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Sample records for 2d goddard cumulus

  1. Microphysics, Radiation and Surface Processes in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, J.; Baker, D.; Braun, S.; Chou, M.-D.; Ferrier, B.; Johnson, D.; Khain, A.; Lang, S.; Lynn, B.

    2001-01-01

    The response of cloud systems to their environment is an important link in a chain of processes responsible for monsoons, frontal depression, El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes and other climate variations (e.g., 30-60 day intra-seasonal oscillations). Numerical models of cloud properties provide essential insights into the interactions of clouds with each other, with their surroundings, and with land and ocean surfaces. Significant advances are currently being made in the modeling of rainfall and rain-related cloud processes, ranging in scales from the very small up to the simulation of an extensive population of raining cumulus clouds in a tropical- or midlatitude-storm environment. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model is a multi-dimensional nonhydrostatic dynamic/microphysical cloud resolving model. It has been used to simulate many different mesoscale convective systems that occurred in various geographic locations. In this paper, recent GCE model improvements (microphysics, radiation and surface processes) will be described as well as their impact on the development of precipitation events from various geographic locations. The performance of these new physical processes will be examined by comparing the model results with observations. In addition, the explicit interactive processes between cloud, radiation and surface processes will be discussed.

  2. Microphysics, Radiation and Surface Processes in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (size about 2-200 km). The CRMs also allow explicit interaction between out-going longwave (cooling) and in-coming solar (heating) radiation with clouds. Observations can provide the initial conditions and validation for CRM results. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model, a CRM, has been developed and improved at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center over the past two decades. The GCE model has been used to understand the following: 1) water and energy cycles and their roles in the tropical climate system; 2) the vertical redistribution of ozone and trace constituents by individual clouds and well organized convective systems over various spatial scales; 3) the relationship between the vertical distribution of latent heating (phase change of water) and the large-scale (pre-storm) environment; 4) the validity of assumptions used in the representation of cloud processes in climate and global circulation models; and 5) the representation of cloud microphysical processes and their interaction with radiative forcing over tropical and midlatitude regions. Four-dimensional cloud and latent heating fields simulated from the GCE model have been provided to the TRMM Science Data and Information System (TSDIS) to develop and improve algorithms for retrieving rainfall and latent heating rates for TRMM and the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). More than 90 referred papers using the GCE model have been published in the last two decades. Also, more than 10 national and international universities are currently using the GCE model for research and teaching. In this talk, five specific major GCE improvements: (1

  3. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model (GCE): Improvements and Applications for Studying Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Zeng, Xiping; Li, Xiaowen; Matsui, Toshi; Mohr, Karen; Posselt, Derek; Chern, Jiundar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Norris, Peter M.; Kang, In-Sik; Choi, Ildae; Hou, Arthur; Lau, K.-M.; Yang, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Convection is the primary transport process in the Earth's atmosphere. About two-thirds of the Earth's rainfall and severe floods derive from convection. In addition, two-thirds of the global rain falls in the tropics, while the associated latent heat release accounts for three-fourths of the total heat energy for the Earth's atmosphere. Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) have been used to improve our understanding of cloud and precipitation processes and phenomena from micro-scale to cloud-scale and mesoscale as well as their interactions with radiation and surface processes. CRMs use sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes and can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems. CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) has been developed and improved at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center over the past three decades. It is amulti-dimensional non-hydrostatic CRM that can simulate clouds and cloud systems in different environments. Early improvements and testing were presented in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003a). A review on the application of the GCE to the understanding of precipitation processes can be found in Simpson and Tao (1993) and Tao (2003). In this paper, recent model improvements (microphysics, radiation and land surface processes) are described along with their impact and performance on cloud and precipitation events in different geographic locations via comparisons with observations. In addition, recent advanced applications of the GCE are presented that include understanding the physical processes responsible for diurnal variation, examining the impact of aerosols (cloud condensation nuclei or CCN and ice nuclei or IN) on

  4. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model: Model Description and Its Application for Studying the TOGA COARE and GATE Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was utilized in two and three dimensions in order to examine the behavior and response of simulated deep tropical cloud systems occurred in west Pacific warm pool region and Atlantic ocean. The periods chosen for simulation were convectively active period over the TOGA-COARE IFA (19-27 December 1992) and GATE (September 1 to 7, 1974). The TOGA COARE IFA period was also in the framework of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) WG4 case 2. We will examine the differences between the microphysics (warm rain and ice processes, evaporation/sublimation and condensation/deposition), Q1 (Temperature) and Q2 (Water vapor) budgets between these two convective events occurred in different large-scale environments. The contribution of stratiform precipitation and its relationship to the vertical shear of the large-scale horizontal wind will also be examined. The results from GCSS model intercomparsion will be presented. The new improvements (i.e., microphysics, cloud radiation interaction, surface processes and numerical advection scheme) of the GCE model as well as their sensitivity to the model results will be discussed.

  5. Summary of Cumulus Parameterization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Starr, David OC.; Hou, Arthur; Newman, Paul; Sud, Yogesh

    2002-01-01

    A workshop on cumulus parameterization took place at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from December 3-5, 2001. The major objectives of this workshop were (1) to review the problem of representation of moist processes in large-scale models (mesoscale models, Numerical Weather Prediction models and Atmospheric General Circulation Models), (2) to review the state-of-the-art in cumulus parameterization schemes, and (3) to discuss the need for future research and applications. There were a total of 31 presentations and about 100 participants from the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, France and South Korea. The specific presentations and discussions during the workshop are summarized in this paper.

  6. The NASA-Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling Framework - Land Information System: Global Land/atmosphere Interaction with Resolved Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen Irene; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2013-01-01

    The present generation of general circulation models (GCM) use parameterized cumulus schemes and run at hydrostatic grid resolutions. To improve the representation of cloud-scale moist processes and landeatmosphere interactions, a global, Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) coupled to the Land Information System (LIS) has been developed at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center. The MMFeLIS has three components, a finite-volume (fv) GCM (Goddard Earth Observing System Ver. 4, GEOS-4), a 2D cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble, GCE), and the LIS, representing the large-scale atmospheric circulation, cloud processes, and land surface processes, respectively. The non-hydrostatic GCE model replaces the single-column cumulus parameterization of fvGCM. The model grid is composed of an array of fvGCM gridcells each with a series of embedded GCE models. A horizontal coupling strategy, GCE4fvGCM4Coupler4LIS, offered significant computational efficiency, with the scalability and I/O capabilities of LIS permitting landeatmosphere interactions at cloud-scale. Global simulations of 2007e2008 and comparisons to observations and reanalysis products were conducted. Using two different versions of the same land surface model but the same initial conditions, divergence in regional, synoptic-scale surface pressure patterns emerged within two weeks. The sensitivity of largescale circulations to land surface model physics revealed significant functional value to using a scalable, multi-model land surface modeling system in global weather and climate prediction.

  7. Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model: Application for Understanding Preciptation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to climate system interactions and the key to understanding their behavior. Rainfall and its associated precipitation processes are a key link in the hydrologic cycle. Fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability can exert a large impact upon the structure of the upper ocean layer. In addition, approximately two-thirds of the global rain falls in the Tropics, while the associated latent heat release accounts for about three-fourths of the total heat energy for the Earth's atmosphere. Precipitation from convective cloud systems comprises a large portion of tropical heating and rainfall. Furthermore, the vertical distribution of convective latent-heat releases modulates large-scale tropical circulations (e.g., the 30-60-day intraseasonal oscillation), which, in turn, impacts midlatitude weather through teleconnection patterns such as those associated with El Nino. Shifts in these global circulations can result in prolonged periods of droughts and floods, thereby exerting a tremendous impact upon the biosphere and human habitation. And yet, monthly rainfall over the tropical oceans is still not known within a factor of two over large (5 degrees latitude by 5 degrees longitude) areas. Hence, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), a joint U.S./Japan space project, can provide a more accurate measurement of rainfall as well as estimate the four-dimensional structure of diabatic heating over the global tropics. The distributions of rainfall and inferred heating can be used to advance our understanding of the global energy and water cycle. In addition, this information can be used for global circulation and climate models for testing and improving their parameterizations.

  8. Evaluating Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling Framework at Different fv-GCM Grid Spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, J.; Matsui, T.; Shen, B.; Tao, W.

    2009-12-01

    The Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) is based on the coupling of the two-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the finite-volume GCM (fv-GCM). Thus MMF enables explicit resolution of stochastic moist convection process by embedded GCE simulations, unlike traditional GCMs that rely on convection parameterization. At each fv-GCM column, the fv-GCM provides mean atmospheric conditions and large-scale temperature and moisture advection to drive the 2D GCE models, which feedback the tendencies of thermodynamic parameter and cloud statistics to the fv-GCM. Earlier investigations show that the Goddard MMF simulates better cloudiness (high and low), single ITCZ and a more realistic diurnal variation of rainfall than traditional GCMs. Another advantages of using the Goddard MMF is that the resolution of GCE-simulated clouds is compatible to satellite observations, while traditional GCM requires disaggregation of grid-volume feature to compare with high-resolution satellite observations. Thus, satellite instrumental simulator can be directly applied to translate MMF simulations into the satellite instrumental signals in straightforward way. In this year, we examine the sensitivity of the Goddard MMF simulation at different fv-GCM grid spacing, and evaluated performances against the TRMM satellite. Previously, fv-GCM was run at 2x2.5 degree horizontal lat-lon grid spacing, and we are currently running fv-GCM at 1x1.25 degree. We examine the performance of the Goddard MMF at different fv-GCM grid spacing with respect to rainfall frequency, rain structure, and microphysics using multi-sensor radiance-based evaluation method, known as the TRMM Triple-Sensor Three-step Evaluation Framework (T3EF). T3EF utilizes multi-sensor satellite simulators, Goddard Satellite Data Simulation Unit, and novel statistics of multi-sensor radiance and backscattering signals observed from the TRMM satellite. Specifically, T3EF compares GCE and satellite observations in

  9. Goddard Welcomes SISTER

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., hosted a weeklong summer institute, SISTER, for the purpose of increasing the awareness of and providing opportunities for middle school girls to ...

  10. Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

  11. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems. In addition, high - resolution (spatial. 2km, and temporal, I minute) visualization showing the model results will be presented.

  12. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the ph ysical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems.

  13. Goddard Summer Interns: Danielle Wood

    NASA Video Gallery

    Profile of Goddard intern Danielle Wood. Danielle is interning at Goddard in the Innovative Partnerships Program and at NASA Headquarters in the Office of the Chief Technologist in the summer of 20...

