick, Jr.; Hunt, Patrick J.; Sacks, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    An improved thermal modulator has been invented for use in a variant of gas chromatography (GC). The variant in question denoted as two-dimensional gas chromatography (2DGC) or GC-GC involves the use of three series-connected chromatographic columns, in the form of capillary tubes coated interiorly with suitable stationary phases (compounds for which different analytes exhibit different degrees of affinity). The two end columns are relatively long and are used as standard GC columns. The thermal modulator includes the middle column, which is relatively short and is not used as a standard GC column: instead, its temperature is modulated to affect timed adsorption and desorption of analyte gases between the two end columns in accordance with a 2DGC protocol.

  11. High pH reversed-phase chromatography with fraction concatenation for 2D proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Orthogonal high-resolution separations are critical for attaining improved analytical dynamic ranges of proteome measurements. Concatenated high pH reversed phase liquid chromatography affords better separations than the strong cation exchange conventionally applied for two-dimensional shotgun proteomic analysis. For example, concatenated high pH reversed phase liquid chromatography increased identification coverage for peptides (e.g., by 1.8-fold) and proteins (e.g., by 1.6-fold) in shotgun proteomics analyses of a digested human protein sample. Additional advantages of concatenated high pH RPLC include improved protein sequence coverage, simplified sample processing, and reduced sample losses, making this an attractive first dimension separation strategy for two-dimensional proteomics analyses.

  12. 2D-MoO3 nanosheets for superior gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fangxu; Ren, Xianpei; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Liu, Yucheng; Pang, Liuqing; Jiang, Jiaxing; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2016-04-28

    By taking advantages of both grinding and sonication, an effective exfoliation process is developed to prepare two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxide (MoO3) nanosheets. The approach avoids high-boiling-point solvents that would leave a residue and cause aggregation. Gas sensors fabricated using the 2D-MoO3 nanosheets provide a significantly enhanced chemical sensor performance. Compared with the sensors using bulk MoO3, the response of the 2D-MoO3 sensor increases from 7 to 33; the sensor response time is reduced from 27 to 21 seconds, and the recovery time is shortened from 26 to 10 seconds. We attribute the superior performance to the 2D-structure with a much increased surface area and reactive sites. PMID:27053379

  13. Chromatography

    MedlinePlus

    Chromatography is a way of separating two or more chemical compounds. Chemical compounds are chemicals that are ... of chemical compound. There are different kinds of chromatography. These include gas, high pressure liquid, or ion ...

  14. 2D-MoO3 nanosheets for superior gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Fangxu; Ren, Xianpei; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Liu, Yucheng; Pang, Liuqing; Jiang, Jiaxing; Liu, Shengzhong (Frank)

    2016-04-01

    By taking advantages of both grinding and sonication, an effective exfoliation process is developed to prepare two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxide (MoO3) nanosheets. The approach avoids high-boiling-point solvents that would leave a residue and cause aggregation. Gas sensors fabricated using the 2D-MoO3 nanosheets provide a significantly enhanced chemical sensor performance. Compared with the sensors using bulk MoO3, the response of the 2D-MoO3 sensor increases from 7 to 33; the sensor response time is reduced from 27 to 21 seconds, and the recovery time is shortened from 26 to 10 seconds. We attribute the superior performance to the 2D-structure with a much increased surface area and reactive sites.By taking advantages of both grinding and sonication, an effective exfoliation process is developed to prepare two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxide (MoO3) nanosheets. The approach avoids high-boiling-point solvents that would leave a residue and cause aggregation. Gas sensors fabricated using the 2D-MoO3 nanosheets provide a significantly enhanced chemical sensor performance. Compared with the sensors using bulk MoO3, the response of the 2D-MoO3 sensor increases from 7 to 33; the sensor response time is reduced from 27 to 21 seconds, and the recovery time is shortened from 26 to 10 seconds. We attribute the superior performance to the 2D-structure with a much increased surface area and reactive sites. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00880a

  15. 2 D patterns of soil gas diffusivity , soil respiration, and methane oxidation in a soil profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    The apparent gas diffusion coefficient in soil (DS) is an important parameter describing soil aeration, which makes it a key parameter for root growth and gas production and consumption. Horizontal homogeneity in soil profiles is assumed in most studies for soil properties - including DS. This assumption, however, is not valid, even in apparently homogeneous soils, as we know from studies using destructive sampling methods. Using destructive methods may allow catching a glimpse, but a large uncertainty remains, since locations between the sampling positions cannot be analyzed, and measurements cannot be repeated. We developed a new method to determine in situ the apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient in order to examine 2 D pattern of DS and methane oxidation in a soil profile. Different tracer gases (SF6, CF4, C2H6) were injected continuously into the subsoil and measured at several locations in the soil profile. These data allow for modelling inversely the 2 D patterns of DS using Finite Element Modeling. The 2D DS patterns were then combined with naturally occurring CH4 and CO2 concentrations sampled at the same locations to derive the 2D pattern of soil respiration and methane oxidation in the soil profile. We show that methane oxidation and soil respiration zones shift within the soil profile while the gas fluxes at the surface remain rather stable during a the 3 week campaign.

  16. HDT mixtures treatment strategies by gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Laquerbe, C.; Contreras, S.; Demoment, J.

    2008-07-15

    Gas phase chromatographic processes are of interest for the separation of hydrogen isotopes from an HDT mixture. For a certain quantity, they are very competitive and present several benefits. Nevertheless no active packing material allows to have simultaneously good enrichment performances for tritium production and high decontamination capabilities for HD gases. The influence of the packing material is first described in this article. Then two specific processes (TCAP and Reverse Chromatography), each well adapted to perform one target, are presented. Finally, the problematic to propose an optimized treatment scheme associating these two processes is formulated. (authors)

  17. Permanent gas analysis using gas chromatography with vacuum ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Smuts, Jonathan; Walsh, Phillip; Fan, Hui; Hildenbrand, Zacariah; Wong, Derek; Wetz, David; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of complex mixtures of permanent gases consisting of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, inert gases, and toxic species plays an increasingly important role in today's economy. A new gas chromatography detector based on vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectroscopy (GC-VUV), which simultaneously collects full scan (115-240 nm) VUV and UV absorption of eluting analytes, was applied to analyze mixtures of permanent gases. Sample mixtures ranged from off-gassing of decomposing Li-ion and Li-metal batteries to natural gas samples and water samples taken from private wells in close proximity to unconventional natural gas extraction. Gas chromatography separations were performed with a porous layer open tubular column. Components such as C1-C5 linear and branched hydrocarbons, water, oxygen, and nitrogen were separated and detected in natural gas and the headspace of natural gas-contaminated water samples. Of interest for the transport of lithium batteries were the detection of flammable and toxic gases, such as methane, ethylene, chloromethane, dimethyl ether, 1,3-butadiene, CS2, and methylproprionate, among others. Featured is the capability for deconvolution of co-eluting signals from different analytes. PMID:25724098

  18. Axial thermal gradients in microchip gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anzi; Hynynen, Sampo; Hawkins, Aaron R; Tolley, Samuel E; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Milton L

    2014-12-29

    Fabrication technologies for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) allow miniaturization of conventional benchtop gas chromatography (GC) to portable, palm-sized microfabricated GC (μGC) devices, which are suitable for on-site chemical analysis and remote sensing. The separation performance of μGC systems, however, has not been on par with conventional GC. Column efficiency, peak symmetry and resolution are often compromised by column defects and non-ideal injections. The relatively low performance of μGC devices has impeded their further commercialization and broader application. In this work, the separation performance of μGC columns was improved by incorporating thermal gradient gas chromatography (TGGC). The analysis time was ∼20% shorter for TGGC separations compared to conventional temperature-programmed GC (TPGC) when a wide sample band was introduced into the column. Up to 50% reduction in peak tailing was observed for polar analytes, which improved their resolution. The signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) of late-eluting peaks were increased by 3-4 fold. The unique focusing effect of TGGC overcomes many of the previous shortcomings inherent in μGC analyses. PMID:25476685

  19. An Inexpensive Detector for Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Allan L.; Thorne, Edward J.; Nadler, Wolfgang

    1998-09-01

    We have developed a low-cost (parts cost approximately $70) detector that can be used in a freshman level class to demonstrate the fundamental principles of gas chromatography (GC). The detector box can be used in a modification of experiments available in the literature which do not enable a quantitative method of analysis. We have used it with success in a freshman class of approximately 450 students in an experiment to separate chlorinated hydrocarbons via GC. Natural gas is used as the carrier gas, a commercial GC column packing is the separating medium, and a Beilstein detector generates a green flame when the halocarbon is burned as it exits the column. The detector box is equipped with a CdS detector selective for the green light emitted and gives a signal that is quantitatively measured by an appropriate means such as a strip chart recorder or computer interfaced terminal panel. The detector box has a limit of detection on the order of 0.5 to 5 mg and shows a linear response over a sixfold change in concentration. Very small volumes (only about 0.1 ml) of most halocarbon vapors are necessary to achieve a measurable signal.

  20. Analysis assessment expert system for gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, J.W.; Roberts, R.S.; Lahiri, S.

    1995-12-01

    An artificial intelligence based analysis assessment system is presented to automate gas chromatography instrument troubleshooting. This system is capable of recognizing symptoms of common problems with GC analysis, reasoning with the symptoms to make a problem diagnosis, and suggest appropriate solutions. In this system, signal processing techniques are used to search for symptoms of problems in the time-series data. For example, peak shapes are analyzed for fronting and tailing and the baseline is analyzed for drift and the presence of electronic spikes. A measurement of the severity of each symptom is then used by the expert system to diagnose potential problems with the analysis. This system will be integrated with the instrument control and laboratory automation that is necessary to effect the recommended solutions when possible. The result will be a more robust instrument capable of recognizing failures and error modes from the sample data and capable of correcting many of the common failures.

  1. Kinetic plots for programmed temperature gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jespers, Sander; Roeleveld, Kevin; Lynen, Frederic; Broeckhoven, Ken; Desmet, Gert

    2016-06-10

    The applicability of the kinetic plot theory to temperature-programmed gas chromatography (GC) has been confirmed experimentally by measuring the efficiency of a temperature gradient separation of a simple test mixture on 15, 30, 60 and 120m long (coupled) columns. It has been shown that the temperature-dependent data needed for the kinetic plot calculation can be obtained from isothermal experiments at the significant temperature, a temperature that characterizes the entire gradient run. Furthermore, optimal flow rates have been calculated for various combinations of column length, diameter, and operating temperature (or significant temperature). The tabulated outcome of these calculations provide good starting points for the optimization of any GC separation. PMID:27179678

  2. Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sylwester, Alan P.

    2007-01-02

    The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

  3. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S; Bakr, Waseem S

    2016-08-26

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions. PMID:27610853

  4. Applications of resistive heating in gas chromatography: a review.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Matthew R; Hilder, Emily F; Shellie, Robert A

    2013-11-25

    Gas chromatography is widely applied to separate, identify, and quantify components of samples in a timely manner. Increasing demand for analytical throughput, instrument portability, environmental sustainability, and more economical analysis necessitates the development of new gas chromatography instrumentation. The applications of resistive column heating technologies have been espoused for nearly thirty years and resistively heated gas chromatography has been commercially available for the last ten years. Despite this lengthy period of existence, resistively heated gas chromatography has not been universally adopted. This low rate of adoption may be partially ascribed to the saturation of the market with older convection oven technology, coupled with other analytical challenges such as sampling, injection, detection and data processing occupying research. This article assesses the advantages and applications of resistive heating in gas chromatography and discusses practical considerations associated with adoption of this technology. PMID:24216193

  5. Local Probing of Phase Coherence in a Strongly Interacting 2D Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luick, Niclas; Siegl, Jonas; Hueck, Klaus; Morgener, Kai; Lompe, Thomas; Weimer, Wolf; Moritz, Henning

    2016-05-01

    The dimensionality of a quantum system has a profound impact on its coherence and superfluid properties. In 3D superfluids, bosonic atoms or Cooper pairs condense into a macroscopic wave function exhibiting long-range phase coherence. Meanwhile, 2D superfluids show a strikingly different behavior: True long-range coherence is precluded by thermal fluctuations, nevertheless Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory predicts that 2D systems can still become superfluid. The superfluid state is characterized by an algebraic decay of phase correlations g1(r) ~r - τ / 4 , where the decay exponent τ is directly related to the superfluid density ns according to τ = 4 /(nsλdB2) . I will present local coherence measurements in a strongly interacting 2D gas of diatomic 6 Li molecules. A self-interference technique allows us to locally extract the algebraic decay exponent and to reconstruct the superfluid density. We determine the scaling of the decay exponent with phase space density to provide a benchmark for studies of 2D superfluids in the strongly interacting regime.

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet detector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schug, Kevin A; Sawicki, Ian; Carlton, Doug D; Fan, Hui; McNair, Harold M; Nimmo, John P; Kroll, Peter; Smuts, Jonathan; Walsh, Phillip; Harrison, Dale

    2014-08-19

    Analytical performance characteristics of a new vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detector for gas chromatography (GC) are reported. GC-VUV was applied to hydrocarbons, fixed gases, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, fatty acids, pesticides, drugs, and estrogens. Applications were chosen to feature the sensitivity and universal detection capabilities of the VUV detector, especially for cases where mass spectrometry performance has been limited. Virtually all chemical species absorb and have unique gas phase absorption cross sections in the approximately 120-240 nm wavelength range monitored. Spectra are presented, along with the ability to use software for deconvolution of overlapping signals. Some comparisons with experimental synchrotron data and computed theoretical spectra show good agreement, although more work is needed on appropriate computational methods to match the simultaneous broadband electronic and vibronic excitation initiated by the deuterium lamp. Quantitative analysis is governed by Beer-Lambert Law relationships. Mass on-column detection limits reported for representatives of different classes of analytes ranged from 15 (benzene) to 246 pg (water). Linear range measured at peak absorption for benzene was 3-4 orders of magnitude. Importantly, where absorption cross sections are known for analytes, the VUV detector is capable of absolute determination (without calibration) of the number of molecules present in the flow cell in the absence of chemical interferences. This study sets the stage for application of GC-VUV technology across a wide breadth of research areas. PMID:25079505

  7. Microphase formation at a 2D solid-gas phase transition.

    PubMed

    Schuman, Adam W; Bsaibes, Thomas S; Schlossman, Mark L

    2014-10-01

    Density modulated micro-separated phases (microphases) occur at 2D liquid interfaces in the form of alternating regions of high and low density domains. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images demonstrate the existence of microphases in cluster, stripe, and mosaic morphologies at the buried interface between hexane and water with fluoro-alkanol surfactant dissolved in the bulk hexane. At high temperature, the surfactant assembles at the interface in a 2D gaseous state. As the system is cooled additional surfactants condense onto the interface, which undergoes a 2D gas-solid phase transition. Microphase structure is observed within a few degrees of this transition in the form of clusters and labyrinthine stripes. Microphases have been observed previously in a number of other systems; nevertheless, we demonstrate that adsorption transitions at the liquid-liquid interface provide a convenient way to observe a full sequence of temperature-dependent 2D phases, from gas to cluster to stripe to mosaic to inverted stripe phases, as well as coexistence between some of these microphases. Cracking and fracture of the clusters reveal that they are a solid microphase. Theories of microphases often predict a single length scale for cluster and stripe phases as a result of the competition between an attractive and a repulsive interaction. Our observation that two characteristic length scales are required to describe clusters whose diameter is much larger than the stripe period, combined with the solid nature of the clusters, suggests that a long-range elastic interaction is relevant. These results complement earlier X-ray measurements on the same system. PMID:25088351

  8. NOVEL CONTINUOUS PH/SALT GRADIENT AND PEPTIDE SCORE FOR STRONG CATION EXCHANGE CHROMATOGRAPHY IN 2D-NANO-LC/MSMS PEPTIDE IDENTIFICATION FOR PROTEOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tryptic digests of human serum albumin (HSA) and human lung epithelial cell lysates were used as test samples in a novel proteomics study. Peptides were separated and analyzed using 2D-nano-LC/MSMS with strong cation exchange (SCX) and reverse phase (RP) chromatography and contin...

  9. Laser Absorption spectrometer instrument for tomographic 2D-measurement of climate gas emission from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    One of the most intricate effects in climate modelling is the role of permafrost thawing during the global warming process. Soil that has formerly never totally lost its ice cover now emits climate gases due to melting processes[1]. For a better prediction of climate development and possible feedback mechanisms, insights into physical procedures (like e.g. gas emission from underground reservoirs) are required[2]. Therefore, a long-term quantification of greenhouse gas concentrations (and further on fluxes) is necessary and the related structures that are responsible for emission need to be identified. In particular the spatial heterogeneity of soils caused by soil internal structures (e.g. soil composition changes or surface cracks) or by surface modifications (e.g. by plant growth) generate considerable complexities and difficulties for local measurements, for example with soil chambers. For such situations, which often cannot be avoided, a spatially resolved 2D-measurement to identify and quantify the gas emission from the structured soil would be needed, to better understand the influence of the soil sub-structures on the emission behavior. Thus we designed a spatially scanning laser absorption spectrometer setup to determine a 2D-gas concentration map in the soil-air boundary layer. The setup is designed to cover the surfaces in the range of square meters in a horizontal plane above the soil to be investigated. Existing field instruments for gas concentration or flux measurements are based on point-wise measurements, so structure identification is very tedious or even impossible. For this reason, we have developed a tomographic in-situ instrument based on TDLAS ('tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy') that delivers absolute gas concentration distributions of areas with 0.8m × 0.8m size, without any need for reference measurements with a calibration gas. It is a simple and robust device based on a combination of scanning mirrors and reflecting foils, so

  10. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    PubMed

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies. PMID:18695295

  11. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seravalli, E.; de Boer, M.; Geurink, F.; Huizenga, J.; Kreuger, R.; Schippers, J. M.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Voss, B.

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  12. Observation of 2D Ising criticality of liquid-gas transition by the flowgram method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmolinsky, Max; Kuklov, Anatoly

    We study the critical properties of the transition in 2D liquid-gas system with the square-well potential interaction by Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. Due to lack of the underlying Ising symmetry, the analysis cannot be done reliably by the standard methods applicable to lattice systems. In contrast, the analysis based on the flowgram method allowed us to find the critical point to significantly higher (and controllable) accuracy than in previous studies by other authors. Simulations were performed in a progression of sizes L up to size L = 84 , with the particle numbers varying over 3 orders of magnitude and the subcritical behavior not extending beyond L = 10 - 15 . The finite size scaling analysis of the critical exponents and their ratio, μ and γ / ν , gives values consistent with the 2D Ising universality class within 1-2% of errors. Our result essentially closes proposals that the nature of the liquid-gas transition might be different from the Ising model in systems with short-range interactions. This work was supported by the NSF Grant PHY1314469.

  13. Thermal Independent Modulator for Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Luong, Jim; Guan, Xiaosheng; Xu, Shifen; Gras, Ronda; Shellie, Robert A

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a modulation strategy for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) with complete thermal independence between the cooling and heating stages and without the need for GC oven heat for remobilization. Based on this approach, a compact thermal independent modulator (TiM) with thermoelectric cooling and micathermic heating has been successfully innovated for use in GC×GC. The device operates externally to a gas chromatograph, does not require liquid cryogen, and has minimal consumables requirements. The augmentation of an additional gas flow stream results in a number of critical chromatographic parameter improvements such as the decoupling of flows of first- and second-dimension columns to attain both efficiency and speed optimized flow in each dimension, the potential for independent retention time locking or scaling in either dimension, the improvement of modulator reinjection efficiency, as well as facilitating back-flushing for the first dimension to enhance system cleanliness and throughput. TiM was found to be useful for chromatographic applications over a volatility range equivalent to nC6 to nC24 under conditions used. Repeatability of retention time for model compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylenes were found to be quite satisfactory with relative standard deviations of less than 0.009% in (1)D and less than 0.008% in (2)D (n = 10). Typical peak widths of 120 ms or less with a relative standard deviation of less than 4.7% were achieved for the aromatic model compounds. In this article, the performance of the modulator is demonstrated and a series of challenging chromatographic applications are presented to illustrate usefulness of the apparatus. PMID:27537206

  14. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography/atomic emission detector (GC/AED) system has been evaluated for its applicability to environmental analysis. Detection limits, elemental response factors, and regression analysis data were determined for 58 semivolatile environmental contaminants. Detection l...

  16. PRACTICAL FAST GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR CONTRACT LABORATORY PROGRAM PESTICIDE ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approach to shortening the analysis time for practical fast gas chromatography (GC) by using Method Translator software, which can be downloaded free from the Internet, is presented. This sofware simplifies the process of optimizing temperature programming while changing colu...

  17. Solid surface mapping by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M C; Osuna, S; Baráibar, I

    2005-09-16

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution, is a technique for characterising solid surfaces. Current practice is the injection of n-alkane homologous series to obtain the free energy of adsorption of the CH2 group, from which the London component of the solid surface free energy, gamma(d)s, is calculated. A value around 40 mJ/m2 is obtained for poly(ethylene), and 30 mJ/m2 for a clean glass fibre, while the potential surface interactivity of a glass fibre is far greater than that of poly(ethylene). A specific component of the surface, in mJ/m2, should be calculated in order to obtain significant parameters. As applied up to date, when calculating the specific component of the surface energy, the fact that W(sp)a energy values are in a totally different scale than AN or DN values is a major drawback. Consequently, Ka and Kb values obtained are in arbitrary energy units, different from those of the London component measured by injecting the n-alkane series. This paper proposes a method to obtain Ka and Kb values of the surface in the same energetic scale than the London component. The method enables us to correct the traditional London component of a solid, obtaining a new value, where the amount of WaCH2 accounting for Debye interactions with polar sites, is excluded. As a result, an approach to surface mapping is performed in several different substrate materials. We show results obtained on different solid surfaces: poly(ethylene), clean glass fibre, glass beads, chemically modified glass beads and carbon fibre. PMID:16130707

  18. Dynamical symmetry breaking in a 2D electron gas with a spectral node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    We study a disordered 2D electron gas with a spectral node in a vicinity of the node. After identifying the fundamental dynamical symmetries of this system, the spontaneous breaking of the latter by a Grassmann field is studied within a nonlinear sigma model approach. This allows us to reduce the average two-particle Green's function to a diffusion propagator with a random diffusion coefficient. The latter has non-degenerate saddle points and is treated by the conventional self-consistent Born approximation. This leads to a renormalized chemical potential and a renormalized diffusion coefficient, where the DC conductivity increases linearly with the density of quasiparticles. Applied to the special case of Dirac fermions, our approach provides a comprehensive description of the minimal conductivity at the Dirac node as well as for the V-shape conductivity inside the bands.

  19. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo–Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near {{e}2}/π h .

  20. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near [Formula: see text]. PMID:27270084

  1. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  2. Metal Decoration Effects on the Gas-Sensing Properties of 2D Hybrid-Structures on Flexible Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byungjin; Yoon, Jongwon; Lim, Sung Kwan; Kim, Ah Ra; Choi, Sun-Young; Kim, Dong-Ho; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Hahm, Myung Gwan

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of metal decoration on the gas-sensing properties of a device with two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) flake channels and graphene electrodes. The 2D hybrid-structure device sensitively detected NO2 gas molecules (>1.2 ppm) as well as NH3 (>10 ppm). Metal nanoparticles (NPs) could tune the electronic properties of the 2D graphene/MoS2 device, increasing sensitivity to a specific gas molecule. For instance, palladium NPs accumulate hole carriers of graphene/MoS2, electronically sensitizing NH3 gas molecules. Contrarily, aluminum NPs deplete hole carriers, enhancing NO2 sensitivity. The synergistic combination of metal NPs and 2D hybrid layers could be also applied to a flexible gas sensor. There was no serious degradation in the sensing performance of metal-decorated MoS2 flexible devices before/after 5000 bending cycles. Thus, highly sensitive and endurable gas sensor could be achieved through the metal-decorated 2D hybrid-structure, offering a useful route to wearable electronic sensing platforms. PMID:26404279

  3. Less common applications of monoliths III. Gas chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Svec, Frantisek; Kurganov, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Porous polymer monoliths emerged about two decades ago. Despite this short time, they are finding applications in a variety of fields. In addition to the most common and certainly best known use of this new category of porous media as stationary phases in liquid chromatography, monolithic materials also found their applications in other areas. This review article focuses on monoliths in capillaries designed for separations in gas chromatography. PMID:17645884

  4. Continuum in MDGC Technology: From Classical Multidimensional to Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kulsing, Chadin; Nolvachai, Yada; Rawson, Paul; Evans, David J; Marriott, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in multidimensional gas chromatography (MDGC) comprise methods such as multiple heart-cut (H/C) analysis and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC); however, clear approaches to evaluate the MDGC results, choice of the most appropriate method, and optimized separation remain of concern. In order to track the capability of these analytical techniques and select an effective experimental approach, a fundamental approach was developed utilizing a time summation model incorporating temperature-dependent linear solvation energy relationship (LSER). The approach allows prediction of optimized analyte distribution in the 2D space for various MDGC approaches employing different experimental variables such as column lengths, temperature programs, and stationary phase combinations in order to evaluate separation performance (apparent (1)D, (2)D, total number of separated peaks, and orthogonality) for simulated MDGC results. The methodology applied LSER to generate results for nonpolar-polar and polar-nonpolar 2D column configurations for separation of 678 compounds in an oxidized kerosene-based jet fuel sample. Three-dimensional plots were generated in order to illustrate the dependency of separation performance on (2)D column length and number of injections for different stationary phase combinations. With a given limit of analysis time, a MDGC approach to obtain an optimized total separated peak number for a particular column set was proposed depending on (1)D and (2)D analyte peak distribution. This study introduces fundamental concepts and establishes approaches to design effective GC × GC or multiple H/C systems for different column combinations, to provide the best overall separation outcomes with the highest separated peak number and/or orthogonality. PMID:26973019

  5. Intracellular ROS mediates gas plasma-facilitated cellular transfection in 2D and 3D cultures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dehui; Wang, Biqing; Xu, Yujing; Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qinjie; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a versatile tool for delivering oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Compared to lipofection and electroporation methods, plasma transfection showed a better uptake efficiency and less cell death in the transfection of oligonucleotides. We demonstrated that the level of extracellular aqueous reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gas plasma is correlated with the uptake efficiency and that this is achieved through an increase of intracellular ROS levels and the resulting increase in cell membrane permeability. This finding was supported by the use of ROS scavengers, which reduced CAP-based uptake efficiency. In addition, we found that cold atmospheric plasma could transfer oligonucleotides such as siRNA and miRNA into cells even in 3D cultures, thus suggesting the potential for unique applications of CAP beyond those provided by standard transfection techniques. Together, our results suggest that cold plasma might provide an efficient technique for the delivery of siRNA and miRNA in 2D and 3D culture models. PMID:27296089

  6. Intracellular ROS mediates gas plasma-facilitated cellular transfection in 2D and 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Wang, Biqing; Xu, Yujing; Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qinjie; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a versatile tool for delivering oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Compared to lipofection and electroporation methods, plasma transfection showed a better uptake efficiency and less cell death in the transfection of oligonucleotides. We demonstrated that the level of extracellular aqueous reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gas plasma is correlated with the uptake efficiency and that this is achieved through an increase of intracellular ROS levels and the resulting increase in cell membrane permeability. This finding was supported by the use of ROS scavengers, which reduced CAP-based uptake efficiency. In addition, we found that cold atmospheric plasma could transfer oligonucleotides such as siRNA and miRNA into cells even in 3D cultures, thus suggesting the potential for unique applications of CAP beyond those provided by standard transfection techniques. Together, our results suggest that cold plasma might provide an efficient technique for the delivery of siRNA and miRNA in 2D and 3D culture models. PMID:27296089

  7. Rise characteristics of gas bubbles in a 2D rectangular column: VOF simulations vs experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, R.; Baten, J.M. van

    1999-10-01

    About five centuries ago, Leonardo da Vinci described the sinuous motion of gas bubbles rising in water. The authors have attempted to simulate the rise trajectories of bubbles of 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 20 mm in diameter rising in a 2D rectangular column filled with water. The simulations were carried out using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique developed by Hirt and Nichols (J. Computational Physics, 39, 201--225 (1981)). To solve the Navier-Stokes equations of motion the authors used a commercial solver, CFX 4.1c of AEA Technology, UK. They developed their own bubble-tracking algorithm to capture sinuous bubble motions. The 4 and 5 mm bubbles show large lateral motions observed by Da Vinci. The 7, 8 and 9 mm bubble behave like jellyfish. The 12 mm bubble flaps its wings like a bird. The extent of lateral motion of the bubbles decreases with increasing bubble size. Bubbles larger than 20 mm in size assume a spherical cap form and simulations of the rise characteristics match experiments exactly. VOF simulations are powerful tools for a priori determination of the morphology and rise characteristics of bubbles rising in a liquid. Bubble-bubble interactions are also properly modeled by the VOF technique.

  8. PROCESS GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY STUDY OF A SELEXOL ACID GAS REMOVAL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of continuous compositional monitoring by process gas chromatography (GC) for three gas streams associated with the Selexol acid gas removal system at the Bi-Gas pilot plant in Homer City, PA. Data were obtained from the inlet and outlet streams of the Se...

  9. Gas chromatography/matrix-isolation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Gerald T.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device provides matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for the spectroscopic analysis of the individual sample bands. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carousel having at least one reflecting surface for holding a sample deposited thereon. A gas inlet is provided for depositing a mixture of sample and matrix material on the reflecting surface which is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. A first parabolic mirror directs an incident beam of electromagnetic radiation, such as in the infrared (IR) spectrum, from a source onto the sample/matrix mixture while a second parabolic mirror directs a second beam of electromagnetic radiation reflected by the specular surface to an IR spectrometer for determining the absorption spectra of the sample material deposited on the reflecting surface. The pair of off-axis parabolic mirrors having a common focal point are positioned outside of the vacuum chamber and may be displaced in combination for improved beam positioning and alignment. The carousel is provided with an aperture for each reflecting surface to facilitate accurate positioning of the incident beam relative to the gas-samples under analysis. Improved gas-sample deposition is insured by the use of a long focal length stereomicroscope positioned outside of the vacuum chamber for monitoring sample formation through a window, while the sample collector is positioned outside of the zone bounded by the incident and reflected electromagnetic beams for improved sample access and monitoring.

  10. A New 2D-Advection-Diffusion Model Simulating Trace Gas Distributions in the Lowermost Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Brunner, D.; Peter, T.; Wirth, V.; Fischer, H.; Hoor, P.

    2004-12-01

    Tracer distributions in the lowermost stratosphere are affected by both, transport (advective and non-advective) and in situ sources and sinks. They influence ozone photochemistry, radiative forcing, and heating budgets. In-situ measurements of long-lived species during eight measurement campaigns revealed relatively simple behavior of the tracers in the lowermost stratosphere when represented in an equivalent-latitude versus potential temperature framework. We here present a new 2D-advection-diffusion model that simulates the main transport pathways influencing the tracer distributions in the lowermost stratosphere. The model includes slow diabatic descent of aged stratospheric air and vertical and/or horizontal diffusion across the tropopause and within the lowermost stratosphere. The diffusion coefficients used in the model represent the combined effects of different processes with the potential of mixing tropospheric air into the lowermost stratosphere such as breaking Rossby and gravity waves, deep convection penetrating the tropopause, turbulent diffusion, radiatively driven upwelling etc. They were specified by matching model simulations to observed distributions of long-lived trace gases such as CO and N2O obtained during the project SPURT. The seasonally conducted campaigns allow us to study the seasonal dependency of the diffusion coefficients. Despite its simplicity the model yields a surprisingly good description of the small scale features of the measurements and in particular of the observed tracer gradients at the tropopause. The correlation coefficients between modeled and measured trace gas distributions were up to 0.95. Moreover, mixing across isentropes appears to be more important than mixing across surfaces of constant equivalent latitude (or PV). With the aid of the model, the distribution of the fraction of tropospheric air in the lowermost stratosphere can be determined.

  11. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal…

  12. IMPROVED FAST GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR FAME ANALYSIS OF BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria are frequently identified by fatty acid analysis. We previously reported on methods to speed up sample preparation and gas chromatography, resulting in greatly improved speed and throughput (Buyer, 2002). In this paper we demonstrate that further reductions in chromatographic retention time...

  13. Optimization of strawberry volatile sampling by direct gas chromatography olfactometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this work was to choose a suitable sampling headspace technique to study ‘Festival’ aroma, the main strawberry cultivar grown in Florida. For that, the aromatic quality of extracts from different headspace techniques was evaluated using direct gas chromatography-olfactometry (D-GC-O), a s...

  14. Enthalpy of Vaporization by Gas Chromatography: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Herbert R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to measure the enthalpy of vaporization of volatile compounds like methylene chloride, carbon tetrachloride, and others by using gas chromatography. This physical property was measured using a very tiny quantity of sample revealing that it is possible to measure the enthalpies of two or more compounds at the same time.

  15. Highly crosslinked silicon polymers for gas chromatography columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A new highly crosslinked silicone polymer particle for gas chromatography application and a process for synthesizing such copolymer are described. The new copolymer comprises vinyltriethoxysilane and octadecyltrichlorosilane. The copolymer has a high degree of crosslinking and a cool balance of polar to nonpolar sites in the porous silicon polymer assuring fast separation of compounds of variable polarity.

  16. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  17. An application of gas chromatography to planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V.

    1974-01-01

    A gas chromatography developed for the Viking experiment is described. The instrument is designed to measure gases in planetary atmospheres and head space in a chamber. It is hoped that the chromatograph will also measure any biological activity present in these environments.

  18. Gas chromatography/matrix-isolation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, G.T.

    1986-06-10

    A gas-sample collection device provides matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for the spectroscopic analysis of the individual sample bands. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carousel having at least one reflecting surface for holding a sample deposited thereon. A gas inlet is provided for depositing a mixture of sample and matrix material on the reflecting surface which is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. A first parabolic mirror directs an incident beam of electromagnetic radiation, such as in the infrared (IR) spectrum, from a source onto the sample/matrix mixture while a second parabolic mirror directs a second beam of electromagnetic radiation reflected by the specular surface to an IR spectrometer for determining the absorption spectra of the sample material deposited on the reflecting surface. The pair of off-axis parabolic mirrors having a common focal point are positioned outside of the vacuum chamber and may be displaced in combination for improved beam positioning and alignment. The carousel is provided with an aperture for each reflecting surface to facilitate accurate positioning of the incident beam relative to the gas-samples under analysis. Improved gas-sample deposition is insured by the use of a long focal length stereomicroscope positioned outside of the vacuum chamber for monitoring sample formation through a window, while the sample collector is positioned outside of the zone bounded by the incident and reflected electromagnetic beams for improved sample access and monitoring. 10 figs.

  19. Probing dipole-dipole interaction in a rubidium gas via double-quantum 2D spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Cundiff, Steven T; Li, Hebin

    2016-07-01

    We have implemented double-quantum 2D spectroscopy on a rubidium vapor and shown that this technique provides sensitive and background-free detection of the dipole-dipole interaction. The 2D spectra include signals from both individual atoms and interatomic interactions, allowing quantitative studies of the interaction. A theoretical model based on the optical Bloch equations is used to reproduce the experimental spectrum and confirm the origin of double-quantum signals. PMID:27367074

  20. Quantitative determination of hydrogen in solids by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Addach, H; Berçot, P; Wery, M; Rezrazi, M

    2004-11-19

    Processes such as electroplating or acid cleaning are notorious causes of post-processing failure through hydrogen embrittlement. So, the determination of amounts of hydrogen in metals is of great importance. An analysis method for investigation of H content in solids has been established based on hot extraction and gas chromatography system. Hot extraction in inert gas enables complete and/or partial removal of the hydrogen from the samples. A gas chromatography system is used to determine quantitatively the amount of thermally desorbed hydrogen. An investigation of the baking operating conditions is made of the hydrogen desorption rate of zinc-plated steel parts. Then, an analysis of the polarisation conditions upon chromium electroplating is given. PMID:15584242

  1. Multiplex gas chromatography for use in space craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Gas chromatography is a powerful technique for the analysis of gaseous mixtures. Some limitations in this technique still exist which can be alleviated with multiplex gas chromatography (MGC). In MGC, rapid multiple sample injections are made into the column without having to wait for one determination to be finished before taking a new sample. The resulting data must then be reduced using computational methods such as cross correlation. In order to efficiently perform multiplexgas chromatography, experiments in the laboratory and on board future space craft, skills, equipment, and computer software were developed. Three new techniques for modulating, i.e., changing, sample concentrations were demonstrated by using desorption, decomposition, and catalytic modulators. In all of them, the need for a separate gas stream as the carrier was avoided by placing the modulator at the head of the column to directly modulate a sample stream. Finally, the analysis of an environmental sample by multiplex chromatography was accomplished by employing silver oxide to catalytically modulate methane in ambient air.

  2. Multiple-injection high-throughput gas chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Wes; Wang, Heather; Welch, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Multiple-injection techniques have been shown to be a simple way to perform high-throughput analysis where the entire experiment resides in a single chromatogram, simplifying the data analysis and interpretation. In this study, multiple-injection techniques are applied to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and mass detection to significantly increase sample throughput. The unique issues of implementing a traditional "Fast" injection mode of multiple-injection techniques with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are discussed. Stacked injections are also discussed as means to increase the throughput of longer methods where mass detection is unable to distinguish between analytes of the same mass and longer retentions are required to resolve components of interest. Multiple-injection techniques are shown to increase instrument throughput by up to 70% and to simplify data analysis, allowing hits in multiple parallel experiments to be identified easily. PMID:27292909

  3. The determination of soil moisture by extraction and gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merek, E. L.; Carle, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Soil moisture content was determined by extracting soil with methanol and subsequently analyzing the extract for water by gas chromatography. With air-dried mineral soils, this method gave slightly higher moisture content values than those obtained by the oven-dry method. Moisture content was determined quantitatively in soils to which various amounts of water had been added. The complete procedure, including extraction and analysis, requires less than one hour and gives results that closely compare to the oven-dry method.

  4. Chelate-modified polymers for atmospheric gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, W. W.; Mayer, L. A.; Woeller, F. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Chromatographic materials were developed to serve as the stationary phase of columns used in the separation of atmospheric gases. These materials consist of a crosslinked porous polymer matrix, e.g., a divinylbenzene polymer, into which has been embedded an inorganic complexed ion such as N,N'-ethylene-bis-(acetylacetoniminato)-cobalt (2). Organic nitrogenous bases, such as pyridine, may be incorporated into the chelate polymer complexes to increase their chromatographic utility. With such materials, the process of gas chromatography is greatly simplified, especially in terms of time and quantity of material needed for a gas separation.

  5. Pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of kerogens and kerogen precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Meent, D.; Brown, S. C.; Philp, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of kerogens and kerogen precursors isolated from DSDP samples, oil shales and recent algal mats have been examined by Curie point pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study has shown that the three main types of kerogens (marine, terrestrial and mixtures of both) can be characterized using these techniques. The marine (algal) kerogens yield principally aliphatic products and the terrestrial kerogens yield more aromatic and phenolic products with some n-alkanes and n-alkenes. The yields of n-alkanes and n-alkenes increase and phenols decrease with increasing geologic age, however, pyrolysis-GC cannot be used to characterize the influence of short term diagenesis on the kerogen structure.

  6. Comparison of three lychee cultivar odor profiles using gas chromatography-olfactometry and gas chromatography-sulfur detection.

    PubMed

    Mahattanatawee, Kanjana; Perez-Cacho, Pilar Ruiz; Davenport, Thomas; Rouseff, Russell

    2007-03-01

    Odor volatiles in three major lychee cultivars (Mauritius, Brewster, and Hak Ip) were examined using gas chromatography-olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection. Fifty-nine odor-active compounds were observed including 11 peaks, which were associated with sulfur detector responses. Eight sulfur volatiles were identified as follows: hydrogen sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, diethyl disulfide, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, 2-methyl thiazole, 2,4-dithiopentane, dimethyl trisulfide, and methional. Mauritius contained 25% and Brewster contained 81% as much total sulfur volatiles as Hak Ip. Cultivars were evaluated using eight odor attributes: floral, honey, green/woody, tropical fruit, peach/apricot, citrus, cabbage, and garlic. Major odor differences in cabbage and garlic attributes correlated with cultivar sulfur volatile composition. The 24 odor volatiles common to all three cultivars were acetaldehyde, ethanol, ethyl-3-methylbutanoate, diethyl disulfide, 2-methyl thiazole, 1-octen-3-one, cis-rose oxide, hexanol, dimethyl trisulfide, alpha-thujone, methional, 2-ethyl hexanol, citronellal, (E)-2-nonenal, linalool, octanol, (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal, menthol, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, (E,E)-2,4-nonadienal, beta-damascenone, 2-phenylethanol, beta-ionone, and 4-vinyl-guaiacol. PMID:17266328

  7. Bayesian inversion of marine CSEM data from the Scarborough gas field using a transdimensional 2-D parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Anandaroop; Key, Kerry; Bodin, Thomas; Myer, David; Constable, Steven

    2014-12-01

    We apply a reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo method to sample the Bayesian posterior model probability density function of 2-D seafloor resistivity as constrained by marine controlled source electromagnetic data. This density function of earth models conveys information on which parts of the model space are illuminated by the data. Whereas conventional gradient-based inversion approaches require subjective regularization choices to stabilize this highly non-linear and non-unique inverse problem and provide only a single solution with no model uncertainty information, the method we use entirely avoids model regularization. The result of our approach is an ensemble of models that can be visualized and queried to provide meaningful information about the sensitivity of the data to the subsurface, and the level of resolution of model parameters. We represent models in 2-D using a Voronoi cell parametrization. To make the 2-D problem practical, we use a source-receiver common midpoint approximation with 1-D forward modelling. Our algorithm is transdimensional and self-parametrizing where the number of resistivity cells within a 2-D depth section is variable, as are their positions and geometries. Two synthetic studies demonstrate the algorithm's use in the appraisal of a thin, segmented, resistive reservoir which makes for a challenging exploration target. As a demonstration example, we apply our method to survey data collected over the Scarborough gas field on the Northwest Australian shelf.

  8. Determination of Vinyl Chloride at ug/l. Level in Water by Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellar, Thomas A.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative method for the determination of vinyl chloride in water is presented. Vinyl chloride is transfered to the gas phase by bubbling inert gas through the water. After concentration on silica gel or Carbosieve-B, determination is by gas chromatography. Confirmation of vinyl chloride is by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. (Author/BT)

  9. Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities on chromatography. Directions for preparing leaf pigment extracts using alcohol are given, and paper chromatography and thin-layer chromatography are described as modifications of the basic principles of chromatography. (KHR)

  10. Ultratrace detector for hand-held gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Miller, Fred S.

    1999-01-01

    An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and C0.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

  11. Smart multi-channel two-dimensional micro-gas chromatography for rapid workplace hazardous volatile organic compounds measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Seo, Jung Hwan; Li, Yubo; Chen, Di; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2013-03-01

    We developed a novel smart multi-channel two-dimensional (2-D) micro-gas chromatography (μGC) architecture that shows promise to significantly improve 2-D μGC performance. In the smart μGC design, a non-destructive on-column gas detector and a flow routing system are installed between the first dimensional separation column and multiple second dimensional separation columns. The effluent from the first dimensional column is monitored in real-time and decision is then made to route the effluent to one of the second dimensional columns for further separation. As compared to the conventional 2-D μGC, the greatest benefit of the smart multi-channel 2-D μGC architecture is the enhanced separation capability of the second dimensional column and hence the overall 2-D GC performance. All the second dimensional columns are independent of each other, and their coating, length, flow rate and temperature can be customized for best separation results. In particular, there is no more constraint on the upper limit of the second dimensional column length and separation time in our architecture. Such flexibility is critical when long second dimensional separation is needed for optimal gas analysis. In addition, the smart μGC is advantageous in terms of elimination of the power intensive thermal modulator, higher peak amplitude enhancement, simplified 2-D chromatogram re-construction and potential scalability to higher dimensional separation. In this paper, we first constructed a complete smart 1 × 2 channel 2-D μGC system, along with an algorithm for automated control/operation of the system. We then characterized and optimized this μGC system, and finally employed it in two important applications that highlight its uniqueness and advantages, i.e., analysis of 31 workplace hazardous volatile organic compounds, and rapid detection and identification of target gas analytes from interference background. PMID:23303462

  12. Characterization of complex phthalic acid/propylene glycol based polyesters by the combination of 2D chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Nadine O; Rhode, Karsten; Simpson, Jaylin M; Pasch, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The combination of gradient HPLC, 2D chromatography, and MALDI-TOF MS facilitated the analysis of the various distributions of phthalic acid/propylene glycol-based model polyesters. Investigations of kinetic samples taken at various reaction times highlighted the subsequent differences at various stages of the polyesterification reaction in terms of molecular weight, chemical composition, and endgroups. Normal-phase gradient-HPLC analysis successfully enabled an oligomeric separation of the respective samples. Peak-splitting behavior in early eluting peaks suggested that the separation was affected by a combination of factors and not solely based on chemical composition, functionality type or degree of polycondensation. Two-dimensional chromatography provided the link between chemical composition and molecular weight distribution, confirming that the first dimension gradient HPLC separation was based on chemical composition with increasing degree of oligomerization in the second dimension. The off-line coupling of LAC with MALDI-TOF MS provided structural details in combination with improved molecular weight determination of the more homogeneous LC fractions. The study indicated that all aspects related to the model saturated anhydride system should be considered in the case of copolyester synthesis to produce industrial type polyester resins. It was shown that the present multidimensional approach provided most comprehensive structural information on the polyester system. PMID:24848117

  13. ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXTRACTS BY CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY AND CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative sensitivities of fused-silica capillary column gas chromatography/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FSCC/GC/FT-IR) versus packed-column GC/FT-IR and FSCC/GC/FT-IR versus fused-silica capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (FSCC/GC/MS) were compa...

  14. Methods for Solving Gas Damping Problems in Perforated Microstructures Using a 2D Finite-Element Solver

    PubMed Central

    Veijola, Timo; Råback, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present a straightforward method to solve gas damping problems for perforated structures in two dimensions (2D) utilising a Perforation Profile Reynolds (PPR) solver. The PPR equation is an extended Reynolds equation that includes additional terms modelling the leakage flow through the perforations, and variable diffusivity and compressibility profiles. The solution method consists of two phases: 1) determination of the specific admittance profile and relative diffusivity (and relative compressibility) profiles due to the perforation, and 2) solution of the PPR equation with a FEM solver in 2D. Rarefied gas corrections in the slip-flow region are also included. Analytic profiles for circular and square holes with slip conditions are presented in the paper. To verify the method, square perforated dampers with 16–64 holes were simulated with a three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes solver, a homogenised extended Reynolds solver, and a 2D PPR solver. Cases for both translational (in normal to the surfaces) and torsional motion were simulated. The presented method extends the region of accurate simulation of perforated structures to cases where the homogenisation method is inaccurate and the full 3D Navier-Stokes simulation is too time-consuming.

  15. 2D models of gas flow and ice grain acceleration in Enceladus' vents using DSMC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy M.

    2015-09-01

    The gas distribution of the Enceladus water vapor plume and the terminal speeds of ejected ice grains are physically linked to its subsurface fissures and vents. It is estimated that the gas exits the fissures with speeds of ∼300-1000 m/s, while the micron-sized grains are ejected with speeds comparable to the escape speed (Schmidt, J. et al. [2008]. Nature 451, 685-688). We investigated the effects of isolated axisymmetric vent geometries on subsurface gas distributions, and in turn, the effects of gas drag on grain acceleration. Subsurface gas flows were modeled using a collision-limiter Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique in order to consider a broad range of flow regimes (Bird, G. [1994]. Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows. Oxford University Press, Oxford; Titov, E.V. et al. [2008]. J. Propul. Power 24(2), 311-321). The resulting DSMC gas distributions were used to determine the drag force for the integration of ice grain trajectories in a test particle model. Simulations were performed for diffuse flows in wide channels (Reynolds number ∼10-250) and dense flows in narrow tubular channels (Reynolds number ∼106). We compared gas properties like bulk speed and temperature, and the terminal grain speeds obtained at the vent exit with inferred values for the plume from Cassini data. In the simulations of wide fissures with dimensions similar to that of the Tiger Stripes the resulting subsurface gas densities of ∼1014-1020 m-3 were not sufficient to accelerate even micron-sized ice grains to the Enceladus escape speed. In the simulations of narrow tubular vents with radii of ∼10 m, the much denser flows with number densities of 1021-1023 m-3 accelerated micron-sized grains to bulk gas speed of ∼600 m/s. Further investigations are required to understand the complex relationship between the vent geometry, gas source rate and the sizes and speeds of ejected grains.

  16. Characterization of crude oils by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mutelet, F; Ekulu, G; Rogalski, M

    2002-09-01

    It was shown that the flocculation onset of asphaltenes in crude oils could be predicted on the basis of the inverse gas chromatography characterization of the crude oil properties. Hildebrand's solubility parameters of four crude oils were calculated from inverse chromatography data and compared with values obtained from the onset of asphaltene flocculation measurements. A good agreement was observed with three crude oils of different origin. A relation between Hildebrand's solubility parameter and linear solvation energy relationship descriptors was established and it was demonstrated that the solubility parameter of a crude oil is determined mainly with dispersion interactions and the hydrogen bond basicity. A large basicity lowers the oil solubility parameter, and increases its stability in respect to flocculation. PMID:12385392

  17. The Use of Gas Chromatography for Biogas Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Amanda; Seeley, John; Aurandt, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    Energy from natural gas accounts for 24 percent of energy consumed in the US. Natural gas is a robust form of energy which is rich in methane content and is low in impurities. This quality suggests that it is a very clean and safe gas; it can be used in providing heat, a source for cooking, and in powering vehicles. The downside is that it is a non-renewable resource. On the contrary, methane rich gas that is produced by the breakdown of organic material in an anaerobic environment, called biogas, is a renewable energy source. This research focuses on the gas analysis portion of the creation of the anaerobic digestion and verification laboratory where content and forensic analysis of biogas is performed. Gas Chromatography is implemented as the optimal analytical tool for quantifying the components of the biogas including methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and siloxanes. In addition, the problems associated with the undesirable components are discussed. Anaerobic digestion of primary sludge has consistently produced about 55 percent methane; future goals of this research include studying different substrates to increase the methane yield and decrease levels of impurities in the gas.

  18. Investigation of 2D-Trace Gas Field Reconstruction Techniques From Tomographic AMAX-DOAS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laepple, T.; Heue, K.; Friedeburg, C. V.; Wang, P.; Knab, V.; Pundt, I.

