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Sample records for 2d gel-based proteomic

  1. 2-D gel-based proteomic approaches to antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Raatschen, Nadja; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    The global analysis of changes in the protein composition of bacterial cells in response to treatment with antibiotic agents grants insights into the physiological response of cells to inhibition of vital cellular functions. This unit gives an overview of how global proteomic studies can impact antibacterial drug discovery by identifying or validating compound mechanism of action and by increasing the confidence in the value of genes with unknown function as potential new targets. It describes the design and function of a reference compendium of proteomic responses to inhibition of vital cellular functions through antibacterial agents or genetic down-regulation of potential target genes. An overview of the workflow for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based experiments is also presented.

  2. Combining high-throughput MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis for virtual 2D gel-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lohnes, Karen; Quebbemann, Neil R; Liu, Kate; Kobzeff, Fred; Loo, Joseph A; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R

    2016-07-15

    The virtual two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (virtual 2D gel/MS) technology combines the premier, high-resolution capabilities of 2D gel electrophoresis with the sensitivity and high mass accuracy of mass spectrometry (MS). Intact proteins separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) gel electrophoresis are imaged from immobilized pH gradient (IPG) polyacrylamide gels (the first dimension of classic 2D-PAGE) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS. Obtaining accurate intact masses from sub-picomole-level proteins embedded in 2D-PAGE gels or in IPG strips is desirable to elucidate how the protein of one spot identified as protein 'A' on a 2D gel differs from the protein of another spot identified as the same protein, whenever tryptic peptide maps fail to resolve the issue. This task, however, has been extremely challenging. Virtual 2D gel/MS provides access to these intact masses. Modifications to our matrix deposition procedure improve the reliability with which IPG gels can be prepared; the new procedure is described. Development of this MALDI MS imaging (MSI) method for high-throughput MS with integrated 'top-down' MS to elucidate protein isoforms from complex biological samples is described and it is demonstrated that a 4-cm IPG gel segment can now be imaged in approximately 5min. Gel-wide chemical and enzymatic methods with further interrogation by MALDI MS/MS provide identifications, sequence-related information, and post-translational/transcriptional modification information. The MSI-based virtual 2D gel/MS platform may potentially link the benefits of 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' proteomics.

  3. Effects of coffee bean aroma on the rat brain stressed by sleep deprivation: a selected transcript- and 2D gel-based proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han-Seok; Hirano, Misato; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Hwang, In Kyeong; Masuo, Yoshinori

    2008-06-25

    The aim of this study was 2-fold: (i) to demonstrate influences of roasted coffee bean aroma on rat brain functions by using the transcriptomics and proteomics approaches and (ii) to evaluate the impact of roasted coffee bean aroma on stress induced by sleep deprivation. The aroma of the roasted coffee beans was administered to four groups of adult male Wistar rats: 1, control group; 2, 24 h sleep deprivation-induced stress group (the stress group); 3, coffee aroma-exposed group without stress (the coffee group); and 4, the stress with coffee aroma group (the stress with coffee group). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of some known genes responsive to aroma or stress was performed using total RNA from these four groups. A total of 17 selected genes of the coffee were differently expressed over the control. Additionally, the expression levels of 13 genes were different between the stress group and the stress with coffee group: Up-regulation was found for 11 genes, and down-regulation was seen for two genes in the stress with coffee group. We also looked to changes in protein profiles in these four samples using two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis; 25 differently expressed gel spots were detected on 2D gels stained by silver nitrate. Out of these, a total of nine proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Identified proteins belonged to five functional categories: antioxidant; protein fate; cell rescue, defense, and virulence; cellular communication/signal transduction mechanism; and energy metabolism. Among the differentially expressed genes and proteins between the stress and the stress with coffee group, NGFR, trkC, GIR, thiol-specific antioxidant protein, and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 are known to have antioxidant or antistress functions. In conclusion, the roasted coffee bean aroma changes the mRNA and protein expression levels of the rat brain, providing for the first time clues to the potential antioxidant or stress

  4. Gel-based versus gel-free proteomics: a review.

    PubMed

    Baggerman, Geert; Vierstraete, Evy; De Loof, Arnold; Schoofs, Liliane

    2005-12-01

    With the sequencing of the genome of over 150 organisms, the field of biology has been revolutionised. Instead of studying one gene or protein at the time, it is now possible to study the effect of physiological or pathological changes on the expression of all genes or proteins in the organism. Proteomics aims at the simultaneous analysis of all proteins expressed by a cell, tissue or organism in a specific physiological condition. Because proteins are the effector molecules in all organisms, it is evident that changes in the physiological condition of an organism will be reflected by changes in protein expression and/or processing. Since the formulation of the concept of proteomics in the mid 90's proteomics has relied heavily on 2 dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) for the separation and visualization of proteins. 2DGE, however, has a number of inherent drawbacks. 2DGE is costly, fairly insensitive to low copy proteins and cannot be used for the entire proteome. Therefore, over the years, several gel-free proteomics techniques have been developed to either fill the gaps left by 2DGE or to entirely abolish the gel based techniques. This review summarizes the most important gel-free and gel-based proteomics techniques and compares their advantages and drawbacks.

  5. Deceptive responsive genes in gel-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hamzelou, Sara; Askari, Hossein; Nobari, Nona Abolfathi

    2016-04-01

    The standard method of the global quantitative analysis of gene expression at the protein level combines high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) with mass spectrometric identification of protein spots. One of the major concerns with the application of gel-based proteomics is the need for the analytical and biological accuracy of the datasets. We mathematically and empirically simulated the possibility of the technical regulations of gene expression using 2DE. Our developed equation predicted a detectable alteration in the quantity of protein spots in response to a new protein added in, with various amounts. Testing the predictability of the developed equation, we observed that a new protein could form deceptive expression profiles, classified using prevalent tools for the analysis of 2DE results. In spite of the theoretically predicted overall reduction of proteins that resulted from adding the new protein, the empirical data revealed differential amount of proteins when various quantities of the new protein were added to the protein sample. The present work emphasize that employment of 2DE would not be a reliable approach for biological samples with extensive proteome alterations such as the developmental and differentiation stages of cells without depletion of high abundant proteins.

  6. Full-length protein extraction protocols and gel-based downstream applications in formalin-fixed tissue proteomics.

    PubMed

    Tanca, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; Addis, Maria Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue repositories and their associated clinical information can represent a valuable resource for tissue proteomics. In order to make these tissues available for protein biomarker discovery and validation studies, dedicated sample preparation procedures overcoming the intermolecular cross-links introduced by formalin need to be implemented. This chapter describes a full-length protein extraction protocol optimized for downstream gel-based proteomics applications. Using the procedures detailed here, SDS-PAGE, western immunoblotting, GeLC-MS/MS, 2D-PAGE, and 2D-DIGE can be carried out on FFPE tissues. Technical tips, critical aspects, and drawbacks of the method are presented and discussed.

  7. Gel-Based and Gel-Free Quantitative Proteomics Approaches at a Glance

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Cosette; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Renaut, Jenny; Sergeant, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is widely applied and remains the method of choice in proteomics; however, pervasive 2-DE-related concerns undermine its prospects as a dominant separation technique in proteome research. Consequently, the state-of-the-art shotgun techniques are slowly taking over and utilising the rapid expansion and advancement of mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a new toolbox of gel-free quantitative techniques. When coupled to MS, the shotgun proteomic pipeline can fuel new routes in sensitive and high-throughput profiling of proteins, leading to a high accuracy in quantification. Although label-based approaches, either chemical or metabolic, gained popularity in quantitative proteomics because of the multiplexing capacity, these approaches are not without drawbacks. The burgeoning label-free methods are tag independent and suitable for all kinds of samples. The challenges in quantitative proteomics are more prominent in plants due to difficulties in protein extraction, some protein abundance in green tissue, and the absence of well-annotated and completed genome sequences. The goal of this perspective assay is to present the balance between the strengths and weaknesses of the available gel-based and -free methods and their application to plants. The latest trends in peptide fractionation amenable to MS analysis are as well discussed. PMID:23213324

  8. Novel royal jelly proteins identified by gel-based and gel-free proteomics.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Lan; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Li, Jianke

    2011-09-28

    Royal jelly (RJ) plays an important role in caste determination of the honeybee; the genetically same female egg develops into either a queen or worker bee depending on the time and amount of RJ fed to the larvae. RJ also has numerous health-promoting properties for humans. Gel-based and gel-free proteomics approaches and high-performance liquid chromatography-chip quadruple time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry were applied to comprehensively investigate the protein components of RJ. Overall, 37 and 22 nonredundant proteins were identified by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and gel-free analysis, respectively, and 19 new proteins were found by these two proteomics approaches. Major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) were identified as the principal protein components of RJ, and proteins related to carbohydrate metabolism such as glucose oxidase, α-glucosidase precursor, and glucose dehydrogenase were also successfully identified. Importantly, the 19 newly identified proteins were mainly classified into three functional categories: oxidation-reduction (ergic53 CG6822-PA isoform A isoform 1, Sec61 CG9539-PA, and ADP/ATP translocase), protein binding (regucalcin and translationally controlled tumor protein CG4800-PA isoform 1), and lipid transport (apolipophorin-III-like protein). These new findings not only significantly increase the RJ proteome coverage but also help to provide new knowledge of RJ for honeybee biology and potential use for human health promotion.

  9. Assessing variability in gel-based proteomic analysis of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Burton, Emily O; Hickey, William J

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics offers a unique look at the way protein expression changes in response to stimuli, and "gel-based" methods that utilize two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) are key technologies in such studies. However, the many steps involved can be technically complex, and the resulting data are subject to variability from both technical and biological sources. Designing 2-DE proteomic studies can be challenging, as a set of standard methods or experimental designs has not been established. This being the case, it is especially important to identify and control sources of variability. Statistically significant results can be obtained if the experimental design includes a sufficient number of replicate 2-DE gels, and if the replicate gels are similar enough to be analyzed in the same experiment. While three or four replicates are often sufficient for compensation of variability, the pilot study illustrated in this chapter showed that statistically significant expression differences could be detected for 90% of the spots matched if six replicate experiments were done.

  10. Microscale 2D separation systems for proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Liu, Ke; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Microscale 2D separation systems have been implemented in capillaries and microfabricated channels. They offer advantages of faster analysis, higher separation efficiency and less sample consumption than the conventional methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC) in a column and slab gel electrophoresis. In this article, we review their recent advancement, focusing on three types of platforms, including 2D capillary electrophoresis (CE), CE coupling with capillary LC, and microfluidic devices. A variety of CE and LC modes have been employed to construct 2D separation systems via sophistically designed interfaces. Coupling of different separation modes has also been realized in a number of microfluidic devices. These separation systems have been applied for the proteomic analysis of various biological samples, ranging from a single cell to tumor tissues. PMID:22462786

  11. Non-gel Based Proteomics to Study Steroid Receptor Agonists in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicoproteomics is an emerging field that is greatly enabled by non-gel based methods using LC MS/MS for biomarker discovery and characterization for endocrine disrupting chemicals. Using iTRAQ (isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation), we quantified a diverse r...

  12. New protein extraction/solubilization protocol for gel-based proteomics of rat (female) whole brain and brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Misato; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Masuo, Yoshinori

    2006-08-31

    The rat is an accepted model for studying human psychiatric/neurological disorders. We provide a protocol for total soluble protein extraction using trichloroacetic acid/acetone (TCA/A) from rat (female) whole brain, 10 brain regions and the pituitary gland, and show that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) using pre-cast immobilized pH (4-7) gradient (IPG) strip gels (13 cm) in the first dimension yields clean silver nitrate stained protein profiles. Though TCA/A precipitation may not be "ideal", the important choice here is the selection of an appropriate lysis buffer (LB) for solubilizing precipitated proteins. Our results reveal enrichment of protein spots by use of individual brain regions rather than whole brain, as well as the presence of differentially expressed spots in their proteomes. Thus individual brain regions provide improved protein coverage and are better suited for differential protein detection. Moreover, using a phosphoprotein-specific dye, in-gel detection of phosphoproteins was demonstrated. Representative high-resolution silver nitrate stained proteome profiles of rat whole brain total soluble protein are presented. Shortcomings apart (failure to separate membrane proteins), gel-based proteomics remains a viable option, and 2-DGE is the method of choice for generating high-resolution proteome maps of rat brain and brain regions.

  13. Comparison of Different Protein Extraction Methods for Gel-Based Proteomic Analysis of Ganoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R; Saidi, Noor Baity; Usuldin, Siti Rokhiyah Ahmad; Hussin, Siti Nahdatul Isnaini Said; Yusoff, Noornabeela Md; Idris, Abu Seman

    2016-04-01

    Ganoderma species are a group of fungi that have the ability to degrade lignin polymers and cause severe diseases such as stem and root rot and can infect economically important plants and perennial crops such as oil palm, especially in tropical countries such as Malaysia. Unfortunately, very little is known about the complex interplay between oil palm and Ganoderma in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Proteomic technologies are simple yet powerful tools in comparing protein profile and have been widely used to study plant-fungus interaction. A critical step to perform a good proteome research is to establish a method that gives the best quality and a wide coverage of total proteins. Despite the availability of various protein extraction protocols from pathogenic fungi in the literature, no single extraction method was found suitable for all types of pathogenic fungi. To develop an optimized protein extraction protocol for 2-DE gel analysis of Ganoderma spp., three previously reported protein extraction protocols were compared: trichloroacetic acid, sucrose and phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol. The third method was found to give the most reproducible gels and highest protein concentration. Using the later method, a total of 10 protein spots (5 from each species) were successfully identified. Hence, the results from this study propose phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol as the most effective protein extraction method for 2-DE proteomic studies of Ganoderma spp.

  14. The use of time-resolved fluorescence in gel-based proteomics for improved biomarker discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, AnnSofi; Buschmann, Volker; Kapusta, Peter; Erdmann, Rainer; Wheelock, Åsa M.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a new platform for quantitative intact proteomics, entitled Cumulative Time-resolved Emission 2-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis (CuTEDGE). The CuTEDGE technology utilizes differences in fluorescent lifetimes to subtract the confounding background fluorescence during in-gel detection and quantification of proteins, resulting in a drastic improvement in both sensitivity and dynamic range compared to existing technology. The platform is primarily designed for image acquisition in 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), but is also applicable to 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DE), and proteins electroblotted to membranes. In a set of proof-of-principle measurements, we have evaluated the performance of the novel technology using the MicroTime 100 instrument (PicoQuant GmbH) in conjunction with the CyDye minimal labeling fluorochromes (GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden) to perform differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analyses. The results indicate that the CuTEDGE technology provides an improvement in the dynamic range and sensitivity of detection of 3 orders of magnitude as compared to current state-of-the-art image acquisition instrumentation available for 2-DE (Typhoon 9410, GE Healthcare). Given the potential dynamic range of 7-8 orders of magnitude and sensitivities in the attomol range, the described invention represents a technological leap in detection of low abundance cellular proteins, which is desperately needed in the field of biomarker discovery.

  15. Normal human mitral valve proteome: A preliminary investigation by gel-based and gel-free proteomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Brioschi, Maura; Baetta, Roberta; Ghilardi, Stefania; Gianazza, Erica; Guarino, Anna; Parolari, Alessandro; Polvani, Gianluca; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure which regulates blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle (LV) avoiding a significant forward gradient during diastole or regurgitation during systole. The integrity of the mitral valve is also essential for the maintenance of normal LV size, geometry, and function. Significant advances in the comprehension of the biological, functional, and mechanical behavior of the mitral valve have recently been made. However, current knowledge of protein components in the normal human mitral valve is still limited and complicated by the low cellularity of this tissue and the presence of high abundant proteins from the extracellular matrix. We employed here an integrated proteomic approach to analyse the protein composition of the normal human mitral valve and reported confident identification of 422 proteins, some of which have not been previously described in this tissue. In particular, we described the ability of pre-MS separation technique based on liquid-phase IEF and SDS-PAGE to identify the largest number of proteins. We also demonstrated that some of these proteins, e.g. αB-Crystallin, septin-11, four-and-a-half LIM domains protein 1, and dermatopontin, are synthesised by interstitial cells isolated from human mitral valves. These initial results provide a valuable basis for future studies aimed at analysing in depth the mitral valve protein composition and at investigating potential pathogenetic molecular mechanisms. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004397.

  16. A 2-D guinea pig lung proteome map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guinea pigs represent an important model for a number of infectious and non-infectious pulmonary diseases. The guinea pig genome has recently been sequenced to full coverage, opening up new research avenues using genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics techniques in this species. In order to furth...

  17. PROTEOMER: A workflow-optimized laboratory information management system for 2-D electrophoresis-centered proteomics.

    PubMed

    Nebrich, Grit; Herrmann, Marion; Hartl, Daniela; Diedrich, Madeleine; Kreitler, Thomas; Wierling, Christoph; Klose, Joachim; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zabel, Claus; Mao, Lei

    2009-04-01

    In recent years proteomics became increasingly important to functional genomics. Although a large amount of data is generated by high throughput large-scale techniques, a connection of these mostly heterogeneous data from different analytical platforms and of different experiments is limited. Data mining procedures and algorithms are often insufficient to extract meaningful results from large datasets and therefore limit the exploitation of the generated biological information. In our proteomic core facility, which almost exclusively focuses on 2-DE/MS-based proteomics, we developed a proteomic database custom tailored to our needs aiming at connecting MS protein identification information to 2-DE derived protein expression profiles. The tools developed should not only enable an automatic evaluation of single experiments, but also link multiple 2-DE experiments with MS-data on different levels and thereby helping to create a comprehensive network of our proteomics data. Therefore the key feature of our "PROTEOMER" database is its high cross-referencing capacity, enabling integration of a wide range of experimental data. To illustrate the workflow and utility of the system, two practical examples are provided to demonstrate that proper data cross-referencing can transform information into biological knowledge.

  18. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparison of 2D and 3D Colon Cancer Cell Culture Models.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaoshan; Lukowski, Jessica K; Weaver, Eric M; Skube, Susan B; Hummon, Amanda B

    2016-12-02

    Cell cultures are widely used model systems. Some immortalized cell lines can be grown in either two-dimensional (2D) adherent monolayers or in three-dimensional (3D) multicellular aggregates, or spheroids. Here, the quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome of colon carcinoma HT29 cells cultures in 2D monolayers and 3D spheroids were compared with a stable isotope labeling of amino acids (SILAC) labeling strategy. Two biological replicates from each sample were examined, and notable differences in both the proteome and the phosphoproteome were determined by nanoliquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to assess how growth configuration affects molecular expression. A total of 5867 protein groups, including 2523 phosphoprotein groups and 8733 phosphopeptides were identified in the samples. The Gene Ontology analysis revealed enriched GO terms in the 3D samples for RNA binding, nucleic acid binding, enzyme binding, cytoskeletal protein binding, and histone binding for their molecular functions (MF) and in the process of cell cycle, cytoskeleton organization, and DNA metabolic process for the biological process (BP). The KEGG pathway analysis indicated that 3D cultures are enriched for oxidative phosphorylation pathways, metabolic pathways, peroxisome pathways, and biosynthesis of amino acids. In contrast, analysis of the phosphoproteomes indicated that 3D cultures have decreased phosphorylation correlating with slower growth rates and lower cell-to-extracellular matrix interactions. In sum, these results provide quantitative assessments of the effects on the proteome and phosphoproteome of culturing cells in 2D versus 3D cell culture configurations.

  19. Chromatographic behaviour of peptides following dimethylation with H2/D2-formaldehyde: implications for comparative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Boutilier, Joseph M; Warden, Hunter; Doucette, Alan A; Wentzell, Peter D

    2012-11-01

    The differential separation of deuterated and non-deuterated forms of isotopically substituted compounds in chromatography is a well-known but not well-understood phenomenon. This separation is relevant in comparative proteomics, where stable isotopes are used for differential labelling and the effect of isotope resolution on quantitation has been used to disqualify some deuterium labelling methods in favour of heavier isotopes. In this work, a detailed evaluation of the extent of isotopic separation and its impact on quantitation was performed for peptides labelled through dimethylation with H(2)/D(2) formaldehyde. The chromatographic behaviour of 71 labelled peptide pairs from quadruplicate tryptic digests of bovine serum albumin were analysed, focusing on differences in median retention times, resolution, and relative quantitation for each peptide. For 94% of peptides, the retention time difference (heavy-light) was less than 12s with a median value 3.4s. With the exception of a single anomalous pair, isotope resolution was below 0.6 with a median value 0.11. Quantitative assessment indicates that the bias in ratio calculation introduced by retention time shifts is only about 3%, substantially smaller than the variation in ratio measurements themselves. Computational studies on the dipole moments of deuterated labels indicate that these results are consistent with literature suggestions that retention time shifts are inversely related to the polarity of the label. This study suggests that the incorporation of deuterium isotopes through peptide dimethylation at amine residues is a viable route to proteome quantitation.

  20. Development of an open source laboratory information management system for 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics workflow

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Hiraku; Hirota, Mikako; Toda, Tosifusa

    2006-01-01

    Background In the post-genome era, most research scientists working in the field of proteomics are confronted with difficulties in management of large volumes of data, which they are required to keep in formats suitable for subsequent data mining. Therefore, a well-developed open source laboratory information management system (LIMS) should be available for their proteomics research studies. Results We developed an open source LIMS appropriately customized for 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics workflow. The main features of its design are compactness, flexibility and connectivity to public databases. It supports the handling of data imported from mass spectrometry software and 2-D gel image analysis software. The LIMS is equipped with the same input interface for 2-D gel information as a clickable map on public 2DPAGE databases. The LIMS allows researchers to follow their own experimental procedures by reviewing the illustrations of 2-D gel maps and well layouts on the digestion plates and MS sample plates. Conclusion Our new open source LIMS is now available as a basic model for proteome informatics, and is accessible for further improvement. We hope that many research scientists working in the field of proteomics will evaluate our LIMS and suggest ways in which it can be improved. PMID:17018156

  1. High pH reversed-phase chromatography with fraction concatenation for 2D proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Orthogonal high-resolution separations are critical for attaining improved analytical dynamic ranges of proteome measurements. Concatenated high pH reversed phase liquid chromatography affords better separations than the strong cation exchange conventionally applied for two-dimensional shotgun proteomic analysis. For example, concatenated high pH reversed phase liquid chromatography increased identification coverage for peptides (e.g., by 1.8-fold) and proteins (e.g., by 1.6-fold) in shotgun proteomics analyses of a digested human protein sample. Additional advantages of concatenated high pH RPLC include improved protein sequence coverage, simplified sample processing, and reduced sample losses, making this an attractive first dimension separation strategy for two-dimensional proteomics analyses.

  2. Proteomic analysis of heat treated bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L. var. Hong Kong Green) using 2D-DIGE.

    PubMed

    Ng, Zhi Xiang; Chua, Kek Heng; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in the proteome of bitter gourd prior to and after subjecting to boiling and microwaving. A comparative analysis of the proteome profiles of raw and thermally treated bitter gourds was performed using 2D-DIGE. The protein content and number of protein spots in raw sample was higher when compared to the cooked samples. Qualitative analysis revealed that 103 (boiled sample) and 110 (microwaved sample) protein spots were up regulated whereas 120 (boiled sample) and 107 (microwaved sample) protein spots were down regulated. Ten protein spots with the highest significant fold change in the cooked samples were involved in carbohydrate/energy metabolisms and stress responses. Small heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, quinone oxidoreductase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglycerate kinase play a role in heat-stress-mediated protection of bitter gourd. This study suggests that appropriate heat treatment (cooking methods) can lead to induction of selected proteins in bitter gourd.

  3. 2D-DIGE analysis of mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit reveals major proteomic changes associated with ripening.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Jonathan de Magalhães; Toledo, Tatiana Torres; Nogueira, Silvia Beserra; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; Lajolo, Franco Maria; do Nascimento, João Roberto Oliveira

    2012-06-18

    A comparative proteomic investigation between the pre-climacteric and climacteric mango fruits (cv. Keitt) was performed to identify protein species with variable abundance during ripening. Proteins were phenol-extracted from fruits, cyanine-dye-labeled, and separated on 2D gels at pH 4-7. Total spot count of about 373 proteins spots was detected in each gel and forty-seven were consistently different between pre-climacteric and climacteric fruits and were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. Functional classification revealed that protein species involved in carbon fixation and hormone biosynthesis decreased during ripening, whereas those related to catabolism and the stress-response, including oxidative stress and abiotic and pathogen defense factors, accumulated. In relation to fruit quality, protein species putatively involved in color development and pulp softening were also identified. This study on mango proteomics provides an overview of the biological processes that occur during ripening.

  4. Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-02-01

    Proteomics aims to characterize the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of proteins in biological systems, the protein response to environmental stimuli, and the differences in protein states between diseased and control biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) plays a crucial role in enabling the analysis of proteomes and typically is the method of choice for identifying proteins present in biological systems. Peptide (and consequently protein) identifications are made by comparing measured masses to calculated values obtained from genome data. Several methodologies based on MS have been developed for the analysis of proteomes. The complexity of the biological systems requires that the proteome be separated prior to analysis. Both gel based and liquid chromatography based separations have proven very useful in this regard. Typically, separated proteins are analyzed with MS either intact (top-down proteomics) or are digested into peptides (bottom-up) prior to MS analysis. Additionally, several procedures, with and without stable isotopic labeling, have been introduced to facilitate protein quantitation (e.g. characterize changes in protein abundances between given biological states).

  5. Introducing Proteomics in the Undergraduate Curriculum: A Simple 2D Gel Electrophoresis Exercise with Serum Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Thomas D.; Craig, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) remains an important tool in the study of biological systems by proteomics. While the use of 2DGE is commonplace in research publications, there are few instructional laboratories that address the use of 2DGE for analyzing complex protein samples. One reason for this lack is the fact that the preparation…

  6. Mapping and Identification of the Urine Proteome of Prostate Cancer Patients by 2D PAGE/MS

    PubMed Central

    Kiprijanovska, Sanja; Stavridis, Sotir; Stankov, Oliver; Komina, Selim; Petrusevska, Gordana; Polenakovic, Momir; Davalieva, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Proteome analysis of the urine has shown that urine contains disease-specific information for a variety of urogenital system disorders, including prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to determine the protein components of urine from PCa patients. Urine from 8 patients with clinically and histologically confirmed PCa was analyzed by conventional 2D PAGE. The MS identification of the most prominent 125 spots from the urine map revealed 45 distinct proteins. According to Gene Ontology, the identified proteins are involved in a variety of biological processes, majority of them are secreted (71%), and half of them are enzymes or transporters. Comparison with the normal urine proteome revealed 11 proteins distinctive for PCa. Using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, we have found 3 proteins (E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase rififylin, tumor protein D52, and thymidine phosphorylase) associated with cellular growth and proliferation (p = 8.35 × 10−4 − 3.41 × 10−2). The top network of functional associations between 11 proteins was Cell Death and Survival, Cell-To-Cell Signaling and Interaction, and System Development and Function (p = 10−30). In summary, we have created an initial proteomic map of PCa patient's urine. The results from this study provide some leads to understand the molecular bases of prostate cancer. PMID:25215235

  7. Top-down, bottom-up, and side-to-side proteomics with virtual 2-D gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Hayes, Richard; Yang, Yanan; Hung, Frank; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Kim, Nuri; Gunsalus, Robert; Loo, Joseph A.

    2005-02-01

    Intact protein masses can be measured directly from immobilized pH gradient (IPG) isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels loaded with mammalian and prokaryotic samples, as demonstrated here with murine macrophage and Methanosarcina acetivorans cell lysates. Mass accuracy and resolution is improved by employing instruments which decouple the desorption event from mass measurement; e.g., quadrupole time-of-flight instruments. MALDI in-source dissociation (ISD) is discussed as a means to pursue top-down sequencing for protein identification. Methods have been developed to enzymatically digest all proteins in an IEF gel simultaneously, leaving the polyacrylamide gel attached to its polyester support. By retaining all gel pieces and their placement relative to one another, sample handling and tracking are minimized, and comparison to 2-D gel images is facilitated. MALDI-MS and MS/MS can then be performed directly from dried, matrix-treated IPG strips following whole-gel trypsin digestion, bottom-up methodology. Side-to-side proteomics, highlighting the link between virtual and classical 2-D gel electrophoresis, is introduced to describe a method whereby intact masses are measured from one side (the IEF gel), while proteins are identified based on analyses performed from the other side (the SDS-PAGE gel).

  8. Dynamic protein phosphorylation during the growth of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris B100 revealed by a gel-based proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Musa, Yaarub Raji; Bäsell, Katrin; Schatschneider, Sarah; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Becher, Dörte; Niehaus, Karsten

    2013-08-20

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) synthesizes huge amounts of the exopolysaccharide xanthan and is a plant pathogen affecting Brassicaceae, among them the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Xanthan is produced as a thickening agent at industrial scale by fermentation of Xcc. In an approach based on 2D gel electrophoresis, protein samples from different growth phases were characterized to initialize analysis of the Xanthomonas phosphoproteome. The 2D gels were stained with Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein stain to identify putatively phosphorylated proteins. Spots of putatively phosphorylated proteins were excised from the gel and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Three proteins were confirmed to be phosphorylated, the phosphoglucomutase/phosphomannomutase XanA that is important for xanthan and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, the phosphoenolpyruvate synthase PspA that is involved in gluconeogenesis, and an anti-sigma factor antagonist RsbR that was so far uncharacterized in xanthomonads. The growth phase in which the samples were collected had an influence on protein phosphorylation in Xcc, particular distinct in case of RsbR, which was phosphorylated during the transition from the late exponential growth phase to the stationary phase.

  9. 2D-DIGE as a proteomic biomarker discovery tool in environmental studies with Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cisnal, Ricardo; García-Sevillano, Miguel A; Gómez-Ariza, José L; Pueyo, Carmen; López-Barea, Juan; Abril, Nieves

    2017-04-15

    A 2D-DIGE/MS approach was used to assess protein abundance differences in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii from polluted aquatic ecosystems of Doñana National Park and surrounding areas with different pollution loads. Procambarus clarkii accumulated metals in the digestive glands and gills reflecting sediment concentrations. We first stated that, probably related to elements accumulation, pollution increased oxidative damage in P. clarkii tissues, as shown by the thiol oxidation status of proteins and MDA levels. In these animals, the altered redox status might be responsible for the deregulated abundance of proteins involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress including protein folding, mitochondrial imbalance and inflammatory processes. Interestingly, polluted P. clarkii crayfish also displayed a metabolic shift to enhanced aerobic glycolysis, most likely aimed at generating ATP and reduction equivalents in an oxidative stress situation that alters mitochondrial integrity. The deregulated proteins define the physiological processes affected by pollutants in DNP and its surrounding areas and may help us to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of environmental pollutants. In addition, these proteins might be used as exposure biomarkers in environmental risk assessment. The results obtained might be extrapolated to many other locations all over the world and have the added value of providing information about the molecular responses of this environmentally and economically interesting animal.

  10. 2D-DIGE proteome analysis on the platelet proteins of patients with major depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Platelet activation is related to the psychopathology of major depression. We attempted to search and identify protein biomarkers from the platelets of patients with major depression. High resolution two-dimensional Differential Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), Western blot, and bioinformatic tools were applied to examine the platelet proteins of 10 patients with major depression and 10 healthy controls. Results The levels of 8 proteins were significantly different between the patients with major depression in the acute phase and healthy controls. The levels of protein disulfide-isomerase A3 (PDIA3) and F-actin-capping protein subunit beta (CAPZB) were higher in patients with major depression than in healthy controls. The levels of fibrinogen beta chain (FIBB), fibrinogen gamma chain (FIBG), retinoic acid receptor beta (RARB), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), SH3 domain-containing protein 19 (SH319), and T-complex protein 1 subunit beta (TCPB) were lower in patients with major depression than in healthy controls. Conclusions Platelet provided valuable information about the pathways and processes of inflammation/immunity, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis, related to major depression. PMID:24383611

  11. Rifaximin-mediated changes to the epithelial cell proteome: 2-D gel analysis.

    PubMed

    Schrodt, Caroline; McHugh, Erin E; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; Dupont, Herbert L; Brown, Eric L

    2013-01-01

    Rifaximin is a semi-synthetic rifamycin derivative that is used to treat different conditions including bacterial diarrhea and hepatic encephalopathy. Rifaximin is of particular interest because it is poorly adsorbed in the intestines and has minimal effect on colonic microflora. We previously demonstrated that rifaximin affected epithelial cell physiology by altering infectivity by enteric pathogens and baseline inflammation suggesting that rifaximin conferred cytoprotection against colonization and infection. Effects of rifaximin on epithelial cells were further examined by comparing the protein expression profile of cells pretreated with rifaximin, rifampin (control antibiotic), or media (untreated). Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis identified 36 protein spots that were up- or down-regulated by over 1.7-fold in rifaximin treated cells compared to controls. 15 of these spots were down-regulated, including annexin A5, intestinal-type alkaline phosphatase, histone H4, and histone-binding protein RbbP4. 21 spots were up-regulated, including heat shock protein (HSP) 90α and fascin. Many of the identified proteins are associated with cell structure and cytoskeleton, transcription and translation, and cellular metabolism. These data suggested that in addition to its antimicrobial properties, rifaximin may alter host cell physiology that provides cytoprotective effects against bacterial pathogens.

  12. Circadian Profiling of the Arabidopsis Proteome Using 2D-DIGE

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mani K.; Nomura, Yuko; Shi, Hua; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Clock-generated biological rhythms provide an adaptive advantage to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. To better elucidate the plant response to the circadian system, we surveyed protein oscillations in Arabidopsis seedlings under constant light. Using large-scale two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) the abundance of more than 1000 proteins spots was reproducibly resolved quantified and profiled across a circadian time series. A comparison between phenol-extracted samples and RuBisCO-depleted extracts identified 71 and 40 rhythmically-expressed proteins, respectively, and between 30 and 40% of these derive from non-rhythmic transcripts. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, photosynthesis, protein chaperones, and stress-mediated responses. The phasing of maximum expression for the cyclic proteins was similar for both datasets, with a nearly even distribution of peak phases across the time series. STRING clustering analysis identified two interaction networks with a notable number of oscillating proteins: plastid-based and cytosolic chaperones and 10 proteins involved in photosynthesis. The oscillation of the ABA receptor, PYR1/RCAR11, with peak expression near dusk adds to a growing body of evidence that intimately ties ABA signaling to the circadian system. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the importance of post-transcriptional circadian control of plant physiology and metabolism. PMID:27462335

  13. NOVEL CONTINUOUS PH/SALT GRADIENT AND PEPTIDE SCORE FOR STRONG CATION EXCHANGE CHROMATOGRAPHY IN 2D-NANO-LC/MSMS PEPTIDE IDENTIFICATION FOR PROTEOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tryptic digests of human serum albumin (HSA) and human lung epithelial cell lysates were used as test samples in a novel proteomics study. Peptides were separated and analyzed using 2D-nano-LC/MSMS with strong cation exchange (SCX) and reverse phase (RP) chromatography and contin...

  14. Proteome analysis of the large and the small rubber particles of Hevea brasiliensis using 2D-DIGE.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qiulan; Xia, Kecan; Dai, Longjun; Kang, Guijuan; Li, Yu; Nie, Zhiyi; Duan, Cuifang; Zeng, Rizhong

    2012-11-01

    The rubber particle is a specialized organelle in which natural rubber is synthesised and stored in the laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis (para rubber tree). It has been demonstrated that the small rubber particles (SRPs) has higher rubber biosynthesis ratio than the large rubber particles (LRPs), but the underlying molecular mechanism still remains unknown. In this study, LRPs and SRPs were firstly separated from the fresh latex using differential centrifugation, and two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF was then applied to investigate the proteomic alterations associated with the changed rubber biosynthesis capacity between LRPs and SRPs. A total of 53 spots corresponding to 22 gene products, were significantly altered with the |ratio|≥2.0 and T value ≤0.05, among which 15 proteins were up-regulated and 7 were down-regulated in the SRPs compared with the LRPs. The 15 up-regulated proteins in the SRPs included small rubber particle protein (SRPP), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS), phospholipase D alpha (PLD α), ethylene response factor 2, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A isoform IV (eIF 5A-4), 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein (HSC 70), several unknown proteins, etc., whereas the 7 up-regulated proteins in the LRPs were rubber elongation factor (REF, 19.6kDa), ASR-like protein 1, REF-like stress-related protein 1, a putative phosphoglyceride transfer family protein, β-1,3-glucanase, a putative retroelement, and a hypothetical protein. Since several proteins related to rubber biosynthesis were differentially expressed between LRPs and SRPs, the comparative proteome data may provide useful insights into understanding the mechanism involved in rubber biosynthesis and latex coagulation in H. brasiliensis.

  15. Effects of Clostridium difficile Toxin A on the proteome of colonocytes studied by differential 2D electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zeiser, Johannes J; Klodmann, Jennifer; Braun, Hans-Peter; Gerhard, Ralf; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2011-12-21

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic pathogen, commonly associated with severe diarrhea or life-threatening pseudomembraneous colitis. Its main virulence factors are the single-chain, multi-domain toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). Their glucosyltransferase domain selectively inactivates Rho proteins leading to a reorganization of the cytoskeleton. To study exclusively glucosyltransferase-dependent molecular effects of TcdA, human colonic cells (Caco-2) were treated with recombinant wild type TcdA and the glucosyltransferase deficient variant of the toxin, TcdA(gd) for 24h. Changes in the protein pattern of the colonic cells were investigated by 2-D DIGE and LCMS/MS methodology combined with detailed proteome mapping. gdTcdA did not induce any detectable significant changes in the protein pattern. Comparing TcdA-treated cells with a control group revealed seven spots of higher and two of lower intensity (p<0.05). Three proteins are involved in the assembly of the cytoskeleton (β-actin, ezrin, and DPYL2) and four are involved in metabolism and/or oxidative stress response (ubiquitin, DHE3, MCCB, FABPL) and two in regulatory processes (FUBP1, AL1A1). These findings correlate well to known effects of TcdA like the reorganization of the cytoskeleton and stress the importance of Rho protein glucosylation for the pathogenic effects of TcdA.

  16. Immature Seed Endosperm and Embryo Proteomics of the Lotus (Nelumbo Nucifera Gaertn.) by One-Dimensional Gel-Based Tandem Mass Spectrometry and a Comparison with the Mature Endosperm Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Carlo F.; Fukao, Yoichiro; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Shioda, Seiji; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Yonekura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seed proteome has been the focus of our studies, and we have recently established the first proteome dataset for its mature seed endosperm. The current study unravels the immature endosperm, as well as the embryo proteome, to provide a comprehensive dataset of the lotus seed proteins and a comparison between the mature and immature endosperm tissues across the seed’s development. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) linked with tandem mass spectrometry provided a protein inventory of the immature endosperm (122 non-redundant proteins) and embryo (141 non-redundant proteins) tissues. Comparing with the previous mature endosperm dataset (66 non-redundant proteins), a total of 206 non-redundant proteins were identified across all three tissues of the lotus seed. Results revealed some significant differences in proteome composition between the three lotus seed tissues, most notably between the mature endosperm and its immature developmental stage shifting the proteins from nutrient production to nutrient storage. PMID:28248268

  17. 2D DIGE saturation labeling for minute sample amounts.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Georg J; Fröhlich, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The 2D DIGE technique, based on fluorophores covalently linked to amino acid side chain residues and the concept of an internal standard, has significantly improved reproducibility, sensitivity, and the dynamic range of protein quantification. In saturation DIGE, sulfhydryl groups of cysteines are labeled with cyanine dyes to completion, providing a so far unraveled sensitivity for protein detection and quantification in 2D gel-based proteomic experiments. Only a few micrograms of protein per 2D gel facilitate the analysis of about 2,000 analytes from complex mammalian cell or tissue samples. As a consequence, 2D saturation DIGE is the method of choice when only minute sample amounts are available for quantitative proteome analysis at the level of proteins rather than peptides. Since very low amounts of samples have to be handled in a reproducible manner, saturation DIGE-based proteomic experiments are technically demanding. Moreover, successful saturation DIGE approaches require a strict adherence to adequate reaction conditions at each step. This chapter is dedicated to colleagues already experienced in 2D PAGE protein separation and intends to support the establishment of this ultrasensitive technique in proteomic workgroups. We provide basic guidelines for the experimental design and discuss crucial aspects concerning labeling chemistry, sample preparation, and pitfalls caused by labeling artifacts. A detailed step-by-step protocol comprises all aspects from initial sample preparation to image analysis and statistical evaluation. Furthermore, we describe the generation of preparative saturation DIGE gels necessary for mass spectrometry-based spot identification.

  18. Analysis of tissue proteomes of the Gulf killifish, Fundulus grandis, by 2D electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abbaraju, Naga V; Boutaghou, Mohamed Nazim; Townley, Ian K; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Guangdi; Cole, Richard B; Rees, Bernard B

    2012-11-01

    The Gulf killifish, Fundulus grandis, is a small teleost fish that inhabits marshes of the Gulf of Mexico and demonstrates high tolerance of environmental variation, making it an excellent subject for the study of physiological and molecular adaptations to environmental stress. In the present study, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry were used to resolve and identify proteins from five tissues: skeletal muscle, liver, brain, heart, and gill. Of 864 protein features excised from 2D gels, 424 proteins were identified, corresponding to a 49% identification rate. For any given tissue, several protein features were identified as the same protein, resulting in a total of 254 nonredundant proteins. These nonredundant proteins were categorized into a total of 11 molecular functions, including catalytic activity, structural molecule, binding, and transport. In all tissues, catalytic activity and binding were the most highly represented molecular functions. Comparing across the tissues, proteome coverage was lowest in skeletal muscle, due to a combination of a low number of gel spots excised for analysis and a high redundancy of identifications among these spots. Nevertheless, the identification of a substantial number of proteins with high statistical confidence from other tissues suggests that F. grandis may serve as a model fish for future studies of environmental proteomics and ultimately help to elucidate proteomic responses of fish and other vertebrates to environmental stress.

  19. 2D-DIGE-based proteome expression changes in leaves of rice seedlings exposed to low-level gamma radiation at Iitate village, Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Gohei; Moro, Carlo F; Rohila, Jai Singh; Shibato, Junko; Kubo, Akihiro; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Kimura, Shinzo; Ozawa, Shoji; Fukutani, Satoshi; Endo, Satoru; Ichikawa, Katsuki; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Shioda, Seiji; Hori, Motohide; Fukumoto, Manabu; Rakwal, Randeep

    2015-01-01

    The present study continues our previous research on investigating the biological effects of low-level gamma radiation in rice at the heavily contaminated Iitate village in Fukushima, by extending the experiments to unraveling the leaf proteome. 14-days-old plants of Japonica rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare) were subjected to gamma radiation level of upto 4 µSv/h, for 72 h. Following exposure, leaf samples were taken from the around 190 µSv/3 d exposed seedling and total proteins were extracted. The gamma irradiated leaf and control leaf (harvested at the start of the experiment) protein lysates were used in a 2-D differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) experiment using CyDye labeling in order to asses which spots were differentially represented, a novelty of the study. 2D-DIGE analysis revealed 91 spots with significantly different expression between samples (60 positive, 31 negative). MALDI-TOF and TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analyses revealed those as comprising of 59 different proteins (50 up-accumulated, 9 down-accumulated). The identified proteins were subdivided into 10 categories, according to their biological function, which indicated that the majority of the differentially expressed proteins consisted of the general (non-energy) metabolism and stress response categories. Proteome-wide data point to some effects of low-level gamma radiation exposure on the metabolism of rice leaves.

  20. 2D-DIGE-based proteome expression changes in leaves of rice seedlings exposed to low-level gamma radiation at Iitate village, Fukushima

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Gohei; Moro, Carlo F; Rohila, Jai Singh; Shibato, Junko; Kubo, Akihiro; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Kimura, Shinzo; Ozawa, Shoji; Fukutani, Satoshi; Endo, Satoru; Ichikawa, Katsuki; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Shioda, Seiji; Hori, Motohide; Fukumoto, Manabu; Rakwal, Randeep

    2015-01-01

    The present study continues our previous research on investigating the biological effects of low-level gamma radiation in rice at the heavily contaminated Iitate village in Fukushima, by extending the experiments to unraveling the leaf proteome. 14-days-old plants of Japonica rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare) were subjected to gamma radiation level of upto 4 µSv/h, for 72 h. Following exposure, leaf samples were taken from the around 190 µSv/3 d exposed seedling and total proteins were extracted. The gamma irradiated leaf and control leaf (harvested at the start of the experiment) protein lysates were used in a 2-D differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) experiment using CyDye labeling in order to asses which spots were differentially represented, a novelty of the study. 2D-DIGE analysis revealed 91 spots with significantly different expression between samples (60 positive, 31 negative). MALDI-TOF and TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analyses revealed those as comprising of 59 different proteins (50 up-accumulated, 9 down-accumulated). The identified proteins were subdivided into 10 categories, according to their biological function, which indicated that the majority of the differentially expressed proteins consisted of the general (non-energy) metabolism and stress response categories. Proteome-wide data point to some effects of low-level gamma radiation exposure on the metabolism of rice leaves. PMID:26451896

  1. From protein catalogues towards targeted proteomics approaches in cereal grains.

    PubMed

    Finnie, Christine; Sultan, Abida; Grasser, Klaus D

    2011-07-01

    Due to their importance for human nutrition, the protein content of cereal grains has been a subject of intense study for over a century and cereal grains were not surprisingly one of the earliest subjects for 2D-gel-based proteome analysis. Over the last two decades, countless cereal grain proteomes, mostly derived using 2D-gel based technologies, have been described and hundreds of proteins identified. However, very little is still known about post-translational modifications, subcellular proteomes, and protein-protein interactions in cereal grains. Development of techniques for improved extraction, separation and identification of proteins and peptides is facilitating functional proteomics and analysis of sub-proteomes from small amounts of starting material, such as seed tissues. The combination of proteomics with structural and functional analysis is increasingly applied to target subsets of proteins. These "next-generation" proteomics studies will vastly increase our depth of knowledge about the processes controlling cereal grain development, nutritional and processing characteristics.

  2. Application of highly sensitive fluorescent dyes (CyDye DIGE Fluor saturation dyes) to laser microdissection and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for cancer proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tadashi; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2006-01-01

    Proteome data combined with histopathological information provides important, novel clues for understanding cancer biology and reveals candidates for tumor markers and therapeutic targets. We have established an application of a highly sensitive fluorescent dye (CyDye DIGE Fluor saturation dye), developed for two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), to the labeling of proteins extracted from laser microdissected tissues. The use of the dye dramatically decreases the protein amount and, in turn, the number of cells required for 2D-DIGE; the cells obtained from a 1 mm2 area of an 8-12 microm thick tissue section generate up to 5,000 protein spots in a large-format 2D gel. This protocol allows the execution of large-scale proteomics in a more efficient, accurate and reproducible way. The protocol can be used to examine a single sample in 5 d or to examine hundreds of samples in large-scale proteomics.

  3. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri surface proteome by 2D-DIGE: Ferric enterobactin receptor and other outer membrane proteins potentially involved in citric host interaction.