  14. Goddard Ground System Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center's work in providing the Ground System Infrastructure to allow for standard interfaces, and allow for a mix of heritage and new components. This software has been used by NASA and other Government users. Telemetry and command services are also provided as are mission planning and scheduling systems. Other areas that the presentation covers are work on trending systems, and data management system.

  15. Goddard Robotic Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Donato, Davide; Gehrels, Neil; Okajima, Takashi; Ukwatta, Tilan N.

    2009-05-01

    We are constructing the 14'' fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up the Swift/Fermi Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our telescope system consists of the 14'' Celestron Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Astro-Physics 1200GTO mount, the Apogee U47 CCD camera, the JMI's electronic focuser, and the Finger Lake Instrumentation's color filter wheel with U, B, V, R and I filters. With the focal reducer, 20'×20' field of view has been achieved. The observatory dome is the Astro Haven's 7 ft clam-shell dome. We started the scientific observations on mid-November 2008. While not observing our primary targets (GRBs and AGNs), we are planning to open our telescope time to the public for having a wider use of our telescope in both a different research field and an educational purpose.

  16. Goddard Robotic Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Donato, Davide; Gehrels, Neil; Okajima, Takashi; Ukwatta, Tilan N.

    2009-05-25

    We are constructing the 14'' fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up the Swift/Fermi Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our telescope system consists of the 14'' Celestron Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Astro-Physics 1200GTO mount, the Apogee U47 CCD camera, the JMI's electronic focuser, and the Finger Lake Instrumentation's color filter wheel with U, B, V, R and I filters. With the focal reducer, 20'x20' field of view has been achieved. The observatory dome is the Astro Haven's 7 ft clam-shell dome. We started the scientific observations on mid-November 2008. While not observing our primary targets (GRBs and AGNs), we are planning to open our telescope time to the public for having a wider use of our telescope in both a different research field and an educational purpose.

  17. Red-based cumulus.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    2015-02-01

    Observations and model simulations of cumulus clouds whose bases are tinted red when the Sun is well above the horizon are presented. Conditions for seeing red bases include (1) a red underlying surface (which may consist of dust clouds, as from haboobs) with high albedo, (2) small fractional cloud cover when the Sun is far enough below the zenith for direct sunlight to illuminate much of the surface directly below and around cloud base, (3) optically thick clouds so that the bases are dark, and (4) clouds with bases that are near enough to the observer to appear high in the sky so that the admixture of scattered light from the intervening atmosphere is minimized.

  18. Goddard Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Under this Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, USRA was expected to provide short term (from I day up to I year) personnel as required to provide a Visiting Scientists Program to support the Earth Sciences Directorate (Code 900) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The Contractor was to have a pool, or have access to a pool, of scientific talent, both domestic and international, at all levels (graduate student to senior scientist), that would support the technical requirements of the following laboratories and divisions within Code 900: 1) Global Change Data Center (902); 2) Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910); 3) Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics (Code 920); 4) Space Data and Computing Division (Code 930); 5) Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes (Code 970). The research activities described below for each organization within Code 900 were intended to comprise the general scope of effort covered under the Visiting Scientist Program.

  19. Astronaut Steve Swanson Visits Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Tuesday, 3 March 2015, a special guest visited NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during his time back on Earth. Steven Swanson, NASA astronaut, intrigued the audience by highlighting his adventur...

  20. Goddard Summer Interns: Alejandro Arambula

    NASA Video Gallery

    Alejandro Arambula is an aerospace engineering student at M.I.T. and a 2011 summer intern in Goddard's Propulsion Lab. This summer he is working with his mentor Khary Parker in building a test asse...

  1. Goddard Virtual Tour: Part 1

    NASA Video Gallery

    Goddard Chief Scientist Jim Garvin takes us on a tour of the life of a spacecraft, from the idea to the collection of data in orbit. Each segment looks at a different phase of the spacecraft and it...

  2. Explore at NASA Goddard Promo

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., will again open its gates to welcome the regional community for a day of fun-filled activities, hands-on demonstrations, entertainment, and foo...

  3. Simulated KWAJEX Convective Systems Using a 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model and Their Comparisons with Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 1999 Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX), one of several major TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments, has successfully obtained a wealth of information and observation data on tropical convective systems over the western Central Pacific region. In this paper, clouds and convective systems that developed during three active periods (Aug 7-12, Aug 17-21, and Aug 29-Sep 13) around Kwajalein Atoll site are simulated using both 2D and 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) models. Based on numerical results, the clouds and cloud systems are generally unorganized and short lived. These features are validated by radar observations that support the model results. Both the 2D and 3D simulated rainfall amounts and their stratiform contribution as well as the heat, water vapor, and moist static energy budgets are examined for the three convective episodes. Rainfall amounts are quantitatively similar between the two simulations, but the stratiform contribution is considerably larger in the 2D simulation. Regardless of dimension, fo all three cases, the large-scale forcing and net condensation are the two major physical processes that account for the evolution of the budgets with surface latent heat flux and net radiation solar and long-wave radiation)being secondary processes. Quantitative budget differences between 2D and 3D as well as between various episodes will be detailed.Morover, simulated radar signatures and Q1/Q2 fields from the three simulations are compared to each other and with radar and sounding observations.

  4. Precipitation Processes Developed During ARM (1997), TOGA COARE (1992), GATE (1974), SCSMEX (1998), and KWAJEX (1999): Consistent 2D, Semi-3D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W-K.

    2003-01-01

    Real clouds and cloud systems are inherently three-dimensional (3D). Because of the limitations in computer resources, however, most cloud-resolving models (CRMs) today are still two-dimensional (2D). A few 3D CRMs have been used to study the response of clouds to large-scale forcing. In these 3D simulations, the model domain was small, and the integration time was 6 hours. Only recently have 3D experiments been performed for multi-day periods for tropical cloud systems with large horizontal domains at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NACAR) and at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center . At Goddard, a 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was used to simulate periods during TOGA COARE, SCSMEX and KWAJEX using 512 by 512 km domain (with 2 km resolution). The results indicate that surface precipitation and latent heating profiles are very similar between the 2D and 3D GCE model simulations. The reason for the strong similarity between the 2D and 3D CRM simulations is that the same observed large-scale advective tendencies of potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and horizontal momentum were used as the main focusing in both the 2D and 3D models. Interestingly, the 2D and 3D versions of the CRM used at CSU showed significant differences in the rainfall and cloud statistics for three ARM cases. The major objectives of this paper are: (1) to assess the performance of the super-parameterization technique, (2) calculate and examine the surface energy (especially radiation) and water budgets, and (3) identify the differences and similarities in the organization and entrainment rates of convection between simulated 2D and 3D cloud systems.

  5. Marshall Team Recreates Goddard Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In honor of the Centernial of Flight celebration and commissioned by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a team of engineers from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) built a replica of the first liquid-fueled rocket. The original rocket, designed and built by rocket engineering pioneer Robert H. Goddard in 1926, opened the door to modern rocketry. Goddard's rocket reached an altitude of 41 feet while its flight lasted only 2.5 seconds. The Marshall design team's plan was to stay as close as possible to an authentic reconstruction of Goddard's rocket. The same propellants were used - liquid oxygen and gasoline - as available during Goddard's initial testing and firing. The team also tried to construct the replica using the original materials and design to the greatest extent possible. By purposely using less advanced techniques and materials than many that are available today, the team encountered numerous technical challenges in testing the functional hardware. There were no original blueprints or drawings, only photographs and notes. However, this faithful adherence to historical accuracy has also allowed the team to experience many of the same challenges Goddard faced 77 years ago, and more fully appreciate the genius of this extraordinary man. The replica will undergo ground tests at MSFC this summer.

  6. Regional-Scale Modeling at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Adler, R.; Baker, D.; Braun, S.; Chou, M.-D.; Jasinski, M. F.; Jia, Y.; Kakar, R.; Karyampudi, M.; Lang, S.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Goddard Mesoscale Modeling and Dynamics Group has used a popular regional scale model, MM5, to study precipitation processes. Our group is making contributions to the MM5 by incorporating the following physical and numerical packages: improved Goddard cloud processes, a land processes model (Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange - PLACE), efficient but sophisticated radiative processes, conservation of hydrometeor mass (water budget), four-dimensional data assimilation for rainfall, and better computational methods for trace gas transport. At NASA Goddard, the MM5 has been used to study: (1) the impact of initial conditions, assimilation of satellite-derived rainfall, and cumulus parameterizations on rapidly intensifying oceanic cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, (2) the dynamic and thermodynamic processes associated with the development of narrow cold frontal rainbands, (3) regional climate and water cycles, (4) the impact of vertical transport by clouds and lightning on trace gas distributiodproduction associated with South and North American mesoscale convective systems, (5) the development of a westerly wind burst (WWB) that occurred during the TOGA COARE and the diurnal variation of precipitation in the tropics, (6) a Florida sea breeze convective event and a Mid-US flood event using a sophisticated land surface model, (7) the influence of soil heterogeneity on land surface energy balance in the southwest GCIP region, (8) explicit simulations (with 1.33 to 4 km horizontal resolution) of hurricanes Bob (1991) and Bonnie (1998), (9) a heavy precipitation event over Taiwan, and (10) to make real time forecasts for a major NASA field program. In this paper, the modifications and simulated cases will be described and discussed.

  7. Frosch Awarded Goddard Memorial Trophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Former President Jimmy Carter presents the National Space Club's Goddard Memorial Trophy to NASA Administrator Dr. Robert A. Frosch on behalf of the team that planned and executed the Voyager mission to Jupiter and beyond. The trophy is America's most prestigious space award, presented annually to an individual or group for outstanding acheivement in space, contributing to U.S. leadership in astronautics. From left to right: John Lent, Martin Marietta Company President Jimmy Carter NASA Administrator Robert A. Frosch

  8. The Goddard optical communications program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seery, B. D.

    1990-07-01

    The main areas of research being conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center are reviewed. Research on transmitter source technology is addressed, emphasizing the development of AlGaAs semiconductor laser diodes. Research on receiver technology is examined, and progress being made in the development of the Pointing, Acquisition, and Tracking System (PATS) is reviewed. Plans for an in-space technology demonstration are briefly discussed.