    2002-12-01

    Tomographic-Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectroscopy (Tom-DOAS) is a new application of the DOAS method designed to measure 2-3-dimensional concentration fields of different trace gases (e.g. NO2, HCHO, Ozone) in the troposphere. Numerical reconstruction techniques are used to obtain spatially resolved data from the slant column densities provided by DOAS instruments. We discuss the detection of emission plumes by AMAX (Airborne Multi AXis) DOAS Systems which measure sunlight by telescopes pointing in different directions. 2D distributions are reconstructed from slant columns by using airmass factor matrices and inversion techniques. We discuss possibilities and limitations of this technique gained with the use of simulated test fields. Therefore the effect of the parameter choice (e.g. flight track, algorithm changes) and measurement errors is investigated. Further, first results from the Partenavia aircraft measurements over Milano (Italy) during the European FORMAT campaign will be presented.

  19. Observation of Rashba zero-field spin splitting in a strained germanium 2D hole gas

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, C. Rhead, S. D.; Foronda, J.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.; Wiśniewski, P.

    2014-11-03

    We report the observation, through Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance, of spin splitting caused by the Rashba spin-orbit interaction in a strained Ge quantum well epitaxially grown on a standard Si(001) substrate. The Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations display a beating pattern due to the spin split Landau levels. The spin-orbit parameter and Rashba spin-splitting energy are found to be 1.0 × 10{sup −28 } eVm{sup 3} and 1.4 meV, respectively. This energy is comparable to 2D electron gases in III-V semiconductors, but substantially larger than in Si, and illustrates the suitability of Ge for modulated hole spin transport devices.

  20. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-07-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal for instructional use, especially to illustrate HS analysis or as an alternative to solid-phase microextraction (SPME) to which it is very similar. The basic principles and practice of HS-GC using SDME are described, including a complete review of the literature. Some possible experiments are suggested using water and N -methylpyrrolidone (NMP) as solvents.

  1. Gas-liquid chromatography in lunar organic analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) is a powerful and sensitive method for the separation and detection of organic compounds at nanogram levels. The primary requirement for successful analyses is that the compounds of interest must be volatile under the chromatographic conditions employed. Nonvolatile organic compounds must be converted to volatile derivatives prior to analysis. The derivatives of choice must be both amenable to chromatographic separation and be relatively stable. The condition of volatility necessitates the development of efficient derivatization reactions for important groups of compounds as amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleosides, etc. Trimethylsilylation and trifluoroacetylation represent specific areas of recent prominence. Some relevant practical aspects of GLC are discussed.

  2. [Determination of acetochlor and oxyfluorfen by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Xiang-Jing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Qing

    2002-09-01

    A method is described for the determination of acetochlor and oxyfluorfen by capillary gas chromatography with FID and an SE-30 capillary column (60 m x 0.53 mm i. d., 1.5 microm), using dibutyl phthalate as the internal standard. The standard deviations for acetochlor and oxyfluorfen concentration(mass fraction) were 0.44% and 0.47% respectively. The relative standard deviations for acetochlor and oxyfluorfen were 0.79% and 0.88% and the average recoveries for acetochlor and oxyfluorfen were 99.3% and 101.1% respectively. The method is simple, rapid and accurate. PMID:16358708

  3. Capillary gas chromatography with two new moderately high temperature phases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatography test results are presented for two new moderately high-temperature phases of Dexsil 400-GC with free hydroxyl end groups (uncapped) and with end groups covered by trimethyl silyl groups (capped). The two Dexsil 400-GC phases were tested for their ability to resolve N-TFA-DL-(+)-2-butyl esters and n-butyl esters, as well as fatty acid methyl esters and hydrocarbon standards. Generally the more polar uncapped phase was superior to the capped phase in all separation comparisons, except for the hydrocarbons.

  4. Thermal History Of PMRs Via Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluyas, Richard E.; Alston, William B.; Snyder, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography (PY-GC) useful as analytical technique to determine extents of cure or postcure of PMR-15 polyimides and to lesser extent, cumulative thermal histories of PMR-15 polyimides exposed to high temperatures. Also applicable for same purposes to other PMR polyimides and to composite materials containing PMR polyimides. Valuable in reducing costs and promoting safety in aircraft industry by helping to identify improperly cured or postcured PMR-15 composite engine and airframe components and helping to identify composite parts nearing ends of their useful lives.

  5. Continuous monitoring of a changing sample by multiplex gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Jose R.; Hall, Kirsten W.; Becker, Joseph F.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a study in which a continuously changed gaseous sample was monitored by multiplex gas chromatography (MGC), using the exponential dilution (ED) technique of Ritter and Adams (1976) to change the composition and concentration of a gaseous mixture in such a way as to imitate changes in the atmospheric gases sampled by a descending aircraft. A calibration of the MGC system was performed with four different rates of sample dilution, and the errors resulting from various degrees of change in the sample concentration were determined.

  6. Pyrolysis comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography study of petroleum source rock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Frank Cheng-Yu; Walters, Clifford C

    2007-08-01

    Detailed compositional analyses of sedimentary organic matter can provide information on its biotic input, environment of deposition, and level of thermal maturation. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography (py-GC), often coupled with a mass spectrometer (py-GC/MS), is one technique used to provide this information. New developments in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC or 2D-GC), coupled with pyrolysis (py-GC x GC), offer the prospect of providing more complete and quantitative compositional information of complex organic solids, such as kerogen and coals. This study will describe applications of pyrolysis-GC x GC to the characterization of petroleum source rocks using flame ionization detector (FID) and sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD). In the hydrocarbon analysis by FID, paraffins, naphthenes, and aromatics form distinct two-dimensional separated groups. In the analysis with SCD, sulfur-containing compounds can be distinguished as different classes, such as mercaptans, sulfides, thiophenes, benzothiophenes, and dibenzothiophenes. Single components or summed bands of homologous components can be analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. With these detailed molecular fingerprints, the relations between kerogen composition and its biotic input, environment of deposition, and thermal maturation may be better understood. PMID:17585835

  7. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  8. 2D Time-lapse Resistivity Monitoring of an Organic Produced Gas Plume in a Landfill using ERT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, N. D.; Mendonça, C. A.; Doherty, R.

    2014-12-01

    This project has the objective to study a landfill located on the margins of Tietê River, in São Paulo, Brazil, using the electroresistivity tomography method (ERT). Due to huge organic matter concentrations in the São Paulo Basin quaternary sediments, there is subsurface depth related biogas accumulation (CH4 and CO2), induced by anaerobic degradation of the organic matter. 2D resistivity sections were obtained from a test area since March 2012, a total of 7 databases, being the last one dated from October 2013. The studied line has the length of 56m, the electrode interval is of 2m. In addition, there are two boreholes along the line (one with 3 electrodes and the other one with 2) in order to improve data quality and precision. The boreholes also have a multi-level sampling system that indicates the fluid (gas or water) presence in relation to depth. With our results it was possible to map the gas plume position and its area of extension in the sections as it is a positive resistivity anomaly, with the gas level having approximately 5m depth. With the time-lapse analysis (Matlab script) between the obtained 2D resistivity sections from the site, it was possible to map how the biogas volume and position change in the landfill in relation to time. Our preliminary results show a preferential gas pathway through the subsurface studied area. A consistent relation between the gas depth and obtained microbiological data from archea and bacteria population was also observed.

  9. Subsurface Gas Flow and Ice Grain Acceleration within Enceladus and Europa Fissures: 2D DSMC Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, O. J.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The ejection of material from geysers is a ubiquitous occurrence on outer solar system bodies. Water vapor plumes have been observed emanating from the southern hemispheres of Enceladus and Europa (Hansen et al. 2011, Roth et al. 2014), and N2plumes carrying ice and ark particles on Triton (Soderblom et al. 2009). The gas and ice grain distributions in the Enceladus plume depend on the subsurface gas properties and the geometry of the fissures e.g., (Schmidt et al. 2008, Ingersoll et al. 2010). Of course the fissures can have complex geometries due to tidal stresses, melting, freezing etc., but directly sampled and inferred gas and grain properties for the plume (source rate, bulk velocity, terminal grain velocity) can be used to provide a basis to constrain characteristic dimensions of vent width and depth. We used a 2-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique to model venting from both axi-symmetric canyons with widths ~2 km and narrow jets with widths ~15-40 m. For all of our vent geometries, considered the water vapor source rates (1027­ - 1028 s-1) and bulk gas velocities (~330 - 670 m/s) obtained at the surface were consistent with inferred values obtained by fits of the data for the plume densities (1026 - 1028 s-1, 250 - 1000 m/s) respectively. However, when using the resulting DSMC gas distribution for the canyon geometries to integrate the trajectories of ice grains we found it insufficient to accelerate submicron ice grains to Enceladus' escape speed. On the other hand, the gas distributions in the jet like vents accelerated grains > 10 μm significantly above Enceladus' escape speed. It has been suggested that micron-sized grains are ejected from the vents with speeds comparable to the Enceladus escape speed. Here we report on these results including comparisons to results obtained from 1D models as well as discuss the implications of our plume model results. We also show preliminary results for similar considerations applied to Europa

  10. 21 CFR 862.2250 - Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use... Instruments § 862.2250 Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use. (a) Identification. A gas liquid... pressure. The device may include accessories such as columns, gases, column supports, and liquid...

  11. Environmental analysis of present and future fuels in 2D simple model marine gas tubines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gohary, M. Morsy

    2013-12-01

    Increased worldwide concerns about fossil fuel costs and effects on the environment lead many governments and scientific societies to consider the hydrogen as the fuel of the future. Many researches have been made to assess the suitability of using the hydrogen gas as fuel for internal combustion engines and gas turbines; this suitability was assessed from several viewpoints including the combustion characteristics, the fuel production and storage and also the thermodynamic cycle changes with the application of hydrogen instead of ordinary fossil fuels. This paper introduces the basic environmental differences happening when changing the fuel of a marine gas turbine from marine diesel fuel to gaseous hydrogen for the same power output. Environmentally, the hydrogen is the best when the CO2 emissions are considered, zero carbon dioxide emissions can be theoretically attained. But when the NOx emissions are considered, the hydrogen is not the best based on the unit heat input. The hydrogen produces 270% more NOx than the diesel case without any control measures. This is primarily due to the increased air flow rate bringing more nitrogen into the combustion chamber and the increased combustion temperature (10% more than the diesel case). Efficient and of course expensive NOx control measures are a must to control these emissions levels.

  12. Profiling of myelin proteins by 2D-gel electrophoresis and multidimensional liquid chromatography coupled to MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vanrobaeys, Frank; Van Coster, Rudy; Dhondt, Goedele; Devreese, Bart; Van Beeumen, Jozef

    2005-01-01

    The myelin sheath is an electrically insulating layer that consists of lipids and proteins. It plays a key role in the functioning of the nervous system by allowing fast saltatory conduction of nerve pulses. Profiling of the proteins present in myelin is an indispensable prerequisite to better understand the molecular aspects of this dynamic, functionally active membrane. Two types of protein, the myelin basic protein and the proteolipid protein, account for nearly 85% of the protein content in myelin. Identification and characterization of the other "minor" proteins is, in this respect, a real challenge. In the present work, two proteomic strategies were applied in order to study the protein composition of myelin from the murine central nervous system. First, the protein mixture was separated by 2D-gel electrophoresis and, after spot excision and in-gel digestion, samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Via this approach, we identified 57 protein spots, corresponding to 38 unique proteins. Alternatively, the myelin sample was digested by trypsin and the resulting peptide mixture was further analyzed by off-line 2D-liquid chromatography. After the second-dimension separation (nanoLC), the peptides were spotted "on-line" onto a MALDI target and analyzed by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. We identified 812 peptides by MALDI MS/MS, representing 93 proteins. Membrane proteins, low abundant proteins, and highly basic proteins were all represented in this shotgun proteomic approach. By combining the results of both approaches, we can present a comprehensive proteomic map of myelin, comprising a total of 103 protein identifications, which is of utmost importance for the molecular understanding of white matter and its disorders. PMID:16335977

  13. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  14. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples. PMID:27131686

  15. Novel stationary phases based on asphaltenes for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Momotko, Malwina; Chruszczyk, Dorota; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kamiński, Marian

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of investigations on the possibility of the application of the asphaltene fraction isolated from the oxidized residue from vacuum distillation of crude oil as a stationary phase for gas chromatography. The results of the investigation revealed that the asphaltene stationary phases can find use for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds. The experimental values of Rohrschneider/McReynolds constants characterize the asphaltenes as stationary phases of medium polarity and selectivity similar to commercially available phases based on alkyl phthalates. Isolation of asphaltenes from the material obtained under controlled process conditions allows the production of a stationary phase having reproducible sorption properties and chromatographic columns having the same selectivity. Unique selectivity and high thermal stability make asphaltenes attractive as a material for stationary phases for gas chromatography. A low production cost from a readily available raw material (oxidized petroleum bitumens) is an important economic factor in case of application of the asphaltene stationary phases for preparative and process separations. PMID:27144876

  16. Pion transfer from hydrogen to deuterium in H2+D2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P.; Armstrong, D. S.; Measday, D. F.; Noble, A. J.; Stanislaus, S.; Harston, M. R.; Aniol, K. A.; Horváth, D.

    1990-01-01

    The transfer of negative pions from pionic hydrogen to deuterium has been investigated in gas mixtures of H2 and D2 as a function of the D2 concentration (C). The concentration dependence of the transfer rate was fitted using a phenomenological model with two parameters. For C-->∞ (32+/-3)% of the pions undergo transfer. The fitted parameters reflect the ratio of pion capture to pion transfer in collisions of pionic hydrogen with protons or deuterons. No pressure dependence for pion transfer was found.

  17. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  18. Pair condensation in a spin-imbalanced 2D Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter; Schauss, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir; Bakr, Waseem

    2016-05-01

    We study the phase diagram of the strongly-interacting spin-imbalanced Fermi gas in two dimensions, where the low dimensionality enhances correlations and phase fluctuations. Our interest is motivated by the connection of this system with superconductivity in the presence of a large Zeeman field. We observe pair condensation for a range of spin imbalance and interaction strengths. The measurement of the phase diagram opens the door for a detailed investigation of exotic phases such as the Sarma/broken pair phase and the elusive FFLO phase.

  19. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  20. A high-throughput 2D-analytical technique to obtain single protein parameters from complex cell lysates for in silico process development of ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Frieder; Elsäßer, Dennis; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-11-29

    The accelerating growth of the market for biopharmaceutical proteins, the market entry of biosimilars and the growing interest in new, more complex molecules constantly pose new challenges for bioseparation process development. In the presented work we demonstrate the application of a multidimensional, analytical separation approach to obtain the relevant physicochemical parameters of single proteins in a complex mixture for in silico chromatographic process development. A complete cell lysate containing a low titre target protein was first fractionated by multiple linear salt gradient anion exchange chromatography (AEC) with varying gradient length. The collected fractions were subsequently analysed by high-throughput capillary gel electrophoresis (HT-CGE) after being desalted and concentrated. From the obtained data of the 2D-separation the retention-volumes and the concentration of the single proteins were determined. The retention-volumes of the single proteins were used to calculate the related steric-mass action model parameters. In a final evaluation experiment the received parameters were successfully applied to predict the retention behaviour of the single proteins in salt gradient AEC. PMID:24139506

  1. Applications of Hadamard transform to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Huang; Kaneta, Takashi; Chen, Hung-Ming; Chen, Wen-Xiong; Chang, Hung-Wei; Liu, Ju-Tsung

    2008-08-01

    Successful application of the Hadamard transform (HT) technique to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is described. Novel sample injection devices were developed to achieve multiple sample injections in both GC and LC instruments. Air pressure was controlled by an electromagnetic valve in GC, while a syringe pump and Tee connector were employed for the injection device in LC. Two well-known, abused drugs, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), were employed as model samples. Both of the injection devices permitted precise successive injections, resulting in clearly modulated chromatograms encoded by Hadamard matrices. After inverse Hadamard transformation of the encoded chromatogram, the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of the signals were substantially improved compared with those expected from theoretical values. The S/N ratios were enhanced approximately 10-fold in HT-GC/MS and 6.8 in HT-LC/MS, using the matrices of 1023 and 511, respectively. The HT-GC/MS was successfully applied to the determination of MDMA in the urine sample of a suspect. PMID:18570388

  2. Spin susceptibility of a 2D gas with Rashba spin-orbit in the HF approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gabriele

    2005-03-01

    The in plane and out of plane spin susceptibility χS^ () (rs, α) in a two dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit is studied within the Hartree-Fock approximation in both the static (φ->0 first then q ->0) and adiabatic (q ->0 first then φ->0) limits. The latter is related to what is commonly referred to as the spin-Hall conductivity. The behavior of χS^ () (rs, α) as a function of the density parameter rs and the spin-orbit coupling strength α has been explored. At variance with a recent perturbative analysis, we find that, as one would expect, the exchange interaction tends to increase χS^ () (rs, α) over its non interacting value. The interplay between the differential instability of the paramagnetic chiral state as signaled by the divergence of χS^ () (rs, α) and the (first order) spin polarization transition to a spin-textured chiral state will be discussed.

  3. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-15

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density, heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. Transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. It is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.

  4. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-09

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Furthermore, two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density,more » heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. In transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. Moreover, it is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.« less

  5. Microscopy of a Quantum Gas in a 2D Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, Waseem; Peng, Amy; Tai, Ming; Ma, Ruichao; Jotzu, Gregor; Gillen, Jonathon; Foelling, Simon; Greiner, Markus

    2010-03-01

    Ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices provide a rich experimental toolbox for simulating the physics of condensed matter systems. With atoms in the lattice playing the role of electrons or Cooper pairs in real materials, it is possible to experimentally realize condensed matter Hamiltonians in a controlled way. To realize the full potential of such quantum simulations, we have created a quantum gas microscope (NA = 0.8) which can spatially resolve the atoms in the optical lattice at the single site level, and project arbitrary potential landscapes onto the atoms by combining the high resolution optics with static holographic masks or a spatial light modulator. The high resolution microscope operates with the atoms trapped in a two dimensional optical lattice at a distance of 10 microns from a glass surface that is part of the microscope. We have experimentally verified a resolution of ˜ 600 nm, providing the capability to study the phase diagram of the Bose Hubbard model by measuring occupation number at individual sites.

  6. Gas chromatography flow rates for determining deuterium/hydrogen ratios of natural gas by gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wanglu; Peng, Ping'an; Liu, Jinzhong

    2008-08-01

    The effects of the gas chromatography flow rate on the determination of the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of natural gas utilising gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/TC/IRMS) have been evaluated. In general, the measured deltaD values of methane, ethane and propane decrease with increase in column flow rate. When the column flow rate is 1 mL/min or higher, which is commonly used for the determination of D/H ratios of natural gas, the organic H in gas compounds may not be completely converted into hydrogen gas. Based on the results of experiments conducted on a GC column with an i.d. of 0.32 mm, a GC flow rate of 0.6 mL/min is proposed for determining the D/H ratios of natural gas by GC/TC/IRMS. Although this value may be dependent on the instrument conditions used in this work, we believe that correct deltaD values of organic compounds with a few carbon atoms are obtained only when relatively low GC flow rates are used for D/H analysis by GC/TC/IRMS. Moreover, as the presence of trace water could significantly affect the determination of D/H ratios, a newly designed inlet liner was used to remove trace water contained in some gas samples. PMID:18636428

  7. Identification of New Metabolites of Bacterial Transformation of Indole by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SPG transformed indole completely in the presence of an additional carbon source. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde as biotransformation products. This is the first report of the formation of indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde from indole by any bacterium. PMID:25548566

  8. Beyond classical nucleation theory: A 2-D lattice-gas automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Joseph

    Nucleation is the first step in the formation of a new phase in a thermodynamic system. The Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) is the traditional theory used to describe this phenomenon. The object of this thesis is to investigate nucleation beyond one of the most significant limitations of the CNT: the assumption that the surface tension of a nucleating cluster of the new phase is independent of the cluster's size and has the same value that it would have in the bulk of the new phase. In order to accomplish this, we consider a microscopic, two-dimensional Lattice Gas Automata (LGA) model of precipitate nucleation in a supersaturated system, with model input parameters Ess (solid particle-to-solid particle bonding energy), Esw (solid particle-to-water particle bonding energy), eta (next-to-nearest neighbour bonding coeffiicent in solid phase), and Cin (initial solute concentration). The LGA method was chosen for its advantages of easy implementation, low memory requirements, and fast computation speed. Analytical results for the system's concentration and the crystal radius as functions of time are derived and the former is fit to the simulation data in order to determine the system's equilibrium concentration. A mean first-passage time (MFPT) technique is used to obtain the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size from the simulation data. The nucleation rate and supersaturation are evaluated using a modification to the CNT that incorporates a two-dimensional, radius-dependent surface tension term. The Tolman parameter, delta, which controls the radius-dependence of the surface tension, decreases (increases) as a function of the magnitude of Ess (Esw), at fixed values of eta and Esw (Ess). On the other hand, delta increases as eta increases while E ss and Esw are held constant. The constant surface tension term of the CNT, Sigma0, increases (decreases) with increasing magnitudes of Ess (Esw) fixed values of Esw (Ess), and increases as eta is increased. Together

  9. Low thermal mass gas chromatography: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Luong, Jim; Gras, Ronda; Mustacich, Robert; Cortes, Hernan

    2006-01-01

    In gas chromatography (GC), temperature programming is often considered to be the second most important parameter to control, the first being column selectivity. A radically new GC technology to achieve ultrafast temperature programming with an unprecedented cool down time and low power consumption has recently become available. This technology is referred to as low thermal mass GC (LTMGC). Though the technology has its roots in resistive heating, which forms the basis of principle and design concept, the approach taken to achieve ultrafast heating and cool down time by LTMGC represents a significant break-through in GC. Despite some rectifiable shortcomings, LTMGC has proven to be an ideal methodology to deliver near/real time GC data, high precision, and high throughput applications. It is a new approach for modern high-speed GC. This paper documents the fundamental design principles behind LTMGC, performance data, and examples of applications investigated. PMID:16774710

  10. Design, testing, and simulation of microscale gas chromatography columns

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.L.; Kottenstette, R.; Matzke, C.M.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Shollenberger, K.A.; Adkins, D.R.; Wong, C.C.

    1998-08-01

    A microscale gas chromatography column is one component in a microscale chemistry laboratory for detecting chemical agents. Several columns were fabricated using the Bosch etch process which allows deep, high aspect ratio channels of rectangular cross-section. A design tool, based on analytical models, was developed to evaluate the effects of operating conditions and column specifications on separation resolution and time. The effects of slip flow, channel configuration, and cross-sectional shape were included to evaluate the differences between conventional round, straight columns and the microscale rectangular, spiral columns. Experimental data were obtained and compared with the predicted flowrates and theoretical number of plates. The design tool was then employed to select more optimum channel dimensions and operating conditions for high resolution separations.

  11. Field gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast analysis.

    PubMed

    Makas, Alexei L; Troshkov, Mikhail L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate the original device and procedure for fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of gaseous and liquid samples and to discuss its features and capabilities. The concept was developed in order to expand the range of compounds suitable for GC separation and to reduce the time of analysis. Field GC-MS, consisting of original "concentrator-thermodesorber" (CTD) unit, multiple module GC system and compact magnetic mass spectrometer with powerful two-stage vacuum system and multicollector ion detector, is represented. The whole weight of the device is 90 kg. Power consumption is 250 W. The device and analytical procedures allow high speed screening of toxic substances in air and extracts within 100 s per sample. The examples of applications are described, including fast screening of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in air at low ppt level at the rate 1 sample/min. PMID:14698236

  12. Estimation of brassylic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah, Erica N. Pfarr, Pooja Thapliyal, Nicholas S. Dusek, Kristofer L. Schiele, Christy Gallagher-Lein, and James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to estimate Brassylic Acid (BA) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BA is a product obtained from the oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). BA has various applications for making nylons and high performance polymers. BA is a 13 carbon compound with two carboxylic acid functional groups at the terminal end. BA has a long hydrocarbon chain that makes the molecule less sensitive to some of the characterization techniques. Although BA can be characterized by NMR, both the starting material (EA) and products BA and nonanoic acid (NA) have peaks at similar {delta}, ppm values. Hence it becomes difficult for the quick estimation of BA during its synthesis.

  13. Modeling of Devonian shale gas reservoirs. Task 16. Mathematical modeling of shale gas production (2D model). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has been supporting the development of flow models for Devonian shale gas reservoirs. The broad objectives of this modeling program are to: (1) develop and validate a mathematical model which describes gas flow through Devonian shales; (2) determine the sensitive parameters that affect deliverability and recovery of gas from Devonian shales; (3) recommend laboratory and field measurements for determination of those parameters critical to the productivity and timely recovery of gas from the Devonian shales; (4) analyze pressure and rate transient data from observation and production gas wells to determine reservoir parameters and well performance; and (5) study and determine the overall performance of Devonian shale reservoirs in terms of well stimulation, well spacing, and resource recovery as a function of gross reservoir properties such as anisotropy, porosity and thickness variations, and boundary effects. During the previous annual period, a mathematical model describing gas flow through Devonian shales and the software for a radial one-dimensional numerical model for single well performance were completed and placed into operation. Although the radial flow model is a powerful tool for studying single well behavior, it is inadequate for determining the effects of well spacing, stimulation treatments, and variation in reservoir properties. Hence, it has been necessary to extend the model to two-dimensions, maintaining full capability regarding Klinkerberg effects, desorption, and shale matrix parameters. During the current annual period, the radial flow model has been successfully extended to provide the two-dimensional capability necessary for the attainment of overall program objectives, as described above.

  14. Analysis of odour compounds from scented consumer products using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Jennifer; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga

    2016-01-21

    Scented consumer products are being bought in increasing amounts and gaining more popularity. There is, however, relatively little information available about their ingredients, emissions and allergenic potential. Frequently, a mixture of different fragrance substances and not solely an individual substance contributes to the overall desired smell. The aim of this study was to investigate the odorous volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in consumer products containing fragrances. Over 44 products were selected: various scented candles, printing products with different scent types and other products types particularly meant to be used indoors. Measurements were carried out in a desiccator. Air samples were collected on thermal desorption tubes to determine the released fragrance substances by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) was used to obtain sensory data and to ensure no important odorant was overlooked. Using both methods it was possible to distinguish between odour active and inactive compounds and subsequently to identify almost 300 different odorants across all scented products. Besides the advantage of differentiation, as the human nose is a very sensitive detector, GC-O was found to be a useful tool for detecting traces and chosen target compounds. One focus in this study lay on the 26 EU-regulated fragrance allergens to prove their relevance in scented consumer goods. In total, 18 of them were identified, with at least one substance being present in almost every product. Benzyl alcohol, cinnamaldehyde, citronellol, eugenol, linalool and limonene were the prevalently detected allergens. Particularly linalool and limonene were observed in over 50% of the products. In addition, eugenol appeared to be one of the most frequently detected compounds in trace-level concentrations in the candle emissions. PMID:26724768

  15. Chemical Discrimination in Turbulent Gas Mixtures with MOX Sensors Validated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance. PMID:25325339

  16. Chemical discrimination in turbulent gas mixtures with MOX sensors validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance. PMID:25325339

  17. Gas phase chromatography of halides of elements 104 and 105

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerler, A.; Gregorich, K.E.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Hannink, N.J.; Henderson, R.A.; Hoffman, D.C.; Kacher, C.D.; Kadkhodayan, B.; Kreek, S.A.; Lee, D.M.; Leyba, J.D.; Nurmia, M.J. ); Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jost, D.T.; Kovacs, J.; Scherer, U.W.; Vermeulen, D.; Weber, A. , Villigen ); Barth, H.; Gober, M.K.; Kratz, J.V. (Philipps-Univ., Marburg

    1991-04-01

    On-line isothermal gas phase chromatography was used to study halides of {sup 261}104 (T{sub {1/2}} = 65 s) and {sup 262,263}105 (T{sub {1/2}} = 34 s and 27 s) produced an atom-at-a time via the reactions {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) and {sup 249}Bk({sup 18}O, 5n, 4n), respectively. Using HBr and HCl gas as halogenating agents, we were able to produce volatile bromides and chlorides of the above mentioned elements and study their behavior compared to their lighter homologs in Groups 4 or 5 of the periodic table. Element 104 formed more volatile bromides than its homolog Hf. In contrast, element 105 bromides were found to be less volatile than the bromides of the group 5 elements Nb and Ta. Both 104 and Hf chlorides were observed to be more volatile than their respective bromides. 31 refs., 8 figs.

  18. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  19. Warm ionized gas in CALIFA early-type galaxies. 2D emission-line patterns and kinematics for 32 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Lehnert, M. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ziegler, B.; Breda, I.; Dos Reis, S. N.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Bomans, D. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Benito, R.; Márquez, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Marino, R. A.; González Delgado, R. M.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Context. The morphological, spectroscopic, and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium (wim) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive, quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer an unprecedented opportunity for advancing our understanding of the wim in ETGs. Aims: This article centers on a 2D investigation of the wim component in 32 nearby (≲150 Mpc) ETGs from CALIFA, complementing a previous 1D analysis of the same sample. Methods: The analysis presented here includes Hα intensity and equivalent width (EW) maps and radial profiles, diagnostic emission-line ratios, and ionized-gas and stellar kinematics. It is supplemented by τ-ratio maps, which are a more efficient means to quantify the role of photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component than alternative mechanisms (e.g., AGN, low-level star formation). Results: Confirming and strengthening our previous conclusions, we find that ETGs span a broad continuous sequence in the properties of their wim, exemplified by two characteristic classes. The first (type i) comprises systems with a nearly constant EW(Hα) in their extranuclear component, which quantitatively agrees with (but is no proof of) the hypothesis that photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component is the main driver of extended wim emission. The second class (type ii) stands for virtually wim-evacuated ETGs with a very low (≤0.5 Å), outwardly increasing EW(Hα). These two classes appear indistinguishable from one another by their LINER-specific emission-line ratios in their extranuclear component. Here we extend the tentative classification we proposed previously by the type i+, which is assigned to a subset of type i ETGs exhibiting ongoing low-level star-forming activity in their periphery. This finding along with faint

  20. Preparation of fatty acid methyl esters for gas-liquid chromatography[S

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Ken'ichi; Fukubayashi, Yumeto

    2010-01-01

    A convenient method using commercial aqueous concentrated HCl (conc. HCl; 35%, w/w) as an acid catalyst was developed for preparation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from sterol esters, triacylglycerols, phospholipids, and FFAs for gas-liquid chromatography (GC). An 8% (w/v) solution of HCl in methanol/water (85:15, v/v) was prepared by diluting 9.7 ml of conc. HCl with 41.5 ml of methanol. Toluene (0.2 ml), methanol (1.5 ml), and the 8% HCl solution (0.3 ml) were added sequentially to the lipid sample. The final HCl concentration was 1.2% (w/v). This solution (2 ml) was incubated at 45°C overnight or heated at 100°C for 1–1.5 h. The amount of FFA formed in the presence of water derived from conc. HCl was estimated to be <1.4%. The yields of FAMEs were >96% for the above lipid classes and were the same as or better than those obtained by saponification/methylation or by acid-catalyzed methanolysis/methylation using commercial anhydrous HCl/methanol. The method developed here could be successfully applied to fatty acid analysis of various lipid samples, including fish oils, vegetable oils, and blood lipids by GC. PMID:19759389

  1. [Determination of dimethylbenzoic acid isomers in urine by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Kostrzewski, P; Wiaderna-Brycht, A; Czerski, B

    1994-01-01

    Trimethylobenzene (TMB) is a main ingredient of many organic solvents used in industry. In Farbasol (Polish trade name of the solvent) TMB occurs as a mixture of three isomers: pseudocumene (1, 2, 4-TMB) 30%; mesitylene (1, 3, 5-TMB) 15%; hemimellitene (1,2,3-TMB) 5%. As it is known in human organism, TMB is metabolized mainly to dimethylbenzoic (DMBA) and dimethylhippuric (DMHA) acids, and some authors suggest, that the acids excreted in urine can be biological indicators of exposure to TMB. This study was aimed at developing the method of determination of DMBA isomers in urine. Biological material was hydrolyzed with sodium hydroxide and next extracted with diethyl ether. DMBA concentration in urine was determined by gas chromatography using a variant of quantitative analysis with internal standard (5-methyl-2-isopropylphenol, thymol). Analytical parameters of the developed method of determination of DMBA isomers in urine such as linearity, precision, reproducibility, stability (192 days, when urine samples stored at-18 degrees C), detectability limit (400 micrograms/dm3) have been fully compatible with the requirements of biological monitoring. In order to confirm the presence of DMBA isomers in urine, four volunteers were exposed (8 hours) to Farbasol in toxicological chamber. The TMB concentration in the air, determined by means of gas chromatograph (HP 5890), amounted to 100 mg/m3 (MAC value in Poland). In urine samples collected 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-; 2,6-; 3,4-; 3,5-dimethylbenzoic acids were identified by means of GC/MSD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8170375

  2. Determination of thermal stability of oils by pyrolytic gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtseva, N.A.; Mikhailov, I.A.; Nikonorov, E.M.; Rakova, L.A.

    1984-03-01

    This article demonstrates how pyrolytic gas chromatography (PGC) offers a means for unambiguous differentiation of the decomposition products from the accompanying products of oil vaporization. The proposed method based on PGC uses a furnace-type pyrolyzer connected to an LKhM-7A chromatograph. The common peak of propane with propylene was selected as a characteristic peak to indicate the oil decomposition temperature. Propane and propylene, along with lighter hydrocarbons, are always present in the decomposition products. A volume graph method is used to determine the temperature of vaporization or decomposition of the substance, based on plotting a curve for the relationship between the heating temperature and the relative volume (or pressure) of the test sample. The decomposition temperatures determined by the PGC method agree with the values report by foreign manufacturers (deviation no greater than 2/sup 0/C). The accuracy of calculation of the thermal stability of the hydrocarbon oils by the PGC method was 5-10/sup 0/C as a result of deficiencies in the heating device in the pyrolytic unit. Includes a table.

  3. Polyimide polymer glass-free capillary columns for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jackie G; Marine, Susan S; Danielson, Neil D

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric polyimide capillary tubing, both uncoated and coated with stationary phases of two polarities, is explored for use as capillary columns for gas chromatography (GC). These glass-free polyimide columns are flexible and their small winding diameter of less than a cm around a solid support makes them compatible for potential use in portable GC instruments. Polyimide columns with dimensions of 0.32 mm i.d. × 3 m are cleaned, annealed at 300°C, and coated using the static method with phenylmethylsilicone (PMS). Separations of volatile organics are investigated isothermally on duplicate sets of polyimide columns by GC with a flame ionization detector using split injection. Unlike the uncoated ones, the coated polyimide columns successfully separate Grob test mix classes of alkanes, amines, and fatty acid methyl esters. The relative standard deviations for retention time and peak area are 0.5 and 2.5 , respectively. With the 3 m PMS-coated column connected to a retention gap to permit operation at its optimum flow rate of 30 cm/s, a plate count of 3200 or plate height of 1 mm is possible. Lack of retention and tailing peaks are evident for the polyimide polymer capillary columns as compared to that of a 3 m commercial cross-linked PMS fused silica capillary. However, headspace analyses of an aromatic hydrocarbon mix and a Clearcoat automotive paint sample are viable applications on the PMS polyimide polymer column. PMID:21682994

  4. Quantitative analysis of terbutaline by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leferink, J G; Baillie, T A; Lindberg, C

    1984-01-01

    Over the past 6 years, several gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for terbutaline have been developed, each with certain advantages and disadvantages. They all involve monitoring of an ion selected from the mass spectrum of a suitable terbutaline derivative. This technique, often referred to as mass fragmentography or selected ion monitoring, reduces the interference from other drugs and endogenous compounds. Different ionization techniques have been employed to obtain high sensitivity, viz. electron impact and chemical ionization. Typically, the methods can be used to measure terbutaline concentrations down to 0.1-0.3 ng/mL in plasma or serum. Isolation of terbutaline from biological materials is complicated by the low partition of the drug from water to organic solvents. Extraction with a large volume of ethyl acetate, ion pair extraction, or isolation on a cation exchange column have been used. These methods are time consuming, and attempts have therefore been made to modify them. Rapid extraction can be achieved on a disposable reversed-phase octadecylsilyl column with unimpaired sensitivity and selectivity. Preliminary results indicate that negative ion chemical ionization of a fluorine-containing derivative can further increase the sensitivity of the terbutaline assays. PMID:6586484

  5. Determination of hair nicotine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Man, Che Nin; Ismail, Syazwani; Harn, Gam Lay; Lajis, Razak; Awang, Rahmat

    2009-01-15

    Hair nicotine is a known biomarker for monitoring long-term environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and smoking status. In general, hair nicotine assay involves alkaline digestion, extraction and instrumental analysis. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) assay currently developed has shown to be of high throughput with average approximately 100 hair samples being extracted and analyzed per day. This was achieved through simplified extraction procedure and shortened GC analysis time. The extraction was improved by using small volume (0.4 mL) of organic solvent that does not require further evaporation and salting steps prior to GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, the amount of hair utilized in the extraction was very little (5 mg) while the sensitivity and selectivity of the assay is equal, if not better than other established methods. The linearity of the assay (r(2)>0.995), limit of quantitation (0.04 ng/mg hair), within- and between-assays accuracies and precisions (<11.4%) and mean recovery (92.6%) were within the acceptable range. PMID:19109080

  6. [Enantioseparation of 2-phenylcarboxylic acid esters by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xueyan; Liu, Feipeng; Bian, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Chiral 2-arylcarboxylic acid derivatives are important intermediates for preparing 2-arylcarboxylic acids, which are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In order to separate 2-phenylcarboxylic acid ester enantiomers by capillary gas chromatography (CGC), 2, 6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin and 2,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin were used as CGC chiral stationary phases, separately, and their enantioseparation abilities to enantiomers of methyl 2-phenylbutanoate, ethyl 2-phenylbutanoate, isopropyl 2-phenylbutanoate, methyl 2-phenylpropionate and cyclopentyl 2-phenylpropionate were examined. It was found that methyl 2-phenylbutanoate, methyl 2-phenylpropionate and cyclopentyl 2-phenylpropionate were successfully separated by using 2,6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin and 2,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin as CGC chiral stationary phases, respectively. The enantiomer separation abilities of 2, 6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin to the three pairs of 2-phenylcarboxylic acid esters tested are superior to those of 2, 6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin. PMID:27319170

  7. An improved multiple flame photometric detector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian G; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2015-11-20

    An improved multiple flame photometric detector (mFPD) is introduced, based upon interconnecting fluidic channels within a planar stainless steel (SS) plate. Relative to the previous quartz tube mFPD prototype, the SS mFPD provides a 50% reduction in background emission levels, an orthogonal analytical flame, and easier more sensitive operation. As a result, sulfur response in the SS mFPD spans 4 orders of magnitude, yields a minimum detectable limit near 9×10(-12)gS/s, and has a selectivity approaching 10(4) over carbon. The device also exhibits exceptionally large resistance to hydrocarbon response quenching. Additionally, the SS mFPD uniquely allows analyte emission monitoring in the multiple worker flames for the first time. The findings suggest that this mode can potentially further improve upon the analytical flame response of sulfur (both linear HSO, and quadratic S2) and also phosphorus. Of note, the latter is nearly 20-fold stronger in S/N in the collective worker flames response and provides 6 orders of linearity with a detection limit of about 2.0×10(-13)gP/s. Overall, the results indicate that this new SS design notably improves the analytical performance of the mFPD and can provide a versatile and beneficial monitoring tool for gas chromatography. PMID:25907666

  8. Novel quantum Monte Carlo methods for spin-orbit Hamiltonians: 2D interacting electron gas with the Rashba interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shi; Zhu, Minyi; Hu, Shuming; Mitas, Lubos

    2013-03-01

    Very recently, a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method was proposed for Rashba spin-orbit operators which expands the applicability of QMC to systems with variable spins. It is based on incorporating the spin-orbit into the Green's function and thus samples (ie, rotates) the spinors in the antisymmetric part of the trial function [1]. Here we propose a new alternative for both variational and diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms for calculations of systems with variable spins. Specifically, we introduce a new spin representation which allows us to sample the spin configurations efficiently and without introducing additional fluctuations. We develop the corresponding Green's function which treats the electron spin as a dynamical variable and we use the fixed-phase approximation to eliminate the negative probabilities. The trial wave function is a Slater determinant of spinors and spin-indepedent Jastrow correlations. The method also has the zero variance property. We benchmark the method on the 2D electron gas with the Rashba interaction and we find very good overall agreement with previously obtained results. Research supported by NSF and ARO.

  9. Isoconversion effective activation energies derived from repetitive injection fast gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robert L.

    2009-10-01

    Evolved gas analysis by using fast temperature programmed gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is described. A small volume gas chromatograph oven is used to permit rapid heating and cooling of a capillary gas chromatography column, resulting in short analysis cycle times. This capability permits automated sampling and analysis of a purge gas effluent stream generated during thermal analysis of a solid sample. Species-specific mass spectral information extracted from successively acquired chromatograms can be used to generate concentration profiles for volatile products produced during sample heating. These species-specific profiles can be used for calculation of isoconversion effective activation energies that are useful for characterizing the thermal reaction processes.

  10. DIRECT-DEPOSITION INFRARED SPECTROMETRY WITH GAS AND SUPERCRITICAL FLUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct-deposition Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) system has been evaluated for applicability to gas chromatography (GC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) of environmental analytes. A 100-um i.d. fused-silica transfer line was used for GC, and a 50-um transfer lin...

  11. Unexpected dimerization of isoprene in a gas chromatography inlet. A study by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Yannick; Gardrat, Christian; Berthelot, Karine; Grau, Etienne; De Jeso, Bernard; Ouardad, Samira; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-02-28

    During analysis of pure isoprene by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using a programmed temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet, the presence of several isoprene dimers was detected in the total ion chromatograms (TICs). This study intends to determine the part of the instrument where dimerization occurs and the relative importance of the dimer amounts under different experimental conditions. The reference thermal dimerization of isoprene gives four six-membered cyclic dimers and two eight-membered ones. In all samples containing different amounts of freshly distilled isoprene, only peaks corresponding to the former appeared in TICs. For the same temperature, their amounts increase as the concentration of injected isoprene increases. The main products are diprene (from 80 to 100%) of the total dimers and dipentene (from 1 to 14%). The sum of the two other dimers is never higher than 6%. In conclusion, isomeric dimers are produced through a dimerization in the inlet. No dimerization of isoprene occurs in the mass spectrometer source. Then care is needed when analyzing terpenic compounds in the presence of isoprene by GC-MS because structures, retention times and mass spectra of diprene and dipentene are close. PMID:24485537

  12. Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell-Baguley, Brittany; Hipp, Rachael E.; Morgan, Neal R.; Morgan, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment in which gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used for latent fingerprint extraction and analysis on glass beads or glass slides is conducted. The results determine that the fingerprint residues are gender dependent.

  13. Analysis of chemical signals in red fire ants by gas chromatography and pattern recognition techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The combination of gas chromatography and pattern recognition (GC/PR) analysis is a powerful tool for investigating complicated biological problems. Clustering, mapping, discriminant development, etc. are necessary to analyze realistically large chromatographic data sets and to seek meaningful relat...

  14. Preparation of pure microbiological samples for pyrolysis gas-liquid chromatography studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Bacterial samples were prepared for pyrolysis gas-liquid chromatography using cells grown on membrane filters. Pyrochromatograms were reproducible when cells harvested from the filters were pyrolyzed without being washed.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS BY AB INITIO QUANTUM MECHANICAL COMPUTATION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational chemistry, in conjunction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (GC/MS/FT-IR), was used to tentatively identify seven tetrachlorobutadiene (TCBD) isomers detected in an environmental sample. Computation of the TCBD infrare...

  16. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  17. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  18. AN EPA MANUAL FOR ORGANICS ANALYSIS USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedural manual defines the areas of applicability of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in environmental analysis. The manual includes sample preparation methods specifically adapted to this measurement technique, data processing and interpretation methods, quality cont...

  19. Analysis of glycylsarcosine transport by lobster intestine using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Maria L; Lane, Amy L; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography was used to measure transepithelial transport of glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) by perfused lobster (Homarus americanus) intestine. Unidirectional and net fluxes of dipeptide across the tissue and luminal factors affecting their magnitude and direction were characterized by perfusing the lumen with the dipeptide and measuring its appearance in saline on the serosal side of the organ. Transmural transport of 10 mM Gly-Sar resulted in serosal accumulation of only the dipeptide; no appearance of corresponding monomeric amino acids glycine or sarcosine was observed. Carrier-mediated and diffusional transmural intestinal transport of Gly-Sar was estimated at 1-15 mM luminal concentrations and followed a curvilinear equation providing a K m = 0.44 ± 0.17 mM, a J max = 1.27 ± 0.12 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), and a diffusional coefficient = 0.026 ± 0.008 nmol cm(-2) min(-1) mM(-1). Unidirectional mucosal to serosal and serosal to mucosal fluxes of 10 mM Gly-Sar provided a significant (p < 0.05) net absorptive flux toward the serosa of 3.54 ± 0.77 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), further supporting carrier-mediated dipeptide transport across the gut. Alkaline (pH 8.5) luminal pH more than doubled transmural Gly-Sar transport as compared to acidic (pH 5.5) luminal pH, while luminal amino acid-metal chelates (e.g., Leu-Zn-Leu), and high concentrations of amino acids alone significantly (p < 0.001) reduced intestinal Gly-Sar transfer by inhibiting carrier transport of the dipeptide. Proposed mechanisms accounting for intestinal dipeptide transport and luminal factors affecting this process are discussed. PMID:25260349

  20. Evaluation of Gas Chromatography/Mini-IMS to Detect VOCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Reese, Eric; Peters, Randy; James, John T.; Billica, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Toxicology Laboratory at Johnson Space Center (JSC) has pioneered the use of gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (GC/IMS) for measuring target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) aboard spacecraft. Graseby Dynamics, under contract to NASA/Wyle, has built several volatile organic analyzers (VOA) based on GC/IMS. Foremost among these have been the volatile organic analyzer-risk mitigation unit and the two flight VOA units for International Space Station (ISS). The development and evaluation of these instruments has been chronicled through presentations at the International Conference on Ion Mobility Spectrometry over the past three years. As the flight VOA from Graseby is prepared for operation on ISS at JSC, it is time to begin evaluations of technologies for the next generation VOA, Although the desired instrument characteristics for the next generation unit are the same as the current unit, the requirements are much more stringent. As NASA looks toward future missions beyond Earth environs, a premium will be placed upon small, light, reliable, autonomous hardware. It is with these visions in mind that the JSC Toxicology Laboratory began a search for the next generation VOA. One technology that is a candidate for the next generation VOA is GC/IMS. The recent miniaturization of IMS technology permits it to compete with other, inherently small, technologies such as chip-sized sensor arrays. This paper will discuss the lessons learned from the VOA experience and how that has shaped the design of a potential second generation VOA based upon GC/IMS technology. Data will be presented from preliminary evaluations of GC technology and the mini-IMS when exposed to VOCs likely to be detected aboard spacecraft. Results from the evaluation of an integrated GC/mini-IMS system will be shown if available.

  1. [Development of methods for determining acrylamide in food products by gas-liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Bessonov, V V; Malinkin, A D; Perederiaev, O I; Bogachuk, M N; Volkovich, S V; Medvedev, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    The method of determination of acrylamide in various food (milk powder, potato chips, instant coffee) by gas-liquid chromatography after pre-bromination was developed. Studies have shown the possibility of using bromination of acrylamide to give it the necessary properties for better extraction, purification and detection. Also revealed the possibility of qualitative and quantitative determine a acrylamide in food by gas-liquid chromatography with detection by electron capture detector. PMID:22232888

  2. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data. PMID:24420979

  3. Analysis of pesticide residues in tobacco with online size exclusion chromatography with gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiyun; Bian, Zhaoyang; Tang, Gangling; Wang, Deguo; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-07-01

    An ultrasensitive method for the simultaneous analysis of pesticides residues in tobacco was developed with online size exclusion chromatography with gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Tobacco samples were extracted with the solvent mixture of cyclohexane and acetone (7:3, v/v) and centrifuged. Then, the supernatant liquors were injected directly into the online size exclusion chromatography with gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry without any other purification procedures after being filtered with a 0.22 μm organic phase filter. The matrix interferences were effectively removed and recoveries of most pesticides were in the range of 72-121%. Especially, for chlorothalonil, the analysis efficiency of this method was much more favorable than that of the general method, in which dispersive solid-phase extraction was used as an additional purified procedure. In addition, the limits of quantitation of this method were from 1 to 50 μg/kg. Therefore, a rapid, cost-effective, labor-saving method was proposed in the present work, which was suitable for the analysis of 41 pesticide residues in tobacco. PMID:27197809

  4. [Analysis of cracking gas compressor fouling by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Fang, Fei; Wei, Tao; Liu, Shuqing; Jiang, Guangshen; Cai, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The fouling from the different sections of the cracked gas compressor in Daqing Petrochemical Corporation was analyzed by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS). All the samples were cracked in RJ-1 tube furnace cracker at the cracking temperature of 500 degrees C, and separated with a 60 m DB-1 capillary column. An electron impact ionization (EI) source was used with the ionizing voltage of 70 eV. The results showed the formation of fouling was closely related with cyclopentadiene which accounted for about 50% of the cracking products. Other components detected were 1-butylene, propylene, methane and n-butane. This Py/GC-MS method can be used as an effective approach to analyze the causes of fouling in the petrochemical plants. PMID:24063202

  5. High temperature diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Freye, Chris E; Mu, Lan; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-12-11

    A high-temperature diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) instrument is demonstrated which readily allows separations up to 325°C. Previously, diaphragm valve-based GC×GC was limited to 175°C if the valve was mounted in the oven, or limited to 265°C if the valve was faced mounted on the outside of the oven. A new diaphragm valve has been commercially developed, in which the temperature sensitive O-rings that previously limited the separation temperatures have been replaced with Kalrez O-rings, a perfluoroelastomer, allowing for significantly higher temperatures permitting a greater range of volatile and semi-volatile compounds to be readily separated. In the current investigation, a separation temperature up to 325°C is demonstrated with the valve mounted directly in the oven. Since the temperature limit for most commonly used GC columns is at or below 325°C, the scope of diaphragm valve-based GC×GC is now dramatically broadened to encompass a majority of all column stationary phase chemistries. A 44-component mixture of alkanes, alcohols, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons is used to study this new configuration whose boiling points range from 98°C (n-heptane) to 450°C (n-triacontane). For the test mixture using a modulation period PM of 1.0s, peak shapes on second dimension separations, (2)D, are symmetric with average widths at base of 79.4ms, producing a (2)D peak capacity of (2)nc∼12. Based on the average peak width of 2.4s for the first dimension separation with a run time of 32.5min, the (1)D peak capacity is (1)nc∼800. Thus, the ideal two-dimensional peak capacity [Formula: see text] is 9600. Little variation in within-analyte (2)D peak width was observed with an average %RSD of less than 3.0%. Furthermore, retention time on (2)D was very reproducible with an average %RSD less than 0.5%. Measured peak areas (sum of all (2)D peaks for given analyte) had an average %RSD of 4.4%. The transfer fraction from (1)D

  6. Chromatography

    MedlinePlus

    ... a way of separating two or more chemical compounds. Chemical compounds are chemicals that are bonded together. For example, ... and hydrogen. Proteins are another type of chemical compound. There are different kinds of chromatography. These include ...