    PubMed

    Carnielli, Carolina Moretto; Artier, Juliana; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques

    2017-01-16

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XAC) is the causative agent of citrus canker, a disease of great economic impact around the world. Understanding the role of proteins on XAC cellular surface can provide new insights on pathogen-plant interaction. Surface proteome was performed in XAC grown in vivo (infectious) and in vitro (non-infectious) conditions, by labeling intact cells followed by cellular lysis and direct 2D-DIGE analysis. Seventy-nine differential spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Highest relative abundance for in vivo condition was observed for spots containing DnaK protein, 60kDa chaperonin, conserved hypothetical proteins, malate dehydrogenase, phosphomannose isomerase, and ferric enterobactin receptors. Elongation factor Tu, OmpA-related proteins, Oar proteins and some Ton-B dependent receptors were found in spots decreased in vivo. Some proteins identified on XAC's surface in infectious condition and predicted to be cytoplasmic, such as DnaK and 60KDa chaperonin, have also been previously found at cellular surface in other microorganisms. This is the first study on XAC surface proteome and results point to mediation of molecular chaperones in XAC-citrus interaction. The approach utilized here can be applied to other pathogen-host interaction systems and help to achieve new insights in bacterial pathogenicity toward promising targets of biotechnological interest.

  4. Consensus Brain-derived Protein, Extraction Protocol for the Study of Human and Murine Brain Proteome Using Both 2D-DIGE and Mini 2DE Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Jumeau, Fanny; Derisbourg, Maxime; Burnouf, Sylvie; Tran, Hélène; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Obriot, Hélène; Dutoit-Lefevre, Virginie; Deramecourt, Vincent; Mitchell, Valérie; Lefranc, Didier; Hamdane, Malika; Blum, David; Buée, Luc; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Sergeant, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) is a powerful tool to uncover proteome modifications potentially related to different physiological or pathological conditions. Basically, this technique is based on the separation of proteins according to their isoelectric point in a first step, and secondly according to their molecular weights by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In this report an optimized sample preparation protocol for little amount of human post-mortem and mouse brain tissue is described. This method enables to perform both two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mini 2DE immunoblotting. The combination of these approaches allows one to not only find new proteins and/or protein modifications in their expression thanks to its compatibility with mass spectrometry detection, but also a new insight into markers validation. Thus, mini-2DE coupled to western blotting permits to identify and validate post-translational modifications, proteins catabolism and provides a qualitative comparison among different conditions and/or treatments. Herein, we provide a method to study components of protein aggregates found in AD and Lewy body dementia such as the amyloid-beta peptide and the alpha-synuclein. Our method can thus be adapted for the analysis of the proteome and insoluble proteins extract from human brain tissue and mice models too. In parallel, it may provide useful information for the study of molecular and cellular pathways involved in neurodegenerative diseases as well as potential novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24747743

  5. Consensus brain-derived protein, extraction protocol for the study of human and murine brain proteome using both 2D-DIGE and mini 2DE immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Jumeau, Fanny; Derisbourg, Maxime; Burnouf, Sylvie; Tran, Hélène; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Obriot, Hélène; Dutoit-Lefevre, Virginie; Deramecourt, Vincent; Mitchell, Valérie; Lefranc, Didier; Hamdane, Malika; Blum, David; Buée, Luc; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Sergeant, Nicolas

    2014-04-10

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) is a powerful tool to uncover proteome modifications potentially related to different physiological or pathological conditions. Basically, this technique is based on the separation of proteins according to their isoelectric point in a first step, and secondly according to their molecular weights by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In this report an optimized sample preparation protocol for little amount of human post-mortem and mouse brain tissue is described. This method enables to perform both two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mini 2DE immunoblotting. The combination of these approaches allows one to not only find new proteins and/or protein modifications in their expression thanks to its compatibility with mass spectrometry detection, but also a new insight into markers validation. Thus, mini-2DE coupled to western blotting permits to identify and validate post-translational modifications, proteins catabolism and provides a qualitative comparison among different conditions and/or treatments. Herein, we provide a method to study components of protein aggregates found in AD and Lewy body dementia such as the amyloid-beta peptide and the alpha-synuclein. Our method can thus be adapted for the analysis of the proteome and insoluble proteins extract from human brain tissue and mice models too. In parallel, it may provide useful information for the study of molecular and cellular pathways involved in neurodegenerative diseases as well as potential novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  6. [Comparative proteomics study of different processing technology for pilose antler using iTRAQ technology coupled with 2D LC-MS].

    PubMed

    Jin, Meng-ya; Dong, Ling; Luo, Yuan-ming; Yu, Li; Mo, Mei; Hou, Cheng-bo; Li, Zhi-yuan

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to use iTRAQ technology coupled with 2D LC-MS/MS to study the comparative proteomics of different processing technology for pilose antler. 1015 proteins were identified with 2D LC combined with MOLDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Comparative analysis with Protein Pilot (Version 4.5) revealed that 87 proteins were changed (P ≤ 0.05, the ratio of > 1.50 or < 0.60 as the threshold selection of difference proteins), of which 24 were up regulated and 33 were down regulated in the traditional frying process (TFP) compared with the fresh pilose antler (P ≤ 0.05). 7 significant different proteins (P ≤ 0.001), most of these significantly changed proteins were found to be involved in calcium ion binding and ATP binding associated with human healthy. Freeze drying with protective agent (FDP) (Trehalose) can improve the content of significantly different proteins (P ≤ 0.001) including Collagen alpha-1 (XII) chain (COL12A1) and Collagen alpha-1 (II) chain (COL2A1). The significant function involves in platelets activating, maintenance of spermatogonium, and disorder expression in tumor cells. The functional annotation by Hierarchical clustering and GO (gene ontology) showed that the main molecule functions of the proteins significantly changed in these processes were involved in binding (52.7%), catalytic (25.3%), structural molecule and transporter (6.6%).

  7. 2D DIGE analysis of the bursa of Fabricius reveals characteristic proteome profiles for different stages of chicken B-cell development.

    PubMed

    Korte, Julia; Fröhlich, Thomas; Kohn, Marina; Kaspers, Bernd; Arnold, Georg J; Härtle, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Antibody producing B-cells are an essential component of the immune system. In contrast to human and mice where B-cells develop in the bone marrow, chicken B-cells develop in defined stages in the bursa of Fabricius, a gut associated lymphoid tissue. In order to gain a better understanding of critical biological processes like immigration of B-cell precursors into the bursa anlage, their differentiation and final emigration from the bursa we analyzed the proteome dynamics of this organ during embryonic and posthatch development. Samples were taken from four representative developmental stages (embryonic day (ED) 10, ED18, day 2, and day 28) and compared in an extensive 2D DIGE approach comprising six biological replicates per time point. Cluster analysis and PCA demonstrated high reliability and reproducibility of the obtained data set and revealed distinctive proteome profiles for the selected time points, which precisely reflect the differentiation processes. One hundred fifty three protein spots with significantly different intensities were identified by MS. We detected alterations in the abundance of several proteins assigned to retinoic acid metabolism (e.g. retinal-binding protein 5) and the actin-cytoskeleton (e.g. vinculin and gelsolin). By immunohistochemistry, desmin was identified as stromal cell protein associated with the maturation of B-cell follicles. Strongest protein expression difference (10.8-fold) was observed for chloride intracellular channel 2. This protein was thus far not associated with B-cell biology but our data suggest an important function in bursa B-cell development.

  8. Toward defining the human parotid gland salivary proteome and peptidome: identification and characterization using 2D SDS-PAGE, ultrafiltration, HPLC, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Markus; Thomas, Lindsay R; Dixon, Scott E; Newport, George; Agabian, Nina; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Fisher, Susan J

    2005-03-01

    Saliva plays many biological roles, from lubrication and digestion to regulating bacterial and leukocyte adhesion. To understand the functions of individual components and families of molecules, it is important to identify as many salivary proteins as possible. Toward this goal, we used a proteomic approach as the first step in a global analysis of this important body fluid. We collected parotid saliva as the ductal secretion from three human donors and separated the protein components by two-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE). Proteins in gel spots were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting, and the results were confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of selected peptides. Complementing this approach we used ultrafiltration to prepare a low-molecular-weight fraction of parotid saliva, which was analyzed directly or after reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography separation by using mass spectrometric approaches. MS analyses of 2D SDS-PAGE spots revealed known components of saliva, including cystatins, histatins, lysozyme, and isoforms and/or fragments of alpha-amylase, albumin, and proline-rich proteins. We also discovered novel proteins, such as several isoforms of Zn-alpha-2-glycoprotein and secretory actin-binding protein. MS analyses of the ultrafiltrate showed that the low-molecular-weight fraction of parotid saliva was peptide-rich, with novel fragments of proline-rich proteins and histatins in abundance. Experiments using Candida albicans as the test organism showed that at least one of the novel peptides had antifungal activity. Our results show that saliva is a rich source of proteins and peptides that are potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  9. Comparative proteomics profile of osteoblasts cultured on dissimilar hydroxyapatite biomaterials: an iTRAQ-coupled 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinling; Khor, Khiam Aik; Sui, Jianjun; Zhang, Jianhua; Tan, Tuan Lin; Chen, Wei Ning

    2008-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) and its derived bioceramic materials have been widely used for skeletal implants and/or bone repair scaffolds. It has been reported that carbon nanotube (CNT) is able to enhance the brittle ceramic matrix without detrimental to the bioactivity. However, interaction between osteoblasts and these bioceramics, as well as the underlying mechanism of osteoblast proliferation on these bioceramic surfaces remain to be determined. Using iTRAQ-coupled 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis, we report the first comparative proteomics profiling of human osteoblast cells cultured on plane HA and CNT reinforced HA, respectively. Cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes, signaling, and cell growth proteins previous associated with cell adhesion and proliferation were found to be differentially expressed on these two surfaces. The level of these proteins was generally higher in cells adhered to HA surface, indicating a higher level of cellular proliferation in these cells. The significance of these findings was further assessed by Western blot analysis. The differential protein profile in HA and CNT strengthened HA established in our study should be valuable for future design of biocompatible ceramics.

  10. Comparative 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis of ovarian carcinoma cells: toward a reorientation of biosynthesis pathways associated with acquired platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Lincet, Hubert; Guével, Blandine; Pineau, Charles; Allouche, Stéphane; Lemoisson, Edwige; Poulain, Laurent; Gauduchon, Pascal

    2012-02-02

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most frequent cause of cancer death in women. Emergence of chemoresistance in the course of treatments with platinum drugs is in part responsible for therapeutic failures. In order to improve the understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in acquired platinum chemoresistance, we decided to compare the basal protein expression profile of the platinum-sensitive cell line OAW42 and that of its resistant counterpart OAW42-R by a proteomic approach. Reversed-phase HPLC pre-fractionated extracts from both cell lines were subjected to 2D-DIGE coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). Forty eight differentially expressed proteins were identified, 39 being up-regulated and 19 down-regulated in OAW42-R versus OAW42 cells. From the current knowledge on biological activities of most differentially expressed proteins, it can be inferred that the acquisition of resistance was associated with a global reorganization of biochemical pathways favoring the production of precursors for biosynthesis, and with the mobilization of macromolecule quality control mechanisms, preserving RNA and protein integrity under damage-inducing conditions.

  11. Proteome analysis of responses to ascochlorin in a human osteosarcoma cell line by 2-D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Han; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Lee, In-Seon; Magae, Junji; Ando, Kunio; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Chang, Young-Chae

    2006-10-01

    Ascochlorin is a prenyl-phenol compound that was isolated from the fungus Ascochyta viciae. Ascochlorin reduces serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels, suppresses hypertension and tumor development, and ameliorates type I and II diabetes. Here, to better understand the mechanisms by which ascochlorin regulates physiological or pathological events and induces responses in the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we performed differential analysis of the proteome of the human osteosarcoma cells U2OS in response to ascochlorin. In addition, we established the first two-dimensional map of the U2OS proteome. The U2OS cell proteomes with and without treatment with ascochlorin were compared using two-dimensional electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. The largest differences in expression were observed for the epidermal growth factor receptor (4-fold decrease), ribulose-5-phosphate-epimerase (13-fold decrease), ATP-dependent RNA helicase (8-fold decrease), and kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (6-fold decrease). The abundance of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L and minichromosome maintenance protein 7 increased 12- and 8.2-fold, respectively. In addition, Erk 2 was increased 3-fold in U2OS cells treated with ascochlorin. The expression of some selected proteins was confirmed by western blotting, zymography and RT-PCR analysis.

  12. Enhanced dietary formulation to mitigate winter thermal stress in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata): a 2D-DIGE plasma proteome study.

    PubMed

    Schrama, Denise; Richard, Nadège; Silva, Tomé S; Figueiredo, Filipe A; Conceição, Luís E C; Burchmore, Richard; Eckersall, David; Rodrigues, Pedro M L

    2016-11-24

    Low water temperatures during winter are common in farming of gilthead sea bream in the Mediterranean. This causes metabolic disorders that in extreme cases can lead to a syndrome called "winter disease." An improved immunostimulatory nutritional status might mitigate the effects of this thermal metabolic stress. A trial was set up to assess the effects of two different diets on gilthead sea bream physiology and nutritional state through plasma proteome and metabolites. Four groups of 25 adult gilthead sea bream were reared during winter months, being fed either with a control diet (CTRL) or with a diet called "winter feed" (WF). Proteome results show a slightly higher number of proteins upregulated in plasma of fish fed the WF. These proteins are mostly involved in the immune system and cell protection mechanisms. Lipid metabolism was also affected, as shown both by plasma proteome and by the cholesterol plasma levels. Overall, the winter feed diet tested seems to have positive effects in terms of fish condition and nutritional status, reducing the metabolic effects of thermal stress.

  13. Haptoglobin is a serological biomarker for adenocarcinoma lung cancer by using the ProteomeLab PF2D combined with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chang, You-Kang; Lai, Yu-Heng; Chu, Yen; Lee, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Chun-Yao; Wu, Semon

    2016-01-01

    Identification of serological biomarker is urgently needed for cancer screening, monitoring cancer progression, treatment response, and surveillance for recurrence in lung cancer. Therefore, we try to find new serological biomarker that has more specificity and sensitivity for lung cancer diagnostics. In this study, the 2-D liquid phase fractionation system (PF2D) and mass spectrometry approach has been used for comparison the serum profiles between lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Eight proteins were identified form PF2D and subsequently by mass spectrometry. Among these proteins, haptoglobin (HP) and apolipoprotein AI (APOA1) were chosen and validated with turbidimetric assay. We found that HP levels were significantly higher and APOA1 levels were significantly lower in lung cancer patients. However, after the participants were stratified by gender, the expression trends of HP and APOA1 in lung cancer patients existed only in men, which is gender specific phenomenon. HP, APOA1 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), used for distinguishing lung adenocarcinoma, had a sensitivity of 64%, 64% and 79%, respectively. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) of HP, APOA1 and CEA were 0.768, 0.761 and 0.884, respectively. When restricted to male subjects, HP, APOA1 and CEA showed sensitivity of 89%, 73% and 100%, respectively. AUC of HP, APOA1 and CEA were 0.929, 0.840 and 0.877, respectively. Therefore, our results showed that combined with PF2D system and mass spectrometry, this is a promising novel approach to identify new serological biomarkers for lung cancer research. In addition, HP may be a potential serological biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma diagnostics, especially in male subjects. PMID:27648369

  14. Proteome analysis of Sorangium cellulosum employing 2D-HPLC-MS/MS and improved database searching strategies for CID and ETD fragment spectra.

    PubMed

    Leinenbach, Andreas; Hartmer, Ralf; Lubeck, Markus; Kneissl, Benny; Elnakady, Yasser A; Baessmann, Carsten; Müller, Rolf; Huber, Christian G

    2009-09-01

    Shotgun proteome analysis of the myxobacterial model strain for secondary metabolite biosynthesis Sorangium cellulosum was performed employing off-line two-dimensional high-pH reversed-phase HPLC x low-pH ion-pair reversed-phase HPLC and dual tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) as complementary fragmentation techniques. Peptide identification using database searching was optimized for ETD fragment spectra to obtain the maximum number of identifications at equivalent false discovery rates (1.0%) in the evaluation of both fragmentation techniques. In the database search of the CID MS/MS data, the mass tolerance was set to the well-established 0.3 Da window, whereas for ETD data, it was widened to 1.1 Da to account for hydrogen-rearrangement in the radical-intermediate of the peptide precursor ion. To achieve a false discovery rate comparable to the CID results, we increased the significance threshold for peptide identification to 0.001 for the ETD data. The ETD based analysis yielded about 74% of all peptides and about 78% of all proteins compared to the CID-method. In the combined data set, 952 proteins of S. cellulosum were confidently identified by at least two peptides per protein, facilitating the study of the function of regulatory proteins in the social myxobacteria and their role in secondary metabolism.

  15. Identification of glycoprotein receptors within the human salivary proteome for the lectin-like BabA and SabA adhesins of Helicobacter pylori by fluorescence-based 2-D bacterial overlay.

    PubMed

    Walz, Anke; Odenbreit, Stefan; Stühler, Kai; Wattenberg, Andreas; Meyer, Helmut E; Mahdavi, Jafar; Borén, Thomas; Ruhl, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Because gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori takes place via the oral route, possible interactions of this bacterium with human salivary proteins could occur. By using modified 1- and 2-D bacterial overlay, binding of H. pylori adhesins BabA and SabA to the whole range of salivary proteins was explored. Bound salivary receptor molecules were identified by MALDI-MS and by comparison to previously established proteome maps of whole and glandular salivas. By use of adhesin-deficient mutants, binding of H. pylori to MUC7 and gp-340 could be linked to the SabA and BabA adhesins, respectively, whereas binding to MUC5B was associated with both adhesins. Binding of H. pylori to the proline-rich glycoprotein was newly detected and assigned to BabA adhesin whereas the SabA adhesin was found to mediate binding to newly detected receptor molecules, including carbonic anhydrase VI, secretory component, heavy chain of secretory IgA1, parotid secretory protein and zinc-alpha(2)-glycoprotein. Some of these salivary glycoproteins are known to act as scavenger molecules or are involved in innate immunity whereas others might come to modify the pathogenetic properties of this organism. In general, this 2-D bacterial overlay technique represents a useful supplement in adhesion studies of bacteria with complex protein mixtures.

  16. HP-Lattice QSAR for dynein proteins: experimental proteomics (2D-electrophoresis, mass spectrometry) and theoretic study of a Leishmania infantum sequence.

    PubMed

    Dea-Ayuela, María Auxiliadora; Pérez-Castillo, Yunierkis; Meneses-Marcel, Alfredo; Ubeira, Florencio M; Bolas-Fernández, Francisco; Chou, Kuo-Chen; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2008-08-15

    The toxicity and inefficacy of actual organic drugs against Leishmaniosis justify research projects to find new molecular targets in Leishmania species including Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) and Leishmaniamajor (L. major), both important pathogens. In this sense, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods, which are very useful in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry to discover small-sized drugs, may help to identify not only new drugs but also new drug targets, if we apply them to proteins. Dyneins are important proteins of these parasites governing fundamental processes such as cilia and flagella motion, nuclear migration, organization of the mitotic splinde, and chromosome separation during mitosis. However, despite the interest for them as potential drug targets, so far there has been no report whatsoever on dyneins with QSAR techniques. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first QSAR for dynein proteins. We used as input the Spectral Moments of a Markov matrix associated to the HP-Lattice Network of the protein sequence. The data contain 411 protein sequences of different species selected by ClustalX to develop a QSAR that correctly discriminates on average between 92.75% and 92.51% of dyneins and other proteins in four different train and cross-validation datasets. We also report a combined experimental and theoretic study of a new dynein sequence in order to illustrate the utility of the model to search for potential drug targets with a practical example. First, we carried out a 2D-electrophoresis analysis of L. infantum biological samples. Next, we excised from 2D-E gels one spot of interest belonging to an unknown protein or protein fragment in the region M<20,200 and pI<4. We used MASCOT search engine to find proteins in the L. major data base with the highest similarity score to the MS of the protein isolated from L. infantum. We used the QSAR model to predict the new sequence as dynein with probability of 99.99% without

  17. 2-D DIGE analysis of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) testis proteome in wild-caught and hormone-treated F1 fish.

    PubMed

    Forné, Ignasi; Agulleiro, María J; Asensio, Esther; Abián, Joaquín; Cerdà, Joan

    2009-04-01

    In the farmed flatfish Senegalese sole, F1 males reared in captivity often show lower sperm production and fertilization capacity than wild-caught males. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms that may be altered in the F1 testis, we used 2-D DIGE to compare the protein profiling of the testis of wild-caught males at the spermiation stage with that of F1 males showing different stages of germ cell development after hormone treatment in vivo. The abundance of 58 out of 1014 protein spots was found to differ significantly between the groups. De novo identification of these proteins by MS/MS revealed that proteins implicated in oxidoreductase activity, protein catabolism, formation of the zona pellucida receptor, cytoskeleton organization, and lipid binding and metabolism, were regulated in the F1 testes as germ cell development progressed. However, distinct isoforms or PTMs of some of these proteins, as well as of proteins involved in iron and glucose metabolism and ATP production, were expressed at lower levels in the testes of F1 males than in wild fish regardless of the hormone treatment. These results contribute to identifying proteins associated with spermatogenesis not previously described in teleosts, and suggest potential mechanisms that may be involved in the poor reproductive performance of Senegalese sole F1 males.

  18. Comparative 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis of bovine mammary epithelial cells during lactation reveals protein signatures for lactation persistency and milk yield.

    PubMed

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Singh, Surender; Jena, Manoj K; Varshney, Nishant; Kola, Srujana; Kumar, Sudarshan; Kaushik, Jai K; Grover, Sunita; Dang, Ajay K; Mukesh, Manishi; Prakash, B S; Mohanty, Ashok K

    2014-01-01

    Mammary gland is made up of a branching network of ducts that end with alveoli which surrounds the lumen. These alveolar mammary epithelial cells (MEC) reflect the milk producing ability of farm animals. In this study, we have used 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry to identify the protein changes in MEC during immediate early, peak and late stages of lactation and also compared differentially expressed proteins in MEC isolated from milk of high and low milk producing cows. We have identified 41 differentially expressed proteins during lactation stages and 22 proteins in high and low milk yielding cows. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a majority of the differentially expressed proteins are associated in metabolic process, catalytic and binding activity. The differentially expressed proteins were mapped to the available biological pathways and networks involved in lactation. The proteins up-regulated during late stage of lactation are associated with NF-κB stress induced signaling pathways and whereas Akt, PI3K and p38/MAPK signaling pathways are associated with high milk production mediated through insulin hormone signaling.

  19. Principles and examples of gel-based approaches for phosphoprotein analysis.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Birgit; Mayrhofer, Corina

    2015-01-01

    Methods for analyzing the phosphorylation status of proteins are essential to investigate in detail key cellular processes, including signal transduction and cell metabolism. The transience of this post-translational modification and the generally low abundance of phosphoproteins require specific enrichment and/or detection steps prior to analysis. Here, we describe three gel-based approaches for the analysis of differentially expressed phosphoproteins. These approaches comprise (1) the sequential fluorescence staining of two-dimensional (2-D) gels using Pro-Q(®) Diamond and SYPRO(®) Ruby dyes to visualize and quantify phosphoproteins in total cellular lysates as well as (2) affinity enrichment of phosphoproteins in conjunction with sequential fluorescence staining of the 2-D gels and (3) affinity enrichment of proteins prior to pre-electrophoretic fluorescence labeling and 2-D gel electrophoresis.

  20. Recent developments and contributions from Chinese scientists in multidimensional separations for proteomics and traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingxia; Deng, Chunhui; Lin, Shuang; Hu, Fengli; Tang, Jia; Yao, Ning; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2007-04-01

    The most basic task in proteomics remains the detection and identification of proteins from a biological sample, and the most traditional way to achieve this goal consists in protein separations performed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). Yet the 2-D PAGE-mass spectrometry (MS) approach has its drawbacks with regard to automation, sensitivity, and throughput. Consequently, considerable effort has been devoted to the development of non-gel-based proteome separation technologies in an effort to alleviate the shortcomings of 2-D PAGE. In addition, traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), due to their long period of clinical testing and reliable therapeutic efficacy, are attracting increased global attention. However, hundreds or even thousands of components are usually present in TCMs, which results in great difficulties of separation. As a mainstream separation tool, multidimensional liquid separation systems have shown powerful separation ability, high peak capacity, and excellent detectability in the analysis of complex samples including biological samples and TCMs, etc. Therefore, this review emphasizes the most recent advances in multidimensional liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis-based separation techniques, and the corresponding applications in proteomics and TCMs. In view of the significant contributions from Chinese scientists, this review focuses mainly on the work of Chinese scientists in the above fields.

  1. Proteomic analysis in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Oda, Teiji; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry technology and bioinformatics using clinical human samples have expanded quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular research. There are two major proteomic strategies: namely, "gel-based" or "gel-free" proteomics coupled with either "top-down" or "bottom-up" mass spectrometry. Both are introduced into the proteomic analysis using plasma or serum sample targeting 'biomarker" searches of aortic aneurysm and tissue samples, such as from the aneurysmal wall, calcific aortic valve, or myocardial tissue, investigating pathophysiological protein interactions and post-translational modifications. We summarize the proteomic studies that analyzed human samples taken during cardiovascular surgery to investigate disease processes, in order to better understand the system-wide changes behind known molecular factors and specific signaling pathways.

  2. Proteome Studies of Filamentous Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Panisko, Ellen A.

    2011-04-20

    The continued fast pace of fungal genome sequence generation has enabled proteomic analysis of a wide breadth of organisms that span the breadth of the Kingdom Fungi. There is some phylogenetic bias to the current catalog of fungi with reasonable DNA sequence databases (genomic or EST) that could be analyzed at a global proteomic level. However, the rapid development of next generation sequencing platforms has lowered the cost of genome sequencing such that in the near future, having a genome sequence will no longer be a time or cost bottleneck for downstream proteomic (and transcriptomic) analyses. High throughput, non-gel based proteomics offers a snapshot of proteins present in a given sample at a single point in time. There are a number of different variations on the general method and technologies for identifying peptides in a given sample. We present a method that can serve as a “baseline” for proteomic studies of fungi.

  3. An improved protocol to study the plant cell wall proteome

    PubMed Central

    Printz, Bruno; Dos Santos Morais, Raphaël; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Sergeant, Kjell; Lutts, Stanley; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Renaut, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall proteins were extracted from alfalfa stems according to a three-steps extraction procedure using sequentially CaCl2, EGTA, and LiCl-complemented buffers. The efficiency of this protocol for extracting cell wall proteins was compared with the two previously published methods optimized for alfalfa stem cell wall protein analysis. Following LC-MS/MS analysis the three-steps extraction procedure resulted in the identification of the highest number of cell wall proteins (242 NCBInr identifiers) and gave the lowest percentage of non-cell wall proteins (about 30%). However, the three protocols are rather complementary than substitutive since 43% of the identified proteins were specific to one protocol. This three-step protocol was therefore selected for a more detailed proteomic characterization using 2D-gel electrophoresis. With this technique, 75% of the identified proteins were shown to be fraction-specific and 72.7% were predicted as belonging to the cell wall compartment. Although, being less sensitive than LC-MS/MS approaches in detecting and identifying low-abundant proteins, gel-based approaches are valuable tools for the differentiation and relative quantification of protein isoforms and/or modified proteins. In particular isoforms, having variations in their amino-acid sequence and/or carrying different N-linked glycan chains were detected and characterized. This study highlights how the extracting protocols as well as the analytical techniques devoted to the study of the plant cell wall proteome are complementary and how they may be combined to elucidate the dynamism of the plant cell wall proteome in biological studies. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001927. PMID:25914713

  4. Normalization and expression changes in predefined sets of proteins using 2D gel electrophoresis: A proteomic study of L-DOPA induced dyskinesia in an animal model of Parkinson's disease using DIGE

    PubMed Central

    Kultima, Kim; Scholz, Birger; Alm, Henrik; Sköld, Karl; Svensson, Marcus; Crossman, Alan R; Bezard, Erwan; Andrén, Per E; Lönnstedt, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    Background Two-Dimensional Difference In Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) is a powerful tool for measuring differences in protein expression between samples or conditions. However, to remove systematic variability within and between gels the data has to be normalized. In this study we examined the ability of four existing and four novel normalization methods to remove systematic bias in data produced with 2D-DIGE. We also propose a modification of an existing method where the statistical framework determines whether a set of proteins shows an association with the predefined phenotypes of interest. This method was applied to our data generated from a monkey model (Macaca fascicularis) of Parkinson's disease. Results Using 2D-DIGE we analysed the protein content of the striatum from 6 control and 21 MPTP-treated monkeys, with or without de novo or long-term L-DOPA administration. There was an intensity and spatial bias in the data of all the gels examined in this study. Only two of the eight normalization methods evaluated ('2D loess+scale' and 'SC-2D+quantile') successfully removed both the intensity and spatial bias. In 'SC-2D+quantile' we extended the commonly used loess normalization method against dye bias in two-channel microarray systems to suit systems with three or more channels. Further, by using the proposed method, Differential Expression in Predefined Proteins Sets (DEPPS), several sets of proteins associated with the priming effects of L-DOPA in the striatum in parkinsonian animals were identified. Three of these sets are proteins involved in energy metabolism and one set involved proteins which are part of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Conclusion Comparison of the different methods leads to a series of methodological recommendations for the normalization and the analysis of data, depending on the experimental design. Due to the nature of 2D-DIGE data we recommend that the p-values obtained in significance tests should be used as rankings only. Individual

  5. Analyzing the platelet proteome.

    PubMed

    García, Angel; Zitzmann, Nicole; Watson, Steve P

    2004-08-01

    During the last 10 years, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a key tool for protein analysis and has underpinned the emerging field of proteomics. Using high-throughput tandem MS/MS following protein separation, it is potentially possible to analyze hundreds to thousands of proteins in a sample at a time. This technology can be used to analyze the protein content (i.e., the proteome) of any cell or tissue and complements the powerful field of genomics. The technology is particularly suitable for platelets because of the absence of a nucleus. Cellular proteins can be separated by either gel-based methods such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography (LC) -MS/MS or by multidimensional LC-MS/MS. Prefractionation techniques, such as subcellular fractionations or immunoprecipitations, can be used to improve the analysis. Each method has particular advantages and disadvantages. Proteomics can be used to compare the proteome of basal and diseased platelets, helping to reveal information on the molecular basis of the disease.

  6. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  7. Quantitative Proteomics of Gut-Derived Th1 and Th1/Th17 Clones Reveal the Presence of CD28+ NKG2D- Th1 Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells*

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Tahira; Sollid, Ludvig Magne; Olsen, Ingrid; de Souza, Gustavo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    T-helper cells are differentiated from CD4+ T cells and are traditionally characterized by inflammatory or immunosuppressive responses in contrast to cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Mass-spectrometry studies on T-helper cells are rare. In this study, we aimed to identify the proteomes of human Th1 and Th1/Th17 clones derived from intestinal biopsies of Crohn's disease patients and to identify differentially expressed proteins between the two phenotypes. Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease, with predominantly Th1- and Th17-mediated response where cells of the “mixed” phenotype Th1/Th17 have also been commonly found. High-resolution mass spectrometry was used for protein identification and quantitation. In total, we identified 7401 proteins from Th1 and Th1/Th17 clones, where 334 proteins were differentially expressed. Major differences were observed in cytotoxic proteins that were overrepresented in the Th1 clones. The findings were validated by flow cytometry analyses using staining with anti-granzyme B and anti-perforin and by a degranulation assay, confirming higher cytotoxic features of Th1 compared with Th1/Th17 clones. By testing a larger panel of T-helper cell clones from seven different Crohn's disease patients, we concluded that only a subgroup of the Th1 cell clones had cytotoxic features, and these expressed the surface markers T-cell-specific surface glycoprotein CD28 and were negative for expression of natural killer group 2 member D. PMID:26637539

  8. Proteomics Research in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Davalieva, Katarina; Maleva Kostovska, Ivana; Dwork, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite intense scientific efforts, the neuropathology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia are poorly understood. Proteomic studies, by testing large numbers of proteins for associations with disease, may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of schizophrenia. They may also indicate the types and locations of cells most likely to harbor pathological alterations. Investigations using proteomic approaches have already provided much information on quantitative and qualitative protein patterns in postmortem brain tissue, peripheral tissues and body fluids. Different proteomic technologies such as 2-D PAGE, 2-D DIGE, SELDI-TOF, shotgun proteomics with label-based (ICAT), and label-free (MSE) quantification have been applied to the study of schizophrenia for the past 15 years. This review summarizes the results, mostly from brain but also from other tissues and bodily fluids, of proteomics studies in schizophrenia. Emphasis is given to proteomics platforms, varying sources of material, proposed candidate biomarkers emerging from comparative proteomics studies, and the specificity of the putative markers in terms of other mental illnesses. We also compare proteins altered in schizophrenia with reports of protein or mRNA sequences that are relatively enriched in specific cell types. While proteomic studies of schizophrenia find abnormalities in the expression of many proteins that are not cell type-specific, there appears to be a disproportionate representation of proteins whose synthesis and localization are highly enriched in one or more brain cell type compared with other types of brain cells. Two of the three proteins most commonly altered in schizophrenia are aldolase C and glial fibrillary acidic protein, astrocytic proteins with entirely different functions, but the studies are approximately evenly divided with regard to the direction of the differences and the concordance or discordance between the two proteins. Alterations of common myelin

  9. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  10. An agarose-gel based method for transporting cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lingzhi; Li, Chufang; Chen, Ling; Li, Zhiyuan

    2009-12-16

    Cryopreserved cells stored in dry ice or liquid nitrogen is the classical method for transporting cells between research laboratories in different cities around the world in order to maintain cell viability. An alternative method is to ship the live cells in flasks filled with cell culture medium. Both methods have limitations of either a requirement on special shipping container or short times for the cells to survive on the shipping process. We have recently developed an agarose gel based method for directly transporting the live adherent cells in cell culture plates or dishes in ambient temperature. This convenient method simplifies the transportation of live cells in long distance that can maintain cells in good viability for several days.

  11. Proteome-pI: proteome isoelectric point database

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Lukasz P.

    2017-01-01

    Proteome-pI is an online database containing information about predicted isoelectric points for 5029 proteomes calculated using 18 methods. The isoelectric point, the pH at which a particular molecule carries no net electrical charge, is an important parameter for many analytical biochemistry and proteomics techniques, especially for 2D gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), capillary isoelectric focusing, liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and X-ray protein crystallography. The database, available at http://isoelectricpointdb.org allows the retrieval of virtual 2D-PAGE plots and the development of customised fractions of proteome based on isoelectric point and molecular weight. Moreover, Proteome-pI facilitates statistical comparisons of the various prediction methods as well as biological investigation of protein isoelectric point space in all kingdoms of life. For instance, using Proteome-pI data, it is clear that Eukaryotes, which evolved tight control of homeostasis, encode proteins with pI values near the cell pH. In contrast, Archaea living frequently in extreme environments can possess proteins with a wide range of isoelectric points. The database includes various statistics and tools for interactive browsing, searching and sorting. Apart from data for individual proteomes, datasets corresponding to major protein databases such as UniProtKB/TrEMBL and the NCBI non-redundant (nr) database have also been precalculated and made available in CSV format. PMID:27789699

  12. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis applied for analytical proteomics: fundamentals and applications to the study of plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Sandra Cristina Capaldi; Barbosa, Herbert de Sousa; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2011-10-21

    The present review reports the principles, fundamentals and some applications of two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis for analytical proteomics based on plant proteome analysis, also emphasizing some advantages of 2-D DIGE over 2-D PAGE techniques. Some fluorescent protein labeling reagents, methods of protein labeling, models of 2-D DIGE experiments, and some limitations of this technique are presented and discussed in terms of 2-D DIGE plant proteomes. Finally, some practical applications of this technique are pointed out, emphasizing its potentialities in plant proteomics.

  13. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  14. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  15. A Proteomic Perspective on the Bacterial Adaptation to Cold: Integrating OMICs Data of the Psychrotrophic Bacterium Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7

    PubMed Central

    Baraúna, Rafael A.; Freitas, Dhara Y.; Pinheiro, Juliana C.; Folador, Adriana R. C.; Silva, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Since the publication of one of the first studies using 2D gel electrophoresis by Patrick H. O’Farrell in 1975, several other studies have used that method to evaluate cellular responses to different physicochemical variations. In environmental microbiology, bacterial adaptation to cold environments is a “hot topic” because of its application in biotechnological processes. As in other fields, gel-based and gel-free proteomic methods have been used to determine the molecular mechanisms of adaptation to cold of several psychrotrophic and psychrophilic bacterial species. In this review, we aim to describe and discuss these main molecular mechanisms of cold adaptation, referencing proteomic studies that have made significant contributions to our current knowledge in the area. Furthermore, we use Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 as a model organism to present the importance of integrating genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data. This species has been isolated in Antarctica and previously studied at all three omic levels. The integration of these data permitted more robust conclusions about the mechanisms of bacterial adaptation to cold. PMID:28248259

  16. Wetting mechanisms of gel-based controlled-release fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Shavit, U; Reiss, M; Shaviv, A

    2003-02-14

    The release mechanism of gel-based controlled release fertilizers (CRFs) involves water penetration into dry mixtures of fertilizers and gel forming polymers. Water penetration provides an upper limit to the whole release process. Where wetting prediction is often based on models that describe the flow of the liquid phase, vapor motion may become significant when a sharp wetting front exists. In this study we examine the role of vapor and fluid flows in the wetting process of CRFs consisting of urea or KNO(3) mixed with polyacrylamide (PAM). Vapor adsorption isotherms were obtained for typical fertilizer-PAM mixtures. Wetting and release experiments were conducted by dividing the CRFs into regions alternately filled with a pure fertilizer and mixtures of PAM and fertilizer. The experiments were designed in such a way that when the wetting front reaches a mixtures interface, its motion depends on the gradient imposed by the difference in osmotic potential (OP). The coupled equations of vapor and liquid flow in initially dry conditions were solved numerically to demonstrate the conceptual understanding gained by the experiments. The results show that wetting front motion is affected by transport and adsorption of vapor. It was also shown that the release rate is different when wetting is governed by vapor flow or by liquid flow. The release pattern from a multi-regions device was consistent with the wetting pattern, demonstrating the possibility to tailor the release according to periods of peak demand.

  17. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in bacterial proteomics.

    PubMed

    Curreem, Shirly O T; Watt, Rory M; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2012-05-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is a gel-based technique widely used for analyzing the protein composition of biological samples. It is capable of resolving complex mixtures containing more than a thousand protein components into individual protein spots through the coupling of two orthogonal biophysical separation techniques: isoelectric focusing (first dimension) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (second dimension). 2-DE is ideally suited for analyzing the entire expressed protein complement of a bacterial cell: its proteome. Its relative simplicity and good reproducibility have led to 2-DE being widely used for exploring proteomics within a wide range of environmental and medically-relevant bacteria. Here we give a broad overview of the basic principles and historical development of gel-based proteomics, and how this powerful approach can be applied for studying bacterial biology and physiology. We highlight specific 2-DE applications that can be used to analyze when, where and how much proteins are expressed. The links between proteomics, genomics and mass spectrometry are discussed. We explore how proteomics involving tandem mass spectrometry can be used to analyze (post-translational) protein modifications or to identify proteins of unknown origin by de novo peptide sequencing. The use of proteome fractionation techniques and non-gel-based proteomic approaches are also discussed. We highlight how the analysis of proteins secreted by bacterial cells (secretomes or exoproteomes) can be used to study infection processes or the immune response. This review is aimed at non-specialists who wish to gain a concise, comprehensive and contemporary overview of the nature and applications of bacterial proteomics.

  18. A single lysis solution for the analysis of tissue samples by different proteomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Pavel; Celis, Julio E; Gromova, Irina; Rank, Fritz; Timmermans-Wielenga, Vera; Moreira, José M A

    2008-12-01

    Cancer, being a major healthcare concern worldwide, is one of the main targets for the application of emerging proteomic technologies and these tools promise to revolutionize the way cancer will be diagnosed and treated in the near future. Today, as a result of the unprecedented advances that have taken place in molecular biology, cell biology and genomics there is a pressing need to accelerate the translation of basic discoveries into clinical applications. This need, compounded by mounting evidence that cellular model systems are unable to fully recapitulate all biological aspects of human dissease, is driving scientists to increasingly use clinically relevant samples for biomarker and target discovery. Tissues are heterogeneous and as a result optimization of sample preparation is critical for generating accurate, representative, and highly reproducible quantitative data. Although a large number of protocols for preparation of tissue lysates has been published, so far no single recipe is able to provide a "one-size fits all" solubilization procedure that can be used to analyse the same lysate using different proteomics technologies. Here we present evidence showing that cell lysis buffer 1 (CLB1), a lysis solution commercialized by Zeptosens [a division of Bayer (Schweiz) AG], provides excellent sample solubilization and very high 2D PAGE protein resolution both when using carrier ampholytes and immobilized pH gradient strips. Moreover, this buffer can also be used for array-based proteomics (reverse-phase lysate arrays or direct antibody arrays), allowing the direct comparison of qualitative and quantitative data yielded by these technologies when applied to the same samples. The usefulness of the CLB1 solution for gel-based proteomics was further established by 2D PAGE analysis of a number of technically demanding specimens such as breast carcinoma core needle biopsies and problematic tissues such as brain cortex, cerebellum, skeletal muscle, kidney cortex and

  19. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  20. Seeing through the trick of cancer cells via 2D gels.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lei

    2013-12-01

    The advancement of modern therapy concepts has dramatically extended the postsurvival rates of patients with malignant gastric cancer. However, a remaining setback is the drug resistance of recurrent cancer, which casts a dark shadow over disease prognosis. The original work of Klein et al. [Proteomics Clin. Appl. 2013, 7, 813-824] has outlined a rational experimental approach to decipher the mechanistic pathway of cancer drug resistance by proteomic approach. They used gel-based comparative proteomics to analyze the nuclear proteome of a human gastric cancer cell line (AGS) with and without inactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), a transcription factor and master regulator of hypoxia adaptation. Using the classical 2DE-MS approach, these researchers observed 163 HIF-1 responsive proteins, among which over half of them could be confidently identified by MS. From this large dataset, the authors proposed an enhanced nuclear translocation of some proteasomal proteins upon inactivation of HIF-1. Overall, this work appropriately used proteomics as a hypothesis-free, top-down approach to dissect imperative clinical problems.

  1. Proteomic Expression Patterns in Fathead Minnows Exposed to Trenbolone and Flutamide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Insights into androgen signaling in the liver of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) was obtained using non-gel based proteomics analysis. We exposed female fathead minnows for 48 hr through the water to a prototypical androgen (17b-trenbolone, 5 ?g/L), a prototypical anti-andr...

  2. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  3. A Two-Dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) Protocol for Studies of Neural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes the basics of two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for multiplex analysis of up to distinct proteomes. The example given describes the analysis of undifferentiated and differentiated neural precursor cells labelled with fluorescent Cy3 and Cy5 dyes in comparison to a pooled standard labelled with Cy2. After labelling, the proteomes are mixed together and electrophoresed on the same 2D gels. Scanning the gels at wavelengths specific for each dye allows direct overlay of the two different proteomes and the differences in abundance of specific protein spots can be determined through comparison to the pooled standard.

  4. Comparative profiling of the sperm proteome.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ashling; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-02-01

    The highly complex and species-selective mechanism of fertilization is a central theme of developmental biology. Gametogenesis, sperm activation, and egg-sperm recognition are fundamental biological processes, warranting detailed studies into the molecular composition of gametes. Biological MS has been instrumental for the comprehensive itemizing of gamete proteomes. The protein constellation of sperm cells and its subcellular structures has been established for a variety of animal species. Spermatogenesis and the crucial activation of sperm cells as a prerequisite of successful fertilization and physiological adaptations to external stressors was investigated using proteomics, as well as the underlying mechanisms of male infertility with respect to proteome-wide alterations. This review outlines recent achievements of sperm proteomics and exemplifies the usefulness of gel-based surveys by outlining the comparative analysis of abnormal spermatozoa in globozoospermia. Besides label-free MS techniques and cell-based labeling methodology, high-resolution fluorescence 2DE has been shown to be highly suitable as a proteomic biomarker discovery tool in sperm protein research. The appropriateness of novel protein markers for improving our understanding of normal spermatogenesis and sperm activation versus the molecular pathogenesis of male infertility will be discussed. New biomarker candidates might be useful to improve diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic aspects of infertility.

  5. Mitochondrial Proteome Studies in Seeds during Germination

    PubMed Central

    Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Janska, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination is considered to be one of the most critical phases in the plant life cycle, establishing the next generation of a plant species. It is an energy-demanding process that requires functioning mitochondria. One of the earliest events of seed germination is progressive development of structurally simple and metabolically quiescent promitochondria into fully active and cristae-containing mitochondria, known as mitochondrial biogenesis. This is a complex and tightly regulated process, which is accompanied by sequential and dynamic gene expression, protein synthesis, and post-translational modifications. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive summary of seed mitochondrial proteome studies during germination of various plant model organisms. We describe different gel-based and gel-free proteomic approaches used to characterize mitochondrial proteomes of germinating seeds as well as challenges and limitations of these proteomic studies. Furthermore, the dynamic changes in the abundance of the mitochondrial proteomes of germinating seeds are illustrated, highlighting numerous mitochondrial proteins involved in respiration, tricarboxycylic acid (TCA) cycle, metabolism, import, and stress response as potentially important for seed germination. We then review seed mitochondrial protein carbonylation, phosphorylation, and S-nitrosylation as well as discuss the possible link between these post-translational modifications (PTMs) and the regulation of seed germination. PMID:28248229

  6. Proteomic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum induced alterations in humans from different endemic regions of India to decipher malaria pathogenesis and identify surrogate markers of severity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Kumar, Vipin; Bhave, Amruta; Singh, Vaidhvi; Gogtay, Nithya J; Thatte, Urmila M; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-08

    India significantly contributes to the global malaria burden and has the largest population in the world at risk of malaria. This study aims to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of non-severe and severe infections by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to identify markers related to disease severity and to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis and host immune responses. In discovery phase of the study, a comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis was performed using gel-based (2D-DIGE) and gel-free (iTRAQ) techniques on two independent mass spectrometry platforms (ESI-Q-TOF and Q-Exactive mass spectrometry), and selected targets were validated by ELISA. Proteins showing altered serum abundance in falciparum malaria patients revealed the modulation of different physiological pathways including chemokine and cytokine signaling, IL-12 signaling and production in macrophages, complement cascades, blood coagulation, and protein ubiquitination pathways. Some muscle related and cytoskeletal proteins such as titin and galectin-3-binding protein were found to be up-regulated in severe malaria patients. Hemoglobin levels and platelet counts were also found to be drastically lower in severe malaria patients. Identified proteins including serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein E and haptoglobin, which exhibited sequential alterations in their serum abundance in different severity levels of malaria, could serve as potential predictive markers for disease severity. To the best of our information, we report here the first comprehensive analysis describing the serum proteomic alterations observed in severe P. falciparum infected patients from different malaria endemic regions of India. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  7. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  8. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  9. USING PROTEOMICS TO IMPROVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Proteomics to Improve Risk Assessment of Human Exposure to Environmental Agents.
    Authors: Witold M. Winnik
    Key Words (4): Proteomics, LC/MS, Western Blots, 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis, toxicity

    The goal of this project is to use proteomics for the character...