  9. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  10. Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical parameters and the technical staff of the VLBI system at the fundamental station GGAO. It also gives an overview about the VLBI activities during the report year. The Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) consists of a 5-meter radio telescope for VLBI, a new 12-meter radio telescope for VLBI2010 development, a 1-meter reference antenna for microwave holography development, an SLR site that includes MOBLAS-7, the NGSLR development system, and a 48" telescope for developmental two-color Satellite Laser Ranging, a GPS timing and development lab, a DORIS system, meteorological sensors, and a hydrogen maser. In addition, we are a fiducial IGS site with several IGS/IGSX receivers. GGAO is located on the east coast of the United States in Maryland. It is approximately 15 miles NNE of Washington, D.C. in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  11. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes the activities of the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST), a consortium of scientists and engineers led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), during the contract reporting period. Topics covered include: new programs, eligibility and selection criteria, Goddard Coastal Research Graduate Fellowship Program and staffing changes.

  12. Shallow cumulus rooted in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H.; Horn, G.; Sikma, M.; Jacobs, C. M.; Baldocchi, D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between plant evapotranspiration, controlled by photosynthesis (for a low vegetation cover by C3 and C4 grasses), and the moist thermals that are responsible for the formation and development of shallow cumulus clouds (SCu). We perform systematic numerical experiments at fine spatial scales using large-eddy simulations explicitly coupled to a plant-physiology model. To break down the complexity of the vegetation-atmospheric system at the diurnal scales, we design the following experiments with increasing complexity: (a) clouds that are transparent to radiation, (b) clouds that shade the surface from the incoming shortwave radiation and (c) plant stomata whose apertures react with an adjustment in time to cloud perturbations. The shading by SCu leads to a strong spatial variability in photosynthesis and the surface energy balance. As a result, experiment (b) simulates SCu that are characterized by less extreme and less skewed values of the liquid water path and cloud-base height. These findings are corroborated by the calculation of characteristics lengths scales of the thermals and clouds using autocorrelation and spectral analysis methods. We find that experiments (a) and (b) are characterized by similar cloud cover evolution, but different cloud population characteristics. Experiment (b), including cloud shading, is characterized by smaller clouds, but closer to each other. By performing a sensitivity analysis on the exchange of water vapor and carbon dioxide at the canopy level, we show that the larger water-use efficiency of C4 grass leads to two opposing effects that directly influence boundary-layer clouds: the thermals below the clouds are more vigorous and deeper driven by a larger buoyancy surface flux (positive effect), but are characterized by less moisture content (negative effect). We conclude that under the investigated mid-latitude atmospheric and well-watered soil conditions, SCu over C4 grass fields is characterized

  13. ALTUS Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tony; Blakeslee, Richard; Russell, Larry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ALTUS Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV)-based project that will investigate thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES is being conducted to both investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and validate Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite measurements. In addition, as part of NASA's UAV-based science demonstration program, this project will provide a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. Part of the demonstration involves getting approvals from the Federal Aviation Administration and the NASA airworthiness flight safety review board. ACES will employ the ALTUS II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and (3) provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload, already developed and flown on ALTUS, includes electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES will contribute important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) offers a useful 'cloud-top' perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the ALTUS will be flown near, and when possible, above (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time, allowing investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations will enable the UAV measurements to be more completely interpreted and evaluated in the context of the thunderstorm structure, evolution, and

  14. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  15. Indiana School for the Blind Visits Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows highlights of the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Indian Creek Public High School visit to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June 2011. Both blind a...

  16. On testing two major cumulus parameterization schemes using the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, C.Y.J.; Bossert, J.E.; Winterkamp, J.; Lai, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    One of the objectives of the DOE ARM Program is to improve the parameterization of clouds in general circulation models (GCMs). The approach taken in this research is two fold. We first examine the behavior of cumulus parameterization schemes by comparing their performance against the results from explicit cloud simulations with state-of-the-art microphysics. This is conducted in a two-dimensional (2-D) configuration of an idealized convective system. We then apply the cumulus parameterization schemes to realistic three-dimensional (3-D) simulations over the western US for a case with an enormous amount of convection in an extended period of five days. In the 2-D idealized tests, cloud effects are parameterized in the ``parameterization cases`` with a coarse resolution, whereas each cloud is explicitly resolved by the ``microphysics cases`` with a much finer resolution. Thus, the capability of the parameterization schemes in reproducing the growth and life cycle of a convective system can then be evaluated. These 2-D tests will form the basis for further 3-D realistic simulations which have the model resolution equivalent to that of the next generation of GCMs. Two cumulus parameterizations are used in this research: the Arakawa-Schubert (A-S) scheme (Arakawa and Schubert, 1974) used in Kao and Ogura (1987) and the Kuo scheme (Kuo, 1974) used in Tremback (1990). The numerical model used in this research is the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) developed at Colorado State University (CSU).

  17. Anomalous scaling of cumulus cloud boundaries

    PubMed

    Siebesma; Jonker

    2000-07-01

    The geometrical properties of cumulus clouds modeled by a numerical technique called large-eddy simulation are investigated. Surface-volume analyses reconfirm previous scaling results based on satellite data. This technique allows for the first time a direct analysis of the scaling behavior of cloud boundaries of individual clouds.

  18. Cumulus convection and the terrestrial water-vapor distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donner, Leo J.

    1988-01-01

    Cumulus convection plays a significant role in determining the structure of the terrestrial water vapor field. Cumulus convection acts directly on the moisture field by condensing and precipitating water vapor and by redistributing water vapor through cumulus induced eddy circulations. The mechanisms by which cumulus convection influences the terrestrial water vapor distribution is outlined. Calculations using a theory due to Kuo is used to illustrate the mechanisms by which cumulus convection works. Understanding of these processes greatly aids the ability of researchers to interpret the seasonal and spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapor by providing information on the nature of sources and sinks and the global circulation.

  19. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Anderson, D.; Atlas, R.; Chern, J.; Houser, P.; Hou, A.; Lang, S.; Lau, W.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kakar, R.; Kumar, S.; Lapenta, W.; Li, X.; Matsui, T.; Rienecker, M.; Shen, B.W.; Shi, J.J.; Simpson, J.; Zeng, X.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical cloud resolving models (CRMs), which are based the non-hydrostatic equations of motion, have been extensively applied to cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that CRMs agree with observations in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and regional scale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a szrper-parameterization or multi-scale modeling -framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign can provide initial conditions as well as validation through utilizing the Earth Satellite simulators. At Goddard, we have developed a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics. The modeling system consists a coupled GCM-CRM (or MMF); a state-of-the-art weather research forecast model (WRF) and a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model). In these models, the same microphysical schemes (2ICE, several 3ICE), radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models are applied. In addition, a comprehensive unified Earth Satellite

  20. Marshall Team Fires Recreated Goddard Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In honor of the Centernial of Flight Celebration and commissioned by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a team of engineers from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) built a replica of the first liquid-fueled rocket. The original rocket, designed and built by rocket engineering pioneer Robert H. Goddard in 1926, opened the door to modern rocketry. Goddard's rocket reached an altitude of 41 feet while its flight lasted only 2.5 seconds. The Marshall design team's plan was to stay as close as possible to an authentic reconstruction of Goddard's rocket. The same propellants were used - liquid oxygen and gasoline - as available during Goddard's initial testing and firing. The team also tried to construct the replica using the original materials and design to the greatest extent possible. By purposely using less advanced techniques and materials than many that are available today, the team encountered numerous technical challenges in testing the functional hardware. There were no original blueprints or drawings, only photographs and notes. However, this faithful adherence to historical accuracy has allowed the team to experience many of the same challenges Goddard faced 77 years ago, and more fully appreciate the genius of this extraordinary man. In this photo, the replica is shown firing in the A-frame launch stand in near-flight configuration at MSFC's Test Area 116 during the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 39th Joint Propulsion Conference on July 23, 2003.

  1. Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Processes over Warm Pool: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.- K.; Johnson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle as well as the primary heat source for the atmosphere, The vertical distribution of convective latent-heat release modulates the large-scale circulations of the tropics, Furthermore, changes in the moisture distribution at middle and upper levels of the troposphere can affect cloud distributions and cloud liquid water and ice contents. How the incoming solar and outgoing longwave radiation respond to these changes in clouds is a major factor in assessing climate change. Present large-scale weather and climate models simulate cloud processes only crudely, reducing confidence in their predictions on both global and regional scales. One of the most promising methods to test physical parameterizations used in General Circulation Models (GCMS) and climate models is to use field observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes, and allow for their complex interactions with solar and infrared radiative transfer processes. The CRMs can reasonably well resolve the evolution, structure, and life cycles of individual clouds and cloud systems, The major objective of this paper is to investigate the latent heating, moisture and momenti,im budgets associated with several convective systems developed during the TOGA COARE IFA - westerly wind burst event (late December, 1992). The tool for this study is the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (CCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (using 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km depth) in the vertical, The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations are performed over a 7 day time period. We will examine (1) the precipitation processes (i.e., condensation/evaporation) and their interaction with warm pool; (2) the heating and moisture budgets in the convective and

  2. Satellite Multiangle Cumulus Geometry Retrieval: Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail

    2003-02-08

    Most satellite-based analyses have been conducted using near nadir-viewing sensors. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), recently launched on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Terra platform, provides high-resolution measurements of reflectance at nine different viewing angles. In this study, we examine the possible retrieval of detailed cumulus geometry using the new and unique MISR datasets. We suggested one approach and apply it to an early MISR dataset of small marine cumulus clouds. This paper also presents validation analysis of this technique with both independent ground-based radar measurements and a model-output inverse problem. Collocated and coincident MISR data and ground-based observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site form the basis of this validation. Future work will attempt to test the suggested approach with additional MISR scenes.

  3. Sky cover from MFRSR observations: cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Berg, L. K.; Flynn, C.; Long, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  4. Dual effects of hydrogen sulfide donor on meiosis and cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Nevoral, Jan; Petr, Jaroslav; Gelaude, Armance; Bodart, Jean-Francois; Kucerova-Chrpova, Veronika; Sedmikova, Marketa; Krejcova, Tereza; Kolbabova, Tereza; Dvorakova, Marketa; Vyskocilova, Alena; Weingartova, Ivona; Krivohlavkova, Lenka; Zalmanova, Tereza; Jilek, Frantisek

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been revealed to be a signal molecule with second messenger action in the somatic cells of many tissues, including the reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to address how exogenous H2S acts on the meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes, including key maturation factors such as MPF and MAPK, and cumulus expansion intensity of cumulus-oocyte complexes. We observed that the H2S donor, Na2S, accelerated oocyte in vitro maturation in a dose-dependent manner, following an increase of MPF activity around germinal vesicle breakdown. Concurrently, the H2S donor affected cumulus expansion, monitored by hyaluronic acid production. Our results suggest that the H2S donor influences oocyte maturation and thus also participates in the regulation of cumulus expansion. The exogenous H2S donor apparently affects key signal pathways of oocyte maturation and cumulus expansion, resulting in faster oocyte maturation with little need of cumulus expansion.