  7. PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION FOR THE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AUTOMATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This documentation contains the program listings, program flowcharts, symbol definitions, symbol references, and program descriptions of all the BASIC language programs which implement the functional specifications for an advanced chromatography automation system (EPA report PB80...

  8. Surface characterization of industrial fibers with inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    van Asten, A; van Veenendaal, N; Koster, S

    2000-08-01

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was applied for the determination of the surface characteristics of Tenax carbon fibers and Akzo Nobel Twaron fibers. Furthermore, IGC procedures for the determination of dispersive and acid-base interactions were validated. The data show that too high values for the dispersive component of the surface energy are obtained when the adsorption area occupied by a single adsorbed n-alkane molecule is estimated from parameters of the corresponding liquid. Comparable values are obtained when the Doris-Gray methodology (area per methylene unit) or measured probe areas are employed. For the fibers studied in this work meaningful Gibbs energy values of the acid-base interaction were only obtained with the polarizability approach. When the dispersive interaction of the polar probes with the fiber surface was scaled to the n-alkane interaction via surface tension, the boiling point, or the vapor pressure of the probes often negative acid-base interaction energies were found. From the temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy, the enthalpy of the acid-base interactions of various probes with the carbon and Twaron aramid fibers was determined. However, from these enthalpy values no meaningful acid-base surface parameters could be obtained. Generally, the limited accuracy with which these parameters can be obtained make the usefulness of this procedure questionable. Also the Gibbs energy data of acid-base interaction can provide a qualitative basis to classify the acidity-basicity of the fiber surface. This latter approach requires only a limited data set and is sufficiently rapid to enable the use of IGC as a screening tool for fibers at a production site. For several polar probes significant concentration effects on carbon fibers were observed. At very low probe loadings the interaction with the fiber surface suddenly increases. This effect is caused by the heterogeneity of the interaction energy of the active sites at the surface. A simple

  9. High resolution gas chromatography analysis of rice bran oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fengxiang; Lin, Qinlu; Chen, Xu; Wei, Xiaojun

    To assess the nutritional value and safety quality of rice bran oil (RBO) ,fatty acids of RBO from 15 species rice come from Hunan Province were analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC). Crude RBOs were extracted by hexane 3-times using a solvent-to-rice bran ratio of 3:1 (w/w) at 40°C and composition of RBOs was analyzed by HRGC. The result showed that main fatty acids of 15 kinds of RBO include myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), palmitoleic acid (C16:1), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), linolenic acid (C18:3), arachidic acid (C20:0), arachidonic acid (C20:1). It is strange that arachidonic acid (C20:1) is not listed in Chinese standard of RBO (GB11192-2003), and it exists in our samples of RBO. The average value of linolenic acid in RBOs is 1.6304% (range from 1.2425% to 2.131%), and it showed higher level comparing with Chinese standard that linolenic acid is less than 1.0%. The average value of USFA and SFA are 76.81% (range 75.96% to 82.06% ) and 20.15% (range 13.72% to 23.06%) respectively, and USFA content is close to olive oil (83.75%), peanut oil (81.75%) and soybean oil (85.86%). USFA in Jingyou 13 RBO is the highest content. The ratio of USFA to SFA content is 4:1 (range from 3.32 to 5.98:1). The ratio of SFA: MUFA: PUFA of 15 RBOs is 1: 2.2: 1.8, and ω6/ω3 ratio is 21.69 (range from16.54 to 27.28) and it is close to the 26:1 which is reported to be helpful to increase SOD activity. The oleic acid /linoleic acid ratio of 15 RBOs is 1.23:1 (rang from 1.04:1 to 1.42:1). Our data analyzed composition of RBOs from 15 species rice of China and will provide new evidence to revise RBO standard. It also helps us to assess nutritional value of RBOs and identify different RBOs from various species rice and places of origin.

  10. Gold Nanoparticle Chemiresistor Arrays for Micro-Gas Chromatography Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, Elizabeth Laura

    Thiolate-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticle (MPN) chemiresistors were studied as the sensing devices for micro-gas chromatography (microGC) systems. Because transport through chemiresistors is dominated by tunneling, they are highly sensitive. In order to improve their limit of detection, their fundamental noise was studied. Chemiresistors exhibit 1/f type noise where noise scales inversely with frequency. Chemiresistor noise was found to scale inversely with MPN film thickness. We lowered the noise prefactor of a 50x60 microm2 chemiresistor by coating a thick rather than monolayer MPN film. Electron beam induced crosslinking (EBIX) of the MPN film slightly reduced chemiresistor noise. A technique for patterning chemiresistor arrays with MPN films using EBIX was developed, and an array with four distinct MPNs was fabricated in an area ˜600 microm 2. This is the smallest chemiresistor array reported to date. Chemiresistors were exposed to vapors and provided differential sensitivities comparable to those from larger uncrosslinked chemiresistors. Chemiresistors were studied to assess their long term stability. Chemiresistors exhibited decreases in resistance over time that is likely caused by loss of MPN ligands. Temperature dependent current-voltage measurements verified the resistance change was not due to changes in the size of the MPN core. While resistance could change by orders of magnitude, vapor sensitivity did not show significant changes. Heating increased the change in resistance, but chemiresistors remained responsive after being held at 80°C for a cumulative 400 hours. It was unknown whether tunneling in the MPN film is through the highest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO) or lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). A new technique was explored to distinguish tunneling through the HOMO and LUMO by measuring the induced thermoelectric voltage caused by a temperature difference across the MPN film. For integration into a microGC system, we

  11. Selective MBE growth of nonalloyed ohmic contacts to 2D electron gas in high-electron-mobility transistors based on GaN/AlGaN heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiboroda, I. O.; Andreev, A. A.; Perminov, P. A.; Fedorov, Yu. V.; Zanaveskin, M. L.

    2014-06-01

    Specific features of how nonalloyed ohmic contacts to the 2D conducting channel of high-electron-mobility transistors based on AlGaN/(AlN)/GaN heterostructures are fabricated via deposition of heavily doped n +-GaN through a SiO2 mask by ammonia molecular-beam epitaxy have been studied. The technique developed makes it possible to obtain specific resistances of contacts to the 2D gas as low as 0.11 Ω mm on various types of Ga-face nitride heterostructures, which are several times lower than the resistance of conventional alloyed ohmic contacts.

  12. NEW SCX PEPTIDE ELUTION SCORE FOR PH/SALT-GRADIENT SCX CHROMATOGRAPHY IN 2D-NANO-LC/MSMS ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN DIGESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new automated 2D-(SCX/RP)-nano-LC/MSMS method was developed. Separation of the peptides in the first LC dimension was the main focus of this work, and it was optimized using human serum albumin (HSA) and human lung cell lysate tryptic digests. Samples were reduced and alkylated...

  13. The application of 2-D dual nanoscale liquid chromatography and triple quadrupole-linear ion trap system for the identification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Tschäppät, Viviane; Varesio, Emmanuel; Signor, Luca; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2005-09-01

    2-D nanoscale LC combined with a triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer was applied to the analysis of a complex peptide mixture. A 2-D dual nanoscale LC-MS/MS system was compared to a conventional one. Peptides were separated with a strong cation exchange (SCX) microcolumn in the first dimension and two C18 nanocolumns were used as second dimension. MS experiments were performed using information-dependent data acquisition, where two precursor ions were selected from an enhanced MS (EMS) or an enhanced multicharged ion (EMC) as survey scan. The major benefit of EMC instead of EMS was a two-fold reduction of the data file and a 15% increase of characterized proteins. The advantage of the 2-D dual nanoscale LC-MS/MS system versus the conventional 2-D nanoscale LC-MS/MS system was reflected in the significant increase of peptides which were successfully identified within the same time frame. The first factor contributing to this increase was that the mass spectrometer was collecting twice the number of relevant MS/MS data. The second factor is the use of twice the number of SCX salt fractions in the first dimension, allowing a better sample fractionation, thereby reducing the number of peptides transferred to the second chromatographic dimension per salt fraction. PMID:16224964

  14. The use of a milli-whistle as a detector in gas analysis by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Huang; He, Yi-San; Lin, Chien-Hung; Fan, Gang-Ting; Chen, Hsin-Kai

    2014-01-01

    This mini-review introduces a general understanding of the use of a milli-whistle as a gas chromatography (GC) detector in gas analysis, including our research on the methodology and theory associated with a number of different related applications. The milli-whistle is connected to the outlet of a GC capillary, and when the eluted gases and the GC carrier gas pass through it, a sound with a fundamental frequency is produced. The sound wave can be picked up by a microphone or an accelerometer, and after a fast Fourier transform, the online data obtained for frequency-change vs. retention time constitute a new method for detecting gases. The first part of this review discusses the fundamentals of the milli-whistle. Some modifications are also discussed, including various types of whistles and an attempt to maximize the sensitivity and stability of the method. The second part then focuses on several practical applications, including an analysis of hydrogen released from ammonia borane, inorganic gases produced from fireworks, the CO2/O2 ratio from expired human breath and a purity test for alcohols. These studies show that the GC-whistle method has great potential for use as a fast sampling ionization method, and for the direct analysis of biological and chemical samples at under ambient conditions. PMID:24420261

  15. Analysis of methaqualone in biological matrices by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography. Comparison with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plaut, O; Girod, C; Staub, C

    1998-04-01

    The analysis of methaqualone (MTQ) in biological matrices by capillary electrophoresis (CE) is described. This methods uses liquid-liquid extraction and micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC), an operation mode of CE. Separations are made using a 25 cm long capillary and a borate/phosphate buffer at pH 8.2. Using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS) as reference method, MTQ has been analyzed in urine, blood, gastric content and hair. For hair analysis, supercritical fluid extraction was compared with liquid-liquid extraction. Linearity was established in urine and blood between 0.25 and 10.0 micrograms/ml. MTQ recovery from blood was estimated at 60%. The limit of detection of this method in urine is about 0.10 microgram/ml. Drawbacks and advantages of MECC over GC-MS are discussed. PMID:9627981

  16. Identification of Explosives from Porous Materials: Applications Using Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Miller; G. Elias; N.C. Schmitt; C. Rae

    2010-06-01

    High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography techniques are well documented and widely used for the detection of trace explosives from organic solvents. These techniques were modified to specifically identify and quantify explosives extracted from various materials taken from people who had recently handled explosives. Documented techniques were modified to specifically detect and quantify RDX, TNT, and PETN from denim, colored flannel, vinyl, and canvas extracted in methanol using no sample cleanup prior to analysis. The methanol extracts were injected directly into several different column types and analyzed by HPLC-UV and/or GC-ECD. This paper describes general screening methods that were used to determine the presence of explosives in unknown samples and techniques that have been optimized for quantification of each explosive from the substrate extracts.

  17. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  18. Community air monitoring for pesticides-part 2: multiresidue determination of pesticides in air by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Matt; Lee, P

    2014-03-01

    Two multiresidue methods were developed to determine pesticides in air collected in California. Pesticides were trapped using XAD-4 resin and extracted with ethyl acetate. Based on an analytical method from the University of California Davis Trace Analytical Laboratory, pesticides were detected by analyzing the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine chlorothalonil, chlorthal-dimethyl, cycloate, dicloran, dicofol, EPTC, ethalfluralin, iprodione, mefenoxam, metolachlor, PCNB, permethrin, pronamide, simazine, trifluralin, and vinclozolin. A GC with a flame photometric detector was used to determine chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos oxon, diazinon, diazinon oxon, dimethoate, dimethoate oxon, fonophos, fonophos oxon, malathion, malathion oxon, naled, and oxydemeton. Trapping efficiencies ranged from 78 to 92 % for low level (0.5 μg) and 37-104 % for high level (50 and 100 μg) recoveries. Little to no degradation of compounds occurred over 31 days; recoveries ranged from 78 to 113 %. In the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) method, pesticides were detected by analyzing the extract by GC-MS to determine chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, dichlorvos, dicofol, endosulfan 1, endosulfan sulfate, oxyfluorfen, permethrin, propargite, and trifluralin. A liquid chromatograph coupled to a MS was used to determine azinphos-methyl, chloropyrifos oxon, DEF, diazinon, diazinon oxon, dimethoate, dimethoate oxon, diuron, EPTC, malathion, malathion oxon, metolachlor, molinate, norflurazon, oryzalin, phosmet, propanil, simazine and thiobencarb. Trapping efficiencies for compounds determined by the CDFA method ranged from 10 to 113, 22 to 114, and 56 to 132 % for 10, 5, and 2 μg spikes, respectively. Storage tests yielded 70-170 % recovery for up to 28 days. These multiresidue methods represent flexible, sensitive, accurate, and cost-effective ways to determine residues of various pesticides in ambient air. PMID:24370860

  19. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  20. Characterization of odor-active compounds of various Chrysanthemum essential oils by gas chromatography-olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and their correlation with sensory attributes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Fan, Binbin; Niu, Yunwei; Wu, Minling; Liu, Junhua; Ma, Shengtao

    2016-01-15

    Volatiles of five kinds of Chrysanthemum essential oils with different manufactures were characterized by descriptive sensory analysis, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and statistics analysis. Six sensory attributes (floral, woody, grassy, fruity, sour and minty) were selected to assess Chrysanthemum essential oils. A total of 38 volatile compounds were detected and quantified using standard substances by GC-O and GC-MS. Terpenes constituted the largest chemical group among the volatiles of the essential oils. Then partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used to elucidate the relationship between sensory attributes and aroma compounds. The result showed that α-pinene, β-thujene, α-terpinolen, β-cubebene, caryophyllene, (Z)β-farnesene, (-)-spathulenol, linalool, camphor, camphene, 4-terpineol, Z-citral and 4-isopropyltoluene were typical aroma compounds covaried with characteristic aroma of Chrysanthemum essential oils. PMID:26735711

  1. Determination of parts-per-billion concentrations of dioxane in water and soil by purge and trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or charcoal tube enrichment gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, P.S.; Mauer, T.; Wagner, M.; Chase, S.; Giles, B.

    1987-08-01

    Two methods for the determination of 1,4-dioxane in water have been studied. The first method is a heated purge and trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system following salting out with sodium sulfate. The second method is an adsorption on coconut-shell charcoal and solvent desorption with carbon disulfide/methanol followed by analysis of the desorbate by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The first method is also successful for the determination of 1,4-dioxane in solids and sediments. The second method is shown to be successful for 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, and butoxyethanol in water. The two methods are compared by analyzing 15 samples by both methods and achieving similar results.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of vetiver essential oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Belhassen, Emilie; Baldovini, Nicolas; Brevard, Hugues; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2013-05-01

    Vetiver essential oils (VEO) are important raw ingredients used in perfume industry, entering the formula of numerous modern fragrances. Vetiver oils are considered to be among the most complex essential oils, resulting most of the time in highly coeluted chromatograms whatever the analytical technique. In this context, conventional gas chromatography has failed to provide a routine tool for the accurate qualitative and quantitative analysis of their constituents. Applying comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography techniques (GC×GC-FID/MS) afforded the mean to separate efficiently vetiver oil constituents in order to identify them in a more reliable way. Moreover, this is the first time that a complete true quantitation of each constituent is carried out on such complex oils by means of internal calibration. Finally, we have studied the influence of the injection mode on the determined chemical composition, and showed that several alcohols underwent dehydration under defined chromatographic conditions (splitless mode) usually recommended for quantitation purposes. PMID:23522261

  3. [Analysis of oxygenates from fischer-Tropsch synthesis oil using column liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrography].

    PubMed

    Fan, Gaixian; Xu, Yuanyuan; Li, Ying; Li, Ying; Xiang, Hongwei; Li, Yongwang

    2007-11-01

    A liquid chromatographic column filled with silica gel of 100 - 200 mesh was used to separate cold trap oil from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as eluent. With this pretreatment method, the cold trap oil was separated into two major classes, namely, hydrocarbons and oxygenates. Minor components were also enriched and determined, and small peaks adjacent to big peaks and tailings were also well solved. The oxygenates were then analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and 139 components were identified. PMID:18257312

  4. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful technique for analyzing gaseous mixtures. Applied to the earth's atmosphere, GC can be used to determine the permanent gases--such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen--and to analyze organic pollutants in air. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used GC in spacecraft missions to Mars (the Viking Biology Gas Exchange Experiment [GEX] and the Viking Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer [GC-MS]) and to Venus (the Pioneer Venus Gas Chromatograph [PVGC] on board the Pioneer Venus sounder probe) for determining the atmospheric constituents of these two planets. Even though conventional GC was very useful in the Viking and Pioneer missions, spacecraft constraints and limitations intrinsic to the technique prevented the collection of more samples. With the Venus probe, for instance, each measurement took a relatively long time to complete (10 min), and successive samples could not be introduced until the previous samples had left the column. Therefore, while the probe descended through the Venusian atmosphere, only three samples were acquired at widely separated altitudes. With the Viking mission, the sampling rate was not a serious problem because samples were acquired over a period of one year. However, the detection limit was a major disadvantage. The GC-MS could not detect simple hydrocarbons and simple alcohols below 0.1 ppm, and the GEX could not detect them below 1 ppm. For more complex molecules, the detection limits were at the parts-per-billion level for both instruments. Finally, in both the Viking and Pioneer missions, the relatively slow rate of data acquisition limited the number of analyses, and consequently, the amount of information returned. Similar constraints are expected in future NASA missions. For instance, gas chromatographic instrumentation is being developed to collect and analyze organic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan (one of Saturn's satellites). The Titan

  5. Multiplex gas chromatography: an alternative concept for gas chromatographic analysis of planetary atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J R

    1989-03-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful technique for analyzing gaseous mixtures. Applied to the earth's atmosphere, GC can be used to determine the permanent gases--such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen--and to analyze organic pollutants in air. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used GC in spacecraft missions to Mars (the Viking Biology Gas Exchange Experiment [GEX] and the Viking Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer [GC-MS]) and to Venus (the Pioneer Venus Gas Chromatograph [PVGC] on board the Pioneer Venus sounder probe) for determining the atmospheric constituents of these two planets. Even though conventional GC was very useful in the Viking and Pioneer missions, spacecraft constraints and limitations intrinsic to the technique prevented the collection of more samples. With the Venus probe, for instance, each measurement took a relatively long time to complete (10 min), and successive samples could not be introduced until the previous samples had left the column. Therefore, while the probe descended through the Venusian atmosphere, only three samples were acquired at widely separated altitudes. With the Viking mission, the sampling rate was not a serious problem because samples were acquired over a period of one year. However, the detection limit was a major disadvantage. The GC-MS could not detect simple hydrocarbons and simple alcohols below 0.1 ppm, and the GEX could not detect them below 1 ppm. For more complex molecules, the detection limits were at the parts-per-billion level for both instruments. Finally, in both the Viking and Pioneer missions, the relatively slow rate of data acquisition limited the number of analyses, and consequently, the amount of information returned. Similar constraints are expected in future NASA missions. For instance, gas chromatographic instrumentation is being developed to collect and analyze organic gases and aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan (one of Saturn's satellites). The Titan

  6. The detection of nicotine in a Late Mayan period flask by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Zagorevski, Dmitri V; Loughmiller-Newman, Jennifer A

    2012-02-29

    Several ancient Mayan vessels from the Kislak Collection of the US Library of Congress were examined for the presence of alkaloids. One of them, a codex-style flask, bears a text that appears to read yo-'OTOT-ti 'u-MAY, spelling y-otoot 'u-may 'the home of its/his/her tobacco'. Samples extracted from this Late Classic period (600 to 900 AD) container were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) methods. Nicotine was identified as the major component of the extracts. LC/MS analyses also yielded signals due to nicotine mono-oxides. The identities of the compounds were determined by comparison of the chromatographic and/or mass spectral characteristics with those from standards and literature data. High-resolution high mass accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of protonated nicotine and nicotine mono-oxides were measured to verify and to correct previous product ion assignments. These analyses provided positive evidence for nicotine from a Mayan vessel, indicating it as a likely holder of tobacco leafs. The result of this investigation is the first physical evidence of tobacco from a Mayan container, and only the second example where the vessel content recorded in a Mayan hieroglyphic text has been confirmed directly by chromatography/mass spectrometry trace analysis. PMID:22279016

  7. Evaluation of gas-liquid chromatography for the rapid diagnosis of Clostridium difficile associated disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gianfrilli, P; Pantosti, A; Luzzi, I

    1985-01-01

    Direct gas-liquid chromatography of faecal specimens with isocaproic acid as a marker was used for the rapid diagnosis of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoeal diseases. Ninety stools were examined and results were compared with conventional culture on selective medium and cytotoxin assay in tissue culture. Using a combined analysis of isocaproic acid and butyric acid peak heights we defined three categories: positive, negative, and indeterminate. When the indeterminate group was excluded, the positive and negative predictive values of gas-liquid chromatography analysis were 86.9% and 85% respectively compared with culture and 71.4% and 95% respectively compared with cytotoxin assay. PMID:4008667

  8. Enhancing gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry data analysis using two-dimensional mass channel cluster plots.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Brian D; Reaser, Brooke C; Pinkerton, David K; Hoggard, Jamin C; Skogerboe, Kristen J; Synovec, Robert E

    2014-04-15

    A novel data reduction and representation method for gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) is presented that significantly facilitates separation visualization and analyte peak deconvolution. The method utilizes the rapid mass spectral data collection rate (100 scans/s or greater) of current generation TOFMS detectors. Chromatographic peak maxima (serving as the retention time, tR) above a user specified signal threshold are located, and the chromatographic peak width, W, are determined on a per mass channel (m/z) basis for each analyte peak. The peak W (per m/z) is then plotted against its respective tR (with 10 ms precision) in a two-dimensional (2D) format, producing a cluster of points (i.e., one point per peak W versus tR in the 2D plot). Analysis of GC-TOFMS data by this method produces what is referred to as a two-dimensional mass channel cluster plot (2D m/z cluster plot). We observed that adjacent eluting (even coeluting) peaks in a temperature programmed separation can have their peak W vary as much as ∼10-15%. Hence, the peak W provides useful chemical selectivity when viewed in the 2D m/z cluster plot format. Pairs of overlapped analyte peaks with one-dimensional GC resolution as low as Rs ≈ 0.03 can be visually identified as fully resolved in a 2D m/z cluster plot and readily deconvoluted using chemometrics (i.e., demonstrated using classical least-squares analysis). Using the 2D m/z cluster plot method, the effective peak capacity of one-dimensional GC separations is magnified nearly 40-fold in one-dimensional GC, and potentially ∼100-fold in the context of comparing it to a two-dimensional separation. The method was studied using a 73 component test mixture separated on a 30 m × 250 μm i.d. RTX-5 column with a LECO Pegasus III TOFMS. PMID:24661185

  9. PRECISION AND ACCURACY IN THE DETERMINATION OF ORGANICS IN WATER BY FUSED SILICA CAPILLARY COLUMN GAS CHROMOTOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY AND PACKED COLUMN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two general methods for the identification and measurement of organic compounds in water are compared. One method employs packed column chromatography and the other fused silica capillary column chromatography. The two gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods use diff...

  10. Determination of [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin and the metabolites containing C-terminal D-leucine by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, H; Nakamura, A; Shinohara, Y; Baba, S

    1997-02-21

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure has been developed for the determination of [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin (DADLE) and the fragments containing D-leucine in rat blood. The procedure was applied to the determination of blood levels of [3H-D-Leu5]DADLE and the C-terminal fragments after intravenous administration of [3H-D-Leu5]DADLE to a rat. Unlabelled DADLE and the C-terminal fragments were spiked as carriers to rat blood samples and the blood samples were extracted with 1% trifluoroacetic acid in methanol. The recoveries from rat blood were quantitative for all compounds. DADLE and the C-terminal four fragments were well separated on a reversed-phase column with gradient elution using a mobile phase composed of 0.14% HClO4 and acetonitrile. PMID:9080313

  11. Measuring Carbon Monoxide in Auto Exhaust by Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Dan; Herndon, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple and reliable technique using commonly available equipment for monitoring carbon monoxide in automobile exhaust. The experiment utilizes a gas chromatograph and a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). (DDR)

  12. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: Results from 2013 high-resolution 2D and multicomponent seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.; Agena, W.; Miller, J. J.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a 16-day seismic acquisition cruise aboard the R/V Pelican in the Gulf of Mexico to survey two established gas hydrate study sites. We used a pair of 105/105 cubic inch generator/injector airguns as the seismic source, and a 450-m 72-channel hydrophone streamer to record two-dimensional (2D) data. In addition, we also deployed at both sites an array of 4-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) to record P- and S-wave energy at the seafloor from the same seismic source positions as the streamer data. At lease block Green Canyon 955 (GC955), we acquired 400 km of 2-D streamer data, in a 50- to 250-m-spaced grid augmented by several 20-km transects that provide long offsets for the OBS. The seafloor recording at GC955 was accomplished by a 2D array of 21 OBS at approximately 400-m spacing, including instruments carefully positioned at two of the three boreholes where extensive logging-while-drilling data is available to characterize the presence of gas hydrate. At lease block Walker Ridge 313 (WR313), we acquired 450 km of streamer data in a set of 11-km, 150- to 1,000-m-spaced, dip lines and 6- to 8-km, 500- to 1000-m-spaced strike lines. These were augmented by a set of 20-km lines that provide long offsets for a predominantly linear array of 25 400- to 800-m spaced OBS deployed in the dip direction in and around WR313. The 2D data provide at least five times better resolution of the gas hydrate stability zone than the available petroleum industry seismic data from the area; this enables considerably improved analysis and interpretation of stratigraphic and structural features including previously unseen faults and gas chimneys that may have considerable impact on gas migration. Initial processing indicates that the OBS data quality is good, and we anticipate that these data will yield estimates of P- and S-wave velocities, as well as PP (reflected) and PS (converted wave) images beneath each sensor location.

  13. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  14. Qualitative Analysis by Gas Chromatography: GC versus the Nose in Formulating Artificial Fruit Flavors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment used to illustrate the use of gas chromatography retention indices for the identification of unknown compounds, specifically for the identification of unknown compounds and for the identification of the volatile compounds responsible for the odor of the banana. Procedures, reference data, and sample…

  15. APPLICATION OF GC/ITD (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ION TRAP DETECTOR) TO ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of gas chromatography (GC) detectors has expanded rapidly. The necessity for mass spectrometric (MS) characterization of GC effluents stems from the complexity of the matrices associated with environmental samples. There are currently several MS types being used in con...

  16. Modified extraction procedure for gas-liquid chromatography applied to the identification of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Thomann, W R; Hill, G B

    1986-01-01

    Chloroform and ether commonly are used as solvents to extract metabolic organic acids for analysis by gas-liquid chromatography in the identification of anaerobic bacteria. Because these solvents are potentially hazardous to personnel, modified extraction procedures involving the use of a safer solvent, methyl tert-butyl ether were developed which remained both simple to perform and effective for organism identification. PMID:3700623

  17. The Separation and Identification of Straight Chain Hydrocarbons: An Experiment Using Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment using gas-liquid chromatography is discussed, introducing the student to concept of dead volume and its measurement, idea and use of an internal reference compound, and to linear relationship existing between measurements of a separation on two different stationary phases. (Author/SK)

  18. An Application of Trimethylsilyl Derivatives with Temperature Programmed Gas Chromatography to the Senior Analytical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelter, Paul B.; Carr, James D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to teach temperature programed gas chromatography (TPGC) techniques and importance of derivatizing many classes of substrated to be separated. Includes equipment needed, procedures for making trimethylsilyl derivatives, applications, sample calculations, and typical results. Procedure required one, three-hour…

  19. A Gas Chromatography Experiment for Proving the Application of Quantum Symmetry Restrictions in Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosiere, M.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment in which gas chromatography is used to prove the application of quantum symmetry restrictions in homonuclear diatomic molecules. Comparisons between experimental results and theoretical computed values show good agreement, within one to two…

  20. Planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, I. A.; Platonov, V. I.; Pavelyev, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The high selectivity of the adsorption layer for low-boiling alkanes is shown, the separation factor (α) couple iso-butane / butane is 1.9 at a column temperature of 50 °C.The paper presents sorption and selective properties of planar gas chromatography column on aluminum plate with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the stationary phase.

  1. Characterization of aroma volatiles in select tangerine hybrids by gas chromatography-olfactometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aroma volatiles in orange juice have been well studied1 but little information is available on those found in fresh tangerine. Five of 25 tangerine hybrids studied in the 2007-2008 season were analyzed by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) using the time intensity (Osme) method. The choice of sa...

  2. A multivariate statistical analysis approach to analyze gas chromatography-olfactometry data of tangerine hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas chromatography (GC) hyphenated with olfactometry (O) when a human subject smells the effluent of the GC is a useful technique to identify aroma activity of volatile compounds in a food. Many techniques have been developed, based on olfactory thresholds (CHARM analysis, AEDA), or based on psychop...

  3. The determination of cyclohexylamine in aqueous solutions of sodium cyclamate by electron-capture gas chromatography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, M. D.; Pereira, W. E.; Duffield, A. M.

    1971-01-01

    A sensitive primary amine assay, capable of detecting 10 to the minus 11th g and utilizing the determination of the amine N-2,4-dinitrophenyl derivative by electron-capture gas chromatography is described. The method is exemplified by the determination of cyclohexylamine in sodium cyclamate.

  4. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  5. Review of recent developments and applications in low-pressure (vacuum outlet) gas chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of low pressure (LP) vacuum outlet gas chromatography (GC) was introduced more than 50 years ago, but it was not until the 2000s that its theoretical applicability to fast analysis of GC-amenable chemicals was realized. In practice, LPGC is implemented by placing the outlet of a short, ...

  6. DETERMINATION OF ACRYLAMIDE IN RAT SERUM AND SCIATIC NERVE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTRON-CAPTURE DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified method for the derivatization and analysis of acrylamide as 2-bromopropenamide by gas chromatography/electron capture detection was validated in serum and sciatic nerve from rats. he method was accurate and precise over the concentration range of 2240 to 74700 ppm (w/v...

  7. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MATRIX ISOLATION - INFRARED SPECTROMETRY FOR AIR SAMPLE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the application of gas chromatography/matrix- solation infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry to the analysIs of environmental air sample extracts. Samples that were analyzed include extracts from woodsmoke-impacted air, XAD-2 blanks, indoor air, and carpet sample...

  8. ON-LINE MEASUREMENT OF NITROUS OXIDE FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES BY AUTOMATED GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses on-line measurement of nitrous oxide (N2O) from combustion sources by automated gas chromatography. ossil fuel combustion is suspected of contributing to measured increases in the ambient concentrations of N2O. haracterization of N2O emissions from fossil fuel...

  9. Quantitation of monomers in poly(glyerol-co-diacid) gels using gas chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The validation of a gas chromatography (GC) method developed to quantify amounts of starting material from the synthesis of hyperbranched polymers made from glycerol and either succinic acid, glutaric acid, or azelaic acid is described. The GC response to concentration was linear for all starting r...

  10. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

  11. High-voltage spark atomic emission detector for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkin, C. L.; Koeplin, S. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A dc-powered, double-gap, miniature nanosecond spark source for emission spectrochemical analysis of gas chromatographic effluents is described. The spark is formed between two thoriated tungsten electrodes by the discharge of a coaxial capacitor. The spark detector is coupled to the gas chromatograph by a heated transfer line. The gas chromatographic effluent is introduced into the heated spark chamber where atomization and excitation of the effluent occurs upon breakdown of the analytical gap. A microcomputer-controlled data acquisition system allows the implementation of time-resolution techniques to distinguish between the analyte emission and the background continuum produced by the spark discharge. Multiple sparks are computer averaged to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The application of the spark detector for element-selective detection of metals and nonmetals is reported.

  12. Selectable one-dimensional or two-dimensional gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry with preparative fraction collection for analysis of ultra-trace amounts of odor compounds.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo

    2011-05-27

    A novel selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry with preparative fraction collection (selectable (1)D/(2)D GC-O/MS with PFC) system was developed. The main advantages of this system are the simple and fast selection of (1)D GC-O/MS or (2)D GC-O/MS or (1)D GC-PFC or (2)D GC-PFC operation with a mouse click (without any instrumental set-up change), and total transfer of enriched compounds with thermal desorption (TD) on the same system for identification with (2)D GC-O/MS analysis. Recovery of PFC enrichment with 20 injection cycles of 15 model compounds at 500pg each (e.g. alcohol, aldehyde, ester, lactone, and phenol) was very good with recoveries in the range of 98-116%. The feasibility and benefit of the proposed system was demonstrated with an identification of off-flavor compounds (e.g. 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), and geosmin) in spiked wine at odor perception threshold level (5-50ngL(-1)). After parallel stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) for 20 aliquots of a sample and subsequent PFC enrichment for the odor-active fractions from the 20 stir bars, three off-flavor compounds were clearly resolved and detected with TD-(2)D GC-O/MS in scan mode. The good efficiency of SBSE-PFC enrichment in the range of 71-78% shows that all analytical steps, e.g. SBSE, TD, (1)D/(2)D GC-O/MS, and PFC, are quantitative and identification of off-flavor compounds at ngL(-1) level in wine is possible. PMID:21081238

  13. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Joseph L.; McCarthy, John F.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  14. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  15. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  16. Determination of methane in ambient air by multiplex gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.; Carle, G. C.; Phillips, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A multiplex gas chromatographic technique for the determination of methane in ambient air over extended periods is reported. A modest gas chromatograph which uses air as the carrier gas was modified by adding a silver oxide sample modulator for multiplex operation. The modulator selectively catalyzes the decomposition of methane in air. The resulting analytical system requires no consumables beyond power. A profile of the methane concentration in this laboratory was obtained for an 8-day period. During this period, methane concentration varied with an approximately daily period from a low of 1.53 + or - 0.60 ppm to a high of 4.63 + or - 0.59 ppm over the entire 8 days. Some of the measured concentrations are higher than those reported elsewhere indicating the presence of some local source or sources for methane. This work has demonstrated the utility of a relatively simple multiplex gas chromatograph for the analysis of environmental samples. The technique should be applicable to other trace components in air through use of other selective modulators.

  17. Large Volume Injection Techniques in Capillary Gas Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large volume injection (LVI) is a prerequisite of modern gas chromatographic (GC) analysis, especially when trace sample components have to be determined at very low concentration levels. Injection of larger than usual sample volumes increases sensitivity and/or reduces (or even eliminates) the need...

  18. Using Divergent Δ12CH2D2 and Δ13CH3D to Trace the Provenance and Evolution of Methane Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. D.; Freedman, P.; Mills, M.; Rumble, D.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of Δ13CH3D (deviations in Δ13CH3D/12CH4 from stochastic; Ono et al. Anal. Chem. v.86, p.6487, 2014) or Δ18 (from (12CH2D2 + 13CH3D)/12CH4; Stolper et al. Science, v.344, p.1500, 2014, ) have been used to infer temperatures of formation of methane gas. However, departures from thermodynamic equilibrium isotopic bond ordering will result from any fractionating process that do not include bond rupture and reformation, including mixing, diffusion, and kinetic processing. This is because the isotopic bond ordering no longer reflects the bulk isotopic composition once fractionation occurs. A direct measure of departures from thermodynamic equilibrium isotopic bond ordering in methane comes from both Δ12CH2D2 and Δ13CH3D in the same gas. Until now, this has not been possible due to instrumental limitations. We have carried out measurements of Δ12CH2D2 and Δ13CH3D in methane gas mixtures using a unique, large-geometry double-focusing isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS), the Panorama, in order to investigate the usefulness of these two mass-18 isotopologues as tracers of mixing of methane sources. This instrument has a dispersion/magnification ratio, the parameter of merit for mass resolving power, of ~ 1400 mm that exceeds that of any other gas-source IRMS by more than 3.5x and is slightly larger than that for large-geometry SIMS instruments. With this geometry we routinely operate with mass resolving power (M/ΔM, 5% and 95%) of 40,000 or greater with useful sensitivity for isotope ratio analysis. For these experiments we mixed two gases with bulk D/H differing by 100 ‰. The results follow theoretical expectations within uncertainties of 0.5 ‰ for Δ12CH2D2 and 0.1 ‰ for Δ13CH3D. Precision is sufficient to detect as little as 10% mixing in this system. This precision would also be capable of detecting subtle departures from equilibrium caused by diffusion and kinetic bond rupture (e.g. CH4 + OH).

  19. Hyphenation of supercritical fluid chromatography and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for group type separations.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, H; van der Westhuizen, R; Rohwer, E; Malan, D

    2013-06-14

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process produces a variety of compounds over a wide carbon number range and the synthetic crude oil produced by this process is rich in highly valuable olefins and oxygenates, which crude oil only contains at trace levels. The characterization of these products is very challenging even when using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF-MS). The separation between cyclic paraffins and olefins is especially difficult since they elute in similar positions on the GC×GC chromatogram and since they have identical molecular masses with indistinguishable fragmentation patterns. Previously, a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation procedure was used prior to GC×GC-TOF-MS analysis to distinguish between alkenes and alkanes, both cyclic and non-cyclic, however, there was co-elution of the solvents used in the HPLC fractionation procedure, and the volatile components in the gasoline sample and the dilution introduced by the off-line fractionation procedure made it very difficult to investigate components present at very low concentrations. The hyphenation of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) to GC×GC is less complicated and the removal of the supercritical CO2 can be easily achieved without any loss of the volatile sample components, eliminating the introduction of co-eluting solvents as well as the dilution effect. This paper describes the on-line hyphenation of SFC to a GC×GC system in order to comprehensively characterize the chemical groups (saturates, unsaturates, oxygenates and aromatics) in an FT sample. PMID:23647609

  20. Hyphenated and comprehensive liquid chromatography × gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Marta P B; Denekamp, Ilse; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Kolk, Arend H J; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2016-03-25

    Tuberculosis is one of the world's most emerging public health problems, particularly in developing countries. Chromatography based methods have been used to tackle this epidemic by focusing on biomarker detection. Unfortunately, interferences from lipids in the sputum matrix, particularly cholesterol, adversely affect the identification and detection of the marker compounds. The present contribution describes the serial combination of normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) with thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) to overcome the difficulties of biomarker evaluation. The in-series combination consists of an LC analysis where fractions are collected and then transferred to the THM-GC-MS system. This was either done with comprehensive coupling, transferring all the fractions, or with hyphenated interfacing, i.e. off-line multi heart-cutting, transferring only selected fractions. Owing to the high sensitivity and selectivity of LC as a sample pre-treatment method, and to the high specificity of the MS as a detector, this analytical approach, NPLC × THM-GC-MS, is extremely sensitive. The results obtained indicate that this analytical set-up is able to detect down to 1 × 10(3) mycobacteria/mL of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain 124, spiked in blank sputum samples. It is a powerful analytical tool and also has great potential for full automation. If further studies demonstrate its usefulness when applied blind in real sputum specimens, this technique could compete with the current smear microscopy in the early diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:26585206

  1. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  2. Communication: two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J

    2013-06-14

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15,000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm(2). PMID:23781772

  3. Communication: Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): Simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15 000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm2.

  4. Communication: Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): Simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15, 000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm2.

  5. Phytochemical Profile of Erythrina variegata by Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Analyses.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, Suriyavathana; Palanisamy, Subha; Subramanian, Senthilkumar; Selvaraj, Sumathi; Mari, Kavitha Rani; Kuppulingam, Ramalingam

    2016-08-01

    Natural products derived from plant sources have been utilized to treat patients with numerous diseases. The phytochemical constituents present in ethanolic leaf extract of Erythrina variegata (ELEV) were identified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analyses. Shade dried leaves were powdered and extracted with ethanol for analyses through HPLC to identify selected flavonoids and through GC-MS to identify other molecules. The HPLC analysis of ELEV showed the presence of gallic and caffeic acids as the major components at concentrations of 2.0 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively, as well as other components. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 3-eicosyne; 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol; butanoic acid, 3-methyl-3,7-dimethyl-6-octenyl ester; phytol; 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester; 1-octanol, 2-butyl-; squalene; and 2H-pyran, 2-(7-heptadecynyloxy) tetrahydro-derivative. Because pharmacopuncture is a new evolving natural mode that uses herbal extracts for treating patients with various ailments with minimum pain and maximum effect, the results of this study are particularly important and show that ELEV possesses a wide range of phytochemical constituents, as indicated above, as effective active principle molecules that can be used individually or in combination to treat patients with various diseases. PMID:27555226

  6. Effective 2D-RPLC/RPLC enrichment and separation of micro-components from Hedyotis diffusa Willd. and characterization by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Cunman; Zhao, Yanyan; Guo, Zhimou; Zhang, Xiuli; Xue, Xingya; Liang, Xinmiao

    2014-10-01

    An effective method aiming at enrichment and analysis of micro-components in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) was developed. One fraction (fraction E) from the extract of Hedyotis diffusa Willd. was selected as test sample, which was isolated by using the XAD-4 macroporous resin. To study the micro-components, a two-dimensional reverse-phase liquid chromatography (2D-RPLC/RPLC) method was developed, comprising Click OEG and C18 stationary phases as the first and second dimensions, respectively. Of the eight sub-fractions isolated from the first dimension, three sub-fractions (fractions II-IV) containing micro-components were further separated with the second dimension. The 2D-RPLC/RPLC system was proved to possess high orthogonality. Furthermore, the micro-components were characterized by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-DAD/Q-TOF MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) source. With the optimized separation and characterization method, a large number (>400) of micro-components were enriched and detected from the extracts of H. diffusa Willd., the majority of which has not been isolated from the herb before. Among these isolated micro-components, 38 compounds involving 24 phenylpropanoids, 7 flavonoids and 7 iridoid glucosides (IGs), were identified or tentatively identified from the H. diffusa extracts on the basis of spectral data of the authentic standards and the fragmentation characteristics information available in literatures. The proposed method made it possible to effectively screen and analyze the micro-components in TCMs or other complex natural medicines. PMID:25061712

  7. Phenotyping breast cancer cell lines EM-G3, HCC1937, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 using 2-D electrophoresis and affinity chromatography for glutathione-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transformed phenotypes are common to cell lines derived from various cancers. Proteome profiling is a valuable tool that may reveal uncharacteristic cell phenotypes in transformed cells. Changes in expression of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and other proteins interacting with glutathione (GSH) in model cell lines could be of particular interest. Methods We compared the phenotypes of breast cell lines EM-G3, HCC1937, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 using 2-D electrophoresis (2-DE). We further separated GSH-binding proteins from the cell lines using affinity chromatography with GSH-Sepharose 4B, performed 2-DE analysis and identified the main protein spots. Results Correlation coefficients among 2-DE gels from the cell lines were lower than 0.65, pointing to dissimilarity among the cell lines. Differences in primary constituents of the cytoskeleton were shown by the 2-D protein maps and western blots. The spot patterns in gels of GSH-binding fractions from primary carcinoma-derived cell lines HCC1937 and EM-G3 were similar to each other, and they differed from the spot patterns of cell lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 that were derived from pleural effusions of metastatic mammary carcinoma patients. Major differences in the expression of GST P1-1 and carbonyl reductase [NADPH] 1 were observed among the cell lines, indicating differential abilities of the cell lines to metabolize xenobiotics. Conclusions Our results confirmed the applicability of targeted affinity chromatography to proteome profiling and allowed us to characterize the phenotypes of four breast cancer cell lines. PMID:20731849

  8. Automated two-dimensional interface for capillary gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Strunk, Michael R.; Bechtold, William E.

    1996-02-20

    A multidimensional gas chromatograph (GC) system having wide bore capillary and narrow bore capillary GC columns in series and having a novel system interface. Heart cuts from a high flow rate sample, separated by a wide bore GC column, are collected and directed to a narrow bore GC column with carrier gas injected at a lower flow compatible with a mass spectrometer. A bimodal six-way valve is connected with the wide bore GC column outlet and a bimodal four-way valve is connected with the narrow bore GC column inlet. A trapping and retaining circuit with a cold trap is connected with the six-way valve and a transfer circuit interconnects the two valves. The six-way valve is manipulated between first and second mode positions to collect analyte, and the four-way valve is manipulated between third and fourth mode positions to allow carrier gas to sweep analyte from a deactivated cold trap, through the transfer circuit, and then to the narrow bore GC capillary column for separation and subsequent analysis by a mass spectrometer. Rotary valves have substantially the same bore width as their associated columns to minimize flow irregularities and resulting sample peak deterioration. The rotary valves are heated separately from the GC columns to avoid temperature lag and resulting sample deterioration.

  9. Automated two-dimensional interface for capillary gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Strunk, M.R.; Bechtold, W.E.

    1996-02-20

    A multidimensional gas chromatograph (GC) system is disclosed which has wide bore capillary and narrow bore capillary GC columns in series and has a novel system interface. Heart cuts from a high flow rate sample, separated by a wide bore GC column, are collected and directed to a narrow bore GC column with carrier gas injected at a lower flow compatible with a mass spectrometer. A bimodal six-way valve is connected with the wide bore GC column outlet and a bimodal four-way valve is connected with the narrow bore GC column inlet. A trapping and retaining circuit with a cold trap is connected with the six-way valve and a transfer circuit interconnects the two valves. The six-way valve is manipulated between first and second mode positions to collect analyte, and the four-way valve is manipulated between third and fourth mode positions to allow carrier gas to sweep analyte from a deactivated cold trap, through the transfer circuit, and then to the narrow bore GC capillary column for separation and subsequent analysis by a mass spectrometer. Rotary valves have substantially the same bore width as their associated columns to minimize flow irregularities and resulting sample peak deterioration. The rotary valves are heated separately from the GC columns to avoid temperature lag and resulting sample deterioration. 3 figs.

  10. Feasibility of the preparation of silica monoliths for gas chromatography: fast separation of light hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Imadeddine; Essoussi, Anouar; Fleury, Joachim; Haudebourg, Raphael; Thiebaut, Didier; Vial, Jerome

    2015-02-27

    The preparation conditions of silica monoliths for gas chromatography were investigated. Silica-based monolithic capillary columns based on sol-gel process were tested in the course of high-speed gas chromatographic separations of light hydrocarbons mixture (C1-C4). The impact of modifying the amount of porogen and/or catalyst on the monolith properties were studied. At the best precursor/catalyst/porogen ratio evaluated, a column efficiency of about 6500 theoretical plates per meter was reached with a very good resolution (4.3) for very light compounds (C1-C2). The test mixture was baseline separated on a 70cm column. To our knowledge for the first time a silica-based monolithic capillary column was able to separate light hydrocarbons from methane to n-butane at room temperature with a back pressure in the range of gas chromatography facilities (under 4.1bar). PMID:25622518

  11. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Stationary Phases in Microfabricated Gas-Chromatography Columns.

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Douglas; Sillerud, Colin Halliday

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to integrate Sandia's microfabricated gas-chromatography ( GC) columns with a stationary phase material that is capable of retaining high-volatility chemicals and permanent gases. The successful integration of such a material with GCs would dramatically expand the repertoire of detectable compounds for Sandia's various microanalysis systems. One such promising class of candidate materials is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this report we detail our methods for controlled deposition of HKUST-1 MOF stationary phases within GC columns. We demonstrate: the chromatographic separation of natural gas; a method for determining MOF film thickness from chromatography alone; and the first-reported GC x GC separation of natural gas -- in general -- let alone for two disparate MOF stationary phases. In addition we determine the fundamental thermodynamic constant for mass sorption, the partition coefficient, for HKUST-1 and several light hydrocarbons and select toxic industrial chemicals.

  12. Development, validation and determination of multiclass pesticide residues in cocoa beans using gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zainudin, Badrul Hisyam; Salleh, Salsazali; Mohamed, Rahmat; Yap, Ken Choy; Muhamad, Halimah

    2015-04-01

    An efficient and rapid method for the analysis of pesticide residues in cocoa beans using gas and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed, validated and applied to imported and domestic cocoa beans samples collected over 2 years from smallholders and Malaysian ports. The method was based on solvent extraction method and covers 26 pesticides (insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides) of different chemical classes. The recoveries for all pesticides at 10 and 50 μg/kg were in the range of 70-120% with relative standard deviations of less than 20%. Good selectivity and sensitivity were obtained with method limit of quantification of 10 μg/kg. The expanded uncertainty measurements were in the range of 4-25%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the routine analysis of pesticide residues in cocoa beans via a monitoring study where 10% of them was found positive for chlorpyrifos, ametryn and metalaxyl. PMID:25442595

  13. Liquid chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography as alternative techniques to gas chromatography for the rapid screening of anabolic agents in urine.

    PubMed

    Desfontaine, Vincent; Nováková, Lucie; Ponzetto, Federico; Nicoli, Raul; Saugy, Martial; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-06-17

    This work describes the development of two methods involving supported liquid extraction (SLE) sample treatment followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography or ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS and UHPSFC-MS/MS) for the screening of 43 anabolic agents in human urine. After evaluating different stationary phases, a polar-embedded C18 and a diol columns were selected for UHPLC-MS/MS and UHPSFC-MS/MS, respectively. Sample preparation, mobile phases and MS conditions were also finely tuned to achieve highest selectivity, chromatographic resolution and sensitivity. Then, the performance of these two methods was compared to the reference routine procedure for steroid analyses in anti-doping laboratories, which combines liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). For this purpose, urine samples spiked with the compounds of interest at five different concentrations were analyzed using the three analytical platforms. The retention and selectivity of the three techniques were very different, ensuring a good complementarity. However, the two new methods displayed numerous advantages. The overall procedure was much faster thanks to high throughput SLE sample treatment using 48-well plates and faster chromatographic analysis. Moreover, the highest sensitivity was attained using UHPLC-MS/MS with 98% of the doping agents detected at the lowest concentration level (0.1ng/mL), against 76% for UHPSFC-MS/MS and only 14% for GC-MS/MS. Finally, the weakest matrix effects were obtained with UHPSFC-MS/MS with 76% of the analytes displaying relative matrix effect between -20 and 20%, while the GC-MS/MS reference method displayed very strong matrix effects (over 100%) for all of the anabolic agents. PMID:27185056

  14. Assessment of the chemical changes during storage of phenol-formaldehyde resins pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry, inverse gas chromatography and Fourier transform infra red methods.