  10. Analysis of the human saliva proteome.

    PubMed

    Amado, Francisco Manuel Lemos; Vitorino, Rui Miguel Pinheiro; Domingues, Pedro Miguel Dimas Neves; Lobo, Maria João Calheiros; Duarte, José Alberto Ramos

    2005-08-01

    Interest in the characterization of the salivary proteome has increased in the last few years. This review discusses the different techniques and methodologies applied to the separation and identification of salivary proteins. Nowadays, proteomic techniques are the state of the art for the analysis of biologic materials and saliva is no exception. 2D electrophoresis and tryptic digest analysis by mass spectrometry are the typical methodology, but new approaches using 2D liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methods have already been introduced for saliva analysis. Due to their important physiologic role in the oral cavity, low-molecular-weight proteins and peptides are also included in this article and the methodologies discussed.

  11. Application of a label-free, gel-free quantitative proteomics method for ecotoxicological studies of small fish species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-GE) remains the basis for many ecotoxicoproteomic analyses, new, non gel-based methods are beginning to be applied to overcome throughput and coverage limitations of 2D-GE. The overall objective of our research was to apply a comprehe...

  12. Quantitative proteomic analyses of crop seedlings subjected to stress conditions; a commentary.

    PubMed

    Nanjo, Yohei; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative proteomics is one of the analytical approaches used to clarify crop responses to stress conditions. Recent remarkable advances in proteomics technologies allow for the identification of a wider range of proteins than was previously possible. Current proteomic methods fall into roughly two categories: gel-based quantification methods, including conventional two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, and MS-based quantification methods consists of label-based and label-free protein quantification approaches. Although MS-based quantification methods have become mainstream in recent years, gel-based quantification methods are still useful for proteomic analyses. Previous studies examining crop responses to stress conditions reveal that each method has both advantages and disadvantages in regard to protein quantification in comparative proteomic analyses. Furthermore, one proteomics approach cannot be fully substituted by another technique. In this review, we discuss and highlight the basis and applications of quantitative proteomic analysis approaches in crop seedlings in response to flooding and osmotic stress as two environmental stresses.

  13. Feature Detection Techniques for Preprocessing Proteomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kimberly F.; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous gel-based and nongel-based technologies are used to detect protein changes potentially associated with disease. The raw data, however, are abundant with technical and structural complexities, making statistical analysis a difficult task. Low-level analysis issues (including normalization, background correction, gel and/or spectral alignment, feature detection, and image registration) are substantial problems that need to be addressed, because any large-level data analyses are contingent on appropriate and statistically sound low-level procedures. Feature detection approaches are particularly interesting due to the increased computational speed associated with subsequent calculations. Such summary data corresponding to image features provide a significant reduction in overall data size and structure while retaining key information. In this paper, we focus on recent advances in feature detection as a tool for preprocessing proteomic data. This work highlights existing and newly developed feature detection algorithms for proteomic datasets, particularly relating to time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Note, however, that the associated data structures (i.e., spectral data, and images containing spots) used as input for these methods are obtained via all gel-based and nongel-based methods discussed in this manuscript, and thus the discussed methods are likewise applicable. PMID:20467457

  14. Proteome-Wide Analysis and Diel Proteomic Profiling of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation. PMID:24914774

  15. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  16. Experimental data of inorganic gel based smart window using silica sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dayeon; Choi, Woosuk; Park, Jun-Young; Kim, Ki Buem; Lee, Naesung; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Hyun Sub; Kong, Nak Kyoung

    2016-12-01

    In this article experimental data are presented for inorganic gel based smart window fabricated using silica sol-gel process. Parallel beam transmittances were measured as functions of voltages for samples fabricated with different concentrations of nitric acid. Spectroscopic transmittance data at different driving voltages for samples fabricated with different LC concentrations are shown. Transmittance spectra of the Si-Ti based gel-based-liquid-crystal (GDLC) device measured as different driving voltages were compared with those of PDLC. GDLC showed much lower operating voltages, 10-15 V, for on-state. Formation of the LC droplet in gelation process is illustrated. The methyl organic group surrounds LC droplets. Demonstration of GDLC based smart window showed the successful operation with low driving voltages. GDLC window shows clear color, even at off-state, compared with PDLC.

  17. Recent technological developments in proteomics shed new light on translational research on diabetic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhang; Yang, Cheng; Tao, Yimin; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Yufan

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has become a heavy social burden worldwide, but at present it is still difficult to predict and diagnose this ailment at an early stage. Various proteomics approaches have been applied to the pathophysiological study of diabetic microangiopathy. Conventional proteomics methods, including gel-based methods, exhibit limited sensitivity and robustness and have typically been used in high- or middle-abundance biomarker discovery. Clinical samples from patients with diabetic microangiopathy, such as biopsy samples, are minute in size. Therefore sample preparation, quantitative labelling and mass spectrometry technologies need to be optimized for low-abundance protein detection, multiple-sample processing and precision quantitation. In this review, we briefly introduce the recent technological developments in proteomics methods and summarize current proteomics-based, translational research on diabetic microangiopathy. Recent technological developments in proteomics tools may shed new light on the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy and biomarkers and therapeutic targets related to this condition.

  18. The gel electrophoresis markup language (GelML) from the Proteomics Standards Initiative.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frank; Hoogland, Christine; Martinez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Wipat, Anil; Hermjakob, Henning; Almeida, Jonas S; Stanislaus, Romesh; Paton, Norman W; Jones, Andrew R

    2010-09-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation's Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed the GelML (gel electrophoresis markup language) data exchange format for representing gel electrophoresis experiments performed in proteomics investigations. The format closely follows the reporting guidelines for gel electrophoresis, which are part of the Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment (MIAPE) set of modules. GelML supports the capture of metadata (such as experimental protocols) and data (such as gel images) resulting from gel electrophoresis so that laboratories can be compliant with the MIAPE Gel Electrophoresis guidelines, while allowing such data sets to be exchanged or downloaded from public repositories. The format is sufficiently flexible to capture data from a broad range of experimental processes, and complements other PSI formats for MS data and the results of protein and peptide identifications to capture entire gel-based proteome workflows. GelML has resulted from the open standardisation process of PSI consisting of both public consultation and anonymous review of the specifications.

  19. Urine collected from diapers can be used for 2-D PAGE in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Mary Jayne; Griffin, Angela; Su, Ruifeng; Merchant, Michael; Klein, Jon

    2009-08-01

    Urinary proteomic profiling has potential to identify candidate biomarkers of renal injury in infants provided an adequate urine sample can be obtained. Although diapers are used to obtain urine for clinical evaluation, their use for proteomic analysis has not been investigated. We therefore performed feasibility studies on the use of diaper-extracted urine for 2-D PAGE. Pediatric waste urine (2-20 mL) was applied to gel-containing, non-gel and cotton-gauze diapers and then mechanically expressed. Urine volume and total protein were measured pre- and post-extraction. Proteins were separated via 2-D PAGE following application of urine (20-40 mL) to each matrix. 2-D PAGE was also performed on clinical specimens collected using each diaper type. Differences in the adsorption and retention of urine volume and protein were noted between matrices. Non-gel and cotton-gauze diapers provided the best protein/volume recovery and the lowest interference with the Bradford assay. 2-D PAGE was also successfully completed using urine samples from both cotton fiber matrices. Conversely, samples from low-gel diapers demonstrated poor protein separation and reproducibility. Diapers containing cotton-fiber matrices appear adequate for 2-D PAGE. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of resolved proteins using replicate, high-resolution gels will be required, however, before diaper-extracted urine can be applied in proteomic profiling.

  20. A gel-based visual immunoassay for non-instrumental detection of chloramphenicol in food samples.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meng; Sheng, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Junping; Yang, Yijin; Zhang, Shuguang; Goryacheva, Irina Yu; Wang, Shuo

    2012-11-02

    A gel-based non-instrumental immuno-affinity assay was developed for the rapid screening of chloramphenicol (CAP) in food samples with the limit of detection (LOD) of 1 μg L(-1). The immuno-affinity test column (IATC) consisted of a test layer containing anti-CAP antibody coupled gel, and a control layer with anti-HRP antibody coupled gel. Based on the direct competitive immuno-reaction and the horseradish peroxidase enzymatic reaction, the test results could be evaluated visually. Basically, blue color development represented the negative results, while the absence of color development represented the positive results. In this study, CAP spiked samples of raw milk, pasteurized milk, UHT milk, skimmed milk powder, acacia honey, date honey, fish and shrimp were tested. Little or none sample pretreatment was required for this assay. The whole procedure was completed within 10min. In conclusion, the gel-based immuno-affinity test is a simple, rapid, and promising on-site screening method for CAP residues in food samples, with no instrumental requirement.

  1. Mathematical biodescriptors of proteomics maps: background and applications.

    PubMed

    Basak, Subhash C; Gute, Brian D

    2008-05-01

    This article reviews recent developments in the formulation and application of biodescriptors to characterize proteomics maps. Such biodescriptors can be derived by applying techniques from discrete mathematics (graph theory, linear algebra and information theory). This review focuses on the development of biodescriptors for proteomics maps derived from 2D gel electrophoresis. Preliminary results demonstrated that such descriptors have a reasonable ability to differentiate between proteomics patterns that result from exposure to closely related individual chemicals and complex mixtures, such as the jet fuel JP-8. Further research is required to evaluate the utility of these proteomics-based biodescriptors for drug discovery and predictive toxicology.

  2. First systematic plant proteomics workshop in Botany Department, University of Delhi: transferring proteomics knowledge to next-generation researchers and students.

    PubMed

    Deswal, Renu; Abat, Jasmeet Kaur; Sehrawat, Ankita; Gupta, Ravi; Kashyap, Prakriti; Sharma, Shruti; Sharma, Bhavana; Chaurasia, Satya Prakash; Chanu, Sougrakpam Yaiphabi; Masi, Antonio; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Agrawal, Raj; Dunn, Michael J; Renaut, Jenny; Rakwal, Randeep

    2014-07-01

    International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) outlined ten initiatives to promote plant proteomics in each and every country. With greater emphasis in developing countries, one of those was to "organize workshops at national and international levels to train manpower and exchange information". This third INPPO highlights covers the workshop organized for the very first time in a developing country, India, at the Department of Botany in University of Delhi on December 26-30, 2013 titled - "1(st) Plant Proteomics Workshop / Training Program" under the umbrella of INPPO India-Nepal chapter. Selected 20 participants received on-hand training mainly on gel-based proteomics approach along with manual booklet and parallel lectures on this and associated topics. In house, as well as invited experts drawn from other Universities and Institutes (national and international), delivered talks on different aspects of gel-based and gel-free proteomics. Importance of gel-free proteomics approach, translational proteomics, and INPPO roles were presented and interactively discussed by a group of three invited speakers Drs. Ganesh Kumar Agrawal (Nepal), Randeep Rakwal (Japan), and Antonio Masi (Italy). Given the output of this systematic workshop, it was proposed and thereafter decided to be organized every alternate year; the next workshop will be held in 2015. Furthermore, possibilities on providing advanced training to those students / researchers / teachers with basic knowledge in proteomics theory and experiments at national and international levels were discussed. INPPO is committed to generating next-generation trained manpower in proteomics, and it would only happen by the firm determination of scientists to come forward and do it.

  3. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  4. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  5. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  6. Proteomic Profiling of Rat Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Marriott, Gerard; Bless, Diane M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Proteomic methodologies offer promise in elucidating the systemwide cellular and molecular processes that characterize normal and diseased thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. This study examined methodological issues central to the application of 2-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) to the study of…

  7. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  8. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  9. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  10. Discovery of regulatory molecular events and biomarkers using 2D capillary chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Powell, David W; Merchant, Michael L; Link, Andrew J

    2006-02-01

    An important component of proteomic research is the high-throughput discovery of novel proteins and protein-protein interactions that control molecular events that contribute to critical cellular functions and human disease. The interactions of proteins are essential for cellular functions. Identifying perturbation of normal cellular protein interactions is vital for understanding the disease process and intervening to control the disease. A second area of proteomics research is the discovery of proteins that will serve as biomarkers for the early detection, diagnosis and drug treatment response for specific diseases. These studies have been referred to as clinical proteomics. To discover biomarkers, proteomics research employs the quantitative comparison of peptide and protein expression in body fluids and tissues from diseased individuals (case) versus normal individuals (control). Methods that couple 2D capillary liquid chromatography (LC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis have greatly facilitated this discovery science. Coupling 2D-LC/MS/MS analysis with automated genome-assisted spectra interpretation allows a direct, high-throughput and high-sensitivity identification of thousands of individual proteins from complex biological samples. The systematic comparison of experimental conditions and controls allows protein function or disease states to be modeled. This review discusses the different purification and quantification strategies that have been developed and used in combination with 2D-LC/MS/MS and computational analysis to examine regulatory protein networks and clinical samples.

  11. Proteomics reveals selective regulation of proteins in response to memory-related serotonin stimulation in Aplysia californica ganglia.

    PubMed

    Monje, Francisco J; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Darnhofer, Barbara; Divisch, Isabella; Pollak, Daniela D; Lubec, Gert

    2012-02-01

    The marine mollusk Aplysia californica (Aplysia) is a powerful model for learning and memory due to its minimalistic nervous system. Key proteins, identified to be regulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin in Aplysia, have been successfully translated to mammalian models of learning and memory. Based upon a recently published large-scale analysis of Aplysia proteomic data, the current study investigated the regulation of protein levels 24 and 48 h after treatment with serotonin in Aplysia ganglia using a 2-D gel electrophoresis approach. Protein spots were quantified and protein-level changes of selected proteins were verified by Western blotting. Among those were Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RabGDIα), synaptotagmin-1 and deleted in azoospermia-associated protein (DAZAP-1) in cerebral ganglia, calreticulin, RabGDIα, DAZAP-1, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNPF), RACK-1 and actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) in pleural ganglia and DAZAP-1, hnRNPF and ADF in pedal ganglia. Protein identity of the majority of spots was confirmed by a gel-based mass spectrometrical method (FT-MS). Taken together, protein-level changes induced by the learning-related neurotransmitter serotonin in Aplysia ganglia are described and a role for the abovementioned proteins in synaptic plasticity is proposed.

  12. An effective placental cotyledons proteins extraction method for 2D gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Niu J; Daim, Leona D J; Jamil, Amilia A M; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Thilakavathy, Karuppiah

    2017-03-01

    Effective protein extraction is essential especially in producing a well-resolved proteome on 2D gels. A well-resolved placental cotyledon proteome, with good reproducibility, have allowed researchers to study the proteins underlying the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy. The aim of this study is to determine the best protein extraction protocol for the extraction of protein from placental cotyledons tissues for a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). Based on widely used protein extraction strategies, 12 different extraction methodologies were carefully selected, which included one chemical extraction, two mechanical extraction coupled protein precipitations, and nine chemical extraction coupled protein precipitations. Extracted proteins were resolved in a one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and 2D-GE; then, it was compared with set criteria: extraction efficacy, protein resolution, reproducibility, and recovery efficiency. Our results revealed that a better profile was obtained by chemical extraction in comparison to mechanical extraction. We further compared chemical extraction coupled protein precipitation methodologies, where the DNase/lithium chloride-dense sucrose homogenization coupled dichloromethane-methanol precipitation (DNase/LiCl-DSH-D/MPE) method showed good protein extraction efficiency. This, however, was carried out with the best protein resolution and proteome reproducibility on 2D-gels. DNase/LiCl-DSH-D/MPE was efficient in the extraction of proteins from placental cotyledons tissues. In addition, this methodology could hypothetically allow the protein extraction of any tissue that contains highly abundant lipid and glycogen.

  13. Examination of light distribution from sol-gel based applicators for interstitial laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hołowacz, I.; Ulatowska-Jarża, A.; Podbielska, H.; Garbaczewska, I.

    2006-02-01

    We describe here the construction of sol-gel based applicators for interstitial thermotheraphy. The silica sol-gel coatings were prepared from silicate precursor TEOS (tetraethylorthosilicate) mixed with ethyl alcohol in acid catalyzed hydrolysis. The matrices were produced with various ratios R=5, 10, 20, 32, 50, whereas R denotes the number of solvent molds (here ethanol) to the number of TEOS moles. The spatial light intensity distribution was examined in order to find out the influence of R factor on the light distribution shape. It was shows that the most homogeneous patterns are observed for sol-gel coatings with R factors equal 10 and 20.

  14. [Proteomics in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Pinet, F

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. The molecular mechanisms responsible for dysfunction of the heart in most cardiac pathologies are still largely unknown, except that the expression of certain genes/proteins is altered. Proteomic analysis is a technology which can provide an overall understanding of changes in the level of protein expression. Especially with differential analysis, it now represents a powerful tool for interpreting all biochemical responses and their regulation. The principal technique employed is two dimensional electrophoresis (2-D gel) to separate the proteins followed by mass spectometry in order to identify them. Recently SELDI-TOF analysis, which is a complementary 2-D electrophoresis technique based on the combination of two principles, chromatography by retention on protein chips and mass spectometry, has allowed the comparison of protein profiles obtained from diverse biological samples. The publication of genome sequences for humans as well as for other species has provided evidence for the biochemical complexity, and in particular the fact that a gene does not just code for a single protein but for several, due to various alternative splicing processes, post-translational modifications etc... The combination of these various approaches has proved to be particularly interesting in the study of cardiovascular diseases with the aim of understanding the molecular mechanisms involved, providing evidence for protein interactions and identifying new biochemical factors / markers involved in the different cardiovascular pathologies.

  15. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  16. Characterization of the FAD2 Gene Family in Soybean Reveals the Limitations of Gel-Based TILLING in Genes with High Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Lakhssassi, Naoufal; Zhou, Zhou; Liu, Shiming; Colantonio, Vincent; AbuGhazaleh, Amer; Meksem, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Soybean seed oil typically contains 18–20% oleic acid. Increasing the content of oleic acid is beneficial for health and biodiesel production. Mutations in FAD2-1 genes have been reported to increase seed oleic acid content. A subset of 1,037 mutant families from a mutagenized soybean cultivar (cv.) Forrest population was screened using reverse genetics (TILLING) to identify mutations within FAD2 genes. Although no fad2 mutants were identified using gel-based TILLING, four fad2-1A and one fad2-1B mutants were identified to have high seed oleic acid content using forward genetic screening and subsequent target sequencing. TILLING has been successfully used as a non-transgenic reverse genetic approach to identify mutations in genes controlling important agronomic traits. However, this technique presents limitations in traits such as oil composition due to gene copy number and similarities within the soybean genome. In soybean, FAD2 are present as two copies, FAD2-1 and FAD2-2. Two FAD2-1 members: FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B; and three FAD2-2 members: FAD2-2A, FAD2-2B, and FAD2-2C have been reported. Syntenic, phylogenetic, and in silico analysis revealed two additional members constituting the FAD2 gene family: GmFAD2-2D and GmFAD2-2E, located on chromosomes 09 and 15, respectively. They are presumed to have diverged from other FAD2-2 members localized on chromosomes 19 (GmFAD2-2A and GmFAD2-2B) and 03 (GmFAD2-2C). This work discusses alternative solutions to the limitations of gel-based TILLING in functional genomics due to high copy number and multiple paralogs of the FAD2 gene family in soybean. PMID:28348573

  17. Characterization of the FAD2 Gene Family in Soybean Reveals the Limitations of Gel-Based TILLING in Genes with High Copy Number.

    PubMed

    Lakhssassi, Naoufal; Zhou, Zhou; Liu, Shiming; Colantonio, Vincent; AbuGhazaleh, Amer; Meksem, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Soybean seed oil typically contains 18-20% oleic acid. Increasing the content of oleic acid is beneficial for health and biodiesel production. Mutations in FAD2-1 genes have been reported to increase seed oleic acid content. A subset of 1,037 mutant families from a mutagenized soybean cultivar (cv.) Forrest population was screened using reverse genetics (TILLING) to identify mutations within FAD2 genes. Although no fad2 mutants were identified using gel-based TILLING, four fad2-1A and one fad2-1B mutants were identified to have high seed oleic acid content using forward genetic screening and subsequent target sequencing. TILLING has been successfully used as a non-transgenic reverse genetic approach to identify mutations in genes controlling important agronomic traits. However, this technique presents limitations in traits such as oil composition due to gene copy number and similarities within the soybean genome. In soybean, FAD2 are present as two copies, FAD2-1 and FAD2-2. Two FAD2-1 members: FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B; and three FAD2-2 members: FAD2-2A, FAD2-2B, and FAD2-2C have been reported. Syntenic, phylogenetic, and in silico analysis revealed two additional members constituting the FAD2 gene family: GmFAD2-2D and GmFAD2-2E, located on chromosomes 09 and 15, respectively. They are presumed to have diverged from other FAD2-2 members localized on chromosomes 19 (GmFAD2-2A and GmFAD2-2B) and 03 (GmFAD2-2C). This work discusses alternative solutions to the limitations of gel-based TILLING in functional genomics due to high copy number and multiple paralogs of the FAD2 gene family in soybean.

  18. Investigation of optical properties of anthocyanin doped into sol-gel based matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Hasrina; Abdul Aziz, Nik Mohd Azmi Nik; Isnin, Aishah

    2012-06-01

    Anthocyanin dye was extracted from petal of Hibiscus rosasinensis (Bunga Raya) and doped into sol-gel based matrix to investigate an effect of pH change on its optical properties. Sol-gel matrix based on Vinyl triethoxysilene (VTES) as a precursor was prepared through Sol-gel process at pH 7. The sol was doped with 0.1% of Anthocyanin and the same amount of dye was also dissolved in ethanol as a comparative sample. Hydrochloric Acid, HCl and Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide, TMAH were used to change the pH value by adding them at various concentrations into each sample. The emission spectra and chemical structures of the samples were measured by Spectrofluorometer and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) respectively. When excited at 410 nm, two emission peaks at about 492 and 574 nm were observed for Anthocyanin in acidic environment both in ethanol and VTES sol. In base environment however, only Anthocyanin dissolved in ethanol produced emission peak with a single peak at about 539 nm. The sensitivity of Anthocyanin dye toward pH changes in VTES open a possibility to use it as sensing element in which sol-gel based matrix are known to have higher mechanical strength and thermal stability.

  19. Quantitative proteomics in Giardia duodenalis-Achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Emery, Samantha J; Lacey, Ernest; Haynes, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. lamblia and G. intestinalis) is a protozoan parasite of vertebrates and a major contributor to the global burden of diarrheal diseases and gastroenteritis. The publication of multiple genome sequences in the G. duodenalis species complex has provided important insights into parasite biology, and made post-genomic technologies, including proteomics, significantly more accessible. The aims of proteomics are to identify and quantify proteins present in a cell, and assign functions to them within the context of dynamic biological systems. In Giardia, proteomics in the post-genomic era has transitioned from reliance on gel-based systems to utilisation of a diverse array of techniques based on bottom-up LC-MS/MS technologies. Together, these have generated crucial foundations for subcellular proteomes, elucidated intra- and inter-assemblage isolate variation, and identified pathways and markers in differentiation, host-parasite interactions and drug resistance. However, in Giardia, proteomics remains an emerging field, with considerable shortcomings evident from the published research. These include a bias towards assemblage A, a lack of emphasis on quantitative analytical techniques, and limited information on post-translational protein modifications. Additionally, there are multiple areas of research for which proteomic data is not available to add value to published transcriptomic data. The challenge of amalgamating data in the systems biology paradigm necessitates the further generation of large, high-quality quantitative datasets to accurately model parasite biology. This review surveys the current proteomic research available for Giardia and evaluates their technical and quantitative approaches, while contextualising their biological insights into parasite pathology, isolate variation and eukaryotic evolution. Finally, we propose areas of priority for the generation of future proteomic data to explore fundamental questions in Giardia

  20. Trends in proteomic analysis of human vitreous humor samples.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ana S; Santos, Fátima M; Monteiro, João P; Castro-de-Sousa, João P; Queiroz, João A; Tomaz, Cândida T; Passarinha, Luís A

    2014-09-01

    Proteomic analysis of human vitreous humor (VH) may elucidate the pathogenesis of retinal ocular diseases and may provide information for the development of potential therapeutic targets due to its pivotal location near lens and retina. The discovery of whole VH proteome involves a complex analysis of thousands of proteins simultaneously. Therefore, in proteomic studies the protein fractionation is important for reducing sample complexity, facilitating the access to the low-abundant proteins, and recognizing them as biotargets for clinical research. Although several separation methods have been used, gel-based proteomics are the most popular and versatile ones applied for global protein separation. However, chromatographic methods and its combination with other separation techniques are now beginning to be used as promising set-ups for VH protein identification. This review attempts to offer an overview of the techniques currently used with VH, exploring its methodological demands, exposing its advantages, and helping the reader to plan future experiences. Moreover, this review shows the relevance of VH proteomic analysis as a tool for the study of the mechanisms underlying some ocular diseases and for the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  2. Novel gel-based rapid test for non-instrumental detection of ochratoxin A in beer.

    PubMed

    Goryacheva, I Y; Basova, E Y; Van Peteghem, C; Eremin, S A; Pussemier, L; Motte, J-C; De Saeger, S

    2008-01-01

    A rapid easy-to-use immunoassay was optimised for the non-instrumental detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in beer. The analytical method involves preconcentration on the immunoaffinity layer inside a column followed by direct competitive ELISA detection in the same layer. The visual cut-off value, i.e. the lowest OTA concentration resulting in no colour development, was 0.2 microg L(-1). Assay validation was performed using samples spiked with OTA. Thirty-seven naturally contaminated samples were screened with the gel-based method developed and no false-negative results were obtained. The method described offers a simple, rapid and cost-effective screening tool, thus contributing to better health protection of consumers.

  3. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  4. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  5. Quantitation of protein in samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The concentration of protein in a sample prepared for two dimensional (2-D) electrophoretic analysis is usually determined by protein assay. Reasons for this include the following. (1) Protein quantitation ensures that the amount of protein to be separated is appropriate for the gel size and visualization method. (2) Protein quantitation facilitates comparison among similar samples, as image-based analysis is simplified when equivalent quantities of proteins have been loaded on the gels to be compared. (3) Quantitation is necessary in cases where the protein sample is labeled with dye before separation (1,2). The labeling chemistry is affected by the dye to protein ratio so it is essential to know the protein concentration before setting up the labeling reaction.A primary consideration with quantitating protein in samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis is interference by nonprotein substances that may be present in the sample. These samples generally contain chaotropic solubilizing agents, detergents, reductants, buffers or carrier ampholytes, all of which potentially interfere with protein quantitation. The most commonly used protein assays in proteomics research are colorimetric assays in which the presence of protein causes a color change that can be measured spectrophotometrically (3). All protein assays utilize standards, a dilution series of a known concentration of a known protein, to create a standard curve. Two methods will be considered that circumvent some of the problems associated with interfering substances and are well suited for samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis. The first method (4.1.1) relies on a color change that occurs upon binding of a dye to protein and the second (4.1.2) relies on binding and reduction of cupric ion (Cu2+) ion to cuprous ion (Cu+) by proteins.

  6. Simulation of Two Dimensional Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Teaching Proteomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Amanda; Sekera, Emily; Payne, Jill; Craig, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In proteomics, complex mixtures of proteins are separated (usually by chromatography or electrophoresis) and identified by mass spectrometry. We have created 2DE Tandem MS, a computer program designed for use in the biochemistry, proteomics, or bioinformatics classroom. It contains two simulations--2D electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry.…

  7. Leveraging Genomics Software to Improve Proteomics Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K; Nelson, D O

    2005-09-06

    Rigorous data analysis techniques are essential in quantifying the differential expression of proteins in biological samples of interest. Statistical methods from the microarray literature were applied to the analysis of two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) proteomics experiments, in the context of technical variability studies involving human plasma. Protein expression measurements were corrected to account for observed intensity-dependent biases within gels, and normalized to mitigate observed gel to gel variations. The methods improved upon the results achieved using the best currently available 2-D DIGE proteomics software. The spot-wise protein variance was reduced by 10% and the number of apparently differentially expressed proteins was reduced by over 50%.

  8. Proteomics in diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Davalieva, K; Polenakovic, M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men worldwide. The introduction of prostate specific antigen (PSA) has greatly increased the number of men diagnosed with PCa but at the same time, as a result of the low specificity, led to overdiagnosis, resulting to unnecessary biopsies and high medical cost treatments. The primary goal in PCa research today is to find a biomarker or biomarker set for clear and effecttive diagnosis of PCa as well as for distinction between aggressive and indolent cancers. Different proteomic technologies such as 2-D PAGE, 2-D DIGE, MALDI MS profiling, shotgun proteomics with label-based (ICAT, iTRAQ) and label-free (SWATH) quantification, MudPIT, CE-MS have been applied to the study of PCa in the past 15 years. Various biological samples, including tumor tissue, serum, plasma, urine, seminal plasma, prostatic secretions and prostatic-derived exosomes were analyzed with the aim of identifying diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and developing a deeper understanding of the disease at the molecular level. This review is focused on the overall analysis of expression proteomics studies in the PCa field investigating all types of human samples in the search for diagnostics biomarkers. Emphasis is given on proteomics platforms used in biomarker discovery and characterization, explored sources for PCa biomarkers, proposed candidate biomarkers by comparative proteomics studies and the possible future clinical application of those candidate biomarkers in PCa screening and diagnosis. In addition, we review the specificity of the putative markers and existing challenges in the proteomics research of PCa.

  9. The PROTICdb database for 2-DE proteomics.

    PubMed

    Langella, Olivier; Zivy, Michel; Joets, Johann

    2007-01-01

    PROTICdb is a web-based database mainly designed to store and analyze plant proteome data obtained by 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). The goals of PROTICdb are (1) to store, track, and query information related to proteomic experiments, i.e., from tissue sampling to protein identification and quantitative measurements; and (2) to integrate information from the user's own expertise and other sources into a knowledge base, used to support data interpretation (e.g., for the determination of allelic variants or products of posttranslational modifications). Data insertion into the relational database of PROTICdb is achieved either by uploading outputs from Mélanie, PDQuest, IM2d, ImageMaster(tm) 2D Platinum v5.0, Progenesis, Sequest, MS-Fit, and Mascot software, or by filling in web forms (experimental design and methods). 2D PAGE-annotated maps can be displayed, queried, and compared through the GelBrowser. Quantitative data can be easily exported in a tabulated format for statistical analyses with any third-party software. PROTICdb is based on the Oracle or the PostgreSQLDataBase Management System (DBMS) and is freely available upon request at http://cms.moulon.inra.fr/content/view/14/44/.

  10. CYP2D6 Is Inducible by Endogenous and Exogenous Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad; Kelly, Edward J; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2016-05-01

    Although cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 has been widely considered to be noninducible on the basis of human hepatocyte studies, in vivo data suggests that it is inducible by endo- and xenobiotics. Therefore, we investigated if the experimental conditions routinely used in human hepatocyte studies may be a confounding factor in the lack of in vitro induction of CYP2D6. Sandwich cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) were preincubated with or without dexamethasone (100 nM) for 72 hours before incubation with 1μM endogenous (cortisol or corticosterone) or exogenous (dexamethasone or prednisolone) corticosteroids. At 72 hours, CYP2D6 mRNA, protein, and activity were quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, quantitative proteomics, and formation of dextrorphan from dextromethorphan, respectively. In the absence of supplemental dexamethasone, CYP2D6 activity, mRNA, and protein were significantly and robustly (>10-fold) induced by all four corticosteroids. However, this CYP2D6 induction was abolished in cells preincubated with supplemental dexamethasone. These data show, for the first time, that CYP2D6 is inducible in vitro but the routine presence of 100 nM dexamethasone in the culture medium masks this induction. Our cortisol data are in agreement with the clinical observation that CYP2D6 is inducible during the third trimester of pregnancy when the plasma concentrations of cortisol increase to ∼1μM. These findings, if confirmed in vivo, have implications for predicting CYP2D6-mediated drug-drug interactions and call for re-evaluation of regulatory guidelines on screening for CYP2D6 induction by xenobiotics. Our findings also suggest that cortisol may be a causative factor in the in vivo induction of CYP2D6 during pregnancy.

  11. ELISA AND SOL-GEL BASED IMMUNOAFFINITY PURIFICATION OF THE PYRETHROID BIOALLETHRIN IN FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The peer-reviewed article describes the development of a new sol-gel based immunoaffinity purification procedure and an immunoassay for the pyrethroid bioallethrin. The immunoaffinity chromatography procedure was applied to food samples providing an efficient cleanup prior to im...

  12. Proteome analysis of Apis mellifera royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Schönleben, Simone; Sickmann, Albert; Mueller, Martin J; Reinders, Joerg

    2007-10-01

    Royal jelly plays a pivotal role in the development of honey bee larvae. However, while various health promoting properties of royal jelly have been reported, most of the active substances within royal jelly that lead to these properties are still unknown. Since up to 50% (dry mass) of royal jelly is protein, royal jelly proteome analysis is a promising starting point for attempts to identify the proteins that provide health-promoting effects. However, the comprehensive analysis of royal jelly proteins is hampered by the enormous abundance of some proteins in the major royal jelly protein family, which constitutes 80-90% of the royal jelly proteome. The high heterogeneity of these proteins is an additional challenge for proteomic analysis, since it necessitates the use of analytical techniques that provide high resolution and a wide dynamic range. The application of individual methods such as 2D-PAGE or multidimensional chromatography can only yield certain subpopulations of a proteome due to the specific bias of each method. We applied different methods for the prefractionation and separation of royal jelly proteins in order to circumvent the shortcomings of the individual techniques and achieve a high coverage of the royal jelly proteome. In this way, we were able to identify 20 different proteins in total, as well as to show a very high degree of cleavage of different proteins of the major royal jelly protein family. Furthermore, we investigated the protein phosphorylation of royal jelly proteins, and identified and located two phosphorylation sites within venom protein 2.

  13. Proteomics: bases for protein complexity understanding.

    PubMed

    Rotilio, Domenico; Della Corte, Anna; D'Imperio, Marco; Coletta, Walter; Marcone, Simone; Silvestri, Cristian; Giordano, Lucia; Di Michele, Michela; Donati, Maria Benedetta

    2012-03-01

    In the post genomic era we became aware that the genomic sequence and protein functions cannot be correlated. One gene can encode multiple protein functions mainly because of mRNA splice variants, post translational modifications (PTM) and moonlighting functions. To study the whole population of proteins present in a cell to a specific time point and under defined conditions it is necessary to investigate the proteome. Comprehensive analysis of the proteome requires the use of emerging high technologies because of the complexity and wide dynamic range of protein concentrations. Proteomics provides the tools to study protein identification and quantitation, protein-protein interactions, protein modifications and localization. The most widespread strategy for studying global protein expression employs two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) allowing thousands of proteins to be resolved and their expression quantified. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a high throughput technique for protein identification and characterization because of its high sensitivity, precision and accuracy. LC-MS/MS is well suited for accurate quantitation of protein expression levels, post-translational modifications and comparative and absolute quantitative analysis of peptides. Bioinformatic tools are required to elaborate the growing number of proteomic data. Here, we give an overview of the current status of the wide range of technologies that define and characterize the modern proteomics.

  14. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  15. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  16. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  17. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  18. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  19. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  20. Comparing Simplification Strategies for the Skeletal Muscle Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Bethany; Young, Iain S.; Cash, Phillip; Whitfield, Phillip D.; Doherty, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a complex tissue that is dominated by the presence of a few abundant proteins. This wide dynamic range can mask the presence of lower abundance proteins, which can be a confounding factor in large-scale proteomic experiments. In this study, we have investigated a number of pre-fractionation methods, at both the protein and peptide level, for the characterization of the skeletal muscle proteome. The analyses revealed that the use of OFFGEL isoelectric focusing yielded the largest number of protein identifications (>750) compared to alternative gel-based and protein equalization strategies. Further, OFFGEL led to a substantial enrichment of a different sub-population of the proteome. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), coupled to peptide-level OFFGEL provided more confidence in the results due to a substantial increase in the number of peptides assigned to each protein. The findings presented here support the use of a multiplexed approach to proteome characterization of skeletal muscle, which has a recognized imbalance in the dynamic range of its protein complement. PMID:28248220

  1. Fabrication and characterization of sol-gel based nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Reeta

    Nanogels are cross linked polymeric sol-gel based nanoparticles that offer an interior network for incorporation and protection of biomolecules, exhibiting unique advantages for polymer based delivery systems. We have successfully synthesized stable sol-gel nanoparticles by means of [a] silicification reactions using cationic peptides like polylysine as gelating agents, and [b] lyophilization of sol-gels. Macromolecules such as Hemoglobin and Glucose Oxidase and small molecules such as Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) and antibiotics were encapsulated within the nanogels. We have used transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, and spectroscopy to perform a physicochemical characterization of the nanogels resulting from the two approaches. Our studies have indicated that the nanogel encapsulated proteins and small molecules remain intact, stable and functional. A Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) and Nitric Oxide (NO) generating drug carrier was synthesized using these nanogels and the effect of generation of H2O2 from Glucose Oxidase encapsulated nanogels and NO from SNP encapsulated nanogels was tested on E.coli. The results show that the nanoparticles exert antimicrobial activity against E.Coli, in addition NO generating nanogels potentiated H2O2 generating nanogels induced killing. These data suggest that these NO and H2O2 releasing nanogels have the potential to serve as a novel class of antimicrobials for the treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria. The unique properties of these protein/drug incorporated nanogels raise the prospect of fine tailoring to specific applications such as drug delivery and bio imaging.

  2. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  3. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  4. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  5. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  6. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  7. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  8. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Gel-based oligonucleotide microarray approach to analyze protein–ssDNA binding specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zasedateleva, Olga A.; Mikheikin, Andrey L.; Turygin, Alexander Y.; Prokopenko, Dmitry V.; Chudinov, Alexander V.; Belobritskaya, Elena E.; Chechetkin, Vladimir R.; Zasedatelev, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    Gel-based oligonucleotide microarray approach was developed for quantitative profiling of binding affinity of a protein to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). To demonstrate additional capabilities of this method, we analyzed the binding specificity of ribonuclease (RNase) binase from Bacillus intermedius (EC 3.1.27.3) to ssDNA using generic hexamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide microchip. Single-stranded octamer oligonucleotides were immobilized within 3D hemispherical gel pads. The octanucleotides in individual pads 5′-{N}N1N2N3N4N5N6{N}-3′ consisted of a fixed hexamer motif N1N2N3N4N5N6 in the middle and variable parts {N} at the ends, where {N} represent A, C, G and T in equal proportions. The chip has 4096 pads with a complete set of hexamer sequences. The affinity was determined by measuring dissociation of the RNase–ssDNA complexes with the temperature increasing from 0°C to 50°C in quasi-equilibrium conditions. RNase binase showed the highest sequence-specificity of binding to motifs 5′-NNG(A/T/C)GNN-3′ with the order of preference: GAG > GTG > GCG. High specificity towards G(A/T/C)G triplets was also confirmed by measuring fluorescent anisotropy of complexes of binase with selected oligodeoxyribonucleotides in solution. The affinity of RNase binase to other 3-nt sequences was also ranked. These results demonstrate the applicability of the method and provide the ground for further investigations of nonenzymatic functions of RNases. PMID:18474529

  10. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  11. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  12. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris—Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J.; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications. PMID:26986963

  13. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris--Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    PubMed

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications.

  14. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  15. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  16. Soybean seed proteome rebalancing

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Eliot M.

    2014-01-01

    The soybean seed’s protein content and composition are regulated by both genetics and physiology. Overt seed protein content is specified by the genotype’s genetic framework and is selectable as a breeding trait. Within the genotype-specified protein content phenotype soybeans have the capacity to rebalance protein composition to create differing proteomes. Soybeans possess a relatively standardized proteome, but mutation or targeted engineering can induce large-scale proteome rebalancing. Proteome rebalancing shows that the output traits of seed content and composition result from two major types of regulation: genotype and post-transcriptional control of the proteome composition. Understanding the underlying mechanisms that specifies the seed proteome can enable engineering new phenotypes for the production of a high-quality plant protein source for food, feed, and industrial proteins. PMID:25232359

  17. Sol-Gel-Based Titania-Silica Thin Film Overlay for Long Period Fiber Grating-Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Biswas, Palas; Trono, Cosimo; Jana, Sunirmal; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Basumallick, Nandini; Giannetti, Ambra; Tombelli, Sara; Bera, Susanta; Mallick, Aparajita; Baldini, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    An evanescent wave optical fiber biosensor based on titania-silica-coated long period grating (LPG) is presented. The chemical overlay, which increases the refractive index (RI) sensitivity of the sensor, consists of a sol-gel-based titania-silica thin film, deposited along the sensing portion of the fiber by means of the dip-coating technique. Changing both the sol viscosity and the withdrawal speed during the dip-coating made it possible to adjust the thickness of the film overlay, which is a crucial parameter for the sensor performance. After the functionalization of the fiber surface using a methacrylic acid/methacrylate copolymer, an antibody/antigen (IgG/anti-IgG) assay was carried out to assess the performance of sol-gel based titania-silica-coated LPGs as biosensors. The analyte concentration was determined from the wavelength shift at the end of the binding process and from the initial binding rate. This is the first time that a sol-gel based titania-silica-coated LPG is proposed as an effective and feasible label-free biosensor. The specificity of the sensor was validated by performing the same model assay after spiking anti-IgG into human serum. With this structured LPG, detection limits of the order of tens of micrograms per liter (10(-11) M) are attained.

  18. Bottom-up and Shotgun Proteomics to Identify a Comprehensive Cochlear Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Darville, Lancia N.F.; Sokolowski, Bernd H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is a commonly used approach that can provide insights into complex biological systems. The cochlear sensory epithelium contains receptors that transduce the mechanical energy of sound into an electro-chemical energy processed by the peripheral and central nervous systems. Several proteomic techniques have been developed to study the cochlear inner ear, such as two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), antibody microarray, and mass spectrometry (MS). MS is the most comprehensive and versatile tool in proteomics and in conjunction with separation methods can provide an in-depth proteome of biological samples. Separation methods combined with MS has the ability to enrich protein samples, detect low molecular weight and hydrophobic proteins, and identify low abundant proteins by reducing the proteome dynamic range. Different digestion strategies can be applied to whole lysate or to fractionated protein lysate to enhance peptide and protein sequence coverage. Utilization of different separation techniques, including strong cation exchange (SCX), reversed-phase (RP), and gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE) can be applied to reduce sample complexity prior to MS analysis for protein identification. PMID:24638115

  19. Bottom-up and shotgun proteomics to identify a comprehensive cochlear proteome.

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Sokolowski, Bernd H A

    2014-03-07

    Proteomics is a commonly used approach that can provide insights into complex biological systems. The cochlear sensory epithelium contains receptors that transduce the mechanical energy of sound into an electro-chemical energy processed by the peripheral and central nervous systems. Several proteomic techniques have been developed to study the cochlear inner ear, such as two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), antibody microarray, and mass spectrometry (MS). MS is the most comprehensive and versatile tool in proteomics and in conjunction with separation methods can provide an in-depth proteome of biological samples. Separation methods combined with MS has the ability to enrich protein samples, detect low molecular weight and hydrophobic proteins, and identify low abundant proteins by reducing the proteome dynamic range. Different digestion strategies can be applied to whole lysate or to fractionated protein lysate to enhance peptide and protein sequence coverage. Utilization of different separation techniques, including strong cation exchange (SCX), reversed-phase (RP), and gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE) can be applied to reduce sample complexity prior to MS analysis for protein identification.

  20. Yeast Proteome Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matros, Andrea; Mock, Hans-Peter

    Yeast organisms, and specifically Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have become model systems for many aspects in fundamental and applied research. Consistently, many papers have been published applying proteome techniques to study these organisms. The review will give an overview on the proteome research performed on yeast systems so far; however, due to the large number of publications, only selected reports can be cited neglecting many more interesting ones in the interest of space. The review will focus on research involving mass spectrom-etry as a basic proteome technique, although many more approaches are relevant for the functional characterization of proteins in the cell, e.g. the yeast two-hybrid system. We will provide an overview on yeasts as models in the context of pro-teome analysis, and explain the basic techniques currently applied in proteome approaches. The main part of the review will deal with a survey on the current status of proteomic studies in yeasts. In a first part of this chapter, we will deal with the currently available proteome maps of yeasts, and in the following part we will discuss studies dealing with fundamental aspects, but also mention proteome studies related to applied microbiology. Finally, we will envisage future perspectives of the proteome technology for studying yeasts, and draw major conclusion on the current status reached in this field of functional genomics.

  1. 2D Gel Electrophoresis of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids such is a common method for investigating the biosynthetic rates of proteins. In this way, the abundance of newly synthesized proteins can be determined by several proteomic techniques including 2D gel electrophoresis (2DE). This chapter describes a protocol for labelling pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine in the presence of low and high concentrations of glucose, followed by subcellular fractionation enrichment of secretory granule proteins and analysis of the granule protein contents by 2DE. This demonstrated that the biosynthetic rates of most of the granule proteins are co-ordinately regulated in the presence of stimulatory glucose concentrations.

  2. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  3. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  4. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  5. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  6. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  7. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  8. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  9. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  10. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  11. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  12. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Analysis of Protein S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhe; Greenlief, C Michael; Gu, Zezong

    2016-01-04

    S-Nitrosylation is a redox-based post-translational modification of a protein in response to nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and it participates in a variety of processes in diverse biological systems. The significance of this type of protein modification in health and diseases is increasingly recognized. In the central nervous system, aberrant S-nitrosylation, due to excessive NO production, is known to cause protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, transcriptional dysregulation, and neuronal death. This leads to an altered physiological state and consequently contributes to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, much effort has been made to understand the mechanisms underlying protein S-nitrosylation, and several approaches have been developed to unveil S-nitrosylated proteins from different organisms. Interest in determining the dynamic changes of protein S-nitrosylation under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions has underscored the need for the development of quantitative proteomic approaches. Currently, both gel-based and gel-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative methods are widely used, and they each have advantages and disadvantages but may also be used together to produce complementary data. This review evaluates current available quantitative proteomic techniques for the analysis of protein S-nitrosylation and highlights recent advances, with emphasis on applications in neurodegenerative diseases. An important goal is to provide a comprehensive guide of feasible quantitative proteomic methodologies for examining protein S-nitrosylation in research to yield insights into disease mechanisms, diagnostic biomarkers, and drug discovery.

  14. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  15. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  16. A Block-matching based technique for the analysis of 2D gel images.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ana; Seoane, José A; Rodríguez, Alvaro; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; López-Campos, Guillermo; Dorado, Julián

    2010-01-01

    Research at protein level is a useful practice in personalized medicine. More specifically, 2D gel images obtained after electrophoresis process can lead to an accurate diagnosis. Several computational approaches try to help the clinicians to establish the correspondence between pairs of proteins of multiple 2D gel images. Most of them perform the alignment of a patient image referred to a reference image. In this work, an approach based on block-matching techniques is developed. Its main characteristic is that it does not need to perform the whole alignment between two images considering each protein separately. A comparison with other published methods is presented. It can be concluded that this method works over broad range of proteomic images, although they have a high level of difficulty.