  5. Motility contrast imaging of live porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David

    2013-02-01

    Freshly-harvested porcine oocytes are invested with cumulus granulosa cells in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). The cumulus cell layer is usually too thick to image the living oocyte under a conventional microscope. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the oocyte viability. The low success rate of implantation is the main problem for in vitro fertilization. In this paper, we demonstrate our dynamic imaging technique called motility contrast imaging (MCI) that provides a non-invasive way to monitor the COCs before and after maturation. MCI shows a change of intracellular activity during oocyte maturation, and a measures dynamic contrast between the cumulus granulosa shell and the oocytes. MCI also shows difference in the spectral response between oocytes that were graded into quality classes. MCI is based on shortcoherence digital holography. It uses intracellular motility as the endogenous imaging contrast of living tissue. MCI presents a new approach for cumulus-oocyte complex assessment.

  6. Remembering Robert Goddard's vision 100 years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, David P.

    “Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” —such are the goals of most of us.Yet a few always exist who feel called by a higher purpose. Society often owes them a great deal.Robert Hutchins Goddard, whose work made spaceflight possible, found his vision 100 years ago this October as a youth of 17. His family was staying on the farm of a relative, when he was asked to trim the branches of a cherry tree behind the barn.

  7. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  8. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  9. Cloud condensation nuclei near marine cumulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive airborne measurements of cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectra and condensation nuclei below, in, between, and above the cumulus clouds near Hawaii point to important aerosol-cloud interactions. Consistent particle concentrations of 200/cu cm were found above the marine boundary layer and within the noncloudy marine boundary layer. Lower and more variable CCN concentrations within the cloudy boundary layer, especially very close to the clouds, appear to be a result of cloud scavenging processes. Gravitational coagulation of cloud droplets may be the principal cause of this difference in the vertical distribution of CCN. The results suggest a reservoir of CCN in the free troposphere which can act as a source for the marine boundary layer.

  10. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  11. Research and Technology, 1987, Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerny, Gene (Editor); Moe, Karen (Editor); Paddack, Steven (Editor); Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Ballard, Jan (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Research at Goddard Space Flight Center during 1987 is summarized. Topics addressed include space and earth sciences, technology, flight projects and mission definition studies, and institutional technology.

  12. Robert H. Goddard and His Liquid-Gasoline Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Goddard's 1926 rocket configuration. Dr. Goddard's liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  13. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  14. Science at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2012-01-01

    The Sciences and Exploration Directorate of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is the largest Earth and space science research organization in the world. Its scientists advance understanding of the Earth and its life-sustaining environment, the Sun, the solar system, and the wider universe beyond. Researchers in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate work with engineers, computer programmers, technologists, and other team members to develop the cutting-edge technology needed for space-based research. Instruments are also deployed on aircraft, balloons, and Earth's surface. I will give an overview of the current research activities and programs at GSFC including the James Web Space Telescope (JWST), future Earth Observing programs, experiments that are exploring our solar system and studying the interaction of the Sun with the Earth's magnetosphere.

  15. NASA/Goddard Thermal Technology Overview 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Daniel; Swanson, Theodore D.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the current plans and efforts at NASA Goddard to develop new thermal control technology for anticipated future missions. It will also address some of the programmatic developments currently underway at NASA, especially with respect to the Technology Development Program at NASA. While funding for basic technology development is still scarce, significant efforts are being made in direct support of flight programs. New technology development continues to be driven by the needs of future missions, and applications of these technologies to current Goddard programs will be addressed. Many of these technologies also have broad applicability to DOD, DOE, and commercial programs. Partnerships have been developed with the Air Force, Navy, and various universities to promote technology development. In addition, technology development activities supported by internal research and development (IRAD) program, the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program, and the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), are reviewed in this presentation. Specific technologies addressed include; two-phase systems applications and issues on NASA missions, latest developments of electro-hydrodynamically pumped systems, development of high electrical conductivity coatings, and various other research activities. New Technology program underway at NASA, although funding is limited center dot NASA/GSFC's primary mission of science satellite development is healthy and vibrant, although new missions are scarce - now have people on overhead working new missions and proposals center dot Future mission applications promise to be thermally challenging center dot Direct technology funding is still very restricted - Projects are the best source for direct application of technology - SBIR thermal subtopic resurrected in FY 14 - Limited Technology development underway via IRAD, NESC, other sources - Administrator pushing to revive technology and educational programs at NASA

  16. Simulation of solar radiative transfer in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    This work presents a 3-D model of radiative transfer which is used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds and fluxes (albedo and transmittance) of visible solar radiation.

  17. Determination of the cumulus size distribution from LANDSAT pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karg, E.; Mueller, H.; Quenzel, H.

    1983-01-01

    Varying insolation causes undesirable thermic stress to the receiver of a solar power plant. The rapid change of insolation depends on the size distribution of the clouds; in order to measure these changes, it is suitable to determine typical cumulus size distributions. For this purpose, LANDSAT-images are adequate. Several examples of cumulus size distributions will be presented and their effects on the operation of a solar power plant are discussed.

  18. Apoptosis of postovulatory cumulus granulosa cells of the rat.

    PubMed

    Szołtys, M; Tabarowski, Z; Pawlik, A

    2000-12-01

    The process of apoptosis in the postovulatory cumulus granulosa cells was investigated in pregnant rats. Mature female Wistar rats, exhibiting a regular 4-day oestrous cycle, were placed with males on the day of pro-oestrus. The following day, on which spermatozoa were found in vaginal smears, was designated day 1 of pregnancy. The animals were killed just before ovulation (24.00 hours), on days 1 (5.00, 11.00, and 18.00 hours), and 2 ( 11.00 hours) of pregnancy. Excised ovaries and oviducts were submitted to a routine histological procedure and paraplast sections were subjected to detection of apoptotic cells using the TUNEL method. The cumulus granulosa cells of preovulatory follicles (24.00 hours) were negative for apoptotic staining. However, 5 h later a positive staining was observed in the oviduct ampulla and included the cumulus granulosa cells lying in the peripheral parts of postovulatory cumuli oophori, and the oviductal epithelial cells of this region. On the evening of day 1 almost all cumulus granulosa cells showed strong immunostaining while on day 2 at 11.00 hours only immunonegative clusters of remnants of cumulus granulosa cells were present in the distended ampulla region, while naked, two or more cell embryos were present in the further parts of oviduct. These results indicate that in the rat apoptosis of cumulus granulosa cells starts shortly after ovulation in the peripheral region. Epithelial ampullary cells surrounding ovulated cumuli show a massive apoptosis. PMID:11131018

  19. The 1993 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1993 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD on May 10-13, 1993. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  20. Effect of oocytectomy on glycosaminoglycan composition during cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Inoue, M; Sato, E

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the role of oocytes in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans during cumulus expansion, we analyzed the amount and composition of glycosaminoglycans in porcine intact and oocytectomized cumulus-oocyte complexes. Follicular fluid induced cumulus expansion in intact and oocytectomized cumulus-oocyte complexes cultured for over 24 h, but the degree of expansion in oocytectomized complexes reached only 76% of that in intact complexes after 24 h in culture. There were no differences in the amounts of [3H]glucosamine incorporated into each type of complex. Metabolic labeling studies on glycosaminoglycans with [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulfate showed that the amounts of 3H- and 35S-labeled glycosaminoglycans increased, and rapidly so, from 16 h in culture. The 3H-labeled glycosaminoglycans at these high levels were digested by Streptomyces hyaluronidase or chondroitinase ABC, and the rate of increase in 3H-labeled glycosaminoglycans was reduced by oocytectomy. In contrast, the increased levels of 35S-labeled glycosaminoglycans were affected only by chondroitinase ABC, and oocytectomy was ineffective. In conclusion, follicular fluid promotes cumulus expansion, and the oocyte plays an essential role in the acute synthesis of hyaluronic acid, but not chondroitin sulfate, during cumulus expansion stimulated in vitro.

  1. Functional significance of cumulus expansion in the mouse: roles for the preovulatory synthesis of hyaluronic acid within the cumulus mass.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Russell, P T; Larsen, W J

    1993-01-01

    Gonadotropin-stimulated expansion of the mouse cumulus oocyte complex (COC) in vitro, measured with a quantitative videographic method, is comparable to that observed to occur in vivo when medium is supplemented with porcine follicle stimulating hormone (pFSH), 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), and 2.5 mM glucosamine or optimal concentrations of glutamine and glucose. In the absence of glucosamine, the volumetric expansion of COCs in vitro is never more than 25% of that occurring in its presence. The addition of 6-diazo-5-oxo-1-norleucine (DON), an inhibitor of glucosamine synthesis to medium supplemented with glutamine and glucose, completely inhibits cumulus expansion in vitro. This system was utilized to examine the relationship between cumulus expansion and fertilization rates, and the maintenance of fertilizability in culture. Successful fertilization (as determined by development to the 2-cell stage) was correlated with the quantity and quality of the expanded cumulus mass, and conversely, the spontaneous loss or mechanical removal of the cumulus was correlated with a loss of fertilizability following additional incubation in culture medium. In addition, the i.p. injection of DON inhibited cumulus expansion within the intact follicle and suppressed ovulation.

  2. First radar echoes from cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Charles A.; Miller, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    In attempting to use centimeter-wavelength radars to investigate the early stage of precipitation formation in clouds, 'mantle echoes' are rediscovered and shown to come mostly from scattering by small-scale variations in refractive index, a Bragg kind of scattering mechanism. This limits the usefulness of single-wavelength radar for studies of hydrometeor growth, according to data on summer cumulus clouds in North Dakota, Hawaii, and Florida, to values of reflectivity factor above about 10 dBZe with 10-cm radar, 0 dBZe with 5-cm radar, and -10 dBZe with 3-cm radar. These are limits at or above which the backscattered radar signal from the kinds of clouds observed can be assumed to be almost entirely from hydrometeors or (rarely) other particulate material such as insects. Dual-wavelength radar data can provide the desired information about hydrometeors at very low reflectivity levels if assumptions can be made about the inhomogeneities responsible for the Bragg scattering. The Bragg scattering signal itself probably will be a useful way to probe inhomogeneities one-half the radar wavelength in scale for studying cloud entrainment and mixing processes. However, this use is possible only before scattering from hydrometeors dominates the radar return.