    PubMed

    Strzemiecka, B; Voelkel, A; Zięba-Palus, J; Lachowicz, T

    2014-09-12

    The chemical changes occurring in the phenol-formaldehyde resins (resol and novolac type) during their storage were investigated. In this paper the FT-IR, py-GCMS and inverse gas chromatography methods were applied for assessment of the changes occurring during storage of the phenolic resins. We have found that during storage some examined resins occurred partial curing. The results from all techniques applied are consistent. Py-GCMS is useful technique for screening the storage processes but IGC seems to be most sensitive one. PMID:25092596

  15. Determination of maximal amount of minor gases adsorbed in a shale sample by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Hu, Hui-Chao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Pan, Lei; Xiao, Xian-Ming

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for determining the maximal amount of ethane, a minor gas species, adsorbed in a shale sample. The method is based on the time-dependent release of ethane from shale samples measured by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC). The study includes a mathematical model for fitting the experimental data, calculating the maximal amount gas adsorbed, and predicting results at other temperatures. The method is a more efficient alternative to the isothermal adsorption method that is in widespread use today. PMID:24411088

  16. Partition coefficients of organic compounds in new imidazolium based ionic liquids using inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Revelli, Anne-Laure; Mutelet, Fabrice; Jaubert, Jean-Noël

    2009-06-01

    Partition coefficients of organic compounds in four ionic liquids: 1-ethanol-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 1-ethanol-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethylphosphate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethylphosphate were measured using inverse gas chromatography from 303.3 to 332.55K. The influence of gas-liquid and gas-solid interfacial adsorption of different solutes on ionic liquids was also studied. Most of the polar solutes were retained largely by partition while light hydrocarbons were retained predominantly by interfacial adsorption on the ionic liquids studied in this work. The solvation characteristics of the ionic liquids were evaluated using the Abraham solvation parameter model. PMID:19414174

  17. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  18. On the two-domain equations for gas chromatography.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis Anthony; Parks, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of gas chromatographic columns where the stationary phase is not assumed to be a thin uniform coating along the walls of the cross section. We also give an asymptotic analysis assuming that the parameter {beta} = KD{sup II}{rho}{sup II}/D{sup I}{rho}{sup I} is small. Here K is the partition coefficient, and D{sup i} and {rho}{sup i}, i = I, II are the diffusivity and density in the mobile (i = I) and stationary (i = II) regions.

  19. Pioneer Venus gas chromatography of the lower atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Carle, G. C.; Woeller, F.; Pollack, J. B.; Reynolds, R. T.; Craig, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A gas chromatograph mounted in the Pioneer Venus sounder probe measured the chemical composition of the atmosphere of Venus at three altitudes. Ne, N2, O2, Ar, CO, H2O, SO2, and CO2 were measured, and upper limits set for H2, COS, H2S, CH4, Kr, N2O, C2H4, C2H6, and C3H8. Simulation studies have provided indirect evidence for sulfuric acid-like droplets and support the possibility of water vapor at altitudes of 42 and 24 km. The paper discusses the implications of these results for the origin, evolution, and present state of Venus' atmosphere.

  20. Depletion and low gas temperature in the L183 (=L134N) prestellar core: the N2H^+-N2D+ tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, L.; Bacmann, A.; Cabrit, S.; Vastel, C.

    2007-05-01

    Context: The study of pre-stellar cores (PSCs) suffers from a lack of undepleted species to trace the physical properties of the gas in their very dense inner parts. Aims: We carry out detailed modelling of N2H+ and N2D+ cuts across the L183 main core to evaluate the depletion of these species and their usefulness as a probe of physical conditions in PSCs. Methods: We have developed a non-LTE (NLTE) Monte-Carlo code treating the 1D radiative transfer of both N2H+ and N2D^+, making use of recently published collisional coefficients with He between individual hyperfine levels. The code includes line overlap between hyperfine transitions. An extensive set of core models is calculated and compared with observations. Special attention is paid to the issue of source coupling to the antenna beam. Results: The best-fitting models indicate that i) gas in the core center is very cold (7 ± 1 K) and thermalized with dust; ii) depletion of N2H+ does occur, starting at densities 5-7×105 cm-3 and reaching a factor of 6^+13-3 in abundance; iii) deuterium fractionation reaches ~70% at the core center; and iv) the density profile is proportional to r-1 out to ~4000 AU, and to r-2 beyond. Conclusions: Our NLTE code could be used to (re-)interpret recent and upcoming observations of N2H+ and N2D+ in many pre-stellar cores of interest, to obtain better temperature and abundance profiles. Based on observations made with the IRAM 30-m and the CSO 10-m. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). Table 1, Figs. 5 and 6 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Can fractional quantum Hall effect be due to the formation of coherent wave structures in a 2D electron gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Babur M.

    2016-05-01

    A microscopic theory of integer and fractional quantum Hall effects is presented here. In quantum density wave representation of charged particles, it is shown that, in a two-dimensional electron gas coherent structures form under the low temperature and high density conditions. With a sufficiently high applied magnetic field, the combined N particle quantum density wave exhibits collective periodic oscillations. As a result the corresponding quantum Hall voltage function shows a step-wise change in multiples of the ratio h/e2. At lower temperatures further subdivisions emerge in the Hall resistance, exhibiting the fractional quantum Hall effect.

  2. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  3. Determination of phenoxy acid herbicides in water by electron-capture and microcoulometric gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerlitz, D.F.; Lamar, William L.

    1967-01-01

    A sensitive gas chromatographic method using microcoulometric titration and electron-capture detection for the analysis of 2,4-D, silvex, 2,4,5-T, and other phenoxy acid herbicides in water is described. The herbicides are extracted from unfiltered water samples (800-1,000 ml) by use of ethyl ether ; then the herbicides are concentrated and esterilied. To allow the analyst a choice, two esterilication procedures--using either boron trifluoride-methanol or diazomethane--are evaluated. Microcoulometric gas chromatography is specific for the detection of halogenated compounds such as the phenoxy acid herbicides whereas it does not respond to nonhalogenated components. Microcoulometric gas chromatography requires care and patience. It is not convenient for rapid screening of l-liter samples that contain less than 1 microgram of the herbicide. Although electroncapture gas chromatography is less selective and more critically affected by interfering substances, it is, nevertheless, convenient and more sensitive than microcoulometric gas chromatography. Two different liquid phases are used in the gas chromatographic columns--DC-200 silicone in one column and QF-1 silicone in the other. The performance of both columns is improved by the addition of Carbowax 20M. The Gas Chrom Q support is coated with the liquid phases by the 'frontal-analysis' technique. The practical lower limits for measurement of the phenoxy acid herbicides in water primarily depend upon the sample size, interferences present, anal instrumentation used. With l-liter samples of water, the practical lower limits of measurement are 10 ppt (parts per trillion) for 2,4-D and 2 ppt for silvex and 2,4,5-T when electron-capture detection is used, and approximately 20 ppt for each herbicide when analyzed by microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Recoveries of the herbicides immediately after addition to unfiltered water samples averaged 92 percent for 2,4-D, 90 percent for silvex, and 98 percent for 2

  4. Process gas chromatography study of a Selexol acid gas removal system. Final report Mar-Sep 82

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    The report gives results of continuous compositional monitoring by process gas chromatography (GC) for three gas streams associated with the Selexol acid gas removal system at the Bi-Gas pilot plant in Homer City, PA. Data were obtained from the inlet and outlet streams of the Selexol system during tests in April and May 1982. Product gas composition data were logged for 55 hours of plant operation. The Bi-Gas pilot plant, utilizing a two-stage, entrained-bed, high-pressure slagging gasifier, produces a product gas that is low in tars and heavy oils. This gas stream required very little cleanup prior to instrumental analysis. However, some problems were encountered in the analysis of the Selexol acid gas stream due to the presence of high levels of naphthalene. The process gas chromatographs performed well and remained very stable during the tests. Material balances based on GC analyses and process flow rate data show a high degree of material accountability. The H/sub 2/S removal efficiency of the Selexol absorber was about 99% during the tests.

  5. Determination of Hydrocarbon Group-Type of Diesel Fuels by Gas Chromatography with Vacuum Ultraviolet Detection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Brandon M; Walsh, Phillip; Harynuk, James J

    2016-06-01

    A GC-vacuum ultraviolet (UV) method to perform group-type separations of diesel range fuels was developed. The method relies on an ionic liquid column to separate diesel samples into saturates, mono-, di-, and polyaromatics by gas chromatography, with selective detection via vacuum UV absorption spectroscopy. Vacuum UV detection was necessary to solve a coelution between saturates and monoaromatics. The method was used to measure group-type composition of 10 oilsands-derived Synfuel light diesel samples, 3 Syncrude light gas oils, and 1 quality control sample. The gas chromatography (GC)-vacuum UV results for the Synfuel samples were similar (absolute % error of 0.8) to historical results from the supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) analysis. For the light gas oils, discrepancies were noted between SFC results and GC-vacuum UV results; however, these samples are known to be challenging to quantify by SFC-flame ionization detector (FID) due to incomplete resolution between the saturate/monoaromatic and/or monoaromatic/diaromatic group types when applied to samples heavier than diesel (i.e., having a larger fraction of higher molecular weight species). The quality control sample also performed well when comparing both methods (absolute % error of 0.2) and the results agreed within error for saturates, mono- and polyaromatics. PMID:27125997

  6. Cyclopentadiene evolution during pyrolysis-gas chromatography of PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, William B.; Gluyas, Richard E.; Snyder, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of formulated molecular weight (FMW), extent of cure, and cumulative aging on the amount of cyclopentadiene (CPD) evolved from Polymerization of Monomeric Reactants (PMR) polyimides were investigated by pyrolysis-gas chromotography (PY-GC). The PMR polyimides are additional crosslinked resins formed from an aromatic diamine, a diester of an aromatic tetracarboxylic acid and a monoester of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid. The PY-GC results were related to the degree of crosslinking and to the thermo-oxidative stability (weight loss) of PMR polyimides. Thus, PY-GC has shown to be a valid technique for the characterization of PMR polyimide resins and composites via correlation of the CPD evolved versus the thermal history of the PMR sample.

  7. Venus lower atmospheric composition - Analysis by gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Carle, G. C.; Woeller, F.; Pollack, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The first gas chromatographic analysis of the lower atmosphere of Venus is reported. Three atmospheric samples were analyzed. The third of these samples showed carbon dioxide (96.4 percent), molecular nitrogen (3.41 percent), water vapor (0.135 percent), molecular oxygen (69.3 ppm), argon (18.6 ppm), neon (4.31 ppm), and sulfur dioxide (186 ppm). The amounts of water vapor and sulfur dioxide detected are roughly compatible with the requirements of greenhouse models of the high surface temperature of Venus. The large positive gradient of sulfur dioxide, molecular oxygen, and water vapor from the cloud tops to their bottoms, as implied by Earth-based observations and these results, gives added support for the presence of major quantities of aqueous sulfuric acid in the clouds. A comparison of the inventory of inert gases found in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars suggests that these components are due to outgassing from the planetary interiors.

  8. Evaluation of fast enantioselective multidimensional gas chromatography methods for monoterpenic compounds: Authenticity control of Australian tea tree oil.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yong Foo; West, Rachel N; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J

    2015-08-01

    This work demonstrates the potential of fast multiple heart-cut enantioselective multidimensional gas chromatography (GC-eGC) and enantioselective comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC), to perform the stereoisomeric analysis of three key chiral monoterpenes (limonene, terpinen-4-ol and α-terpineol) present in tea tree oil (TTO). In GC-eGC, separation was conducted using a combination of mid-polar first dimension ((1)D) column and a chiral second dimension ((2)D) column, providing interference-free enantioresolution of the individual antipodes of each optically active component. A combination of (1)D chiral column and (2)D polar columns (ionic liquid and wax phases) were tested for the eGC×GC study. Quantification was proposed based on summation of two major modulated peaks for each antipode, displaying comparable results with those derived from GC-eGC. Fast chiral separations were achieved within 25min for GC-eGC and<20min for eGC×GC, while ensuring adequate interference-free enantiomer separation. The suitability of using these two enantioselective multidimensional approaches for the routine assessment of chiral monoterpenes in TTO was evaluated and discussed. Exact enantiomeric composition of chiral markers for authentic TTOs was proposed by analysing a representative number of pure TTOs sourced directly from plantations of known provenance in Australia. Consistent enantiomeric fractions of 61.6±1.5% (+):38.4±1.5% (-) for limonene, 61.7±1.6% (+):38.3±1.6% (-) for terpinen-4-ol and 79.6±1.4% (+):20.4±1.4% (-) for α-terpineol were obtained for the 57 authentic Australian TTOs. The results were compared (using principle component analysis) with commercial TTOs (declared as derived from Melaleuca alternifolia) obtained from different continents. Assessing these data to determine adulteration, or additives that affect the enantiomeric ratios, in commercially sourced TTOs is discussed. The proposed method offers distinct advantages over e

  9. Headspace-solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer and to enantioselective gas chromatography for strawberry flavoured food quality control.

    PubMed

    Schipilliti, Luisa; Dugo, Paola; Bonaccorsi, Ivana; Mondello, Luigi

    2011-10-21

    Authenticity assessment of flavoured strawberry foods was performed using headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). An authenticity range was achieved, investigating on the carbon isotope ratio of numerous selected aroma active volatile components (methyl butanoate, ethyl butanoate, hex-(2E)-enal, methyl hexanoate, buthyl butanoate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, linalool, hexyl butanoate, octyl isovalerate, γ-decalactone and octyl hexanoate) of organic Italian fresh strawberries. To the author's knowledge, this is the first time that all these components were investigated simultaneously by GC-C-IRMS on the same sample. The results were compared, when applicable, with those obtained by analyzing the HS-SPME extracts of commercial flavoured food matrices. In addition, one Kenyan pineapple and one fresh Italian peach were analyzed to determine the δ(13)C(VPDB) of the volatile components common to strawberry. The δ(13)C(VPDB) values are allowed to differentiate between different biogenetic pathways (C(3) and CAM plants) and more interestingly between plants of the same CO(2) fixation group (C(3) plants). Additional analyses were performed on all the samples by means of Enantioselective Gas Chromatography (Es-GC), measuring the enantiomeric distribution of linalool and γ-decalactone. It was found that GC-C-IRMS and Es-GC measurements were in agreement to detect the presence of non-natural strawberry aromas in the food matrices studied. PMID:21872872

  10. Impact of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry combined with gas chromatography and olfactometry for the sex differentiation of Baccharis articulata by the analysis of volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Minteguiaga, Manuel; Umpiérrez, Noelia; Fariña, Laura; Falcão, Manuel A; Xavier, Vanessa B; Cassel, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    The Baccharis genus has more than 400 species of aromatic plants. However, only approximately 50 species have been studied in oil composition to date. From these studies, very few take into consideration differences between male and female plants, which is a significant and distinctive factor in Baccharis in the Asteraceae family. Baccharis articulata is a common shrub that grows wild in south Brazil, northern and central Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. It is considered to be a medicinal plant and is employed in traditional medicine. We report B. articulata male and female volatile composition obtained by simultaneous distillation-extraction technique and analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Also, an assessment of aromatic differences between volatile extracts was evaluated by gas chromatography with olfactometry. The results show a very similar chemical composition between male and female extracts, with a high proportion of terpene compounds of which β-pinene, limonene and germacrene D are the main components. Despite the chemical similarity, great differences in aromatic profile were found: male plant samples exhibited the strongest odorants in number and intensity of aromatic attributes. These differences explain field observations which indicate differences between male and female flower aroma, and might be of ecological significance in the attraction of pollinating insects. PMID:26140379

  11. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  12. Differentiation of mint (Mentha haplocalyx Briq.) from different regions in China using gas and liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjiang; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2015-02-01

    In this study, complex substances such as Mint (Mentha haplocalyx Briq.) samples from different growing regions in China were analyzed for phenolic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and for the volatile aroma compounds by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Chemometrics methods, e.g. principal component analysis, back-propagation artificial neural networks, and partial least squares discriminant analysis, were applied to resolve complex chromatographic profiles of Mint samples. A total of 49 aroma components and 23 phenolic compounds were identified in 79 Mint samples. Principal component analysis score plots from gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection data sets showed a clear distinction among Mint from three different regions in China. Classification results showed that satisfactory performance of prediction ability for back-propagation artificial neural networks and partial least squares discriminant analysis. The major compounds that contributed to the discrimination were chlorogenic acid, unknown 3, kaempherol 7-O-rutinoside, salvianolic acid L, hesperidin, diosmetin, unknown 6 and pebrellin in Mint according to regression coefficients of the partial least squares discriminant analysis model. This study indicated that the proposed strategy could provide a simple and rapid technique to distinguish clearly complex profiles from samples such as Mint. PMID:25431171

  13. Simultaneous quantification of cannabinoids and metabolites in oral fluid by two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J; Lowe, Ross H; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2010-02-26

    Development and validation of a method for simultaneous identification and quantification of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), and metabolites 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in oral fluid. Simultaneous analysis was problematic due to different physicochemical characteristics and concentration ranges. Neutral analytes, such as THC and CBD, are present in ng/mL, rather than pg/mL concentrations, as observed for the acidic THCCOOH biomarker in oral fluid. THCCOOH is not present in cannabis smoke, definitively differentiating cannabis use from passive smoke exposure. THC, 11-OH-THC, THCCOOH, CBD, and CBN quantification was achieved in a single oral fluid specimen collected with the Quantisal device. One mL oral fluid/buffer solution (0.25 mL oral fluid and 0.75 mL buffer) was applied to conditioned CEREX Polycrom THC solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns. After washing, THC, 11-OH-THC, CBD, and CBN were eluted with hexane/acetone/ethyl acetate (60:30:20, v/v/v), derivatized with N,O-bis-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide and quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography electron ionization mass spectrometry (2D-GCMS) with cold trapping. Acidic THCCOOH was separately eluted with hexane/ethyl acetate/acetic acid (75:25:2.5, v/v/v), derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol, and quantified by the more sensitive 2D-GCMS-electron capture negative chemical ionization (NCI-MS). Linearity was 0.5-50 ng/mL for THC, 11-OH-THC, CBD and 1-50 ng/mL for CBN. The linear dynamic range for THCCOOH was 7.5-500 pg/mL. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision as percent RSD at three concentrations across the linear dynamic range were 0.3-6.6%. Analytical recovery was within 13.8% of target. This new SPE 2D-GCMS assay achieved efficient quantification of five cannabinoids in oral fluid, including pg/mL concentrations of THCCOOH by combining differential elution, 2D-GCMS with electron ionization and

  14. Simultaneous quantification of cannabinoids and metabolites in oral fluid by two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J.; Lowe, Ross H.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Development and validation of a method for simultaneous identification and quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), and metabolites 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in oral fluid. Simultaneous analysis was problematic due to different physicochemical characteristics and concentration ranges. Neutral analytes, such as THC and CBD, are present in ng/mL, rather than pg/mL concentrations, as observed for the acidic THCCOOH biomarker in oral fluid. THCCOOH is not present in cannabis smoke, definitively differentiating cannabis use from passive smoke exposure. THC, 11-OH-THC, THCCOOH, CBD, and CBN quantification was achieved in a single oral fluid specimen collected with the Quantisal™ device. One mL oral fluid/buffer solution (0.25mL oral fluid and 0.75mL buffer) was applied to conditioned CEREX® Polycrom™ THC solid phase extraction (SPE) columns. After washing, THC, 11-OH-THC, CBD, and CBN were eluted with hexane/acetone/ethyl acetate (60:30:20, v/v/v), derivatized with N, O-bis-(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide and quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography electron ionization mass spectrometry (2D-GCMS) with cold trapping. Acidic THCCOOH was separately eluted with hexane/ethyl acetate/acetic acid (75:25:2.5, v/v/v), derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol, and quantified by the more sensitive 2D-GCMS–electron capture negative chemical ionization (NCI-MS). Linearity was 0.5-50ng/mL for THC, 11-OH-THC, CBD and 1-50ng/mL for CBN. The linear dynamic range for THCCOOH was 7.5–500pg/mL. Intra-and inter-assay imprecision as percent RSD at three concentrations across the linear dynamic range were 0.3%-6.6%. Analytical recovery was within 13.8% of target. This new SPE 2D-GCMS assay achieved efficient quantification of five cannabinoids in oral fluid, including pg/mL concentrations of THCCOOH by combining differential elution, 2D-GCMS with electron

  15. Venus lower atmospheric composition: analysis by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Oyama, V I; Carle, G C; Woeller, F; Pollack, J B

    1979-02-23

    The first gas chromatographic analysis of the lower atmosphere of Venus is reported. Three atmospheric samples were analyzed. The third of these samples showed carbon dioxide (96.4 percent), molecular nitrogen (3.41 percent), water vapor (0.135 percent), molecular oxygen [69.3 parts per million (ppm)], argon (18.6 ppm), neon (4.31 ppm), and sulfuir dioxide (186 ppm). The amounts of water vapor and sulfur dioxide detected are roughly compatible with the requirements of greenhouse models of the high surface temperature of Venus. The large positive gradient of sulfur dioxide, molecular oxygen, and water vapor from the clould tops to their bottoms, as implied by Earth-based observations and these resuilts, gives added support for the presence of major quantities of aqueous sulfuric acid in the clouds. A comparison of the inventory of inert gases found in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars suggests that these components are due to outgassing from the planetary interiors. PMID:17833004

  16. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  17. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Antonia; Barbas, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic fingerprinting, the main tool in metabolomics, is a non-targeted methodology where all detectable peaks (or signals), including those from unknown analytes, are considered to establish sample classification. After pattern comparison, those signals changing in response to a specific situation under investigation are identified to gain biological insight. For this purpose, gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS) has a drawback in that only volatile compounds or compounds that can be made volatile after derivatization can be analysed, and derivatization often requires extensive sample treatment. However, once the analysis is focused on low molecular weight metabolites, GC-MS is highly efficient, sensitive, and reproducible. Moreover, it is quantitative, and its compound identification capabilities are superior to other separation techniques because GC-MS instruments obtain mass spectra with reproducible fragmentation patterns, which allow for the creation of public databases. This chapter describes well-established protocols for metabolic fingerprinting (i.e. the comprehensive analysis of small molecules) in plasma and urine using GC-MS. Guidelines will also be provided regarding subsequent data pre-treatment, pattern recognition, and marker identification. PMID:21207291

  18. Application of Gas-Kinetic BGK Scheme for Solving 2-D Compressible Inviscid Flow around Linear Turbine Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdusslam, Saleh N.; Chit, Ong J.; Hamdan, Megat M.; Omar, Ashraf A.; Asrar, Waqar

    2006-12-01

    Fluid flows within turbomachinery tend to be extremely complex. Understanding such flows is crucial in the effort to improve current turbomachinery designs. Hence, computational approaches can be used to great advantage in this regard. In this paper, gas-kinetic BGK (Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook) scheme is developed for simulating compressible inviscid flow around a linear turbine cascade. BGK scheme is an approximate Riemann solver that uses the collisional Boltzmann equation as the governing equation for flow evolutions. For efficient computations, particle distribution functions in the general solution of the BGK model are simplified and used for the flow simulations. Second-order accuracy is achieved via the reconstruction of flow variables using the MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-Centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) interpolation technique together with a multistage Runge-Kutta method. A multi-zone H-type mesh for the linear turbine cascades is generated using a structured algebraic grid generation method. Computed results are compared with available experimental data and found to be in agreement with each other. In order to further substantiate the performance of the BGK scheme, another test case, namely a wedge cascade, is used. The numerical solutions obtained via this test are validated against analytical solutions, which showed to be in good agreement.

  19. Measuring fuel contamination using high speed gas chromatography and cone penetration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, S.P.; Bratton, W.L.; Akard, M.L.

    1995-10-01

    Decision processes during characterization and cleanup of hazardous waste sites are greatly retarded by the turnaround time and expense incurred through the use of conventional sampling and laboratory analyses. Furthermore, conventional soil and groundwater sampling procedures present many opportunities for loss of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by exposing sample media to the atmosphere during transfers between and among sampling devices and containers. While on-site analysis by conventional gas chromatography can reduce analytical turnaround time, time-consuming sample preparation procedures are still often required, and the potential for loss of VOC is not reduced. This report describes the development of a high speed gas chromatography and cone penetration testing system which can detect and measure subsurface fuel contamination in situ during the cone penetration process.

  20. Investigating Solvent Purity Utilizing Comprehensive Gas Chromatography: A Study of Acetones

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Jon H.; Bolz, Cinnamon DH; Wahl, Karen L.

    2010-04-01

    Broad spectrum chemical analysis of trace level components is a continuing challenge for any analytical chemist. This challenge is further confounded when chemical impurities may be present in common organic solvents or when chemical artifacts may be formed, produced and introduced during an analytical procedure. Minimizing and understanding these chemical artifacts, is critical for trace level detection and is crucial for unambiguous analytical results. Comprehensive gas chromatography is an excellent analytical tool to help address these complex mixture challenges. This work examines the impurities present in various acetone sources utilizing comprehensive gas chromatography. This work highlights the extreme variability possible in solvent sources and hence the importance of understanding the impurities that may confound an analytical method or result.

  1. [Determination of aromatics in light petroleum products by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) have been used widely, and the applications of this technique to many fields have already been reported. In the standard method of oil analysis, the concentrations of aromatics and naphthalene hydrocarbons in light petroleum products must be detected by more than two methods. Mono-aromatics, di-aromatics etc. in light petroleum products were detected only by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography. After the proper selection of column system and optimization of chromatographic conditions, the method can achieve the group separations of paraffins, olefins, naphthenes, aromatics with 1 to 2 rings and some target components in light petroleum products with good reproducibility and good precision. The recoveries of standard compounds were 89.5% - 106.1%, and the relative standard deviations of repeatedly detecting the components were all lower than 5.8%. It took only 30 min to finish a determination. PMID:17017165

  2. Comparison of non-volatile bituminous residues and coal materials by pyrolysis gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.A.; Smiley, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    A study of non-volatile bituminous residues and coal materials by pyrolysis gas chromatography was undertaken. The objective was to determine the coal and coke precursors in a residue from the co-processing of coal and bitumen. This was investigated by quantifying 8 model aromatic compounds and their co-eluting compound groups in the pyrolysis products. Five samples consisting of a coke obtained from hydroprocessing a bitumen, a sub-bituminous coal, pitch from the co-processing of the bitumen and the coal, THF insolubles of the pitch, and a residual coal from liquefaction were pyrolysed to 900 C and the volatile products were analysed by gas chromatography. Details of the results are given.

  3. Confirmational analysis of beta-agonists by cryotrapping gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Visser, T; Vredenbregt, M J; de Jong, A P; van Rossum, H J; Stephany, R W; van Ginkel, L A

    1994-12-01

    Cryotrapping gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry has been used for confirmation analysis of the beta-agonists clenbuterol, salbutamol, mabuterol, bromobuterol, cimaterol, cimbuterol and mapenterol in urine and liver samples of veal calves, subsequent to selected ion detection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Samples have been analysed as their trimethylsilyl and methylboronate derivatives. Methylboronate derivatives yielded strongly diminished chemical background and interference levels in the infrared chromatograms of standards and samples. The limit of identification for methylboronate derivatives was at the low ppb level in incurred samples. The similarity of analyte and reference spectra, together with the retention time, was found to be a useful criterion for confirmation of unknown compounds. PMID:7879875

  4. Structural analysis of commercial ceramides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bleton, J; Gaudin, K; Chaminade, P; Goursaud, S; Baillet, A; Tchapla, A

    2001-05-11

    A simple method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to analyse structures of ceramides. Identification of trimethylsilylated ceramides were obtained in short analysis times (derivatization of ceramides in 30 min at room temperature and 20 min gas chromatography mass spectrometry run) even for complex mixtures. For example in ceramide Type III, 18 peaks were observed which represent 27 various structures. The coeluted compounds were ceramides containing the same functional groups and the same carbon number but with a different distribution on the two alkyl chains of the molecule. They were accurately differentiated by mass spectrometry. Therefore, 83 structures of trimethylsilylated ceramides were identified in 11 different commercial mixtures. For 52 structures of these, mass spectral data were not described in the literature, neither full mass spectra nor characteristic fragments. PMID:11403477

  5. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: Recent evolution and current trends.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Franchina, Flavio A; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    The present contribution is focused on the evolution and current trends of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC × GC-MS), with respect to a review that described this specific methodology published at the beginning of 2008 (Mondello et al., 2008). In fact, since then there has been considerable evolution in the MS field, certainly exceeding that observed in GC × GC. In particular, the present paper will cover the combination of novel MS machines [single quadrupole (Q) and triple quadrupole, isotope ratio, low- and high-resolution time-of-flight (ToF), hybrid (Q-ToF)] to GC × GC systems, and will position comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography within the wider context of separation science. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:524-534, 2016. PMID:25269651

  6. Gas chromatography analysis of cellular fatty acids and neutral monosaccharides in the identification of lactobacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, A F; Korkeala, H; Mononen, I

    1987-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids and monosaccharides in a group of 14 lactobacilli were analyzed by gas chromatography and the identity of the components was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the same bacterial sample, both monosaccharides and fatty acids were liberated by methanolysis, and in certain experiments, fatty acids alone were released by basic hydrolysis. The results indicate that basic hydrolysis gave more comprehensive information about the fatty acids, but the analysis of monosaccharides was found to be much more useful in distinguishing between different species of lactobacilli. The method described allowed differentiation of 11 of 14 Lactobacillus species, and even single colonies isolated from agar plates could be used for analysis without subculturing. PMID:3435147

  7. Determination of alkyl amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkyl amines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkyl amines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkyl amines in aerosol particles. Alkyl amines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg. For the IC approach, a solid phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkyl amines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkyl amines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkyl amines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  8. Determination of alkylamines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Jia, W. T.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkylamines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkylamines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkylamines in aerosol particles. Alkylamines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg (or 0.02-0.04 ng m-3). For the IC approach, a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkylamines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkylamines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng (or 0.9-6.4 ng m-3), and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkylamines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  9. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques in the examination of engine oils.

    PubMed

    Fall, Jacek; Voelkel, Adam

    2002-09-01

    The emerging market of engine oils consists of a number of products from different viscosity and quality classes. Determination of the base oil used in manufacturing of the final product (engine oil) as well as estimation of mutual miscibility of oils and their solubility could be crucial problems. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques are presented as an interesting and fruitful extension of normalised standard analytical methods used in the oil industry. PMID:12385390

  10. [Determination of volatile constituents in guanxin suhe wan by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiu-yan; Wu, Jian-bing; Wang, Su-juan

    2002-07-01

    The volatile constituents of Guanxin Suhe Wan and its ingredient drugs were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two compounds, borneol and benzyl benzoate were determined by selected ion monitoring with methyl salicylate as the internal standard. The recoveries of borneol and benzyl benzoate were 91.7% and 89.7% with the RSDs of 5.6% and 2.3%, respectively. PMID:12541931

  11. Determination of the polar and total surface energy distributions of particulates by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal C; Larson, Ian; Morton, David A V; Stewart, Peter J

    2011-01-18

    This Letter reports a technique of measuring polar surface energy distributions of lactose using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The significance of this study is that the total surface energy distributions can now be characterized by combining the already known dispersive surface energy distribution with polar surface energy distribution determined in this study. The polar surface energy was calculated from the specific free energies for surface interactions with a monopolar basic probe, ethyl acetate, and a monopolar acidic probe, dichloromethane. PMID:21174410

  12. Formation of dehydroalanine from mimosine and cysteine: artifacts in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Hu, Zeping; Wiedner, Susan D.; Kim, Jong Seo; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

    2011-08-15

    Trimethylsilyation is a chemical derivatization procedure routinely applied in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics. In this report, through de novo structural elucidation and comparison with authentic standards, we demonstrate that mimosine can be completely converted into dehydroalanine and 3,4-dihydroxypyridine during the trimethylsilyating process. Similarly, dehydroalanine can be formed from derivatization of cysteine. This conversion is a potential interference in GC-MS-based global metabolomics, as well as in analysis of amino acids.

  13. Pyrolysis analysis of the herbicide paraquat on cannabis by coupled gas chromatography-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beutler, J A; Varano, A; DerMarderosian, A

    1979-10-01

    Pyrolysis gas chromatography coupled with infrared identification of eluted peaks confirms that paraquat is pyrolyzed into chloromethane and 4,4'-dipyridyl at smoking temperatures and above. This reaction occurs at 610 degrees C to completion in small amounts in an inert atmosphere. The toxicity of 4,4'-dipyridyl remains to be determined. Pyrolysis of contaminated marijuana also produces the same two products, although detection at low limits is difficult with this procedure. PMID:541644

  14. The solubility parameter for biomedical polymers-Application of inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Adamska, K; Voelkel, A; Berlińska, A

    2016-08-01

    The solubility parameter seems to be a useful tool for thermodynamic characterisation of different materials. The solubility parameter concept can be used to predict sufficient miscibility or solubility between a solvent and a polymer, as well as components of co-polymer matrix in composite biomaterials. The values of solubility parameter were determined for polycaprolactone (PCL), polylactic acid (PLA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) by using different procedures and experimental data, collected by means of inverse gas chromatography. PMID:27155736

  15. Sample introduction in gas chromatography using a coiled wire filament.

    PubMed

    Truong, Tai V; Nackos, Aaron N; Murray, Jacolin A; Kimball, Jon A; Hawkes, Jason E; Harvey, Donald J; Tolley, H Dennis; Robison, Richard A; Bartholomew, Calvin H; Lee, Milton L

    2009-10-01

    A simple device for field sampling and concentration of analytes for subsequent introduction into an injection port for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis has been developed. It consists of a tiny, coiled platinum wire filament (CWF) that is attached to a retractable plunger wire, which fits inside a syringe needle housing. Sampling is accomplished by dipping the end of the CWF in a liquid sample, which is drawn into the wire coil by capillary action, and introducing it into the injection port either before or after allowing the solvent to evaporate. The CWF can be used with or without a nonvolatile chemical coating. A major advantage of this sampling device is that nonvolatile sample matrix components remain on the wire coil, reducing the required injection port and liner cleaning frequency and contamination of the head of the chromatographic column. The coil itself can be easily cleaned between analyses by rinsing and/or burning off residual material in a small flame. The sampling coil facilitates specifically designed chemical reactions in the injection port, such as thermochemolysis and methylation. Applications demonstrated in this work include: (1) direct introduction of samples with little or no pre-treatment, (2) simultaneous thermochemolysis and methylation of lipid-containing samples such as bacteria and bacterial endospores for analysis of biomarkers, and (3) solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) using temporary wire coatings. The CWF allowed for significant reduction in sample preparation time, in most cases to less than a few minutes. The peak shapes examined for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analytes (PAHs) were significantly better (asymmetry factors <1.3) when using the CWF sampling technique compared to splitless and on-column injection techniques (asymmetry factors >1.3). Extraction efficiencies for SPME (especially for high boiling point components such as PAHs) improved by an average of 2.5 times when using the CWF compared to the performance of

  16. Analysis of benzo(a)pyrene in airborne particulates by gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luedecke, E.

    1976-01-01

    A routine method was developed to measure benzo(a)pyrene in airborne particulates. Samples were collected on a filter and the organic portion was extracted with cyclohexane. The polynuclear hydrocarbon (PNHC) fraction was separated from the aliphatics by column chromatography. An internal standard was added to the extract and a portion of it was injected into a gas chromatograph. Although the gas chromatographic method has often been reported in the literature, satisfactory separation of benzo(a)pyrene and benzo(e)pyrene has not been achieved. With the introduction of a nematic liquid crystal as the stationary phase good separation is now possible.

  17. Development of a simple vent-free interface for capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Chuichi; Takeda, Shihori; Freeman, Robert R; Ohtani, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    A novel and simple interface for capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed using a piece of deactivated stainless-steel tubing. This interface eliminated the need to vent the MS ion source when changing columns. Various chromatographic performance indicators, such as inertness, and thermal and chemical stability, were confirmed to be unaffected by using this interface at an elevated temperature of around 300°C. The new interface should facilitate the characterization of polymeric materials using analytical pyrolysis techniques in which frequent switching is required in the measuring mode, such as evolved gas analysis-MS and flash pyrolysis-GC-MS. PMID:22076334

  18. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  19. Organophosphorus pesticide and ester analysis by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangping; Li, Dengkun; Li, Jiequan; Rose, Gavin; Marriott, Philip J

    2013-12-15

    Thirty-seven phosphorus (P)-containing compounds comprising organophosphorus pesticides and organophosphate esters were analyzed by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame photometric detection in P mode (GC × GC-FPD(P)), with a non-polar/moderately polar column set. A suitable modulation temperature and period was chosen based on experimental observation. A number of co-eluting peak pairs on the (1)D column were well separated in 2D space. Excellent FPD(P) detection selectivity, responding to compounds containing the P atom, produces clear 2D GC × GC plots with little interference from complex hydrocarbon matrices. Limits of detection (LOD) were within the range of 0.0021-0.048 μmol L(-1), and linear calibration correlation coefficients (R(2)) for all 37 P-compounds were at least 0.998. The P-compounds were spiked in 2% diesel and good reproducibility for their response areas and retention times was obtained. Spiked recoveries were 88%-157% for 5 μg L(-1) and 80%-138% for 10 μg L(-1) spiked levels. Both (1)tR and (2)tR shifts were noted when the content of diesel was in excess of 5% in the matrix. Soil samples were analyzed by using the developed method; some P-compounds were positively detected. In general, this study shows that GC × GC-FPD(P) is an accurate, sensitive and simple method for P-compound analysis in complicated environmental samples. PMID:24238476

  20. Multicomponent, 3-D, and High-Resolution 2-D Seismic Characterization of Gas Hydrate Study Sites in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Ruppel, C. D.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W.; Lee, M. W.; Miller, J.

    2012-12-01

    High saturations of gas hydrates have been identified within coarse-grained sediments in the Green Canyon 955 and Walker Ridge 313 lease blocks of the deepwater northern Gulf of Mexico. The thickness, lateral extent, and hydrate saturations in these deposits are constrained by geological and geophysical data and state-of-the-art logging-while-drilling information obtained in multiple boreholes at each site during a 2009 expedition. Presently lacking are multicomponent seismic data that can provide a thorough understanding of the in-situ compressional and shear seismic properties of the hydrate-bearing sediments. Such data may represent an important tool for future characterization of gas hydrate resources. To address this data gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will collaborate on a 20-day research expedition to acquire wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer and high-resolution vertical incidence 2-D seismic data at the study sites. In preparation for this mid-2013 expedition, we have analyzed existing industry 3-D seismic data, along with numerically modeled multicomponent data. The 3-D seismic data allow us to identify and rank specific survey targets and can be combined with the numerical modeling results to determine optimal survey line orientation and acquisition parameters. Together, these data also provide a more thorough understanding of the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  1. A 2D multiwavelength study of the ionized gas and stellar population in the giant H II region NGC 588

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal-Ibero, A.; Relaño, M.; Kehrig, C.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M.; Kelz, A.; Roth, M. M.; Streicher, O.

    2011-05-01

    Giant H II regions (GHIIRs) in nearby galaxies are a local sample in which we can study in detail processes in the interaction of gas, dust and newly formed stars which are analogous to those which occurred in episodes of higher intensity in which much of the current stellar population was born. Here, we present an analysis of NGC 588, a GHIIR in M33, based on optical Integral Field Spectroscopy data obtained with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer at the 3.5-m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory, CAHA, together with Spitzer infrared images at 8 and 24 μm. The extinction distribution measured in the optical shows complex structure, with three maxima which correlate in position with those of the emission at 24 and 8 μm. Furthermore, the Hα luminosity absorbed by the dust within the H II region reproduces the structure observed in the 24-μm image, supporting the use of the 24-μm band as a valid tracer of recent star formation. A velocity difference of ˜50 km s-1 was measured between the areas of high and low surface brightness, which would be expected if NGC 588 were an evolved GHIIR. We have carefully identified the areas which contribute most to the line ratios measured in the integrated spectrum. Those line ratios which are used in diagnostic diagrams proposed by Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich (i.e. the BPT diagrams) show a larger range of variation in the low surface brightness areas. The ranges are ˜0.5-1.2 dex for [N II]λ6584/Hα, 0.7-1.7 dex for [S II]λλ6717,6731/Hα and 0.3-0.5 dex for [O III]λ5007/Hβ, with higher values of [N II]λ6584/Hα and [S II]λλ6717,6731/Hα, and lower values of [O III]λ5007/Hβ in the areas of lower surface brightness. Ratios corresponding to large ionization parameter (U) are found between the peak of the emission in Hβ and the main ionizing source decreasing radially outwards within the region. Differences between the integrated and local values of the U tracers can be as high as ˜0.8 dex, notably when

  2. ENANTIOMER SEPARATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL ATROPISOMERS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL RETENTION BEHAVIOR ON MODIFIED CYCLODEXTRIN CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COLUMNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven commercially-available chiral capillary gas chromatography columns containing modified cyclodextrins were evaluated for their ability to separate enantiomers of the 19 stable chiral polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) atropisomers, and for their ability to separate these enantio...

  3. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines using gas chromatography - negative chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a residue analysis method for the simultaneous determination of 107 pesticides in the traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), Angelica sinensis, Angelica dahurica, Leonurus heterophyllus Sweet, Pogostemon cablin, and Lonicera japonica Thunb, was developed using gas chromatography couple...

  4. Study of Ether-, Alcohol-, or Cyano-Functionalized Ionic Liquids Using Inverse Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Revelli, Anne-Laure; Mutelet, Fabrice; Jaubert, Jean-Noel; Garcia-Martinez, Marina; Sprunger, Laura; Acree, William; Baker, Gary A

    2010-01-01

    Activity coefficients of 52 organic compounds in four ionic liquids (ILs), 1,3-dimethoxyimidazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide, 1-(methylethylether)-3-methylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl) imide, 1-ethanol-3-methylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)-sulfonyl)imide, and 1-(3-cyanopropyl)-3- methylimidazolium dicyanamide, were measured using inverse gas chromatography from (312 to 353) K. The retention data were also converted in gas-to-IL partition coefficients and water-to-IL partition coefficients using the corresponding gas-to-water partition coefficients. Both sets of partition coefficients were analyzed using the modified Abraham solvation parameter model. The derived equations correlated the experimental gas-to-IL and water-to-IL partition coefficient data to within (0.09 and 0.14) log units, respectively.

  5. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of tert. -butyldimethylsilyl derivatives of 2-acetylaminofluorene and metabolites in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Diez Ibanez, M.A.; Chessebeuf-Padieu, M.; Nordmann, P.; Padieu, P.

    1987-09-01

    A new technique for the conversion of 2-acetylaminofluorene and several ring-hydroxylated metabolites to mono- and di-tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives was developed to permit their analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to quantify the metabolism of 2-acetylaminofluorene incubated in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. This new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method allowed the separation, identification and quantitation of seven known metabolites comprising five arylhydroxylated compounds, 2-aminofluorene and N-hydroxy-2-acetylaminofluorene.

  6. Trace level determination of organochlorine, organophosphorus and pyrethroid pesticides in lanolin using gel permeation chromatography followed by dual gas chromatography and gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometric confirmation.

    PubMed

    Jover, Eric; Bayona, Josep Maria

    2002-03-15

    A methodology for multi-class pesticide determination at trace level in lanolin is presented. Gel permeation chromatography on a Bio-Beads SX-3 column followed by a dual GC chromatographic determination has been developed. The effluent of the analytical column (50% diphenyl-methyl- or 14% cyanopropyl-phenylpolysiloxane) was split into an electron-capture and a nitrogen-phosphorus detection system. The chromatographic system was optimised for 28 pesticides commonly used to control sheep pests and corresponding to organochlorine, organophosphorus and pyretroid classes. Identification has been carried out by gas chromatography coupled to negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Recoveries ranged from 72 to 94% and the detection limits from 20 to 97 ng/g depending on the pesticide class, the RSDs were below 10%. Finally, the developed analytical methodology has been successfully applied to the determination of pesticides in several lanolin samples. PMID:11990995

  7. The characterization of eight maceral concentrates by means of Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography and Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nip, Margriet; De Leeuw, J. W.; Schenck, P. A.

    1988-03-01

    In order to study the relationships between the chemical structures of coals, coal macerals and their precursors (plant tissues), eight coal macerals originating from the Yorkshire coal basin (U.K.) were studied by Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography and Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The samples were selected on the basis of a previous study of a large set of macerals. The macerals were studied in order to relate structural moieties of the macerals, as reflected by their pyrolysis products, to structural elements of their likely precursors, plant tissues. The maceral pyrolysates mainly consist of alkylbenzenes, alkylnaphthalenes, alkylphenols and series of straight-chain alk-l-enes and alkanes over a wide molecular weight range. The relative contribution of the (hydroxy)aromatic pyrolysis products and of the straight-chain alk-l-enes and alkanes to each maceral pyrolysate was calculated, although the internal distribution patterns of the alkyl derivatives of these pyrolysis products exhibited to a certain extent dissimilarities. Differences between the relative contributions of these pyrolysis products to the pyrolysates of different macerals with the same coal rank and to those of similar macerals with different coal rank depend on differences in precursor material and the chemical modification of these precursors upon increasing coalification. Multivariate data treatment by means of factor analysis was chosen to compare the pyrolysis data - represented by these histograms - with the petrographic data and the proximate and ultimate analysis values of the macerals. In addition, similar analyses was performed on the macerals using such a low Curie temperature (358°C), that from some of the macerals "thermal extracts" were obtained, containing a series of n-alkanes and some isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane. Although these thermal extracts represent only a low percentage by weight of the maceral samples, their existence

  8. Simultaneous determination of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in animal tissues by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Chen, D; Yu, G; Yu, H; Pan, Y; Wang, Y; Huang, L; Yuan, Z

    2011-02-01

    A new multi-dimensional analytical method using gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-NPD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for qualitative and quantitative measurement of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in food animal tissues. This method is based on a new extraction procedure using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The analytes were extracted by phosphate buffer with trichloroacetic acid deproteinization and clean-up by C₁₈ solid-phase extraction (SPE) adding dodecanesulfonic acid sodium salt as an ion-pair reagent. The eluted fraction was evaporated and derivatised with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) for GC-NPD analysis and GC-MS confirmation. Parameters for extraction pressure, temperature and cycle of ASE, clean-up, derivatisation and analysis procedure were optimised. The method was validated in muscle, kidney and liver of swine, bovine with a low concentration (limit of quantification) of 16.4 and 21.4 µg kg⁻¹ for these two analytes using GC-NPD. For GC-MS, the limits of quantification were 4.1 and 5.6 µg kg⁻¹, respectively. Spiked recoveries from levels of 20 to 200 µg kg⁻¹ were found to be between 73% and 99% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 17% in GC-NPD. For GC-MS, levels from 5 to 20 µg kg⁻¹ had between 70% and 93% with an RSD of less than 21%. This rapid and reliable method can be used for the characterisation and quantification of residues of lincomycin and spectinomycin in animal tissues. PMID:21240824

  9. Identification and measurement of chlorinated organic pesticides in water by electron-capture gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, Donald F.; Law, LeRoy M.

    1965-01-01

    Pesticides, in minute quantities, may affect the regimen of streams, and because they may concentrate in sediments, aquatic organisms, and edible aquatic foods, their detection and their measurement in the parts-per-trillion range are considered essential. In 1964 the U.S. Geological Survey at Menlo Park, Calif., began research on methods for monitoring pesticides in water. Two systems were selected--electron-capture gas chromatography and microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Studies on these systems are now in progress. This report provides current information on the development and application of an electron-capture gas chromatographic procedure. This method is a convenient and extremely sensitive procedure for the detection and measurement of organic pesticides having high electron affinities, notably the chlorinated organic pesticides. The electron-affinity detector is extremely sensitive to these substances but it is not as sensitive to many other compounds. By this method, the chlorinated organic pesticide may be determined on a sample of convenient size in concentrations as low as the parts-per-trillion range. To insure greater accuracy in the identifications, the pesticides reported were separated and identified by their retention times on two different types of gas chromatographic columns.

  10. Separation and Detection of Toxic Gases with a Silicon Micromachined Gas Chromatography System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolesar, Edward S.; Reston, Rocky R.

    1995-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatography (GC) system was designed and fabricated using silicon micromachining and integrated circuit (IC) processing techniques. The silicon micromachined gas chromatography system (SMGCS) is composed of a miniature sample injector that incorporates a 10 microliter sample loop; a 0.9 meter long, rectangular shaped (300 micrometer width and 10 micrometer height) capillary column coated with a 0.2 micrometer thick copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) stationary phase; and a dual detector scheme based upon a CuPc-coated chemiresistor and a commercially available 125 micrometer diameter thermal conductivity detector (TCD) bead. Silicon micromachining was employed to fabricate the interface between the sample injector and the GC column, the column itself, and the dual detector cavity. A novel IC thin-film processing technique was developed to sublime the CuPc stationary phase coating on the column walls that were micromachined in the host silicon wafer substrate and Pyrex (r) cover plate, which were then electrostatically bonded together. The SMGCS can separate binary gas mixtures composed of parts-per-million (ppm) concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) when isothermally operated (55-80 degrees C). With a helium carrier gas and nitrogen diluent, a 10 microliter sample volume containing ammonia and nitrogen dioxide injected at 40 psi ((2.8 x 10(exp 5)Pa)) can be separated in less than 30 minutes.