  17. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  18. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  19. Quantitative plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Cramer, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    Quantitation is an inherent requirement in comparative proteomics and there is no exception to this for plant proteomics. Quantitative proteomics has high demands on the experimental workflow, requiring a thorough design and often a complex multi-step structure. It has to include sufficient numbers of biological and technical replicates and methods that are able to facilitate a quantitative signal read-out. Quantitative plant proteomics in particular poses many additional challenges but because of the nature of plants it also offers some potential advantages. In general, analysis of plants has been less prominent in proteomics. Low protein concentration, difficulties in protein extraction, genome multiploidy, high Rubisco abundance in green tissue, and an absence of well-annotated and completed genome sequences are some of the main challenges in plant proteomics. However, the latter is now changing with several genomes emerging for model plants and crops such as potato, tomato, soybean, rice, maize and barley. This review discusses the current status in quantitative plant proteomics (MS-based and non-MS-based) and its challenges and potentials. Both relative and absolute quantitation methods in plant proteomics from DIGE to MS-based analysis after isotope labeling and label-free quantitation are described and illustrated by published studies. In particular, we describe plant-specific quantitative methods such as metabolic labeling methods that can take full advantage of plant metabolism and culture practices, and discuss other potential advantages and challenges that may arise from the unique properties of plants.

  20. Proteomic Analyses of Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix Venom Using 2D Electrophoresis and MS Techniques.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Urbanik, Małgorzata; Hus, Konrad; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Petrilla, Vladimír; Andrejčáková, Zuzana; Petrillová, Monika; Legáth, Jaroslav

    2016-12-13

    Snake venom is a complex mixture of proteins and peptides which in the Viperidae is mainly hemotoxic. The diversity of these components causes the venom to be an extremely interesting object of study. Discovered components can be used in search for new pharmaceuticals used primarily in the treatment of diseases of the cardiovascular system. In order to determine the protein composition of the southern copperhead venom, we have used high resolution two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI ToF/ToF MS-based identification. We have identified 10 groups of proteins present in the venom, of which phospholipase A₂ and metalloprotease and serine proteases constitute the largest groups. For the first time presence of 5'-nucleotidase in venom was found in this group of snakes. Three peptides present in the venom were also identified. Two of them as bradykinin-potentiating agents and one as an inhibitor.

  1. Proteomic Analyses of Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix Venom Using 2D Electrophoresis and MS Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Urbanik, Małgorzata; Hus, Konrad; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Petrilla, Vladimír; Andrejčáková, Zuzana; Petrillová, Monika; Legáth, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom is a complex mixture of proteins and peptides which in the Viperidae is mainly hemotoxic. The diversity of these components causes the venom to be an extremely interesting object of study. Discovered components can be used in search for new pharmaceuticals used primarily in the treatment of diseases of the cardiovascular system. In order to determine the protein composition of the southern copperhead venom, we have used high resolution two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI ToF/ToF MS-based identification. We have identified 10 groups of proteins present in the venom, of which phospholipase A2 and metalloprotease and serine proteases constitute the largest groups. For the first time presence of 5′-nucleotidase in venom was found in this group of snakes. Three peptides present in the venom were also identified. Two of them as bradykinin-potentiating agents and one as an inhibitor. PMID:27983581

  2. Optimization of large gel 2D electrophoresis for proteomic studies of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Reed, Patrick W; Densmore, Allison; Bloch, Robert J

    2012-04-01

    We describe improved methods for large format, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) that improve protein solubility and recovery, minimize proteolysis, and reduce the loss of resolution due to contaminants and manipulations of the gels, and thus enhance quantitative analysis of protein spots. Key modifications are: (i) the use of 7 M urea and 2 M thiourea, instead of 9 M urea, in sample preparation and in the tops of the gel tubes; (ii) standardized deionization of all solutions containing urea with a mixed bed ion exchange resin and removal of urea from the electrode solutions; and (iii) use of a new gel tank and cooling device that eliminate the need to run two separating gels in the SDS dimension. These changes make 2DE analysis more reproducible and sensitive, with minimal artifacts. Application of this method to the soluble fraction of muscle tissues reliably resolves ~1800 protein spots in adult human skeletal muscle and over 2800 spots in myotubes.

  3. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  4. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  5. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  6. Kinetics of hybridization on surface oligonucleotide microchips: theory, experiment, and comparison with hybridization on gel-based microchips.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, N V; Chechetkin, V R; Pan'kov, S V; Somova, O G; Livshits, M A; Donnikov, M Y; Turygin, A Y; Barsky, V E; Zasedatelev, A S

    2006-08-01

    The optimal design of oligonucleotide microchips and efficient discrimination between perfect and mismatch duplexes strongly depend on the external transport of target DNA to the cells with immobilized probes as well as on respective association and dissociation rates at the duplex formation. In this paper we present the relevant theory for hybridization of DNA fragments with oligonucleotide probes immobilized in the cells on flat substrate. With minor modifications, our theory also is applicable to reaction-diffusion hybridization kinetics for the probes immobilized on the surface of microbeads immersed in hybridization solution. The main theoretical predictions are verified with control experiments. Besides that, we compared the characteristics of the surface and gel-based oligonucleotide microchips. The comparison was performed for the chips printed with the same pin robot, for the signals measured with the same devices and processed by the same technique, and for the same hybridization conditions. The sets of probe oligonucleotides and the concentrations of probes in respective solutions used for immobilization on each platform were identical as well. We found that, despite the slower hybridization kinetics, the fluorescence signals and mutation discrimination efficiency appeared to be higher for the gel-based microchips with respect to their surface counterparts even for the relatively short hybridization time about 0.5-1 hour. Both the divergence between signals for perfects and the difference in mutation discrimination efficiency for the counterpart platforms rapidly grow with incubation time. In particular, for hybridization during 3 h the signals for gel-based microchips surpassed their surface counterparts in 5-20 times, while the ratios of signals for perfect-mismatch pairs for gel microchips exceeded the corresponding ratios for surface microchips in 2-4 times. These effects may be attributed to the better immobilization efficiency and to the higher

  7. Genomics of Dementia: APOE- and CYP2D6-Related Pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Martínez, Rocío; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; Carril, Juan C.; Lombardi, Valter; Carrera, Iván; Corzo, Lola; Tellado, Iván; Leszek, Jerzy; McKay, Adam; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a major problem of health in developed societies. Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia, and mixed dementia account for over 90% of the most prevalent forms of dementia. Both genetic and environmental factors are determinant for the phenotypic expression of dementia. AD is a complex disorder in which many different gene clusters may be involved. Most genes screened to date belong to different proteomic and metabolomic pathways potentially affecting AD pathogenesis. The ε4 variant of the APOE gene seems to be a major risk factor for both degenerative and vascular dementia. Metabolic factors, cerebrovascular disorders, and epigenetic phenomena also contribute to neurodegeneration. Five categories of genes are mainly involved in pharmacogenomics: genes associated with disease pathogenesis, genes associated with the mechanism of action of a particular drug, genes associated with phase I and phase II metabolic reactions, genes associated with transporters, and pleiotropic genes and/or genes associated with concomitant pathologies. The APOE and CYP2D6 genes have been extensively studied in AD. The therapeutic response to conventional drugs in patients with AD is genotype specific, with CYP2D6-PMs, CYP2D6-UMs, and APOE-4/4 carriers acting as the worst responders. APOE and CYP2D6 may cooperate, as pleiotropic genes, in the metabolism of drugs and hepatic function. The introduction of pharmacogenetic procedures into AD pharmacological treatment may help to optimize therapeutics. PMID:22482072

  8. Proteomic Profiling of the Dystrophin-Deficient mdx Phenocopy of Dystrophinopathy-Associated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory complications are frequent symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a neuromuscular disorder caused by primary abnormalities in the dystrophin gene. Loss of cardiac dystrophin initially leads to changes in dystrophin-associated glycoproteins and subsequently triggers secondarily sarcolemmal disintegration, fibre necrosis, fibrosis, fatty tissue replacement, and interstitial inflammation. This results in progressive cardiac disease, which is the cause of death in a considerable number of patients afflicted with X-linked muscular dystrophy. In order to better define the molecular pathogenesis of this type of cardiomyopathy, several studies have applied mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine proteome-wide alterations in dystrophinopathy-associated cardiomyopathy. Proteomic studies included both gel-based and label-free mass spectrometric surveys of dystrophin-deficient heart muscle from the established mdx animal model of dystrophinopathy. Comparative cardiac proteomics revealed novel changes in proteins associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism, glycolysis, signaling, iron binding, antibody response, fibre contraction, basal lamina stabilisation, and cytoskeletal organisation. This review summarizes the importance of studying cardiomyopathy within the field of muscular dystrophy research, outlines key features of the mdx heart and its suitability as a model system for studying cardiac pathogenesis, and discusses the impact of recent proteomic findings for exploring molecular and cellular aspects of cardiac abnormalities in inherited muscular dystrophies. PMID:24772416

  9. Methodologies and Perspectives of Proteomics Applied to Filamentous Fungi: From Sample Preparation to Secretome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Linda; Perrotta, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi possess the extraordinary ability to digest complex biomasses and mineralize numerous xenobiotics, as consequence of their aptitude to sensing the environment and regulating their intra and extra cellular proteins, producing drastic changes in proteome and secretome composition. Recent advancement in proteomic technologies offers an exciting opportunity to reveal the fluctuations of fungal proteins and enzymes, responsible for their metabolic adaptation to a large variety of environmental conditions. Here, an overview of the most commonly used proteomic strategies will be provided; this paper will range from sample preparation to gel-free and gel-based proteomics, discussing pros and cons of each mentioned state-of-the-art technique. The main focus will be kept on filamentous fungi. Due to the biotechnological relevance of lignocellulose degrading fungi, special attention will be finally given to their extracellular proteome, or secretome. Secreted proteins and enzymes will be discussed in relation to their involvement in bio-based processes, such as biomass deconstruction and mycoremediation. PMID:25775160

  10. The application of DIGE-based proteomics to renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Hoorn, Ewout J; Hoffert, Jason D; Knepper, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics is seeing increasing use as a means of identifying new mechanistic hypotheses in physiology. Proteomics based on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) has recently been optimized with the development of Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE). In DIGE-based proteomics, the experimental and control samples are derivatized with different fluorophores and are run in the same gel, thereby minimizing technical variation. DIGE is currently one of the few techniques to perform quantitative proteomics, generating a statistical output to differences in protein abundances. In this review, we discuss the principles of DIGE-based proteomics, including sample preparation, 2-DE, statistical analysis of 2D-gels, and mass spectrometry. Strengths and weaknesses of DIGE are discussed, including possible solutions to overcome certain limitations, such as the identification of low abundance and integral membrane proteins. In addition, we provide a brief synopsis of our recent experiments in which DIGE-based proteomics was applied to study vasopressin signaling in the renal collecting duct. Finally, we illustrate how quantification based on the DIGE approach combined with bioinformatics may facilitate the study of systems biology of the kidney.

  11. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  12. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  13. Proteomics for systems toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Titz, Bjoern; Elamin, Ashraf; Martin, Florian; Schneider, Thomas; Dijon, Sophie; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Current toxicology studies frequently lack measurements at molecular resolution to enable a more mechanism-based and predictive toxicological assessment. Recently, a systems toxicology assessment framework has been proposed, which combines conventional toxicological assessment strategies with system-wide measurement methods and computational analysis approaches from the field of systems biology. Proteomic measurements are an integral component of this integrative strategy because protein alterations closely mirror biological effects, such as biological stress responses or global tissue alterations. Here, we provide an overview of the technical foundations and highlight select applications of proteomics for systems toxicology studies. With a focus on mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we summarize the experimental methods for quantitative proteomics and describe the computational approaches used to derive biological/mechanistic insights from these datasets. To illustrate how proteomics has been successfully employed to address mechanistic questions in toxicology, we summarized several case studies. Overall, we provide the technical and conceptual foundation for the integration of proteomic measurements in a more comprehensive systems toxicology assessment framework. We conclude that, owing to the critical importance of protein-level measurements and recent technological advances, proteomics will be an integral part of integrative systems toxicology approaches in the future. PMID:25379146

  14. Proteomics in medical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Cash, P

    2000-04-01

    The techniques of proteomics (high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein characterisation) are widely used for microbiological research to analyse global protein synthesis as an indicator of gene expression. The rapid progress in microbial proteomics has been achieved through the wide availability of whole genome sequences for a number of bacterial groups. Beyond providing a basic understanding of microbial gene expression, proteomics has also played a role in medical areas of microbiology. Progress has been made in the use of the techniques for investigating the epidemiology and taxonomy of human microbial pathogens, the identification of novel pathogenic mechanisms and the analysis of drug resistance. In each of these areas, proteomics has provided new insights that complement genomic-based investigations. This review describes the current progress in these research fields and highlights some of the technical challenges existing for the application of proteomics in medical microbiology. The latter concern the analysis of genetically heterogeneous bacterial populations and the integration of the proteomic and genomic data for these bacteria. The characterisation of the proteomes of bacterial pathogens growing in their natural hosts remains a future challenge.

  15. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  16. A Sampling of the Yeast Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Futcher, B.; Latter, G. I.; Monardo, P.; McLaughlin, C. S.; Garrels, J. I.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examined yeast proteins by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and gathered quantitative information from about 1,400 spots. We found that there is an enormous range of protein abundance and, for identified spots, a good correlation between protein abundance, mRNA abundance, and codon bias. For each molecule of well-translated mRNA, there were about 4,000 molecules of protein. The relative abundance of proteins was measured in glucose and ethanol media. Protein turnover was examined and found to be insignificant for abundant proteins. Some phosphoproteins were identified. The behavior of proteins in differential centrifugation experiments was examined. Such experiments with 2D gels can give a global view of the yeast proteome. PMID:10523624

  17. Proteomic Findings in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Deepanwita; Tackett, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Although the emergence of proteomics as an independent branch of science is fairly recent, within a short period of time it has contributed substantially in various disciplines. The tool of mass spectrometry has become indispensable in the analysis of complex biological samples. Clinical applications of proteomics include detection of predictive and diagnostic markers, understanding mechanism of action of drugs as well as resistance mechanisms against them and assessment of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patients. Here, we have summarized the major contributions of proteomics towards the study of melanoma, which is a deadly variety of skin cancer with a high mortality rate. PMID:27274624

  18. Proteome sequencing goes deep

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alicia L.; Merrill, Anna E.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry have transformed the scope and impact of protein characterization efforts. Identifying hundreds of proteins from rather simple biological matrices, such as yeast, was a daunting task just a few decades ago. Now, expression of more than half of the estimated ~20,000 human protein coding genes can be confirmed in record time and from minute sample quantities. Access to proteomic information at such unprecedented depths has been fueled by strides in every stage of the shotgun proteomics workflow – from sample processing to data analysis – and promises to revolutionize our understanding of the causes and consequences of proteome variation. PMID:25461719

  19. A proteomic glimpse into human ureter proteome

    PubMed Central

    Hirao, Yoshitoshi; Elguoshy, Amr; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yates, John R.; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Urine has evolved as one of the most important biofluids in clinical proteomics due to its noninvasive sampling and its stability. Yet, it is used in clinical diagnostics of several disorders by detecting changes in its components including urinary protein/polypeptide profile. Despite the fact that majority of proteins detected in urine are primarily originated from the urogenital (UG) tract, determining its precise source within the UG tract remains elusive. In this article, we performed a comprehensive analysis of ureter proteome to assemble the first unbiased ureter dataset. Next, we compared these data to urine, urinary exosome, and kidney mass spectrometric datasets. Our result concluded that among 2217 nonredundant ureter proteins, 751 protein candidates (33.8%) were detected in urine as urinary protein/polypeptide or exosomal protein. On the other hand, comparing ureter protein hits (48) that are not shown in corresponding databases to urinary bladder and prostate human protein atlas databases pinpointed 21 proteins that might be unique to ureter tissue. In conclusion, this finding offers future perspectives for possible identification of ureter disease‐associated biomarkers such as ureter carcinoma. In addition, the ureter proteomic dataset published in this article will provide a valuable resource for researchers working in the field of urology and urine biomarker discovery. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002620 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002620). PMID:26442468

  20. Bead Based Proteome Enrichment Enhances Features of the Protein Elution Plate (PEP) for Functional Proteomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Davies, Michael; Roy, Swapan; Kuruc, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    A novel functional proteomics technology called PEP(Protein Elution Plate) was developed to separate complex proteomes from natural sources and analyze protein functions systematically. The technology takes advantage of the powerful resolution of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-D Gels). The modification of electrophoretic conditions in combination with a high-resolution protein elution plate supports the recovery of functionally active proteins. As 2DE(2-Dimensional Electrophoresis) resolution can be limited by protein load, we investigated the use of bead based enrichment technologies, called AlbuVoid™ and KinaSorb™ to determine their effect on the proteomic features which can be generated from the PEP platform. Using a variety of substrates and enzyme activity assays, we report on the benefits of combining bead based enrichment to improve the signal report and the features generated for Hexokinase, Protein Kinase, Protease, and Alkaline Phosphatase activities. As a result, the PEP technology allows systematic analysis of large enzyme families and can build a comprehensive picture of protein function from a complex proteome, providing biological insights that could otherwise not be observed if only protein abundances were analyzed. PMID:28248280

  1. A gel-based solid-phase amplification and its application for SNP typing and sequencing on-chip.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Xiao, Pengfeng; Qi, Zongtai; Bu, Ying; Liu, Wenbo; Zhou, Guohua

    2009-12-01

    As conventional solid-phase amplification (SPA) on a two-dimensional slide has a low amplification capacity due to a limited amount of immobilized primers, we propose a three-dimensional SPA by immobilizing primers in hydrogel attached to a slide. One of the PCR primers, modified with an acrylamide group at the 5'-terminal, was copolymerized with both polyacrylamide gel and an acryl-modified glass slide, resulting in a high amplification capacity. The immobilization process was carried out by adding the catalysis reagent N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) volatilized in vacuum, with uniform sample-concentration and gel-viscosity in the course of one-step nucleic acid immobilization. The porous structure of polyacrylamide gel, which allows PCR reagents such as Taq DNA polymerase, primers, dNTPs and DNA templates to freely enter the gel matrix, provides a homogeneous solution-mimicking environment for SPA on the interface or the inside of gel pads. Based on gel-based SPA, genotypes of different samples were accurately discriminated by either dual-color fluorescence hybridization or BAMPER (Bioluminometric Assay coupled with Modified Primer Extension Reactions). Pyrosequencing was also successfully carried out on SPA products. As the linkage between DNA molecules and gel is very strong, SPA products immobilized on gel pads could be reused several times if extended strands were removed by electrophoresis. Thus, the gel-based SPA provides a powerful tool for directly using on-chip amplicons for parallel detection.

  2. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  3. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  4. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  5. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  6. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  7. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  8. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  9. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  10. The Platelet Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Senzel, Lisa; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Bahou, Wadie F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The proteome is the pool of proteins expressed at a given time and circumstance. The word “proteomics” summarizes several technologies for visualization, quantitation and identification of these proteins. Recent advances in these techniques are helping to elucidate platelet processes which are relevant to bleeding and clotting disorders, transfusion medicine and regulation of angiogenesis. Recent findings Over 1100 platelet proteins have been identified using proteomic techniques. Various subproteomes have been characterized, including platelet releasates (the “secretome”), alpha and dense granules, membrane and cytoskeletal proteins, platelet-derived microparticles, and the platelet “phosphoproteome”. Proteomic data about platelets have become increasingly available in integrated databases. Summary Proteomic experiments in resting and activated platelets have identified novel signaling pathways and secreted proteins which may represent therapeutic targets, as well as potential cancer biomarkers. PMID:19550320

  11. Proteome Characterization Centers - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The centers, a component of NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, will analyze a subset of TCGA samples to define proteins translated from cancer genomes and their related biological processes.

  12. [Proteomics in infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Quero, Sara; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; García-Núñez, Marian; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases have a high incidence in the population, causing a major impact on global health. In vitro culture of microorganisms is the first technique applied for infection diagnosis which is laborious and time consuming. In recent decades, efforts have been focused on the applicability of "Omics" sciences, highlighting the progress provided by proteomic techniques in the field of infectious diseases. This review describes the management, processing and analysis of biological samples for proteomic research.

  13. A European Pathogenic Microorganism Proteome Database: Construction and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pleißner, Klaus-Peter; Eifert, Till

    2002-01-01

    A relational database structure based on MS-Access and MySQL to store and manage proteomics data was established. This system may be used to publish two-dimensional electrophoretic proteomics data, and also may be accessed by external users who want to compare their own data with those in the databases. The maintenance of the database is managed centrally. The producers of proteomics data do not need to construct a database themselves. Users can introduce mass spectra into the database, which allows the searching of peptide mass fingerprints against their own protein sequence databases. The first release published in January 2002 contains data from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori, Borrelia garinii, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Jurkat T-cells and mouse mammary gland projects (http://www.mpiib-berlin. mpg.de/2D-PAGE/). PMID:18628887

  14. Progress in the fabrication of optical fibers by the sol-gel-based granulated silica method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilz, S.; Najafi, H.; El Sayed, A.; Boas, J.; Kummer, D.; Scheuner, J.; Etissa, D.; Ryser, M.; Raisin, P.; Berger, S.; Romano, V.

    2016-04-01

    Novel special optical fibers nowadays can take advantage of several new preform production techniques. During the last years we have devoted our attention to the granulated silica method. It is one of the variants of the powder-in-tube technique and potentially offers a high degree of freedom regarding the usable dopants, the maximum possible dopant concentration, the homogeneity of the dopants, the geometry and minimal refractive index contrast. We developed and refined an approach for the production of doped granulated silica material based on the sol-gel process. Here, we present material analysis results of an ytterbium (Yb) doped, aluminum (Al) and phosphorous (P) co-doped glass on the basis of our sol-gel glass based granulated silica method as well as first measurements of two LMA fibers obtained from this material. For the material analysis we used advanced analysis techniques, such as HAADF-STEM and STEM-EDX spectroscopy to determine the composition of the material and the distribution of the dopants and the codopants. The chemical mapping of the STEM-EDX shows an extremely homogeneous distribution of the dopants and co-dopants in nano-scale. Based on self-made LMA fibers, we measured the refractive index contrast of the sol-gelbased granulated silica derived core compared to the pure silica cladding. In addition we quantified optical characteristics such as the emission and absorption spectrum. The measured upper state lifetime of the optical active dopant ytterbium was 0.99ms, which in turn confirms the homogeneous distribution of the Yb atoms. The propagation losses were determined to be 0.2dB/m at 633nm and 0.02414dB/m at1550nm.

  15. Nanoscaled Proteomic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Lee

    2013-09-01

    Global proteomics research is currently hampered by the extremely complexity of the proteome and the absence of techniques like the polymerase chain reaction in genomics which enables multiplication of a single protein molecule. Since all the existing analytical technologies cannot overcome the detection limit and the dynamic concentration barrier, development of improved analytical technologies at nanoscale, ideally those that could recognize single protein molecule in the presence of high abundant of others, is a high priority for proteomics. In this chapter, we will show the state-of-the-art of nanoproteomics, i.e., the application of nanotechnologies to proteomics. Various nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles, polymer and copolymer nanoparticles, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles have been used to improve sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability of proteomic analysis especially when the multidimensional separation system coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS is used. Among them, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the two most important nanomaterials: while GNPs are frequently utilized for enzyme immobilization, high throughput bioassay, selection of target-peptides and target-protein, CNTs including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and mutiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have wide applications to electronic sensor, sensitive immunodetection, nanobiocatalysis, affinity probes, MALDI matrices, protein digestion, peptides enrichment and analysis. In perspectives, a deep understanding of the structures and property of nanomaterials and interdisciplinary applications of nanotechnology to proteomics will certainly be revolutionary and intellectually rewarding.

  16. Proteomic research in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Taurines, Regina; Dudley, Edward; Grassl, Julia; Warnke, Andreas; Gerlach, Manfred; Coogan, Andrew N; Thome, Johannes

    2011-02-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and mood disorders are severe and disabling conditions of largely unknown origin and poorly understood pathophysiology. An accurate diagnosis and treatment of these disorders is often complicated by their aetiological and clinical heterogeneity. In recent years proteomic technologies based on mass spectrometry have been increasingly used, especially in the search for diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in neuropsychiatric disorders. Proteomics enable an automated high-throughput protein determination revealing expression levels, post-translational modifications and complex protein-interaction networks. In contrast to other methods such as molecular genetics, proteomics provide the opportunity to determine modifications at the protein level thereby possibly being more closely related to pathophysiological processes underlying the clinical phenomenology of specific psychiatric conditions. In this article we review the theoretical background of proteomics and its most commonly utilized techniques. Furthermore the current impact of proteomic research on diverse psychiatric diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders, drug abuse and autism, is discussed. Proteomic methods are expected to gain crucial significance in psychiatric research and neuropharmacology over the coming decade.

  17. The proteome of seed development in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S; Ornfelt, Jane H; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Staerfeldt, Hans Henrik; Friis, Carsten; Nielsen, Kasper; Goffard, Nicolas; Besenbacher, Søren; Krusell, Lene; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Stougaard, Jens

    2009-03-01

    We have characterized the development of seeds in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Like soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum), Lotus develops straight seed pods and each pod contains approximately 20 seeds that reach maturity within 40 days. Histological sections show the characteristic three developmental phases of legume seeds and the presence of embryo, endosperm, and seed coat in desiccated seeds. Furthermore, protein, oil, starch, phytic acid, and ash contents were determined, and this indicates that the composition of mature Lotus seed is more similar to soybean than to pea. In a first attempt to determine the seed proteome, both a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis approach and a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach were used. Globulins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and five legumins, LLP1 to LLP5, and two convicilins, LCP1 and LCP2, were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For two distinct developmental phases, seed filling and desiccation, a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach was used, and 665 and 181 unique proteins corresponding to gene accession numbers were identified for the two phases, respectively. All of the proteome data, including the experimental data and mass spectrometry spectra peaks, were collected in a database that is available to the scientific community via a Web interface (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/cgi-bin/lotus/db.cgi). This database establishes the basis for relating physiology, biochemistry, and regulation of seed development in Lotus. Together with a new Web interface (http://bioinfoserver.rsbs.anu.edu.au/utils/PathExpress4legumes/) collecting all protein identifications for Lotus, Medicago, and soybean seed proteomes, this database is a valuable resource for comparative seed proteomics and pathway analysis within and beyond the legume family.

  18. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  19. Proteomics in nutrition research: principles, technologies and applications.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Dagmar; Winkelmann, Isabel; Johnson, Ian T; Mariman, Edwin; Wenzel, Uwe; Daniel, Hannelore

    2005-09-01

    The global profiling of the whole protein complement of the genome expressed in a particular cell or organ, or in plasma or serum, makes it possible to identify biomarkers that respond to alterations in diet or to treatment, and that may have predictive value for the modelling of biological processes. Proteomics has not yet been applied on a large scale in nutritional studies, yet it has advantages over transcriptome profiling techniques in that it directly assesses the entities that carry out the biological functions. The present review summarizes the different approaches in proteomics research, with special emphasis on the current technical 'workhorses': two-dimensional (2D)-PAGE with immobilized pH gradients and protein identification by MS. Using a work-flow approach, we provide information and advice on sample handling and preparation, protein solubilization and pre-fractionation, protein separation by 2D-PAGE, detection and quantification via computer-assisted analysis of gels, and protein identification and characterization techniques by means of MS. Examples from nutritional studies employing proteomics are provided to demonstrate not only the advantages but also the limitations of current proteome analysis platforms.

  20. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  1. SEM signal emulation for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Evgenii; Muelders, Thomas; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Braylovska, Mariya

    2016-03-01

    The application of accurate and predictive physical resist simulation is seen as one important use model for fast and efficient exploration of new patterning technology options, especially if fully qualified OPC models are not yet available at an early pre-production stage. The methodology of using a top-down CD-SEM metrology to extract the 3D resist profile information, such as the critical dimension (CD) at various resist heights, has to be associated with a series of presumptions which may introduce such small, but systematic CD errors. Ideally, the metrology effects should be carefully minimized during measurement process, or if possible be taken into account through proper metrology modeling. In this paper we discuss the application of a fast SEM signal emulation describing the SEM image formation. The algorithm is applied to simulated resist 3D profiles and produces emulated SEM image results for 1D and 2D patterns. It allows estimating resist simulation quality by comparing CDs which were extracted from the emulated and from the measured SEM images. Moreover, SEM emulation is applied for resist model calibration to capture subtle error signatures through dose and defocus. Finally, it should be noted that our SEM emulation methodology is based on the approximation of physical phenomena which are taking place in real SEM image formation. This approximation allows achieving better speed performance compared to a fully physical model.

  2. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  3. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  4. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  5. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  6. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  7. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  8. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  9. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  10. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  11. Proteomic Assessment of Poultry Spermatozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully characterizing the protein composition of spermatozoa is the first step in utilizing proteomics to delineate the function of sperm proteins. To date, sperm proteome maps have been partially developed for the human, mouse, rat, bull and several invertebrates. Here we report the first proteomic...

  12. Proteomics of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagerquist, Clifton K.

    This chapter is intended to be a relatively brief overview of proteomic techniques currently in use for the identification and analysis of microorganisms with a special emphasis on foodborne pathogens. The chapter is organized as follows. First, proteomic techniques are introduced and discussed. Second, proteomic applications are presented specifically as they relate to the identification and qualitative/quantitative analysis of foodborne pathogens.

  13. Environmental proteomics and metallomics.

    PubMed

    López-Barea, Juan; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2006-04-01

    Monitoring environmental pollution using biomarkers requires detailed knowledge about the markers, and many only allow a partial assessment of pollution. New proteomic methods (environmental proteomics) can identify proteins that, after validation, might be useful as alternative biomarkers, although this approach also has its limitations, derived mainly from their application to non-model organisms. Initial studies using environmental proteomics were carried out in animals exposed to model pollutants, and led to the concept of protein expression signatures. Experiments have been carried out in model organisms (yeast, Arabidopsis, rat cells, or mice) exposed to model contaminants. Over the last few years, proteomics has been applied to organisms from ecosystems with different pollution levels, forming the basis of an environmental branch in proteomics. Another focus is connected with the presence of metals bound to biomolecules, which adds an additional dimension to metal-biomolecule and metalloprotein characterization - the field of metallomics. The metallomic approach considers the metallome: a whole individual metal or metalloid species within a cell or tissue. A metallomic analytical approach (MAA) is proposed as a new tool to study and identify metalloproteins.

  14. Beer and wort proteomics.

    PubMed

    Iimure, Takashi; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Proteome analysis provides a way to identify proteins related to the quality traits of beer. A number of protein species in beer and wort have been identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with enzyme digestion such as trypsin, followed by mass spectrometry analyses and/or liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry. In addition, low molecular weight polypeptides in beer have been identified by the combination of non-enzyme digestion and mass analyses. These data sets of various molecular weight polypeptides (i.e., proteomes) provide a platform for analyzing protein functions in beer. Several novel proteins related to beer quality traits such as foam stability and haze formation have been identified by analyzing these proteomes. Some of the proteins have been applied to the development of efficient protein or DNA markers for trait selection in malting barley breeding. In this chapter, recent proteome studies of beer and wort are reviewed, and the methods and protocols of beer and wort proteome analysis are described.

  15. The Cysteine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Chandler, Joshua D.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine (Cys) proteome is a major component of the adaptive interface between the genome and the exposome. The thiol moiety of Cys undergoes a range of biologic modifications enabling biological switching of structure and reactivity. These biological modifications include sulfenylation and disulfide formation, formation of higher oxidation states, S-nitrosylation, persulfidation, metallation, and other modifications. Extensive knowledge about these systems and their compartmentalization now provides a foundation to develop advanced integrative models of Cys proteome regulation. In particular, detailed understanding of redox signaling pathways and sensing networks is becoming available to discriminate network structures. This research focuses attention on the need for atlases of Cys modifications to develop systems biology models. Such atlases will be especially useful for integrative studies linking the Cys proteome to imaging and other omics platforms, providing a basis for improved redox-based therapeutics. Thus, a framework is emerging to place the Cys proteome as a complement to the quantitative proteome in the omics continuum connecting the genome to the exposome. PMID:25843657

  16. Toxoplasma gondii proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Louis M; Fiser, Andras; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Kim, Kami

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous, Apicomplexan parasite that, in humans, can cause several clinical syndromes, including encephalitis, chorioretinitis and congenital infection. T. gondii was described a little over 100 years ago in the tissues of the gundi (Ctenodoactylus gundi). There are a large number of applicable experimental techniques available for this pathogen and it has become a model organism for the study of intracellular pathogens. With the completion of the genomes for a type I (GT-1), type II (ME49) and type III (VEG) strains, proteomic studies on this organism have been greatly facilitated. Several subcellular proteomic studies have been completed on this pathogen. These studies have helped elucidate specialized invasion organelles and their composition, as well as proteins associated with the cytoskeleton. Global proteomic studies are leading to improved strategies for genome annotation in this organism and an improved understanding of protein regulation in this pathogen. Web-based resources, such as EPIC-DB and ToxoDB, provide proteomic data and support for studies on T. gondii. This review will summarize the current status of proteomic research on T. gondii. PMID:19489701

  17. Microbiology and proteomics, getting the best of both worlds!

    PubMed

    Armengaud, Jean

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput identification of proteins with the latest generation of hybrid high-resolution mass spectrometers is opening new perspectives in microbiology. I present, here, an overview of tandem mass spectrometry technology and bioinformatics for shotgun proteomics that make 2D-PAGE approaches obsolete. Non-labelling quantitative approaches have become more popular than labelling techniques on most proteomic platforms because they are easier to carry out while their quantitative outcome is rather robust. Parameters for recording mass spectrometry data, however, need to be chosen carefully and statistics to assess the confidence of the results should not be neglected. Interestingly, next-generation sequencing methodologies make any microbial model quickly amenable to proteomics, leading to the documentation of a wide range of organisms from diverse environments. Some recent discoveries made using microbial proteomics have challenged some biological dogma, such as: (i) initiation of the translation does not occur predominantly from ATG codons in some microorganisms, (ii) non-canonical initiation codons are used to regulate the production of specific but important proteins and (iii) a gene may code for multiple polypeptide species, heterogeneous in terms of sequences. Microbial diversity and microbial physiology can now be revisited by means of exhaustive comparative proteomic surveys where thousands of proteins are detected and quantified. Proteogenomics, consisting of better annotating of genomes with the help of proteomic evidence, is paving the way for integrated multi-omic approaches in microbiology. Finally, meta-proteomic tools and approaches are emerging for tackling the high complexity of the microbial world as a whole, opening new perspectives for assessing how microbial communities function.

  18. Comparative Proteomics of Mouse Tears and Saliva: Evidence from Large Protein Families for Functional Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Robert C.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    We produced a tear proteome of the genome mouse, C57BL/6, that contained 139 different protein identifications: 110 from a two-dimensional (2D) gel with subsequent trypsin digestion, 19 from a one-dimensional (1D) gel with subsequent trypsin digestion and ten from a 1D gel with subsequent Asp-N digestion. We compared this tear proteome with a C57BL/6 mouse saliva proteome produced previously. Sixteen of the 139 tear proteins are shared between the two proteomes, including six proteins that combat microbial growth. Among the 123 other tear proteins, were members of four large protein families that have no counterparts in humans: Androgen-binding proteins (ABPs) with different members expressed in the two proteomes, Exocrine secreted peptides (ESPs) expressed exclusively in the tear proteome, major urinary proteins (MUPs) expressed in one or both proteomes and the mouse-specific Kallikreins (subfamily b KLKs) expressed exclusively in the saliva proteome. All four families have members with suggested roles in mouse communication, which may influence some aspect of reproductive behavior. We discuss this in the context of functional adaptation involving tear and saliva proteins in the secretions of mouse lacrimal and salivary glands, respectively.

  19. Proteomic tools for environmental microbiology--a roadmap from sample preparation to protein identification and quantification.

    PubMed

    Wöhlbrand, Lars; Trautwein, Kathleen; Rabus, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    The steadily increasing amount of (meta-)genomic sequence information of diverse organisms and habitats has a strong impact on research in microbial physiology and ecology. In-depth functional understanding of metabolic processes and overall physiological adaptation to environmental changes, however, requires application of proteomics, as the context specific proteome constitutes the true functional output of a cell. Considering the enormous structural and functional diversity of proteins, only rational combinations of various analytical approaches allow a holistic view on the overall state of the cell. Within the past decade, proteomic methods became increasingly accessible to microbiologists mainly due to the robustness of analytical methods (e.g. 2DE), and affordability of mass spectrometers and their relative ease of use. This review provides an overview on the complex portfolio of state-of-the-art proteomics and highlights the basic principles of key methods, ranging from sample preparation of laboratory or environmental samples, via protein/peptide separation (gel-based or gel-free) and different types of mass spectrometric protein/peptide analyses, to protein identification and abundance determination.

  20. Subcellular proteomics in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B

    2008-05-01

    The brain is the most complex and dynamically organized organ of the human body, with a high degree of computation capability enabling the execution of a wide spectrum of physiological processes and behaviors. In the past decades a large number of genomics studies have been undertaken to investigate brain function and brain disorders, but despite these efforts many of the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain largely unknown. The implementation of mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics in recent years enabled to tap into condition-specific protein trafficking and protein interaction that are the key to organelle proteome (dys)function. The technology for neuroproteomics is still evolving; currently there are no standardized protocols. In this review we describe the most commonly used methods to prepare brain subcellular fractions suitable for proteomics analysis, and highlight the various approaches for quantitative neuroproteomics.

  1. Protein extraction and gel-based separation methods to analyze responses to pathogens in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L).

    PubMed

    Ardila, Harold Duban; Fernández, Raquel González; Higuera, Blanca Ligia; Redondo, Inmaculada; Martínez, Sixta Tulia

    2014-01-01

    We are currently using a 2-DE-based proteomics approach to study plant responses to pathogenic fungi by using the carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L)-Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi pathosystem. It is clear that the protocols for the first stages of a standard proteomics workflow must be optimized to each biological system and objectives of the research. The optimization procedure for the extraction and separation of proteins by 1-DE and 2-DE in the indicated system is reported. This strategy can be extrapolated to other plant-pathogen interaction systems in order to perform an evaluation of the changes in the host protein profile caused by the pathogen and to identify proteins which, at early stages, are involved or implicated in the plant defense response.

  2. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  3. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  4. Online matrix removal platform for coupling gel-based separations to whole protein electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Compton, Philip D; Tran, John C; Kelleher, Neil L

    2015-05-01

    A fractionation method called gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE) has been used to dramatically increase the number of proteins identified in top-down proteomic workflows; however, the technique involves the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a surfactant that interferes with electrospray ionization. Therefore, an efficient removal of SDS is absolutely required prior to mass analysis. Traditionally, methanol/chloroform precipitation and spin columns have been used, but they lack reproducibility and are difficult to automate. Therefore, we developed an in-line matrix removal platform to enable the direct analysis of samples containing SDS and salts. Only small molecules like SDS permeate a porous membrane and are removed in a manner similar to cross-flow filtration. With this device, near-complete removal of SDS is accomplished within 5 min and proteins are subsequently mobilized into a mass spectrometer. The new platform was optimized for the analysis of GELFrEE fractions enriched for histones extracted from human HeLa cells. All four core histones and their proteoforms were detected in a single spectrum by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The new method versus protein precipitation/resuspension showed 2- to 10-fold improved signal intensities, offering a clear path forward to improve proteome coverage and the efficiency of top-down proteomics.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of the Protein Expression Profile in the Mature Nigella sativa (Black Seed).

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Ibrahim O; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Alfadda, Assim A; AlYahya, Sami A; Alghamdi, Waleed M; Aljohi, Hasan A; Almalik, Abdulaziz; Masood, Afshan

    2016-08-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) seed has been used as an important nutritional flavoring agent and in traditional medicine for treating many illnesses since ancient times. Understanding the proteomic component of the seed may lead to enhance the understanding of its structural and biological functional complexity. In this study, we have analyzed its proteome profile based on gel-based proteome mapping technique that includes one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry strategy. We have not come across any such studies that have been performed in N. sativa seeds up to date. A total of 277 proteins were identified, and their functional, metabolic, and location-wise annotations were carried out using the UniProt database. The majority of proteins identified in the proteome dataset based on their function were those involved in enzyme catalytic activity, nucleotide binding, and protein binding while the major cellular processes included regulation of biological process followed by regulation of secondary biological process, cell organization and biogenesis, protein metabolism, and transport. The identified proteome was localized mainly to the nucleus then to the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, mitochondria, plastid, and others. A majority of the proteins were involved in biochemical pathways involving carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid and shikimate pathway, lipid metabolism, nucleotide, cell organization and biogenesis, transport, and defense processes. The identified proteins in the dataset help to improve our understanding of the pathways involved in N. sativa seed metabolism and its biochemical features and detail out useful information that may help to utilize these proteins. This study could thus pave a way for future further high-throughput studies using a more targeted proteomic approach.

  6. Proteome analysis of subsarcolemmal cardiomyocyte mitochondria: a comparison of different analytical platforms.

    PubMed

    Giorgianni, Francesco; Koirala, Diwa; Weber, Karl T; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka

    2014-05-26

    Mitochondria are complex organelles that play critical roles in diverse aspects of cellular function. Heart disease and a number of other pathologies are associated with perturbations in the molecular machinery of the mitochondria. Therefore, comprehensive, unbiased examination of the mitochondrial proteome represents a powerful approach toward system-level insights into disease mechanisms. A crucial aspect in proteomics studies is design of bioanalytical strategies that maximize coverage of the complex repertoire of mitochondrial proteins. In this study, we evaluated the performance of gel-based and gel-free multidimensional platforms for profiling of the proteome in subsarcolemmal mitochondria harvested from rat heart. We compared three different multidimensional proteome fractionation platforms: polymeric reversed-phase liquid chromatography at high pH (PLRP), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and isoelectric focusing (IEF) separations combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and bioinformatics for protein identification. Across all three platforms, a total of 1043 proteins were identified. Among the three bioanalytical strategies, SDS-PAGE followed by LC-MS/MS provided the best coverage of the mitochondrial proteome. With this platform, 890 proteins with diverse physicochemical characteristics were identified; the mitochondrial protein panel encompassed proteins with various functional roles including bioenergetics, protein import, and mitochondrial fusion. Taken together, results of this study provide a large-scale view of the proteome in subsarcolemmal mitochondria from the rat heart, and aid in the selection of optimal bioanalytical platforms for differential protein expression profiling of mitochondria in health and disease.

  7. Proteome Analysis of Subsarcolemmal Cardiomyocyte Mitochondria: A Comparison of Different Analytical Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Giorgianni, Francesco; Koirala, Diwa; Weber, Karl T.; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are complex organelles that play critical roles in diverse aspects of cellular function. Heart disease and a number of other pathologies are associated with perturbations in the molecular machinery of the mitochondria. Therefore, comprehensive, unbiased examination of the mitochondrial proteome represents a powerful approach toward system-level insights into disease mechanisms. A crucial aspect in proteomics studies is design of bioanalytical strategies that maximize coverage of the complex repertoire of mitochondrial proteins. In this study, we evaluated the performance of gel-based and gel-free multidimensional platforms for profiling of the proteome in subsarcolemmal mitochondria harvested from rat heart. We compared three different multidimensional proteome fractionation platforms: polymeric reversed-phase liquid chromatography at high pH (PLRP), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and isoelectric focusing (IEF) separations combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and bioinformatics for protein identification. Across all three platforms, a total of 1043 proteins were identified. Among the three bioanalytical strategies, SDS-PAGE followed by LC-MS/MS provided the best coverage of the mitochondrial proteome. With this platform, 890 proteins with diverse physicochemical characteristics were identified; the mitochondrial protein panel encompassed proteins with various functional roles including bioenergetics, protein import, and mitochondrial fusion. Taken together, results of this study provide a large-scale view of the proteome in subsarcolemmal mitochondria from the rat heart, and aid in the selection of optimal bioanalytical platforms for differential protein expression profiling of mitochondria in health and disease. PMID:24865490

  8. Optimisation of a 2-D gel electrophoresis protocol for the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Kniemeyer, Olaf; Lessing, Franziska; Scheibner, Olaf; Hertweck, Christian; Brakhage, Axel A

    2006-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important airborne fungal pathogen causing life-threatening infections in immunosuppressed patients. One of the important questions concerning A. fumigatus is the identification of pathogenicity determinants. To obtain a comprehensive overview about the proteins produced at different physiological conditions that are related to the infectious process a proteomic approach has been applied. Here, 2-D gel electrophoresis for filamentous fungi was optimised concerning removal of interfering compounds, protein extraction and separation methods. A trichloroacetic acid-based precipitation method of proteins with their subsequent solubilisation by the use of a combination of CHAPS with a second sulfobetaine detergent gave the best results. The optimised protocol was evaluated by the analysis of the proteomes of A. fumigatus grown on two different carbon sources, i.e., glucose and ethanol. Carbon catabolite repression has not been studied in detail at the protein level in A. fumigatus yet. In addition, growth on ethanol leads to activation of the glyoxylate cycle which was shown to be essential for pathogenesis in bacteria and fungi. In A. fumigatus, differential patterns of enzymes of the gluconeogenesis, glyoxylate cycle and ethanol degradation pathway during growth on glucose and ethanol were observed.

  9. Pressurized Pepsin Digestion in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    López-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Robinson, Errol W.; Hixson, Kim K.; Tian, Zhixin; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Sang-Won; Tolić, Nikola; Weitz, Karl K.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Integrated top-down bottom-up proteomics combined with on-line digestion has great potential to improve the characterization of protein isoforms in biological systems and is amendable to high throughput proteomics experiments. Bottom-up proteomics ultimately provides the peptide sequences derived from the tandem MS analyses of peptides after the proteome has been digested. Top-down proteomics conversely entails the MS analyses of intact proteins for more effective characterization of genetic variations and/or post-translational modifications. Herein, we describe recent efforts toward efficient integration of bottom-up and top-down LC-MS-based proteomics strategies. Since most proteomics separations utilize acidic conditions, we exploited the compatibility of pepsin (where the optimal digestion conditions are at low pH) for integration into bottom-up and top-down proteomics work flows. Pressure-enhanced pepsin digestions were successfully performed and characterized with several standard proteins in either an off-line mode using a Barocycler or an on-line mode using a modified high pressure LC system referred to as a fast on-line digestion system (FOLDS). FOLDS was tested using pepsin and a whole microbial proteome, and the results were compared against traditional trypsin digestions on the same platform. Additionally, FOLDS was integrated with a RePlay configuration to demonstrate an ultrarapid integrated bottom-up top-down proteomics strategy using a standard mixture of proteins and a monkey pox virus proteome. PMID:20627868

  10. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Powerful Modality for Pulmonary Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Hua-Ping; Li, Yan-Ming; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute and lethal clinical syndrome that is characterized by hypoxemic respiratory failure and diffuse alveolar inflammatory damage. This review aimed to search and discuss the mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic studies on different subsets of ARDS patients. Data Sources: Original research articles were collected from the PubMed database published in English up to December 2015. Study Selection: The literature search was done using the term “(acute lung injury OR acute respiratory distress syndrome) AND (proteomics OR proteome OR mass spectrum OR differential in-gel electrophoresis OR two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis)”. Related original research articles were included and were carefully analyzed. Results: Eight original proteomic researches on ARDS patients were found. The common proteomic modalities were two-dimensional (2D) high-performance liquid chromatography-based electronic spray ion-MS/MS and 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/differential in-gel electrophoresis-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/MS. They compared the proteome between ARDS patients and normal controls and analyzed the dynamic changes of proteome at different ARDS stages or severity. The disturbed proteome in ARDS patients includes plasma acute-phase proteins, inflammatory/immune-associated proteins, and coagulation proteins. Conclusions: Although several previous studies have provided some useful information about the lung proteome in ARDS patients and gained several interesting disease-associated biomarkers, clinical proteomic studies in ARDS patients are still in the initial stage. An increased cooperation is still needed to establish a global and faithful database containing disease-specific proteome from the largest ARDS subsets. PMID:27647196

  11. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  12. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  13. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  14. Proteomic analysis of the porcine platelet proteome and alterations induced by thrombin activation.