  3. GLOW: The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huailin; Li, Steven X.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    GLOW (Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds) is a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. The system is contained in a modified van to allow deployment in field operations. The lidar system uses a Nd:YAG laser transmitter to measure winds using either aerosol backscatter at 1064 nm or molecular backscatter at 355 nm. The receiver telescope is a 45 cm Dall-Kirkham which is fiber coupled to separate Doppler receivers, one optimized for the aerosol backscatter wind measurement and another optimized for the molecular backscatter wind measurement. The receivers are implementations of the 'double edge' technique and use high spectral resolution Fabry-Perot etalons to measure the Doppler shift. A 45 cm aperture azimuth-over-elevation scanner is mounted on the roof of the van to allow full sky access and a variety of scanning options. GLOW is intended to be used as a deployable field system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. In addition, it can be used for calibration/validation activities following launch of spaceborne wind lidar systems. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the examples of lidar wind profiles obtained with the system.

  4. GLOW- The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huailin; Li, Steven X.

    2000-01-01

    GLOW (Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds) is a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. The system is contained in a modified van to allow deployment in field operations. The lidar system uses a Nd:YAG laser transmitter to measure winds using either aerosol backscatter at 1064 nm or molecular backscatter at 355 nm. The receiver telescope is a 45 cm Dall-Kirkham which is fiber coupled to separate Doppler receivers, one optimized for the aerosol backscatter wind measurement and another optimized for the molecular backscatter wind measurement. The receivers are implementations of the 'double edge' technique and use high spectral resolution Fabry-Perot etalons to measure the Doppler shift. A 45 cm aperture azimuth-over-elevation scanner is mounted on the roof of the van to allow full sky access and a variety of scanning options. GLOW is intended to be used as a deployable field system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. In addition, it can be used for calibration/validation activities following launch of spaceborne wind lidar systems. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the examples of lidar wind profiles obtained with the system.

  5. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  6. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca(2+)) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence.

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, D. R.; Guillemette, C.; Sirard, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3′5′-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca2+) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence. PMID:26082143

  9. Seeding cumulus in Florida: new 1970 results.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J; Woodley, W L

    1971-04-01

    In the Florida single cloud experiments, the main result of the statistical analyses is that the dynamic seeding effect on rainfall is large, positive, and significant. From all the 1968 and 1970 data together, the seeding effect is estimated to be larger than a factor of 3; that is, the seeded clouds rained more than three times as much as the controls after the seeding run. On fair days, defined objectively by percentage of area covered by showers, the seeding effect is shown to be larger than the overall average, but it may be negative on rainy days. Rainy days in the tropics are about 10 percent of the days with rain, but they produce about half the total rainfall. The applicability of our single cloud results to other areas is not established but seems hopeful for many tropical and subtropical regions. It can be assessed by cloud population studies together with our numerical model (25). Guidance for the next steps toward practical rainfall enhancement and toward the understanding and modification of cloud systems in storms may be provided by our study of merger clouds. Mergers are shown often to produce more than an order of magnitude more rain than isolated clouds on the same day, probably owing to dynamic invigoration of the merged cloud circulations. Results of our first small attempt toward inducing and documenting mergers in a multiple cloud seeding experiment appear promising. Although far from statistically conclusive, they have opened a new frontier in the science and technology of dynamic cloud modification. It is also hoped that the multiple cumulus seeding experiments will help to clarify the formation of "cloud clusters" and their role in large-scale circulations, thus contributing to the focal subject of the Global Atmospheric Research Program in the tropics.

  10. Immature oocyte quality and maturational competence of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Gabriel Martin; Dalvit, Gabriel Carlos; Achi, María Verónica; Miguez, Marcelo Sergio; Cetica, Pablo Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Porcine immature oocyte quality (i.e., that of live oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage) was evaluated according to features of the surrounding cumulus, aiming to establish maturational competence of different subpopulations of such cumulus-oocyte complexes. Six subpopulations were identified: A1 (with a dense cumulus), A2 (with a translucent cumulus), B1 (with the corona radiata), B2 (partly naked oocytes), C (naked oocytes), D (with a dark cumulus). The percent incidence of live oocyte in these subpopulations changed significantly as related to cumulus features, however the occurrence of oocytes in the germinal vesicle stage was lower in class D only. Similar metaphase II rates achieved in A1, A2, B1 and B2 classes after in vitro maturation suggest that the nucleus may in fact mature in vitro, in spite of the different accompanying cumulus features which are typical of these classes. In contrast, a higher cytoplasmic maturation rate obtained in class A may indicate a stronger dependence of this variable upon cumulus features than that shown by nuclear maturation. When different types of cumulus expansion after in vitro maturation were considered (i.e., fully expanded cumulus, partly expanded cumulus, and partly naked oocyte), no differences were found in the percent of oocytes reaching metaphase II or cytoplasmic maturation. It is concluded that morphological features of the collected porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (rather than cumulus behavior during culture) may be useful for selection of potentially competent oocytes for in vitro fertilization and embryo production. PMID:20067032

  11. Derivation of Cumulus Cloud Dimensions and Shape from the Airborne Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Ottaviani, Matteo; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.

    2016-01-01

    The Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is an airborne instrument, whose measurements have been extensively used for retrievals of microphysical properties of clouds. In this study we show that for cumulus clouds the information content of the RSP data can be extended by adding the macroscopic parameters of the cloud, such as its geometric shape, dimensions, and height above the ground. This extension is possible by virtue of the high angular resolution and high frequency of the RSP measurements, which allow for geometric constraint of the cloud's 2D cross section between a number of tangent lines of view. The retrieval method is tested on realistic 3D radiative transfer simulations and applied to actual RSP data.

  12. Hubble 25th Anniversary: NASA Social at Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 25th anniversary on April 24, 2015. To mark the occasion, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland -- home of Hubble operations -- host...

  13. ISS Update: NBL Orion Flight Lead Tim Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Tim Goddard, Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) Orion Flight Lead, about how the NBL is used to train rescue and recovery personnel for future Orio...

  14. The Goddard Space Flight Center preferred parts list, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, N. E. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    A listing is presented of preferred electronic parts, part upgrading procedures, part derating guidelines, and part screening procedures to be used in the selection, procurement, and application of parts for Goddard Space Flight Center space systems and ground support equipment.

  15. Progesterone from the Cumulus Cells Is the Sperm Chemoattractant Secreted by the Rabbit Oocyte Cumulus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Guidobaldi, Héctor Alejandro; Teves, María Eugenia; Uñates, Diego Rafael; Anastasía, Agustín; Giojalas, Laura Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Sperm chemotaxis in mammals have been identified towards several female sources as follicular fluid (FF), oviduct fluid, and conditioned medium from the cumulus oophorus (CU) and the oocyte (O). Though several substances were confirmed as sperm chemoattractant, Progesterone (P) seems to be the best chemoattractant candidate, because: 1) spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor, 2) capacitated spermatozoa are chemotactically attracted in vitro by gradients of low quantities of P; 3) the CU cells produce and secrete P after ovulation; 4) a gradient of P may be kept stable along the CU; and 5) the most probable site for sperm chemotaxis in vivo could be near and/or inside the CU. The aim of this study was to verify whether P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the rabbit oocyte-cumulus complex (OCC) in the rabbit, as a mammalian animal model. By means of videomicroscopy and computer image analysis we observed that only the CU are a stable source of sperm attractants. The CU produce and secrete P since the hormone was localized inside these cells by immunocytochemistry and in the conditioned medium by enzyme immunoassay. In addition, rabbit spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor detected by western blot and localized over the acrosomal region by immunocytochemistry. To confirm that P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the CU, the sperm chemotactic response towards the OCC conditioned medium was inhibited by three different approaches: P from the OCC conditioned medium was removed with an anti-P antibody, the attractant gradient of the OCC conditioned medium was disrupted by a P counter gradient, and the sperm P receptor was blocked with a specific antibody. We concluded that only the CU but not the oocyte secretes P, and the latter chemoattract spermatozoa by means of a cell surface receptor. Our findings may be of interest in assisted reproduction procedures in humans, animals of economic importance and endangered species. PMID:18725941

  16. Status of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Participation in SNAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Dr. Rauscher will present programatic status and high-level/summary information on the technical status of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's participation in the SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Goddard's participation falls into four areas, and status in each of these will be covered. These areas are as follows: (I) focal plane array and packaging, (2) Teledyne HAWAII-4RG sensor chip assembly, (3) communications studies, and (4) integration and test studies.

  17. Advancing Models and Evaluation of Cumulus, Climate and Aerosol Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, Andrew

    2015-10-27

    This project was successfully able to meet its’ goals, but faced some serious challenges due to personnel issues. Nonetheless, it was largely successful. The Project Objectives were as follows: 1. Develop a unified representation of stratifom and cumulus cloud microphysics for NCAR/DOE global community models. 2. Examine the effects of aerosols on clouds and their impact on precipitation in stratiform and cumulus clouds. We will also explore the effects of clouds and precipitation on aerosols. 3. Test these new formulations using advanced evaluation techniques and observations and release

  18. The beneficial effects of cumulus cells and oocyte-cumulus cell gap junctions depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Wu, Sha-Na; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Wang, Dong-Hui; Kong, Xiang-Wei; Lu, Angeleem; Li, Yan-Jiao; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Yue-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Cumulus cells are a group of closely associated granulosa cells that surround and nourish oocytes. Previous studies have shown that cumulus cells contribute to oocyte maturation and fertilization through gap junction communication. However, it is not known how this gap junction signaling affects in vivo versus in vitro maturation of oocytes, and their subsequent fertilization and embryonic development following insemination. Therefore, in our study, we performed mouse oocyte maturation and insemination using in vivo- or in vitro-matured oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCCs, which retain gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes co-cultured with cumulus cells (DCs, which lack gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), and in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes without cumulus cells (DOs). Using these models, we were able to analyze the effects of gap junction signaling on oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. We found that gap junctions were necessary for both in vivo and in vitro oocyte maturation. In addition, for oocytes matured in vivo, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization and blastocyst formation, and this improvement was strengthened by gap junctions. Moreover, for oocytes matured in vitro, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization, but not blastocyst formation, and this improvement was independent of gap junctions. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the beneficial effect of gap junction signaling from cumulus cells depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods. PMID:26966678