  11. Metabolomics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: Combined Targeted and Untargeted Profiling.

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics is ideal for identifying and quantitating small-molecule metabolites (<650 Da), including small acids, alcohols, hydroxyl acids, amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, sterols, catecholamines, drugs, and toxins, often using chemical derivatization to make these compounds sufficiently volatile for gas chromatography. This unit shows how GC-MS-based metabolomics allows integration of targeted assays for absolute quantification of specific metabolites with untargeted metabolomics to discover novel compounds. Complemented by database annotations using large spectral libraries and validated standard operating procedures, GC-MS can identify and semiquantify over 200 compounds from human body fluids (e.g., plasma, urine, or stool) per study. Deconvolution software enables detection of more than 300 additional unidentified signals that can be annotated through accurate mass instruments with appropriate data processing workflows, similar to untargeted profiling using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. GC-MS is a mature technology that uses not only classic detectors (quadrupole) but also target mass spectrometers (triple quadrupole) and accurate mass instruments (quadrupole-time of flight). This unit covers sample preparation from mammalian samples, data acquisition, quality control, and data processing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27038389

  12. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, Eric Robert

    1998-10-01

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr{sub 4}, HfBr{sub 4}, RfBr{sub 4}, NbBr{sub 5}, TaOBr{sub 3}, HaCl{sub 5}, WBr{sub 6}, FrBr, and BiBr{sub 3}. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub a}) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} was observed: RfBr{sub 4} > ZrBr{sub 4} > HfBr{sub 4}. The {Delta}H{sub a} values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of {sup 261}Rf was performed. {sup 261}Rf was produced via the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74{sub -6}{sup +7} seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78{sub -6}{sup +11} seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75{+-}7 seconds for {sup 261}Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant temperature) gas phase chromatography instrument to a thermochromatographic (variable temperature

  13. Isomeric differentiation of chloroanilines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with tosylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhu, Guohua; Chen, Mengmeng; Liu, Jinsong; Jiang, Kezhi

    2016-01-01

    p-Chloroaniline is one of the banned aromatic amines in azo dyes, but it is very difficult to distinguish it from its isomers due to their identical retention time in chromatography and similar mass spectra. In this work, derivatization of the isomeric chloroanilines was carried out to yield the corresponding N-tosyl chloroanilines, which were completely separated by gas chromatography and also possessed clearly different electron ionization mass spectra. Thus, the three isomers could be differentiated and determined at the same time. Density functional theory calculation results indicated that the effect of the substituent pattern in electron ionization mass spectrometry is mainly due to the difference in the stability of the product ion (P2) at m/z 126, originating from the loss of tosyl radical from the precursor ion. PMID:27553734

  14. Quantitative structure retention relationship studies for predicting relative retention times of chlorinated phenols on gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yin; Sun, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Xu, Shi-Fen; Yao, Shu-Chun; Wang, Lian-Sheng

    2002-07-01

    A new method of quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) studies was reported for predicting gas chromatography (GC) relative retention times (RRTs) of chlorinated phenols (CPs) using a DB-5 column. Chemical descriptors were calculated from the molecular structure of CPs and related to their gas chromatographic RRTs by using multiple linear regression analysis. The proposed model had a multiple square correlation coefficient R2 = 0.970, standard error SE = 0.0472, and significant level P = 0.0000. The QSRR model also reveals that the gas chromatographic relative retention times of CPs are associated with physicochemical property interactions with the stationary phase, and influenced by the number of chlorine and oxygen in the CP mOlecules. PMID:12211996

  15. Influence of relative humidity on the properties of examined materials by means of inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Strzemiecka, Beata; Kołodziejek, Joanna; Kasperkowiak, Małgorzata; Voelkel, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution was applied to evaluate the surface properties of sorbents and the effect of different carrier gas humidity. They were stored in different environmental humidity - 29%, 40%, and 80%. The dispersive components of the surface free energy of the zeolites and perlite were determined by Schulz-Lavielle method, whereas their tendency to undergo specific interactions was estimated basing on the electron donor-acceptor approach presented by Flour and Papirer. Surface parameters were used to monitor the changes of the properties caused by the humidity of the storage environment as well as of RH of carrier gas. The increase of humidity of storage environment caused a decrease of sorbents surface activity and increase the ability to specific interaction. PMID:23219027

  16. Headspace analysis of engine oil by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Levermore, D M; Josowicz, M; Rees, W S; Janata, J

    2001-03-15

    This study establishes the rationale necessary for determining the time to change engine oil. This is based on identifying gaseous components in new and used automobile lubricants. Key compounds, so-called "signature", are separated and identified qualitatively by coupled gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Volatile antioxidants at zero miles and fuel contaminants at low mileage are observed in the headspace of engine oil. Several oxidative degradation components have been positively identified in the used oil, which include the following: acetaldehyde, acetone, butanal, 2-propanol, acetic acid, 2-hexanol, benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, and 1-pentanol. This study strongly suggests that the status of lubricating oil can be determined by the analysis of the gas phase above the oil. Most importantly, it opens the possibility of performing conditional maintenance of the combustion engine based on information obtained from gas sensors. PMID:11305675

  17. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the chemical characterisation of modern and archaeological figs (Ficus carica).

    PubMed

    Ribechini, Erika; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2011-06-24

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethylsilylation, and analytical pyrolysis using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) for in situ derivatisation followed by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis (Pyrolysis-silylation-GC/MS) were used to investigate the hydrolysable and soluble constituents, and the polymerised macromolecules of an archaeological fig (Ficus carica) recovered in Zaragoza (Spain), as well as of modern figs. The main aim was to study the compositional alterations undergone by the fig tissues in a particular archaeological environment: the fig was in a vessel and covered by a layer of a mixture of orpiment and gypsum. A comparison between the GC/MS results from modern and archaeological figs revealed that degradative reactions took place, leading to the disappearance/depletion of reactive (unsaturated fatty acids) and sensitive compounds (phytosterols and triterpenes). Py-silylation-GC/MS data provided evidence of a significant degradation of the saccharide and lipid components of the fig tissue, which left a residue enriched in polyphenols and polyesters. PMID:21570079

  18. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the investigation of on-column dehydration of steroid hormones during gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trafford, D J; Coldwell, R D; Makin, H L

    1991-01-01

    Some underivatized steroids when injected onto conventional packed columns for gas-liquid chromatography underwent varying degrees of dehydration. This problem was traced to the presence of small pieces of broken glass on the top of the column at the point of injection. This observation provoked an examination of the effect of pre-column dehydration on a number of different types of steroids. Powdered aluminium was placed in the injection liner of a Hewlett-Packard gas chromatograph fitted with an HP1 capillary column connected to a mass selective detector, and injections were made using a new high temperature septumless injection system at temperatures between 200 and 400 degrees C. 5 alpha-androstan-3 alpha-ol, a simple monofunctional C19 steroid chosen as a model to establish optimum conditions, underwent dehydration at injection temperatures greater than 250 degrees C and the product reached a maximum at 400 degrees C when no unchanged steroid was present. Monohydroxylated androgens and oestrogens underwent dehydration at 400 degrees C producing products whose mass spectra indicated they were monenes, although the position of the double bond could not be assigned. Polyfunctional androgens and oestrogens and corticosteroids underwent complex changes producing a number of products some of whose structures could not be determined. The dehydration products had the advantage that they had relatively intense high mass ions and for suitable steroids this might provide enhanced sensitivity of detection during mass fragmentography. In such cases dehydration was reproducible and straight line standard curves were obtained. C27 and C28 secosteroids (vitamins D2 and D3) and some of their metabolites (e.g. 25-hydroxyvitamin D) underwent efficient dehydration, again producing products with intense molecular ions. In the case of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 25,26-dihydroxyvitamin D3, dehydration produced different products which were easily resolved in the chromatographic

  19. Determination of vaporization enthalpies of the branched esters from correlation gas chromatography and transpiration methods

    SciTech Connect

    Verevkin, S.P.; Heintz, A.

    1999-12-01

    Vaporization enthalpies are indispensable for the assessment of the environmental fate and behavior of environmental contaminants. The temperature dependencies of retention indices of a set of 80 esters with branched molecular structures were measured on a nonpolar gas chromatographic column. The correlation gas chromatography method and reliable data set of 16 esters selected from the literature were used to derive a correlation for the prediction of the standard molar enthalpies of vaporization {Delta}{sub 1}{sup g}H{sub m}{sup {degree}} at the temperature T = 298.15 K. Experimental values of {Delta}{sub 1}{sup g}H{sub m}{sup {degree}} for 64 branched esters were obtained with the help of this correlation. The vaporization enthalpies of isopentyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and neopentyl pivalate were additionally obtained by the transpiration method from the temperature dependence of the vapor pressure measured in a flow system and used for checking the validity of the correlation gas chromatography method.

  20. Gas chromatography-vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy for analysis of fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Smuts, Jonathan; Bai, Ling; Walsh, Phillip; Armstrong, Daniel W; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    A new vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detector for gas chromatography was recently developed and applied to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. VUV detection features full spectral acquisition in a wavelength range of 115-240nm, where virtually all chemical species absorb. VUV absorption spectra of 37 FAMEs, including saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated types were recorded. Unsaturated FAMEs show significantly different gas phase absorption profiles than saturated ones, and these classes can be easily distinguished with the VUV detector. Another advantage includes differentiating cis/trans-isomeric FAMEs (e.g. oleic acid methyl ester and linoleic acid methyl ester isomers) and the ability to use VUV data analysis software for deconvolution of co-eluting signals. As a universal detector, VUV also provides high specificity, sensitivity, and a fast data acquisition rate, making it a powerful tool for fatty acid screening when combined with gas chromatography. The fatty acid profile of several food oil samples (olive, canola, vegetable, corn, sunflower and peanut oils) were analyzed in this study to demonstrate applicability to real world samples. PMID:26471553

  1. Development of a soft-X ray detector for energy resolved 2D imaging by means of a Gas Pixel Detector with highly integrated microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Pacella, D.; Pizzicaroli, G.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.

    2008-03-12

    Soft-X ray 2-D imaging on ITER is not considered yet. We propose a new approach, based on a gas detector with a gas electron multiplier (GEM) as amplifying structure and with a two-dimensional readout fully integrated with the front end electronics, through an ASIC developed on purpose. The concept has been already tested by means of a prototype, with 128 pixels, carried out in Frascati in collaboration with INFN-Pisa and tested on FTU in 2001 and NSTX in 2002-2004. Thanks to the photon counting mode, it provides 2-D imaging with high time resolution (sub millisecond), high sensitivity and signal to noise ratio. Its capability of energy discrimination allows the acquisition of pictures in X-ray energy bands or to perform a spectral scan in the full energy interval. We propose the realisation of such kind a detector with a readout microchip (ASIC) equipped with 105600 hexagonal pixels arranged at 70 {mu}m pitch in a 300x352 honeycomb matrix, corresponding to an active area of 2.1x2.1 cm{sup 2}, with a pixel density of 240 pixels/ mm{sup 2}. Each pixel is connected to a charge sensitive amplifier followed by a discriminator of pulse amplitude and counter. The chip integrates more than 16.5 million transistors and it is subdivided in 64 identical clusters, to be read independently each other. An important part of the work will be also the design of the whole detector to fulfil all the constraints and requirements as plasma diagnostic in a tokamak machine. Since the detector has high and controllable intrinsic gain, it works well even at very low photon energy, ranging from 0.2 keV to 10 keV (X-VUV region). This range appears therefore particularly suitable for ITER to monitor the outer part of the plasma. In particular pedestal physics, edge modes, localization and effects of additional heating, boundary plasma control etc. The capability of this proposed detector to work in this energy range is further valuable because solid state detectors are not favorite at low

  2. Rapid presumptive identification of anaerobes in blood cultures by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Sondag, J E; Ali, M; Murray, P R

    1980-01-01

    Production of volatile and nonvolatile metabolic acids in blood culture broths by aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and obligate anaerobic bacteria was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Anaerobic blood culture isolates were presumptively identified by the qualitative analysis of volatile fatty acids. Isolates, with a characteristic Gram stain reaction and cellular morphology, were identified by the following acid patterns: Bacteriodes fragilis group with acetic and propionic acids; Fusobacterium with acetic, butyric, and usually propionic acids; Veillonella with acetic and propionic acids; gram-positive cocci with acetic and butyric acids; and Clostridium with acetic and butyric acids. PMID:7381002

  3. Headspace gas chromatography-flame ionization detector method for organic solvent residue analysis in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mijeong Lee; Zahn, Michael; Trinh, Thao; Jia, Qi; Ma, Wenwen

    2006-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the identification and quantification of 20 organic solvent residues in dietary supplements. The method utilizes a headspace sampler interfaced with gas chromatography and flame ionization detection. With split injection (5:1) and a DB-624 column, most of the organic solvents are separated in 9 min. The method has been validated and was found to be relatively simple and fast, and it can be applied to most common organic solvent residues. With the mass detector, the method was able to identify organic solvents beyond the 20 standards tested. PMID:17225592

  4. Serum acetaminophen assay using activated charcoal adsorption and gas chromatography without derivatization.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandam, M; Novic, B; Savich, R; Wagman, E

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative assay of acetaminophen in serum has been developed. The drug, together with an internal standard 2-acetamidophenol, is adsorbed on activated charcoal and then extracted into a mixture of ethyl acetate and isopropanol. This extract is then analyzed, without any derivatization, by gas chromatography. The isothermal analysis yielded a good, highly reproducible separation. The drug peak was symmetrical and without any tailing. The peak height response ratio was found to be linear with concentrations ranging from 25-500 ng/L. No interference was observed with the various drugs or metabolites which are commonly encountered in human serum. PMID:7421146

  5. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, J.

    1995-08-23

    The Savannah River Site contains approximately 1500 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are collected. Many of these samples are sent off-site for various analyses, including the determination of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report describes accomplishments that have been made during the past year which will ultimately allow VOC analysis to be performed on-site using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Through the use of the on-site approach, it is expected that there will be a substantial cost savings. This approach will also provide split-sample analysis capability which can serve as a quality control measure for off-site analysis.

  6. The use of rapid turnaround heated headspace/gas chromatography to support regulatory soil cleanup standards

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, J.; Evans, C.; Francoeur, T.L.; Guerra, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper addresses the use of rapid turnaround, heated headspace/gas chromatography (GC) to support a soil remediation project in the state of New Jersey. In the past, rapid turnaround, heated head space/GC procedures have been used primarily as a screening tool to delineate areas of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination on-site. For this project, the heated headspace/GC method was the primary analytical tool used to support a large soil remediation project. This paper reviews the project goals, presents analytical protocol, presents internal quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), evaluates laboratory split data, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of this rapid turnaround method.

  7. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of historical varnishes of ancient Italian lutes and violin.

    PubMed

    Echard, J P; Benoit, C; Peris-Vicente, J; Malecki, V; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Vaiedelich, S

    2007-02-12

    The organic constituents of historical vanishes from two ancient Italian lutes and a Stradivari violin, kept in the Musée de la musique in Paris, have been characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results have been compared with the chromatograms and mass spectra of recent as well as old naturally aged reference materials. The three historical varnishes analyzed have been shown to be oil varnishes, probably mixtures of linseed oil with resins. Identification of diterpenoids and triterpenoids compounds, and of the resins that may have been ingredients of the varnishes, are discussed in this paper. PMID:17386601

  8. Determination of water content by capillary gas chromatography coupled with thermal conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Lodi, A; Bellini, M S; Clavel, A; Pijnenburg, N

    2011-11-01

    This article presents some experience obtained by applying capillary gas chromatography coupled with thermal conductivity detection (GC/TCD) to the determination of water in substances for pharmaceutical use. This technique represents a useful, orthogonal tool complementary to water determination methods based on volumetric or coulometric titration. It can also represent an alternative technique when such titrations are not applicable. This article presents the preliminary results obtained in a number of case studies where a GC/TCD procedure was applied in comparison with pharmacopoeial methods to substances with different water contents. PMID:22225767

  9. Effect of emulsifiers on surface properties of sucrose by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Ph; Sellappan, P; Daoud, P

    2002-09-01

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was employed to characterize the changes in surface properties of sucrose particles coated with either lecithin or polyglycerol polyricinoleate. IGC was performed using polar and non-polar adsorbates at infinite dilution with the sucrose particles as the solid stationary phase. Coating the sugar surface with emulsifiers induced an increase in the lipophilicity of the sugar particles, i.e. a sharp decrease in the acidity of the surface. Yet the two emulsifiers induced a slightly different increase in the surface basicity. It was hypothesized that this observation was due to a difference in the molecular structure of the emulsifiers. PMID:12385382

  10. Simple, specific analysis of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides in sediments using column extraction and gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belisle, A.A.; Swineford, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    A simple, specific procedure was developed for the analysis of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides in sediment. The wet soil was mixed with anhydrous sodium sulfate to bind water and the residues were column extracted in acetone:methylene chloride (1:l,v/v). Coextracted water was removed by additional sodium sulfate packed below the sample mixture. The eluate was concentrated and analyzed directly by capillary gas chromatography using phosphorus and nitrogen specific detectors. Recoveries averaged 93 % for sediments extracted shortly after spiking, but decreased significantly as the samples aged.

  11. Evaluation of microextraction/capillary column gas chromatography for monitoring industrial outfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Thielen, D.R.; Olsen, G.; Davis, A.; Bajor, E.; Stefanovski, J.; Chodkowski, J.

    1987-01-01

    Microextraction and capillary-column gas chromatography techniques are applied to plant discharge streams for repetitive wastewater discharge permit analyses. This combination allows the analyst to reduce sample preparation since microextraction replaces both purge-and-trap for volatiles and microextraction for semi-volatiles. An additional advantage is the elimination of a concentration step, which is ,ften a major contributor to low method recoveries. The overall procedure is shown to be more precise than purge-and-trap but slightly less precise than conventional extraction. The results of each method are shown to be equivalent.

  12. Inverse gas chromatography. V - Computer simulation of diffusion processes on the column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattam, Paul; Munk, Petr

    1988-01-01

    The elution behavior of low molecular weight probes on inverse gas chromatography (IGC) columns is simulated using a computer. The IGC model is based on a polymer stationary phase of uniform thickness with a nonnegligible resitance to probe penetration. Three characteristic numbers are found to determine the whole process: Z(p) characterizing the distribution of the probe between phases, Z(f) describing the diffusion in the polymer phase, and Z(g) related to diffusion in the gaseous phase. For situations when Z(p)/Z(f) is less than 2, the standard evaluation procedures are virtually useless. The actual behavior of such systems is described.

  13. Determination of carboxylic acids in oil samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.

    1981-03-01

    A combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method for measuring carboxylic acids in oil samples without first going through solvent extraction and group separation is reported. The carboxylic acids in oils are directly derivatized to their corresponding methyl esters via anion formation in tetramethylammonium hydroxide/methanol/methyl iodide/n-butyl acetate solutions prior to GC/MS analysis using a glass wall coated capillary column. The reaction is mild, selective, and rapid. It can usually be carried out at room temperature and completed in 10 to 15 min. Multiple ion detection techniques (MID) can be readily used to further resolve methyl esters from other compounds if necessary.

  14. [Gas chromatography in quantitative analysis of hydrocyanic acid and its salts in cadaveric blood].

    PubMed

    Iablochkin, V D

    2003-01-01

    A direct gas chromatography method was designed for the quantitative determination of cyanides (prussic acid) in cadaveric blood. Its sensitivity is 0.05 mg/ml. The routine volatile products, including substances, which emerge due to putrefaction of organic matters, do not affect the accuracy and reproducibility of the method; the exception is H-propanol that was used as the internal standard. The method was used in legal chemical expertise related with acute cyanide poisoning (suicide) as well as with poisoning of products of combustion of nonmetals (foam-rubber). The absolute error does not exceed 10% with a mean quadratic deviation of 0.0029-0.0033 mg. PMID:14689782

  15. Environmental Analysis by ab Initio Quantum Mechanical Computation and Gas Chromatography/Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gurka, D F; Titus, R; Robins, K; Wong, A; Wurrey, C J; Durig, J R; Shen, Z; Burkhard, L P

    1996-12-01

    Computational chemistry, in conjunction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (GC/MS/FT-IR), was used to tentatively identify seven tetrachlorobutadiene (TCBD) isomers detected in an environmental sample. Computation of the TCBD infrared spectra was performed with the Gaussian quantum chemistry software. The Hartree-Fock/6-31G* level of theory was employed, with IR frequencies scaled by a standard factor of 0.89. This approach shows great promise as a means of characterizing or confirming environmental analyte identifications when standard spectra, or pure standards required to measure standard spectra, are unavailable. PMID:21619333

  16. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  17. Determination of n-alkane content in middle and heavy distillates by gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Fadeev, V.S.; Shteingardt, N.S.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have modified a procedure of determination of n-alkane content in middle and heavy distillates by gas chromatography. The zeolite is replaced by a surface-layer absorbent consisting of grains of diatomite on which there has been deposited a surface layer of MgA zeolite particles, and the helium is replaced by hydrogen. A special chromatograph attachment is described and the chromatograms are calculated on the basis of the heights or areas of the peaks of the charge and the impurity hydrocarbons which are not n-alkanes.

  18. Complete elution of vacuum gas oil resins by comprehensive high-temperature two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boursier, Laure; Souchon, Vincent; Dartiguelongue, Cyril; Ponthus, Jérémie; Courtiade, Marion; Thiébaut, Didier

    2013-03-01

    The development of efficient conversion processes requires extended knowledge on vacuum gas oils (VGOs). Among these processes, hydrocracking is certainly one of the best suited to meet the increasing demand on high quality diesel fuels. Most of refractory and inhibiting compounds towards hydrocracking and especially nitrogen containing compounds are contained in a fraction of the VGO called the resin fraction, which corresponds to the most polar fraction of a VGO obtained by liquid chromatography (LC) fractionation on a silica column. However, the lack of resolution observed through existing analytical methods does not allow a detailed characterization of these fractions. A recent study showed that comprehensive high temperature two-dimensional gas chromatography (HT-GC×GC) methods could be optimized in order to elute heavy compounds. This method was implemented for the analysis of VGO resin fractions and complete elution was reached. Firstly, the method was validated through repeatability, accuracy, linearity and response factors calculations. Four VGO resin fractions were analyzed and their HT-GC×GC simulated distillation curves were compared to their GC simulated distillation (GC-SimDist) curves. This comparison showed that the method allows complete elution of most of the analyzed VGO resin fractions. However, a detailed characterization of these fractions is not yet obtained due to the very large number of heteroatomic and aromatic species that a flame ionization detector can detect. Current work aims at increasing the selectivity of GC×GC by using heteroatom selective detectors in order to improve the characterization of such products. PMID:23375830

  19. Stable isotope dilution method for the determination of guanidinoacetic acid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    For more than 30 years, guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), together with other guanidino compounds, has been proposed as an important marker for renal failure, in kidney transplantation, and for renal metabolism, especially for the metabolic activity of the renal proximal tubules. Since the discovery of the first patient with guanidinoacetic acid methyltransferase deficiency in 1994 by Stöckler et al. (Pediatr. Res. 1994; 36: 409), GAA has become of great interest for all laboratories involved in the diagnosis of metabolic diseases. In the literature there are several methods described for the determination of GAA, ranging from ion-exchange chromatography with post-column derivatisation, enzymatic methods, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), to liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS). Here a stable isotope dilution method for quantitative and accurate determination of GAA in urine, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid is described. GAA is converted to the bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine di(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) derivative by stepwise derivatisation with hexafluoroacetylacetone and N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Analysis can be performed using a standard benchtop GC/MS system. For quantitative GAA determination with 1,2-(13)C-GAA as internal standard, selected ion monitoring is performed using m/z 460/462, with m/z 432/433 and 375/376 as qualifiers. PMID:12661026

  20. Methods of analysis-Determination of pesticides in sediment using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; McWayne, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of 119 pesticides in environmental sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in support of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The pesticides included in this method were chosen through prior prioritization. Herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides along with degradates are included in this method and span a variety of chemical classes including, but not limited to, chloroacetanilides, organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, triazines, and triazoles. Sediment samples are extracted by using an accelerated solvent extraction system (ASE®, and the compounds of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences (including sulfur) by passing the extracts through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) along with the use of either stacked graphitized carbon and alumina solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges or packed Florisil®. Chromatographic separation, detection, and quantification of the pesticides from the sediment-sample extracts are done by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 micrograms per kilogram (μg/kg) dry weight ranged from 75 to 102 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 3 to 13 percent. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), ranged from 0.6 to 3.4 μg/kg dry weight.

  1. Gas and dust in the star-forming region ρ Oph A. The dust opacity exponent β and the gas-to-dust mass ratio g2d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseau, R.; Larsson, B.; Lunttila, T.; Olberg, M.; Rydbeck, G.; Bergman, P.; Justtanont, K.; Olofsson, G.; de Vries, B. L.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim at determining the spatial distribution of the gas and dust in star-forming regions and address their relative abundances in quantitative terms. We also examine the dust opacity exponent β for spatial and/or temporal variations. Methods: Using mapping observations of the very dense ρ Oph A core, we examined standard 1D and non-standard 3D methods to analyse data of far-infrared and submillimetre (submm) continuum radiation. The resulting dust surface density distribution can be compared to that of the gas. The latter was derived from the analysis of accompanying molecular line emission, observed with Herschel from space and with APEX from the ground. As a gas tracer we used N2H+, which is believed to be much less sensitive to freeze-out than CO and its isotopologues. Radiative transfer modelling of the N2H+ (J = 3-2) and (J = 6-5) lines with their hyperfine structure explicitly taken into account provides solutions for the spatial distribution of the column density N(H2), hence the surface density distribution of the gas. Results: The gas-to-dust mass ratio is varying across the map, with very low values in the central regions around the core SM 1. The global average, = 88, is not far from the canonical value of 100, however. In ρ Oph A, the exponent β of the power-law description for the dust opacity exhibits a clear dependence on time, with high values of 2 for the envelope-dominated emission in starless Class -1 sources to low values close to 0 for the disk-dominated emission in Class III objects. β assumes intermediate values for evolutionary classes in between. Conclusions: Since β is primarily controlled by grain size, grain growth mostly occurs in circumstellar disks. The spatial segregation of gas and dust, seen in projection toward the core centre, probably implies that, like C18O, also N2H+ is frozen onto the grains. Based on observations with APEX, which is a 12 m diameter submillimetre telescope at 5100 m altitude on Llano Chajnantor

  2. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  3. Multidimensional gas chromatography of oxidative degradation products in algae-derived fuel oil samples using narrow heartcuts and rapid cycle times.

    PubMed

    Mitrevski, Blagoj; Webster, Renée L; Rawson, Paul; Evans, David J; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Marriott, Philip J

    2012-02-10

    To characterize a fuel's thermal and storage stability an understanding of the process of oxidation and oxidation pathways is essential. Oxidation pathways commence with hydroperoxides which quickly decompose to form a range of alcohols, acids and other oxygen-containing species. In the presence of significant levels of hydrocarbon-based matrix, analysis of these heteroatomic species is difficult. Applying multidimensional gas chromatography with very narrow heart-cut windows (0.20 min) minimizes the number of compounds transferred to the second dimension (2D) column during each heart-cut. Successive heart-cuts every 2.00 min are taken throughout the analytical run, since each heart-cut has a maximum retention on 2D of <2.00 min on the fast elution 2D column. Subsequent analyses involve incrementing or offsetting the heart-cut windows by 0.20 min, so after 10 analyses, a complete coverage of the sample components can be obtained. On the polar 1D and non-polar 2D phase column arrangement, non-polar matrix compounds elute last on the 2D column, and this determines the largest (2t)R; i.e., (2t)R < P(M) to ensure retained components on 2D will not overlap with subsequent heart-cuts. Heartcutting is supported by cryotrapping at the start of the 2D column in order to provide significantly better resolution. Good quality MS library match data generally demonstrate the high resolution separation of oxygenates achieved. Whilst 1D GC-MS was unsuccessful in identifying any of the oxygen-containing compounds reported here, good correlation of MS data (with average MS library similarity data) for acids (903), alcohols (909), ketones (941) and aldehydes (938) in the sample is obtained. The method requires ten sequential runs, and this can be accomplished automatically once the events table is set up. However if fewer target compounds are to be transferred, a reduced number of sequential runs can be implemented. PMID:22226457

  4. An unambiguous identification of 2D electron gas features in the photoluminescence spectrum of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Sharma, T. K.

    2016-07-01

    A fast and non-destructive method for probing the true signatures of 2D electron gas (2DEG) states in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is presented. Two broad features superimposed with interference oscillations are observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The two features are identified as the ground and excited 2DEG states which are confirmed by comparing the PL spectra of as-grown and top barrier layer etched samples. Broad PL features disappear at a certain temperature along with the associated interference oscillations. Furthermore, the two broad PL features depicts specific temperature and excitation intensity dependencies which make them easily distinguishable from the bandedge excitonic or defect related PL features. The presence of strong interference oscillations associated with the 2DEG PL features is explained by considering the localized generation of PL signal at the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Finally, a large value of the polarization induced electric field of ~1.01 MV cm‑1 is reported from PL measurements for AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures. It became possible only when the true identification of 2DEG features was made possible by the proposed method.

  5. Design and construct of a new detector for gas chromatography based on continuous negative corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Ghahfarokhi, M Sharifian; Khayamian, T

    2011-05-01

    In this work, a new detector was designed and constructed based on negative corona discharge. This detector can be used separately or as a detector in gas chromatography. The detector and chromatographic variables including cell temperature, gas flow rates, voltage between the two electrodes, and column temperature were optimized. Chloroform was used as a test compound to evaluate the performance of the detector. The detection limit of chloroform was obtained 0.78 ng∕ml and its dynamic range was over the range of 2-840 ng∕ml. The relative standard detection was about 6% for the limit of quantification. This detector is able to be used as an alternative for analysis of compounds containing electronegative elements. PMID:21639545

  6. Analysis of fatty oil in Semen Ziziphi Spinosae by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yu-Juan, Li; Kai-Shun, Bi; Xin-Miao, Liang; Hong-Bin, Xiao

    2003-01-01

    A simple and fast capillary gas chromatographic (CGC) method with flame ionization detection is developed for the analysis of fatty oil in Semen Ziziphi Spinosae. After methyl-esterification, eight components are identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The derivatization condition is investigated in order to validate this method. Palmitic acid and stearic acid are quantitated simultaneously. The limits of detection are 5.024 microg/mL for palmitic acid and 6.957 microg/mL for stearic acid, respectively. The limits of quantitation are 16.76 microg/mL for palmitic acid and 23.19 microg/mL for stearic acid, respectively. The percent recoveries of palmitic and stearic acid are 97.4% and 96.6%. CGC is shown to be a quick and informative tool for the analysis of fatty oil in Semen Ziziphi Spinosae. PMID:12597596

  7. Derivatization of pinacolyl alcohol with phenyldimethylchlorosilane for enhanced detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Albo, Rebecca L F; Valdez, Carlos A; Leif, Roald N; Mulcahy, Heather A; Koester, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    A derivatization procedure for the qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of pinacolyl alcohol (PA) that employs phenyldimethylchlorosilane (PhDMClS) and the promoter N-methylimidazole is described. While PA, underivatized, can be detected using conventional gas chromatographic methods, its polarity and low boiling point make its detection in complex matrices challenging. The silylation procedure described herein generates a PA-derivative exhibiting an increased on-column retention time, thus shifting its GC-MS signal away from commonly encountered, volatile, interfering analytes. Derivatized PA could be distinguished from other PhDMClS-derivatized isomeric alcohols by its unique retention time and mass spectrum. The derivatization was demonstrated to perform well in the GC-MS analysis and identification of PA in samples from Proficiency Tests administered by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). PMID:24481624

  8. Indirect hydrogen analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Augsburger, M

    2013-08-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is an analytical tool very useful to investigate the composition of gaseous mixtures. The different gases are separated by specific columns but, if hydrogen (H2 ) is present in the sample, its detection can be performed by a thermal conductivity detector or a helium ionization detector. Indeed, coupled to GC, no other detector can perform this detection except the expensive atomic emission detector. Based on the detection and analysis of H2 isotopes by low-pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS), a new method for H2 detection by GC coupled to MS with an electron ionization ion source and a quadrupole analyser is presented. The presence of H2 in a gaseous mixture could easily be put in evidence by the monitoring of the molecular ion of the protonated carrier gas. PMID:23893637

  9. [Determination of sulfur dioxide residues in sulfur fumigated Chinese herbs with headspace gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jia, Zheng-Wei; Mao, Bei-Ping; Miao, Shui; Mao, Xiu-Hong; Ji, Shen

    2014-02-01

    This paper aims to establish a method for the determination of sulfur dioxide in sulfur fumigation Chinese herbs. Sample powder and hydrochloric acid solution were isolated by paraffin layer in order to avoid early reactions, with the generation of sulfur dioxide, headspace with airtight needle was used to transfer sulfur dioxide into gas chromatograph, and detected with thermal conductivity detector. The analytical performance was demonstrated by the analysis of 12 herbs, spiked at four concentration levels. In general, the recoveries ranging from 70% to 110%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) within 15%, were obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) was below 10 mg x kg(-1). Standard addition can be used for low recovery samples. The method is simple, less time-consuming, specific and sensitive. Methods comparison revealed that gas chromatography is better than traditional titration in terms of method operability, accuracy and specificity, showing good application value. PMID:24761623

  10. In situ search for organics by gas chromatography analysis: new derivatization / thermochemolysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffroy, Claude; Buch, Arnaud; David, Marc; Aissat, Lyes; El Mufleh, Amel; Papot, S.; Sternberg, Robert

    Many organic molecules are present in interstellar clouds and might be carried to the early Earth by comets and meteorites during the heavy bombardment phase in the first few hundred million years of the solar system. It has been suggested that extraterrestrial organic material may well represent an important part of the organic material available for the origin of life. Until samples, brought by future space missions, are available on Earth, in situ measurements are one of the way to get unaltered and non-contaminated samples for analysis. The analytical technique has to be robust, sensitive and non-specific due to the large scope of targets molecules. The only currently flight qualified technique of analysis of organic molecules in space is gas chromatography (Viking, Cassini-Huygens, SAM-MSL, COSAC-Rosetta). The main objective of this work is to present a new approach with multi step analysis using derivatisation and thermochemolysis reagents for a one pot in situ analysis of volatile and refractory organics in surface or sub-surface samples (Mars, comets).Indeed, no single technology enables to identify all organic compounds because naturally occurring molecules have different polarities, molecular weights, being extractible or recalcitrant, bonded trapped or adsorbed on minerals. Thus, we propose to wider the scope of chemical reagent already validated for in situ wet chemistry such as MTBSTFA (Rodier et al. 2001, 2002), DMF-DMA (Rodier et al. 2002), or TMAH (Rodier et al, 2005, Geffroy-Rodier et al; 2009) to analyze enantiomers of amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids in a one pot several steps sub system using a multi reagent and multi step approach. Thus using a new derivatizing agent, we successfully identified twenty one amino acids including twelve of the twenty proteinic amino acids without inhibiting following multi step thermochemolysis. *Geffroy-Rodier C, Grasset L, Sternberg R. Buch A. Amblès A. (2009) Thermochemolysis in search for organics in

  11. Flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using ≈4mLmin(-1) gas flows.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of the herein described research was focused on performing satisfactory flow modulation (FM), in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), using an MS-compatible second-dimension gas flow of approx. 4mLmin(-1). The FM model used was based on that initially proposed by Seeley et al. [3]. The use of limited gas flows was enabled through fine tuning of the FM parameters, in particular the duration of the re-injection (or flushing) process. Specifically, the application of a long re-injection period (i.e., 700ms) enabled efficient accumulation-loop flushing with gas flows of about 4mLmin(-1). It was possible to apply such extended re-injection periods by using different restrictor lengths in the connections linking the modulator to the auxiliary pressure source. FM GC×GC-MS applications were performed on a mixture containing C9-10 alkanes, and on a sample of essential oil. GC×GC-MS sensitivity was compared with that attained by using conventional GC-MS analysis, in essential oil applications. It was observed that signal intensities were, in general, considerably higher in the FM GC×GC-MS experiments. PMID:26968229

  12. Determination of Free Fatty Acids and Triglycerides by Gas Chromatography Using Selective Esterification Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-11-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography–flame ionization detection, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.

  13. Detection for Non-Milk Fat in Dairy Product by Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of fatty acids, triacylglycerols, and cholesterol in the detection of adulterated milk fat. The fatty acid, triacylglycerol, and cholesterol profiles of the mixtures of milk and non-milk fat (adulteration ratios of 10%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 90%) were analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed that concentrations of the fatty acids with oleic acid (C18:1n9c) and linoleic acid (C18:2n6c), triglycerides with C52 and C54, and cholesterol detected are proportional to the adulteration ratios remarkably. Oleic acid (C18:1n9c), linoleic acid (C18:2n6c), C52, and C54 were lower in pure milk fat than in adulterated mixtures. In contrast, pure milk has a higher cholesterol concentration than all adulterated mixtures (adulteration concentration in the range 10-90%). Thus, we suggest that oleic acid (C18:1n9c), linoleic acid (C18:2n6c), C52, C54, and cholesterol are suitable indicators and can be used as biomarkers to rapidly detect adulterated milk fat by gas chromatography. This study is expected to provide basic data for adulteration and material usage. Moreover, this new approach can detect the presence of foreign oils and fats in the milk fat of cheese and can find application in related studies. PMID:27194929

  14. Detection for Non-Milk Fat in Dairy Product by Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Park, Jung-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Man

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of fatty acids, triacylglycerols, and cholesterol in the detection of adulterated milk fat. The fatty acid, triacylglycerol, and cholesterol profiles of the mixtures of milk and non-milk fat (adulteration ratios of 10%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 90%) were analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed that concentrations of the fatty acids with oleic acid (C18:1n9c) and linoleic acid (C18:2n6c), triglycerides with C52 and C54, and cholesterol detected are proportional to the adulteration ratios remarkably. Oleic acid (C18:1n9c), linoleic acid (C18:2n6c), C52, and C54 were lower in pure milk fat than in adulterated mixtures. In contrast, pure milk has a higher cholesterol concentration than all adulterated mixtures (adulteration concentration in the range 10-90%). Thus, we suggest that oleic acid (C18:1n9c), linoleic acid (C18:2n6c), C52, C54, and cholesterol are suitable indicators and can be used as biomarkers to rapidly detect adulterated milk fat by gas chromatography. This study is expected to provide basic data for adulteration and material usage. Moreover, this new approach can detect the presence of foreign oils and fats in the milk fat of cheese and can find application in related studies. PMID:27194929

  15. Flavor characterization of ripened cod roe by gas chromatography, sensory analysis, and electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Rosa; Olafsdottir, Gudrun; Martinsdottir, Emilia; Stefansson, Gudmundur

    2004-10-01

    Characterization of the flavors of ripened roe products is of importance to establish a basis for a standardized product. Flavor profiles of commercially processed ripened roe from Iceland and Norway were studied by sensory analysis, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and an electronic nose to characterize the headspace of ripened roe. Sensory analysis showed that ripened roe odor and flavor in combination with caviar flavor and whey/caramel-like odor give the overall positive effect of the complex characteristic roe flavor. Analysis of volatiles by GC-MS and electronic nose confirmed the presence of aroma compounds contributing to the typical ripening and spoilage flavors detected by the sensory analysis. Methional, 1-octen-3-ol, and 2,6-nonadienal were the most important compounds contributing to ripened roe odor. Spoilage flavors were partly contributed by 3-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methylbutanal, which can be measured by the electronic nose and are suggested as quality indicators for objectively assessing the ripening of roe. Principal component analysis of the overall data showed that GC-O correlated well with sensory evaluation and the electronic nose measurements. PMID:15453695

  16. [Determination of docosahexaenoic acid in milk powder by gas chromatography using acid hydrolysis].

    PubMed

    Shao, Shiping; Xiang, Dapeng; Li, Shuang; Xi, Xinglin; Chen, Wenrui

    2015-11-01

    A method to determine docosahexenoic acid (DHA) in milk powder by gas chromatography was established. The milk powder samples were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid, extracted to get total fatty acids by Soxhlet extractor, then esterified with potassium hydroxide methanol solution to form methyl esters, and treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate. The optimal experiment conditions were obtained from orthogonal experiment L9(3(3)) which performed with three factors and three levels, and it requires the reaction performed with 1 mol/L potassium hydroxide solution at 25 degrees C for 5 min. The derivative treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate was separated on a column of SP-2560 (100 m x 0.25 mm x 0.20 μm), and determined in 55 min by temperature programming-gas chromatography. Good linearity was obtained in the range 5.0-300 mg/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.999 9. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 3.4%, 1.2% and 1.1% for the seven repeated experiments of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L of DHA, respectively. The limit of detection was 2 mg/kg, and the recoveries of DHA were in the range of 90.4%-93.5%. The results are satisfactory through the tests of practical samples. PMID:26939370

  17. Composition of ultrathin binary polymer brushes by thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Diego; Sparnacci, Katia; Laus, Michele; Ferrarese Lupi, Federico; Giammaria, Tommaso Jacopo; Seguini, Gabriele; Ceresoli, Monica; Perego, Michele; Gianotti, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, a reliable and rugged thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) method was developed to determine the composition of ultrathin films consisting of binary blends of functional polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) grafted to a silicon wafer. A general methodology will be given to address the composition determination problem for binary or even multicomponent polymer brush systems using the PS/PMMA-based samples as a paradigmatic example. In this respect, several distinct tailor-made materials were developed to ensure reliable calibration and validation stages. The analytical method was tested on unknown samples to follow the composition evolution in PS/PMMA brushes during the grafting reaction. A preferential grafting of the PMMA was revealed in full agreement with its preferential interaction with the SiO2 polar surface. Graphical abstract A reliable and rugged thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) method was developed to determine the composition of ultrathin films consisting of binary blends of functional polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) grafted to a silicon wafer. PMID:26873220

  18. Development of a technique for mercury speciation and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Barshick, C.M.; Britt, P.F.; Vance, M.A.; Duckworth, D.C.

    1997-07-01

    One element of concern to DOE is mercury. Mercury was used extensively at the DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee from 1950 to 1963 in the process of making lithium deuteride, a component of nuclear weapons. Although both the inorganic and organometallic forms of mercury are toxic to humans, the organic compounds are often more toxic. Since the toxicity of mercury is a function of its chemical form, an understanding of the interactions between commercially discharged mercury, naturally occurring mercury, and the environment in which they are present is vital. In this report, the authors have been investigating gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the analysis of both the organometallic and inorganic forms of mercury in the same environmental sample (e.g., solutions, soils, and sludges). Although gas chromatography is the classical technique for analyzing organic molecules, (e.g., organometallic compounds) little has been done on the analysis of inorganic compounds. In a previous publication, the authors described how a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber could be used to sample organomercurials from aqueous samples. An alkylation reaction was then carried out to transform chemically mercury nitrate into dimethylmercury; subsequent GC/MS analysis of this compound permitted quantification of the inorganic constituent. Subsequently, several different alkylation reagents have been synthesized that methylate any inorganic mercury compound to methylmercury iodide. Here, the authors report results on alkylation reaction time and the effect of pH on the population of the product.

  19. Simultaneous determination of three organophosphorus pesticides in different food commodities by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Bhaskar Reddy, Ambavaram; Yusop, Zulkifli; Jaafar, Jafariah; Bin Aris, Azmi; Abdul Majid, Zaiton; Umar, Khalid; Talib, Juhaizah

    2016-06-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatography with mass spectrometry method was developed for the simultaneous determination of three organophosphorus pesticides, namely, chlorpyrifos, malathion, and diazinon in three different food commodities (milk, apples, and drinking water) employing solid-phase extraction for sample pretreatment. Pesticide extraction from different sample matrices was carried out on Chromabond C18 cartridges using 3.0 mL of methanol and 3.0 mL of a mixture of dichloromethane/acetonitrile (1:1 v/v) as the eluting solvent. Analysis was carried out by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry using selected-ion monitoring mode. Good linear relationships were obtained in the range of 0.1-50 μg/L for chlorpyrifos, and 0.05-50 μg/L for both malathion and diazinon pesticides. Good repeatability and recoveries were obtained in the range of 78.54-86.73% for three pesticides under the optimized experimental conditions. The limit of detection ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 μg/L, and the limit of quantification ranged from 0.05 to 0.1 μg/L for all three pesticides. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the determination of three targeted pesticides in milk, apples, and drinking water samples each in triplicate. No pesticide was found in apple and milk samples, but chlorpyrifos was found in one drinking water sample below the quantification level. PMID:27095506

  20. Estimation of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin residues in chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jyot, Gagan; Mandal, Kousik; Battu, R S; Singh, Balwinder

    2013-07-01

    Dissipation of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin in chilli was studied following three applications of a combination formulation of Nurelle-D 505 (chlorpyriphos 50% + cypermethrin 5%) at 1 and 2 L ha(-1) at an interval of 15 days. Residues of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin in chilli were estimated by gas-liquid chromatography and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Half-life periods for chlorpyriphos were found to be 4.43 and 2.01 days, whereas for cypermethrin these values were observed to be 2.51 and 2.64 days at single and double the application rates, respectively. Residues of chlorpyriphos dissipated to more than 80% after 10 days at both the dosages. However, residues of cypermethrin dissipated to the extent of more than 70% in 7 days. Soil samples collected after 15 days of the last application did not show the presence of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin at their respective determination limit of 0.01 mg kg(-1). The use of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin mixture at the recommended dosage does not seem to pose any hazards to the consumers, and a waiting period of 1 day is suggested to reduce the risk before consumption of green chilli. PMID:23114920

  1. Rapid separation of beryllium and lanthanide derivatives by capillary gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.; Lucke, Richard B.; Douglas, Matt

    2012-09-04

    Previous studies describe derivatization of metal ions followed by analysis using gas chromatography, usually on packed columns. In many of these studies, stable and volatile derivatives were formed using fluorinated β-diketonate reagents. This paper extends previous work by investigating separations of the derivatives on small-diameter capillary gas chromatography columns and exploring on-fiber, solid-phase microextraction derivatization techniques for beryllium. The β-diketonate used for these studies was 1,1,1,2,2,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-3,5-heptanedione. Derivatization of lanthanides also required addition of a neutral donor, dibutyl sulfoxide, in addition to 1,1,1,2,2,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-3,5-heptanedione. Unoptimized separations on a 100-μm i.d. capillary column proved capable of rapid separations (within 15 min) of lanthanide derivatives that are adjacent to one another in the periodic table. Full-scan mass spectra were obtained from derivatives containing 5 ng of each lanthanide. Studies also developed a simple on-fiber solid-phase microextraction derivatization of beryllium. Beryllium could be analyzed in the presence of other alkali earth elements (Ba(II) and Sr(II)) without interference. Finally, extension of the general approach was demonstrated for several additional elements (i.e. Cu(II), Cr(III), and Ga(III)).

  2. Chemical warfare agent detection in complex environments with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Ni, Mingtian; Kottapalli, Visweswara; Visvanathan, Arvind; Ledford, Edward B., Jr.; Oostdijk, John; Trap, Henk C.

    2003-08-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) is an emerging technology for chemical separation that provides an order-of-magnitude increase in separation capacity over traditional gas chromatography. GCxGC separates chemical species with two capillary columns interfaced by two-stage thermal desorption. Because GCxGC is comprehensive and has high separation capacity, it can perform multiple traditional analytical methods with a single analysis. GCxGC has great potential for a wide variety of environmental sensing applications, including detection of chemical warfare agents (CWA) and other harmful chemicals. This paper demonstrates separation of nerve agents sarin and soman from a matrix of gasoline and diesel fuel. Using a combination of an initial column separating on the basis of boiling point and a second column separating on the basis of polarity, GCxGC clearly separates the nerve agents from the thousands of other chemicals in the sample. The GCxGC data is visualized, processed, and analyzed as a two-dimensional digital image using a software system for GCxGC image processing developed at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln.