    PubMed

    Esteso, Gloria; Mora, María Isabel; Garrido, Juan José; Corrales, Fernando; Moreno, Angela

    2008-12-02

    Platelets are enucleated cells derived from bone marrow megakaryocytes and defects in platelet functions could be involved in many cardiovascular diseases. Proteomics can be used to provide a new insight in the study of these platelet functions and can help to identify the biochemical events underlying platelet activation. In this study, we have obtained a reference 2-DE map of porcine platelet proteins. A large number of cytoskeletal and metabolic proteins were found as well as some proteins related to cell mobility and immunological functions. Other proteins implicated in the cell signalling process, transport or apoptosis were also identified. Moreover, we have analysed, by 2D-DIGE methodology, quantitative modifications of platelet proteins following their activation by thrombin. 26 spots exhibited statistically significant differences, and a total of 16 spots corresponding to 13 different proteins were successfully identified. Using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, the association of the deregulated proteins with canonical pathways highlighted two major pathways; coagulation system and integrin signalling. These results confirm that this proteomic approach (based on 2D-DIGE, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic and pathway databases) has proved to be a powerful tool when applied to studying signalling pathways that could play a relevant role in the activation of platelets.

  15. The proteome of lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Bernd A; Wrocklage, Christian; Hasilik, Andrej; Saftig, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Lysosomes are organelles of eukaryotic cells that are critically involved in the degradation of macromolecules mainly delivered by endocytosis and autophagocytosis. Degradation is achieved by more than 60 hydrolases sequestered by a single phospholipid bilayer. The lysosomal membrane facilitates interaction and fusion with other compartments and harbours transport proteins catalysing the export of catabolites, thereby allowing their recycling. Lysosomal proteins have been addressed in various proteomic studies that are compared in this review regarding the source of material, the organelle/protein purification scheme, the proteomic methodology applied and the proteins identified. Distinguishing true constituents of an organelle from co-purifying contaminants is a central issue in subcellular proteomics, with additional implications for lysosomes as being the site of degradation of many cellular and extracellular proteins. Although many of the lysosomal hydrolases were identified by classical biochemical approaches, the knowledge about the protein composition of the lysosomal membrane has remained fragmentary for a long time. Using proteomics many novel lysosomal candidate proteins have been discovered and it can be expected that their functional characterisation will help to understand functions of lysosomes at a molecular level that have been characterised only phenomenologically so far and to generally deepen our understanding of this indispensable organelle.

  16. “Seed Proteomics"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic analysis of seeds encounters some specific problems that do not impinge on analyses of other plant cells, tissues, or organs. There are anatomic considerations. Seeds comprise the seed coat, the storage organ(s), and the embryonic axis. Are these to be studied individually or as a compo...

  17. Xylem sap proteomics.

    PubMed

    de Bernonville, Thomas Dugé; Albenne, Cécile; Arlat, Matthieu; Hoffmann, Laurent; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of xylem sap has recently become a major field of interest to understand several biological questions related to plant development and responses to environmental clues. The xylem sap appears as a dynamic fluid undergoing changes in its proteome upon abiotic and biotic stresses. Unlike cell compartments which are amenable to purification in sufficient amount prior to proteomic analysis, the xylem sap has to be collected in particular conditions to avoid contamination by intracellular proteins and to obtain enough material. A model plant like Arabidopsis thaliana is not suitable for such an analysis because efficient harvesting of xylem sap is difficult. The analysis of the xylem sap proteome also requires specific procedures to concentrate proteins and to focus on proteins predicted to be secreted. Indeed, xylem sap proteins appear to be synthesized and secreted in the root stele or to originate from dying differentiated xylem cells. This chapter describes protocols to collect xylem sap from Brassica species and to prepare total and N-glycoprotein extracts for identification of proteins by mass spectrometry analyses and bioinformatics.

  18. Genomes to Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Panisko, Ellen A.; Grigoriev, Igor; Daly, Don S.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Baker, Scott E.

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  19. Three-dimensional electrophoresis for quantitative profiling of complex proteomes.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Sergio; Colignon, Bertrand; Dieu, Marc; Delaive, Edouard; Raes, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative 2D-gel-dependent proteomics became feasible with 2D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and this technique has gained wide acceptance because it has eliminated the gel to gel variations and greatly facilitated the quantitative comparisons across gels for many different experimental conditions. However, the co-migration of several proteins in the same spot is still a major limitation which detracts from the accuracy of comparative quantification and prevents unambiguous post-translational modifications (PTMs) detection.A protocol based on traditional polyacrylamide gel IEF sample fractionation, and followed by two consecutive SDS-PAGE electrophoreses alleviates co-migration limitations. The use of two different buffer systems for SDS-PAGE is central to the proposed approach.

  20. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  1. Market opportunity in computational proteomics.

    PubMed

    Razvi, Enal

    2002-03-01

    The current exuberance on the potential of proteomics as a means to deploy the wealth of the human genome is expected to last into the coming years. Unlike the genome, a finite entity with a fixed number of base pairs of the genetic material, the proteome is "plastic", changing throughout growth and development and environmental stresses, as well as in pathological situations. Our proteomes change over time, and therefore there is no one proteome; the proteome is for practical purposes an infinite entity. It is therefore crucial to build systems that are capable of manipulating the information content that is the proteome, thence the need for computational proteomics as a discipline. In this Market View article, we present the industry landscape that is emerging in the computational proteomics space. This space is still in its infancy and for the most part undefined; therefore we seek to present the market opportunity in informatics in the drug discovery space and then extend that to an examination of industry trends in proteomics. Thus, the gestalt is a set of predictions as to the evolution of the landscape in computational proteomics over the coming years.

  2. Whole proteomes as internal standards in quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ong, Shao-En

    2010-07-30

    As mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics approaches become increasingly powerful, researchers are taking advantage of well established methodologies and improving instrumentation to pioneer new protein expression profiling methods. For example, pooling several proteomes labeled using the stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) method yields a whole-proteome stable isotope-labeled internal standard that can be mixed with a tissue-derived proteome for quantification. By increasing quantitative accuracy in the analysis of tissue proteomes, such methods should improve integration of protein expression profiling data with transcriptomic data and enhance downstream bioinformatic analyses. An accurate and scalable quantitative method to analyze tumor proteomes at the depth of several thousand proteins provides a powerful tool for global protein quantification of tissue samples and promises to redefine our understanding of tumor biology.

  3. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  4. Sol-gel based TiO2 thin film deposition on frustules towards facile and scalable manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, W.; McNaughton, R.; Anderson, S.; Zhang, X.

    2016-11-01

    Diatom frustules have drawn a lot of attention from engineering researchers in the past decades. As a type of biomaterial, diatom frustules have been applied in a variety of areas such as biosensors and solar cells due to their excellent material and optical properties. Titanium dioxide (TiO2), on the other hand, is also semiconductor material and photocatalyst, micro and nanoparticles of which can be found in applications such as dye sensitised solar cells (DSSC). It has been demonstrated that by using diatom frustule-TiO2 composite particles in DSSCs, the performance of the solar cells could be increased. In this paper, we introduce a sol- gel based method to deposit TiO2 layers on the surface of diatom frustules. TiO2 nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of the frustules. After a subsequent annealing process, TiO2 crystal grains were formed. The method in this paper has the potential for scalable manufacturing of frustule-TiO2 composite materials for future solar cell applications.

  5. Universal sample preparation method integrating trichloroacetic acid/acetone precipitation with phenol extraction for crop proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Erhui; Wang, Wei; Scali, Monica; Cresti, Mauro

    2014-02-01

    Crop plants contain large amounts of secondary compounds that interfere with protein extraction and gel-based proteomic analysis. Thus, a protein extraction protocol that can be easily applied to various crop materials with minimal optimization is essential. Here we describe a universal protocol for total protein extraction involving trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone precipitation followed by SDS and phenol extraction. Through SDS extraction, the proteins precipitated by the TCA/acetone treatment can be fully resolubilized and then further purified by phenol extraction. This protocol combines TCA/acetone precipitation, which aggressively removes nonprotein compounds, and phenol extraction, which selectively dissolves proteins, resulting in effective purification of proteins from crop tissues. This protocol can also produce high-quality protein preparations from various recalcitrant tissues, and therefore it has a wide range of applications in crop proteomic analysis. Designed to run on a small scale, this protocol can be completed within 5 h.

  6. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-07

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs.

  7. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, Marina A; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labeling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts.

  8. Biological versus technical variability in 2-D DIGE experiments with environmental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zech, Hajo; Echtermeyer, Christoph; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Blasius, Bernd; Rabus, Ralf

    2011-08-01

    Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) allows for reliable quantification of global protein abundance changes. The threshold of significance for protein abundance changes depends on the experimental variation (biological and technical). This study estimates biological, technical and total variation inherent to 2-D DIGE analysis of environmental bacteria, using the model organisms "Aromatoleum aromaticum" EbN1 and Phaeobacter gallaeciensis DSM 17395. Of both bacteria the soluble proteomes were analyzed from replicate cultures. For strains EbN1 and DSM 17395, respectively, CV revealed a total variation of below 19 and 15%, an average technical variation of 12 and 7%, and an average biological variation of 18 and 17%. Multivariate analysis of variance confirmed domination of biological over technical variance to be significant in most cases. To visualize variances, the complex protein data have been plotted with a multidimensional scaling technique. Furthermore, comparison of different treatment groups (different substrate conditions) demonstrated that variability within groups is significantly smaller than differences caused by treatment.

  9. The Human Eye Proteome Project: perspectives on an emerging proteome.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Enghild, Jan J; Venkatraman, Vidya; Dyrlund, Thomas F; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2013-08-01

    There are an estimated 285 million people with visual impairment worldwide, of whom 39 million are blind. The pathogenesis of many eye diseases remains poorly understood. The human eye is currently an emerging proteome that may provide key insight into the biological pathways of disease. We review proteomic investigations of the human eye and present a catalogue of 4842 nonredundant proteins identified in human eye tissues and biofluids to date. We highlight the need to identify new biomarkers for eye diseases using proteomics. Recent advances in proteomics do now allow the identification of hundreds to thousands of proteins in tissues and fluids, characterization of various PTMs and simultaneous quantification of multiple proteins. To facilitate proteomic studies of the eye, the Human Eye Proteome Project (HEPP) was organized in September 2012. The HEPP is one of the most recent components of the Biology/Disease-driven Human Proteome Project (B/D-HPP) whose overarching goal is to support the broad application of state-of-the-art measurements of proteins and proteomes by life scientists studying the molecular mechanisms of biological processes and human disease. The large repertoire of investigative proteomic tools has great potential to transform vision science and enhance understanding of physiology and disease processes that affect sight.

  10. Proteomic profiling of the rat hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus plays a pivotal role in numerous mechanisms highly relevant to the maintenance of body homeostasis, such as the control of food intake and energy expenditure. Impairment of these mechanisms has been associated with the metabolic disturbances involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. Since rodent species constitute important models for metabolism studies and the rat hypothalamus is poorly characterized by proteomic strategies, we performed experiments aimed at constructing a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) profile of rat hypothalamus proteins. Results As a first step, we established the best conditions for tissue collection and protein extraction, quantification and separation. The extraction buffer composition selected for proteome characterization of rat hypothalamus was urea 7 M, thiourea 2 M, CHAPS 4%, Triton X-100 0.5%, followed by a precipitation step with chloroform/methanol. Two-dimensional (2-D) gels of hypothalamic extracts from four-month-old rats were analyzed; the protein spots were digested and identified by using tandem mass spectrometry and database query using the protein search engine MASCOT. Eighty-six hypothalamic proteins were identified, the majority of which were classified as participating in metabolic processes, consistent with the finding of a large number of proteins with catalytic activity. Genes encoding proteins identified in this study have been related to obesity development. Conclusion The present results indicate that the 2-DE technique will be useful for nutritional studies focusing on hypothalamic proteins. The data presented herein will serve as a reference database for studies testing the effects of dietary manipulations on hypothalamic proteome. We trust that these experiments will lead to important knowledge on protein targets of nutritional variables potentially able to affect the complex central nervous system control of energy homeostasis. PMID:22519962

  11. Statistical Analysis of Variation in the Human Plasma Proteome

    DOE PAGES

    Corzett, Todd H.; Fodor, Imola K.; Choi, Megan W.; ...

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the variation in the human plasma proteome is an essential prerequisite for disease-specific biomarker detection. We report here on the longitudinal and individual variation in human plasma characterized by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) using plasma samples from eleven healthy subjects collected three times over a two week period. Fixed-effects modeling was used to remove dye and gel variability. Mixed-effects modeling was then used to quantitate the sources of proteomic variation. The subject-to-subject variation represented the largest variance component, while the time-within-subject variation was comparable to the experimental variation found in a previous technical variability study where onemore » human plasma sample was processed eight times in parallel and each was then analyzed by 2-D DIGE in triplicate. Here, 21 protein spots had larger than 50% CV, suggesting that these proteins may not be appropriate as biomarkers and should be carefully scrutinized in future studies. Seventy-eight protein spots showing differential protein levels between different individuals or individual collections were identified by mass spectrometry and further characterized using hierarchical clustering. The results present a first step toward understanding the complexity of longitudinal and individual variation in the human plasma proteome, and provide a baseline for improved biomarker discovery.« less

  12. Circular photogalvanic effect caused by the transitions between edge and 2D states in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron absorption and the edge photocurrent of a 2D topological insulator are studied for transitions between edge states to 2D states. The circular polarized light is found to produce the edge photocurrent, the direction of which is determined by light polarization and edge orientation. It is shown that the edge-state current is found to exceed the 2D current owing to the topological protection of the edge states.

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of lung tissue from guinea pigs with Leptospiral Pulmonary Haemorrhage Syndrome (LPHS) reveals a decrease in abundance of host proteins involved in cytoskeletal and cellular organization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent completion of the complete genome sequence of the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) provides innovative opportunities to apply proteomic technologies to an important animal model of disease. In this study, a 2-D guinea pig proteome lung map was used to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of ...

  14. Energy Efficiency of D2D Multi-User Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zufan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-28

    The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication system is an important part of heterogeneous networks. It has great potential to improve spectrum efficiency, throughput and energy efficiency cooperation of multiple D2D users with the advantage of direct communication. When cooperating, D2D users expend extraordinary energy to relay data to other D2D users. Hence, the remaining energy of D2D users determines the life of the system. This paper proposes a cooperation scheme for multiple D2D users who reuse the orthogonal spectrum and are interested in the same data by aiming to solve the energy problem of D2D users. Considering both energy availability and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is introduced in the cooperation scheme to solve relay selection problems. Thus, the cooperation issue is transformed into a maximum weighted matching (MWM) problem. In order to enhance energy efficiency without the deterioration of Quality of Service (QoS), the link outage probability is derived according to the Shannon Equation by considering the data rate and delay. The simulation studies the relationships among the number of cooperative users, the length of shared data, the number of data packets and energy efficiency.

  15. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  16. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  17. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  18. [FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN BRYOZOAN COLONY: A PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Kutyumov, V A; Maltseva, A L; Kotenko, N; Ostrovsky, A N

    2016-01-01

    Bryozoans are typical modular organisms. They consist of repetitive structural units, the zooids. Bryozoan colonies grow by zooidal budding, with the distribution pattern of the budding loci underlying the diversity of colony forms. Budding is usually restricted to the zooids at the periphery of the colony, which form a "growing edge" or local terminal growth zones. Non-budding parts of the colony can be functionally subdivided, too. In many species colonies consists of regular, often repetitive zones of feeding and non-feeding modules, associated with a periodical degeneration and regeneration of the polypide, retractile tentacle crown with a gut and the accompanying musculature. So, there is functional differentiation in bryozoan colonies but its mechanisms are unknown. Presumably, budding and/or polypide recycling in different colony parts are induced or inhibited by certain determinants of functional specialization. An effective tool of their identification is the comparison of proteomes of functionally different zones. Here we report the results of proteomic analysis of three bryozoan species from the White Sea, which have a different colony form: Flustrellidra hispida, Terminoflustra membranaceotruncata and Securiflustra securifrons. Using differential two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we compared proteomes of the growing edge and the zones consisting of feeding and non-feeding zooids in these species. We estimated the overall proteome variability, revealed proteins whose relative abundance gradually changed along the proximal-distal colony axis and suggested that they might be involved in the functional differentiation of the colony.

  19. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  20. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  1. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  2. Methods in tubulin proteomics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leah M; Xiao, Hui; Burd, Berta; Horwitz, Susan Band; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    New analytical methods are needed for the successful outcome of experiments aimed at characterizing mechanisms of microtubule dynamics and at understanding the effects of drugs on microtubules. The identification of tubulin isotypes and of regions of the microtubule involved in drug interactions has been advanced by proteomic methodologies. The diversity of tubulin sequences and posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can generate a complex mixture of heterodimers with unique molecular dynamics driving specific functions. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches have been developed, and in combination with chromatographic and/or electrophoretic separation of tubulin polypeptides or peptides, they have contributed to our understanding of tubulin proteomics. We present protocols that we have used for the analysis of tubulin isotypes and PTMs present in tubulin isolated from cells in culture or tissues and for the identification of tubulin regions altered by microtubule-stabilizing agents. Tubulin proteomics complements structural and computer modeling information for a high-resolution view of microtubule dynamics and its alteration by drugs. These methodologies will help in providing insights into tubulin isotype-specific functions and in the design of drugs targeting either all tubulin heterodimers indiscriminately or only those containing specific isotypes.

  3. Chromatin enrichment for proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kustatscher, Georg; Wills, Karen L. H.; Furlan, Cristina; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, chromatin hosts fundamental cellular processes, such as gene expression, DNA replication and DNA damage repair. To analyze chromatin on a proteomic scale, we have developed chromatin enrichment for proteomics (ChEP), which is a simple biochemical procedure that enriches interphase chromatin in all its complexity. It enables researchers to take a ‘snapshot’ of chromatin and to isolate and identify even transiently bound factors. In ChEP, cells are fixed with formaldehyde; subsequently, DNA together with all cross-linked proteins is isolated by centrifugation under denaturing conditions. This approach enables the analysis of global chromatin composition and its changes, which is in contrast with existing chromatin enrichment procedures, which either focus on specific chromatin loci (e.g., affinity purification) or are limited in specificity, such as the analysis of the chromatin pellet (i.e., analysis of all insoluble nuclear material). ChEP takes half a day to complete and requires no specialized laboratory skills or equipment. ChEP enables the characterization of chromatin response to drug treatment or physiological processes. Beyond proteomics, ChEP may preclear chromatin for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. PMID:25101823

  4. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xian; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼ 50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter.

  5. A kinetic model for the deterministic prediction of gel-based single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotube separation.

    PubMed

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Jain, Rishabh M; Han, Rebecca; Hilmer, Andrew J; McNicholas, Thomas P; Strano, Michael S

    2013-02-26

    We propose a kinetic model that describes the separation of single-chirality semiconducting carbon nanotubes based on the chirality-selective adsorption to specific hydrogels. Experimental elution profiles of the (7,3), (6,4), (6,5), (8,3), (8,6), (7,5), and (7,6) species are well described by an irreversible, first-order site association kinetic model with a single rate constant describing the adsorption of each SWNT to the immobile gel phase. Specifically, we find first-order binding rate constants for seven experimentally separated nanotubes normalized by the binding site molarity (M(θ)): k₇,₃ = 3.5 × 10⁻⁵ M(θ)⁻¹ s⁻¹, k₆,₄ = 7.7 × 10⁻⁸ M(θ)⁻¹ s⁻¹, k₈,₃ = 2.3 × 10⁻⁹ M(θ)⁻¹ s⁻¹, k₆,₅ = 3.8 × 10⁻⁹ M(θ)⁻¹ s⁻¹, k₇,₅ = 1.9 × 10⁻¹¹ M(θ)⁻¹ s⁻¹, k₈,₆ = 7.7 × 10⁻¹² M(θ)⁻¹ s⁻¹, and k₇,₆ = 3.8 × 10⁻¹² M(θ)⁻¹ s⁻¹. These results, as well as additional control experiments, unambiguously identify the separation process as a selective adsorption. Unlike certain chromatographic processes with retention time dependence, this separation procedure can be scaled to arbitrarily large volumes, as we demonstrate. This study provides a foundation for both the mechanistic understanding of gel-based SWNT separation as well as the potential industrial-scale realization of single-chirality production of carbon nanotubes.

  6. Effect of boron doping on optical properties of sol-gel based nanostructured zinc oxide films on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Sunirmal; Vuk, Angela Surca; Mallick, Aparajita; Orel, Boris; Biswas, Prasanta Kumar

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Room temperature fine structured UV-vis PL emissions (a) as phonon replicas in 1 at.% boron doped film originated from LO phonon evidenced from Near Grazing Incidence Angle (NGIA) IR spectral study (b). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sol-gel based boron doped nanostructured ZnO thin films deposited on pure silica glass using crystalline boric acid as boron source. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observed first time, room temperature fine structured PL emissions in 1 at.% doped film as phonon replicas originated from LO phonon (both IR and Raman active). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boron doping controls the LO phonon energy in addition to visible reflection, band gap and grain size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films possessed mixed crystal phases with hexagonal as major phase. -- Abstract: Boron doped zinc oxide thin films ({approx}80 nm) were deposited onto pure silica glass by sol-gel dip coating technique from the precursor sol/solution of 4.0 wt.% equivalent oxide content. The boron concentration was varied from 0 to 2 at.% w.r.t. Zn using crystalline boric acid. The nanostructured feature of the films was visualized by FESEM images and the largest cluster size of ZnO was found in 1 at.% boron doped film (B1ZO). The presence of mixed crystal phases with hexagonal as major phase was identified from XRD reflections of the films. Particle size, optical band gap, visible specular reflection, room temperature photoluminescence (PL) emissions (3.24-2.28 eV), infra-red (IR) and Raman active longitudinal optical (LO) phonon vibration were found to be dependent on dopant concentration. For the first time, we report the room temperature fine structured PL emissions as phonon replicas originated from the LO phonon (both IR and Raman active) in 1 at.% boron doped zinc oxide film.

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis of casein and whey as prepared by chymosin-induced separation, isoelectric precipitation or ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hanne B; Poulsen, Nina A; Møller, Hanne S; Stensballe, Allan; Larsen, Lotte B

    2012-11-01

    Fractionation of bovine milk was performed using chymosin-induced separation, isoelectric precipitation or ultracentrifugation as separation techniques prior to gel-based proteomic analysis. This approach allowed for comparative display and identification of proteins partitioned into casein and whey, respectively. Initially, three different staining methods (silver staining, colloidal Coomassie Blue G-250 or fluorescent Flamingo Pink staining) for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) analysis were compared for their suitability as staining agent, especially in relation to their suitability to reveal differences in the casein fractions. Fluorescent staining proved to be the most appropriate for this purpose, giving a high sensitivity, and using this staining method, characteristic 2-DGE fingerprints were obtained for each casein and whey fraction from each separation method. A number of protein spots in both casein and whey fractions varied with separation method and these spots were subsequently identified using tandem mass spectrometry (MS). In rennet casein, proteolytic fragmentation of caseins (α(s1)-, α(s2),-, β- and κ-) was identified as a result of chymosin hydrolysis, whereas the 2-DGE profile of acid and ultracentrifuged casein was dominated by the presence of multiple isoforms of κ-caseins. Furthermore, casein remnants were identified in milk serum after ultracentrifugation. This study shows that gel-based proteomic analysis is suitable for characterisation of subtle variations in protein composition of milk fractions that occur as a consequence of different milk fractionation strategies.

  8. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-04

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  9. Proteome analysis of Pueraria mirifica tubers collected in different seasons.

    PubMed

    Jungsukcharoen, Jutarmas; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Sangvanich, Polkit

    2016-06-01

    Pueraria mirifica-derived tuberous powder has been long-term consumed in Thailand as female hormone-replacement traditional remedies. The protein profiles of tubers collected in different seasons were evaluated. Phenol extraction, 2D-PAGE, and mass spectrometry were employed for tuberous proteome analysis. Out of the 322 proteins detected, over 59% were functionally classified as being involved in metabolism. The rest proteins were involved in defense, protein synthesis, cell structure, transportation, stress, storage, and also unidentified function. The proteins were found to be differentially expressed with respect to harvest season. Importantly, chalcone isomerase, isoflavone synthase, cytochrome p450, UDP-glycosyltransferase, and isoflavone reductase, which are all involved in the biosynthesis pathway of bioactive isoflavonoids, were most abundantly expressed in the summer-collected tubers. This is the first report on the proteomic patterns in P. mirifica tubers in relevant with seasonal variation. The study enlights the understanding of variance isoflavonoid production in P. mirifica tubers.

  10. Proteomic and Microscopic Strategies towards the Analysis of the Cytoskeletal Networks in Major Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coumans, Joëlle V. F.; Palanisamy, Suresh K. A.; McFarlane, Jim; Moens, Pierre D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health disorders have become worldwide health priorities. It is estimated that in the next 20 years they will account for a 16 trillion United State dollars (US$) loss. Up to now, the underlying pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Altered cytoskeleton proteins expression that may influence the assembly, organization and maintenance of cytoskeletal integrity has been reported in major depressive disorders, schizophrenia and to some extent bipolar disorders. The use of quantitative proteomics, dynamic microscopy and super-resolution microscopy to investigate disease-specific protein signatures holds great promise to improve our understanding of these disorders. In this review, we present the currently available quantitative proteomic approaches use in neurology, gel-based, stable isotope-labelling and label-free methodologies and evaluate their strengths and limitations. We also reported on enrichment/subfractionation methods that target the cytoskeleton associated proteins and discuss the need of alternative methods for further characterization of the neurocytoskeletal proteome. Finally, we present live cell imaging approaches and emerging dynamic microscopy technology that will provide the tools necessary to investigate protein interactions and their dynamics in the whole cells. While these areas of research are still in their infancy, they offer huge potential towards the understanding of the neuronal network stability and its modification across neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27104521

  11. Proteomic view of the venom from the fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Pinto, José R A; Fox, Eduardo G P; Saidemberg, Daniel M; Santos, Lucilene D; da Silva Menegasso, Anally R; Costa-Manso, Eliúde; Machado, Ednildo A; Bueno, Odair C; Palma, Mario S

    2012-09-07

    Fire ants are well-known by their aggressive stinging behavior, causing many stinging incidents of medical importance. The limited availability of fire ant venom for scientific and clinical uses has restricted, up to now, the knowledge about the biochemistry, immunology, and pharmacology of these venoms. For this study, S. invicta venom was obtained commercially and used for proteomic characterization. For this purpose, the combination of gel-based and gel-free proteomic strategies was used to assign the proteomic profile of the venom from the fire ant S. invicta. This experimental approach permitted the identification of 46 proteins, which were organized into four different groups according to their potential role in fire ant venom: true venom components, housekeeping proteins, body muscle proteins, and proteins involved in chemical communication. The active venom components that may not present toxic roles were classified into three subgroups according to their potential functions: self-venom protection, colony asepsis, and chemical communication. Meanwhile, the proteins classified as true toxins, based on their functions after being injected into the victims' bodies by the fire ants, were classified in five other subgroups: proteins influencing the homeostasis of the victims, neurotoxins, proteins that promote venom diffusion, proteins that cause tissue damage/inflammation, and allergens.

  12. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) induced changes in the liver proteome of eu- and hypothyroid female rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, I; Serchi, T; Cambier, S; Diepenbroek, C; Renaut, J; Van der Berg, J H J; Kwadijk, C; Gutleb, A C; Rijntjes, E; Murk, A J

    2016-03-14

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant known for its low acute toxicity as observed in animal experiments. However, HBCD exposure can affect liver functioning and thyroid hormone (TH) status. As exact mechanisms are unknown and only limited toxicological data exists, a gel-based proteomic approach was undertaken. In a eu- and hypothyroid female rat model, rats were exposed to 3 and 30 mg/kg bw/day HBCD for 7 days via their diet, and exposure was related to a range of canonical endpoints (hormone status, body weight) available for these animals. Alterations in the liver proteome under HBCD exposure were determined in comparison with patterns of control animals, for both thyroid states. This revealed significantly changed abundance of proteins involved in metabolic processes (gluconeogenesis/glycolysis, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism), but also in oxidative stress responses, in both euthyroid and hypothyroid rats. The results provide a more detailed picture on the mechanisms involved in these alterations, e.g. at the protein level changes of the proposed influence of HBCD on the lipid metabolism. Present results show that proteomic approaches can provide further mechanistic insights in toxicological studies.

  13. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  14. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  15. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  17. NKG2D Receptor and Its Ligands in Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells, and subsets of CD4(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells (iNKT), and γδ T cells. In humans, NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit, and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least eight genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and posttranslation. In general, healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyperproliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves as a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone "stress." Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system, and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

  18. 2-D Versus 3-D Magnetotelluric Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, the number of publications dealing with the mathematical and physical 3-D aspects of the magnetotelluric method has increased drastically. However, field experiments on a grid are often impractical and surveys are frequently restricted to single or widely separated profiles. So, in many cases we find ourselves with the following question: is the applicability of the 2-D hypothesis valid to extract geoelectric and geological information from real 3-D environments? The aim of this paper is to explore a few instructive but general situations to understand the basics of a 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data and to determine which data subset (TE-mode or TM-mode) is best for obtaining the electrical conductivity distribution of the subsurface using 2-D techniques. A review of the mathematical and physical fundamentals of the electromagnetic fields generated by a simple 3-D structure allows us to prioritise the choice of modes in a 2-D interpretation of responses influenced by 3-D structures. This analysis is corroborated by numerical results from synthetic models and by real data acquired by other authors. One important result of this analysis is that the mode most unaffected by 3-D effects depends on the position of the 3-D structure with respect to the regional 2-D strike direction. When the 3-D body is normal to the regional strike, the TE-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, while the TM-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects. In this case, a 2-D interpretation of the TM-mode is prone to error. When the 3-D body is parallel to the regional 2-D strike the TE-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects and the TM-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, making it more suitable for 2-D interpretation. In general, a wise 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data can be a guide to a reasonable geological interpretation.

  19. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  20. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  1. Proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic studies of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have recently received great attention because this animal is a useful model platform for the in vivo study of various biological problems relevant to human disease. In general, proteomic analysis is performed in order to address a...

  2. Proteomic analysis of the mature Brassica stigma reveals proteins with diverse roles in vegetative and reproductive development.

    PubMed

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S

    2016-09-01

    The stigma, the specialized apex of the Brassicaceae gynoecium, plays a role in pollen capture, discrimination, hydration, germination, and guidance. Despite this crucial role in reproduction, the global proteome underlying Brassicaceae stigma development and function remains largely unknown. As a contribution towards the characterization of the Brassicaceae dry stigma global proteome, more than 2500 Brassica napus mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based proteomics approaches. Most stigma proteins participated in Metabolic Processes, Responses to Stimulus or Stress, Cellular or Developmental Processes, and Transport. The stigma was found to express a wide variety of proteins with demonstrated roles in cellular and organ development including proteins known to be involved in cellular expansion and morphogenesis, embryo development, as well as gynoecium and stigma development. Comparisons to a corresponding proteome from a very morphologically different Poaceae dry stigma showed a very similar distribution of proteins among different functional categories, but also revealed evident distinctions in protein composition especially in glucosinolate and carotenoid metabolism, photosynthesis, and self-incompatibility. To our knowledge, this study reports the largest Brassicaceae stigma protein dataset described to date.

  3. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  4. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  5. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  6. Recent developments in 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Late, Dattatray J.; Morgan, Hywel; Rout, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional layered inorganic nanomaterials (2D-LINs) have recently attracted huge interest because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties and potential technological applications. The properties of these layered materials can be tuned via both physical and chemical processes. Some 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials like MoS2, WS2 and SnS2 have been recently developed and employed in various applications, including new sensors because of their layer-dependent electrical properties. This article presents a comprehensive overview of recent developments in the application of 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials as sensors. Some of the salient features of 2D materials for different sensing applications are discussed, including gas sensing, electrochemical sensing, SERS and biosensing, SERS sensing and photodetection. The working principles of the sensors are also discussed together with examples.

  7. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-07

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  8. Exact Solution of Ising Model in 2d Shortcut Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, O.

    We give the exact solution to the Ising model in the shortcut network in the 2D limit. The solution is found by mapping the model to the square lattice model with Brascamp and Kunz boundary conditions.

  9. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  10. Reconstruction-based 3D/2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel 3D/2D registration method, where first, a 3D image is reconstructed from a few 2D X-ray images and next, the preoperative 3D image is brought into the best possible spatial correspondence with the reconstructed image by optimizing a similarity measure. Because the quality of the reconstructed image is generally low, we introduce a novel asymmetric mutual information similarity measure, which is able to cope with low image quality as well as with different imaging modalities. The novel 3D/2D registration method has been evaluated using standardized evaluation methodology and publicly available 3D CT, 3DRX, and MR and 2D X-ray images of two spine phantoms, for which gold standard registrations were known. In terms of robustness, reliability and capture range the proposed method outperformed the gradient-based method and the method based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs).

  11. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-09

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  12. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevector aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of inertial ranged magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between perpendicular and parallel reduced power spectra which is expected for the 2D component but not for the slab component. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant (approximately 85 percent by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  13. Studying Zeolite Catalysts with a 2D Model System

    SciTech Connect

    Boscoboinik, Anibal

    2016-12-07

    Anibal Boscoboinik, a materials scientist at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials, discusses the surface-science tools and 2D model system he uses to study catalysis in nanoporous zeolites, which catalyze reactions in many industrial processes.

  14. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  15. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  16. Anisotropic 2D Materials for Tunable Hyperbolic Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Nemilentsau, Andrei; Low, Tony; Hanson, George

    2016-02-12

    Motivated by the recent emergence of a new class of anisotropic 2D materials, we examine their electromagnetic modes and demonstrate that a broad class of the materials can host highly directional hyperbolic plasmons. Their propagation direction can be manipulated on the spot by gate doping, enabling hyperbolic beam reflection, refraction, and bending. The realization of these natural 2D hyperbolic media opens up a new avenue in dynamic control of hyperbolic plasmons not possible in the 3D version.

  17. RNA folding pathways and kinetics using 2D energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Senter, Evan; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA folding pathways play an important role in various biological processes, such as (i) the hok/sok (host-killing/suppression of killing) system in E. coli to check for sufficient plasmid copy number, (ii) the conformational switch in spliced leader (SL) RNA from Leptomonas collosoma, which controls trans splicing of a portion of the '5 exon, and (iii) riboswitches--portions of the 5' untranslated region of messenger RNA that regulate genes by allostery. Since RNA folding pathways are determined by the energy landscape, we describe a novel algorithm, FFTbor2D, which computes the 2D projection of the energy landscape for a given RNA sequence. Given two metastable secondary structures A, B for a given RNA sequence, FFTbor2D computes the Boltzmann probability p(x, y) = Z(x,y)/Z that a secondary structure has base pair distance x from A and distance y from B. Using polynomial interpolationwith the fast Fourier transform,we compute p(x, y) in O(n(5)) time and O(n(2)) space, which is an improvement over an earlier method, which runs in O(n(7)) time and O(n(4)) space. FFTbor2D has potential applications in synthetic biology, where one might wish to design bistable switches having target metastable structures A, B with favorable pathway kinetics. By inverting the transition probability matrix determined from FFTbor2D output, we show that L. collosoma spliced leader RNA has larger mean first passage time from A to B on the 2D energy landscape, than 97.145% of 20,000 sequences, each having metastable structures A, B. Source code and binaries are freely available for download at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/FFTbor2D. The program FFTbor2D is implemented in C++, with optional OpenMP parallelization primitives.

  18. Supported and Free-Standing 2D Semimetals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    of this effort on focusing on rare- earth arsenides (RE-A), although not a van der Waals 2D solid, nonetheless, exhibits substantial 2D quantum size...this effort on focusing on rare- earth arsenides (RE- A), although not a van der Waals 20 solid, nonetheless, exhibits substantial 20 quantum size...Brongersma and S.R. Bank, "Rare- earth monopnictide alloys for tunable, epitaxial metals" in preparation. iii. S. Rahimi, E. M. Krivoy, J. Lee, M. E

  19. Application of 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Tan, Mingshu; Ding, Kequan

    2005-10-01

    Recently, we proposed a 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence [Bo Liao, A 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence, Chem. Phys. Lett. 401 (2005) 196-199]. Based on this representation, we consider properties of mutations and compute the similarities among 11 mitochondrial sequences belonging to different species. The elements of the similarity matrix are used to construct phylogenic tree. Unlike most existing phylogeny construction methods, the proposed method does not require multiple alignment.

  20. phase_space_cosmo_fisher: Fisher matrix 2D contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alejo

    2016-11-01

    phase_space_cosmo_fisher produces Fisher matrix 2D contours from which the constraints on cosmological parameters can be derived. Given a specified redshift array and cosmological case, 2D marginalized contours of cosmological parameters are generated; the code can also plot the derivatives used in the Fisher matrix. In addition, this package can generate 3D plots of qH^2 and other cosmological quantities as a function of redshift and cosmology.

  1. A simultaneous 2D/3D autostereo workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Dennis; McGinnis, Bradley; Talandis, Jonas; Leigh, Jason; Peterka, Tom; Knoll, Aaron; Sumer, Aslihan; Papka, Michael; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel immersive workstation environment that scientists can use for 3D data exploration and as their everyday 2D computer monitor. Our implementation is based on an autostereoscopic dynamic parallax barrier 2D/3D display, interactive input devices, and a software infrastructure that allows client/server software modules to couple the workstation to scientists' visualization applications. This paper describes the hardware construction and calibration, software components, and a demonstration of our system in nanoscale materials science exploration.

  2. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  3. Isolation and fractionation of the endoplasmic reticulum from castor bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm for proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Simon, William J; Maltman, Daniel J; Slabas, Antoni R

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the preparation and isolation of highly purified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from the endosperm of developing and germinating castor bean (Ricinus communis) seeds to provide a purified organelle fraction for differential proteomic analyses. The method uses a two-step ultracentrifugation protocol first described by Coughlan (1) and uses sucrose density gradients and a sucrose flotation step to yield purified ER devoid of other contaminating endomembrane material. Using a combination of one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis the complexity and reproducibility of the protein profile of the purified organelle is evaluated prior to detailed proteomic analyses using mass spectrometry based techniques.

  4. The Proteomics of Drusen

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of extracellular deposits known as drusen below the macular region of the retina correlates with increased risk of severe visual loss from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Inflammation and complement dysregulation contribute to AMD progression; however, disease mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Multiple genetic and environmental factors influence AMD pathology, and although immune system processes play a central role, multiple molecular mechanisms appear to be involved. Drusen proteomics, including the analyses of constituent proteins, oxidative protein modifications, and pattern recognition receptors, provide a foundation for deciphering mechanisms of drusen biogenesis and AMD pathology. PMID:24799364

  5. Regulation of NKG2D ligand gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Robert A; Traherne, James A; Ashiru, Omodele; Wills, Mark R; Trowsdale, John

    2006-03-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D has seven known host ligands encoded by the MHC class I chain-related MIC and ULBP/RAET genes. Why there is such diversity of NKG2D ligands is not known but one hypothesis is that they are differentially expressed in different tissues in response to different stresses. To explore this, we compared expression patterns and promoters of NKG2D ligand genes. ULBP/RAET genes were transcribed independent of each other in a panel of cell lines. ULBP/RAET gene expression was upregulated on infection with human cytomegalovirus; however, a clinical strain, Toledo, induced expression more slowly than did a laboratory strain, AD169. ULBP4/RAET1E was not induced by infection with either strain. To investigate the mechanisms behind the similarities and differences in NKG2D ligand gene expression a comparative sequence analysis of NKG2D ligand gene putative promoter regions was conducted. Sequence alignments demonstrated that there was significant sequence diversity; however, one region of high similarity between most of the genes is evident. This region contains a number of potential transcription factor binding sites, including those involved in shock responses and sites for retinoic acid-induced factors. Promoters of some NKG2D ligand genes are polymorphic and several sequence alterations in these alleles abolished putative transcription factor binding.

  6. CYP2D6 variability in populations from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nancy; Flores-Angulo, Carlos; Villegas, Cecilia; Mora, Yuselin

    2016-12-01

    CYP2D6 is an important cytochrome P450 enzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of about 25% of currently prescribed drugs. The presence of polymorphisms in the CYP2D6 gene may modulate enzyme level and activity, thereby affecting individual responses to pharmacological treatments. The most prevalent diseases in the admixed population from Venezuela are cardiovascular and cancer, whereas viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases, particularly malaria, are prevalent in Amerindian populations; in the treatment of these diseases, several drugs that are metabolized by CYP2D6 are used. In this work, we reviewed the data on CYP2D6 variability and predicted metabolizer phenotypes, in healthy volunteers of two admixed and five Amerindian populations from Venezuela. The Venezuelan population is very heterogeneous as a result of the genetic admixture of three major ethnical components: Europeans, Africans and Amerindians. There are noticeable inter-regional and inter-population differences in the process of mixing of this population. Hitherto, there are few published studies in Venezuela on CYP2D6; therefore, it is necessary to increase research in this regard, in particular to develop studies with a larger sample size. There is a considerable amount of work remaining before CYP2D6 is integrated into clinical practice in Venezuela.

  7. 2D microscopic model of graphene fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2015-05-01

    An analytical two-dimensional (2D) microscopic fracture model based on Morse-type interaction is derived containing no adjustable parameter. From the 2D Young’s moduli and 2D intrinsic strengths of graphene measured by nanoindentation based on biaxial tension and calculated by density functional theory for uniaxial tension the widely unknown breaking force, line or edge energy, surface energy, fracture toughness, and strain energy release rate were determined. The simulated line energy agrees well with ab initio calculations and the fracture toughness of perfect graphene sheets is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and the fracture toughness evaluated for defective graphene using the Griffith relation. Similarly, the estimated critical strain energy release rate agrees well with result of various theoretical approaches based on the J-integral and surface energy. The 2D microscopic model, connecting 2D and three-dimensional mechanical properties in a consistent way, provides a versatile relationship to easily access all relevant fracture properties of pristine 2D solids.

  8. Proteomics LIMS: A caBIG™ Project, Year 1

    PubMed Central

    Tchuvatkina, Olga; Shimoni, Liat; Ochs, Michael F.; Moloshok, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    protLIMS is a web-based proteomics laboratory information management system. In February, we released version 1 of protLIMS, completed to the year one goal: The web-interface provides for recording of the biological material, protein mixture preparation, 2D-PAGE, gel image files and spot and plug mapping. Associated files may be uploaded and retrieved through the web-interface to the file system. In year two, protLIMS will be extended to accommodate mass spectrometric analyses and protein identification. PMID:17238735

  9. DEVELOPMENTAL CIGARETTE SMOKE EXPOSURE: HIPPOCAMPUS PROTEOME AND METABOLOME PROFILES IN LOW BIRTH WEIGHT PUPS

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Rachel E.; Chen, Jing; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Jang, HyeJeong; Abomoelak, Bassam; Brock, Guy; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke during development is linked to neurodevelopmental delays and cognitive impairment including impulsivity, attention deficit disorder, and lower IQ. However, brain region specific biomolecular alterations induced by developmental cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) remain largely unexplored. In the current molecular phenotyping study, a mouse model of ‘active’ developmental CSE (serum cotinine>50 ng/mL) spanning pre-implantation through third trimester-equivalent brain development (gestational day (GD) 1 through postnatal day (PD) 21) was utilized. Hippocampus tissue collected at the time of cessation of exposure was processed for gel-based proteomic and non-targeted metabolomic profiling with Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) for selection of features of interest. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was utilized to identify candidate molecular and metabolic pathways impacted within the hippocampus. CSE impacted glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, and neurodevelopment pathways within the developing hippocampus. PMID:24486158

  10. Chemical Component and Proteomic Study of the Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite Shell

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-sheng; Wong, Yue-Him; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-yuan

    2015-01-01

    As typical biofoulers, barnacles possess hard shells and cause serious biofouling problems. In this study, we analyzed the protein component of the barnacle Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite shell using gel-based proteomics. The results revealed 52 proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. Among them, 40 proteins were categorized into 11 functional groups based on KOG database, and the remaining 12 proteins were unknown. Besides the known proteins in barnacle shell (SIPC, carbonic anhydrase and acidic acid matrix protein), we also identified chorion peroxidase, C-type lectin-like domains, serine proteases and proteinase inhibitor proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. The sequences of these proteins were characterized and their potential functions were discussed. Histology and DAPI staining revealed living cells in the shell, which might secrete the shell proteins identified in this study. PMID:26222041

  11. Chemical Component and Proteomic Study of the Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite Shell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Wong, Yue-Him; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    As typical biofoulers, barnacles possess hard shells and cause serious biofouling problems. In this study, we analyzed the protein component of the barnacle Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite shell using gel-based proteomics. The results revealed 52 proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. Among them, 40 proteins were categorized into 11 functional groups based on KOG database, and the remaining 12 proteins were unknown. Besides the known proteins in barnacle shell (SIPC, carbonic anhydrase and acidic acid matrix protein), we also identified chorion peroxidase, C-type lectin-like domains, serine proteases and proteinase inhibitor proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. The sequences of these proteins were characterized and their potential functions were discussed. Histology and DAPI staining revealed living cells in the shell, which might secrete the shell proteins identified in this study.

  12. Proteomic analyses of baculovirus Anticarsia gemmatalis multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus budded and occluded virus.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Carla Torres; Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel Mendes Pereira; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Oliveira, Juliana Velasco de Castro; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Garcia-Maruniak, Alejandra; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais; Maruniak, James E; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade

    2014-04-01

    Baculoviruses infect insects, producing two distinct phenotypes during the viral life cycle: the budded virus (BV) and the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) for intra- and inter-host spread, respectively. Since the 1980s, several countries have been using Anticarsia gemmatalis multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AgMNPV) as a biological control agent against the velvet bean caterpillar, A. gemmatalis. The genome of AgMNPV isolate 2D (AgMNPV-2D) carries at least 152 potential genes, with 24 that possibly code for structural proteins. Proteomic studies have been carried out on a few baculoviruses, with six ODV and two BV proteomes completed so far. Moreover, there are limited data on virion proteins carried by AgMNPV-2D. Therefore, structural proteins of AgMNPV-2D were analysed by MALDI- quadrupole-TOF and liquid chromatography MS/MS. A total of 44 proteins were associated with the ODV and 33 with the BV of AgMNPV-2D. Although 38 structural proteins were already known, we found six new proteins in the ODV and seven new proteins carried by the AgMNPV-2D BV. Eleven cellular proteins that were found on several other enveloped viruses were also identified, which are possibly carried with the virion. These findings may provide novel insights into baculovirus biology and their host interaction. Moreover, our data may be helpful in subsequent applied studies aiming to improve AgMNPV use as a biopesticide and a biotechnology tool for gene expression or delivery.