  19. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Divsion Annual Report 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD, Code 660) is one of the world's largest and most diverse astronomical organizations. Space flight missions are conceived, built and launched to observe the entire range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to centimeter waves. In addition, experiments are flown to gather data on high-energy cosmic rays, and plans are being made to detect gravitational radiation from space-borne missions. To enable these missions, we have vigorous programs of instrument and detector development. Division scientists also carry out preparatory theoretical work and subsequent data analysis and modeling. In addition to space flight missions, we have a vibrant suborbital program with numerous sounding rocket and balloon payloads in development or operation. The ASD is organized into five labs: the Astroparticle Physics Lab, the X-ray Astrophysics Lab, the Gravitational Astrophysics Lab, the Observational Cosmology Lab, and the Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Lab. The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is an Office at the Division level. Approximately 400 scientists and engineers work in ASD. Of these, 80 are civil servant scientists, while the rest are resident university-based scientists, contractors, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and administrative staff. We currently operate the Swift Explorer mission and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In addition, we provide data archiving and operational support for the XMM mission (jointly with ESA) and the Suzaku mission (with JAXA). We are also a partner with Caltech on the NuSTAR mission. The Hubble Space Telescope Project is headquartered at Goddard, and ASD provides Project Scientists to oversee operations at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Projects in development include the Neutron Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission, an X-ray timing experiment for the International Space Station; the Transiting Exoplanet Sky Survey (TESS

  20. Cumulus parameterizations in chemical transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahowald, Natalie M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1995-12-01

    Global three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs) are valuable tools for studying processes controlling the distribution of trace constituents in the atmosphere. A major uncertainty in these models is the subgrid-scale parametrization of transport by cumulus convection. This study seeks to define the range of behavior of moist convective schemes and point toward more reliable formulations for inclusion in chemical transport models. The emphasis is on deriving convective transport from meteorological data sets (such as those from the forecast centers) which do not routinely include convective mass fluxes. Seven moist convective parameterizations are compared in a column model to examine the sensitivity of the vertical profile of trace gases to the parameterization used in a global chemical transport model. The moist convective schemes examined are the Emanuel scheme [Emanuel, 1991], the Feichter-Crutzen scheme [Feichter and Crutzen, 1990], the inverse thermodynamic scheme (described in this paper), two versions of a scheme suggested by Hack [Hack, 1994], and two versions of a scheme suggested by Tiedtke (one following the formulation used in the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting) and ECHAM3 (European Centre and Hamburg Max-Planck-Institut) models [Tiedtke, 1989], and one formulated as in the TM2 (Transport Model-2) model (M. Heimann, personal communication, 1992). These convective schemes vary in the closure used to derive the mass fluxes, as well as the cloud model formulation, giving a broad range of results. In addition, two boundary layer schemes are compared: a state-of-the-art nonlocal boundary layer scheme [Holtslag and Boville, 1993] and a simple adiabatic mixing scheme described in this paper. Three tests are used to compare the moist convective schemes against observations. Although the tests conducted here cannot conclusively show that one parameterization is better than the others, the tests are a good measure of the

  1. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  2. Ground-Based Remote Retrievals of Cumulus Entrainment Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy J.; Turner, David D.; Berg, Larry K.; Krueger, Steven K.

    2013-07-26

    While fractional entrainment rates for cumulus clouds have typically been derived from airborne observations, this limits the size and scope of available data sets. To increase the number of continental cumulus entrainment rate observations available for study, an algorithm for retrieving them from ground-based remote sensing observations has been developed. This algorithm, called the Entrainment Rate In Cumulus Algorithm (ERICA), uses the suite of instruments at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility as inputs into a Gauss-Newton optimal estimation scheme, in which an assumed guess of the entrainment rate is iteratively adjusted through intercomparison of modeled liquid water path and cloud droplet effective radius to their observed counterparts. The forward model in this algorithm is the Explicit Mixing Parcel Model (EMPM), a cloud parcel model that treats entrainment as a series of discrete entrainment events. A quantified value for measurement uncertainty is also returned as part of the retrieval. Sensitivity testing and information content analysis demonstrate the robust nature of this method for retrieving accurate observations of the entrainment rate without the drawbacks of airborne sampling. Results from a test of ERICA on three months of shallow cumulus cloud events show significant variability of the entrainment rate of clouds in a single day and from one day to the next. The mean value of 1.06 km-¹ for the entrainment rate in this dataset corresponds well with prior observations and simulations of the entrainment rate in cumulus clouds.

  3. High-Resolution NU-WRF Simulations of a Deep Convective-Precipitation System During MC3E. Part 1; Comparisons Between Goddard Microphysics Schemes and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Di; Lang, Stephen; Chern, Jiundar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Fridlind, Ann; Matsui, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard microphysics scheme was recently improved by adding a 4th ice class (frozen dropshail). This new 4ICE scheme was implemented and tested in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) for an intense continental squall line and a moderate,less-organized continental case. Simulated peak radar reflectivity profiles were improved both in intensity and shape for both cases as were the overall reflectivity probability distributions versus observations. In this study, the new Goddard 4ICE scheme is implemented into the regional-scale NASA Unified - Weather Research and Forecasting model (NU-WRF) and tested on an intense mesoscale convective system that occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The NU42WRF simulated radar reflectivities, rainfall intensities, and vertical and horizontal structure using the new 4ICE scheme agree as well as or significantly better with observations than when using previous versions of the Goddard 3ICE (graupel or hail) schemes. In the 4ICE scheme, the bin microphysics-based rain evaporation correction produces more erect convective cores, while modification of the unrealistic collection of ice by dry hail produces narrow and intense cores, allowing more slow-falling snow to be transported rearward. Together with a revised snow size mapping, the 4ICE scheme produces a more horizontally stratified trailing stratiform region with a broad, more coherent light rain area. In addition, the NU-WRF 4ICE simulated radar reflectivity distributions are consistent with and generally superior to those using the GCE due to the less restrictive open lateral boundaries

  4. High-resolution NU-WRF simulations of a deep convective-precipitation system during MC3E: Further improvements and comparisons between Goddard microphysics schemes and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Di; Lang, Stephen; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Fridlind, Ann; Matsui, Toshihisa

    2016-02-01

    The Goddard microphysics was recently improved by adding a fourth ice class (frozen drops/hail). This new 4ICE scheme was developed and tested in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model for an intense continental squall line and a moderate, less organized continental case. Simulated peak radar reflectivity profiles were improved in intensity and shape for both cases, as were the overall reflectivity probability distributions versus observations. In this study, the new Goddard 4ICE scheme is implemented into the regional-scale NASA Unified-Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model, modified and evaluated for the same intense squall line, which occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). NU-WRF simulated radar reflectivities, total rainfall, propagation, and convective system structures using the 4ICE scheme modified herein agree as well as or significantly better with observations than the original 4ICE and two previous 3ICE (graupel or hail) versions of the Goddard microphysics. With the modified 4ICE, the bin microphysics-based rain evaporation correction improves propagation and in conjunction with eliminating the unrealistic dry collection of ice/snow by hail can replicate the erect, narrow, and intense convective cores. Revisions to the ice supersaturation, ice number concentration formula, and snow size mapping, including a new snow breakup effect, allow the modified 4ICE to produce a stronger, better organized system, more snow, and mimic the strong aggregation signature in the radar distributions. NU-WRF original 4ICE simulated radar reflectivity distributions are consistent with and generally superior to those using the GCE due to the less restrictive domain and lateral boundaries.

  5. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  6. The 1988 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James (Editor); Hughes, Peter (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1988 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland on May 24, 1988. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed. The papers in these proceedings fall into the following areas: mission operations support, planning and scheduling; fault isolation/diagnosis; image processing and machine vision; data management; modeling and simulation; and development tools/methodologies.

  7. The Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST Center)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The following is a technical report of the progress made under Cooperative Agreement NCC5494, the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST). The period covered by this report is October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001. GEST is a consortium of scientists and engineers, led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to conduct scientific research in Earth and information sciences and related technologies in collaboration with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). GEST was established through a cooperative agreement signed May 11, 2000, following a competitive procurement process initiated by GSFC.

  8. Entrainment rates at the tops of laboratory analogs of cumulus and stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górska, Anna; Malinowski, Szymon P.; Fugal, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    We investigate entrainment at tops of laboratory analogs of convective clouds: cumulus and stratocumulus. Cloudy saturated moist air (T ~22 °C) containing droplets of diameters of ~3-10 μm, is introduced into a laboratory cloud chamber of dimensions of 1.0×1.0×1.8 through an opening in the bottom wall. Initialy cloudy air fills ~60 cm thick layer at the bottom. Mixing between the cloud and unsaturated air above (T ~22 °C, RH ~35 %) results in evaporative cooling triggering convection which, in turn, leads to formation of a well mixed layer capperd with a temperature inversion. The temperature jump is about 2 °C within ~30 cm deep layer. Then updrafts are forced through a 30cm high tube extending from the bottom of the chamber. "Strong' updrafts which penetrate the whole inversion layer mimic overshooting cumulus clouds while "weak' updrafts diverging under the inversion simulate stratocumulus clouds. We use a laser sheet technique to image two-dimensional cross sections through the clouds. A specially developed mutiscale Particle Image Velicimetry (PIV) algorithm allows to retrieve 2D velocity fields. Suitable image processing allows to determine cloud-clear air interface in the images. Extracting velocities of cloudy (ui) and environmental (ua) air on both sides of the interface allows us calculate entrainment / detrainment rates: E = -ρa(ua - ui) - entrainment rate D = ρa(ua - ui) - detrainment rate. On the poster we will present fine structures of entraimnet/dertaiment process and discuss similarities and differences in both investigated types of clouds.

  9. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  10. The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES): A UAV-based Investigation of Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is a NASA-sponsored and -led science investigation that utilizes an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) to investigate thunderstorms in the vicinity of the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida. As part of NASA's UAV-based science demonstration program, ACES will provide a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. ACES will employ the Altus 11 aircraft, built by General Atomics-Aeronautical Systems, Inc. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high-altitude flight (up to 55,000 feet), the Altus will be flown near, and when possible, above (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time, allowing investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and (3) provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload, already developed and flown on Altus, includes electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. The ACES field campaign will be conducted during July 2002 with a goal of performing 8 to 10 UAV flights. Each flight will require about 4 to 5 hours on station at altitudes from 40,000 ft to 55,000 ft. The ACES team is comprised of scientists from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and NASA Goddard Space Flight Centers partnered with General Atomics and IDEA, LLC.