  3. Application of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography for the assessment of oil contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Van De Weghe, Hendrik; Vanermen, Guido; Gemoets, Johan; Lookman, Richard; Bertels, Diane

    2006-12-22

    A crucial step in the remediation of oil contaminated soils is the characterization of the pollution. Information on the chemical composition is used to assess the toxicity (and thus the need for remediation) and to determine the most appropriate technology for treatment. Mostly these analyses are carried out in routine environmental laboratories using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC/FID) based on a protocol developed by the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group (TPHCWG). In the present study, an alternative method was developed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCXGC) with FID. Sample preparation was limited to pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), and the analysis was carried out on a commercially available instrument with a conventional column combination (RTX-1/BPX50) and with standard chromatographic software. Compared to the TPH method, the group-types in the GCXGC analysis are chemically better defined and more specific information is obtained especially for the (toxicologically important) aromatic hydrocarbon fraction. Preliminary results indicate that higher recoveries and lower RSDs are obtained with GCXGC, probably because of the less complex sample preparation. Furthermore a data processing method was developed to generate TPH results from GCXGC data; the volatility distribution profiles compared very well with conventional TPH data. The possibility of extracting physicochemical properties directly from the GCXGC chromatogram was briefly explored, but software limitations hindered this promising application. PMID:17055525

  4. Quantitative analysis of fragrance in selectable one dimensional or two dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with simultaneous detection of multiple detectors in single injection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Peng; Wan, Tow Shi; Min, Christina Liew Shu; Osborne, Murray; Ng, Khim Hui

    2014-03-14

    A selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system coupled with flame ionization detector (FID) and olfactory detection port (ODP) was employed in this study to analyze perfume oil and fragrance in shower gel. A split/splitless (SSL) injector and a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) injector are connected via a 2-way splitter of capillary flow technology (CFT) in this selectable (1)D/(2)D GC-MS/FID/ODP system to facilitate liquid sample injections and thermal desorption (TD) for stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) technique, respectively. The dual-linked injectors set-up enable the use of two different injector ports (one at a time) in single sequence run without having to relocate the (1)D capillary column from one inlet to another. Target analytes were separated in (1)D GC-MS/FID/ODP and followed by further separation of co-elution mixture from (1)D in (2)D GC-MS/FID/ODP in single injection without any instrumental reconfiguration. A (1)D/(2)D quantitative analysis method was developed and validated for its repeatability - tR; calculated linear retention indices (LRI); response ratio in both MS and FID signal, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), as well as linearity over a concentration range. The method was successfully applied in quantitative analysis of perfume solution at different concentration level (RSD≤0.01%, n=5) and shower gel spiked with perfume at different dosages (RSD≤0.04%, n=5) with good recovery (96-103% for SSL injection; 94-107% for stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption (SBSE-TD). PMID:24548435

  5. Partial least squares analysis of rocket propulsion fuel data using diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Freye, Chris E; Fitz, Brian D; Billingsley, Matthew C; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    The chemical composition and several physical properties of RP-1 fuels were studied using comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled with flame ionization detection (FID). A "reversed column" GC×GC configuration was implemented with a RTX-wax column on the first dimension ((1)D), and a RTX-1 as the second dimension ((2)D). Modulation was achieved using a high temperature diaphragm valve mounted directly in the oven. Using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV), the summed GC×GC-FID signal of three compound-class selective 2D regions (alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics) was regressed against previously measured ASTM derived values for these compound classes, yielding root mean square errors of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.855, 0.734, and 0.530mass%, respectively. For comparison, using partial least squares (PLS) analysis with LOOCV, the GC×GC-FID signal of the entire 2D separations was regressed against the same ASTM values, yielding a linear trend for the three compound classes (alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics), yielding RMSECV values of 1.52, 2.76, and 0.945 mass%, respectively. Additionally, a more detailed PLS analysis was undertaken of the compounds classes (n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, mono-, di-, and tri-cycloalkanes, and aromatics), and of physical properties previously determined by ASTM methods (such as net heat of combustion, hydrogen content, density, kinematic viscosity, sustained boiling temperature and vapor rise temperature). Results from these PLS studies using the relatively simple to use and inexpensive GC×GC-FID instrumental platform are compared to previously reported results using the GC×GC-TOFMS instrumental platform. PMID:27130110

  6. Multiple inert gas elimination technique by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry--a comparison with reference gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Schilling, Thomas; Vogt, Andreas; Rothen, Hans Ulrich; Borges, João Batista; Hachenberg, Thomas; Larsson, Anders; Baumgardner, James E; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2013-10-15

    The mismatching of alveolar ventilation and perfusion (VA/Q) is the major determinant of impaired gas exchange. The gold standard for measuring VA/Q distributions is based on measurements of the elimination and retention of infused inert gases. Conventional multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) uses gas chromatography (GC) to measure the inert gas partial pressures, which requires tonometry of blood samples with a gas that can then be injected into the chromatograph. The method is laborious and requires meticulous care. A new technique based on micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MMIMS) facilitates the handling of blood and gas samples and provides nearly real-time analysis. In this study we compared MIGET by GC and MMIMS in 10 piglets: 1) 3 with healthy lungs; 2) 4 with oleic acid injury; and 3) 3 with isolated left lower lobe ventilation. The different protocols ensured a large range of normal and abnormal VA/Q distributions. Eight inert gases (SF6, krypton, ethane, cyclopropane, desflurane, enflurane, diethyl ether, and acetone) were infused; six of these gases were measured with MMIMS, and six were measured with GC. We found close agreement of retention and excretion of the gases and the constructed VA/Q distributions between GC and MMIMS, and predicted PaO2 from both methods compared well with measured PaO2. VA/Q by GC produced more widely dispersed modes than MMIMS, explained in part by differences in the algorithms used to calculate VA/Q distributions. In conclusion, MMIMS enables faster measurement of VA/Q, is less demanding than GC, and produces comparable results. PMID:23869066

  7. Identification of Aroma-active Compounds in Essential Oil from Uncaria Hook by Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Megumi; Nakaya, Satoshi; Maki, Yusuke; Marumoto, Shinsuke; Usami, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil extracted from Uncaria Hook ("Chotoko" in Japanese), the branch with curved hook of the herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla has been investigated by GC and GC-MS analyses. Eighty-four compounds, representing 90.8% of the total content was identified in oil obtained from Uncaria Hook. The main components i were (E)-cinnamaldehyde (13.4%), α-copaene (8.0%), methyl eugenol (6.8%), δ-cadinene (5.3%), and curcumene (3.6%). The important key aroma-active compounds in the oil were detected by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA), using the flavor dilution (FD) factor to express the odor potency of each compounds. Furthermore, the odor activity value (OAV) has been used as a measure of the relative contribution of each compound to the aroma of the Uncaria Hook oil. The GC-O and AEDA results showed that α-copaene (FD = 4, OAV = 4376), (E)-linalool oxide (FD = 64, OAV = 9.1), and methyl eugenol (FD = 64, OAV = 29) contributed to the woody and spicy odor of Uncaria Hook oil, whereas furfural (FD = 8, OAV = 4808) contributed to its sweet odor. These results warrant further investigations of the application of essential oil from Uncaria Hook in the phytochemical and medicinal fields. PMID:26179003

  8. Parallel dual secondary column-dual detection: a further way of enhancing the informative potential of two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, Luca; Cordero, Chiara; Bressanello, Davide; Cagliero, Cecilia; Liberto, Erica; Magagna, Federico; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Sgorbini, Barbara; Bicchi, Carlo

    2014-09-19

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is one of today's most powerful analytical platforms for detailed analysis of medium-to-high complexity samples. The column set usually consists of a long, conventional-inner-diameter first dimension ((1)D) (typically 15-30m long, 0.32-0.25mm dc), and a short, narrow-bore second dimension ((2)D) column (typically 0.5-2m, 0.1mm dc) where separation is run in a few seconds. However, when thermal modulation is used, since the columns of a set are coupled in series, a flow mismatch occurs between the two dimensions, making it impossible to operate simultaneously at optimized flow conditions. Further, short narrow-bore capillaries can easily be overloaded, because of their lower loadability, limiting the effectiveness of (2)D separation. In this study, improved gas linear velocities in both chromatographic dimensions were achieved by coupling the (1)D column with two parallel (2)D columns, having identical inner diameter, stationary phase chemistry, and film thickness. In turn, these were connected to two detectors: a fast quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (MS) and a Flame Ionization Detector (FID). Different configurations were tested and performances compared to a conventional set-up; experimental results on two model mixtures (n-alkanes and fourteen medium-to-high polarity volatiles of interest in the flavor and fragrance field) and on the essential oil of Artemisia umbelliformis Lam., show the system provides consistent results, in terms of analyte identification (reliability of spectra and MS matching) and quantitation, also affording an internal cross-validation of quantitation accuracy. PMID:25130094

  9. Generating multiple independent retention index data in dual-secondary column comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Stefan; Marriott, Philip J

    2006-12-01

    A method producing simultaneously three retention indexes for compounds has been developed for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography by using a dual secondary column approach (GC x 2GC). For this purpose, the primary flow of the first dimension column was equally diverted into two secondary microbore columns of identical geometry by means of a three-way flow splitter positioned after the longitudinally modulated cryogenic system. This configuration produced a pair of comprehensive two-dimensional chromatograms and generated retention data on three different stationary phases in a single run. First dimension retention indexes were determined on a polar SolGel-Wax column under linear programmed-temperature conditions according to the van den Dool approach using primary alcohol homologues as the reference scale. Calculation of pseudoisothermal retention indexes in both second dimensions was performed on low-polarity 5% phenyl equivalent polysilphenylene/siloxane (BPX5) and 14% cyanopropylphenyl/86% dimethylpolysiloxane (BP10) columns. To construct a retention correlation map in the second dimension separation space upon which KovAts indexes can be derived, two methods exploiting "isovolatility" relationships of alkanes were developed. The first involved 15 sequential headspace samplings of selected n-alkanes by solid-phase microextraction (SPME), with each sampling followed by their injection into the GC at predetermined times during the chromatographic run. The second method extended the second dimension retention map and consisted of repetitive introduction of SPME-sampled alkane mixtures at various isothermal conditions incremented over the temperature program range. Calculated second dimension retention indexes were compared with experimental values obtained in conventional one-dimensional GC. A case study mixture including 24 suspected allergens (i.e., fragrance ingredients) was used to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of retention index

  10. Aroma characterization of chinese rice wine by gas chromatography-olfactometry, chemical quantitative analysis, and aroma reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Xu, Yan; Qian, Michael C

    2013-11-27

    The aroma profile of Chinese rice wine was investigated in this study. The volatile compounds in a traditional Chinese rice wine were extracted using Lichrolut EN and further separated by silica gel normal phase chromatography. Seventy-three aroma-active compounds were identified by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition to acids, esters, and alcohols, benzaldehyde, vanillin, geosmin, and γ-nonalactone were identified to be potentially important to Chinse rice wine. The concentration of these aroma-active compounds in the Chinese rice wine was further quantitated by combination of four different methods, including headsapce-gas chromatography, solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography (SPME)-GC-MS, solid-phase extraction-GC-MS, and SPME-GC-pulsed flame photometric detection (PFPD). Quantitative results showed that 34 aroma compounds were at concentrations higher than their corresponding odor thresholds. On the basis of the odor activity values (OAVs), vanillin, dimethyl trisulfide, β-phenylethyl alcohol, guaiacol, geosmin, and benzaldehyde could be responsible for the unique aroma of Chinese rice wine. An aroma reconstitution model prepared by mixing 34 aroma compounds with OAVs > 1 in an odorless Chinese rice wine matrix showed a good similarity to the aroma of the original Chinese rice wine. PMID:24099139

  11. Rapid gas analyses for the investigation of spontaneous combustion using capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Havenga, W J

    1993-02-01

    A simple and fast but sensitive and precise gas chromatographic method is described for the quantitative determination of O(2), N(2), CO, CO(2), C1 and C2-hydrocarbons for coal research. Gas analyses are necessary to obtain parameters for modelling spontaneous combustion and to predict long term coal behaviour. The method is based on a single PLOT-type capillary column in a single channel gas chromatograph. Using a micro-volume TCD coupled in series with a FID detector containing a capillary methanizer it is possible to determine high and trace level gases simultaneously. Trace quantities of CO and CO(2) can be determined with a single analysis and the detection limits are improved significantly using the capillary methanizer. The detection limit of the described method is approximately ten parts per million CO(2) and one part per million CO. Using the same instrument configuration the O(2)/N(2) ratios (major components), as parameter for coal reactivity, are also determined. The proposed approach is restricted to the determination of gases evolved during coal studies and the application to other gas mixtures is not considered. PMID:18965618

  12. The fabrication of all-silicon micro gas chromatography columns using gold diffusion eutectic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radadia, A. D.; Salehi-Khojin, A.; Masel, R. I.; Shannon, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature programming of gas chromatography (GC) separation columns accelerates the elution rate of chemical species through the column, increasing the speed of analysis, and hence making it a favorable technique to speedup separations in microfabricated GCs (micro-GC). Temperature-programmed separations would be preferred in an all-silicon micro-column compared to a silicon-Pyrex® micro-column given that the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of silicon is 2 orders of magnitude higher than Pyrex®. This paper demonstrates how to fabricate all-silicon micro-columns that can withstand the temperature cycling required for temperature-programmed separations. The columns were sealed using a novel bonding process where they were first bonded using a gold eutectic bond, then annealed at 1100 °C to allow gold diffusion into silicon and form what we call a gold diffusion eutectic bond. The gold diffusion eutectic-bonded micro-columns when examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) and blade insertion techniques showed bonding strength comparable to the previously reported anodic-bonded columns. Gas chromatography-based methane injections were also used as a novel way to investigate proper sealing between channels. A unique methane elution peak at various carrier gas inlet pressures demonstrated the suitability of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded channels as micro-GC columns. The application of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded all-silicon micro-columns to temperature-programmed separations (120 °C min-1) was demonstrated with the near-baseline separation of n-C6 to n-C12 alkanes in 35 s.

  13. On-line gas-free electrodialytic eluent generator for capillary ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingcheng; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2008-01-01

    Both low- and high-pressure, gas-free, capillary-scale electrodialytic generators for eluents in ion chromatography are described. While the low-pressure devices rely on planar or tubular membranes, the high-pressure devices rely on ion-exchange beads used both as one-way ionic gates and as ball-on-seat valves to provide sealing. The high-pressure device is easily implemented in the form of a commercial cross fitting and can withstand at least 1400 psi. By design these devices do not produce gas in the eluent channel; hence, it is not necessary to remove gas afterward. With appropriate electrolytes and electrode polarities, such devices can produce either acid or base or salt. In regard to ionic transport, the behavior of these devices fully corresponds to that of a semiconductor diode. To our knowledge, this is the first time such complete equivalence of ion transport through ion-exchange media and with the more familiar example of electron transport through a semiconductor diode under both forward- and reverse-biased conditions have been demonstrated. Reverse bias can be applied to minimize/prevent Donnan-forbidden leakage or ion exchange. Even with 4 M KOH in the electrode compartments and 4 microL/min water flowing through the eluent channel, with a reverse bias of -12 V, the leakage KOH concentration is <30 microM, whereas the KOH concentration with zero voltage applied, herein after termed open circuit penetration (OCP), is 1600 microM. It is suggested that this OCP occurs not as much through Donnan-forbidden leakage but via ion exchange. Chromatograms and reproducibility data are presented for both isocratic and gradient chromatography, using ion-exchange, latex-modified, open tubular and packed monolithic columns. PMID:18062705

  14. Detection of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in Camembert irradiated before and after the maturing process-comparison of florisil column chromatography and on-line coupled liquid chromatography-gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Schulzki, G.; Spiegelberg, A.; Schreiber, G.A.

    1995-02-01

    The influence of the maturing process on the detection of radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbons in the fat of Camembert has been investigated. Two analytical methods for separation of the hydrocarbon fraction from the lipid were applied: Florisil column chromatography with subsequent gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) determination as well as on-line coupled liquid chromatography-GC-MS. The maturing process had no influence on the detection of radiation-induced volatiles. Comparable results were achieved with both analytical methods. However, preference is given to the more effective on-line coupled LC-GC method. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Hydrogenation Reactions during Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Polymer Samples Using Hydrogen Carrier Gas.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Freeman, Robert R; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime

    2016-05-17

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of polymer samples is studied focusing on the effect of hydrogen (H2) carrier gas on chromatographic and spectral data. The pyrograms and the related mass spectra of high density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene, and polystyrene (PS) serve to illustrate the differences between the species formed in H2 and the helium environment. Differences in the pyrograms and the spectra are generally thought to be a result of the hydrogenation reaction of the pyrolyzates. From the peak intensity changes in the pyrograms of HDPE and PS, hydrogenation of unsaturated pyrolyzates is concluded to occur when the pyrolysis is done in H2. Moreover, additional hydrogenation of the pyrolyzates occurs in the electron ionization source of a MS detector when H2 is used as a carrier gas. Finally, the applicability of mass spectral libraries to characterize pyrograms obtained in H2 is illustrated using 24 polymers. The effect of the hydrogenation reaction on the library search results is found to be negligible for most polymer samples with polar and nonpolar monomer units. PMID:27125864

  16. High resolution capillary column development for selective separations in gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Przybyciel, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of techniques for the preparation of high resolution capillary columns for gas chromatography is presented. Surface roughing, surface deactivation, stationary phase coating, and stationary phase crosslinking are discussed. Criteria for the selection of GC stationary phases and procedures for column evaluation are presented. A method is proposed for the isolation and determination of crude oil contamination in tropical plants and sediments. The method uses Florisil (TM) chromatography for the simultaneous clean-up and fractionation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Crosslinked SE-54 fused silica capillary columns prepared in our laboratory were employed for all GC separations. Mass spectrometry was used to help locate and identify specific oil components despite the intense background of the chromatogram. Crude oil components were identified in extracts of mangrove plant samples collected from the Peck Slip oil spill site at Media Munda, Puerto Rico. Crude oil components were also identified in sediment samples from controlled oil spill of Prudhoe Bay oil at Laguna de Chiriqui, Panama.

  17. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry characterisation of the anti-Listeria components of Garcinia kola seeds.

    PubMed

    Penduka, D; Basson, K A; Mayekiso, B; Buwa, L; Okoh, I A

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption chromatography was used to separate the bioactive constituents of the crude n-hexane extract of Garcinia kola seeds. The silica gel 60 column fractions were eluted using the solvent combination of benzene: ethanol : ammonium hydroxide (BEA) in the ratio combination of 36 : 4 : 0.4 v/v. The fractions were tested for anti-Listeria activities by determining their MIC50, MIC90 or MIC against 4 Listeria isolates. The fractions were labelled BEA1 to BEA5 and 3 out of the 5 fractions eluted were active against the test Listeria species with MIC's ranging from MIC 0.57 mg/mL to MIC50 0.625 mg/mL. The most active fractions, BEA2 and BEA3, were subjected to gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify their composition. Fraction BEA2 constituted of 18 compounds mostly sterols and the BEA3 fraction contained 27 compounds with the most abundant compounds being fatty acids derivatives. The BEA2 fraction's interactions with antibiotics proved to be 100% synergistic with ciprofloxacin and ampicillin whilst it exhibited 50% additivity and 50% synergism with penicillin G. However, all the interactions of the BEA2 fraction with each of the conventional antibiotics used were synergistic against the human listeriosis causative bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:25757343

  18. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to liquid and gas chromatography for wine ethanol characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabañero, Ana I; Recio, Jose L; Rupérez, Mercedes

    2008-10-01

    Two new procedures for wine ethanol 13C/12C isotope ratio determination, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS and GC/IRMS), have been developed to improve isotopic methods dedicated to the study of wine authenticity. Parameters influencing separation of ethanol from wine matrix such as column, temperature, mobile phase, flow rates and injection mode were investigated. Twenty-three wine samples from various origins were analyzed for validation of the procedures. The analytical precision was better than 0.15 per thousand, and no significant isotopic fractionation was observed employing both separative techniques coupled to IRMS. No significant differences and a very strong correlation (r = 0.99) were observed between the 13C/12C ratios obtained by the official method (elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the proposed new methodology. The potential advantages of the developed methods over the traditional one are speed (reducing time required from hours to minutes) and simplicity. In addition, these are the first isotopic methods that allow 13C/12C determination directly from a liquid sample with no previous ethanol isolation, overcoming technical difficulties associated with sample treatment. PMID:18798196

  19. Issues pertaining to the analysis of buprenorphine and its metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Shan; Lin, Dong-Liang; Yang, Shu-Ching; Wu, Meng-Yan; Liu, Ray H; Su, Lien-Wen; Cheng, Pai-Sheng; Liu, Chiareiy; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2010-03-01

    "Substitution therapy" and the use of buprenorphine (B) as an agent for treating heroin addiction continue to gain acceptance and have recently been implemented in Taiwan. Mature and widely utilized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology can complement the low cost and highly sensitive immunoassay (IA) approach to facilitate the implementation of analytical tasks supporting compliance monitoring and pharmacokinetic/pharmacogenetic studies. Issues critical to GC-MS analysis of B and norbuprenorphine (NB) (free and as glucuronides), including extraction, hydrolysis, derivatization, and quantitation approaches were studied, followed by comparing the resulting data against those derived from IA and two types of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. Commercial solid-phase extraction devices, highly effective for recovering all metabolites, may not be suitable for the analysis of free B and NB; acetyl-derivatization products exhibit the most favorable chromatographic, ion intensity, and cross-contribution characteristics for GC-MS analysis. Evaluation of IA, GC-MS, and LC-MS/MS data obtained in three laboratories has proven the 2-aliquot GC-MS protocol effective for the determination of free B and NB and their glucuronides. PMID:20122691

  20. Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis: a comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/quadrupole mass spectrometry methods in an interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Ebert, Karin; Laskov, Christine; Hunkeler, Daniel; Jeannottat, Simon; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Laaks, Jens; Jochmann, Maik A; Cretnik, Stefan; Jager, Johannes; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C; Aravena, Ramon; Elsner, Martin

    2011-10-15

    Chlorine isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) is of emerging demand because these species are important environmental pollutants. Continuous flow analysis of noncombusted TCE molecules, either by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) or by GC/quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/qMS), was recently brought forward as innovative analytical solution. Despite early implementations, a benchmark for routine applications has been missing. This study systematically compared the performance of GC/qMS versus GC/IRMS in six laboratories involving eight different instruments (GC/IRMS, Isoprime and Thermo MAT-253; GC/qMS, Agilent 5973N, two Agilent 5975C, two Thermo DSQII, and one Thermo DSQI). Calibrations of (37)Cl/(35)Cl instrument data against the international SMOC scale (Standard Mean Ocean Chloride) deviated between instruments and over time. Therefore, at least two calibration standards are required to obtain true differences between samples. Amount dependency of δ(37)Cl was pronounced for some instruments, but could be eliminated by corrections, or by adjusting amplitudes of standards and samples. Precision decreased in the order GC/IRMS (1σ ≈ 0.1‰), to GC/qMS (1σ ≈ 0.2-0.5‰ for Agilent GC/qMS and 1σ ≈ 0.2-0.9‰ for Thermo GC/qMS). Nonetheless, δ(37)Cl values between laboratories showed good agreement when the same external standards were used. These results lend confidence to the methods and may serve as a benchmark for future applications. PMID:21851081

  1. Comparison of sensitivity between gas chromatography-low-resolution mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry for determining metandienone metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, J; Leinonen, A; Tuominen, J; Seppälä, T

    1999-11-12

    In doping control laboratories the misuse of anabolic androgenic steroids is commonly investigated in urine by gas chromatography-low-resolution mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring (GC-LRMS-SIM). By using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) detection sensitivity is improved due to reduction of biological background. In our study HRMS and LRMS methods were compared to each other. Two different sets were measured both with HRMS and LRMS. In the first set metandienone (I) metabolites 17alpha-methyl-5beta-androstan-3alpha,17beta-dio l (II), 17-epimetandienone (III), 17beta-methyl-5beta-androst-1-ene-3alpha,17alpha-diol (IV) and 6beta-hydroxymetandienone (V) were spiked in urine extract prepared by solid-phase extraction, hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase from Escherichia coli and liquid-liquid extraction. In the second set the metabolites were first spiked in blank urine samples of four male persons before pretreatment. Concentration range of the spiked metabolites was 0.1-10 ng/ml in both sets. With HRMS (resolution of 5000) detection limits were 2-10 times lower than with LRMS. However, also with the HRMS method the biological background hampered detection and compounds from matrix were coeluted with some metabolites. For this reason the S/N values of the metabolites spiked had to be first compared to S/N values of coeluted matrix compounds to get any idea of detection limits. At trace concentrations selective isolation procedures should be implemented in order to confirm a positive result. The results suggest that metandienone misuse can be detected by HRMS for a prolonged period after stopping the intake of metandienone. PMID:10595716

  2. Multiresidue analysis of 30 organochlorine pesticides in milk and milk powder by gel permeation chromatography-solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guocan; Han, Chao; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Meiwen; Wang, Chengjun; Shen, Yan

    2014-10-01

    A method for simultaneous determination of the 30 organochlorine pesticides (OCP) in milk and milk powder samples has been developed. Prior to the gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis, the residual OCP in samples were extracted with n-hexane and acetone mixture (1/1, vol/vol) and cleaned up by gel permeation chromatography and solid phase extraction. Selected reaction monitoring mode was used for gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric data acquisition to identify and quantify the OCP. To avoid the matrix effects, matrix-matched calibration solutions ranging from 2 to 50 ng/mL were used to record the calibration curve. Limits of quantification of all OCP were 0.8 μg/kg. With the exception of endrin, limits of quantification are significantly lower than maximum residue limits set by the European Union and China. The average recoveries were in the range of 70.1 to 114.7% at 3 spiked concentration levels (0.8, 2.0, and 10.0 μg/kg) with residual standard deviation lower than 12.9%. The developed method was successfully applied to analyze the OCP in commercial milk products. PMID:25087035

  3. Design for gas chromatography-corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2012-11-20

    A corona discharge ionization-ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) with a novel sample inlet system was designed and constructed as a detector for capillary gas chromatography. In this design, a hollow needle was used instead of a solid needle which is commonly used for corona discharge creation, helping us to have direct axial interfacing for GC-IMS. The capillary column was passed through the needle, resulting in a reaction of effluents with reactant ions on the upstream side of the corona discharge ionization source. Using this sample introduction design, higher ionization efficiency was achieved relative to the entrance direction through the side of the drift tube. In addition, the volume of the ionization region was reduced to minimize the resistance time of compounds in the ionization source, increasing chromatographic resolution of the instrument. The effects of various parameters such as drift gas flow, makeup gas flow, and column tip position inside the needle were investigated. The designed instrument was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and reproducibility by analyzing the standard solutions of methyl isobutyl ketone, heptanone, nonanone, and acetophenone as the test compounds. The results obtained by CD-IMS detector were compared with those of the flame ionization detector, which revealed the capability of the proposed GC-IMS for two-dimensional separation (based on the retention time and drift time information) and identification of an analyte in complex matrixes. PMID:23083064

  4. Speciation of subsurface contaminants by cone penetrometry gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshteyn, A.; Smarason, S.; Robbat, A. Jr. )

    1999-07-15

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collectors, the TECP extracts organics from soil without bringing the soil to the surface or into a collection chamber. Results show that polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and explosives can be recovered (60--95%) from wet or dry soil, with extraction efficiency compound-specific. The data are in remarkable agreement with closed cell thermal desorption (TD) experiments, where no organics are lost to the environment during heating. ECP GC/MS results also compare favorably with solvent-extracted GC/MS analyses and can be used to delineate the presence and extent of contamination at hazardous waste sites. Data illustrating TECP dependence on probe temperature and soil moisture as well as carrier gas liner velocity and volume (modified Reynolds number) are shown along with sample analysis data from two hazardous waste sites. The total ion and reconstructed ion current chromatograms are shown for PAHs collected by TECP from a coal tar contaminated soil obtained at a manufactured gas plant in Massachusetts. TECP and TD results are within 15% for nonvolatile PAHs and within 50% of the solvent-extracted data.

  5. Microfluidic valve geometries and possibilities for flow switching in gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, Philip J.; Eyres, Graham T.; Urban, Sylvia; Rühle, Christian

    2008-12-01

    Classical multi-(two-)dimensional separations in gas chromatography (GC) require switching systems to transfer the gas flow stream from the first to second dimension. This can be accomplished by valve systems, but is more suitably effected by pressure balanced systems, such as the Deans' switch method. Recent developments in microfluidics and related micro-technologies should make gas phase switching much more effective. The capillary flow technology platform of Agilent Technologies is an example of recent developments introduced to GC. Thus various Deans' switch pressure balanced devices, stream splitters, and column couplings bring new capabilities to analytical GC. We are uniquely placed to take advantage of the new devices, owing to our development of advanced operational methods in GC which can make use of microfluidic capillary couplings, and novel cryogenic approaches that deliver performance previously impossible with conventional methods. Multidimensional chromatographic flow switching to isolate pure compounds from complex mixtures suggests many potential applications for enhanced chemical analysis. Multiple dimensions of GC analysis, capabilities for integrating different spectroscopic detection methods for chemical identification of isolated chemical species including mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared, can be proposed. Applications in the essential oils and petrochemical area will be outlined.

  6. Extension of the two-dimensional mass channel cluster plot method to fast separations utilizing low thermal mass gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Brian D; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-03-24

    Implementation of a data reduction and visualization method for use with high-speed gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) is reported. The method, called the "2D m/z cluster method" facilitates analyte detection, deconvolution, and identification, by accurately measuring peak widths and retention times using a fast TOFMS sampling frequency (500 Hz). Characteristics and requirements for high speed GC are taken into consideration: fast separations with narrow peak widths and high peak capacity, rapid data collection rate, and effective peak deconvolution. Transitioning from standard GC (10-60+ minute separations) to fast GC (1-10 min separations) required consideration of how to properly analyze the data. This report validates use of the 2D m/z cluster method with newly developed GC technology that produces ultra-fast separations (∼1 min) with narrow analyte peak widths. Low thermal mass gas chromatography (LTM-GC) operated at a heating rate of 250 °C/min coupled to a LECO Pegasus III TOFMS analyzed a 115 component test mixture in 120 s with peak widths-at-base, wb (4σ), of 350 ms (average) to produce a separation with a high peak capacity, nc ∼ 340 (at unit resolution Rs = 1). The 2D m/z cluster method is shown to separate overlapped analytes to a limiting Rs ∼ 0.03, so the effective peak capacity was increased nearly 30-fold to nc ∼10,000 in the 120 s separation. The method, when coupled with LTM-GC-TOFMS, is demonstrated to provide unambiguous peak rank (i.e. the number of analytes per overlapped peak in the total ion current (TIC)), by visualizing locations of pure and chromatographically overlapped m/z. Hence, peak deconvolution and identification using MCR-ALS (multivariate curve resolution - alternating least squares) is demonstrated. PMID:26945000

  7. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolic Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Epileptic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, Tetsuya; SUMITA, Maho; HORITANI, Yusuke; TAMAI, Reo; TANAKA, Katsuhiro; KOMORI, Masayuki; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy. PMID:24334864

  8. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of nitrosamines in red wine.

    PubMed

    Lona-Ramirez, Fernando J; Gonzalez-Alatorre, Guillermo; Rico-Ramírez, Vicente; Perez-Perez, Ma Cristina I; Castrejón-González, Edgar O

    2016-04-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms) are highly active carcinogens that have been detected in food and beverages. Currently certain studies report their presence in red wine, while others fail to detect their presence. In this study the head space solid phase micro-extraction technique coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was applied to quantify four NAms in different types of red wine. The technique was found to be a simple, precise, fast and environmentally friendly alternative for the quantification of volatile NAms. A factorial analysis was carried out to evaluate the influence of the parameters on the HS-SPME technique. This is the first study that such analysis has been reported and where NAms in red wine have been quantified using HS-SPME-GC-MS. The method was validated by calculating the linearity, limit of detection and quantification. Two of the four NAms analyzed were found to be present in red wine samples. PMID:26593598

  9. Physicochemical characterization of dilute n-alcohol/biodiesel mixtures by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bobbitt, N Scott; King, Jerry W

    2010-12-10

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) has been used to determine the physicochemical parameters that characterize solution thermodynamic interactions in biodiesel-n-alcohol solute systems. Such data is of value to chemical engineers and separation scientists in optimizing separation processes to separate alcoholic solutes at low concentrations in soybean oil methyl ester mixtures (biodiesel). The derived activity and Henry's Law coefficient data can be used to rationalize the interaction of four members of an n-alcoholic homologous series and the soya-based methyl ester solvent in terms of such esters as "green" renewable solvents. Sorption isotherm data confirm linear behavior in most cases between the solute (alcohol) vapor state concentrations and their uptake into the biodiesel phase. Overall, the experimentally determined activity coefficients agree well with those predicted by solution thermodynamic theories as well as correlative chemical engineering equations. PMID:21067759

  10. [Determination of 10 volatile organic compounds in toys by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lü, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Kang, Suyuan; Bai, Hua; Wang, Chao

    2010-08-01

    A headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 10 residual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in toys. The experimental conditions such as headspace temperature, headspace time and the analytical conditions of GC-MS were optimized. Toy samples were treated at 140 degrees C for 45 min, and then the evolved products were separated on a DB-624 column, determined by MS and quantified by external standard method. The recoveries were from 79% to 106% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were from 0.4% to 5.6%. The linear range was 0.001 - 2.0 microg with a good linear correlation coefficient (r > 0.994 0) and the limits of quantification (LOQ) were less than 0 66 mg/kg. The method is accurate, simple, rapid, and is suitable for the analysis of residual VOCs in various toys. PMID:21261051

  11. [Differentiation of ballpoint pen inks by thermodesorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2004-01-01

    Differentiation and classification of ink entries with dated samples of a reference collection are important aspects in the examination of questioned documents. Classification of writing inks is presently achieved by analysis of dyes and colorants contained in the ink. This technique has its limitations in newly developed ink formulations with identical dye composition but differing in their solvents and binder resins. This paper introduces a method for the determination of solvents and binder resins of an ink sample directly from paper without sample preparation. This aim is accomplished by thermodesorption of the sample followed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The method was tested on numerous samples of ballpoint pen inks, which were subsequently grouped into several solvent and resin subgroups. A case study shows the applicability of the newly developed method. PMID:15666970

  12. Accurate determination of fiber water-retaining capability at process conditions by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; He, Liang

    2016-09-16

    This work reports on a method for the accurate determination of fiber water-retaining capability at process conditions by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method. The method was based the HS-GC measurement of water vapor on a set closed vials containing in a given amount pulp with different amounts of water addition, from under-saturation to over-saturation. By plotting the equilibrated water vapor signal vs. the amount of water added in pulp, two different trend lines can be observed, in which the transition of the lines corresponds to fiber water-retaining capability. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good measurement precision (much better than the reference method) and good accuracy. The present method can be also used for determining pulp fiber water-retaining capability at the process temperatures in both laboratory research and mill applications. PMID:27554029

  13. A micro gas chromatography column with a micro thermal conductivity detector for volatile organic compound analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, J H; Cui, D F; Chen, X; Zhang, L L; Cai, H Y; Li, H

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a micro gas chromatography (μGC) system contained a μGC column and a micro thermal conductivity detector (μTCD) was proposed. In order to reduce the volume of the system, some micro heaters were integrated on the surface and backside of the GC column, which could provide a robust temperature programming capability and rapidly increase the temperature of the μGC column. In addition, a silicon-glass μTCD with four-thermistor thermal conductivity cells that can offer significant advantages over previously reported designs including low dead volume, good thermal isolation, and elimination of the thermal noise was proposed in this paper. Experimental results have indicated that the μGC system with a detection limit of several ppm concentration levels separated and detected the benzene, toluene, and styrene in less than 3 min, and the μGC system also exhibited a good linear response in the test range. PMID:23464240

  14. Capillary gas chromatography determination of volatile organic acids in rain and fog samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1984-08-01

    A fused silica capillary gas chromatography technique is described for the determination of volatile acids (C/sub 1/-C/sub 7/) in rain samples using p-bromophenacyl esters. As the sensitivity of this method is high (GC detection limit is ca. 10 pmol), a small volume of rain (25-50 mL) or fog (1-2 mL) is needed. Spiked experiments showed that the measured concentrations of volatile acids in the spiked rain samples linearly increased with a slope of approx.1 in proportion to the concentrations of volatile acids added in the rainwater. Repeated analyses of rain samples showed that relative standard deviations are less than or equal to 18% for C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ acids, which are the major volatile acids.

  15. Determination of residual styrene monomer in polystyrene granules by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garrigós, M C; Marín, M L; Cantó, A; Sánchez, A

    2004-12-24

    Polystyrene is widely used in formulations intended for children use. The main problem with this plastic is the residual styrene, which can migrate from the product, and therefore, be in contact with children. The acute toxicity of styrene is well known, raising the need of an efficient and fast method of analysis for this compound. Several extraction methods have been evaluated and compared for the determination of residual styrene monomer in polystyrene granules used in toys: supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), Soxhlet extraction, headspace emission and dissolution-precipitation. The analyte was subsequently detected by gas chromatography (GC) with MS detection. The results indicated that the most efficient method was dissolution-precipitation giving even higher extraction efficiency than SFE. For validating the method, PS samples spiked with known quantities of styrene at three concentration levels were prepared to calculate the extraction recovery. The founded validation data proved the suitability of the proposed method. PMID:15641364

  16. Lignans in resin of Araucaria angustifolia by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuichi; Otto, Angelika; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2004-11-01

    Total extract of resin from Araucaria angustifolia was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and 32 lignans were identified. Lignan acetates are present in the resin and consist of four secoisolariciresinol acetates, six lariciresinol acetates, two 7'-hydroxylariciresinol acetates and an isolariciresinol acetate, which have hitherto not been reported in the plant kingdom. Shonanin and 7'-hydroxylariciresinol type lignans are also present in A. angustifolia resin. Lignans containing syringyl moieties, characteristic for angiosperms, occur in the resin and consist of 5-methoxylariciresinol-9-acetate, 5'-methoxylariciresinol-9-acetate, 5-methoxypinoresinol dimethyl ether and 5-methoxypinoresinol. This is noteworthy because syringyl moieties have only been reported for Thuja species (Cupressaceae) among the gymnosperms. The mass spectra of the various lignan trimethylsilyl derivatives are discussed with the interpretations of the fragmentation patterns. PMID:15532064

  17. Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christopher R.; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Giordano, Braden C.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can account for instrumentation losses, which makes it ideal for minimizing variability and quantitative trace chemical detection. Gas chromatography with an electron capture detector is an instrumentation configuration sensitive to nitro-energetics, such as TNT and RDX, due to their relatively high electron affinity. However, vapor quantitation of these compounds is difficult without viable vapor standards. Thus, we eliminate the requirement for vapor standards by combining the sensitivity of the instrumentation with a direct liquid deposition protocol to analyze trace explosive vapor samples. PMID:25145416

  18. Pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of polychlorinated biphenyls on sediment

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtrey, K.D.; Wildman, N.J.; Tai, H.

    1983-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are common environmental contaminants which were freely employed for many years in numerous industrial applications but whose use has now been regulated. Many analytical schemes for monitoring these materials in environmental samples have been developed over the last decades, however, PCBs remain difficult analytical subjects. Most protocols rely on a combination of wet chemical pre-analytical isolation and purification whose complexity depends on the sample matrix. The time required for these manipulations may greatly hamper efforts directed towards emergency cleanup of accidental or illicit contamination of the environment. Thus, a clear need exists for methods which will allow rapid analysis of relatively intransigent samples for PCB contamination. Preliminary experiments directed to assessing the use of pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in determining PCB contamination of soils and sediments are reported. In these experiments pyrolytic desorption at 1000/sup 0/C during 10 sec was used to completely replace more lengthy wet chemical manipulations.

  19. H2S Analysis in Biological Samples Using Gas Chromatography with Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a metabolite and signaling molecule in biological tissues that regulates many physiological processes. Reliable and sensitive methods for H2S analysis are necessary for a better understanding of H2S biology and for the pharmacological modulation of H2S levels in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the use of gas chromatography coupled to sulfur chemiluminescence detection to measure the rates of H2S production and degradation by tissue homogenates at physiologically relevant concentrations of substrates. This method allows separation of H2S from other sulfur compounds and provides sensitivity of detection to ~15 pg (or 0.5 pmol) of H2S per injected sample. PMID:25725519

  20. Application of inverse gas chromatography in physicochemical characterization of phenolic resin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Strzemiecka, Beata; Voelkel, Adam; Hinz, Mateusz; Rogozik, Mateusz

    2014-11-14

    One of the most important stages during production of abrasive tools is their hardening. The degree of hardening is very important and influence toughness of the final product. During hardening process the cross-linking of the phenolic resins, used as a binder, occurs. Nowadays, there is no standard, accurate and simple method for the estimation of the hardening degree of abrasive tools. The procedure of the determination of hardening degree of the binder (phenolic resins) by means of inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was presented in this paper. Results obtained by use of IGC derived method was verified by Soxhlet extraction and by FTIR method. Good agreement was found for results from IGC and Soxhlet extraction whereas those from FTIR were much lower. FTIR method supplies data concerning bulk properties not the surface as in case of IGC and Soxhlet methods. These results indicate that resins are more cross-linked on the surface than inside the material. PMID:25441354

  1. Buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine determination in mice plasma and brain by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiadmi, Fouad; Schlatter, Joël

    2014-01-01

    A gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for quantification of buprenorphine (BUP) and norbuprenorphine (NBUP) in brain and plasma samples from mice was developed and validated. Analytes were extracted from the brain or plasma by solid phase extraction and quantified within 20 minutes. Calibration was achieved by linear regression with a 1/x weighting factor and d4-buprenorphine internal standard. All products were linear from 1 to 2000 ng/mL with a correlation of determination >0.99. Assay accuracy and precision of back-calculated standards were within ±10%. The lower limit of quantification for both BUP and NBUP from the brain and plasma was 1 ng/mL. This sensitive and specific method can be used for the investigation of BUP mechanism of action and clinical profile. PMID:24653644

  2. Linked Gas Chromatography/Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry/Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry For Mixture Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laude, David A., Jr.; Johlman, Carolyn; Wilkins, Charles L.

    1985-12-01

    During the past few years it has been demonstrated that linkage of multiple spectrometry systems with gas chromatography (GC) offers significant advantages for structural analysis of mixture components as they are sepa-rated. In the work to be described, a Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS) has been linked in parallel with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer for concurrent analysis of GC eluants from a fused silica capillary column. This system provides FTIR, electron impact, and chemical ionization mass spectral analysis of each mixture component as it emerges from the GC. Furthermore, mass measurement accuracy in the low ppm range in the absence of calibrant is made possible by the FTMS. Effective use of the com-plementary information obtained is shown to produce more reliable analytical performance than for any individual measurement.

  3. Improvements in bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium purity as determined with gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    BARTRAM,MICHAEL E.

    2000-03-08

    Bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium (MgCp2) is used commonly as a source for doping nitride materials with magnesium. Increased oxygen incorporation known to accompany the use of MgCp2 makes the purity of this precursor an important consideration in nitride CVD. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS) methods have now been developed for the identification of volatile impurities in MgCp2. Diethylether, an oxygen containing organic compound (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}), and additional organic impurities were found in the MgCp2 supplied by three manufacturers. Subsequent refinements in the synthetic processes by these companies have resulted in the availability of MgCp2 free of ether and other organic impurities as determined by GCMS.

  4. Rapid determination of moisture content in paper materials by multiple headspace extraction gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2016-04-22

    This paper describes a new method for the rapid determination of the moisture content in paper materials. The method is based on multiple headspace extraction gas chromatography (MHE-GC) at a temperature above the boiling point of water, from which an integrated water loss from the tested sample due to evaporation can be measured and from which the moisture content in the sample can be determined. The results show that the new method has a good precision (with the relative standard deviation <0.96%), high sensitivity (the limit of quantitation=0.005%) and good accuracy (the relative differences <1.4%). Therefore, the method is quite suitable for many uses in research and industrial applications. PMID:27033986

  5. Rapid measurement of phytosterols in fortified food using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Duong, Samantha; Strobel, Norbert; Buddhadasa, Saman; Stockham, Katherine; Auldist, Martin; Wales, Bill; Orbell, John; Cran, Marlene

    2016-11-15

    A novel method for the measurement of total phytosterols in fortified food was developed and tested using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Unlike existing methods, this technique is capable of simultaneously extracting sterols during saponification thus significantly reducing extraction time and cost. The rapid method is suitable for sterol determination in a range of complex fortified foods including milk, cheese, fat spreads, oils and meat. The main enhancements of this new method include accuracy and precision, robustness, cost effectiveness and labour/time efficiencies. To achieve these advantages, quantification and the critical aspects of saponification were investigated and optimised. The final method demonstrated spiked recoveries in multiple matrices at 85-110% with a relative standard deviation of 1.9% and measurement uncertainty value of 10%. PMID:27283669

  6. Determination of pyrethroid residues in tobacco and cigarette smoke by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jibao; Liu, Baizhan; Zhu, Xiaolan; Su, Qingde

    2002-07-26

    The extraction of fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and deltamethrin from tobacco (Nicotina tobaccum) and cigarette smoke condensate with acetone, followed by partition of resulting acetone mixture with petroleum ether, was investigated and found suitable for capillary gas chromatography (GC) residue analysis. Florisil column clean-up was found to provide clean-up procedure for tobacco and cigarette smoke condensate permitting analysis to < or = 0.01 microgram.g-1 for most of the pyrethroids by GC with a 63Ni electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Quantitative determination was obtained by the method of external standards. Cigarettes made from flue-cured tobacco spiked with different amounts of pyrethroids were used and the pyrethroid levels in mainstream smoke were determined. For all the pyrethroid residues, 1.51-15.50% were transferred from tobacco into cigarette smoke. PMID:12198849

  7. Analysis of acetamiprid in vegetables using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mateu-Sánchez, Manuel; Moreno, Mercedes; Arrebola, F Javier; Martínez Vidal, José Luis

    2003-05-01

    A new analytical method has been validated for determining the insecticide acetamiprid in vegetables using gas chromatography (OC) and different mass spectrometric detection techniques, such as full-scan mass spectrometry (MS), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). For this purpose, a previous extraction of the vegetable sample was carried out with ethyl acetate. In GC-MS/MS, the lowest detectable concentration was 0.001 mg kg(-1), the average recovery rates at various fortification levels (0.015 and 0.030 mg kg(-1)) ranged between 82.4 and 85.7% and the relative standard deviations were lower than 12.2% in all cases. PMID:12769368

  8. Determination of 112 halogenated pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Gregory E

    2005-01-01

    A procedure for the analysis of 112 halogenated pesticides that do not contain phosphorus has been developed. The procedure uses gas chromatography with a mass selective detector (GC-MSD), electron impact ionization, and selected-ion monitoring. This GC-MSD procedure provided lower limits of quantitation and provided increased confirmational data compared to the traditional element-selective GC procedures that are commonly used for the detection of this class of pesticides. These analytical improvements were demonstrated by the 25 pesticides that were detected at < or =50 ng/g levels in a variety of fruit and vegetable matrixes using this procedure that were missed by the traditional element selective GC procedures. Validation of the procedure was performed using 20 representative target pesticides with an acetone extraction and a solid-phase extraction cleanup. These target pesticides were used to demonstrate repeatability and linearity of the chromatographic response and recovery from fruit and vegetable matrixes. PMID:16385996

  9. Through the years with on-a-chip gas chromatography: a review.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, F; Talebpour, Z; Sanati-Nezhad, A

    2015-06-21

    In recent years, the need for measurement and detection of samples in situ or with very small volume and low concentration (low and sub-parts per billion) is a cause for miniaturizing systems via microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. Gas chromatography (GC) is a common technique that is widely used for separating and measuring semi-volatile and volatile compounds. Conventional GCs are bulky and cannot be used for in situ analysis, hence in the past decades many studies have been reported with the aim of designing and developing chip-based GC. The focus of this review is to follow and investigate the development and the achievements in the field of chip-based GC and its components from the beginning up to the present. PMID:25994317

  10. Accurate measurements of thermodynamic properties of solutes in ionic liquids using inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mutelet, Fabrice; Jaubert, Jean-Noël

    2006-01-13

    Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of 29 organic compounds in two room temperature ionic liquids were determined using inverse gas chromatography. The measurements were carried out at different temperatures between 323.15 and 343.15K. To establish the influence of concurrent retention mechanisms on the accuracy of activity coefficients at infinite dilution for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium octyl sulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate, phase loading studies of the net retention volume per gram of packing as a function of the percent phase loading were used. It is shown that most of the solutes are retained largely by partition with a small contribution from adsorption on 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium octyl sulfate and that the n-alkanes are retained predominantly by interfacial adsorption on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate. PMID:16310203

  11. Analysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in foods by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, E; Santos, F J; Puignou, L; Galceran, M T

    2006-11-24

    A new, simple and selective method for the analysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in foods by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is proposed. Several derivatising procedures based on the formation of an HMF silylated derivative using different reagents were studied. Among the derivatising reagents examined, N,O-bis-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) provided the best derivatisation yield. Sample clean-up was also optimised, using either liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane or solid-phase extraction (SPE) with several commercially available cartridges, and the best results were obtained using ENV+ cartridges. Quality parameters such as day-to-day and run-to-run precision (RSD<10%), linearity (between 25 and 700 ng g(-1)) and detection limit (6 ng g(-1)) were established. This method was successfully applied to the analysis of HMF content in several Spanish food samples from a local market, such as jam, honey, orange juice and bakery products. PMID:17010355

  12. [Determination of doping in human urine by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xing, Yan-Yi; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Xu, You-Xuan

    2012-12-01

    A method was evaluated for determination of twenty-one doping (including nandrolone, boldenone and methandienone) in human urine by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. Samples were prepared by liquid-liquid extraction, concentrated, TMS derivatization and limit of detection at ng x mL(-1) by MID/GC/HRMS. According to the code of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), precision and recoveries of the procedure were evaluated by replicate analysis (n = 6), the recoveries in the range of 66%-103%, with the RSD below 10.0%. The precision within the day of the method with three different concentrations was also determined RSD were less than 9.5%, 10.0% and 9.7%. PMID:23460974

  13. Modulation techniques and applications in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC).

    PubMed

    Pursch, Matthias; Sun, Kefu; Winniford, Bill; Cortes, Hernan; Weber, Andy; McCabe, Terry; Luong, Jim

    2002-07-01

    More than a decade after Phillips' first published work this article reviews recent developments in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC). Special attention is devoted to the further development and diversity of modulation devices. These include heated sweepers, cryofocused modulators, and a variety of diaphragm valve-switching strategies. It is demonstrated that all modulation approaches can be very well suited to GC x GC, depending on the particular application. Diaphragm-valve modulation is very powerful for volatile organic compounds. Slotted heater and cryofocused modulation are preferred for samples that contain non-volatile components. Applications ranging from petroleum to environmental and biological samples are illustrated. Extension of the technique to GC x GC-mass spectrometry (MS) is also discussed and trends for future research activity are pointed out. PMID:12172670

  14. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography using liquid nitrogen modulation: set-up and applications.

    PubMed

    Pursch, Matthias; Eckerle, Patric; Biel, Juergen; Streck, Roman; Cortes, Heman; Sun, Kefu; Winniford, Bill

    2003-11-26

    An improved modulation system for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) is presented. It is based on two-jet modulation with liquid nitrogen as cryogen. A valve system was designed to include subsequent re-heating of cooled capillary segments after modulation. It is demonstrated that even volatile components, such as propane or butane, are easily modulated with this system. Thus, the temperature range for GC x GC operation compared to diaphragm valve or liquid CO2 modulation is extended. The system allows highly efficient analysis of volatile and non-volatile components. Applications include separations of alkenes and gasoline samples. Also sulfur-containing hydrocarbon samples were compared via GC x GC and differences among samples of different producers were observed. Finally, headspace GC x GC investigations of volatiles found in polymer latex-coated papers round out the increasing portfolio of valuable applications. PMID:14650603

  15. Dispersive surface properties of glass-ionomer cements determined by inverse gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewska, E.; Voelkel, A.; Andrzejewski, M.; Limanowska-Shaw, H.

    2005-05-01

    The surface properties of several glass-ionomer cements (GIC), restorative dental materials, (GC-Fuji, Chemadent G-J, Ketac Fil and Ketac Molar) were investigated for the first time by means of inverse gas chromatography. This method enables characterization of surface activity in dispersive (non-polar) and acid-base interactions. The ability of the surface of glass-ionomers to participate in dispersive interactions was expressed by the use of the dispersive component of surface free energy γsd. This parameter was determined with satisfactory precision, meaning that the values of γsd can be further used in the discussion of the influence of the type of GIC, its preparation and the storage time on the surface properties. The greatest capacity for dispersive interactions was revealed by Ketac Molar and the lowest by GC-Fuji. Dispersive interactions in the surface activity of glass-ionomers increased with increasing storage time after cement preparation.

  16. Discrimination of honeys using colorimetric sensor arrays, sensory analysis and gas chromatography techniques.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid; Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Jiyong, Shi; Mariod, Abdalbasit Adam

    2016-09-01

    Aroma profiles of six honey varieties of different botanical origins were investigated using colorimetric sensor array, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and descriptive sensory analysis. Fifty-eight aroma compounds were identified, including 2 norisoprenoids, 5 hydrocarbons, 4 terpenes, 6 phenols, 7 ketones, 9 acids, 12 aldehydes and 13 alcohols. Twenty abundant or active compounds were chosen as key compounds to characterize honey aroma. Discrimination of the honeys was subsequently implemented using multivariate analysis, including hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Honeys of the same botanical origin were grouped together in the PCA score plot and HCA dendrogram. SPME-GC/MS and colorimetric sensor array were able to discriminate the honeys effectively with the advantages of being rapid, simple and low-cost. Moreover, partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied to indicate the relationship between sensory descriptors and aroma compounds. PMID:27041295

  17. Interaction between hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and biphasic calcium phosphate after steam sterilisation: capillary gas chromatography studies.