  13. 2D Hexagonal Boron Nitride (2D-hBN) Explored for the Electrochemical Sensing of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aamar F; Brownson, Dale A C; Randviir, Edward P; Smith, Graham C; Banks, Craig E

    2016-10-04

    Crystalline 2D hexagonal boron nitride (2D-hBN) nanosheets are explored as a potential electrocatalyst toward the electroanalytical sensing of dopamine (DA). The 2D-hBN nanosheets are electrically wired via a drop-casting modification process onto a range of commercially available carbon supporting electrodes, including glassy carbon (GC), boron-doped diamond (BDD), and screen-printed graphitic electrodes (SPEs). 2D-hBN has not previously been explored toward the electrochemical detection/electrochemical sensing of DA. We critically evaluate the potential electrocatalytic performance of 2D-hBN modified electrodes, the effect of supporting carbon electrode platforms, and the effect of "mass coverage" (which is commonly neglected in the 2D material literature) toward the detection of DA. The response of 2D-hBN modified electrodes is found to be largely dependent upon the interaction between 2D-hBN and the underlying supporting electrode material. For example, in the case of SPEs, modification with 2D-hBN (324 ng) improves the electrochemical response, decreasing the electrochemical oxidation potential of DA by ∼90 mV compared to an unmodified SPE. Conversely, modification of a GC electrode with 2D-hBN (324 ng) resulted in an increased oxidation potential of DA by ∼80 mV when compared to the unmodified electrode. We explore the underlying mechanisms of the aforementioned examples and infer that electrode surface interactions and roughness factors are critical considerations. 2D-hBN is utilized toward the sensing of DA in the presence of the common interferents ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). 2D-hBN is found to be an effective electrocatalyst in the simultaneous detection of DA and UA at both pH 5.0 and 7.4. The peak separations/resolution between DA and UA increases by ∼70 and 50 mV (at pH 5.0 and 7.4, respectively, when utilizing 108 ng of 2D-hBN) compared to unmodified SPEs, with a particularly favorable response evident in pH 5.0, giving rise to a

  14. Extracellular polysaccharide-degrading proteome of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Jonathan C; Li, Dong; Kelly, William J; Leahy, Sinead C; Bond, Judy J; Attwood, Graeme T; Jordan, T William

    2012-01-01

    Plant polysaccharide-degrading rumen microbes are fundamental to the health and productivity of ruminant animals. Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316(T) is a gram-positive, butyrate-producing anaerobic bacterium with a key role in hemicellulose degradation in the rumen. Gel-based proteomics was used to examine the growth-phase-dependent abundance patterns of secreted proteins recovered from cells grown in vitro with xylan or xylose provided as the sole supplementary carbon source. Five polysaccharidases and two carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) were among 30 identified secreted proteins. The endo-1,4-β-xylanase Xyn10B was 17.5-fold more abundant in the culture medium of xylan-grown cells, which suggests it plays an important role in hemicellulose degradation. The secretion of three nonxylanolytic enzymes and two CBPs implies they augment hemicellulose degradation by hydrolysis or disruption of associated structural polysaccharides. Sixteen ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate-binding proteins were identified, several of which had altered relative abundance levels between growth conditions, which suggests they are important for oligosaccharide uptake. This study demonstrates that B. proteoclasticus modulates the secretion of hemicellulose-degrading enzymes and ATP-dependent sugar uptake systems in response to growth substrate and supports the notion that this organism makes an important contribution to polysaccharide degradation in the rumen.

  15. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sandra; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2016-01-01

    The pioneering work by Patrick H. O’Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry 1975, 250, 4007–4021). The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O’Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:28248237

  16. New insights on the mitochondrial proteome plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Aroso, Miguel; Ferreira, Rita; Freitas, Ana; Vitorino, Rui; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases whose relentless progression results in severe disability. Although PD aetiology is unknown, growing evidences point to the mitochondrial involvement in the pathobiology of this disorder. So, it seems imperative to understand the means by which the molecular pathways harboured in this organelle are regulated. With the advances in MS-based proteomics, there is a substantial expectation in the increased knowledge of mitochondrial protein dynamics. Still, few studies have been performed on mitochondrial protein profiling in the context of PD. In order to integrate data from these studies, network analyses were performed taking into consideration variables such as model of PD, cell line, or tissue origin. Overall, data retrieved from these analyses highlighted the modulation of the biological processes related with "generation of energy," "cellular metabolism," and "mitochondrial transport" in PD. However, it was noted that the impact of sample type and/or PD model on the biological processes was modulated by the disease. Moreover, technical considerations related to protein characterization using gel-based or gel-free MS approaches should be considered in data comparison among different studies. Data from the present review will help to envisage future studies targeting these mechanisms.

  17. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sandra; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2016-09-09

    The pioneering work by Patrick H. O'Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry1975, 250, 4007-4021). The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O'Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  18. The seed nuclear proteome.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Ombretta; Rogniaux, Hélène; Larré, Colette; Thompson, Richard; Gallardo, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory networks coordinating seed development will help to manipulate seed traits, such as protein content and seed weight, in order to increase yield and seed nutritional value of important food crops, such as legumes. Because of the cardinal role of the nucleus in gene expression, sub-proteome analyses of nuclei from developing seeds were conducted, taking advantage of the sequences available for model species. In this review, we discuss the strategies used to separate and identify the nuclear proteins at a stage when the seed is preparing for reserve accumulation. We present how these data provide an insight into the complexity and distinctive features of the seed nuclear proteome. We discuss the presence of chromatin-modifying enzymes and proteins that have roles in RNA-directed DNA methylation and which may be involved in modifying genome architecture in preparation for seed filling. Specific features of the seed nuclei at the transition between the stage of cell divisions and that of cell expansion and reserve deposition are described here which may help to manipulate seed quality traits, such as seed weight.

  19. Proteomic Signatures of Thymomas

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Konstantin; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Freitas, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the histological features and outcome, the current WHO classification separates thymomas into A, AB, B1, B2 and B3 subtypes. It is hypothesized that the type A thymomas are derived from the thymic medulla while the type B thymomas are derived from the cortex. Due to occasional histological overlap between the tumor subtypes creating difficulties in their separation, the aim of this study was to provide their proteomic characterization and identify potential immunohistochemical markers aiding in tissue diagnosis. Pair-wise comparison of neoplastic and normal thymus by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue revealed 61 proteins differentially expressed in thymomas compared to normal tissue. Hierarchical clustering showed distinct segregation of subtypes AB, B1 and B2 from that of A and B3. Most notably, desmoyokin, a protein that is encoded by the AHNAK gene, was associated with type A thymomas and medulla of normal thymus, by LC-MS/MS and immunohistochemistry. In this global proteomic characterization of the thymoma, several proteins unique to different thymic compartments and thymoma subtypes were identified. Among differentially expressed proteins, desmoyokin is a marker specific for thymic medulla and is potentially promising immunohistochemical marker in separation of type A and B3 thymomas. PMID:27832160

  20. In this issue: Proteomics - Clinical Applications 3/2009.

    PubMed

    2009-03-01

    In this issue of Proteomics - Clinical Applications you will find the following highlighted articles: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/prca.200800050Labour isn't just a British party If you ask a woman who's had labor induced at the end of a normal pregnancy about the experience, she will probably flinch at the memory, which is not to say that spontaneous labor is a picnic. MacIntyre et al. report here on the proteomic analysis of the differences between spontaneous (SL) and induced (IL) labor in the myometrium. Applying 2-D DIGE to the question, they found 23 significant differences between SL and NL (non-laboring) myometria, and 59 differences between IL and NL samples. Comparison of SL to IL revealed 69 differences. Only two proteins showed the same changes for SL and IL vs, NL, suggesting that there might be more than one route to the same end. MacIntyre, D. A. et al., Proteomics Clin. Appl. 2009, 3, 288-298. Fresh mud for prostate info, not for spa facial Prostate cancer is one of the more challenging cancers to treat. It is not susceptible to any conventional chemotherapeutics, one of the most common approaches is implantation of radioactive "seeds" in the tumor. One chemotherapeutic agent that shows some promise when administered in combination with other therapies is mitoxantrone (MTXT). Symes et al. looked at proteomic changes in primary prostate cancer biopsy cultures with or without 100 nM MTXT, using MudPIT technology. Approximately 110 of 1500 proteins changed levels significantly. Among the up-regulated proteins were a number of membrane proteins - fatty acid synthase, caveolin-1 et al. - interesting targets for the combination therapy. Symes, J. et al., Proteomics Clin. Appl. 2009, 3, 347-358. Alien morph virus invasion We'll leave the royalty rights issue to the lawyers but if I were a wagering man, I'd put my money on the virus. We're talking about the battle between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and B-lymphocytes, the antibody boys. Once EBV gets into a

  1. Immunocapture strategies in translational proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fredolini, Claudia; Byström, Sanna; Pin, Elisa; Edfors, Fredrik; Tamburro, Davide; Iglesias, Maria Jesus; Häggmark, Anna; Hong, Mun-Gwan; Uhlen, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at clinical studies of human diseases, antibody-assisted assays have been applied to biomarker discovery and toward a streamlined translation from patient profiling to assays supporting personalized treatments. In recent years, integrated strategies to couple and combine antibodies with mass spectrometry-based proteomic efforts have emerged, allowing for novel possibilities in basic and clinical research. Described in this review are some of the field’s current and emerging immunocapture approaches from an affinity proteomics perspective. Discussed are some of their advantages, pitfalls and opportunities for the next phase in clinical and translational proteomics. PMID:26558424

  2. Phenols content and 2-D electrophoresis protein pattern: a promising tool to monitor Posidonia meadows health state

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Luciana; Rotini, Alice; Randazzo, Davide; Albanese, Nadia N; Giallongo, Agata

    2007-01-01

    Background The endemic seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile colonizes soft bottoms producing highly productive meadows that play a crucial role in coastal ecosystems dynamics. Human activities and natural events are responsible for a widespread meadows regression; to date the identification of "diagnostic" tools to monitor conservation status is a critical issue. In this study the feasibility of a novel tool to evaluate ecological impacts on Posidonia meadows has been tested. Quantification of a putative stress indicator, i.e. phenols content, has been coupled to 2-D electrophoretic protein analysis of rhizome samples. Results The overall expression pattern from Posidonia rhizome was determined using a preliminary proteomic approach, 437 protein spots were characterized by pI and molecular weight. We found that protein expression differs in samples belonging to sites with high or low phenols: 22 unique protein spots are peculiar of "low phenols" and 27 other spots characterize "high phenols" samples. Conclusion Posidonia showed phenols variations within the meadow, that probably reflect the heterogeneity of environmental pressures. In addition, comparison of the 2-D electrophoresis patterns allowed to highlight qualitative protein expression differences in response to these pressures. These differences may account for changes in metabolic/physiological pathways as adaptation to stress. A combined approach, based on phenols content determination and 2-D electrophoresis protein pattern, seems a promising tool to monitor Posidonia meadows health state. PMID:17663776

  3. Ovarian Cancer Proteomic, Phosphoproteomic, and Glycoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples,

  4. A guide to the Proteomics Identifications Database proteomics data repository.

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Côté, Richard; Reisinger, Florian; Foster, Joseph M; Mueller, Michael; Rameseder, Jonathan; Hermjakob, Henning; Martens, Lennart

    2009-09-01

    The Proteomics Identifications Database (PRIDE, www.ebi.ac.uk/pride) is one of the main repositories of MS derived proteomics data. Here, we point out the main functionalities of PRIDE both as a submission repository and as a source for proteomics data. We describe the main features for data retrieval and visualization available through the PRIDE web and BioMart interfaces. We also highlight the mechanism by which tailored queries in the BioMart can join PRIDE to other resources such as Reactome, Ensembl or UniProt to execute extremely powerful across-domain queries. We then present the latest improvements in the PRIDE submission process, using the new easy-to-use, platform-independent graphical user interface submission tool PRIDE Converter. Finally, we speak about future plans and the role of PRIDE in the ProteomExchange consortium.

  5. Regulation of ligands for the activating receptor NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Anita R; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of an encounter between a cytotoxic cell and a potential target cell depends on the balance of signals from inhibitory and activating receptors. Natural Killer group 2D (NKG2D) has recently emerged as a major activating receptor on T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In both humans and mice, multiple different genes encode ligands for NKG2D, and these ligands are non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. The NKG2D–ligand interaction triggers an activating signal in the cell expressing NKG2D and this promotes cytotoxic lysis of the cell expressing the ligand. Most normal tissues do not express ligands for NKG2D, but ligand expression has been documented in tumour and virus-infected cells, leading to lysis of these cells. Tight regulation of ligand expression is important. If there is inappropriate expression in normal tissues, this will favour autoimmune processes, whilst failure to up-regulate the ligands in pathological conditions would favour cancer development or dissemination of intracellular infection. PMID:17614877

  6. Rotation invariance principles in 2D/3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernard; Staedele, Harald; Hammer, Beat; Gellrich, Niels C.; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-05-01

    2D/3D patient-to-computed tomography (CT) registration is a method to determine a transformation that maps two coordinate systems by comparing a projection image rendered from CT to a real projection image. Applications include exact patient positioning in radiation therapy, calibration of surgical robots, and pose estimation in computer-aided surgery. One of the problems associated with 2D/3D registration is the fast that finding a registration includes sovling a minimization problem in six degrees-of-freedom in motion. This results in considerable time expenses since for each iteration step at least one volume rendering has to be computed. We show that by choosing an appropriate world coordinate system and by applying a 2D/2D registration method in each iteration step, the number of iterations can be grossly reduced from n6 to n5. Here, n is the number of discrete variations aroudn a given coordinate. Depending on the configuration of the optimization algorithm, this reduces the total number of iterations necessary to at least 1/3 of its original value. The method was implemented and extensively tested on simulated x-ray images of a pelvis. We conclude that this hardware-indepenent optimization of 2D/3D registration is a step towards increasing the acceptance of this promising method for a wide number of clinical applications.

  7. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future.

  8. 2D Materials for Optical Modulation: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoliang; Wu, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yipei; Guo, Xin; Tong, Limin

    2017-02-21

    Owing to their atomic layer thickness, strong light-material interaction, high nonlinearity, broadband optical response, fast relaxation, controllable optoelectronic properties, and high compatibility with other photonic structures, 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have been attracting increasing attention for photonic applications. By tuning the carrier density via electrical or optical means that modifies their physical properties (e.g., Fermi level or nonlinear absorption), optical response of the 2D materials can be instantly changed, making them versatile nanostructures for optical modulation. Here, up-to-date 2D material-based optical modulation in three categories is reviewed: free-space, fiber-based, and on-chip configurations. By analysing cons and pros of different modulation approaches from material and mechanism aspects, the challenges faced by using these materials for device applications are presented. In addition, thermal effects (e.g., laser induced damage) in 2D materials, which are critical to practical applications, are also discussed. Finally, the outlook for future opportunities of these 2D materials for optical modulation is given.

  9. Mermin–Wagner fluctuations in 2D amorphous solids

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Kaiser, Herbert; Klix, Christian L.; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In a recent commentary, J. M. Kosterlitz described how D. Thouless and he got motivated to investigate melting and suprafluidity in two dimensions [Kosterlitz JM (2016) J Phys Condens Matter 28:481001]. It was due to the lack of broken translational symmetry in two dimensions—doubting the existence of 2D crystals—and the first computer simulations foretelling 2D crystals (at least in tiny systems). The lack of broken symmetries proposed by D. Mermin and H. Wagner is caused by long wavelength density fluctuations. Those fluctuations do not only have structural impact, but additionally a dynamical one: They cause the Lindemann criterion to fail in 2D in the sense that the mean squared displacement of atoms is not limited. Comparing experimental data from 3D and 2D amorphous solids with 2D crystals, we disentangle Mermin–Wagner fluctuations from glassy structural relaxations. Furthermore, we demonstrate with computer simulations the logarithmic increase of displacements with system size: Periodicity is not a requirement for Mermin–Wagner fluctuations, which conserve the homogeneity of space on long scales. PMID:28137872

  10. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  11. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  12. 2-D Clinostat for Simulated Microgravity Experiments with Arabidopsis Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Xugang; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Schüler, Oliver; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Kircher, Stefan; Lasok, Hanna; Haser, Thomas; Rapp, Katja; Schmidt, Jürgen; Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Aubry-Hivet, Dorothée; Tietz, Olaf; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus; Ditengou, Franck Anicet

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based simulators of microgravity such as fast rotating 2-D clinostats are valuable tools to study gravity related processes. We describe here a versatile g-value-adjustable 2-D clinostat that is suitable for plant analysis. To avoid seedling adaptation to 1 g after clinorotation, we designed chambers that allow rapid fixation. A detailed protocol for fixation, RNA isolation and the analysis of selected genes is described. Using this clinostat we show that mRNA levels of LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), MIZU-KUSSEI 1 (MIZ1) and microRNA MIR163 are down-regulated in 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana roots after 3 min and 6 min of clinorotation using a maximal reduced g-force of 0.02 g, hence demonstrating that this 2-D clinostat enables the characterization of early transcriptomic events during root response to microgravity. We further show that this 2-D clinostat is able to compensate the action of gravitational force as both gravitropic-dependent statolith sedimentation and subsequent auxin redistribution (monitoring D R5 r e v :: G F P reporter) are abolished when plants are clinorotated. Our results demonstrate that 2-D clinostats equipped with interchangeable growth chambers and tunable rotation velocity are suitable for studying how plants perceive and respond to simulated microgravity.

  13. Secretory pathways generating immunosuppressive NKG2D ligands

    PubMed Central

    Baragaño Raneros, Aroa; Suarez-Álvarez, Beatriz; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural Killer Group 2 member D (NKG2D) activating receptor, present on the surface of various immune cells, plays an important role in activating the anticancer immune response by their interaction with stress-inducible NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) on transformed cells. However, cancer cells have developed numerous mechanisms to evade the immune system via the downregulation of NKG2DL from the cell surface, including the release of NKG2DL from the cell surface in a soluble form. Here, we review the mechanisms involved in the production of soluble NKG2DL (sNKG2DL) and the potential therapeutic strategies aiming to block the release of these immunosuppressive ligands. Therapeutically enabling the NKG2D-NKG2DL interaction would promote immunorecognition of malignant cells, thus abrogating disease progression. PMID:25050215

  14. Splashing transients of 2D plasmons launched by swift electrons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao; Kaminer, Ido; Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Zhen; Buljan, Hrvoje; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Baile

    2017-01-01

    Launching of plasmons by swift electrons has long been used in electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) to investigate the plasmonic properties of ultrathin, or two-dimensional (2D), electron systems. However, the question of how a swift electron generates plasmons in space and time has never been answered. We address this issue by calculating and demonstrating the spatial-temporal dynamics of 2D plasmon generation in graphene. We predict a jet-like rise of excessive charge concentration that delays the generation of 2D plasmons in EELS, exhibiting an analog to the hydrodynamic Rayleigh jet in a splashing phenomenon before the launching of ripples. The photon radiation, analogous to the splashing sound, accompanies the plasmon emission and can be understood as being shaken off by the Rayleigh jet–like charge concentration. Considering this newly revealed process, we argue that previous estimates on the yields of graphene plasmons in EELS need to be reevaluated. PMID:28138546

  15. Available information in 2D motional Stark effect imaging.

    PubMed

    Creese, Mathew; Howard, John

    2010-10-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques have allowed the extension of the standard polarimetric 1D motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic to 2D imaging of the internal magnetic field of fusion devices [J. Howard, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 125003 (2008)]. This development is met with the challenge of identifying and extracting the new information, which can then be used to increase the accuracy of plasma equilibrium and current density profile determinations. This paper develops a 2D analysis of the projected MSE polarization orientation and Doppler phase shift. It is found that, for a standard viewing position, the 2D MSE imaging system captures sufficient information to allow imaging of the internal vertical magnetic field component B(Z)(r,z) in a tokamak.

  16. Perception-based reversible watermarking for 2D vector maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Chaoguang; Cao, Liujuan; Li, Xiang

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an effective and reversible watermarking approach for digital copyright protection of 2D-vector maps. To ensure that the embedded watermark is insensitive for human perception, we only select the noise non-sensitive regions for watermark embedding by estimating vertex density within each polyline. To ensure the exact recovery of original 2D-vector map after watermark extraction, we introduce a new reversible watermarking scheme based on reversible high-frequency wavelet coefficients modification. Within the former-selected non-sensitive regions, our watermarking operates on the lower-order vertex coordinate decimals with integer wavelet transform. Such operation further reduces the visual distortion caused by watermark embedding. We have validated the effectiveness of our scheme on our real-world city river/building 2D-vector maps. We give extensive experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art methods, including embedding capability, invisibility, and robustness over watermark attacking.

  17. 2D materials for photon conversion and nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.

    2015-09-01

    The field of two-dimensional (2D) materials has the potential to enable unique applications across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. While 2D-layered materials hold promise for next-generation photon-conversion intrinsic limitations and challenges exist that shall be overcome. Here we discuss the intrinsic limitations as well as application opportunities of this new class of materials, and is sponsored by the NSF program Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program, which links to the President's Materials Genome Initiative. We present general material-related details for photon conversion, and show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling MoS2/graphene/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for solar absorption up to 90%.

  18. Rapid-scan coherent 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Draeger, Simon; Roeding, Sebastian; Brixner, Tobias

    2017-02-20

    We developed pulse-shaper-assisted coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in liquids using fluorescence detection. A customized pulse shaper facilitates shot-to-shot modulation at 1 kHz and is employed for rapid scanning over all time delays. A full 2D spectrum with 15 × 15 pixels is obtained in approximately 6 s of measurement time (plus further averaging if needed). Coherent information is extracted from the incoherent fluorescence signal via 27-step phase cycling. We exemplify the technique on cresyl violet in ethanol and recover literature-known oscillations as a function of population time. Signal-to-noise behavior is analyzed as a function of the amount of averaging. Rapid scanning provides a 2D spectrum with a root-mean-square error of < 0.05 after 1 min of measurement time.

  19. 2D-3D transition of gold cluster anions resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Mikael P.; Lechtken, Anne; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M.; Furche, Filipp

    2008-05-01

    Small gold cluster anions Aun- are known for their unusual two-dimensional (2D) structures, giving rise to properties very different from those of bulk gold. Previous experiments and calculations disagree about the number of gold atoms nc where the transition to 3D structures occurs. We combine trapped ion electron diffraction and state of the art electronic structure calculations to resolve this puzzle and establish nc=12 . It is shown that theoretical studies using traditional generalized gradient functionals are heavily biased towards 2D structures. For a correct prediction of the 2D-3D crossover point it is crucial to use density functionals yielding accurate jellium surface energies, such as the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functional or the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional modified for solids (PBEsol). Further, spin-orbit effects have to be included, and large, flexible basis sets employed. This combined theoretical-experimental approach is promising for larger gold and other metal clusters.

  20. IUPAP Award: Ion transport in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Intercalation in 2D materials drastically influences both physical and chemical properties, which leads to a new degree of freedom for fundamental studies and expands the potential applications of 2D materials. In this talk, I will discuss our work in the past two years related to ion intercalation of 2D materials, including insertion of Li and Na ions in graphene and MoS2. We focused on both fundamental mechanism and potential application, e.g. we measured in-situ optical transmittance spectra and electrical transport properties of few-layer graphene (FLG) nanostructures upon electrochemical lithiation/delithiation. By observing a simultaneous increase of both optical transmittance and DC conductivity, strikingly different from other materials, we proposed its application as a next generation transparent electrode.

  1. 2d-retrieval For Mipas-envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, T.; von Clarmann, T.; Grabowski, U.; Höpfner, M.

    Limb sounding of the Earth's atmosphere provides vertically high resolved profiles of geophysical parameters. The long ray path through the atmosphere makes limb sounders sensitive to even little abundant species. On the other hand, horizontal in- homogeneities, if not taken into account properly, can cause systematic errors within the retrieval process. Especially for limb emission measurements in the mid IR, at- mopheric temperature gradients result in considerable vmr retrieval errors if they are neglected. We present a dedicated method of taking full 2D fields of state parameters (indepen- dent of tangent points) into account in the forward model and in the retrieval. The basic idea is that the 2D state vector is updated sequentially for each limb scan. This method is applied to the 2D retrieval of temperature and vmr for simulated radiances as expected from MIPAS-ENVISAT.

  2. Genetics, genomics, and evolutionary biology of NKG2D ligands.

    PubMed

    Carapito, Raphael; Bahram, Seiamak

    2015-09-01

    Human and mouse NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) are absent or only poorly expressed by most normal cells but are upregulated by cell stress, hence, alerting the immune system in case of malignancy or infection. Although these ligands are numerous and highly variable (at genetic, genomic, structural, and biochemical levels), they all belong to the major histocompatibility complex class I gene superfamily and bind to a single, invariant, receptor: NKG2D. NKG2D (CD314) is an activating receptor expressed on NK cells and subsets of T cells that have a key role in the recognition and lysis of infected and tumor cells. Here, we review the molecular diversity of NKG2DLs, discuss the increasing appreciation of their roles in a variety of medical conditions, and propose several explanations for the evolutionary force(s) that seem to drive the multiplicity and diversity of NKG2DLs while maintaining their interaction with a single invariant receptor.

  3. Graphene based 2D-materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniselvam, Thangavelu; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-09-01

    Ever-increasing energy demands and the depletion of fossil fuels are compelling humanity toward the development of suitable electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices to attain a more sustainable society with adequate renewable energy and zero environmental pollution. In this regard, supercapacitors are being contemplated as potential energy storage devices to afford cleaner, environmentally friendly energy. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, including 2D graphene and its inorganic analogues (transition metal double layer hydroxides, chalcogenides, etc), as potential electrodes for the development of supercapacitors with high electrochemical performance. This review provides an overview of the recent progress in using these graphene-based 2D materials as potential electrodes for supercapacitors. In addition, future research trends including notable challenges and opportunities are also discussed.

  4. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    DOE PAGES

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a highmore » crystallinity and very low defect concentration.« less

  5. Optoelectronics based on 2D TMDs and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Nengjie; Yang, Yujue; Li, Jingbo

    2017-03-01

    2D materials including graphene and TMDs have proven interesting physical properties and promising optoelectronic applications. We reviewed the growth, characterization and optoelectronics based on 2D TMDs and their heterostructures, and demonstrated their unique and high quality of performances. For example, we observed the large mobility, fast response and high photo-responsivity in MoS2, WS2 and WSe2 phototransistors, as well as the novel performances in vdW heterostructures such as the strong interlayer coupling, am-bipolar and rectifying behaviour, and the obvious photovoltaic effect. It is being possible that 2D family materials could play an increasingly important role in the future nano- and opto-electronics, more even than traditional semiconductors such as silicon.

  6. Applications of Doppler Tomography in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M.; Budaj, J.; Agafonov, M.; Sharova, O.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past few years, the applications of Doppler tomography have been extended beyond the usual calculation of 2D velocity images of circumstellar gas flows. This technique has now been used with the new Shellspec spectrum synthesis code to demonstrate the effective modeling of the accretion disk and gas stream in the TT Hya Algol binary. The 2D tomography procedure projects all sources of emission onto a single central (Vx, Vy) velocity plane even though the gas is expected to flow beyond that plane. So, new 3D velocity images were derived with the Radioastronomical Approach method by assuming a grid of Vz values transverse to the central 2D plane. The 3D approach has been applied to the U CrB and RS Vul Algol-type binaries to reveal substantial flow structures beyond the central velocity plane.

  7. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a high crystallinity and very low defect concentration.

  8. Proteomic Characterization of Yersinia pestis Virulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chromy, B; Murphy, G; Gonzales, A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2005-01-05

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, functions via the Type III secretion mechanism whereby virulence factors are induced upon interactions with a mammalian host. Here, the Y. pestis proteome was studied by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) under physiologically relevant growth conditions mimicking the calcium concentrations and temperatures that the pathogen would encounter in the flea vector and upon interaction with the mammalian host. Over 4100 individual protein spots were detected of which hundreds were differentially expressed in the entire comparative experiment. A total of 43 proteins that were differentially expressed between the vector and host growth conditions were identified by mass spectrometry. Expected differences in expression were observed for several known virulence factors including catalase-peroxidase (KatY), murine toxin (Ymt), plasminogen activator (Pla), and F1 capsule antigen (Caf1), as well as putative virulence factors. Chaperone proteins and signaling molecules hypothesized to be involved in virulence due to their role in Type III secretion were also identified. Other differentially expressed proteins not previously reported to contribute to virulence are candidates for more detailed mechanistic studies, representing potential new virulence determinants. For example, several sugar metabolism proteins were differentially regulated in response to lower calcium and higher temperature, suggesting these proteins, while not directly connected to virulence, either represent a metabolic switch for survival in the host environment or may facilitate production of virulence factors. Results presented here contribute to a more thorough understanding of the virulence mechanism of Y. pestis through proteomic characterization of the pathogen under induced virulence.

  9. Real-time 2-D temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2010-01-01

    We have previously introduced methods for noninvasive estimation of temperature change using diagnostic ultrasound. The basic principle was validated both in vitro and in vivo by several groups worldwide. Some limitations remain, however, that have prevented these methods from being adopted in monitoring and guidance of minimally invasive thermal therapies, e.g., RF ablation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). In this letter, we present first results from a real-time system for 2-D imaging of temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound. The front end of the system is a commercially available scanner equipped with a research interface, which allows the control of imaging sequence and access to the RF data in real time. A high-frame-rate 2-D RF acquisition mode, M2D, is used to capture the transients of tissue motion/deformations in response to pulsed HIFU. The M2D RF data is streamlined to the back end of the system, where a 2-D temperature imaging algorithm based on speckle tracking is implemented on a graphics processing unit. The real-time images of temperature change are computed on the same spatial and temporal grid of the M2D RF data, i.e., no decimation. Verification of the algorithm was performed by monitoring localized HIFU-induced heating of a tissue-mimicking elastography phantom. These results clearly demonstrate the repeatability and sensitivity of the algorithm. Furthermore, we present in vitro results demonstrating the possible use of this algorithm for imaging changes in tissue parameters due to HIFU-induced lesions. These results clearly demonstrate the value of the real-time data streaming and processing in monitoring, and guidance of minimally invasive thermotherapy.

  10. Towards functional assembly of 3D and 2D nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.; Wang, Kai; Ievlev, Anton V.; Muckley, Eric S.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-09-01

    Functional assemblies of materials can be realized by tuning the work function and band gap of nanomaterials by rational material selection and design. Here we demonstrate the structural assembly of 2D and 3D nanomaterials and show that layering a 2D material monolayer on a 3D metal oxide leads to substantial alteration of both the surface potential and optical properties of the 3D material. A 40 nm thick film of polycrystalline NiO was produced by room temperature rf-sputtering, resulting in a 3D nanoparticle assembly. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown 10-30 μm WS2 flakes (2D material) were placed on the NiO surface using a PDMS stamp transfer technique. The 2D/3D WS2/NiO assembly was characterized using confocal micro Raman spectroscopy to evaluate the vibrational properties and using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to evaluate the surface potential. Raman maps of the 2D/3D assembly show spatial non-uniformity of the A1g mode ( 418 cm-1) and the disorder-enhanced longitudinal acoustic mode, 2LA(M) ( 350 cm-1), suggesting that the WS2 exists in a strained condition on when transferred onto 3D polycrystalline NiO. KPFM measurements show that single layer WS2 on SiO2 has a surface potential 75 mV lower than that of SiO2, whereas the surface potential of WS2 on NiO is 15 mV higher than NiO, indicating that WS2 could act as electron donor or acceptor depending on the 3D material it is interfaced with. Thus 2D and 3D materials can be organized into functional assemblies with electron flow controlled by the WS2 either as the electron donor or acceptor.

  11. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection. PMID:20589070

  12. Three dimensional liquid chromatography coupling ion exchange chromatography/hydrophobic interaction chromatography/reverse phase chromatography for effective protein separation in top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Valeja, Santosh G; Xiu, Lichen; Gregorich, Zachery R; Guner, Huseyin; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    To address the complexity of the proteome in mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down proteomics, multidimensional liquid chromatography (MDLC) strategies that can effectively separate proteins with high resolution and automation are highly desirable. Although various MDLC methods that can effectively separate peptides from protein digests exist, very few MDLC strategies, primarily consisting of 2DLC, are available for intact protein separation, which is insufficient to address the complexity of the proteome. We recently demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) utilizing a MS-compatible salt can provide high resolution separation of intact proteins for top-down proteomics. Herein, we have developed a novel 3DLC strategy by coupling HIC with ion exchange chromatography (IEC) and reverse phase chromatography (RPC) for intact protein separation. We demonstrated that a 3D (IEC-HIC-RPC) approach greatly outperformed the conventional 2D IEC-RPC approach. For the same IEC fraction (out of 35 fractions) from a crude HEK 293 cell lysate, a total of 640 proteins were identified in the 3D approach (corresponding to 201 nonredundant proteins) as compared to 47 in the 2D approach, whereas simply prolonging the gradients in RPC in the 2D approach only led to minimal improvement in protein separation and identifications. Therefore, this novel 3DLC method has great potential for effective separation of intact proteins to achieve deep proteome coverage in top-down proteomics.

  13. The Cultural Divide: Exponential Growth in Classical 2D and Metabolic Equilibrium in 3D Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Borkowski, Kamil; Schwämmle, Veit; Dai, Jie; Joensen, Kira Eyd; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Carvalho, Vasco Botelho; Fey, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found that they are dramatically different. Results Structurally, actin organization is changed, microtubules are increased and keratins 8 and 18 decreased. Metabolically, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism and the pentose phosphate shunt are increased while TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is unchanged. Enzymes involved in cholesterol and urea synthesis are increased consistent with the attainment of cholesterol and urea production rates seen in vivo. DNA repair enzymes are increased even though cells are predominantly in Go. Transport around the cell – along the microtubules, through the nuclear pore and in various types of vesicles has been prioritized. There are numerous coherent changes in transcription, splicing, translation, protein folding and degradation. The amount of individual proteins within complexes is shown to be highly coordinated. Typically subunits which initiate a particular function are present in increased amounts compared to other subunits of the same complex. Summary We have previously demonstrated that cells at dynamic equilibrium can match the physiological performance of cells in tissues in vivo. Here we describe the multitude of protein changes necessary to achieve this performance. PMID:25222612

  14. The use of 2D-DIGE to understand the regeneration of somatic embryos in avocado.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-García, Eva; Sánchez-Romero, Carolina; Panis, Bart; Carpentier, Sebastien Christian

    2013-12-01

    Avocado embryogenic cell cultures can be classified into two groups based on their morphology when cultured on a medium containing auxin: somatic embryo (SE) and proembryonic masses (PEM) type cultures. The calli of SE-type cell lines are able to go through the maturation process, whereas the calli of PEM cell lines rarely mature. We have investigated four independent avocado cell cultures (two SE and two PEM). The aim of this study was to link the differential regeneration capacity of the four cell cultures to a proteomic pattern and to gain insight into the regeneration capacity. A 2D-DIGE analysis followed by a blind multivariate analysis was able to separate the two SE lines from the PEM lines indicating that the protein profiles of SE and PEM calli are different. Based on the variable importance, that is, the differential protein pattern, we hypothesize that the regeneration capacity in avocado is correlated to the ability to overcome the physicochemical stress stimuli associated with the in vitro culture. Our identical culture conditions do not seem to trigger an appropriate response in PEM lines.

  15. Laboratory Experiments On Continually Forced 2d Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. G.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Van Heijst, G. J. F.

    There has been much recent interest in the advection of tracers by 2D turbulence in geophysical flows. While there is a large body of literature on decaying 2D turbulence or forced 2D turbulence in unbounded domains, there have been very few studies of forced turbulence in bounded domains. In this study we present new experimental results from a continuously forced quasi 2D turbulent field. The experiments are performed in a square Perspex tank filled with water. The flow is made quasi 2D by a steady background rotation. The rotation rate of the tank has a small (<8 %) sinusoidal perturbation which leads to the periodic formation of eddies in the corners of the tank. When the oscillation period of the perturbation is greater than an eddy roll-up time-scale, dipole structures are observed to form. The dipoles can migrate away from the walls, and the interior of the tank is continually filled with vortexs. From experimental visualizations the length scale of the vortexs appears to be largely controlled by the initial formation mechanism and large scale structures are not observed to form at large times. Thus the experiments provide a simple way of cre- ating a continuously forced 2D turbulent field. The resulting structures are in contrast with most previous laboratory experiments on 2D turbulence which have investigated decaying turbulence and have observed the formations of large scale structure. In these experiments, decaying turbulence had been produced by a variety of methods such as the decaying turbulence in the wake of a comb of rods (Massen et al 1999), organiza- tion of vortices in thin conducting liquids (Cardoso et al 1994) or in rotating systems where there are sudden changes in angular rotation rate (Konijnenberg et al 1998). Results of dye visualizations, particle tracking experiments and a direct numerical simulation will be presented and discussed in terms of their oceanographic application. Bibliography Cardoso,O. Marteau, D. &Tabeling, P

  16. 2dF grows up: Echidna for the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Andrew; Barden, Sam; Miziarski, Stan; Rambold, William; Smith, Greg

    2008-07-01

    We present the concept design of a new fibre positioner and spectrograph system for the Anglo-Australian Telescope, as a proposed enhancement to the Anglo-Australian Observatory's well-known 2dF facility. A four-fold multiplex enhancement is accomplished by replacing the 400-fibre 2dF fibre positioning robot with a 1600-fibre Echidna unit, feeding three clones of the AAOmega optical spectrograph. Such a facility has the capability of a redshift 1 survey of a large fraction of the southern sky, collecting five to ten thousand spectra per night for a million-galaxy survey.

  17. Noninvasive deep Raman detection with 2D correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Min; Park, Hyo Sun; Cho, Youngho; Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Kang Taek; Jung, Young Mee; Suh, Yung Doug

    2014-07-01

    The detection of poisonous chemicals enclosed in daily necessaries is prerequisite essential for homeland security with the increasing threat of terrorism. For the detection of toxic chemicals, we combined a sensitive deep Raman spectroscopic method with 2D correlation analysis. We obtained the Raman spectra from concealed chemicals employing spatially offset Raman spectroscopy in which incident line-shaped light experiences multiple scatterings before being delivered to inner component and yielding deep Raman signal. Furthermore, we restored the pure Raman spectrum of each component using 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis with chemical inspection. Using this method, we could elucidate subsurface component under thick powder and packed contents in a bottle.

  18. Evaluation of 2D ceramic matrix composites in aeroconvective environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R.; Love, Wendell L.; Balter-Peterson, Aliza

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of a novel ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) material system for use in the aeroconvective-heating environments encountered by the nose caps and wing leading edges of such aerospace vehicles as the Space Shuttle, during orbit-insertion and reentry from LEO. These CMCs are composed of an SiC matrix that is reinforced with Nicalon, Nextel, or carbon refractory fibers in a 2D architecture. The test program conducted for the 2D CMCs gave attention to their subsurface oxidation.

  19. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego A R

    2015-06-03

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  20. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  1. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  2. Experimental validation of equations for 2D DIC uncertainty quantification.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) equations have been derived for predicting matching uncertainty in two-dimensional image correlation a priori. These equations include terms that represent the image noise and image contrast. Researchers at the University of South Carolina have extended previous 1D work to calculate matching errors in 2D. These 2D equations have been coded into a Sandia National Laboratories UQ software package to predict the uncertainty for DIC images. This paper presents those equations and the resulting error surfaces for trial speckle images. Comparison of the UQ results with experimentally subpixel-shifted images is also discussed.

  3. Scale Invariance in 2D BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensarma, Rajdeep; Taylor, Edward; Randeria, Mohit

    2013-03-01

    In 2D BCS-BEC crossover, the frequency of the breathing mode in a harmonic trap, as well as the lower edge of the radio frequency spectroscopy response, show remarkable scale-invariance throughout the crossover regime, i.e. they are independent of the coupling constant. Using functional integral methods, we study the behaviour of these quantities in the 2D BCS-BEC crossover and comment on the possible reasons for this scale independence. RS was supported by DAE, Govt. of India. MR was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1006532. ET was supported by NSERC and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  4. Closed-shell and open-shell 2D nanographenes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhe; Wu, Jishan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a series of two-dimensional (2D) expanded arene networks, also known as nanographenes, with either closed-shell or open-shell electronic structure in the ground state. These systems are further categorized into three classes on a basis of different edge structures: those with zigzag edges only, those with armchair edges only, and those possessing both. Distinctive physical properties of these 2D aromatic systems are closely related to their structural characteristics and provide great potential for them as materials for different applications.

  5. 2D Log-Gabor Wavelet Based Action Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Xu, De

    The frequency response of log-Gabor function matches well the frequency response of primate visual neurons. In this letter, motion-salient regions are extracted based on the 2D log-Gabor wavelet transform of the spatio-temporal form of actions. A supervised classification technique is then used to classify the actions. The proposed method is robust to the irregular segmentation of actors. Moreover, the 2D log-Gabor wavelet permits more compact representation of actions than the recent neurobiological models using Gabor wavelet.

  6. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion relaxation data—2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T2- D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T2- D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T2- D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D = 3 × 10 -12 m 2 s -1 and T2 = 180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D = 10 -9 m 2 s -1, T2 = 10 ms and D = 3 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1, T2 = 13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  7. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Fearn, Jamie M; Brownson, Dale A C; Smith, Graham C; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E

    2016-08-21

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm(-2) modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR.

  8. Imaging beyond the proteome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pamela V.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging technologies developed in the early 20th century achieved contrast solely by relying on macroscopic and morphological differences between the tissues of interest and the surrounding tissues. Since then, there has been a movement toward imaging at the cellular and molecular level in order to visualize biological processes. This rapidly growing field is known as molecular imaging. In the last decade, many methodologies for imaging proteins have emerged. However, most of these approaches cannot be extended to imaging beyond the proteome. Here, we highlight some of the recently developed technologies that enable imaging of non-proteinaceous molecules in the cell: lipids, signalling molecules, inorganic ions, glycans, nucleic acids, small-molecule metabolites, and protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and methylation. PMID:22801420

  9. Proteomics of Human Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Keene, C. Dirk; Pan, Catherine; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The technology, experimental approaches, and bioinformatics that support proteomic research are evolving rapidly. The application of these new capabilities to the study of neurodegenerative diseases is providing insight into the biochemical pathogenesis of neurodegeneration as well as fueling major efforts in biomarker discovery. Here, we review the fundamentals of commonly used proteomic approaches and the outcomes of these investigations with autopsy and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18800015

  10. The Succinated Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  11. Image analysis tools and emerging algorithms for expression proteomics

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Lisacek, Frederique; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Dunn, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Since their origins in academic endeavours in the 1970s, computational analysis tools have matured into a number of established commercial packages that underpin research in expression proteomics. In this paper we describe the image analysis pipeline for the established 2-D Gel Electrophoresis (2-DE) technique of protein separation, and by first covering signal analysis for Mass Spectrometry (MS), we also explain the current image analysis workflow for the emerging high-throughput ‘shotgun’ proteomics platform of Liquid Chromatography coupled to MS (LC/MS). The bioinformatics challenges for both methods are illustrated and compared, whilst existing commercial and academic packages and their workflows are described from both a user’s and a technical perspective. Attention is given to the importance of sound statistical treatment of the resultant quantifications in the search for differential expression. Despite wide availability of proteomics software, a number of challenges have yet to be overcome regarding algorithm accuracy, objectivity and automation, generally due to deterministic spot-centric approaches that discard information early in the pipeline, propagating errors. We review recent advances in signal and image analysis algorithms in 2-DE, MS, LC/MS and Imaging MS. Particular attention is given to wavelet techniques, automated image-based alignment and differential analysis in 2-DE, Bayesian peak mixture models and functional mixed modelling in MS, and group-wise consensus alignment methods for LC/MS. PMID:21046614

  12. Challenges and Solutions in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hongzhan, Huang; Shukla, Hem D; Cathy, Wu; Satya, Saxena

    2007-01-01

    The accelerated growth of proteomics data presents both opportunities and challenges. Large-scale proteomic profiling of biological samples such as cells, organelles or biological fluids has led to discovery of numerous key and novel proteins involved in many biological/disease processes including cancers, as well as to the identification of novel disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets. While proteomic data analysis has been greatly assisted by the many bioinformatics tools developed in recent years, a careful analysis of the major steps and flow of data in a typical highthroughput analysis reveals a few gaps that still need to be filled to fully realize the value of the data. To facilitate functional and pathway discovery for large-scale proteomic data, we have developed an integrated proteomic expression analysis system, iProXpress, which facilitates protein identification using a comprehensive sequence library and functional interpretation using integrated data. With its modular design, iProXpress complements and can be integrated with other software in a proteomic data analysis pipeline. This novel approach to complex biological questions involves the interrogation of multiple data sources, thereby facilitating hypothesis generation and knowledge discovery from the genomic-scale studies and fostering disease diagnosis and drug development. PMID:18645629

  13. The proteome of human saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2013-05-01

    Human saliva holds tremendous potential for transforming disease and health diagnostics given its richness of molecular information and non-invasive collection. Enumerating its molecular constituents is an important first step towards reaching this potential. Among the molecules in saliva, proteins and peptides arguably have the most value: they can directly indicate biochemical functions linked to a health condition/disease state, and they are attractive targets for biomarker assay development. However, cataloging and defining the human salivary proteome is challenging given the dynamic, chemically heterogeneous and complex nature of the system. In addition, the overall human saliva proteome is composed of several "sub-proteomes" which include: intact full length proteins, proteins carrying post-translational modifications (PTMs), low molecular weight peptides, and the metaproteome, derived from protein products from nonhuman organisms (e.g. microbes) present in the oral cavity. Presented here will be a summary of communal efforts to meet the challenge of characterizing the multifaceted saliva proteome, focusing on the use of mass spectrometry as the proteomic technology of choice. Implications of these efforts to characterize the salivary proteome in the context of disease diagnostics will also be discussed.

  14. Data for a comparative proteomic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis (clb) mutants.

    PubMed

    de Luna-Valdez, L A; Martínez-Batallar, A G; Hernández-Ortiz, M; Encarnación-Guevara, S; Ramos-Vega, M; López-Bucio, J S; León, P; Guevara-García, A A

    2014-12-01

    This data article contains data related to the research article titled Proteomic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis (clb) mutants uncovers novel proteins potentially involved in the development of Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts (de Luna-Valdez et al., 2014) [1]. This research article describes the 2-D PAGE-based proteomic analysis of wild-type and four mutant lines (cla1-1, clb2, clb5 and clb19) affected in the development of Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. The report concludes with the discovery of three proteins potentially involved in chloroplast biogenesis. The information presented here represent the tables and figures that detail the processing of the raw data obtained from the image analysis of the 2-D PAGE gels.

  15. Data for a comparative proteomic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis (clb) mutants

    PubMed Central

    de Luna-Valdez, L.A.; Martínez-Batallar, A.G.; Hernández-Ortiz, M.; Encarnación-Guevara, S.; Ramos-Vega, M.; López-Bucio, J.S.; León, P.; Guevara-García, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    This data article contains data related to the research article titled Proteomic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis (clb) mutants uncovers novel proteins potentially involved in the development ofArabidopsis thalianachloroplasts (de Luna-Valdez et al., 2014) [1]. This research article describes the 2-D PAGE-based proteomic analysis of wild-type and four mutant lines (cla1-1, clb2, clb5 and clb19) affected in the development of Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. The report concludes with the discovery of three proteins potentially involved in chloroplast biogenesis. The information presented here represent the tables and figures that detail the processing of the raw data obtained from the image analysis of the 2-D PAGE gels. PMID:26217679

  16. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  17. 2-D Finite Element Cable and Box IEMP Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scivner, G.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1998-12-17

    A 2-D finite element code has been developed for the solution of arbitrary geometry cable SGEMP and box IEMP problems. The quasi- static electric field equations with radiation- induced charge deposition and radiation-induced conductivity y are numerically solved on a triangular mesh. Multiple regions of different dielectric materials and multiple conductors are permitted.