  11. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  12. Hyaluronidase removal of the cumulus oophorus increases in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Lavy, G; Boyers, S P; DeCherney, A H

    1988-10-01

    The effect of hyaluronidase removal of the cumulus oophorus on the in vitro fertilization rate of oocytes obtained from patients with poor oocyte fertilizability has been evaluated. Eighty-eight oocytes were obtained from 13 patients undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) for indications of male-factor, immunological, and idiopathic infertility. In addition, patients in whom fertilization did not occur on previous IVF cycles were evaluated in the study. The oocytes of each individual patient were randomly assigned into a treatment (removal of the cumulus; N = 40 oocytes) or nontreatment group (control; N = 48 oocytes). Hyaluronidase was used to remove the cumulus immediately following oocyte retrieval, and insemination was performed 6-8 hr later. The overall oocyte fertilization rate (both treated and untreated) was 42%. The treatment group demonstrated a higher rate of fertilization compared to the nontreatment group (55% vs 31%; P less than 0.05). Examination of various patient groups revealed a statistically significant difference in fertilization rates between the treated and the untreated oocytes only in the "no previous fertilization" group (60% vs 28%; P less than 0.05). A higher rate of fertilization of the treated oocytes was also seen in the immunologic infertility group, however, statistical significance was not achieved (50% vs 25%; P = 0.07). Only one clinical pregnancy was achieved in this group of 13 patients. We conclude that in this group of patients, removal of the cumulus prior to insemination may, in some cases, increase the fertilization potential of the oocyte.

  13. Near infrared reflection spectra of artificial cumulus clouds.

    PubMed

    Plummer, W T

    1969-10-01

    Reflection spectra are presented for artificial cumulus clouds with a progression of droplet sizes, including sizes common in natural clouds, over the wavelength range from 1.0 micro to 2.4 micro. A correction is made for gaseous absorption. The spectra show reflectivity minima at 1.16 micro, 1.41 micro, and 1.92micro which deepen as the droplets become larger and are in good agreement with reflection spectra of terrestrial clouds.

  14. Understanding Albrecht's model of trade cumulus cloud fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bretherton, C.S. )

    1993-07-15

    Using Albrecht's model, approximate analytical formulas are found for the dependence of the steady-state mean thermodynamic structure of a partly cloudy convective marine boundary layer on external parameters. The goals are to understand the physical factors that influence the vertical profiles of mean relative humidity, temperature, and fractional cloudiness within the cloud layer using the model to gain insight into the stratocumulus-trade cumulus transition in the subtropical trade wind regime, and to understand the sensitivity of the model to tunable internal parameters. A prototype model for trade cumulus boundary layers consists of a well-mixed subcloud layer topped by a cumulus layer and a sharp trade inversion. Precipitation is ignored and simple parameterizations for radiative cooling and fractional cloudiness are used. The analytical approximation agrees with exact steady-state numerical solutions of Albrecht's model. The cloud-base and the trade-inversion heights are not strongly dependent on adjustable parameters within the cloud model and are determined by bulk balances of radiative fluxes, surface fluxes, and subsidence in a manner similar to the more empirical model of Bets and Ridgway. The cloud-layer sounding and the cloud fraction are affected by external parameters only through changes in the cloud-base latent heat flux and the cloud thickness. The cloud fraction is sensitive to two tunable internal constants in the cloud model that affect rates of cloud entrainment and detrainment, respectively. For most choices of SST and upper-air conditions, these constants can be tuned to produce either a mainly saturated (stratocumulus-like) cloud layer or a trade cumulus-like layer with no environmental saturation. The sensitivity of cloud fraction to SST and mean subsidence is explored for two choices of these constants and the effect of unsteadiness due to downstream changes in external conditions are considered. 33 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Morphological dynamics of cumulus-oocyte complex during oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Sato, E

    1998-01-01

    The recent advances on the cytoplasmic regulators of the induction of germinal vesicle break down, maturation and degeneration of oocytes, and glycosaminoglycan composition during cumulus expansion of cumulus-oocyte complexes are discussed. A) Inactive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are present in the oocytes at germinal vesicle (GV) stage, and are activated with germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), and remain highly active throughout maturation in porcine oocytes. Inactive MAPKs are localized in the cytoplasm of GV-arrested oocytes and active MAPKs were detected in the GV just before GVBD. B) Cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) was reduced by oocy tectomy. The profile of total glycosaminoglycan synthesis was attributed to hyaluronic acid rather than chondroitin sulfate in intact COCs and oocytectomy reduced hyaluronic acid synthesis. C) The abnormalities of chromosomes and alpha-tubulin morphology were observed in the oocytes of c-mos deficient mice. MAPK activity of c-mos deficient oocytes did not significantly fluctuate throughout maturation and was clearly lower than that of wild-type oocytes. One of the most drastic abnormalities in c-mos knockout mouse oocytes was their entrance into the interphase instead of second meiosis after first polar body emission. D) Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction-Southern blot hybridization demonstrated positive expression of Fas in intraovarian mouse oocytes. In contrast, expression of Fas ligand was detected in granulosa cells. These findings were histologically confirmed by in situ hybridization with Fas- and FasL-specific probes. Co-culture of intact and zona-free eggs and granulosa cells demonstrated positive TUNEL staining only zona-free eggs.

  16. Research and Technology Report. Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Maran, Stephen (Editor); Walter, Lou (Editor); Brown, Mitch (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of Goddard Space Flight Center's annual report highlights the importance of mission operations and data systems covering mission planning and operations; TDRSS, positioning systems, and orbit determination; ground system and networks, hardware and software; data processing and analysis; and World Wide Web use. The report also includes flight projects, space sciences, Earth system science, and engineering and materials.

  17. Technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, Henry H.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presented to Civil Space Technology Development workshop on technology transfer and effectiveness are provided. Topics covered include: obstacles to technology transfer; technology transfer improvement program at GSFC: communication between technology developers and users; and user feedback to technologists.

  18. Geographic information systems at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    The basic functions of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and the different ways that a GIS may be implemented are described. It surveys that GIS software packages that are currently in operation at the Goddard Space Flight Center and discusses the types of applications for which they are best suited. Future plans for in-house GIS research and development are outlined.

  19. Carrier account utilization at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, W. E.; Langmead, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The system in use at Goddard Space Flight Center for the utilization of the Common Use Service Carrier Account and the R&D Inventory Carrier Account technique for budgeting, accounting, financial control, and management reporting, both for the individual functional area and on a Center-wide basis, is documented.

  20. The 1994 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1994 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland, on 10-12 May 1994. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  1. Implementation of hydrologic models at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Major watershed simulation models were implemented on the computer system at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and their operation was verified. Historical and physiographic data were acquired for two Maryland river basins (Monocasy River above Jug Bridge and Patuxent River near Laurel, Maryland) and the models were calibrated to simulate them. GSFC personnel were instructed in model operation after the models were implemented.

  2. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Supply Chain Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the working of the Supplier Assessment Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The program supports many GSFC projects to ensure suppliers are aware of and are following the contractual requirements, to provide an independent assessment of the suppliers' processes, and provide suppliers' safety and mission assurance organizations information to make the changes within their organization.

  3. Performance of the Goddard multiscale modeling framework with Goddard ice microphysical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Li, J.-L. F.; Mohr, Karen I.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2016-03-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount, total cloud fractions, net radiation, and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow and graupel. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with subgrid processes, cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs, and momentum transport remain and will require future improvement.

  4. Performance of the Goddard Multiscale Modeling Framework with Goddard Ice Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, J. D.; Tao, W. K.; Lang, S. E.; Matsui, T.; Li, J. L. F.; Mohr, K. I.

    2015-12-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products, CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud fractions, and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow/graupel as functions of temperature and mixing ratio. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with sub-grid processes and cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs remain and will require future improvement.

  5. Performance of the Goddard Multiscale Modeling Framework with Goddard Ice Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Li, J.-L.; Mohr, Karen I.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2016-01-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount, total cloud fractions, net radiation, and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow and graupel. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with subgrid processes, cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs, and momentum transport remain and will require future improvement.

  6. Continuous growth of cloud droplets in cumulus cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Suehiro, Tamotsu; Saito, Izumi

    2016-04-01

    A new method to seamlessly simulate the continuous growth of droplets advected by turbulent flow inside a cumulus cloud was developed from first principle. A cubic box ascending with a mean updraft inside a cumulus cloud was introduced and the updraft velocity was self-consistently determined in such a way that the mean turbulent velocity within the box vanished. All the degrees of freedom of the cloud droplets and turbulence fields were numerically integrated. The box ascended quickly inside the cumulus cloud due to the updraft and the mean radius of the droplets grew from 10 to 24 μm for about 10 min. The turbulent flow tended to slow down the time evolutions of the updraft velocity, the box altitude and the mean cloud droplet radius. The size distribution of the cloud droplets in the updraft case was narrower than in the absence of the updraft. It was also found that the wavenumeber spectra of the variances of the temperature and water vapor mixing ratio were nearly constant in the low wavenumber range. The future development of the new method was argued.

  7. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  8. Selective binding of human cumulus cell-secreted glycoproteins to human spermatozoa during capacitation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, J.; Kopecny, V.; Dvorak, M.

    1984-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that glycoproteins manufactured by human cumulus cells can be detected bound to human spermatozoa incubated in capacitational medium containing the labeled cumulus-cell secretions. Cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins were labeled with a mixture of /sup 3/H-methionine and /sup 3/H-tryptophan or with 3H-fucose, and the binding of the labeled compounds to spermatozoa was evaluated by autoradiography. The binding was highly selective, involving only approximately 1% of the samples of spermatozoa used. The results suggest that the binding of cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins to spermatozoa may represent a final and highly selective step in human sperm capacitation.