    PubMed

    Bourges, X; Schmitt, M; Amouriq, Y; Daculsi, G; Legeay, G; Weiss, P

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to check the chemical stability of an injectable bone substitute (IBS) composed of a 50/50 w/w mixture of 2.92% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) solution in deionized water containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules (60% hydroxyapatite/40% beta-tricalcium phosphate w/w). After separation of the organic and mineral phases, capillary gas chromatography (GC) was used to study the possible modification of HPMC due to the contact with BCP granules following steam sterilisation and 32 days storage at room temperature. HPMC was extracted from IBS in aqueous medium, and a dialytic method was then used to extract calcium phosphate salts from the HPMC. The percentage of HPMC extracted from BCP was 98.5%+/-0.5%, as measured by UV. GC showed no chemical modifications after steam sterilisation and storage. PMID:11556737

  18. Interaction between hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and biphasic calcium phosphate after steam sterilisation: capillary gas chromatography studies

    PubMed Central

    Bourges, Xavier; Schmitt, Michel; Amouriq, Yves; Daculsi, Guy; Legeay, Gilbert; Weiss, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to check the chemical stability of an injectable bone substitute (IBS) composed of a 50/50 w/w mixture of a 2.92% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) solution in deionised water containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules (60% hydroxyapatite/40% β-tricalcium phosphate w/w). After separation of the organic and mineral phases, capillary gas chromatography (GC) was used to study the possible modification of HPMC due to the contact with BCP granules following steam sterilisation and 32 days of storage at room temperature. HPMC was extracted from IBS in aqueous medium, and a dialytic method was then use to extract calcium phosphate salts from HPMC. The percentage of HPMC extracted from BCP was 98.5% ± 0.5% as measured by a UV method. GC showed no chemical modifications after steam sterilisation and storage. PMID:11556737

  19. Determination of glyphosate, glyphosate metabolites, and glufosinate in human serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Motojyuku, Megumi; Saito, Takeshi; Akieda, Kazuki; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2008-11-15

    This paper describes an assay for the determination of glyphosate (GLYP), glyphosate metabolites [(aminomethyl) phosphonic acid] (AMPA), and glufosinate (GLUF) in human serum. After protein precipitation using acetonitrile and solid-phase extraction, serum samples were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The assay was linear over a concentration range of 3-100.0 microg/ml for GLYP, AMPA, and GLUF. The overall recoveries for the three compounds were >73%. The intra- and inter-day variations were <15%. Precision and accuracy were 6.4-10.6% and 88.2-103.7%, respectively. The validated method was applied to quantify the GLYP and AMPA content in the serum of a GLYP-poisoned patient. In conclusion, the method was successfully applied for the determination of GLYP and its metabolite AMPA in serum obtained from patient of GLYP-poisoning. PMID:18945648

  20. A micro gas chromatography column with a micro thermal conductivity detector for volatile organic compound analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. H.; Cui, D. F.; Chen, X.; Zhang, L. L.; Cai, H. Y.; Li, H.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a micro gas chromatography (μGC) system contained a μGC column and a micro thermal conductivity detector (μTCD) was proposed. In order to reduce the volume of the system, some micro heaters were integrated on the surface and backside of the GC column, which could provide a robust temperature programming capability and rapidly increase the temperature of the μGC column. In addition, a silicon-glass μTCD with four-thermistor thermal conductivity cells that can offer significant advantages over previously reported designs including low dead volume, good thermal isolation, and elimination of the thermal noise was proposed in this paper. Experimental results have indicated that the μGC system with a detection limit of several ppm concentration levels separated and detected the benzene, toluene, and styrene in less than 3 min, and the μGC system also exhibited a good linear response in the test range.

  1. Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin isomer differentiation by capillary gas chromatography fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grainger, J.; Gelbaum, L.T.

    1987-07-01

    Reference infrared vapor-phase spectra of the 22 tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) isomers were recorded at low microgram concentrations. These reference spectra of synthetic mixture components separated chromatographically or by spectra subtraction exhibit distinct infrared spectra for each isomer. The infrared frequencies are delineated in correlation tables and are interpreted in terms of substitution patterns which determine the strength of the ether linkage. Absorbance values in the 1330-1280 cm (C-O-C asymmetric stretch) region correlate with specific substitution patterns and molecular geometry. Relative electron-with-drawing capacities for chlorinated aromatic rings in TCDD isomers were estimated on the basis of relative capacities determined for model compounds. Qualitative correlations were established between electron-with-drawing capacities and the effects of resonance and field interactions on the ether linkage absorption frequencies of individual TCDD isomers. Gas chromatography Fourier transform infrared (GC/FT-IR) isomer assignments are generally consistent with those obtained by proton Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance ( H FT/NMR) and flame ionization gas chromatography (GC/FID). A chromatographically independent method of assigning TCDD isomer structures on the basis of ether linkage asymmetric stretching frequencies was established by utilization of valence-bond approximations. GC/FT-IR assignments for several TCDD isomers differ from isomer assignments in previously publised results. A user-generated, vapor-phase reference library, containing individual TCDD spectra and spectra of isomer pairs that are incompletely resolved on chromatographic columns, correctly identified each isomer in variety of mixtures by means of a software algorithm.

  2. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and food sensory properties: potential and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Kiefl, Johannes; Schieberle, Peter; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Bicchi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Modern omics disciplines dealing with food flavor focus the analytical efforts on the elucidation of sensory-active compounds, including all possible stimuli of multimodal perception (aroma, taste, texture, etc.) by means of a comprehensive, integrated treatment of sample constituents, such as physicochemical properties, concentration in the matrix, and sensory properties (odor/taste quality, perception threshold). Such analyses require detailed profiling of known bioactive components as well as advanced fingerprinting techniques to catalog sample constituents comprehensively, quantitatively, and comparably across samples. Multidimensional analytical platforms support comprehensive investigations required for flavor analysis by combining information on analytes' identities, physicochemical behaviors (volatility, polarity, partition coefficient, and solubility), concentration, and odor quality. Unlike other omics, flavor metabolomics and sensomics include the final output of the biological phenomenon (i.e., sensory perceptions) as an additional analytical dimension, which is specifically and exclusively triggered by the chemicals analyzed. However, advanced omics platforms, which are multidimensional by definition, pose challenging issues not only in terms of coupling with detection systems and sample preparation, but also in terms of data elaboration and processing. The large number of variables collected during each analytical run provides a high level of information, but requires appropriate strategies to exploit fully this potential. This review focuses on advances in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and analytical platforms combining two-dimensional gas chromatography with olfactometry, chemometrics, and quantitative assays for food sensory analysis to assess the quality of a given product. We review instrumental advances and couplings, automation in sample preparation, data elaboration, and a selection of applications. PMID:25354891

  3. Analysis of phenolic acids as chloroformate derivatives using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Citová, Ivana; Sladkovský, Radek; Solich, Petr

    2006-07-28

    In the presented study, a simple and original procedure of phenolic acids derivatization treated by ethyl and methyl chloroformate performed in an aqueous media consisting of acetonitrile, water, methanol/ethanol and pyridine has been modified and optimized. Seven phenolic acid standards-caffeic, ferulic, gallic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic, syringic and vanillic were derivatized into corresponding methyl/ethyl esters and subsequently determined by the means of gas chromatography connected to the flame-ionisation detector (FID). Some selected validation parameters as linearity, detection and quantitation limits and peak area repeatability were valued. The total time of gas chromatography (GC) analysis was 24 min for methyl chloroformate and 30 min for ethyl chloroformate derivatization. The more suitable methyl chloroformate derivatization was used for further experiments on the possibility of multiple pre-concentration by the direct solid phase microextraction technique (SPME). For this purpose, polyacrylate (PA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibres were tested and the extraction conditions concerning time of extraction, temperature and time of desorption were optimized. The most polar PA fibre gave the best results under optimal extraction conditions (50 min extraction time, 25 degrees C extraction temperature and 10 min desorption time). As a result, the total time of SPME-GC analysis was 74 min and an increase in method sensitivity was reached. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) of p-coumaric, ferulic, syringic and vanillic acid esters after SPME pre-concentration were 0.02, 0.17, 0.2 and 0.2 microg mL(-1), respectively, showing approximately 10 times higher sensitivity in comparison with the original GC method. PMID:17723529

  4. Quantitation of ethyl glucuronide in serum & urine by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priyamvada; Bharat, Venkatesh; Murthy, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Alcohol misuse has now become a serious public health problem and early intervention is important in minimizing the harm. Biochemical markers of recent and high levels of alcohol consumption can play an important role in providing feedback regarding the health consequences of alcohol misuse. Existing markers are not sensitive to recent consumption and in detecting early relapse. Ethyl glucuronide (EtG), a phase-II metabolite of ethanol is a promising marker of recent alcohol use and can be detected in body fluids. In this study an analytical technique for quantitation of EtG in body fluids using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric detection (MS) was developed and validated. Methods: De-proteinization of serum and urine samples was done with perchloric acid and hydrochloric acid, respectively. Serum samples were passed through phospholipids removal cartridges for further clean up. EtG was isolated using amino propyl solid phase extraction columns. Chromatographic separation was achieved by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Results: Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 50 and 150 ng/ml for urine and 80 and 210 ng/ml for serum, respectively. Signal to noise ratio was 3:1, mean absolute recovery was 80-85 per cent. Significant correlation was obtained between breath alcohol and serum EtG levels (r=0.853) and urine EtG and time since last abuse (r = -0.903) in clinical samples. Interpretation & conclusions: In the absence of other standardized techniques to quantitate EtG in biological samples, this GC-MS method was found to have high throughput and was sensitive and specific. PMID:25857498

  5. Fast derivatization of fatty acids in different meat samples for gas chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ingrid Lima; Claus, Thiago; Oliveira Santos Júnior, Oscar; Almeida, Vitor Cinque; Magon, Thiago; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergilio

    2016-07-22

    In order to analyze the composition of fatty acids employing gas chromatography as the separation method, a derivatization of lipids using esterification and transesterification reactions is needed. The methodologies currently available are time consuming and use large amounts of sample and reagents. Thus, this work proposes a new procedure to carry out the derivatization of fatty acids without the need for prior extraction of lipids. The use of small amounts of sample (100mg) allows the analysis to be performed in specific parts of animals, in most cases without having them slaughtered. Another benefit is the use of small amounts of reagents (only 2mL of NaOH/Methanol and H2SO4/Methanol). The use of an experimental design procedure (Design Expert software) allows the optimization of the alkaline and acid reaction times. The procedure was validated for five minutes in both steps. The method was validated for bovine fat, beef, chicken, pork, fish and shrimp meats. The results for the merit figures of accuracy (from 101.07% to 109.18%), precision (RSDintra-day (from 0.65 to 3.93%), RSDinter-day (from 1.57 to 5.22%)), linearity (R(2)=0.9864) and robustness confirmed that the new method is satisfactory within the linear range of 2-30% of lipids in the sample. Besides the benefits of minimizing the amount of samples and reagents, the procedure enables gas chromatography sample preparation in a very short time compared with traditional procedures. PMID:27320376

  6. Determination of butylated hydroxytoluene in food samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sanches-Silva, Ana; Cruz, José M; Sendón-García, Raquel; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2007-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed and compared with a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for determining butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in foodstuffs as a result of migration from plastic packaging. Similar extraction procedures were used in both methods. BHT was quantitated using an external standard in the HPLC method and an internal standard in the GC/MS method. Both methods presented good linearity (r(2) > or = 0.9917) and low detection limits. Recoveries obtained with the HPLC method (chicken meat, 95.8%, and Gouda cheese, 83.9%) were better than with the GC/MS method (chicken meat, 85.6%, and Gouda cheese, 71.3%). PMID:17373461

  7. On-line coupled high performance liquid chromatography-gas chromatography for the analysis of contamination by mineral oil. Part 1: method of analysis.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni

    2012-09-14

    For the analysis of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH), on-line coupled high performance liquid chromatography-gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (HPLC-GC-FID) offers important advantages: it separates MOSH and MOAH in robust manner, enables direct injection of large aliquots of raw extracts (resulting in a low detection limit), avoids contamination of the sample during preparation and is fully automated. This review starts with an overview of the technology, particularly the fundamentals of introducing large volumes of solvent into GC, and their implementation into various transfer techniques. The main part deals with the concepts of MOSH and MOAH analysis, with a thorough discussion of the choices made. It is followed by a description of the method. Finally auxiliary tools are summarized to remove interfering components, enrich the sample in case of a high fat content and obtain additional information about the MOSH and MOAH composition. PMID:22770383

  8. One-step multiple component isolation from the oil of Crinitaria tatarica (Less) Sojak by preparative capillary gas chromatography with characterization by spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present work multiple component isolation from the oil of Crinitaria tatarica (Less.) Sojak. by Preparative Capillary Gas Chromatography (PCGC) with characterization by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been carried out. Gas chromatography (GC-FID) ...

  9. Determination of vinyl chloride in soil-gas samples by gas chromatography coupled with ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.L.; Hill, H.; Simpson, G.; Klasmeier, M.; Lopez-Avila, V.; Radolovich, G.

    1995-12-31

    The advantages of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), such as ambient pressure operation, simplicity of design, high sensitivity, speed of response, spectral output, and ability to respond to a large number of compounds, make IMS technology attractive for a variety of field monitoring applications. A quantitative, multicompound field detector based on IMS technology has not been successful, however, because of technology limitations. For multicomponent samples, multiple ion-molecule reactions result in confusing spectral information. Varying humidity can result in ion-water clusters that cause errors in both the identification and quantification of the target analyte. These limitations could be overcome through the addition of gas chromatography (GC) prior to high-temperature IMS. When coupling GC to IMS, the following need to be considered: (a) currently available IMS cells have a relatively large internal volume (> 20 mL), reducing the chromatographic resolution; (b) smaller IMS cells are not capable of operating above 100 C; (c) the radioactive ionization cell limits the dynamic range of the device to 2 to 3 orders of magnitude; and (d) most standard miniature cells have a membrane inlet that does not allow direct interface with a GC column. The authors have overcome some of these difficulties by interfacing GC with Fourier Transform IMS (FTIMS). They will present data on determining vinyl chloride in soil-gas samples by GC-FTIMS.

  10. Analyzing Inquiry Questions of High-School Students in a Gas Chromatography Open-Ended Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blonder, Ron; Mamlock-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an open-ended inquiry experiment for high-school students, based on gas chromatography (GC). The research focuses on identifying the level of questions that students ask during the GC open inquiry laboratory, and it examines whether implementing the advanced inquiry laboratory opens up new directions for…

  11. Characterization of dibromopolychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins and dibromopolychlorodibenzofurans in municipal waste incinerator fly ash using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.Q.; Tong, Huayi; Donnelly, J.R.

    1992-05-01

    This article describes the first-time characterization of specific dioxins and benzofurans in municipal waste from incinerator fly ash. Only the high resolution of the mass spectrometer in combination with high resolution gas chromatography allowed for the measurement of these environmental health hazards in the range of low to high parts-per-trillion. 44 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF ORGANOTIN, ORGANOLEAD, AND ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES USING CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a continuing evaluation of new analytical and sample preparation techniques conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the use of capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED) for the simultaneous determination of organotin, organ...

  13. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  14. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  15. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  16. ANALYSIS OF TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMBUSTION PROCESS EMISSIONS USING NOVEL MULTIDIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the analysis of trace-level organic combustion process emissions using novel multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) procedures. It outlines the application of the technique through the analyses of various incinerator effluent and produ...

  17. EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MATRIX ISOLATION INFRARED SPECTROMETRY FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR SAMPLE EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capabilities of gas chromatography/matrix isolation-infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry for determination of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in air sample extracts were evaluated. ystematic experiment, using xylene isomers as test compounds, were conducted to determine th...

  18. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining…

  19. Implementation of Gas Chromatography and Microscale Distillation into the General Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum as Vehicles for Examining Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an NSF-funded Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) project that seeks, in part, to increase student exposure to scientific instrumentation, a gas chromatography experiment has been integrated into the second-semester general chemistry laboratory curriculum. The experiment uses affordable, commercially available equipment…

  20. The Use of Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Introduce General Chemistry Students to Percent Mass and Atomic Mass Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Brian W.; Schaefer, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to instrumental analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), while simultaneously reinforcing the concepts of mass percent and the calculation of atomic mass. Working in small groups, students use the GC to separate and quantify the percent composition…

  1. Detection of Caribbean fruit fly [(Anastrepha suspensa Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae)]-infested grapefruit with portable gas chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New technologies are being sought by plant protection officials to more quickly and efficiently identify concealed pests in imported commodities. The zNose portable gas chromatography unit was investigated as a tool for identifying organic volatile signatures indicative of Caribbean fruit fly infest...

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A TRANSPORTABLE FAST GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR THE MONITORING OF ORGANIC VAPORS IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatography has the potential to be a real-time or near real-time monitoring method for organics in air. ransportable fast GC with FID/ECD and PID/ECD configurations has been developed. reliminary evaluation has shown that all design features and improvements of the instru...

  3. CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PENTYLATED ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A capillary gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) method was developed for the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, NV, for determination of selected organotin compounds. Here we report on an interlabora...

  4. DETERMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS USING EQUILIBRIUM HEADSPACE ANALYSIS AND CAPILLARY COLUMN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing methods for determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil matrices using the purge and trap technique with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) have several problems, which include preserving sample integrity from collection to analysis and efficient...

  5. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  6. Analysis of 4-bromo-3-fluorobenzaldehyde and separation of its regioisomers by one-dimensional and two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo; Semin, David; Fang, Jan; Guo, Gary

    2016-09-01

    A starting material, 4-bromo-3-fluorobenzaldehyde, was used for active drug substance (API) AMG 369 production. The presence of the regioisomer impurities in the starting material 4-bromo-3-fluorobenzaldehyde presented significant challenges for the API synthetic route development due to the physical-chemical similarities of the impurities. These impurities significantly impact on the purity of the starting-material and final drug substance. Control of these impurities is important due to the potential genotoxicity of these impurities (p-GTI). Analytical development was carried out to develop GC methods with high resolving power and high sensitivity to quantify the regioisomers presented in starting material and therefore to control the purity of the starting material and the final drug substance. In the study, complete resolution of the ten regioisomers by 1D-GC and heart-cutting two-dimensional GC (2D-GC) was achieved. A sensitive GC/micro electron capture detection (μ-ECD) method with high resolving power and sensitivity to fully resolve all the ten regioisomers of 4-bromo-3-fluorobenzaldehyde was obtained by using a CHIRALDEX GC column (1D- GC). To facilitate the systematic GC method development, heart-cutting two-dimensional gas chromatography (2D-GC) using a Deans switch was exploited for the separation of the ten regioisomers. The resulting heart-cutting 2D-GC method successfully separated all the ten regioisomers with better sensitivity and resolution. Regioisomer impurities in the starting material were identified and quantified by these GC methods. The sensitivity for the methods is in the range of 0.004ng to 0.02ng for the regioisomers. Linearity for the methods is: R(2)=0.999 to 1.000. The methods were suitable for control of the regioisomer impurities, p-GTIs, in the starting material and final drug substance. PMID:27492600

  7. Analysis of small carbohydrates in several bioactive botanicals by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moldoveanu, Serban; Scott, Wayne; Zhu, Jeff

    2015-11-01

    Bioactive botanicals contain natural compounds with specific biological activity, such as antibacterial, antioxidant, immune stimulating, and taste improving. A full characterization of the chemical composition of these botanicals is frequently necessary. A study of small carbohydrates from the plant materials of 18 bioactive botanicals is further described. The study presents the identification of the carbohydrate using a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis that allows detection of molecules as large as maltotetraose, after changing them into trimethylsilyl derivatives. A number of carbohydrates in the plant (fructose, glucose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, xylose, sorbitol, and myo-, chiro-, and scyllo-inositols) were quantitated using a novel liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric technique. Both techniques involved new method developments. The gas chromatography with mass spectrometric analysis involved derivatization and separation on a Rxi(®)-5Sil MS column with H2 as a carrier gas. The liquid chromatographic separation was obtained using a hydrophilic interaction type column, YMC-PAC Polyamine II. The tandem mass spectrometer used an electrospray ionization source in multiple reaction monitoring positive ion mode with the detection of the adducts of the carbohydrates with Cs(+) ions. The validated quantitative procedure showed excellent precision and accuracy allowing the analysis in a wide range of concentrations of the analytes. PMID:26315495

  8. A novel micropreconcentrator employing a laminar flow patterned heater for micro gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.-C.; Wu, T. H.; Lu, C.-J.; Chen, W. R.; Sheen, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple micromachined process based on one photomask is developed for a novel micropreconcentrator (µPCT) used in a micro gas chromatograph (µGC). Unique thick silver heating microstructures with a high surface area for microheater of µPCT are fabricated by combining the microfluidic laminar flow technique and the Tollens’ reaction within a microchannel. Silver deposition using this laminar flow patterning technique provides a higher deposition rate and easier microfabrication compared to conventional micromachined technologies for thick metal microstructures (>200 µm). An amorphous and porous carbon film that functions as an adsorbent is grown on microheaters inside the microchannel. The µPCT can be heated to >300 °C rapidly by applying a constant electrical power of ˜1 W with a heating rate of 10 °C s-1. Four volatile organic compounds, acetone, benzene, toluene and xylene, are collected through the proposed novel µPCTs and separated successfully using a 17 m long gas chromatography column. The peak widths at half height (PWHHs) of the four compounds are relatively narrow (<6 s), and the minimum PWHH of 3.75 s is obtained for acetone. The preconcentration factors are >38 000 for benzene and toluene.

  9. Development of an automated high temperature valveless injection system for on-line gas chromatography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kreisberg, N. M.; Worton, D. R.; Zhao, Y.; Isaacman, G.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hering, S. V.

    2014-07-23

    A reliable method of sample introduction is presented for on-line gas chromatography with a special application to in-situ field portable atmospheric sampling instruments. A traditional multi-port valve is replaced with a controlled pressure switching device that offers the advantage of long term reliability and stable sample transfer efficiency. An engineering design model is presented and tested that allows customizing the interface for other applications. Flow model accuracy is within measurement accuracy (1%) when parameters are tuned for an ambient detector and 15% accurate when applied to a vacuum based detector. Laboratory comparisons made between the two methods of sample introductionmore » using a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) show approximately three times greater reproducibility maintained over the equivalent of a week of continuous sampling. Field performance results for two versions of the valveless interface used in the in-situ instrument demonstrate minimal trending and a zero failure rate during field deployments ranging up to four weeks of continuous sampling. Extension of the VLI to dual collection cells is presented with less than 3% cell-to-cell carry-over.« less

  10. Development of an automated high-temperature valveless injection system for online gas chromatography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kreisberg, N. M.; Worton, D. R.; Zhao, Y.; Isaacman, G.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hering, S. V.

    2014-12-12

    A reliable method of sample introduction is presented for online gas chromatography with a special application to in situ field portable atmospheric sampling instruments. A traditional multi-port valve is replaced with a valveless sample introduction interface that offers the advantage of long-term reliability and stable sample transfer efficiency. An engineering design model is presented and tested that allows customizing this pressure-switching-based device for other applications. Flow model accuracy is within measurement accuracy (1%) when parameters are tuned for an ambient-pressure detector and 15% accurate when applied to a vacuum-based detector. Laboratory comparisons made between the two methods of sample introductionmore » using a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) show that the new interface has approximately 3 times greater reproducibility maintained over the equivalent of a week of continuous sampling. Field performance results for two versions of the valveless interface used in the in situ instrument demonstrate typically less than 2% week-1 response trending and a zero failure rate during field deployments ranging up to 4 weeks of continuous sampling. Extension of the valveless interface to dual collection cells is presented with less than 3% cell-to-cell carryover.« less

  11. Separation of dialkyl sulfides by metallo-mesogenic stationary phases for complexation gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Lian; Liu, Chuen-Ying

    2007-08-17

    A copper mesogenic side-chain polymer (P-C(15)CuC(18)) was cross-linked onto the capillary wall as a stationary film for gas chromatography (GC) separation of alkyl sulfides. These organic sulfides are of interest for their large health impact because of their wide range of volatiles and high reactivities toward metals. Different GC parameters for optimal separation efficiency are discussed for use with a mesogenic polymer column along with flame photometric detection (FPD). Both the carrier gas flow-rate and column temperature were studied to determine the relationship of plate height to the chemical structure of the solutes, as well as to determine the morphology of the mesogenic polymer. Van 't Hoff plots show phase transitions of the stationary mesophase as the column temperature was varied. The results reveal that the separation mechanism might be based on ligand exchange and polarity interaction between the analytes and the stationary phase, with the vapor pressure of the analytes also being important. The former interaction dominates in the lamellar crystalline phase and the latter interaction dominates in the hexagonal columnar-discotic phase. With high reproducibility for retention time (RSD< or =0.37%) and for peak area (RSD< or =5.16%), the GC-FPD system produced linear calibration graphs (r> or =0.9918) for the determination of 13 sulfides with a detection limit below 2.5 ng. PMID:17568598

  12. [Determination of organic residues in macroporous adsorption resins by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jia, Cunqin; Li, Yangchun; Tu, Pengfei; Zhang, Hongquan

    2005-11-01

    A method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of benzene, toluene, xylene, styrene, decane, diethylbenzene, undecane, divinylbenzene, dodecane and naphthalene residues in macroporous adsorption resins (MARs). The organic residues were extracted from resin samples by ultrasonic extraction with dichloromethane and analyzed by gas chromatography. The chromatographic conditions were as follows: a DB-624 capillary column (30 m x 0.32 mm i.d., 1.8 microm); carrier gas, nitrogen with a flow rate of 2.5 mL/min; column temperature, programmed from 40 degrees C to 200 degrees C at a rate of 14 degrees C /min and kept at 200 degrees C for 1 min; flame ionization detector temperature, 250 degrees C; injector temperature, 220 degrees C; splitless injection, 1 microL. All the 10 organic residues were separated well in 12 min. The recoveries for spiked standards (n = 3) were 73.8% - 107.9%. The relative standard deviations were 1.3% - 4.4%. The limits of detection were 0.007 - 0.03 mg/L. This method is sensitive, accurate and quick. Nine commercial MARs and their pretreated samples were assayed, and the results show that the contents of organic residues varied greatly in two kinds of samples. And the pretreated MARs can be used safely in the production of traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:16499000

  13. Two-dimensional gas chromatography-online hydrogenation for improved characterization of petrochemical samples.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, H; Bekker, R; Govender, A; Rohwer, E

    2016-05-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process produces a variety of hydrocarbons over a wide carbon number range and during subsequent product workup a large variety of synthetic fuels and chemicals are produced. The complexity of the product slate obtained from this process is well documented and the high temperature FT (HT-FT) process products are spread over gas, oil and water phases. The characterization of these phases is very challenging even when using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). Despite the increase in separation power, peak co-elution still occurs when samples containing isomeric compounds are analysed by comprehensive two dimensional GC. The separation of isomeric compounds with the same double bond equivalents is especially difficult since these compounds elute in a similar position on the GC×GC chromatogram and have identical molecular masses and similar fragmentation patterns in their electron ionization (EI) mass spectra. On-line hydrogenation after GC×GC separation is a possible way to distinguish between these isomeric compounds since the number of rings and alkene double bonds can be determined from the mass spectra of the compounds before and after hydrogenation. This paper describes development of a GC×GC method with post column hydrogenation for the determination of the backbone of cyclic/olefinic structures enabling us to differentiate between classes like dienes and cyclic olefins in complex petrochemical streams. PMID:27067493

  14. Review of recent developments and applications in low-pressure (vacuum outlet) gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikova, Yelena; Lehotay, Steven J

    2015-10-29

    The concept of low pressure (LP) vacuum outlet gas chromatography (GC) was introduced more than 50 years ago, but it was not until the 2000s that its theoretical applicability to fast analysis of GC-amenable chemicals was realized. In practice, LPGC is implemented by placing the outlet of a short, wide (typically 10-15 m, 0.53 mm inner diameter) analytical column under vacuum conditions, which speeds the separation by reducing viscosity of the carrier gas, thereby leading to a higher optimal flow rate for the most separation efficiency. To keep the inlet at normal operating pressures, the analytical column is commonly coupled to a short, narrow uncoated restriction capillary that also acts as a guard column. The faster separations in LPGC usually result in worse separation efficiency relative to conventional GC, but selective detection usually overcomes this drawback. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides highly selective and sensitive universal detection, and nearly all GC-MS instruments provide vacuum outlet conditions for implementation of LPGC-MS(/MS) without need for adaptations. In addition to higher sample throughput, LPGC provides other benefits, including lower detection limits, less chance of analyte degradation, reduced peak tailing, increased sample loadability, and more ruggedness without overly narrow peaks that would necessitate excessively fast data acquisition rates. This critical review summarizes recent developments in the application of LPGC with MS and other detectors in the analysis of pesticides, environmental contaminants, explosives, phytosterols, and other semi-volatile compounds. PMID:26547491

  15. [Determination of endosulfan pesticide residues in Litopenaeus vannamai by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaosong; Huang, Daxin; Lu, Shengyu

    2007-05-01

    A method is described for the determination of endosulfan pesticide residues in Litopenaeus vannamai by capillary gas chromatography. The residues of alpha-endosulfan and beta-endosulfan were extracted from the sample with ethyl acetate, and the extract was cleaned up using a neutral alumina column and an active carbon column after concentrated and then eluted with a mixture of n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1 : 1, v/v). During the process of purification, the flow rate of eluent was controlled within 3 mL/min. The eluate was collected and evaporated to 1 mL for analysis. The determination was performed on a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. The retention time was used for qualification and the external calibration standard was used for quantitation. The results obtained showed that the recoveries were 80.5% - 97.3% for alpha-endosulfan and 81.1% - 109.5% for beta-endosulfan. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0. 002 mg/kg, and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 0. 007 mg/kg for both. The precision of the method, expressed as the relative standard deviation for the within-laboratory repeatability, was generally below 8.5%. The method was used for the analysis of Litopenaeus vannamai samples from Guangxi Province, a Litopenaeus vannamai aquiculture area in south China. PMID:17679437

  16. Determination of paraldehyde by gas chromatography in whole blood from children.

    PubMed

    Githiga, Isaiah M; Muchohi, Simon N; Ogutu, Bernhards R; Newton, Charles R J C; Otieno, Godfrey O; Gitau, Evelyn N; Kokwaro, Gilbert O

    2004-06-15

    A rapid, sensitive and selective gas chromatographic method with flame ionization detection was developed for the determination of paraldehyde in small blood samples taken from children. Whole blood samples (300 microl) collected in a 3 ml Wheaton glass sample vial were spiked with acetone (internal standard: 15 ng) followed by addition of concentrated hydrochloric acid. The mixture was heated in the sealed airtight sample vial in a water bath (96 Celsius; 5 min) to depolymerize paraldehyde to acetaldehyde. A 2 ml aliquot of the headspace was analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector using a stainless steel column (3 m x 4 mm i.d.) packed with 10% Carbowax 20 M/ 2% KOH on 80/100 Chromosorb WAW. Calibration curves were linear from 1.0-20 microg (r2>0.99). The limit of detection was 1.5 microg/ml, while relative mean recoveries at 2 and 18 microg were 105.6 +/- 8.4 and 101.2 +/- 5.9%, respectively (n = 10 for each level). Intra- and inter-assay relative standard deviations at 2, 10 and 18 microg were <15%. There was no interference from other drugs concurrently used in children with severe malaria, such as anticonvulsants (diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbitone), antipyretics/analgesics (paracetamol and salicylate), antibiotics (gentamicin, chloramphenicol, benzyl penicillin) and antimalarials (chloroquine, quinine, proguanil, cycloguanil, pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine). The method was successfully applied for pharmacokinetic studies of paraldehyde in children with convulsions associated with severe malaria. PMID:15135115

  17. Identification of gasoline adulteration using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined to multivariate data processing.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Marcio Pozzobon; de Godoy, Luiz Antonio Fonseca; Ferreira, Ernesto Correa; Poppi, Ronei Jesus; Augusto, Fabio

    2008-08-01

    A method to detect potential adulteration of commercial gasoline (Type C gasoline, available in Brazil and containing 25% (v/v) ethanol) is presented here. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GCxGC-FID) data and multivariate calibration (multi-way partial least squares regression, N-PLS) were combined to obtain regression models correlating the concentration of gasoline on samples from chromatographic data. Blends of gasoline and white spirit, kerosene and paint thinner (adopted as model adulterants) were used for calibration; the regression models were evaluated using samples of Type C gasoline spiked with these solvents, as well as with ethanol. The method was also checked with real samples collected from gas stations and analyzed using the official method. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for gasoline concentrations on test samples calculated using the regression model ranged from 3.3% (v/v) to 8.2% (v/v), depending on the composition of the blends; in addition, the results for the real samples agree with the official method. These observations suggest that GCxGC-FID and N-PLS can be an alternative for routine monitoring of fuel adulteration, as well as to solve several other similar analytical problems where mixtures should be detected and quantified as single species in complex samples. PMID:18571187

  18. Development of a gas chromatography silicon-based microsystem in clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Lorenzelli, Leandro; Benvenuto, Antonella; Adami, Andrea; Guarnieri, Vittorio; Margesin, Benno; Mulloni, Viviana; Vincenzi, Donato

    2005-04-15

    The accurate determination of biological parameters by means of rapid, on-line measurements at low-concentrations is an important task within the fields of pharmaceutical screening and medical diagnostic. Nevertheless, in biological samples, the analytes of interest are present as minor components in complex mixtures and with interfering species. Biosensors are the best candidates for these applications providing a direct solution to this need of accuracy, but their intrinsic selectivity often excludes all the other components in the sample. A separation step introduced prior to the sensing component could allow both the increase of selectivity with respect the interfering species and the identification of a large spectrum of molecular components in the sample. This work reports the development of a silicon-based integrated separation microsystem for gas chromatography aimed to biomedical applications, with particular emphasis to monitor the homovanillic acid (HVA) and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) ratios in mass population screening for neuroblastoma diagnosis and prognosis. The miniaturised system consists of two main modules: (i) a metal oxide semiconductor detector and (ii) a micromachined separation capillary column. As first step, the metal oxide semiconductor capability to detect HVA and VMA has been demonstrated. Then, a technology for a silicon separation capillary microcolumn including the on-chip gas sensor housing has been proposed and a first prototype has been developed. The proposed microsystem is an analytical device with biosensing capabilities for diagnostic and biomedical applications, which yield an electronic signal proportional to the concentration of a specific analyte or group of analytes. PMID:15741065

  19. Development of an automated high-temperature valveless injection system for online gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreisberg, N. M.; Worton, D. R.; Zhao, Y.; Isaacman, G.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hering, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    A reliable method of sample introduction is presented for online gas chromatography with a special application to in situ field portable atmospheric sampling instruments. A traditional multi-port valve is replaced with a valveless sample introduction interface that offers the advantage of long-term reliability and stable sample transfer efficiency. An engineering design model is presented and tested that allows customizing this pressure-switching-based device for other applications. Flow model accuracy is within measurement accuracy (1%) when parameters are tuned for an ambient-pressure detector and 15% accurate when applied to a vacuum-based detector. Laboratory comparisons made between the two methods of sample introduction using a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) show that the new interface has approximately 3 times greater reproducibility maintained over the equivalent of a week of continuous sampling. Field performance results for two versions of the valveless interface used in the in situ instrument demonstrate typically less than 2% week-1 response trending and a zero failure rate during field deployments ranging up to 4 weeks of continuous sampling. Extension of the valveless interface to dual collection cells is presented with less than 3% cell-to-cell carryover.

  20. Development of an automated high temperature valveless injection system for on-line gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreisberg, N. M.; Worton, D. R.; Zhao, Y.; Isaacman, G.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hering, S. V.

    2014-07-01

    A reliable method of sample introduction is presented for on-line gas chromatography with a special application to in-situ field portable atmospheric sampling instruments. A traditional multi-port valve is replaced with a controlled pressure switching device that offers the advantage of long term reliability and stable sample transfer efficiency. An engineering design model is presented and tested that allows customizing the interface for other applications. Flow model accuracy is within measurement accuracy (1%) when parameters are tuned for an ambient detector and 15% accurate when applied to a vacuum based detector. Laboratory comparisons made between the two methods of sample introduction using a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) show approximately three times greater reproducibility maintained over the equivalent of a week of continuous sampling. Field performance results for two versions of the valveless interface used in the in-situ instrument demonstrate minimal trending and a zero failure rate during field deployments ranging up to four weeks of continuous sampling. Extension of the VLI to dual collection cells is presented with less than 3% cell-to-cell carry-over.

  1. Modeling Transport in Gas Chromatography Columns for the Micro-ChemLab

    SciTech Connect

    ADKINS,DOUGLAS R.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; HUDSON,MARY L.; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; SALINGER,ANDREW G.; SHADID,JOHN N.; WONG, CHUNGNIN CHANN

    1999-09-01

    The gas chromatography (GC) column is a critical component in the microsystem for chemical detection ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) being developed at Sandia. The goal is to etch a meter-long GC column onto a 1-cm{sup 2} silicon chip while maintaining good chromatographic performance. Our design strategy is to use a modeling and simulation approach. We have developed an analytical tool that models the transport and surface interaction process to achieve an optimized design of the GC column. This analytical tool has a flow module and a separation module. The flow module considers both the compressibility and slip flow effects that may significantly influence the gas transport in a long and narrow column. The separation module models analyte transport and physico-chemical interaction with the coated surface in the GC column. It predicts the column efficiency and performance. Results of our analysis will be presented in this paper. In addition to the analytical tool, we have also developed a time-dependent adsorption/desorption model and incorporated this model into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate analyte transport and separation process in GC columns. CFD simulations can capture the complex three-dimensional flow and transport dynamics, whereas the analytical tool cannot. Different column geometries have been studied, and results will be presented in this paper. Overall we have demonstrated that the modeling and simulation approach can guide the design of the GC column and will reduce the number of iterations in the device development.

  2. Determination of trace sulfides in turbid waters by gas dialysis/ion chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, L.R.; Francom, D.; Urso, A.; Dieken, F.P.

    1988-02-01

    The accuracy of the methylene blue colorimetric procedure for the determination of sulfide in environmental waters and waste waters is influenced by turbidity interferences even after application of recommended pretreatment techniques. The direct analysis of sulfide by ion chromatography (IC), without sample pretreatment, is complicated by field preservation of samples with zinc ion (or equivalent). A continuous-flow procedure has been developed that converts the acid-extractable sulfide to H/sub 2/S, which is separated from the sample matrix by a gas dialysis membrane and then trapped in a dilute sodium hydroxide solution. A 200-..mu..L portion of this solution is injected into the ion chromatograph for analysis with an electrochemical detector. Detection limits as low as 1.9 ng/mL have been obtained. Good agreement was found between the gas dialysis/IC and methylene blue methods for nonturbid standards. The addition of ascorbic acid as an antioxidant is required to obtain adequate recoveries from spiked tap and well waters.

  3. Nitrogen isotopic analyses by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Amino acids containing natural-abundance levels of 15N were derivatized and analyzed isotopically using a technique in which individual compounds are separated by gas chromatography, combusted on-line, and the product stream sent directly to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For samples of N2 gas, standard deviations of ratio measurement were better than 0.1% (Units for delta are parts per thousand or per million (%).) for samples larger than 400 pmol and better than 0.5% for samples larger than 25 pmol (0.1% 15N is equivalent to 0.00004 atom % 15N). Results duplicated those of conventional, batchwise analyses to within 0.05%. For combustion of organic compounds yielding CO2/N2 ratios between 14 and 28, in particular for N-acetyl n-propyl derivatives of amino acids, delta values were within 0.25% of results obtained using conventional techniques and standard deviations were better than 0.35%. Pooled data for measurements of all amino acids produced an accuracy and precision of 0.04 and 0.23%, respectively, when 2 nmol of each amino acid was injected on column and 20% of the stream of combustion products was delivered to the mass spectrometer.

  4. [Determination of soluble organic fraction in diesel exhaust particulates by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guihua; Wang, Junxiao; Huang, Xuezheng; Lu, Jiaxiang; Liu, Na

    2004-07-01

    The soluble organic fractions (SOF) in diesel exhaust particulates have been extracted with ultrasonic separator and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/ MS). The GC/MS conditions were as follows: an HP SE-50 capillary column (30 m x 0.2 mm i. d. x 0.2 microm); temperature programming started at 100 degrees C, holding for 2.0 min, then increased to 160 degrees C at a rate of 4.0 degrees C /min, then to 250 degrees C at 8 degrees C/min, finally, kept at 250 degrees C for 31.75 min; boiling chamber temperature 260 degrees C; helium gas as carrier; chapiter pressure 45 kPa; sample size 1 microL; electron impact energy of mass spectrometer 70 eV; multiplier voltage 1 800 V; mass range 300 - 500 u. The results showed that under exhaust temperature, about 80% of SOF in particulates were normal or isomeric alkanes with carbon numbers from 9 to 28. The rest of the fractions of SOF were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (homologs of indene, fluorene, phenanthrene, naphthalene etc.) and other organic substances. It is demonstrated that most of SOF were from unburned diesel and engine oils. The testing conclusion should be useful in designing and evaluating particulate filters. PMID:15709431

  5. Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol Precursors Using Two-Dimensional Gas-Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskamp, M.; Lou, W.; Pankow, J. F.; Harley, P. C.; Turnipseed, A.; Barsanti, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) plays a role in both regional and global air quality. However, field and laboratory research indicate that the body of knowledge around the identities, quantities and oxidation processes of these compounds in the ambient atmosphere is still incomplete (e.g., Goldstein & Galbally, 2007; Robinson et al., 2009). VOCs emitted to the atmosphere largely are of biogenic origin (Guenther et al., 2006), and many studies of ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) suggest that SOA is largely of biogenic origin (albeit closely connected to anthropogenic activities, e.g., de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Accurate modeling of SOA levels and properties will require a more complete understanding of biogenic VOCs (BOCs) and their atmospheric oxidation products. For example, satellite measurements indicate that biogenic VOC emissions are two to three times greater than levels currently included in models (Heald et al., 2010). Two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) is a powerful analytical technique that shows much promise in advancing the state-of-knowledge regarding BVOCs and their role in SOA formation. In this work, samples were collected during BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere Interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) in July and August of 2011. The field site was a Ponderosa Pine forest near Woodland, CO, inside the Manitou Experimental Forest, which is operated by the US Forest Service. The area is characteristic of the central Rocky Mountains and trace gas monitoring indicates that little anthropogenic pollution is transported from the nearby urban areas (Kim et al. 2010 and references therein). Ambient and enclosure samples were collected on ATD (adsorption/thermal desorption) cartridges and analyzed for BVOCs using two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) with time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) and flame ionized detection (FID). Measurements of

  6. Cross validation of gas chromatography-flame photometric detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for measuring dialkylphosphate metabolites of organophosphate pesticides in human urine.

    PubMed

    Prapamontol, Tippawan; Sutan, Kunrunya; Laoyang, Sompong; Hongsibsong, Surat; Lee, Grace; Yano, Yukiko; Hunter, Ronald Elton; Ryan, P Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd; Panuwet, Parinya

    2014-01-01

    We report two analytical methods for the measurement of dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites of organophosphate pesticides in human urine. These methods were independently developed/modified and implemented in two separate laboratories and cross validated. The aim was to develop simple, cost effective, and reliable methods that could use available resources and sample matrices in Thailand and the United States. While several methods already exist, we found that direct application of these methods required modification of sample preparation and chromatographic conditions to render accurate, reliable data. The problems encountered with existing methods were attributable to urinary matrix interferences, and differences in the pH of urine samples and reagents used during the extraction and derivatization processes. Thus, we provide information on key parameters that require attention during method modification and execution that affect the ruggedness of the methods. The methods presented here employ gas chromatography (GC) coupled with either flame photometric detection (FPD) or electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) with isotopic dilution quantification. The limits of detection were reported from 0.10ng/mL urine to 2.5ng/mL urine (for GC-FPD), while the limits of quantification were reported from 0.25ng/mL urine to 2.5ng/mL urine (for GC-MS), for all six common DAP metabolites (i.e., dimethylphosphate, dimethylthiophosphate, dimethyldithiophosphate, diethylphosphate, diethylthiophosphate, and diethyldithiophosphate). Each method showed a relative recovery range of 94-119% (for GC-FPD) and 92-103% (for GC-MS), and relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 20%. Cross-validation was performed on the same set of urine samples (n=46) collected from pregnant women residing in the agricultural areas of northern Thailand. The results from split sample analysis from both laboratories agreed well for each metabolite, suggesting that each method can produce

  7. Fast volatile organic compound recovery from soil standards for analysis by thermal desorption gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Meniconi, Maria de Fátima Guadalupe; Parris, R; Thomas, C L P

    2003-10-01

    The development of high-throughput environmental screening assays are needed to meet high-specification data quality objectives (DQOs) that require large numbers of samples to be taken and analysed rapidly. The acquisition and stabilisation of the sample is a key technical and operational challenge in analytical sequences associated with the determination of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination of soils. Further the development of miniaturised and embedded analytical systems for environmental conditioning monitoring requires the development of new sampling techniques. A proof-of-concept study is described that shows how pressurised gas, in this case carbon dioxide, may be used to recover reversibly-bound VOCs from soil into an adsorbent sampler, and then analysed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography. The effects of the volume of the pressurised gas, the gas flow rate and the mass of the soil sample on the recovery efficiency and breakthrough from the adsorbent trap were investigated in a preliminary characterisation study. Two distinct approaches were identified. The first involved ventilation of the voids within the soil matrix to displace the soil-gas headspace, a rapid screening approach. The second involved a more prolonged purge of the matrix to strip reversibly bound species into the gas phase and hence pass them into the adsorbent trap, a purge and trap approach. The shortest possible sample processing time required to yield analytically useful responses was 5 s with the use of the headspace approach. In this case n-octane, benzene and toluene were recovered from conditioned spiked soil samples at concentrations in the range 42 to 1690 mg kg(-1). The limit of detection for the system was estimated to be no greater than 1.2 mg kg(-1). Using the purge and trap variant enabled recovery efficiencies greater than 93% to be achieved with liquid spikes of n-octane onto soil samples. These preliminary studies showed that a system based on this approach

  8. New gas chromatography-olfactometric investigative method, and its application to cooked Silurus glanis (European catfish) odor characterization.

    PubMed

    Hallier, Arnaud; Courcoux, Philippe; Sérot, Thierry; Prost, Carole

    2004-11-12

    A new gas chromatography-olfactometric method, gas chromatography-global olfactometry omission detection (GC-GOOD), was applied to dynamic headspace odor extracts of Silurus glanis (European catfish). The GC-GOOD method is based on the omission test theory and uses a gas chromatograph coupled with a three-way valve and an a flame ionization detector. The GC-GOOD method enabled the identification of key families of volatile compounds in the S. glanis global odor and the elucidation of the interactions occurring between these families. Significant main effects were observed for the families of volatile compounds exhibiting cooked odor, grassy odor and alcohol, solvent and plastic odors. Omission of these families involved a loss of odor similarity. PMID:15595551

  9. Quantitative confirmation of dimetridazole and ipronidazole in swine feed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with multiple ion detection.

    PubMed

    Morris, W J; Nandrea, G J; Roybal, J E; Munns, R K; Shimoda, W; Skinner, H R

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from 4 types of swine feed containing 0.11 ppm each of dimetridazole (DMZ) and ipronidazole (IPR) were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using multiple ion detection (MID) techniques. We demonstrate in this paper that the quantitative results obtained by capillary GC/MS with MID are comparable for both compounds to results obtained by liquid chromatography and have a lower coefficient of variation for DMZ. Moreover, consistency in the ion ratios (5 ions in DMZ and 6 ions in IPR) permits identification of these compounds by electron ionization MS. PMID:3624166

  10. Application of capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry/computer techniques to synoptic survey of organic material in bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Pereira, W.E.; Johnson, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A bed sediment sample taken from an area impacted by heavy industrial activity was analyzed for organic compounds of environmental significance. Extraction was effected on a Soxhlet apparatus using a freeze-dried sample. The Soxhlet extract was fractionated by silica gel micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic compounds was accomplished by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. More than 50 compounds were identified; these include saturated hydrocarbons, olefins, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as aldehydes and ketones. The role of bed sediments as a source or sink for organic pollutants is discussed. ?? 1981.

  11. A gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method for helium detection in postmortem blood and tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Schaff, Jason E; Karas, Roman P; Marinetti, Laureen

    2012-03-01

    In cases of death by inert gas asphyxiation, it can be difficult to obtain toxicological evidence supporting assignment of a cause of death. Because of its low mass and high diffusivity, and its common use as a carrier gas, helium presents a particular challenge in this respect. We describe a rapid and simple gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method to qualitatively screen a variety of postmortem biological specimens for the presence of helium. Application of this method is demonstrated with three case examples, encompassing an array of different biological matrices. PMID:22337780

  12. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief that

  13. Analysis of dexamethasone and betamethasone in bovine urine by purification with an "on-line" immunoaffinity chromatography-high-performance liquid chromatography system and determination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bagnati, R; Ramazza, V; Zucchi, M; Simonella, A; Leone, F; Bellini, A; Fanelli, R

    1996-03-15

    A method for the immunoaffinity extraction of dexamethasone and betamethasone in bovine urine, followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination, is described. A commercial immunoaffinity gel, containing antibodies raised against dexamethasone, was used to prepare an immunoaffinity cartridge which was inserted in an automatic HPLC system for on-line extraction and purification. By injecting urine samples (spiked with flumethasone as internal standard) directly into the system, it was possible to collect purified fractions, containing the analytes of interest. The fractions were dried and derivatized to yield the tetra-trimethylsilyl derivatives of the three corticosteroids, which were analyzed by selected ion monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method allowed a very good purification of samples and reached a detection limit of 0.1 ng/ml for dexamethasone and 0.2 ng/ml for betamethasone. Several samples, coming from a steer treated with dexamethasone and from other bovines coming from breedings in northern Italy, were analyzed with the method described. Dexamethasone levels ranged from 0.12 to 146 ng/ml. PMID:8833319

  14. Rapid determination of pyridine derivatives by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/gas sensor based on nanostructured conducting polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Pirsa, Sajad; Alizadeh, Naader

    2011-12-15

    Polypyrrole (PPy) gas sensor has been prepared by polymerization of pyrrole on surfaces of commercial polymer fibers in the presence of an oxidizing agent. The sensing behavior of PPy gas sensor was investigated in the presence of pyridine derivatives. The resistive responses of the PPy gas sensor to pyridine derivatives were in the order of quinoline>pyridine>4-methyl pyridine and 2-methyl pyridine. The PPy gas sensor was used as gas chromatography (GC) detector and exhibited linear responses to pyridine derivatives in the ranges 40-4,000 ng. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with GC/PPy gas sensor has been developed for simultaneous determination of pyridine derivatives and quinoline. The purposed method was used for determination of pyridine derivatives from cigarette smoke. The GC runs were completed in 4 min. The reproducibility of this method is suitable and good standard deviations were obtained. RSD value is less than 10% for all analytes. PMID:22099675

  15. 2D numerical modelling of the gas temperature in a high-temperature high-power strontium atom laser excited by nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in a He-SrBr2 mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2014-05-01

    Assuming axial symmetry and a uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed numerically for determination of the gas temperature in the case of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in He-SrBr2 formed in a newly-designed large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge-free zone, in order to find the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. The model determines the gas temperature of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  16. A Chemical Detector for Gas Chromatography Using Pulsed Discharge Emission Spectroscopy on a Microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Zhu, W.; Mitra, B.; Liu, J.; Liu, T.; Fan, X.; Gianchandani, Y.