  18. 2D Orthogonal Locality Preserving Projection for Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Shikkenawis, Gitam; Mitra, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    Sparse representations using transform-domain techniques are widely used for better interpretation of the raw data. Orthogonal locality preserving projection (OLPP) is a linear technique that tries to preserve local structure of data in the transform domain as well. Vectorized nature of OLPP requires high-dimensional data to be converted to vector format, hence may lose spatial neighborhood information of raw data. On the other hand, processing 2D data directly, not only preserves spatial information, but also improves the computational efficiency considerably. The 2D OLPP is expected to learn the transformation from 2D data itself. This paper derives mathematical foundation for 2D OLPP. The proposed technique is used for image denoising task. Recent state-of-the-art approaches for image denoising work on two major hypotheses, i.e., non-local self-similarity and sparse linear approximations of the data. Locality preserving nature of the proposed approach automatically takes care of self-similarity present in the image while inferring sparse basis. A global basis is adequate for the entire image. The proposed approach outperforms several state-of-the-art image denoising approaches for gray-scale, color, and texture images.

  19. 2D signature for detection and identification of drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.; Shen, Jingling; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhou, Qingli; Shi, Yulei

    2011-06-01

    The method of spectral dynamics analysis (SDA-method) is used for obtaining the2D THz signature of drugs. This signature is used for the detection and identification of drugs with similar Fourier spectra by transmitted THz signal. We discuss the efficiency of SDA method for the identification problem of pure methamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and Ketamine.

  20. Optoelectronics of supported and suspended 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotin, Kirill

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional semiconductors, materials such monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are characterized by strong spin-orbit and electron-electron interactions. However, both electronic and optoelectronic properties of these materials are dominated by disorder-related scattering. In this talk, we investigate approaches to reduce scattering and explore physical phenomena arising in intrinsic 2D semiconductors. First, we discuss fabrication of pristine suspended monolayer MoS2 and use photocurrent spectroscopy measurements to study excitons in this material. We observe band-edge and van Hove singularity excitons and estimate their binding energies. Furthermore, we study dissociation of these excitons and uncover the mechanism of their contribution to photoresponse of MoS2. Second, we study strain-induced modification of bandstructures of 2D semiconductors. With increasing strain, we find large and controllable band gap reduction of both single- and bi-layer MoS2. We also detect experimental signatures consistent with strain-induced transition from direct to indirect band gap in monolayer MoS2. Finally, we fabricate heterostructures of dissimilar 2D semiconductors and study their photoresponse. For closely spaced 2D semiconductors we detect charge transfer, while for separation larger than 10nm we observe Forster-like energy transfer between excitations in different layers.

  1. Graphene band structure and its 2D Raman mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narula, Rohit; Reich, Stephanie

    2014-08-01

    High-precision simulations are used to generate the 2D Raman mode of graphene under a range of screening conditions and laser energies EL. We reproduce the decreasing trend of the 2D mode FWHM vs EL and the nearly linearly increasing dispersion ∂ω2D/∂EL seen experimentally in freestanding (unscreened) graphene, and propose relations between these experimentally accessible quantities and the local, two-dimensional gradients |∇ | of the electronic and TO phonon bands. In light of state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations that acutely treat the long-range e-e interactions of isolated graphene and its experimentally observed 2D Raman mode, our calculations determine a 40% greater slope of the TO phonons about K than given by explicit phonon measurements performed in graphite or GW phonon calculations in graphene. We also deduce the variation of the broadening energy γ [EL] for freestanding graphene and find a nominal value γ ˜140 meV, showing a gradually increasing trend for the range of frequencies available experimentally.

  2. Development of a MEMS 2D separations device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloschock, Kristen P.; Flyer, Jonathan N.; Schneider, Thomas W.; Hussam, Abul; Van Keuren, Edward R.

    2004-12-01

    A polymer based biochip for rapid 2D separations of peptides, proteins, and other biomedically relevant molecules was designed and fabricated. Like traditional 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) methods, the device will allow molecules to separate based on isoelectric point (pI) and molecular weight (MW). Our design, however, integrates both an initial capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) step followed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in multiple parallel channels, all on a single microfluidic chip. Not only is the "lab-on-a-chip" design easier to use and less expensive, but the miniaturization of the device produces very rapid separations. Compared to traditional 2D-PAGE, which can take hours to complete, we estimate separation times on the order of seconds. Fluorescence detection will be used in the preliminary stages of testing, but the device also is equipped with integrated electrodes in the electrophoresis channels to perform multiplexed electrochemical detection for quantitative analysis. We will present preliminary results of the chip development and testing.

  3. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Steve; 2DF Galaxy Redshift Survey Team; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; Driver, Simon; Ellis, Richard; Efstathiou, George; Folkes, Simon; Frenk, Carlos; Glazebrook, Karl; Kaiser, Nick; Lahav, Ofer; Lumsden, Stuart; Peterson, Bruce; Peacock, John; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    Spectroscopic observations for a new survey of 250 000 galaxy redshifts are underway, using the 2dF instrument at the AAT. The input galaxy catalogue and commissioning data are described. The first result from the preliminary data is a new estimate of the galaxy luminosity function at = 0.1.

  4. Volume Calculation of Venous Thrombosis Using 2D Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Dhibi, M; Puentes, J; Bressollette, L; Guias, B; Solaiman, B

    2005-01-01

    Venous thrombosis screening exams use 2D ultrasound images, from which medical experts obtain a rough idea of the thrombosis aspect and infer an approximate volume. Such estimation is essential to follow up the thrombosis evolution. This paper proposes a method to calculate venous thrombosis volume from non-parallel 2D ultrasound images, taking advantage of a priori knowledge about the thrombosis shape. An interactive ellipse fitting contour segmentation extracts the 2D thrombosis contours. Then, a Delaunay triangulation is applied to the set of 2D segmented contours positioned in 3D, and the area that each contour defines, to obtain a global thrombosis 3D surface reconstruction, with a dense triangulation inside the contours. Volume is calculated from the obtained surface and contours triangulation, using a maximum unit normal component approach. Preliminary results obtained on 3 plastic phantoms and 3 in vitro venous thromboses, as well as one in vivo case are presented and discussed. An error rate of volume estimation inferior to 4,5% for the plastic phantoms, and 3,5% for the in vitro venous thromboses was obtained.

  5. ELLIPT2D: A Flexible Finite Element Code Written Python

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Mollis, J.C.

    2001-03-22

    The use of the Python scripting language for scientific applications and in particular to solve partial differential equations is explored. It is shown that Python's rich data structure and object-oriented features can be exploited to write programs that are not only significantly more concise than their counter parts written in Fortran, C or C++, but are also numerically efficient. To illustrate this, a two-dimensional finite element code (ELLIPT2D) has been written. ELLIPT2D provides a flexible and easy-to-use framework for solving a large class of second-order elliptic problems. The program allows for structured or unstructured meshes. All functions defining the elliptic operator are user supplied and so are the boundary conditions, which can be of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robbins type. ELLIPT2D makes extensive use of dictionaries (hash tables) as a way to represent sparse matrices.Other key features of the Python language that have been widely used include: operator over loading, error handling, array slicing, and the Tkinter module for building graphical use interfaces. As an example of the utility of ELLIPT2D, a nonlinear solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation is computed using a Newton iterative scheme. A second application focuses on a solution of the toroidal Laplace equation coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic stability code, a problem arising in the context of magnetic fusion research.

  6. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on complex fluids and fluids in restricted geometries has attracted much attention in the scientific community. This can be attributed not only to the development of novel materials based on complex fluids but also to a variety of important physical phenomena which have barely been explored. One example is the behavior of membranes and thin fluid films, which can be described by two-dimensional (2D) rheology behavior that is quite different from 3D fluids. In this study, we have investigated the rheological properties of freely suspended films of a thermotropic liquid crystal in microgravity experiments. This model system mimics isotropic and anisotropic quasi 2D fluids [46]. We use inkjet printing technology to dispense small droplets (inclusions) onto the film surface. The motion of these inclusions provides information on the rheological properties of the films and allows the study of a variety of flow instabilities. Flat films have been investigated on a sub-orbital rocket flight and curved films (bubbles) have been studied in the ISS project OASIS. Microgravity is essential when the films are curved in order to avoid sedimentation. The experiments yield the mobility of the droplets in the films as well as the mutual mobility of pairs of particles. Experimental results will be presented for 2D-isotropic (smectic-A) and 2D-nematic (smectic-C) phases.

  7. Validation and testing of the VAM2D computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. )

    1991-10-01

    This document describes two modeling studies conducted by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. for the US NRC under contract no. NRC-04089-090, entitled, Validation and Testing of the VAM2D Computer Code.'' VAM2D is a two-dimensional, variably saturated flow and transport code, with applications for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal. The computer code itself is documented in a separate NUREG document (NUREG/CR-5352, 1989). The studies presented in this report involve application of the VAM2D code to two diverse subsurface modeling problems. The first one involves modeling of infiltration and redistribution of water and solutes in an initially dry, heterogeneous field soil. This application involves detailed modeling over a relatively short, 9-month time period. The second problem pertains to the application of VAM2D to the modeling of a waste disposal facility in a fractured clay, over much larger space and time scales and with particular emphasis on the applicability and reliability of using equivalent porous medium approach for simulating flow and transport in fractured geologic media. Reflecting the separate and distinct nature of the two problems studied, this report is organized in two separate parts. 61 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  9. Studying Zeolite Catalysts with a 2D Model System

    ScienceCinema

    Boscoboinik, Anibal

    2016-12-14

    Anibal Boscoboinik, a materials scientist at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials, discusses the surface-science tools and 2D model system he uses to study catalysis in nanoporous zeolites, which catalyze reactions in many industrial processes.

  10. 2D nanomaterials based electrochemical biosensors for cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Xiong, Qirong; Xiao, Fei; Duan, Hongwei

    2017-03-15

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that early diagnosis holds the key towards effective treatment outcome. Cancer biomarkers are extensively used in oncology for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Electrochemical sensors play key roles in current laboratory and clinical analysis of diverse chemical and biological targets. Recent development of functional nanomaterials offers new possibilities of improving the performance of electrochemical sensors. In particular, 2D nanomaterials have stimulated intense research due to their unique array of structural and chemical properties. The 2D materials of interest cover broadly across graphene, graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide), and graphene-like nanomaterials (i.e., 2D layered transition metal dichalcogenides, graphite carbon nitride and boron nitride nanomaterials). In this review, we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of 2D nanomaterials and their applications in electrochemical biosensing of cancer biomarkers (nucleic acids, proteins and some small molecules), and present a personal perspective on the future direction of this area.

  11. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Fearn, Jamie M.; Brownson, Dale A. C.; Smith, Graham C.; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E.

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm-2 modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR.Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets

  12. Detection of toxin proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis strain 4.0718 by strategy of 2D-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Tang, Sijia; Rang, Jie; Zuo, Mingxing; Ding, Xuezhi; Sun, Yunjun; Feng, Pinghui; Xia, Liqiu

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a kind of insecticidal microorganism which can produce a variety of toxin proteins, it is particularly important to find an effective strategy to identify novel toxin proteins rapidly and comprehensively with the discovery of the wild-type strains. Multi-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry has become one of the main methods to detect and identify toxin proteins and proteome of B. thuringiensis. In this study, protein samples from B. thuringiensis strain 4.0718 were analyzed on the basis of two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS), and tryptic peptides of whole cell from the late sporulation phase were eluted at different concentration gradients of ammonium chloride and followed by secondary mass spectrum identification. 831 and 894 proteins were identified from two biological replicates, respectively, while 1,770 and 1,859 peptides were detected correspondingly. Among the identified proteins and peptides, 606 proteins and 1,259 peptides were detected in both replicates, which mean that 1,119 proteins and 2,370 peptides were unique to the proteome of this strain. A total of 15 toxins have been identified successfully, and seven of them were firstly discovered in B. thuringiensis strain 4.0718 that were Crystal protein (A1E259), pesticidal protein (U5KS09), Cry2Af1 (A4GVF0), Cry2Ad (Q9RM89), Cry1 (K4HMB5), Cry1Bc (Q45774), and Cry1Ga (Q45746). The proteomic strategy employed in the present study has provided quick and exhaustive identification of toxins produced by B. thuringiensis.

  13. WE-AB-BRA-07: Quantitative Evaluation of 2D-2D and 2D-3D Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Clinical Trial Credentialing, NRG Oncology/RTOG

    SciTech Connect

    Giaddui, T; Yu, J; Xiao, Y; Jacobs, P; Manfredi, D; Linnemann, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 2D-2D kV image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) credentialing evaluation for clinical trial qualification was historically qualitative through submitting screen captures of the fusion process. However, as quantitative DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D image registration tools are implemented in clinical practice for better precision, especially in centers that treat patients with protons, better IGRT credentialing techniques are needed. The aim of this work is to establish methodologies for quantitatively reviewing IGRT submissions based on DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D image registration and to test the methodologies in reviewing 2D-2D and 2D-3D IGRT submissions for RTOG/NRG Oncology clinical trials qualifications. Methods: DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D automated and manual image registration have been tested using the Harmony tool in MIM software. 2D kV orthogonal portal images are fused with the reference digital reconstructed radiographs (DRR) in the 2D-2D registration while the 2D portal images are fused with DICOM planning CT image in the 2D-3D registration. The Harmony tool allows alignment of the two images used in the registration process and also calculates the required shifts. Shifts calculated using MIM are compared with those submitted by institutions for IGRT credentialing. Reported shifts are considered to be acceptable if differences are less than 3mm. Results: Several tests have been performed on the 2D-2D and 2D-3D registration. The results indicated good agreement between submitted and calculated shifts. A workflow for reviewing these IGRT submissions has been developed and will eventually be used to review IGRT submissions. Conclusion: The IROC Philadelphia RTQA center has developed and tested a new workflow for reviewing DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D IGRT credentialing submissions made by different cancer clinical centers, especially proton centers. NRG Center for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (CIRO) and IROC RTQA center continue their collaborative efforts to enhance

  14. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  15. 2d-LCA - an alternative to x-wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2014-11-01

    The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA) is an innovative sensor for two-dimensional velocity measurements in fluids. It uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon and SU-8 as a sensing element and is capable of performing mesurements with extremly high temporal resolutions up to 150 kHz. The size of the cantilever defines its spatial resolution, which is in the order of 150 μm only. Another big feature is a large angular range of 180° in total. The 2d-LCA has been developed as an alternative measurement method to x-wires with the motivation to create a sensor that can operate in areas where the use of hot-wire anemometry is difficult. These areas include measurements in liquids and in near-wall or particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high speed flows. Comparative measurements with the 2d-LCA and hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the new anemometer. The data of both measurement techniques were analyzed using the same stochastic methods including a spectral analysis as well as an inspection of increment statistics and structure functions. Furthermore, key parameters, such as mean values of both velocity components, angles of attack and the characteristic length scales were determined from both data sets. The analysis reveals a great agreement between both anemometers and thus confirms the new approach.

  16. 2D/3D Image Registration using Regression Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Frederick, Brandon; Mageras, Gig; Chang, Sha; Pizer, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In computer vision and image analysis, image registration between 2D projections and a 3D image that achieves high accuracy and near real-time computation is challenging. In this paper, we propose a novel method that can rapidly detect an object’s 3D rigid motion or deformation from a 2D projection image or a small set thereof. The method is called CLARET (Correction via Limited-Angle Residues in External Beam Therapy) and consists of two stages: registration preceded by shape space and regression learning. In the registration stage, linear operators are used to iteratively estimate the motion/deformation parameters based on the current intensity residue between the target projec-tion(s) and the digitally reconstructed radiograph(s) (DRRs) of the estimated 3D image. The method determines the linear operators via a two-step learning process. First, it builds a low-order parametric model of the image region’s motion/deformation shape space from its prior 3D images. Second, using learning-time samples produced from the 3D images, it formulates the relationships between the model parameters and the co-varying 2D projection intensity residues by multi-scale linear regressions. The calculated multi-scale regression matrices yield the coarse-to-fine linear operators used in estimating the model parameters from the 2D projection intensity residues in the registration. The method’s application to Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) requires only a few seconds and yields good results in localizing a tumor under rigid motion in the head and neck and under respiratory deformation in the lung, using one treatment-time imaging 2D projection or a small set thereof. PMID:24058278

  17. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  18. SpotLight Proteomics: uncovering the hidden blood proteome improves diagnostic power of proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Susanna L.; Zhang, Bo; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Aarsland, Dag; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2017-01-01

    The human blood proteome is frequently assessed by protein abundance profiling using a combination of liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In traditional sequence database search, many good-quality MS/MS data remain unassigned. Here we uncover the hidden part of the blood proteome via novel SpotLight approach. This method combines de novo MS/MS sequencing of enriched antibodies and co-extracted proteins with subsequent label-free quantification of new and known peptides in both enriched and unfractionated samples. In a pilot study on differentiating early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) from Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), on peptide level the hidden proteome contributed almost as much information to patient stratification as the apparent proteome. Intriguingly, many of the new peptide sequences are attributable to antibody variable regions, and are potentially indicative of disease etiology. When the hidden and apparent proteomes are combined, the accuracy of differentiating AD (n = 97) and DLB (n = 47) increased from ≈85% to ≈95%. The low added burden of SpotLight proteome analysis makes it attractive for use in clinical settings. PMID:28167817

  19. Comparative study of gel-based separated arcdischarge, HiPCO, and CoMoCAT carbon nanotubes for macroelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Hui; Zhang, Jialu; Liu, Bilu; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-03-01

    Due to their excellent electrical properties and compatibility with room-temperature deposition/printing processing, single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) hold great potential for macroelectronic applications. However, the relative advantages and disadvantages of various SWNTs for macroelectronics remains an open issue, despite the great significance. Here we report a systematic study of three kinds of mainstream SWNTs (arc-discharge, HiPCO, CoMoCAT) separated using gel-based column chromatography for thin-film transistor applications, and high performance transistors--which satisfy the requirements for transistors used in active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays--have been achieved. We observe a trade-off between transistor mobility and on/off ratio depending on the SWNT diameter. While arc-discharge SWNTs with larger diameters lead to high device mobility, HiPCO and CoMoCAT SWNTs with smaller diameters can provide high on/off ratios (>106) . Furthermore, we compare gel-based separated SWNTs with SWNTs separated by the density gradient ultracentrifuge (DGU) method, and find that gel-separated SWNTs can offer purity and thin-film transistor performance as good as DGU-separated SWNTs.

  20. In vitro assessment of a gel base containing 2% chlorhexidine as a sodium perborate's vehicle for intracoronal bleaching of discolored teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniel Pinto de; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Souza-Filho, Francisco José de; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess a gel base containing 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) as a vehicle to be mixed with sodium perborate for intracoronal bleaching of discolored teeth, comparing its bleaching efficacy to sodium perborate mixed with other vehicles; 37% carbamide peroxide and 30% hydrogen peroxide. There were 110 fresh bovine incisors artificially stained using whole blood. The samples were divided into 11 groups and the intracoronal bleaching was performed using the "walking bleach technique". The bleaching agents were replaced three times at 7-day intervals. Using digital photos and a shade guide created for bovine teeth, the samples were evaluated at day 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28. On evaluation day, the photos were examined by three endodontists giving scores from 1 to 5 based on the shade guide created. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskall-Wallis test. After 28 days, all evaluated teeth received scores that were statistically similar. Groups that used sodium perborate and a liquid vehicle bleached faster than those that used a gel based vehicle. The CHX gel allowed dissociation for the bleaching agent. The 2% CHX gel exhibited a good potential for use as a vehicle for sodium perborate or as a complement for carbamide peroxide.

  1. Consolidation of proteomics data in the Cancer Proteomics database.

    PubMed

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Boddie, Paul; Frick, Rahel; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by abnormal cell growth and one of the major reasons for human deaths. Proteins are involved in the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer, furthermore they are affected by anti-cancer drugs, and protein biomarkers can be used to diagnose certain cancer types. Therefore, it is important to explore the proteomics background of cancer. In this report, we developed the Cancer Proteomics database to re-interrogate published proteome studies investigating cancer. The database is divided in three sections related to cancer processes, cancer types, and anti-cancer drugs. Currently, the Cancer Proteomics database contains 9778 entries of 4118 proteins extracted from 143 scientific articles covering all three sections: cell death (cancer process), prostate cancer (cancer type) and platinum-based anti-cancer drugs including carboplatin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin (anti-cancer drugs). The detailed information extracted from the literature includes basic information about the articles (e.g., PubMed ID, authors, journal name, publication year), information about the samples (type, study/reference, prognosis factor), and the proteomics workflow (Subcellular fractionation, protein, and peptide separation, mass spectrometry, quantification). Useful annotations such as hyperlinks to UniProt and PubMed were included. In addition, many filtering options were established as well as export functions. The database is freely available at http://cancerproteomics.uio.no.

  2. Proteomic identification of salivary biomarkers of type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Paturi V; Reddy, Ashok P; Lu, Xinfang; Dasari, Surendra; Krishnaprasad, Adiraju; Biggs, Evan; Roberts, Charles T; Nagalla, Srinivasa R

    2009-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers to noninvasively detect prediabetes/diabetes will facilitate interventions designed to prevent or delay progression to frank diabetes and its attendant complications. The purpose of this study was to characterize the human salivary proteome in type-2 diabetes to identify potential biomarkers of diabetes. Whole saliva from control and type-2 diabetic individuals was characterized by multidimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS). Label-free quantification was used to identify differentially abundant protein biomarkers. Selected potential biomarkers were then independently validated in saliva from control, diabetic, and prediabetic subjects by Western immunoblotting and ELISA. Characterization of the salivary proteome identified a total of 487 unique proteins. Approximately 33% of these have not been previously reported in human saliva. Of these, 65 demonstrated a greater than 2-fold difference in abundance between control and type-2 diabetes samples. A majority of the differentially abundant proteins belong to pathways regulating metabolism and immune response. Independent validation of a subset of potential biomarkers utilizing immunodetection confirmed their differential expression in type-2 diabetes, and analysis of prediabetic samples demonstrated a trend of relative increase in their abundance with progression from the prediabetic to the diabetic state. This comprehensive proteomic analysis of the human salivary proteome in type-2 diabetes provides the first global view of potential mechanisms perturbed in diabetic saliva and their utility in detection and monitoring of diabetes. Further characterization of these markers in a larger cohort of subjects may provide the basis for new, noninvasive tests for diabetes screening, detection, and monitoring.

  3. A scanning-mode 2D shear wave imaging (s2D-SWI) system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Li, Yongchuan; Zhou, Juan; Yang, Ge; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Ge; Jin, Qiaofeng; Mu, Peitian; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound elastography is widely used for the non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) is a quantitative method for assessing tissue stiffness. SWI has been demonstrated to be less operator dependent than quasi-static elastography, and has the ability to acquire quantitative elasticity information in contrast with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire two dimensional (2D) quantitative images of the tissue elasticity distribution. This study proposes and evaluates a scanning-mode 2D SWI (s2D-SWI) system. The hardware and image processing algorithms are presented in detail. Programmable devices are used to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. An analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transformation based shear wave speed determination method are proposed, which can be implemented using parallel computation. Imaging of tissue mimicking phantoms, and in vitro, and in vivo imaging test are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The s2D-SWI system represents a new choice for the quantitative mapping of tissue elasticity, and has great potential for implementation in commercial ultrasound scanners.

  4. 2D-2D tunneling field-effect transistors using WSe2/SnSe2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tania; Tosun, Mahmut; Hettick, Mark; Ahn, Geun Ho; Hu, Chenming; Javey, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials present a versatile platform for developing steep transistors due to their uniform thickness and sharp band edges. We demonstrate 2D-2D tunneling in a WSe2/SnSe2 van der Waals vertical heterojunction device, where WSe2 is used as the gate controlled p-layer and SnSe2 is the degenerately n-type layer. The van der Waals gap facilitates the regulation of band alignment at the heterojunction, without the necessity of a tunneling barrier. ZrO2 is used as the gate dielectric, allowing the scaling of gate oxide to improve device subthreshold swing. Efficient gate control and clean interfaces yield a subthreshold swing of ˜100 mV/dec for >2 decades of drain current at room temperature, hitherto unobserved in 2D-2D tunneling devices. The subthreshold swing is independent of temperature, which is a clear signature of band-to-band tunneling at the heterojunction. A maximum switching ratio ION/IOFF of 107 is obtained. Negative differential resistance in the forward bias characteristics is observed at 77 K. This work bodes well for the possibilities of two-dimensional materials for the realization of energy-efficient future-generation electronics.

  5. The utilization of Triton X-100 for enhanced two-dimensional liquid-phase proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mina; Lee, Sang-Hee; Min, Jiho; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Um, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges in proteomics lies in obtaining a high level of reproducible fractionation of the protein samples. Automated two-dimensional liquid phase fractionation (PF2D) system manufactured by Beckman Coulter provides a process well suited for proteome studies. However, the protein recovery efficiency of such system is low when a protocol recommended by the manufacturer is used for metaproteome profiling of environmental sample. In search of an alternative method that can overcome existing limitations, this study replaced manufacturer's buffers with Triton X-100 during the PF2D evaluation of Escherichia coli K12. Three different Triton X-100 concentrations-0.1%, 0.15%, and 0.2%-were used for the first-dimension protein profiling. As the first-dimension result was at its best in the presence of 0.15% Triton X-100, second-dimension protein fractionation was performed using 0.15% Triton X-100 and the standard buffers. When 0.15% Triton X-100 was used, protein recovery increased as much as tenfold. The elution reliability of 0.15% Triton X-100 determined with ribonuclease A, insulin, α-lactalbumin, trypsin inhibitor, and cholecystokinin (CCK) affirmed Triton X-100 at 15% can outperform the standard buffers without having adverse effects on samples. This novel use of 0.15% Triton X-100 for PF2D can lead to greater research possibilities in the field of proteomics.

  6. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology.

    PubMed

    Baer, B; Millar, A H

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary ecologists are traditionally gene-focused, as genes propagate phenotypic traits across generations and mutations and recombination in the DNA generate genetic diversity required for evolutionary processes. As a consequence, the inheritance of changed DNA provides a molecular explanation for the functional changes associated with natural selection. A direct focus on proteins on the other hand, the actual molecular agents responsible for the expression of a phenotypic trait, receives far less interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This is partially due to the central dogma of molecular biology that appears to define proteins as the 'dead-end of molecular information flow' as well as technical limitations in identifying and studying proteins and their diversity in the field and in many of the more exotic genera often favored in ecological studies. Here we provide an overview of a newly forming field of research that we refer to as 'Evolutionary Proteomics'. We point out that the origins of cellular function are related to the properties of polypeptide and RNA and their interactions with the environment, rather than DNA descent, and that the critical role of horizontal gene transfer in evolution is more about coopting new proteins to impact cellular processes than it is about modifying gene function. Furthermore, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes generate a remarkable diversity of mature proteins from a single gene, and the properties of these mature proteins can also influence inheritance through genetic and perhaps epigenetic mechanisms. The influence of post-transcriptional diversification on evolutionary processes could provide a novel mechanistic underpinning for elements of rapid, directed evolutionary changes and adaptations as observed for a variety of evolutionary processes. Modern state-of the art technologies based on mass spectrometry are now available to identify and quantify peptides, proteins, protein

  7. Response to CYP2D6 substrate antidepressants is predicted by a CYP2D6 composite phenotype based on genotype and comedications with CYP2D6 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gressier, F; Verstuyft, C; Hardy, P; Becquemont, L; Corruble, E

    2015-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is involved in the metabolism of most antidepressants. Comedication with a potent CYP2D6 inhibitor can convert patients with extensive metabolizer (EM) or ultra-rapid metabolizer (UM) genotypes into poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes. Since comedication is frequent in depressed patients treated with antidepressants, we investigated the effect of the CYP2D6 composite phenotype on antidepressant efficacy, taking into account both the CYP2D6 genotype and comedication with CYP2D6 inhibitors. 87 Caucasian in patients with a major depressive episode were prospectively treated with flexible doses of antidepressant monotherapy as well as comedications and genotyped for the major CYP2D6 alleles (CYP2D6*3 rs35742686, *4 rs3892097, *5 del, *6 rs5030655, and *2xN). They were classified for CYP2D6 composite phenotype and assessed for antidepressant response after 4 weeks. In terms of genotypes (g), 6 subjects were UMg, 6 PMg, and 75 EMg. Ten patients were coprescribed a CYP2D6 inhibitor, resulting in the following composite phenotypes (cp): 5 UMcp, 16 PMcp, and 66 EMcp. Whereas none of the CYP2D6 genotypes were significantly associated with antidepressant response, UMcp had a lower antidepressant response than PMcp or EMcp (respectively: 39.0 ± 17.9, 50.0 ± 26.0, and 61.6 ± 23.4, p = 0.02). Despite small sample size, this study suggests that a CYP2D6 composite phenotype, taking into account both genotype and comedications with CYP2D6 inhibitors, could predict CYP2D6 substrate antidepressants response. Thus, to optimize antidepressant response, CYP2D6 genotype could be performed and comedications with CYP2D6 inhibitors should be avoided, when prescribing CYP2D6 substrate antidepressants.

  8. 2-D linear motion system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program requires buildings to be decontaminated, decommissioned, and surveyed for radiological contamination in an expeditious and cost-effective manner. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. D and D workers must perform duties high off the ground, requiring the use of manlifts or scaffolding, often, in radiologically or chemically contaminated areas or in areas with limited access. Survey and decontamination instruments that are used are sometimes heavy or awkward to use, particularly when the worker is operating from a manlift or scaffolding. Finding alternative methods of performing such work on manlifts or scaffolding is important. The 2-D Linear Motion System (2-D LMS), also known as the Wall Walker{trademark}, is designed to remotely position tools and instruments on walls for use in such activities as radiation surveys, decontamination, and painting. Traditional (baseline) methods for operating equipment for these tasks require workers to perform duties on elevated platforms, sometimes several meters above the ground surface and near potential sources of contamination. The Wall Walker 2-D LMS significantly improves health and safety conditions by facilitating remote operation of equipment. The Wall Walker 2-D LMS performed well in a demonstration of its precision, accuracy, maneuverability, payload capacity, and ease of use. Thus, this innovative technology is demonstrated to be a viable alternative to standard methods of performing work on large, high walls, especially those that have potential contamination concerns. The Wall Walker was used to perform a final release radiological survey on over 167 m{sup 2} of walls. In this application, surveying using a traditional (baseline) method that employs an aerial lift for manual access was 64% of the total cost of the improved technology

  9. Gold-standard performance for 2D hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, G. B.; MacVicar, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional, depth-averaged hydrodynamic (2D) models are emerging as an increasingly useful tool for environmental water resources engineering. One of the remaining technical hurdles to the wider adoption and acceptance of 2D modeling is the lack of standards for 2D model performance evaluation when the riverbed undulates, causing lateral flow divergence and convergence. The goal of this study was to establish a gold-standard that quantifies the upper limit of model performance for 2D models of undulating riverbeds when topography is perfectly known and surface roughness is well constrained. A review was conducted of published model performance metrics and the value ranges exhibited by models thus far for each one. Typically predicted velocity differs from observed by 20 to 30 % and the coefficient of determination between the two ranges from 0.5 to 0.8, though there tends to be a bias toward overpredicting low velocity and underpredicting high velocity. To establish a gold standard as to the best performance possible for a 2D model of an undulating bed, two straight, rectangular-walled flume experiments were done with no bed slope and only different bed undulations and water surface slopes. One flume tested model performance in the presence of a porous, homogenous gravel bed with a long flat section, then a linear slope down to a flat pool bottom, and then the same linear slope back up to the flat bed. The other flume had a PVC plastic solid bed with a long flat section followed by a sequence of five identical riffle-pool pairs in close proximity, so it tested model performance given frequent undulations. Detailed water surface elevation and velocity measurements were made for both flumes. Comparing predicted versus observed velocity magnitude for 3 discharges with the gravel-bed flume and 1 discharge for the PVC-bed flume, the coefficient of determination ranged from 0.952 to 0.987 and the slope for the regression line was 0.957 to 1.02. Unsigned velocity

  10. Dairy products and the Maillard reaction: A promising future for extensive food characterization by integrated proteomics studies.

    PubMed

    Arena, Simona; Renzone, Giovanni; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea

    2017-03-15

    Heating of milk and dairy products is done using various technological processes with the aim of preserving microbiological safety and extending shelf-life. These treatments result in chemical modifications in milk proteins, mainly generated as a result of the Maillard reaction. Recently, different bottom-up proteomic methods have been applied to characterize the nature of these structural changes and the modified amino acids in model protein systems and/or isolated components from thermally-treated milk samples. On the other hand, different gel-based and shotgun proteomic methods have been utilized to assign glycation, oxidation and glycoxidation protein targets in diverse heated milks. These data are essential to rationalize eventual, different nutritional, antimicrobial, cell stimulative and antigenic properties of milk products, because humans ingest large quantities of corresponding thermally modified proteins on a daily basis and these molecules also occur in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. This review provides an updated picture of the procedures developed for the proteomic characterization of variably-heated milk products, highlighting their limits as result of concomitant factors, such as the multiplicity and the different concentration of the compounds to be detected.

  11. Instantons in 2D U(1) Higgs model and 2D CP(N-1) sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yaogang

    2007-12-01

    In this thesis I present the results of a study of the topological structures of 2D U(1) Higgs model and 2D CP N-1 sigma models. Both models have been studied using the overlap Dirac operator construction of topological charge density. The overlap operator provides a more incisive probe into the local topological structure of gauge field configurations than the traditional plaquette-based operator. In the 2D U(1) Higgs model, we show that classical instantons with finite sizes violate the negativity of topological charge correlator by giving a positive contribution to the correlator at non-zero separation. We argue that instantons in 2D U(1) Higgs model must be accompanied by large quantum fluctuations in order to solve this contradiction. In 2D CPN-1 sigma models, we observe the anomalous scaling behavior of the topological susceptibility chi t for N ≤ 3. The divergence of chi t in these models is traced to the presence of small instantons with a radius of order a (= lattice spacing), which are directly observed on the lattice. The observation of these small instantons provides detailed confirmation of Luscher's argument that such short-distance excitations, with quantized topological charge, should be the dominant topological fluctuations in CP1 and CP 2, leading to a divergent topological susceptibility in the continuum limit. For the CPN-1 models with N > 3 the topological susceptibility is observed to scale properly with the mass gap. Another topic presented in this thesis is an implementation of the Zolotarev optimal rational approximation for the overlap Dirac operator. This new implementation has reduced the time complexity of the overlap routine from O(N3 ) to O(N), where N is the total number of sites on the lattice. This opens up a door to more accurate lattice measurements in the future.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Involved in Peel Senescence in Harvested Mandarin Fruit.

    PubMed

    Li, Taotao; Zhang, Jingying; Zhu, Hong; Qu, Hongxia; You, Shulin; Duan, Xuewu; Jiang, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Mandarin (Citrus reticulata), a non-climacteric fruit, is an economically important fruit worldwide. The mechanism underlying senescence of non-climacteric fruit is poorly understood. In this study, a gel-based proteomic study followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis was carried out to investigate the proteomic changes involved in peel senescence in harvested mandarin "Shatangju" fruit stored for 18 days. Over the course of the storage period, the fruit gradually senesced, accompanied by a decreased respiration rate and increased chlorophyll degradation and disruption of membrane integrity. Sixty-three proteins spots that showed significant differences in abundance were identified. The up-regulated proteins were mainly associated with cell wall degradation, lipid degradation, protein degradation, senescence-related transcription factors, and transcription-related proteins. In contrast, most proteins associated with ATP synthesis and scavenging of reactive oxygen species were significantly down-regulated during peel senescence. Three thioredoxin proteins and three Ca(2+) signaling-related proteins were significantly up-regulated during peel senescence. It is suggested that mandarin peel senescence is associated with energy supply efficiency, decreased antioxidant capability, and increased protein and lipid degradation. In addition, activation of Ca(2+) signaling and transcription factors might be involved in cell wall degradation and primary or secondary metabolism.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Early-Responsive Redox-Sensitive Proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of protein function through oxidative modification has emerged as an important molecular mechanism modulating various biological processes. Here, we report a proteomic study of redox-sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis cells subjected to H2O2 treatment. Four gel-based approaches were employed, leading to the identification of four partially overlapping sets of proteins whose thiols underwent oxidative modification in the H2O2-treated cells. Using a method based on differential labeling of thiols followed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, five of the six selected putative redox-sensitive proteins were confirmed to undergo oxidative modification following the oxidant treatment in Arabidopsis leaves. Another method, which is based on differential labeling of thiols coupled with protein electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was adopted to reveal that one of the H2O2-sensitive proteins, a homologue of cytokine-induced apoptosis inhibitor 1 (AtCIAPIN1), also underwent oxidative modification in Arabidopsis leaves after treatments with salicylic acid or the peptide elicitor flg22, two inducers of defense signaling. The redox-sensitive proteins identified from the proteomic study are involved in various biological processes such as metabolism, the antioxidant system, protein biosynthesis and processing, and cytoskeleton organization. The identification of novel redox-sensitive proteins will be helpful toward understanding of cellular components or pathways previously unknown to be redox-regulated. PMID:22050424

  14. Proteomic analysis for tissues and liquid from bonghan ducts on rabbit intestinal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jae; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Nam, Chang Hoon; Lee, Won-Chul; Jhang, Seong-Uk; Park, Hyung Soon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2008-12-01

    Research on the Bonghan system has recently prompted great interest in the theory proposed by Bong Han Kimin in the early 1960s. In order to study the biochemical characteristics of the Bonghan system, we analyzed Bonghan ducts (BHD) on the surface of rabbit intestines and characterized the liquid in the BHD at the level of the proteome. Proteomic analysis was performed using nano LC-ESI MS/MS. Using a solution digestion technique, we identified 70 different proteins in the liquid of the BHD. We used gel-based digestion to analyze the BHD itself and our results showed the presence of 207 proteins. We used these proteins to analyze gene ontology (GO) to yield insights into biological processes, molecular functions and cellular compartmentalization. Remarkably, GO clustering showed high concentrations of proteins involved in metabolism. These proteins are not usually found in blood, lymph or blood vessels, and thus can be useful for characterizing BHD. It is worth studying their association with stem cells, especially mesenchymal stem cells, cancer cells and myeloid cells.

  15. Compositional and Proteomic Analyses of Genetically Modified Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) Harboring an Agrobacterial Gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mao-Sen; Ko, Miau-Hwa; Li, Hui-Chun; Tsai, Shwu-Jene; Lai, Ying-Mi; Chang, You-Ming; Wu, Min-Tze; Chen, Long-Fang O.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed improved shelf life for agrobacterial isopentenyltransferase (ipt) transgenic broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), with yield comparable to commercial varieties, because of the protection mechanism offered by molecular chaperones and stress-related proteins. Here, we used proximate analysis to examine macronutrients, chemical and mineral constituents as well as anti-nutrient and protein changes of ipt-transgenic broccoli and corresponding controls. We also preliminarily assessed safety in mice. Most aspects were comparable between ipt-transgenic broccoli and controls, except for a significant increase in carbohydrate level and a decrease in magnesium content in ipt-transgenic lines 101, 102 and 103, as compared with non-transgenic controls. In addition, the anti-nutrient glucosinolate content was increased and crude fat content decreased in inbred control 104 and transgenic lines as compared with the parental control, “Green King”. Gel-based proteomics detected more than 50 protein spots specifically found in ipt-transgenic broccoli at harvest and after cooking; one-third of these proteins showed homology to potential allergens that also play an important role in plant defense against stresses and senescence. Mice fed levels of ipt-transgenic broccoli mimicking the 120 g/day of broccoli eaten by a 60-kg human adult showed normal growth and immune function. In conclusion, the compositional and proteomic changes attributed to the transgenic ipt gene did not affect the growth and immune response of mice under the feeding regimes examined. PMID:25170807

  16. Compositional and proteomic analyses of genetically modified broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) harboring an agrobacterial gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao-Sen; Ko, Miau-Hwa; Li, Hui-Chun; Tsai, Shwu-Jene; Lai, Ying-Mi; Chang, You-Ming; Wu, Min-Tze; Chen, Long-Fang O

    2014-08-28

    Previously, we showed improved shelf life for agrobacterial isopentenyltransferase (ipt) transgenic broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), with yield comparable to commercial varieties, because of the protection mechanism offered by molecular chaperones and stress-related proteins. Here, we used proximate analysis to examine macronutrients, chemical and mineral constituents as well as anti-nutrient and protein changes of ipt-transgenic broccoli and corresponding controls. We also preliminarily assessed safety in mice. Most aspects were comparable between ipt-transgenic broccoli and controls, except for a significant increase in carbohydrate level and a decrease in magnesium content in ipt-transgenic lines 101, 102 and 103, as compared with non-transgenic controls. In addition, the anti-nutrient glucosinolate content was increased and crude fat content decreased in inbred control 104 and transgenic lines as compared with the parental control, "Green King". Gel-based proteomics detected more than 50 protein spots specifically found in ipt-transgenic broccoli at harvest and after cooking; one-third of these proteins showed homology to potential allergens that also play an important role in plant defense against stresses and senescence. Mice fed levels of ipt-transgenic broccoli mimicking the 120 g/day of broccoli eaten by a 60-kg human adult showed normal growth and immune function. In conclusion, the compositional and proteomic changes attributed to the transgenic ipt gene did not affect the growth and immune response of mice under the feeding regimes examined.

  17. Proteomic characterization of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica-a protein resource for neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Darnhofer, Barbara; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Monje, Francisco J; Lubec, Gert

    2012-08-01

    Aplysia californica (AC) is a widely used model for testing learning and memory. Although ESTs have been generated, proteomics studies on AC proteins are limited. Studies at the protein level, however, are mandatory, not only due to the fact that studies at the nucleic acid level are not allowing conclusions about PTMs. A gel-based proteomics method was therefore applied to carry out protein profiling in abdominal ganglia from AC. Abdominal ganglia were extirpated, proteins extracted and run on 2DE with subsequent in-gel digestion with trypsin, chymotrypsin, and partially by subtilisin. Peptides were identified using a nano-LC-ESI-LTQ-FT-mass spectrometer. MS/MS data were analyzed by searching the NCBI nonredundant public AC EST database and the NCBI nonredundant public AC protein database. A total of 477 different proteins represented by 363 protein spots were detected and were assigned to different protein pathways as for instance signaling (receptors, protein kinases, and phosphatases), metabolism, protein synthesis, handling and degradation, cytoskeleton and structural, oxido-redox, heat shock and chaperone, hypothetical, predicted and unnamed proteins. The generation of a protein map of soluble proteins shows the existence of so far hypothetical and predicted proteins and is allowing and challenging further work at the protein level, in particular in the field of neuroscience.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Involved in Peel Senescence in Harvested Mandarin Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Taotao; Zhang, Jingying; Zhu, Hong; Qu, Hongxia; You, Shulin; Duan, Xuewu; Jiang, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Mandarin (Citrus reticulata), a non-climacteric fruit, is an economically important fruit worldwide. The mechanism underlying senescence of non-climacteric fruit is poorly understood. In this study, a gel-based proteomic study followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis was carried out to investigate the proteomic changes involved in peel senescence in harvested mandarin “Shatangju” fruit stored for 18 days. Over the course of the storage period, the fruit gradually senesced, accompanied by a decreased respiration rate and increased chlorophyll degradation and disruption of membrane integrity. Sixty-three proteins spots that showed significant differences in abundance were identified. The up-regulated proteins were mainly associated with cell wall degradation, lipid degradation, protein degradation, senescence-related transcription factors, and transcription-related proteins. In contrast, most proteins associated with ATP synthesis and scavenging of reactive oxygen species were significantly down-regulated during peel senescence. Three thioredoxin proteins and three Ca2+ signaling-related proteins were significantly up-regulated during peel senescence. It is suggested that mandarin peel senescence is associated with energy supply efficiency, decreased antioxidant capability, and increased protein and lipid degradation. In addition, activation of Ca2+ signaling and transcription factors might be involved in cell wall degradation and primary or secondary metabolism. PMID:27303420

  19. Changes in the cellular proteins of A549 infected with Hepatitis E virus by proteomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our understanding of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has changed enormously over the past 30 years, from a waterborne infection causing outbreaks of acute hepatitis in developing countries to an infection of global distribution causing a range of hepatic and extra-hepatic illness. However, the key proteins playing important parts in the virus infection were still unknown. Understanding the changes of cellular proteins in these cells exposed to HEV is helpful for elucidating molecular mechanisms associated with function alterations of HEV-infected susceptible cells. In the present study, a comparative gel-based proteomic analysis was employed to study the changes in cellular proteins of A549 exposed to HEV in vitro to provide novel information for understanding the functional alterations of A549 induced by HEV infection. Result Of 2 585-3 152 protein spots visualized on each gel using silver staining, a total of 31 protein spots were found to be differentially expressed in HEV-infected A549 cells compared with mock-infected A549, including 10 significantly up-regulated protein spots and 21 significantly down-regulated protein spots. Conclusion Our work is the first time regarding the proteomic analysis on the cellular responses to HEV infection. This work is helpful for investigating the molecular basis associated with the interaction between HEV and the host cells although more efforts should be required to discover the mechanisms. PMID:25175408

  20. The intestinal proteome of diabetic and control children is enriched with different microbial and host proteins.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Elsa; Anselmo, Marisol; Calha, Manuela; Bottrill, Andrew; Duarte, Isabel; Andrew, Peter W; Faleiro, Maria L

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the intestinal microbial proteome of children with established type 1 diabetes (T1D) was compared with the proteome of healthy children (Control) with the aim to identify differences in the activity of the intestinal microbiota that not only will contribute to a deeper knowledge of the functionality of the gut in these children but also may provide new approaches to improve the control of the disease. Faecal protein extracts collected from three T1D children (aged 9.3±0.6 years) and three Control children (aged 9.3±1.5 years) were analysed using a combination of 2D gel electrophoresis and spectral counting. The results evidenced markedly differences between the intestinal proteome of T1D children and the Control. The T1D microbial intestinal proteome was enriched with proteins of clostridial cluster XVa and cluster IV and Bacteroides. In contrast, the Control proteome was enriched with bifidobacterial proteins. In both groups, proteins with moonlight function were observed. Human proteins also distinguished the two groups with T1D children depleted in exocrine pancreatic enzymes.

  1. Soil solid phases effects on the proteomic analysis of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34

    SciTech Connect

    Giagnoni L.; Taghavi S.; Magherini, F.; Landi, L.; van der Lelie, D.; Puglia, M.; Bianchi, L.; Bini, L.; Nannipieri, P.; Renella, G.; Modesti, A.

    2012-05-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is a completely sequenced soil-borne beta-proteobacterium with known genome and proteome. Comparative 2-D electrophoresis and protein mass spectrometry were used to compare the proteome of C. metallidurans CH34 from liquid culture and after incubation for 1, 3, and 12 days in microcosms containing quartz sand, kaolinite, montmorillonite, or an artificial soil. Results showed that proteome from liquid culture was similar to CH34 proteins extracted from sand and kaolinite, whereas the proteins extracted from artificial soil differed significantly and no proteins were detected from C. metallidurans CH34 incubated in the montmorillonite microcosms. Protein recovery decreased on prolonging incubation time in all microcosms. Mass spectrometry identification showed that the trend of lower recovery upon incubation time was independent on the putative function of protein. These results suggest that the soil solid phase influences the protein recovery and soil proteomic analysis and that distinction between protein recovery and protein expression in soil will be a challenging for soil proteomic researchers.

  2. Salivary proteomics in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xijun

    2013-01-16

    Proteins that are important indicators of physiological or pathological states, can provide information for the identification of early and differential markers for disease. Saliva, contains an abundance of proteins, offers an easy, inexpensive, safe, and non-invasive approach for disease detection, and possesses a high potential to revolutionize the diagnostics. Discovery of salivary biomarkers could be used to scrutinize health and disease surveillance. The impact of human saliva proteome analysis in the search for clinically relevant disease biomarkers will be realized through advances made using proteomic technologies. The advancements of emerging proteomic techniques have benefited biomarker research to the point where saliva is now recognized as an excellent diagnostic medium for the detection of disease. This review presents an overview of the value of saliva as a credible diagnostic tool and we aim to summarize the proteomic technologies currently used for global analysis of saliva proteins and to elaborate on the application of saliva proteomics to the discovery of disease biomarkers, and discuss some of the critical challenges and perspectives in this field.

  3. Perfluorooctanoic Acid for Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Chandra Sekhar Rao; Tomechko, Sara E.; Miyagi, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Here, we describe the novel use of a volatile surfactant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), for shotgun proteomics. PFOA was found to solubilize membrane proteins as effectively as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). PFOA concentrations up to 0.5% (w/v) did not significantly inhibit trypsin activity. The unique features of PFOA allowed us to develop a single-tube shotgun proteomics method that used all volatile chemicals that could easily be removed by evaporation prior to mass spectrometry analysis. The experimental procedures involved: 1) extraction of proteins in 2% PFOA; 2) reduction of cystine residues with triethyl phosphine and their S-alkylation with iodoethanol; 3) trypsin digestion of proteins in 0.5% PFOA; 4) removal of PFOA by evaporation; and 5) LC-MS/MS analysis of the resulting peptides. The general applicability of the method was demonstrated with the membrane preparation of photoreceptor outer segments. We identified 75 proteins from 1 µg of the tryptic peptides in a single, 1-hour, LC-MS/MS run. About 67% of the proteins identified were classified as membrane proteins. We also demonstrate that a proteolytic 18O labeling procedure can be incorporated after the PFOA removal step for quantitative proteomic experiments. The present method does not require sample clean-up devices such as solid-phase extractions and membrane filters, so no proteins/peptides are lost in any experimental steps. Thus, this single-tube shotgun proteomics method overcomes the major drawbacks of surfactant use in proteomic experiments. PMID:21209883

  4. [Proteomics: biomarker research in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Hünnerkopf, R; Grassl, J; Thome, J

    2007-10-01

    Over the last decade, genomics research in psychiatry and neuroscience has provided important insights into genes expressed under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Contrary to the great expectations regarding a clinical use of these datasets, genomics failed to improve markedly the diagnostic and therapeutic options in brain disorders. Due to alternative splicing and posttranslational modifications, one single gene determines a multitude of gene products. Therefore, in order to understand molecular processes in neuropsychiatric disorders, it is necessary to unravel signal transduction pathways and complex interaction networks on the level of proteins, not only DNA and mRNA. Proteomics utilises high-throughput mass spectrometric protein identification that can reveal protein expression levels, posttranslational modifications and protein-protein interactions. Proteomic tools have the power to identify quantitative and qualitative protein patterns in postmortem brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or serum, thus increasing the knowledge about etiology and pathomechanisms of brain diseases. Comparing protein profiles in healthy and disease states provides an opportunity to establish specific diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, proteomic studies of the effects of medication - in vitro and in vivo - might help to design specific pharmaceutical agents with fewer side effects. In this overview, we present the most widely used proteomic techniques and illustrate the potential and limitations of this field of research. Furthermore, we provide insight into the contributions of proteomics to the study of psychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, drug addiction, schizophrenia and depression.

  5. Proteomics of saliva: personal experience.

    PubMed

    Scarano, E; Fiorita, A; Picciotti, P M; Passali, G C; Calò, L; Cabras, T; Inzitari, R; Fanali, C; Messana, I; Castagnola, M; Paludetti, G

    2010-06-01

    The salivary proteome is a complex protein mixture resulting from the activity of salivary glands with the contribution of other components that form the oral environment such as oral tissues and micro-organisms. For diagnosis purposes, saliva collection has the great advantage of being an easy and non-invasive technique. Human saliva proteomics have proven to be a novel approach in the search for protein biomarkers for detection of different local and systemic diseases. Currently, more than 1400 salivary proteins have been identified. In the last few years, our research group has extensively studied the salivary proteomics in order to analyse the salivary composition, investigating the major families of proteins present in human and mammalian saliva, the post-translational modifications, the different contributions of glands, the physiological and pathological modifications of saliva. The aim of this report is to present our personal experience in salivary proteomics. In conclusion, salivary proteome analysis represents an important field both for diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases and could be considered a novel approach to prevention of various pathological conditions.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds promise for the treatment of damaged and diseased tissues, especially for those tissues that do not undergo repair and regeneration readily in situ. Many techniques are available for cell and tissue culturing and differentiation of chondrocytes using a variety of cell types, differentiation methods, and scaffolds. In each case, it is critical to demonstrate the cellular phenotype and tissue composition, with particular attention to the extracellular matrix molecules that play a structural role and that contribute to the mechanical properties of the resulting tissue construct. Mass spectrometry provides an ideal analytical method with which to characterize the full spectrum of proteins produced by tissue-engineered cartilage. Using normal cartilage tissue as a standard, tissue-engineered cartilage can be optimized according to the entire proteome. Proteomic analysis is a complementary approach to biochemical, immunohistochemical, and mechanical testing of cartilage constructs. Proteomics is applicable as an analysis approach to most cartilage constructs generated from a variety of cellular sources including primary chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, proteomics can be used to optimize novel scaffolds and bioreactor applications, yielding cartilage tissue with the proteomic profile of natural cartilage.

  7. Optimizing sparse sampling for 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeding, Sebastian; Klimovich, Nikita; Brixner, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    We present a new data acquisition concept using optimized non-uniform sampling and compressed sensing reconstruction in order to substantially decrease the acquisition times in action-based multidimensional electronic spectroscopy. For this we acquire a regularly sampled reference data set at a fixed population time and use a genetic algorithm to optimize a reduced non-uniform sampling pattern. We then apply the optimal sampling for data acquisition at all other population times. Furthermore, we show how to transform two-dimensional (2D) spectra into a joint 4D time-frequency von Neumann representation. This leads to increased sparsity compared to the Fourier domain and to improved reconstruction. We demonstrate this approach by recovering transient dynamics in the 2D spectrum of a cresyl violet sample using just 25% of the originally sampled data points.

  8. D2-D1 phase transition of columnar liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. F.; Swift, J.

    1986-04-01

    The D2-D1 phase transition in columnar liquid crystals of the HAT series [e.g., HAT11 (triphenelene hexa-n-dodecanoate)] is discussed within the framework of Landau theory. The order parameters which describe the transition are abstracted from a tensor density function, and are associated with two irreducible representations of the symmetry group of the high-temperature D2 phase. A mechanism for a first-order transition is then suggested in accordance with both theoretical considerations and the experimental result for the D2-D1 transition. Two possible arrangements of the herringbone structure of the D1 phase are obtained, each of which gives six orientational states in the low-temperature D1 phase.

  9. Extreme Growth of Enstrophy on 2D Bounded Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protas, Bartosz; Sliwiak, Adam

    2016-11-01

    We study the vortex states responsible for the largest instantaneous growth of enstrophy possible in viscous incompressible flow on 2D bounded domain. The goal is to compare these results with estimates obtained using mathematical analysis. This problem is closely related to analogous questions recently considered in the periodic setting on 1D, 2D and 3D domains. In addition to systematically characterizing the most extreme behavior, these problems are also closely related to the open question of the finite-time singularity formation in the 3D Navier-Stokes system. We demonstrate how such extreme vortex states can be found as solutions of constrained variational optimization problems which in the limit of small enstrophy reduce to eigenvalue problems. Computational results will be presented for circular and square domains emphasizing the effect of geometric singularities (corners of the domain) on the structure of the extreme vortex states. Supported by an NSERC (Canada) Discovery Grant.

  10. Strength design with 2-d triaxial braid textile composites

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.V.; Swanson, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    Textile preforms are currently being considered as a possible means for reducing the cost of advanced fiber composites. This paper presents a methodology for strength design of carbon/epoxy 2-d braid fiber composites under general conditions of biaxial stress loading. A comprehensive investigation into the in-plane strength properties of 2-d braids has been carried out, using tubular specimens of AS4/1895 carbon fiber/epoxy made with the RTM process. The biaxial loadings involved both compression-compression and tension-tension biaxial tests. The results showed that failure under biaxial loading could be based on procedures similar to those developed for laminates, using critical strain values in the axial and braid direction fibers, but with degraded strength properties because of the undulating nature of -the fiber paths. A significant loss of strength was observed in the braid directions.

  11. Band-structure engineering in conjugated 2D polymers.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico

    2016-10-26

    Conjugated polymers find widespread application in (opto)electronic devices, sensing, and as catalysts. Their common one-dimensional structure can be extended into the second dimension to create conjugated planar sheets of covalently linked molecules. Extending π-conjugation into the second dimension unlocks a new class of semiconductive polymers which as a consequence of their unique electronic properties can find usability in numerous applications. In this article the theoretical band structures of a set of conjugated 2D polymers are compared and information on the important characteristics band gap and valence/conduction band dispersion is extracted. The great variance in these characteristics within the investigated set suggests 2D polymers as exciting materials in which band-structure engineering can be used to tailor sheet-like organic materials with desired electronic properties.

  12. Enhanced automated platform for 2D characterization of RFID communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuza, Dan Tudor; Vlǎdescu, Marian

    2016-12-01

    The characterization of the quality of communication between an RFID reader and a transponder at all expected positions of the latter on the reader antenna is of primal importance for the evaluation of performance of an RFID system. Continuing the line of instruments developed for this purpose by the authors, the present work proposes an enhanced version of a previously introduced automated platform for 2D evaluation. By featuring higher performance in terms of mechanical speed, the new version allows to obtain 2D maps of communication with a higher resolution that would have been prohibitive in terms of test duration with the previous version. The list of measurement procedures that can be executed with the platform is now enlarged with additional ones, such as the determination of the variation of the magnetic coupling between transponder and antenna across the antenna surface and the utilization of transponder simulators for evaluation of the quality of communication.

  13. Transition to chaos in an open unforced 2D flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.; Vastano, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The present numerical study of unsteady, low Reynolds number flow past a 2D airfoil attempts to ascertain the bifurcation sequence leading from simple periodic to complex aperiodic flow with rising Reynolds number, as well as to characterize the degree of chaos present in the aperiodic flow and assess the role of numerics in the modification and control of the observed bifurcation scenario. The ARC2D Navier-Stokes code is used in an unsteady time-accurate mode for most of these computations. The system undergoes a period-doubling bifurcation to chaos as the Reynolds number is increased from 800 to 1600; its chaotic attractors are characterized by estimates of the fractal dimension and partial Liapunov exponent spectra.

  14. Hard and Soft Physics with 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEuen, Paul

    With their remarkable structural, thermal, mechanical, optical, chemical, and electronic properties, 2D materials are truly special. For example, a graphene sheet can be made into a high-performance transistor, but it is also the ultimate realization of a thin mechanical sheet. Such sheets, first studied in detail by August Föppl over a hundred years ago, are notoriously complex, since they can bend, buckle, and crumple in a variety of ways. In this talk, I will discuss a number of experiments to probe these unusual materials, from the effects of ripples on the mechanical properties of a graphene sheet, to folding with atomically thin bimorphs, to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene solitons. Finally, I discuss how the Japanese paper art of kirigami (kiru = `to cut', kami = `paper') applied to 2D materials offers a route to mechanical metamaterials and the construction of nanoscale machines.

  15. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  16. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zohar, Y. C.; Yochelis, S.; Dahmen, K. A.; Jung, G.; Paltiel, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments. PMID:23677142

  17. FPCAS2D user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    1994-01-01

    The FPCAS2D computer code has been developed for aeroelastic stability analysis of bladed disks such as those in fans, compressors, turbines, propellers, or propfans. The aerodynamic analysis used in this code is based on the unsteady two-dimensional full potential equation which is solved for a cascade of blades. The structural analysis is based on a two degree-of-freedom rigid typical section model for each blade. Detailed explanations of the aerodynamic analysis, the numerical algorithms, and the aeroelastic analysis are not given in this report. This guide can be used to assist in the preparation of the input data required by the FPCAS2D code. A complete description of the input data is provided in this report. In addition, four test cases, including inputs and outputs, are provided.

  18. Structural Complexity and Phonon Physics in 2D Arsenenes.

    PubMed

    Carrete, Jesús; Gallego, Luis J; Mingo, Natalio

    2017-03-15

    In the quest for stable 2D arsenic phases, four different structures have been recently claimed to be stable. We show that, due to phonon contributions, the relative stability of those structures differs from previous reports and depends crucially on temperature. We also show that one of those four phases is in fact mechanically unstable. Furthermore, our results challenge the common assumption of an inverse correlation between structural complexity and thermal conductivity. Instead, a richer picture emerges from our results, showing how harmonic interactions, anharmonicity, and symmetries all play a role in modulating thermal conduction in arsenenes. More generally, our conclusions highlight how vibrational properties are an essential element to be carefully taken into account in theoretical searches for new 2D materials.

  19. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Y C; Yochelis, S; Dahmen, K A; Jung, G; Paltiel, Y

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments.

  20. Micro-structural Fluctuations in 2D Dusty Plasma Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    I Lin; Huang, Y.-H.; Teng, L.-W.

    2007-07-13

    We address structural fluctuations in a cold 2D dusty plasma liquid which is self-organized through the strong Coulomb coupling of the negatively charged micro-meter sized dust particles suspending in weakly ionized discharges. The 2D liquids consist of triangular type ordered domains surrounded by defect clusters, which can be reorganized through avalanche type hopping under the interplay of strong Coulomb coupling and thermal fluctuations. The spatio-temporal evolutions of the local bond-orientational order are directly tracked through digital optical microscopy. The power law scaling of the temporal persistence length of fluctuations is obtained for the cold liquid. The measurement of the conditional probability of the persistence lengths of the successive fluctuating cycles suggests certain types of the persistence length combinations are more preferred. The memory of persistence lasts a few fluctuating cycles.

  1. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  2. High-throughput proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesley, Scott A.; Nasoff, Marc; Kreusch, Andreas; Spraggon, Glen

    2001-04-01

    Proteomics has become a major focus as researchers attempt to understand the vast amount of genomic information. Protein complexity makes identifying and understanding gene function inherently difficult. The challenge of studying proteins in a global way is driving the development of new technologies for systematic and comprehensive analysis of protein structure and function. We are addressing this challenge through instrumentation and approaches to rapidly express, purify, crystallize, and mutate large numbers of human gene products. Our approach applies the principles of HTS technologies commonly used in pharmaceutical development. Genes are cloned, expressed, and purified in parallel to achieve a throughput potential of hundreds per day. Our instrumentation allows us to produce tens of milligrams of protein from 96 separate clones simultaneously. Purified protein is used for several applications including a high-throughput crystallographic screening approach for structure determination using automated image analysis. To further understand protein function, we are integrating a mutagenesis and screening approach. By combining these key technologies, we hope to provide a fundamental basis for understanding gene function at the protein level.

  3. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Baptiste; Gillet, Laurent; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections. PMID:26907323

  4. Proteome of Hydra Nematocyst*

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Prakash G.; Beckmann, Anna; Warnken, Uwe; Schnölzer, Martina; Schüler, Andreas; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Holstein, Thomas W.; Özbek, Suat

    2012-01-01

    Stinging cells or nematocytes of jellyfish and other cnidarians represent one of the most poisonous and sophisticated cellular inventions in animal evolution. This ancient cell type is unique in containing a giant secretory vesicle derived from the Golgi apparatus. The organelle structure within the vesicle comprises an elastically stretched capsule (nematocyst) to which a long tubule is attached. During exocytosis, the barbed part of the tubule is accelerated with >5 million g in <700 ns, enabling a harpoon-like discharge (Nüchter, T., Benoit, M., Engel, U., Ozbek, S., and Holstein, T. W. (2006) Curr. Biol. 16, R316–R318). Hitherto, the molecular components responsible for the organelle's biomechanical properties were largely unknown. Here, we describe the proteome of nematocysts from the freshwater polyp Hydra magnipapillata. Our analysis revealed an unexpectedly complex secretome of 410 proteins with venomous and lytic but also adhesive or fibrous properties. In particular, the insoluble fraction of the nematocyst represents a functional extracellular matrix structure of collagenous and elastic nature. This finding suggests an evolutionary scenario in which exocytic vesicles harboring a venomous secretome assembled a sophisticated predatory structure from extracellular matrix motif proteins. PMID:22291027

  5. Absolute state-selected total cross sections for the ion-molecule reactions O + (4S,2D,2P)+H2(D2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Huang, Y.-L.; Flesch, G. D.; Ng, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Absolute total cross sections for the state-selected reactions of O+(4S,2D,2P)+H2 (D2) have been measured in the center-of-mass collision energy (Ec.m.) range of 0.02-12 eV. The cross sections for OH+ (OD+) from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) are slightly higher than those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2), whereas the OH+ (OD+) cross sections from O+ (2P)+H2 (D2) are ≈40% lower than those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2) and O+ (2D)+H2 (D2). At Ec.m.<0.5 eV, the total cross sections for OH+ (OD+) from O+ (4S)+H2 (D2) and O+(2D)+H2 (D2) are in accord with those predicted by the Langevin-Gioumousis-Stevenson model. Significantly higher cross sections are observed for H+ (D+) and H2+ (D2+) from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) and O+(2P)+H2 (D2), as compared to those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2). The exothermic nature of the O+(2D,2P)+H2 (D2) charge transfer collisions accounts for the high cross sections observed for H2+ (D2+). While the H+ (D+) ions observed in the O+(4S)+H2 (D2) reaction are identified with the H+ (D+)+O+H channel, the H+ (D+) ions from the reactions involving O+(2D) and O+(2P) are associated mostly with the H+ (D+)+OH (OD) channel, the formation of which obeys the spin-conservation rule. The comparison of the sum (σT) of cross sections for OH+ (OD+), H2+ (D2+), and H+ (D+) from O+(4S)+H2 (D2) to those from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) and O+(2P)+H2 (D2) shows that the σTs for O+(4S)+H2 (D2), O+(2D)+H2 (D2), and O+(2P)+H2 (D2) at Ec.m.<0.5 eV are comparable. At Ec.m.>0.5 eV, the σTs for O+(2P)+H2 (D2) are greater than those for O+(2D)+H2 (D2), which in turn are greater than those for O+(4S)+H2 (D2). This observation is attributed to the increase in the number of accessible product channels for reactions involving the excited O+(2D) and O+(2P) reactant ions.

  6. Honeybee (Apis mellifera ligustica) drone embryo proteomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianke; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Lan; Begna, Desalegn

    2011-03-01

    Little attention has been paid to the drone honeybee (Apis mellifera ligustica) which is a haploid individual carrying only the set of alleles that it inherits from its mother. Molecular mechanisms underlying drone embryogenesis are poorly understood. This study evaluated protein expression profiles of drone embryogenesis at embryonic ages of 24, 48 and 72h. More than 100 reproducible proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry on 2D electrophoresis gels. Sixty-two proteins were significantly changed at the selected three experimental age points. Expression of the metabolic energy requirement-related protein peaked at the embryonic age of 48h, whereas development and metabolizing amino acid-related proteins expressed optimally at 72h. Cytoskeleton, protein folding and antioxidant-related proteins were highly expressed at 48 and 72h. Protein networks of the identified proteins were constructed and protein expressions were validated at the transcription level. This first proteomic study of drone embryogenesis in the honeybee may provide geneticists an exact timetable and candidate protein outline for further manipulations of drone stem cells.

  7. Local Topological Order Inhibits Thermal Stability in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landon-Cardinal, Olivier; Poulin, David

    2013-03-01

    We study the robustness of quantum information stored in the degenerate ground space of a local, frustration-free Hamiltonian with commuting terms on a 2D spin lattice. On one hand, a macroscopic energy barrier separating the distinct ground states under local transformations would protect the information from thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, local topological order would shield the ground space from static perturbations. Here we demonstrate that local topological order implies a constant energy barrier, thus inhibiting thermal stability.

  8. Synchronization of semiconductor laser arrays with 2D Bragg structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, V. R.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    A model of a planar semiconductor multi-channel laser is developed. In this model two-dimensional (2D) Bragg mirror structures are used for synchronizing radiation of multiple laser channels. Coupling of longitudinal and transverse waves can be mentioned as the distinguishing feature of these structures. Synchronization of 20 laser channels is demonstrated with a semi-classical approach based on Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  9. Statistical analysis of quiet stance sway in 2-D.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Avijit; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R

    2014-04-01

    Subjects exposed to a rotating environment that perturbs their postural sway show adaptive changes in their voluntary spatially directed postural motion to restore accurate movement paths but do not exhibit any obvious learning during passive stance. We have found, however, that a variable known to characterize the degree of stochasticity in quiet stance can also reveal subtle learning phenomena in passive stance. We extended Chow and Collins (Phys Rev E 52(1):909-912, 1995) one-dimensional pinned-polymer model (PPM) to two dimensions (2-D) and then evaluated the model's ability to make analytical predictions for 2-D quiet stance. To test the model, we tracked center of mass and centers of foot pressures, and compared and contrasted stance sway for the anterior-posterior versus medio-lateral directions before, during, and after exposure to rotation at 10 rpm. Sway of the body during rotation generated Coriolis forces that acted perpendicular to the direction of sway. We found significant adaptive changes for three characteristic features of the mean square displacement (MSD) function: the exponent of the power law defined at short time scales, the proportionality constant of the power law, and the saturation plateau value defined at longer time scales. The exponent of the power law of MSD at a short time scale lies within the bounds predicted by the 2-D PPM. The change in MSD during exposure to rotation also had a power-law exponent in the range predicted by the theoretical model. We discuss the Coriolis force paradigm for studying postural and movement control and the applicability of the PPM model in 2-D for studying postural adaptation.

  10. Flow transitions in a 2D directional solidification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larroude, Philippe; Ouazzani, Jalil; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1992-01-01

    Flow transitions in a Two Dimensional (2D) model of crystal growth were examined using the Bridgman-Stockbarger me thod. Using a pseudo-spectral Chebyshev collocation method, the governing equations yield solutions which exhibit a symmetry breaking flow tansition and oscillatory behavior indicative of a Hopf bifurcation at higher values of Ra. The results are discussed from fluid dynamic viewpoint, and broader implications for process models are also addressed.

  11. Vertical heterostructures based on graphene and other 2D materials

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, I. V.

    2016-01-15

    Recent advances in the fabrication of vertical heterostructures based on graphene and other dielectric and semiconductor single-layer materials, including hexagonal boron nitride and transition-metal dichalcogenides, are reviewed. Significant progress in this field is discussed together with the great prospects for the development of vertical heterostructures for various applications, which are associated, first of all, with reconsideration of the physical principles of the design and operation of device structures based on graphene combined with other 2D materials.

  12. Fully automated 2D-3D registration and verification.

    PubMed

    Varnavas, Andreas; Carrell, Tom; Penney, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    Clinical application of 2D-3D registration technology often requires a significant amount of human interaction during initialisation and result verification. This is one of the main barriers to more widespread clinical use of this technology. We propose novel techniques for automated initial pose estimation of the 3D data and verification of the registration result, and show how these techniques can be combined to enable fully automated 2D-3D registration, particularly in the case of a vertebra based system. The initialisation method is based on preoperative computation of 2D templates over a wide range of 3D poses. These templates are used to apply the Generalised Hough Transform to the intraoperative 2D image and the sought 3D pose is selected with the combined use of the generated accumulator arrays and a Gradient Difference Similarity Measure. On the verification side, two algorithms are proposed: one using normalised features based on the similarity value and the other based on the pose agreement between multiple vertebra based registrations. The proposed methods are employed here for CT to fluoroscopy registration and are trained and tested with data from 31 clinical procedures with 417 low dose, i.e. low quality, high noise interventional fluoroscopy images. When similarity value based verification is used, the fully automated system achieves a 95.73% correct registration rate, whereas a no registration result is produced for the remaining 4.27% of cases (i.e. incorrect registration rate is 0%). The system also automatically detects input images outside its operating range.

  13. Report of the 1988 2-D Intercomparison Workshop, chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Brasseur, Guy; Soloman, Susan; Guthrie, Paul D.; Garcia, Rolando; Yung, Yuk L.; Gray, Lesley J.; Tung, K. K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Isaken, Ivar

    1989-01-01

    Several factors contribute to the errors encountered. With the exception of the line-by-line model, all of the models employ simplifying assumptions that place fundamental limits on their accuracy and range of validity. For example, all 2-D modeling groups use the diffusivity factor approximation. This approximation produces little error in tropospheric H2O and CO2 cooling rates, but can produce significant errors in CO2 and O3 cooling rates at the stratopause. All models suffer from fundamental uncertainties in shapes and strengths of spectral lines. Thermal flux algorithms being used in 2-D tracer tranport models produce cooling rates that differ by as much as 40 percent for the same input model atmosphere. Disagreements of this magnitude are important since the thermal cooling rates must be subtracted from the almost-equal solar heating rates to derive the net radiative heating rates and the 2-D model diabatic circulation. For much of the annual cycle, the net radiative heating rates are comparable in magnitude to the cooling rate differences described. Many of the models underestimate the cooling rates in the middle and lower stratosphere. The consequences of these errors for the net heating rates and the diabatic circulation will depend on their meridional structure, which was not tested here. Other models underestimate the cooling near 1 mbar. Suchs errors pose potential problems for future interactive ozone assessment studies, since they could produce artificially-high temperatures and increased O3 destruction at these levels. These concerns suggest that a great deal of work is needed to improve the performance of thermal cooling rate algorithms used in the 2-D tracer transport models.

  14. 2D Hybrid Nanostructured Dirac Materials for Broadband Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunfan; Lin, Li; Zhao, Shuli; Deng, Bing; Chen, Hongliang; Ma, Bangjun; Wu, Jinxiong; Yin, Jianbo; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2015-08-05

    Broadband transparent electrodes based on 2D hybrid nanostructured Dirac materials between Bi2 Se3 and graphene are synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Bi2 Se3 nanoplates are preferentially grown along graphene grain boundaries as "smart" conductive patches to bridge the graphene boundary. These hybrid films increase by one- to threefold in conductivity while remaining highly transparent over broadband wavelength. They also display outstanding chemical stability and mechanical flexibility.

  15. Parallel-pipeline 2-D DCT/IDCT processor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, G. A.; Michell, J. A.; Buron, A.

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the architecture of an 8x8 2-D DCT/IDCT processor with high throughput and a cost-effective architecture. The 2D DCT/IDCT is calculated using the separability property, so that its architecture is made up of two 1-D processors and a transpose buffer (TB) as intermediate memory. This transpose buffer presents a regular structure based on D-type flip-flops with a double serial input/output data-flow very adequate for pipeline architectures. The processor has been designed with parallel and pipeline architecture to attain high throughput, reduced hardware and maximum efficiency in all arithmetic elements. This architecture allows that the processing elements and arithmetic units work in parallel at half the frequency of the data input rate, except for normalization of transform which it is done in a multiplier operating at maximum frequency. Moreover, it has been verified that the precision analysis of the proposed processor meets the demands of IEEE Std. 1180-1990 used in video codecs ITU-T H.261 and ITU-T H.263. This processor has been conceived using a standard cell design methodology and manufactured in a 0.35-μm CMOS CSD 3M/2P 3.3V process. It has an area of 6.25 mm2 (the core is 3mm2) and contains a total of 11.7k gates, of which 5.8k gates are flip-flops. A data input rate frequency of 300MHz has been established with a latency of 172 cycles for the 2-D DCT and 178 cycles for the 2-D IDCT. The computing time of a block is close to 580ns. Its performances in computing speed as well as hardware complexity indicate that the proposed design is suitable for HDTV applications.

  16. FASTWO - A 2-D interactive algebraic grid generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luh, Raymond Ching-Chung; Lombard, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a very simple and effective computational procedure, FASTWO, for generating patched composite finite difference grids in 2-D for any geometry. Major components of the interactive graphics based method that is closely akin to and borrows many tools from transfinite interpolation are highlighted. Several grids produced by FASTWO are shown to illustrate its powerful capability. Comments about extending the methodology to 3-D are also given.

  17. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyaev, Yurii V.; Chertova, Nadezhda V.; Psakhie, Sergei G.

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  18. 2D Lattices of Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles as Supermagnetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-18

    Supermagnetics DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Availability: Hard copy only. This paper is part of the following report: TITLE...Technology" OAN.01 i St Petersburg, Russia, June 14-18, 1999 © 1999 loffe Institute 2D lattices of ferromagnetic nanoparticles as supermagnetics A. A...temperature the system became ordered due to the dipole interaction of particles. Such a state of the system was defined as supermagnetic [ ]. The critical

  19. 2D and 3D Traveling Salesman Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haxhimusa, Yll; Carpenter, Edward; Catrambone, Joseph; Foldes, David; Stefanov, Emil; Arns, Laura; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    When a two-dimensional (2D) traveling salesman problem (TSP) is presented on a computer screen, human subjects can produce near-optimal tours in linear time. In this study we tested human performance on a real and virtual floor, as well as in a three-dimensional (3D) virtual space. Human performance on the real floor is as good as that on a…

  20. Numerical 2D-modeling of multiroll leveling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, N.; Potier-Ferry, M.; Zahrouni, H.

    2016-10-01

    Multiroll leveling is a forming process used in the metals industries (aluminum, steel, …) in order to correct flatness defects and minimize residual stresses in strips thanks to alternating bending. This work proposes a Finite Element 2D model to simulate the metal sheet conveying through the machine. Obtained results (plastic strain and residual stress distributions through thickness) are analysed. Strip deformation, after elastic springback and potential buckling, is also predicted (residual curvatures).

  1. 2-D Signal Generation Using State-Space Formulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    published that have established nonoptical .~ -~ Iimage processing as a viable area of research. A large portion of this research emphasizes the linear...research and the study of time-discrete linear systems. This thesis develops the discrete model of Roesser [Ref. 5] for linear image processing which... THESIS 2-D SIGNAL GENERATION USING STATE-SPACE FORMULATION - • by (.) Evangelos Theofilou December 1985 • Thesis Advisor: Sydney R. Parker Approved

  2. Geometric properties of quasiperiodic orbits of 2D Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrover, A.; Giona, M.

    1999-08-01

    By enforcing the isomorphism between the group SL(2, R ) and linear fractional transforms, this letter shows that, for quasi-periodic orbits of 2D area-preserving maps possessing regions of chaotic behavior, the vector tangent to the quasiperiodic orbit can be obtained from the dynamics of the associated linear fractional transforms (obtained from the differential of the map), which is Cesaro convergent. Several implications of this geometric result are addressed.

  3. [3D display of sequential 2D medical images].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yisong; Chen, Yazhu

    2003-12-01

    A detailed review is given in this paper on various current 3D display methods for sequential 2D medical images and the new development in 3D medical image display. True 3D display, surface rendering, volume rendering, 3D texture mapping and distributed collaborative rendering are discussed in depth. For two kinds of medical applications: Real-time navigation system and high-fidelity diagnosis in computer aided surgery, different 3D display methods are presented.

  4. NASA High-Speed 2D Photogrammetric Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismond, Harriett R.

    2012-01-01

    The object of this report is to provide users of the NASA high-speed 2D photogrammetric measurement system with procedures required to obtain drop-model trajectory and impact data for full-scale and sub-scale models. This guide focuses on use of the system for vertical drop testing at the NASA Langley Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of temporal alterations in cellular proteome of Bacillus subtilis under curcumin treatment.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Sinha, Sneha; Ray, Sandipan; Sathe, Gajanan J; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Dhali, Snigdha; Srikanth, Rapole; Panda, Dulal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a natural dietary compound with antimicrobial activity against various gram positive and negative bacteria. This study aims to investigate the proteome level alterations in Bacillus subtilis due to curcumin treatment and identification of its molecular/cellular targets to understand the mechanism of action. We have performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of B. subtilis AH75 strain at different time intervals of curcumin treatment (20, 60 and 120 min after the drug exposure, three replicates) to compare the protein expression profiles using two complementary quantitative proteomic techniques, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive longitudinal investigation describing the effect of curcumin treatment on B. subtilis proteome. The proteomics analysis revealed several interesting targets such UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase 1, putative septation protein SpoVG and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit. Further, in silico pathway analysis using DAVID and KOBAS has revealed modulation of pathways related to the fatty acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis, which are crucial for cell viability. Our findings revealed that curcumin treatment lead to inhibition of the cell wall and fatty acid synthesis in addition to differential expression of many crucial proteins involved in modulation of bacterial metabolism. Findings obtained from proteomics analysis were further validated using 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) assay for respiratory activity, resazurin assay for metabolic activity and membrane integrity assay by potassium and inorganic phosphate leakage measurement. The gene expression analysis of selected cell wall biosynthesis enzymes has strengthened the proteomics findings and indicated the major effect of curcumin on cell division.

  6. 2D:4D Ratio and its Implications in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jeevanandam, Saravanakumar

    2016-01-01

    Digit ratios, especially 2D:4D ratio, a potential proxy marker for prenatal androgen exposure shows sexual dimorphism. Existing literature and recent research show accumulating evidence on 2D:4D ratio showing correlations with various phenotypic traits in humans. Ratio of 2D:4D is found to correlate negatively to testosterone and positively to oestrogen in the foetus. Interestingly, it is constant since birth and not influenced by the adult hormone levels. Usually, males have lower ratios when compared to females. Prenatal androgen exposure and therefore, digit ratios have been reported to be associated with numerical competencies, spatial skills, handedness, cognitive abilities, academic performance, sperm counts, personalities and prevalence of obesity, migraine, eating disorders, depression, myopia, autism etc. The authors have attempted to write a brief account on the digit ratios and the dimorphism observed in various physiological, psychological and behavioural traits. Also, the authors have discussed the relevant molecular basics and the methods of measurement of digit ratios. PMID:28208851

  7. 2D optical beam splitter using diffractive optical elements (DOE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fung J.; Chung, Po S.

    2006-09-01

    A novel approach for optical beam distribution into a 2-dimensional (2-D) packaged fiber arrays using 2-D Dammann gratings is investigated. This paper focuses on the design and fabrication of the diffractive optical element (DOE) and investigates the coupling efficiencies of the beamlets into a packaged V-grooved 2x2 fibre array. We report for the first time experimental results of a 2-D optical signal distribution into a packaged 2x2 fibre array using Dammann grating. This grating may be applicable to the FTTH network as it can support sufficient channels with good output uniformity together with low polarization dependent loss (PDL) and acceptable insertion loss. Using an appropriate optimization algorithm (the steepest descent algorithm in this case), the optimum profile for the gratings can be calculated. The gratings are then fabricated on ITO glass using electron-beam lithography. The overall performance of the design shows an output uniformity of around 0.14 dB and an insertion loss of about 12.63 dB, including the DOE, focusing lens and the packaged fiber array.

  8. Shear viscosity measurements in a 2D Yukawa liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, Volodymyr

    2005-03-01

    Shear viscosity was measured for a 2D strongly-coupled Yukawa liquid. First, we formed a dilute monolayer suspension of microspheres in a partially-ionized rarefied gas, i.e., a dusty plasma. In the absence of manipulation, the suspension forms a 2D triangular lattice. We used a new in-situ method of applying a shear stress using the scattering forces applied by counter-propagating laser beams. The lattice melted and a shear flow formed. Using digital video microscopy for direct imaging and particle tracking, the microscopic dynamics of the shear flow are observed. Averaging the velocities of individual microspheres, a velocity flow profile was calculated. Using the Navier-Stokes equation with an additional frictional term to account for gas drag, we fit the velocity profile. The fit yielded the value of the shear viscosity. The kinematic viscosity of our particle suspension is of order 1 mm^2s-1, which is comparable to that for liquid water. We believe this is the first report of a rheological measurement in a 2D dusty plasma. This talk is based on V. Nosenko and J. Goree, PRL 93, 155004 (2004).

  9. Hybrid 3D-2D printing for bone scaffolds fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2017-02-01

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  10. Volumetric elasticity imaging with a 2-D CMUT array.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ted G; Hall, Timothy J; Panda, Satchi; Richards, Michael S; Barbone, Paul E; Jiang, Jingfeng; Resnick, Jeff; Barnes, Steve

    2010-06-01

    This article reports the use of a two-dimensional (2-D) capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) to acquire radio-frequency (RF) echo data from relatively large volumes of a simple ultrasound phantom to compare three-dimensional (3-D) elasticity imaging methods. Typical 2-D motion tracking for elasticity image formation was compared with three different methods of 3-D motion tracking, with sum-squared difference (SSD) used as the similarity measure. Differences among the algorithms were the degree to which they tracked elevational motion: not at all (2-D search), planar search, combination of multiple planes and plane independent guided search. The cross-correlation between the predeformation and motion-compensated postdeformation RF echo fields was used to quantify motion tracking accuracy. The lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was used to quantify image quality. Tracking accuracy and strain image quality generally improved with increased tracking sophistication. When used as input for a 3-D modulus reconstruction, high quality 3-D displacement estimates yielded accurate and low noise modulus reconstruction.

  11. Building 3D scenes from 2D image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul D.

    2006-05-01

    Sequences of 2D images, taken by a single moving video receptor, can be fused to generate a 3D representation. This dynamic stereopsis exists in birds and reptiles, whereas the static binocular stereopsis is common in mammals, including humans. Most multimedia computer vision systems for stereo image capture, transmission, processing, storage and retrieval are based on the concept of binocularity. As a consequence, their main goal is to acquire, conserve and enhance pairs of 2D images able to generate a 3D visual perception in a human observer. Stereo vision in birds is based on the fusion of images captured by each eye, with previously acquired and memorized images from the same eye. The process goes on simultaneously and conjointly for both eyes and generates an almost complete all-around visual field. As a consequence, the baseline distance is no longer fixed, as in the case of binocular 3D view, but adjustable in accordance with the distance to the object of main interest, allowing a controllable depth effect. Moreover, the synthesized 3D scene can have a better resolution than each individual 2D image in the sequence. Compression of 3D scenes can be achieved, and stereo transmissions with lower bandwidth requirements can be developed.

  12. A novel point cloud registration using 2D image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Chou; Tai, Yen-Chou; Lee, Jhong-Jin; Chen, Yong-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Since a 3D scanner only captures a scene of a 3D object at a time, a 3D registration for multi-scene is the key issue of 3D modeling. This paper presents a novel and an efficient 3D registration method based on 2D local feature matching. The proposed method transforms the point clouds into 2D bearing angle images and then uses the 2D feature based matching method, SURF, to find matching pixel pairs between two images. The corresponding points of 3D point clouds can be obtained by those pixel pairs. Since the corresponding pairs are sorted by their distance between matching features, only the top half of the corresponding pairs are used to find the optimal rotation matrix by the least squares approximation. In this paper, the optimal rotation matrix is derived by orthogonal Procrustes method (SVD-based approach). Therefore, the 3D model of an object can be reconstructed by aligning those point clouds with the optimal transformation matrix. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed method is close to the ICP, but the computation cost is reduced significantly. The performance is six times faster than the generalized-ICP algorithm. Furthermore, while the ICP requires high alignment similarity of two scenes, the proposed method is robust to a larger difference of viewing angle.

  13. Resolving 2D Amorphous Materials with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Buechner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) materials have garnered significant scientific interest due to their potential technological applications. Alongside the emphasis on crystalline materials, such as graphene and hexagonal BN, a new class of 2D amorphous materials must be pursued. For amorphous materials, a detailed understanding of the complex structure is necessary. Here we present a structural study of 2D bilayer silica on Ru(0001), an insulating material which is weakly coupled to the substrate. Atomic structure has been determined with a dual mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) sensor in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperatures, revealing a network of different ring sizes. Liquid AFM measurements with sub-nanometer resolution bridge the gap between clean UHV conditions and the environments that many material applications demand. Samples are grown and characterized in vacuum and subsequently transferred to the liquid AFM. Notably, the key structural features observed, namely nanoscale ring networks and larger holes to the substrate, show strong quantitative agreement between the liquid and UHV microscopy measurements. This provides direct evidence for the structural stability of these silica films for nanoelectronics and other applications. KMB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  14. F-theory and 2d (0, 2) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura; Weigand, Timo

    2016-05-01

    F-theory compactified on singular, elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau five-folds gives rise to two-dimensional gauge theories preserving N = (0 , 2) supersymmetry. In this paper we initiate the study of such compactifications and determine the dictionary between the geometric data of the elliptic fibration and the 2d gauge theory such as the matter content in terms of (0 , 2) superfields and their supersymmetric couplings. We study this setup both from a gauge-theoretic point of view, in terms of the partially twisted 7-brane theory, and provide a global geometric description based on the structure of the elliptic fibration and its singularities. Global consistency conditions are determined and checked against the dual M-theory compactification to one dimension. This includes a discussion of gauge anomalies, the structure of the Green-Schwarz terms and the Chern-Simons couplings in the dual M-theory supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Furthermore, by interpreting the resulting 2d (0 , 2) theories as heterotic worldsheet theories, we propose a correspondence between the geometric data of elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau five-folds and the target space of a heterotic gauged linear sigma-model (GLSM). In particular the correspondence between the Landau-Ginsburg and sigma-model phase of a 2d (0 , 2) GLSM is realized via different T-branes or gluing data in F-theory.

  15. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  16. Volumetric Elasticity Imaging with a 2D CMUT Array

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Ted G.; Hall, Timothy J.; Panda, Satchi; Richards, Michael S.; Barbone, Paul E.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Resnick, Jeff; Barnes, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the use of a two-dimensional (2D) capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) to acquire radio frequency (RF) echo data from relatively large volumes of a simple ultrasound phantom to compare 3D elasticity imaging methods. Typical 2D motion tracking for elasticity image formation was compared to three different methods of 3D motion tracking, with sum-squared difference (SSD) used as the similarity measure. Differences among the algorithms were the degree to which they tracked elevational motion: not at all (2D search), planar search, combination of multiple planes, and plane independent guided search. The cross correlation between the pre-deformation and motion-compensated post-deformation RF echo fields was used to quantify motion tracking accuracy. The lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was used to quantify image quality. Tracking accuracy and strain image quality generally improved with increased tracking sophistication. When used as input for a 3D modulus reconstruction, high quality 3D displacement estimates yielded accurate and low noise modulus reconstruction. PMID:20510188

  17. Murine cytomegalovirus regulation of NKG2D ligands.

    PubMed

    Lenac, Tihana; Arapović, Jurica; Traven, Luka; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2008-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that causes morbidity risk in immunologically suppressed and immunodeficient patients including congenital infections. Approaches to curb the consequences of HCMV infections are restricted by a lack of complete understanding of viral pathogenesis. The infection of mice with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as a model of HCMV infection has been particularly useful in elucidating the role of innate and adaptive immune response mechanisms. A large number of cytomegalovirus genes modulate the innate and the adaptive host immune response. The products of several MCMV genes are involved in subverting the natural killer (NK) cell response by down-modulating cellular ligands for the NKG2D receptor expressed on NK cells and CD8(+) T cells. Mutant viruses lacking these immunoevasion genes are attenuated with respect to virus growth in vivo. Given the importance of the NKG2D receptor in controlling both NK- and T cell-mediated immunity, it is of tremendous importance to understand the molecular mechanisms and consequences of viral regulation of the NKG2D ligands.

  18. Design Application Translates 2-D Graphics to 3-D Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Fabric Images Inc., specializing in the printing and manufacturing of fabric tension architecture for the retail, museum, and exhibit/tradeshow communities, designed software to translate 2-D graphics for 3-D surfaces prior to print production. Fabric Images' fabric-flattening design process models a 3-D surface based on computer-aided design (CAD) specifications. The surface geometry of the model is used to form a 2-D template, similar to a flattening process developed by NASA's Glenn Research Center. This template or pattern is then applied in the development of a 2-D graphic layout. Benefits of this process include 11.5 percent time savings per project, less material wasted, and the ability to improve upon graphic techniques and offer new design services. Partners include Exhibitgroup/Giltspur (end-user client: TAC Air, a division of Truman Arnold Companies Inc.), Jack Morton Worldwide (end-user client: Nickelodeon), as well as 3D Exhibits Inc., and MG Design Associates Corp.

  19. 2D depiction of nonbonding interactions for protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Tian, Feifei; Shang, Zhicai

    2009-04-30

    A program called the 2D-GraLab is described for automatically generating schematic representation of nonbonding interactions across the protein binding interfaces. The input file of this program takes the standard PDB format, and the outputs are two-dimensional PostScript diagrams giving intuitive and informative description of the protein-protein interactions and their energetics properties, including hydrogen bond, salt bridge, van der Waals interaction, hydrophobic contact, pi-pi stacking, disulfide bond, desolvation effect, and loss of conformational entropy. To ensure these interaction information are determined accurately and reliably, methods and standalone programs employed in the 2D-GraLab are all widely used in the chemistry and biology community. The generated diagrams allow intuitive visualization of the interaction mode and binding specificity between two subunits in protein complexes, and by providing information on nonbonding energetics and geometric characteristics, the program offers the possibility of comparing different protein binding profiles in a detailed, objective, and quantitative manner. We expect that this 2D molecular graphics tool could be useful for the experimentalists and theoreticians interested in protein structure and protein engineering.

  20. Broadband THz Spectroscopy of 2D Nanoscale Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Tripathi, Shivendra; Huang, Mengchen; Hsu, Jen-Feng; D'Urso, Brian; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) have attracted intense research interest in the past decade. Their unique electronic and optical properties offer the promise of novel optoelectronic applications in the terahertz regime. Recently, generation and detection of broadband terahertz (10 THz bandwidth) emission from 10-nm-scale LaAlO3/SrTiO3 nanostructures created by conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography has been demonstrated . This unprecedented control of THz emission at 10 nm length scales creates a pathway toward hybrid THz functionality in 2D-material/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. Here we report initial efforts in THz spectroscopy of 2D nanoscale materials with resolution comparable to the dimensions of the nanowire (10 nm). Systems under investigation include graphene, single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanoflakes. 1. Y. Ma, et al., Nano Lett. 13, 2884 (2013). We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: AFOSR (FA9550-12-1-0268 (JL, PRI), FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)), ONR (N00014-13-1-0806 (JL, CBE), N00014-15-1-2847 (JL)), NSF DMR-1124131 (JL, CBE) and DMR-1234096 (CBE).