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing interest in miniaturized systems for chemical analysis in harsh environments. Chemical detection by emission spectroscopy of on-chip microdischarges [1-3] can be performed at >200°C [4], suggesting utility inspace exploration, volcanic monitoring, and oil well monitoring. This abstract describes the first use of pulsed microdischarge spectroscopy for gas chromatography (GC).This effort supports NASA interests in monitoring closed-loop life support systems for spacecraft. The microdischarge occurs on a 1cm2 glass chip (Fig. 1a), with thin-film Ni electrodes separated by 160μm. A glass lid with a grooved gas-flow channel, and inlet/outlet capillary tubes are epoxy-sealed to the chip. Located downstream of the 1.7m-long, RTX-1-coated, GC separation column, the microdischarge chip is read by a spectrometer. In a typical experiment (Fig. 1b), a mixture of acetone 3.6μg, 1-hexanol 2.8μg and nitrobenzene 3.0μg, is injected, with He carrier gas at 1.56sccm, through the GC. Acetone elutes quickly while nitrobenzene is slower. Microdischarges are triggered at 0.5Hz for 6 min., and 0.04Hz thereafter. Each microdischarge consumes ≈8mJ; the average power is ≈1.14mW. The spectrum (Fig. 1b, inset) shows that the 388nm peak, representing CN/CH fragments [5], is enhanced by carbon compounds. Its strength relative to the 588nm peak of He provides a chromatogram. Fig. 1b also shows a benchmark result from a commercial flame ionization detector (FID). The differences in elution time are attributed to differences in the gas flow paths for the two detectors [1]. REFERENCES [1] Eijkel et al, Anal. Chem, 2000 [2] Mitra et al, IEEE Trans Plasma Sci, 2008 [3] Mitra et al, IEEE Sensors, 2008 [4] Wright et al, APL, 2009 [5] Pearse et al, The Identification of Molecular Spectra, 1963

  17. Screening and confirmation of thyreostatics in urine by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after sample clean-up with a mercurated affinity column.

    PubMed

    Schilt, R; Weseman, J M; Hooijerink, H; Korbee, H J; Traag, W A; van Steenbergen, M J; Haasnoot, W

    1989-04-01

    Methods are described for the screening and confirmation of residues of the thyreostatics thiouracil, methylthiouracil and propylthiouracil in urine samples of cattle at levels down to 25 micrograms/l. After a selective preconcentration of the thiol-containing thyreostatics on a mercurated affinity column, the analytes are derivatized by extractive alkylation and analysed by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus or mass spectrometric detection. PMID:2745644

  18. Rapid screening and identification of illicit drugs by IR absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengali, Sandro; Liberatore, Nicola; Luciani, Domenico; Viola, Roberto; Cardinali, Gian Carlo; Elmi, Ivan; Poggi, Antonella; Zampolli, Stefano; Biavardi, Elisa; Dalcanale, Enrico; Bonadio, Federica; Delemont, Olivier; Esseiva, Pierre; Romolo, Francesco S.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical instruments based on InfraRed Absorption Spectroscopy (IRAS) and Gas Chromatography (GC) are today available only as bench-top instrumentation for forensic labs and bulk analysis. Within the 'DIRAC' project funded by the European Commission, we are developing an advanced portable sensor, that combines miniaturized GC as its key chemical separation tool, and IRAS in a Hollow Fiber (HF) as its key analytical tool, to detect and recognize illicit drugs and key precursors, as bulk and as traces. The HF-IRAS module essentially consists of a broadly tunable External Cavity (EC) Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL), thermo-electrically cooled MCT detectors, and an infrared hollow fiber at controlled temperature. The hollow fiber works as a miniaturized gas cell, that can be connected to the output of the GC column with minimal dead volumes. Indeed, the module has been coupled to GC columns of different internal diameter and stationary phase, and with a Vapour Phase Pre-concentrator (VPC) that selectively traps target chemicals from the air. The presentation will report the results of tests made with amphetamines and precursors, as pure substances, mixtures, and solutions. It will show that the sensor is capable of analyzing all the chemicals of interest, with limits of detection ranging from a few nanograms to about 100-200 ng. Furthermore, it is suitable to deal with vapours directly trapped from the headspace of a vessel, and with salts treated in a basic solution. When coupled to FAST GC columns, the module can analyze multi-components mixes in less than 5 minutes.

  19. A volatile organic analyzer for Space Station: Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ ion mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) is being developed as an essential component of the Space Station's Environmental Health System (EHS) air quality monitoring strategy to provide warning to the crew and ground personnel if volatile organic compounds exceed established exposure limits. The short duration of most Shuttle flights and the relative simplicity of the contaminant removal mechanism have lessened the concern about crew exposure to air contaminants on the Shuttle. However, the longer missions associated with the Space Station, the complex air revitalization system and the proposed number of experiments have led to a desire for real-time monitoring of the contaminants in the Space Station atmosphere. Achieving the performance requirements established for the VOA within the Space Station resource (e.g., power, weight) allocations led to a novel approach that joined a gas chromatograph (GC) to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors of this paper will discuss the rational for selecting the GC/IMS technology as opposed to the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the foundation of the VOA. The data presented from preliminary evaluations will demonstrate the versatile capability of the GC/IMS to analyze the major contaminants expected in the Space Station atmosphere. The favorable GC/IMS characteristics illustrated in this paper included excellent sensitivity, dual-mode operation for selective detection, and mobility drift times to distinguish co-eluting GC peaks. Preliminary studies have shown that the GC/IMS technology can meet surpass the performance requirements of the Space Station VOA.

  20. A rapid analysis of plasma/serum ethylene and propylene glycol by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Alexandra; Morris, Cory; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2013-12-01

    A rapid headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the analysis of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol in plasma and serum specimens using 1,3-propanediol as the internal standard. The method employed a single-step derivitization using phenylboronic acid, was linear to 200 mg/dL and had a lower limit of quantitation of 1 mg/dL suitable for clinical analyses. The analytical method described allows for laboratories with HS-GC instrumentation to analyze ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, ethylene glycol, and propylene glycol on a single instrument with rapid switch-over from alcohols to glycols analysis. In addition to the novel HS-GC method, a retrospective analysis of patient specimens containing ethylene glycol and propylene glycol was also described. A total of 36 patients ingested ethylene glycol, including 3 patients who presented with two separate admissions for ethylene glycol toxicity. Laboratory studies on presentation to hospital for these patients showed both osmolal and anion gap in 13 patients, osmolal but not anion gap in 13 patients, anion but not osmolal gap in 8 patients, and 1 patient with neither an osmolal nor anion gap. Acidosis on arterial blood gas was present in 13 cases. Only one fatality was seen; this was a patient with initial serum ethylene glycol concentration of 1282 mg/dL who died on third day of hospitalization. Propylene glycol was common in patients being managed for toxic ingestions, and was often attributed to iatrogenic administration of propylene glycol-containing medications such as activated charcoal and intravenous lorazepam. In six patients, propylene glycol contributed to an abnormally high osmolal gap. The common presence of propylene glycol in hospitalized patients emphasizes the importance of being able to identify both ethylene glycol and propylene glycol by chromatographic methods. PMID:23741644

  1. Innovations in high-pressure liquid injection technique for gas chromatography: pressurized liquid injection system.

    PubMed

    Luong, Jim; Gras, Ronda; Tymko, Richard

    2003-01-01

    In gas chromatography (GC), highly volatile liquefied hydrocarbons are commonly injected using devices such as high-pressure syringes, piston valves, liquid rotary sampling valves, or vaporizing regulators. Although these techniques are adequate in some cases, there are known deficiencies. A new generation of sampling valve has been recently innovated and commercialized. Some of the highlights of the pressurized liquid injection system (PLIS) include compact size, the capability to directly couple to an injection port without the need for preinjection vaporization and transfer lines, and sample sizes ranging from 0.2 to 2.0 micro L. Although the valve has a specification of helium leak-free rating of 82.7 bar (1200 psig), the valve passes a hydrostatic pressure test of up to 414 bar (6000 psig). In the unheated version of PLIS, vaporization of solutes occur mainly because of the sheering effect of carrier gas in combination with thermal energy drawn from an injection port or a heated adaptor. This was found to be adequate for solutes with high to medium volatility of up to nC14 hydrocarbon. A higher molecular weight range of up to nC44 hydrocarbon can be achieved with the implementation of a heated version of PLIS, in which the channel of the shaft can be resistively heated at a rate of up to 400 degrees C/s. With its first introduction in May 2002, PLIS has gained acceptance amongst practitioners in GC because it addresses a key unarticulated need in sample introduction/enrichment and by specifically targeting many deficiencies encountered in contemporary high-pressure injection devices. In this paper, the design and performance of the various valve systems of PLIS, as well as industrial chromatographic applications, is presented. PMID:14629794

  2. Isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine for stable isotope analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-09-01

    A method for the isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine is described that allows stable isotope determinations of taurine to be made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The isolation procedure can be applied to 0.1 ml of plasma; the recovery of plasma taurine was 70 to 80%. For gc separation, taurine was converted to its dimethylaminomethylene methyl ester derivative which could not be detected by hydrogen flame ionization, but could be monitored readily by NH/sub 3/ chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The derivatization reaction occurred partially on-column and required optimization of injection conditions. Using stable isotope ratiometry multiple ion detection, (M + 2 + H)/sup +//(M + H)/sup +/ ion ratio of natural abundance taurine was determined with a standard deviation of less than +-0.07% of the ratio. The (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine/taurine mole ratios of standard mixtures could be accurately determined to 0.001. This stable isotope gc-ms method is suitable for studying the plasma kinetics of (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine in infants who are at risk with respect to taurine depletion.

  3. Determination of methacrylic acid in food simulants by pyrolytic butylation-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongping; Qiu, Ruofeng; Liu, Tingfei; Huang, Yilei; Zhu, Zuoyi; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-01

    An on-line pyrolytic butylation approach was proposed to determine methacrylic acid (MA) in food simulants by gas chromatography (GC) without an expensive pyrolyzer. MA in food simulants was converted into butyl methacrylate in the presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) without any pretreatment at 330°C in the injection-port, contributing to high GC signal response. The derivatizing conditions for the proposed method were optimized, namely the injection-port temperature, type and amount of the organic alkaline used for derivatization. A series of standard solutions of MA in the range of 1.0-50mg/kg were analyzed with correlation coefficient r≥0.9975. The limits of detection (LODs) were less than 0.15mg/kg for MA in four matrix simulants (distilled water, 3%w/v acetic acid, 10%v/v ethanol, and isooctane). Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for retention time, peak height and peak area were all less than 3.88%. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of MA migrating from plastic cup samples, with recoveries of added MA in the range of 96.5-123.0%. Direct injection of the simulants into the GC system after migration tests, without any pretreatment step, makes the developed method of great value for rapid screening analysis of samples in bulks. PMID:27262371

  4. Profiling of Serum Metabolites in Canine Lymphoma Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    TAMAI, Reo; FURUYA, Masaru; HATOYA, Shingo; AKIYOSHI, Hideo; YAMAMOTO, Ryohei; KOMORI, Yoshiaki; YOKOI, Shin-ichi; TANI, Kenichiro; HIRANO, Yuji; KOMORI, Masayuki; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Canine lymphoma is a common cancer that has high rates of complete remission with combination chemotherapy. However, the duration of remission varies based on multiple factors, and there is a need to develop a method for early detection of recurrence. In this study, we compared the metabolites profiles in serum from 21 dogs with lymphoma and 13 healthy dogs using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The lymphoma group was separated from the control group in an orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) plot using ions of m/z 100–600, indicating that the metabolites profiles in lymphoma cases differed from those in healthy dogs. The lymphoma group was also separated from the control group on OPLS-DA plot using 29 metabolites identified in all serum samples. Significant differences were found for 16 of these metabolites with higher levels in the lymphoma group for 15 of the metabolites and lower levels for inositol. An OPLS-DA plot showed separation of the lymphoma and healthy groups using these 16 metabolites only. These results indicate that metabolites profile with GC-MS may be a useful tool for detection of potential biomarker and diagnosis of canine lymphoma. PMID:25131950

  5. Fluoro-substituted tetraphenyl-phenyl grafted polysiloxanes as highly selective stationary phases for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; He, Xinxin; Wang, Huan; Wang, Bing; Wu, Bo

    2016-06-01

    In this work, two new types of polycyclic aromatic grafted polysiloxanes, namely, 3,4-bis(4-fluoro phenyl)-2,5-diphenyl polysiloxane (FPP) and 3,4-bis(3,4,5-trifluoro phenyl)-2,5-diphenyl polysiloxane (TFPP), were synthesized and statically coated onto capillary columns as stationary phases for gas chromatography (GC). Based on their McReynolds constants, both columns exhibited moderate polarity. The efficiencies of the FPP and TFPP columns were 3316 (k=3.96, naphthalene; 0.25mm inner diameter) and 3768 (k=4.14, naphthalene; 0.25mm inner diameter) plates/m, respectively. The thermostability of the polymers was tested by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and results revealed that both TFPP and FPP began to decompose slightly at 380°C. Separation of polyethylene pyrolysis products showed that the upper working temperature of the two columns can reach up to 360°C. Relying on their unique polarizable characteristics in combination with other types of interactions, such as H-bond acceptor, dipole-dipole, and dispersive interactions, the newly synthesized polarizable stationary phases offered unique selectivity for aromatic isomers and substituted benzenes. A slight separation difference between TPP and TFPP was observed. TFPP also exerted excellent selectivity for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fatty acid esters, and fatty alcohols. Overall, FPP and TFPP demonstrated considerable potential for further applications because of their unique structures and outstanding separation performance. PMID:27139216

  6. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  7. Determination of steroidal estrogens in flushed dairy manure wastewater by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Travis A; Graetz, Donald A; Wilkie, Ann C; Szabo, Nancy J; Diaz, Carolyn S

    2006-01-01

    There is a critical need to accurately measure the concentrations of natural steroidal estrogens in flushed dairy manure wastewater (FDMW) to assess any potential risk of waterway contamination resulting from land application. Estrogens are a concern because low concentrations (10-100 ng L-1) in water can adversely affect aquatic vertebrate species such as fish, turtles, and frogs by disrupting the normal function of their endocrine systems. The objective of this study was to develop a sample preparation method that permits the quantification of four natural steroidal estrogens (17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and estriol) in FDMW by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Solid-phase extraction with graphitized carbon black was used for the bulk extraction of estrogens from FDMW and additional sample purification was accomplished with C-18. The sample preparation method allowed estrogens to be detected accurately by GC-MS in FDMW. Spiked recovery experiments indicated that the method is satisfactory for measuring the estrogens of interest in FDMW with average recovery of >90%. As expected in FDMW, characterization of the estrogen profile revealed a large abundance of 17alpha-estradiol relative to 17beta-estradiol and estrone. Estriol was not detected in FDMW. The methodology developed in this research helps provide an analytical foundation for the quantification of steroidal estrogens in FDMW by GC-MS. PMID:16585610

  8. Gas Chromatography Data Classification Based on Complex Coefficients of an Autoregressive Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Weixiang; Morgan, Joshua T.; Davis, Cristina E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces autoregressive (AR) modeling as a novel method to classify outputs from gas chromatography (GC). The inverse Fourier transformation was applied to the original sensor data, and then an AR model was applied to transform data to generate AR model complex coefficients. This series of coefficients effectively contains a compressed version of all of the information in the original GC signal output. We applied this method to chromatograms resulting from proliferating bacteria species grown in culture. Three types of neural networks were used to classify the AR coefficients: backward propagating neural network (BPNN), radial basis function-principal component analysismore » (RBF-PCA) approach, and radial basis function-partial least squares regression (RBF-PLSR) approach. This exploratory study demonstrates the feasibility of using complex root coefficient patterns to distinguish various classes of experimental data, such as those from the different bacteria species. This cognition approach also proved to be robust and potentially useful for freeing us from time alignment of GC signals.« less

  9. Microscale analysis of amino acids using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ping; Yang, Xiao-Yuan; Hegeman, Adrian D; Gray, William M; Cohen, Jerry D

    2010-08-15

    To conduct studies of stable isotope incorporation and dilution in growing plants, a rapid microscale method for determination of amino acid profiles from minute amounts of plant samples was developed. The method involves solid-phase ion exchange followed by derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The procedure allowed the eluent to be derivatized directly with methyl chloroformate without sample lyophilization or other evaporation procedures. Sample extraction and derivatization required only ca. 30min and quantification of the 19 amino acids eluted from the cation exchange solid-phase extraction step from a single cotyledon (0.4mg fresh weight) or three etiolated 7-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings (0.1mg fresh weight) was easily accomplished in the selected ion monitoring mode. This method was especially useful for monitoring mass isotopic distribution of amino acids as illustrated by Arabidopsis seedlings that had been labeled with deuterium oxide and (15)N salts. Sample preparation was facile, rapid, economical, and the method is easily modified for integration into robotic systems for analysis with large numbers of samples. PMID:20663719

  10. Metabolomic profiling in inner ear fluid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Irino, Yasuhiro; Kitamoto, Junko; Fukuda, Yuriko; Inokuchi, Go; Hasegawa, Shingo; Otsuki, Naoki; Yoshida, Masaru; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2015-10-01

    The composition and homeostasis of inner ear fluids are important in hearing function. The purpose of this study was to perform metabolomic analysis of the inner ear fluid in guinea pig cochlea, which has not been previously reported in literature, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seventy-seven kinds of metabolites were detected in the inner ear fluid. Six metabolites, ascorbic acid, fructose, galactosamine, inositol, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, and meso-erythritol, were significantly more abundant, and nine metabolites, phosphate, valine, glycine, glycerol, ornithine, glucose, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, were less abundant in the inner ear fluid than in plasma. The levels of ten metabolites, 3-hydroxy-butyrate, glycerol, fumaric acid, galactosamine, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, phosphate, meso-erythritol, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and inositol, in the inner ear fluid significantly changed after loud noise exposure. These observations may help to elucidate various clinical conditions of sensorineural hearing loss, including noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:26343935

  11. Determination of Selected Phthalates by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in Personal Perfumes.

    PubMed

    Orecchio, Santino; Indelicato, Roberta; Barreca, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    A simple and fast method is proposed to analyze commercial personal perfumes. Our method includes measurement of phthalates, known to be major sources of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDC), which originate from the less volatile fraction of perfumes. The quantification of phthalates were carried out directly with no sample preparation required on 30 samples of commercial products using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a detector. The total concentrations of 15 investigated compounds ranged from 17 to 9650 mg/L with an average of 2643 mg/L. The highest total concentration was found in cologne. Diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were detected in appreciable concentrations. Further, it was found that the composition of counterfeit samples varied widely from that of authentic products. The composition of old products was different from that of recent perfumes, which contain less harmful chemicals, attributed to the ban on some phthalates in Europe due their toxicity. It should be noted that older and contaminated products are not equivalent to authentic products when considering quality, safety, and probably effectiveness. Older and nonapproved perfumes contain chemicals that are not allowed for commercial use and may contain toxic impurities. PMID:26262443

  12. [Determination of hexabromocyclododecane in coatings by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Xue, Qiuhong; Tao, Lin; Ye, Xiwen; Liang, Shengkang; Li, Yanqiu; Niu, Zengyuan

    2013-08-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in fire proof coatings by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The sample was extracted with dichloromethane and purified through an organic membrane before analysis with GC-MS. The characteristic fragments (m/z 157, 239, 319, 401) and the quantitative ion (m/z 239) were selected. With the optimized conditions, the good linear relationship was obtained between the peak area and the mass concentration of HBCD in the range of 5 to 100 mg/L with the correlation coefficient more than 0. 999. The spiked recoveries in the coatings of acrylic and epoxy resins were 92.9% - 116.3% with the RSDs not more than 8%. The LOD (S/N > or = 3) of HBCD was 30 microg/g, and the LOQ (S/N > or = 10) was 100 microg/g, which were much lower than the international maximum residue limit. The method is simple, quick, accurate and precise, which can meet the requirements of the European Commission Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 and Norway PoHS instruction (Prohibition on Certain Hazardous Substances in Consumer Products) for the determination of HBCD. It is suitable for the analysis of HBCD in fire proof coatings. PMID:24369615

  13. Metabolomic study of aging in mouse plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Chan; Hwang, Yun-Ho; Kim, Youngbae; Joo, Bo Sun; Yee, Sung-Tae; Kim, Cheol Min; Paik, Man-Jeong

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomic analysis of aging was performed in plasma samples of young (8 weeks) and old (72 weeks) mice as ethoxycarbonyl/methoxime/tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). As new approaches, study of altered metabolism from aging was attempted by simultaneous profiling analysis of amino acids (AAs), organic acids (OAs) and fatty acids (FAs) by GC-MS in a single run combined with pattern analysis. As a result, 27 amino acids (AAs), 17 organic acids (OAs) and 24 fatty acids (FAs) were positively screened with large variations in plasma samples. Among altered metabolites, levels of six AAs (proline, methionine, 4-hydroxyproline, pipecolic acid, glutamic acid, α-aminoadipic acid) as neurotransmetters and nutrients, five OAs (2-hydroxybutyric acid, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid, cis-aconitic acid citric acid, isocitric acid) including intermediate metabolites in the TCA cycle, and three n-3 polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) of α-octadecatrienoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid as potential biomarkers were significantly different between young and old groups. Their levels were normalized to the corresponding mean values of the young group and then plotted into star symbol patterns, which were clearly distinct compared with numerical data and readily distinguishable for young and old groups. Thus, the present metabolomic screening and the star pattern recognition method might be useful for understanding the complexity of biochemical events in aging. PMID:27183212

  14. Aircraft measurements of nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacetyl nitrates using luminol chemiluminescence with fast capillary gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Steele, H.D.; Drayton, P.J.; Hubbe, J.M.

    1999-10-01

    Fast capillary gas chromatography with luminol detection has been used to make airborne measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). The analysis system allows for the simultaneous measurement of NO{sub 2} and peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) with time resolution of less than 1 min, and improvement of a factor of 4--5 over previously reported methods using electron capture detection. Data presented were taken near Pasco, Washington, in August 1997, during a test flight onboard the US Department of Energy G-1 aircraft. The authors report measurements of NO{sub 2} in the boundary layer in a paper mill plume and a plume from a grass fire, in addition to analyses for free tropospheric NO{sub 2} and PAN. Ratios of PAN/NO{sub 2} were observed to increase with altitude (decreasing temperature) and to reach values of 2--4 above the boundary layer, consistent with the thermal equilibrium of the peroxyacetyl radical and NO{sub 2} and PAN. Estimates for the peroxyacetyl radical in the continental free troposphere, calculated from this equilibrium, were found to be in the range of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} molecules per cubic centimeter. These results demonstrate the application of this approach for airborne measurements of NO{sub 2} and PAN in a wide range of field study scenarios.

  15. Analysis of endogenous aldehydes in human urine by static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Serrano, María; Gallego, Mercedes; Silva, Manuel

    2016-03-11

    Endogenous aldehydes (EAs) generated during oxidative stress and cell processes are associated with many pathogenic and toxicogenic processes. The aim of this research was to develop a solvent-free and automated analytical method for the determination of EAs in human urine using a static headspace generator sampler coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS). Twelve significant EAs used as markers of different biochemical and physiological processes, namely short- and medium-chain alkanals, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyl aldehydes have been selected as target analytes. Human urine samples (no dilution is required) were derivatized with O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine in alkaline medium (hydrogen carbonate-carbonate buffer, pH 10.3). The HS-GC-MS method developed renders an efficient tool for the sensitive and precise determination of EAs in human urine with limits of detection from 1 to 15ng/L and relative standard deviations, (RSDs) from 6.0 to 7.9%. Average recoveries by enriching urine samples ranged between 92 and 95%. Aldehydes were readily determined at 0.005-50μg/L levels in human urine from healthy subjects, smokers and diabetic adults. PMID:26879451

  16. Determination of Menthol in Plasma and Urine by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Frazee, Clint; Kearns, Gregory; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Menthol, a monoterpene, is a principal component of peppermint oil and is used extensively in consumer products as a flavoring aid. It is also commonly used medicinally as a topical skin coolant; to treat inflammation of the mucous membranes, digestive problems, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); and in preventing spasms during endoscopy and for its spasmolytic effect on the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract. Menthol has a half life of 3-6 h and is rapidly metabolized to menthol glucuronide which is detectable in urine and serum following menthol use. We describe a method for the determination of total menthol in human plasma and urine using liquid/liquid extraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selected ion monitoring mode and menthol-d4 as the internal standard. Controls are prepared with menthol glucuronide and all samples undergo enzymatic hydrolysis for the quantification of total menthol. The method has a linear range of 5-1000 ng/mL, and coefficient of variation <10%. PMID:26660189

  17. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  18. Identification of tartary buckwheat tea aroma compounds with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peiyou; Ma, Tingjun; Wu, Li; Shan, Fang; Ren, Guixing

    2011-08-01

    Tartary buckwheat tea, which is an important and healthy product, has a distinct malty aroma. However, its characteristic aroma compounds have not been elucidated. The aims of present study were identification and quantification of its aroma compounds. The analyses were performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after 3 different isolation techniques. Seventy-seven compounds were identified. Among these compounds, 35 were quantified by available standards. The compounds with a high probability of contribution to the tartary buckwheat tea aroma (OAV ≥ 10) were as follows: 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone, nonanal, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, benzeneacetaldehyde, maltol, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, trimethylpyrazine. Some nutritional and bioactive compounds were also identified in this study, such as linoleic acid, niacin, vanillic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin, butylated hydroxytoluene. Practical Application: Tartary buckwheat, one type of buckwheat, has gained much attention from nutritionists and medical doctors in recent years. It is rich in rutin, quercetin, and other nutrients that are good for health. Tartary buckwheat-based product such as tartary buckwheat tea is an important and popular healthy product in China, Japan,South Korea, European countries as well as in American countries. It has a distinct malty aroma. The present study first identified and quantified of its aroma compounds. The results will draw attention to other researchers in food flavor and buckwheat filed. PMID:22417522

  19. Characterisation of the volatile fraction of aromatic caramel using heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Paravisini, Laurianne; Prot, Aurélie; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Moretton, Cédric; Nigay, Henri; Dacremont, Catherine; Guichard, Elisabeth

    2015-01-15

    The first aim of our study was to improve characterisation of the volatile fraction of aromatic caramel by applying heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and olfactometry (MDGC-MS-O) on targeted odorant fractions. The second aim was to compare the volatile composition of two caramel samples, which differed in terms of their carbohydrate composition and cooking process. MDGC analyses enabled identification of 37 compounds (17 with the addition of pure standard) in the burnt sugar caramel, 20 of which were reported for the first time in caramel. Fifteen compounds were identified as odour-active and described using a range of attributes such as floral, roasted, spicy and almond. Furans, lactones and acids resulting from the thermal breakdown of sugars predominated in the volatile fraction of the burnt sugar caramel, due to the harsher cooking conditions. Finally, these results have enabled a clearer understanding of aromatic caramel as well as the identification of new compounds which might make an important contribution to its aroma. PMID:25148990

  20. Pharmaceuticals in grocery market fish fillets by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mottaleb, Musavvir Arafat; Stowe, Carly; Johnson, Daniel R; Meziani, Mohammed J; Mottaleb, M Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Occurrences of pharmaceuticals are evident in aquatic organisms. A reproducible gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method using selected ion monitoring (SIM) has been used to determine the anti-histamine diphenhydramine (DPH), anti-anxiety diazepam (DZP), anti-seizure carbamazepine (CZP) drugs and their metabolites in grocery stores fish that were homogenized, extracted, pre-concentrated, cleaned up, and examined. Identifications of the compounds in extracts were obtained by comparing similar mass spectral features and retention properties with standards. Among nine frequently detected drugs, only DPH and DZP were observed and ranged from 0.61 to 6.21 and 1.99 to 16.57 ng/g, respectively, in fourteen fish species. These concentration values were lower than the environmental fish. Mean spike recoveries of analytes exceeded 75% with relative standard deviations (RSD)<10%. The statistically-derived method detection limits (MDLs) for nine compounds ranged from 0.13 to 5.56 ng/g. Average surrogate recoveries were 80-85% with 4-9% RSD. PMID:26213006

  1. Characterisation of varnishes used in violins by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiavari, Giuseppe; Montalbani, Simona; Otero, Vanessa

    2008-12-01

    The correct characterisation and a detailed knowledge of the materials originally used in violin varnishes, like natural resins, is crucial for the conservation in museums and for a suitable restoration technique. The study presented here reports on the potential of pyrolysis (Py) coupled with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS) for the identification of chemical markers of each resin; this technique is very sensitive and selective, it needs a small quantity of sample and does not require chemical treatments. To improve the chromatographic behaviour of polar compounds the derivatising agent tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in combination with pyrolysis has been used, in the so-called TMAH thermochemolysis or thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM), or more simply pyrolysis-methylation. The natural resins studied were colophony, sandarac, manila copal, elemi, amber and benzoin, mainly composed of terpenic compounds, with the exception of the latter, composed of aromatic compounds. Many compounds were identified; in particular, methyl esters of resinous acids that, individually or in a group, can be used as chemical markers. However, through this technique it was not possible to distinguish between the sandarac and manila copal resins because their chromatographic behaviour is very similar. Finally, the procedure applied has been employed in the characterisation of original varnish samples. PMID:18973195

  2. [Dead time determination of the second dimension in a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Kong, Hongwei; Ye, Fen; Lu, Xin; Dong, Mingquan; Guo, Lei; Xu, Guowang

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) is rapidly gaining importance for the analysis of complex samples. In order to predict chromatogram and optimize the operational conditions, the dead time of each dimension should be obtained exactly. Two methods to calculate the dead time of the second dimension were introduced. In the first method, based on the relationship between the time differences of a series of n-alkanes substances and the apparent retention times under different pressures, the true retention time can be calculated for non-synchronous GC x GC. The retention times of homologous series were used to calculate the dead time. Another rapid method to calculate the dead time of the second dimension is based on three or more apparent retention times in a single temperature programmed chromatographic run. The results show that the dead time of the second dimension can be calculated successfully by using the proposed methods and the deviation between the two methods is less than 0.05 s. PMID:15881364

  3. Sediment matrix effects in analysis of pyrethroid insecticides using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongli; You, Jing; Lydy, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, we developed a gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry method for analyzing nine pyrethroid insecticides in sediment after accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction cleanup. The operation was optimized, and negative chemical ionization was selected to improve analytical selectivity. The sediment matrix effects on qualification were evaluated, and matrix-matched standard solutions, along with the internal standard calibration, were used to reduce the matrix-induced chromatographic response enhancement. The method detection limits were 0.68 to 1.43 microg/kg dry weight (dw), and recoveries were 70.3 to 143.3%, 61.1 to 169.7%, and 65.7 to 118.8%, with relative SDs of 4.2% to 32.1%, 4.9 to 23.6%, and 1.5 to 23.3% at the spiked levels of 1.0, 5.0 and 20 microg/kg dw, respectively. The method was also validated by measuring pyrethroids in field-contaminated sediment samples collected in central California and southern Illinois. PMID:20340013

  4. Fast detection of coliform bacteria by means of gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saptalena, Lena Ganda; Kuklya, Andriy; Telgheder, Ursula

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the combination of an enzymatic method (based on Colilert-18 medium) and gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) can reduce the time required for detection of coliform bacteria (including Escherichia coli) from 18 to 2.5 h. The presented method includes the incubation (~2.5 h) of the sample containing coliform bacteria in Colilert-18 medium. The incubation time of 2.5 h is required for the activation of the β-galactosidase enzyme. Produced during the incubation biomarker o-nitrophenol (ONP) can be detected by means of GC-DMS within just 200 s. The detection limit for ONP was 45 ng (on-column). The method developed in this work provides significantly shorter analysis time compared with standard methods, and can be potentially adapted to the field conditions. Therefore, this method is a promising tool for an early detection of coliform bacteria (including E. coli). Graphical Abstract Fast detection of coliform bacteria by means of GC-DMS. PMID:27002609

  5. Analysis of volatile compounds of Malaysian Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) honey using gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nurul Syazana, M S; Gan, S H; Halim, A S; Shah, Nurul Syazana Mohamad; Gan, Siew Hua; Sukari, Halim Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The constituents of honey's volatile compounds depend on the nectar source and differ depending on the place of origin. To date, the volatile constituents of Tualang honey have never been investigated. The objective of this study was to analyze the volatile compounds in local Malaysian Tualang honey. A continuous extraction of Tualang honey using five organic solvents was carried out starting from non-polar to polar solvents and the extracted samples were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Overall, 35 volatile compounds were detected. Hydrocarbons constitute 58.5% of the composition of Tualang honey. Other classes of chemical compounds detected included acids, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, terpenes, furans and a miscellaneous group. Methanol yielded the highest number of extracted compounds such as acids and 5-(Hydroxymethyl) furfural (HMF). This is the first study to describe the volatile compounds in Tualang honey. The use of a simple one tube, stepwise, non-thermal liquid-liquid extraction of honey is a advantageous as it prevents sample loss. Further research to test the clinical benefits of these volatile compounds is recommended. PMID:24146441

  6. The utilisation of two detectors for the determination of water in honey using headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Frink, Lillian A; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-08-15

    A headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) method was developed for the determination of water content in honey. This method was shown to work with five different honey varieties which had a range of water from 14-16%. It also utilised two different detectors, the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and the barrier discharge ionisation detector (BID). This method needs no heating pretreatment step as in the current leading method, (i.e. the measurement of refractive index). The solvent-free procedure negates the possibility of solvent-compound interactions as well as solubility limitations, as is common with Karl Fischer titrations. It was also apparent that the classic loss on drying method consistently and substantially produced results that were lower than the correct values. This approach is shown to be rapid, with an analysis time of 4 min when using the TCD detector and under 3 min when utilising the BID detector. HSGC is feasible for the determination of water due to the new PEG-linked geminal dicationic ionic-liquid-coated GC capillary column. In addition it provides accurate and precise determinations of the water content in honey. When using the sensitive BID detector, other trace volatile compounds are observed as well. PMID:27006209

  7. Improved sensitivity gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of parabens in waters using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure for the introduction of ionic liquid samples in gas chromatography (GC) is proposed. This procedure, based on microvial insert thermal desorption, allows the direct analysis of the compounds preconcentrated by ionic liquid based liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-LLME) using the combination of a thermal desorption unit (TDU) and a programmed temperature vaporization injector (PTV). Two different IL-LLME methodologies, one based on the formation of a microdroplet emulsion by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other through ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) were studied and evaluated. IL-DLLME proved advantageous and consequently, it was adopted for preconcentration purposes. This easy to apply approach was used for the determination of five parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and isobutyl paraben) in swimming pool waters, after in situ acetylation. The optimized conditions of TDU/PTV allowed the analytes contained in 20 µL of the enriched IL to be transferred to the capillary column. Quantification of the samples was carried out against aqueous standards, and quantification limits of between 4.3 and 8.1 ng L(-1) were obtained, depending on the compound. Concentrations of between 9 and 47 ng L(-1) for some analytes were obtained in the analysis of ten samples. PMID:26695305

  8. Vinegar Metabolomics: An Explorative Study of Commercial Balsamic Vinegars Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pinu, Farhana R; de Carvalho-Silva, Samuel; Trovatti Uetanabaro, Ana Paula; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2016-01-01

    Balsamic vinegar is a popular food condiment produced from cooked grape must by two successive fermentation (anaerobic and aerobic) processes. Although many studies have been performed to determine the composition of major metabolites, including sugars and aroma compounds, no study has been undertaken yet to characterize the comprehensive metabolite composition of balsamic vinegars. Here, we present the first metabolomics study of commercial balsamic vinegars by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The combination of three GC-MS methods allowed us to detect >1500 features in vinegar samples, of which 123 metabolites were accurately identified, including 25 amino acids, 26 carboxylic acids, 13 sugars and sugar alcohols, four fatty acids, one vitamin, one tripeptide and over 47 aroma compounds. Moreover, we identified for the first time in vinegar five volatile metabolites: acetin, 2-methylpyrazine, 2-acetyl-1-pyroline, 4-anisidine and 1,3-diacetoxypropane. Therefore, we demonstrated the capability of metabolomics for detecting and identifying large number of metabolites and some of them could be used to distinguish vinegar samples based on their origin and potentially quality. PMID:27455339

  9. Isotopic exchange during derivatization of platelet activating factor for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, P.E.; Gaskell, S.J.; Weintraub, S.T.; Pinckard, R.N. )

    1991-04-01

    One approach to the quantitative analysis of platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine; also referred to as AGEPC, alkyl glyceryl ether phosphocholine) is hydrolytic removal of the phosphocholine group and conversion to an electron-capturing derivative for gas chromatography-negative ion mass spectrometry. (2H3)Acetyl-AGEPC has been commonly employed as an internal standard. When 1-hexadecyl-2-(2H3)acetyl glycerol (obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of (2H3)-C16:0 AGEPC) is treated with pentafluorobenzoyl chloride at 120 degrees C, the resulting 3-pentafluorobenzoate derivative shows extensive loss of the deuterium label. This exchange is evidently acid-catalyzed since derivatization of 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl glycerol under the same conditions in the presence of a trace of 2HCl results in the incorporation of up to three deuterium atoms. Isotope exchange can be avoided if the reaction is carried out at low temperature in the presence of base. Direct derivatization of (2H3)-C16:0 AGEPC by treatment with pentafluorobenzoyl chloride or heptafluorobutyric anhydride also results in loss of the deuterium label. The use of (13C2)-C16:0 AGEPC as an internal standard is recommended for rigorous quantitative analysis.

  10. Practical criteria for classifying kerogens: Some observations from pyrolysis-gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, B.

    1989-04-01

    Two pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC) techniques were used to gain a succinct perspective of kerogen composition and structure which, by comparison with ( 13C NMR data, appears to be representative of the kerogen structure in toto. One-step Py-GC was used to determine the chain length distribution of selected compounds in kerogen pyrolysates and, by correlation with petroleum composition, to construct a scheme for evaluating kerogen quality. This scheme indicates that, inter alia, hydrogen-deficiency is not unequivocally synonymous with inferior oil potential, and waxy crude oil can be generated from both aquatic and terrigenous organic matter. Sequential two-step Py-GC allowed kerogen composition to be further defined in terms of how petroleum precursors are distributed throughout the kerogen macro-structure (homogeneously or heterogeneously) and the ease with which these precursors are released during pyrolysis ( maturation characteristics). Routinely defining kerogen types according to not only genetic potential (from Rock-Eval) but also the aforementioned criteria is therefore a step towards unifying kerogen geochemistry and petroleum geochemistry. Maturation characteristics play a crucial role in defining the nature of the oil generation window, particularly as regards assessing the relative roles played by (1) precursor depletion and (2) product cracking, in defining the upper maturity limit of oil generation.

  11. Rapid determination of acrylamide contaminant in conventional fried foods by gas chromatography with electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Dong, Yi; Ren, Yiping; Zhang, Ying

    2006-05-26

    Gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was successfully developed and applied for the rapid determination of acrylamide in conventional fried foods, such as potato crisps, potato chips, and fried chicken wings. The method included defatting with n-hexane, extraction with aqueous solution of sodium chloride (NaCl), derivatization with potassium bromate (KBrO3) and potassium bromide (KBr), and liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The final acrylamide extract was analyzed by GC-ECD for quantification and by GC-MS for confirmation. The chromatographic analysis was performed on the HP-INNOWax capillary column, and good retention and peak response of acrylamide were achieved under the optimal conditions (numbers of theoretical plates N = 83,815). The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.1 microg kg(-1) on the basis of ECD technique. Recoveries of acrylamide from conventional samples spiked at levels of 150, 500 and 1000 microg kg(-1) (n = 4 for each level) ranged between 87 and 97% with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 4%. Furthermore, the GC-ECD method showed that no clean-up steps of acrylamide derivative would be performed prior to injection and was slightly more sensitive than the MS/MS-based methods. Validation and quantification results demonstrated that this method should be regarded as a new, low-cost, and robust alternative for conventional investigation of acrylamide. PMID:16580677

  12. A systematic analysis of a flow-switching modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laclair, Russell W; Bueno, Pedro A; Seeley, John V

    2004-04-01

    A simple flow-switching device has been designed for use as a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography modulator. The device is constructed from fused silica tubing, t-unions, and a solenoid valve. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the influence of primary flow, secondary flow, modulation time, and device dimensions on the performance of the modulator. The flow-switching device was found to produce pulses with widths near the theoretical minimum. High-performance was maintained over a wide range of modulation times. The flow-switching device did not introduce extra broadening along the primary retention axis. However, the modulator performance was optimal only over a narrow range of primary to secondary flow ratios. The ideal flow ratio is determined by the dimensions of the tubes that connect the t-unions. A simple flow resistance model has been developed that can predict the dimensions that will produce optimal results for a specified primary to secondary flow ratio. Thus, it is possible to construct a device that operates near the theoretical limit without numerous alterations. Under optimal conditions, the flow switching modulator generates peaks that are narrower than those produced by a diaphragm valve. PMID:15335074

  13. Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of fragrance allergens in baby bathwater.

    PubMed

    Lamas, J Pablo; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2009-07-01

    A method based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized for the determination of fragrance allergens in water samples. This is the first study devoted to this family of cosmetic ingredients performed by SPME. The influence of parameters such as fibre coating, extraction and desorption temperatures, salting-out effect and sampling mode on the extraction efficiency has been studied by means of a mixed-level factorial design, which allowed the study of the main effects as well as two-factor interactions. Excluding desorption temperature, the other parameters were, in general, very important for the achievement of high response. The final procedure was based on headspace sampling at 100 degrees C, using polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fibres. The method showed good linearity and precision for all compounds, with detection limits ranging from 0.001 to 0.3 ng mL(-1). Reliability was demonstrated through the evaluation of the recoveries in different real water samples, including baby bathwater and swimming pool water. The absence of matrix effects allowed the use of external standard calibration to quantify the target compounds in the samples. The proposed procedure was applied to the determination of allergens in several real samples. All the target compounds were found in the samples, and, in some cases, at quite high concentrations. The presence and the levels of these chemicals in baby bathwater should be a matter of concern. PMID:19458938

  14. Detection of metabolites of trapped humans using ion mobility spectrometry coupled with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vautz, Wolfgang; Slodzynski, Rafael; Hariharan, Chandrasekhara; Seifert, Luzia; Nolte, Jürgen; Fobbe, Rita; Sielemann, Stefanie; Lao, Bolan C; Huo, Ran; Thomas, C L Paul; Hildebrand, Lars

    2013-02-19

    For the first time, ion mobility spectrometry coupled with rapid gas chromatography, using multicapillary columns, was applied for the development of a pattern of signs of life for the localization of entrapped victims after disaster events (e.g., earthquake, terroristic attack). During a simulation experiment with entrapped volunteers, 12 human metabolites could be detected in the air of the void with sufficient sensitivity to enable a valid decision on the presence of a living person. Using a basic normalized summation of the measured concentrations, all volunteers involved in the particular experiments could be recognized only few minutes after they entered the simulation void and after less than 3 min of analysis time. An additional independent validation experiment enabled the recognition of a person in a room of ∼25 m(3) after ∼30 min with sufficiently high sensitivity to detect even a person briefly leaving the room. Undoubtedly, additional work must be done on analysis time and weight of the equipment, as well as on validation during real disaster events. However, the enormous potential of the method as a significantly helpful tool for search-and-rescue operations, in addition to trained canines, could be demonstrated. PMID:23249433

  15. High-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for skin surface lipids profiling[S

    PubMed Central

    Michael-Jubeli, Rime; Bleton, Jean; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2011-01-01

    Skin surface lipids (SSLs) arising from both sebaceous glands and skin removal form a complex lipid mixture composed of free fatty acids and neutral lipids. High-temperature gas chromatography coupled with electron impact or chemical ionization mass spectrometry was used to achieve a simple analytical protocol, without prior separation in classes and without prior cleavage of lipid molecules, in order to obtain simultaneously i) a qualitative characterization of the individual SSLs and ii) a quantitative evaluation of lipid classes. The method was first optimized with SSLs collected from the forehead of a volunteer. More than 200 compounds were identified in the same run. These compounds have been classified in five lipid classes: free fatty acids, hydrocarbons, waxes, sterols, and glycerides. The advantage to this method was it provided structural information on intact compounds, which is new for cholesteryl esters and glycerides, and to obtain detailed fingerprints of the major SSLs. These fingerprints were used to compare the SSL compositions from different body areas. The squalene/cholesterol ratio was used to determine the balance between sebaceous secretion and skin removal. This method could be of general interest in fields where complex lipid mixtures are involved. PMID:20952798

  16. Coupling gas chromatography and electronic nose detection for detailed cigarette smoke aroma characterization.

    PubMed

    Rambla-Alegre, Maria; Tienpont, Bart; Mitsui, Kazuhisa; Masugi, Eri; Yoshimura, Yuta; Nagata, Hisanori; David, Frank; Sandra, Pat

    2014-10-24

    Aroma characterization of whole cigarette smoke samples using sensory panels or electronic nose (E-nose) devices is difficult due to the masking effect of major constituents and solvent used for the extraction step. On the other hand, GC in combination with olfactometry detection does not allow to study the delicate balance and synergetic effect of aroma solutes. To overcome these limitations a new instrumental set-up consisting of heart-cutting gas chromatography using a capillary flow technology based Deans switch and low thermal mass GC in combination with an electronic nose device is presented as an alternative to GC-olfactometry. This new hyphenated GC-E-nose configuration is used for the characterization of cigarette smoke aroma. The system allows the transfer, combination or omission of selected GC fractions before injection in the E-nose. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant factor analysis (DFA) allowed clear visualizing of the differences among cigarette brands and classifying them independently of their nicotine content. Omission and perceptual interaction tests could also be carried out using this configuration. The results are promising and suggest that the GC-E-nose hyphenation is a good approach to measure the contribution level of individual compounds to the whole cigarette smoke. PMID:25260341

  17. [Determination of five representative ultraviolet filters in water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ding, Yiran; Huang, Yun; Zhao, Tingting; Cai, Qian; Luo, Yu; Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yuxia; Pan, Xuejun

    2014-06-01

    A method for the determination of five representative organic UV filters: ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), octocrylene (OC), homosalate (HMS) in water was investigated. The method was ased on derivatization, solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by determination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The variables involved in the derivatization of BP-3 and HMS were optimized, and SPE conditions were studied. For derivatization, 100 microL N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) was used as derivatization reagent and reacted with BP-3 and HMS at 100 degrees C for 100 min. For SPE, the pH value of water sample was adjusted to 3-5. The Oasis HLB cartridges were employed and the solution of ethyl acetate and dichloromethane (1 : 1, v/v) was used as the eluting solvent, and good recoveries of the target compounds were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantification (LOQs) for the five target compounds in water samples were 0.5-1.2 ng/L and 1.4-4.0 ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of spiked water samples were 87.85%-102.34% with good repeatability and reproducibility (RSD < 5%, n = 3) for all the target compounds. Finally, the validated method was applied to analysis the representative UV filters in water samples collected from a wastewater treatment plant in Kunming city of Yunnan province. PMID:25269262

  18. Forensic profiling of sassafras oils based on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, M; Gröger, T; Pütz, M; Zimmermann, R

    2013-06-10

    Safrole, the main compound in the essential oil of several plants of the Laurel family (Lauraceae), and its secondary product piperonylmethylketone are the predominantly used precursors for the illicit synthesis of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) which is, in turn, the most common active ingredient in Ecstasy tablets. Analytical methods with adequate capacity to identify links and origin of precursors, such as safrole, provide valuable information for drug-related police intelligence. Authentic sassafras oil samples from police seizures were subjected to comparative analysis based on their chemical profiles obtained by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS). The enhanced separation power and increased sensitivity of GC × GC allowed for the detection of minor compounds present in the essential oils which were of particular interest in case of very pure samples whose impurity profiles were not very pronounced. Discrimination of such samples was still possible even in the absence of characteristic main compounds. PMID:23683915

  19. Determination of phthalate esters in teas and tea infusions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Liping; Ma, Lijuan; Qiao, Yang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-04-15

    Phthalate esters (PAEs), a group of environmental pollutants which are carcinogenic to human body, have been detected in teas. In this work, five PAEs in teas and tea infusions were quantitatively determined by a modified simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After the optimization of SDE, the proposed method afforded a wide range of linearity and high linear regression coefficients with the limits of detection range of 0.24-3.72 μg/kg. The average recoveries were 79.83-116.67% for tea samples and 78.22-101.64% for tea infusions with all the relative standard deviations below 20%. The total content of five PAEs in teas was 1.135-3.734 mg/kg and the total dissolving ratio of five PAEs from tea to infusion was 19.05-28.07% for the selected tea samples. The risk assessment result of all the selected tea samples demonstrated that the population with the habit of drinking tea won't cause risk to human health. PMID:26675858

  20. Validation of an enantioselective analysis for (l)-pidolic acid by chiral gas chromatography with derivatization.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, John J; Li, Mingshu; Boyd, Aisha

    2016-02-20

    A sensitive and rapid analytical method has been validated for the enantiomeric purity determination of l-pidolic acid, a biological lactam and metabolite of glutamic acid commonly found in urine, skin, bones, brain and is available commercially as a food supplement. An efficient, two-step achiral derivatization was implemented which consisted of an alkylation step (using HCl-IPA) followed by an acylation step (using TFAA) of the carboxy and amide functional groups. This allowed detection with high sensitivity using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The described procedure employs a CP-Chiralsil-L Val column (25m×0.25mm) at a constant flow rate of 1.5mLmin(-1), a gradient temperature program from 80°C to 160°C and an injector and detector temperature of 250°C. The proposed method was validated according to ICH Q2 standards and included such parameters as specificity, system precision, analyst repeatability, intermediate precision, accuracy, linearity, LOD/LOQ and solution stability. PMID:26710173