  9. Proteolytic activity of the 26S proteasome is required for the meiotic resumption, germinal vesicle breakdown, and cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young-Joo; Nagyova, Eva; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Procházka, Radek; Sutovsky, Miriam; Park, Chang-Sik; Sutovsky, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The resumption of oocyte meiosis in mammals encompasses the landmark event of oocyte germinal vesicle (GV) breakdown (GVBD), accompanied by the modification of cell-to-cell communication and adhesion between the oocyte and surrounding cumulus cells. The concomitant cumulus expansion relies on microfilament-cytoskeletal remodeling and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. We hypothesized that this multifaceted remodeling event requires substrate-specific proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP). We evaluated meiotic progression, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the production of cumulus ECM in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) cultured with or without 10-200 microM MG132, a specific proteasomal inhibitor, for the first 22 h of in vitro maturation, followed by 22 h of culture with or without MG132. Treatment with 10 microM MG132 arrested 28.4% of oocytes in GV stage (vs. 1.3% in control), 43.1% in prometaphase I, and 16.2% in metaphase I, whereas 83.7% of control ova reached metaphase II (0% of MG132 reached metaphase II). The proportion of GV-stage ova increased progressively to >90% with increased concentration of MG132 (20-200 microM). Furthermore, MG132 blocked the extrusion of the first polar body and degradation of F-actin-rich transzonal projections (TZP) interconnecting cumulus cells with the oocyte. The microfilament disruptor cytochalasin E (CE) prevented cumulus expansion but accelerated the breakdown of TZPs. Ova treated with a combination of 10 microM MG132 and 10 microM CE underwent GVBD, despite the inhibition of proteasomal activity. However, 90.0% of cumulus-free ova treated with 10 microM MG132 remained in GV stage, compared with 16.7% GV ova in control. Cumulus expansion, retention of hyaluronic acid, and the deposition of cumulus ECM relying on the covalent transfer of heavy chains of inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor (IalphaI) were also inhibited by MG132. Cumulus expansion in control COCs was accompanied by the degradation of ubiquitin

  10. Research and technology, 1990: Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Goddard celebrates 1990 as a banner year in space based astronomy. From above the Earth's obscuring atmosphere, four major orbiting observatories examined the heavens at wavelengths that spanned the electromagnetic spectrum. In the infrared and microwave, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), measured the spectrum and angular distribution of the cosmic background radiation to extraordinary precision. In the optical and UV, the Hubble Space Telescope has returned spectacular high resolution images and spectra of a wealth of astronomical objects. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph has resolved dozens of UV spectral lines which are as yet unidentified because they have never before been seen in any astronomical spectrum. In x rays, the Roentgen Satellite has begun returning equally spectacular images of high energy objects within our own and other galaxies.

  11. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  12. Aerospace Battery Activities at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2006-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has "pioneered" rechargeable secondary battery design, test, infusion and in-orbit battery management among NASA installations. Nickel cadmium batteries of various designs and sizes have been infused for LEO, GEO and Libration Point spacecraft. Nickel-Hydrogen batteries have currently been baselined for the majority of our missions. Li-Ion batteries from ABSL, JSB, SaFT and Lithion have been designed and tested for aerospace application.

  13. The 1990 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The papers presented at the 1990 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence are given. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed. The proceedings fall into the following areas: Planning and Scheduling, Fault Monitoring/Diagnosis, Image Processing and Machine Vision, Robotics/Intelligent Control, Development Methodologies, Information Management, and Knowledge Acquisition.

  14. Reliability Practice at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruessner, Paula S.; Li, Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes in brief the Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) Programs performed directly by the reliability branch at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The mission assurance requirements flow down is explained. GSFC practices for PRA, reliability prediction/fault tree analysis/reliability block diagram, FMEA, part stress and derating analysis, worst case analysis, trend analysis, limit life items are presented. Lessons learned are summarized and recommendations on improvement are identified.

  15. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph: Instrument, goals, and science results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Heap, S. R.; Beaver, E. A.; Boggess, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Ebbets, D. C.; Hutchings, J. B.; Jura, M.; Leckrone, D. S.; Linsky, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), currently in Earth orbit on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), operates in the wavelength range 1150-3200 A with spectral resolutions (lambda/delta lambda) of approximately 2 x 10(exp 3), 2 x 10(exp 4), and 1 x 10(exp 3). The instrument and its development from inception, its current status, the approach to operations, representative results in the major areas of the scientific goals, and prospects for the future are described.

  16. The 1977 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The papers presented were derived from transcripts taken at the Tenth Annual Battery Workshop held at the Goddard Space Flight Center, November 15-17, 1977. The Workshop was attended by manufacturers, users, and government representatives interested in the latest results of testing, analysis, and development of the sealed nickel cadmium cell system. The purpose of the Workshop was to share flight and test experience, stimulate discussion on problem areas, and to review the latest technology improvements.

  17. RFI Risk Reduction Activities Using New Goddard Digital Radiometry Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Kim, Ed; Young, Peter; Miles, Lynn; Wong, Mark; Morris, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard Radio-Frequency Explorer (GREX) is the latest fast-sampling radiometer digital back-end processor that will be used for radiometry and radio-frequency interference (RFI) surveying at Goddard Space Flight Center. The system is compact and deployable, with a mass of about 40 kilograms. It is intended to be flown on aircraft. GREX is compatible with almost any aircraft, including P-3, twin otter, C-23, C-130, G3, and G5 types. At a minimum, the system can function as a clone of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) ground-based development unit [1], or can be a completely independent system that is interfaced to any radiometer, provided that frequency shifting to GREX's intermediate frequency is performed prior to sampling. If the radiometer RF is less than 200MHz, then the band can be sampled and acquired directly by the system. A key feature of GREX is its ability to simultaneously sample two polarization channels simultaneously at up to 400MSPS, 14-bit resolution each. The sampled signals can be recorded continuously to a 23 TB solid-state RAID storage array. Data captures can be analyzed offline using the supercomputing facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition, various Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) - amenable radiometer signal processing and RFI detection algorithms can be implemented directly on the GREX system because it includes a high-capacity Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA prototyping system that is user customizable.

  18. An Empirical Cumulus Parameterization Scheme for a Global Spectral Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajendran, K.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Misra, V.; Tao, W.-K.

    2004-01-01

    Realistic vertical heating and drying profiles in a cumulus scheme is important for obtaining accurate weather forecasts. A new empirical cumulus parameterization scheme based on a procedure to improve the vertical distribution of heating and moistening over the tropics is developed. The empirical cumulus parameterization scheme (ECPS) utilizes profiles of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) based heating and moistening derived from the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis. A dimension reduction technique through rotated principal component analysis (RPCA) is performed on the vertical profiles of heating (Q1) and drying (Q2) over the convective regions of the tropics, to obtain the dominant modes of variability. Analysis suggests that most of the variance associated with the observed profiles can be explained by retaining the first three modes. The ECPS then applies a statistical approach in which Q1 and Q2 are expressed as a linear combination of the first three dominant principal components which distinctly explain variance in the troposphere as a function of the prevalent large-scale dynamics. The principal component (PC) score which quantifies the contribution of each PC to the corresponding loading profile is estimated through a multiple screening regression method which yields the PC score as a function of the large-scale variables. The profiles of Q1 and Q2 thus obtained are found to match well with the observed profiles. The impact of the ECPS is investigated in a series of short range (1-3 day) prediction experiments using the Florida State University global spectral model (FSUGSM, T126L14). Comparisons between short range ECPS forecasts and those with the modified Kuo scheme show a very marked improvement in the skill in ECPS forecasts. This improvement in the forecast skill with ECPS emphasizes the importance of incorporating realistic vertical distributions of heating and drying in the model cumulus scheme. This

  19. Sensitivity of land surface and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Mohanty, U. C.; Kumar, Krishan

    2016-06-01

    The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme) and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme) have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6, and KF schemes

  20. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  1. Vertical Velocities in Cumulus Convection: Implications for Climate and Prospects for Realistic Simulation at Cloud Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Leo

    2014-05-01

    Cumulus mass fluxes are essential controls on the interactions between cumulus convection and large-scale flows. Cumulus parameterizations have generally been built around them, and these parameterizations are basic components of climate models. Several important questions in climate science depend also on cumulus vertical velocities. Interactions between aerosols and convection comprise a prominent example, and scale-aware cumulus parameterizations that require explicit information about cumulus areas are another. Basic progress on these problems requires realistic characterization of cumulus vertical velocities from observations and models. Recent deployments of dual-Doppler radars are providing unprecedented observations, which can be compared against cloud-resolving models (CRMs). The CRMs can subsequently be analyzed to develop and evaluate parameterizations of vertical velocities in climate models. Vertical velocities from several cloud models will be compared against observations in this presentation. CRM vertical velocities will be found to depend strongly on model resolution and treatment of sub-grid turbulence and microphysics. Although many current state-of-science CRMs do not simulate vertical velocities well, recent experiments with these models suggest that with appropriate treatments of sub-grid turbulence and microphysics robustly realistic modeling of cumulus vertical velocities is possible.

  2. Vertical coupling of the stratocumulus boundary layer by penetrating cumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Lenschow, D.H.

    1994-12-31

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX), small cumulus clouds that penetrate through the stratocumulus sheets were observed frequently. Radar observations show that the reflectivity cores in the penetrating cumuli are generally 1--2 km in diameter with a much larger enhanced patch of stratocumulus approximately 15--20 km across, whereas visual estimates of the diameter of the cumuli are generally in the neighborhood of several kilometers. In this study, the authors analyze measurements made on 10 June 1992 from the NCAR Electra aircraft. They are particularly interested in the role penetrating cumuli play in transporting moisture and other scalar between the sea surface and the top of the boundary layer, which is directly related to the important practical question of whether or not the penetrating cumuli tend to break up or dissipate the overlying stratocumulus cloud and aid the transition from a stratocumulus to a cumulus boundary layer. Large variations in temperature, specific humidity, and ozone are observed on both in-cloud legs. The differences between the maximum and minimum values of potential temperature, specific humidity, and ozone on these legs are around 1.1 deg, 1.4 g kg{sup {minus}1}, and 7 ppbv, respectively. To the authors` knowledge, such substantial horizontal variations of scalar variables have never been reported before in stratocumulus-topped boundary layers over the ocean. Close inspections of the time series indicate that the highest temperature and moisture and the lowest ozone concentration are found in the Cu region on both legs.

  3. Nearest neighbor spacing of fair weather cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Joachim H.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    Histograms of nearest neighbor spacings of fair weather cumulus at 15 locations over the world's oceans are presented based on the analysis of high resolution Landsat 3 Multispectral Scanner images for amounts of cloud cover ranging from 0.6 to 37.6 percent. These histograms are found to be essentially the same at all locations analyzed, similarly to previous findings on the size distributions and the fractal dimensions of the perimeters for this cloud type. The nearest neighbor spacings are linearly dependent on the effective cloud radii, with a proportionality factor ranging from five to twenty. The histograms peak at about 0.5 km. Nearest-neighbor spacings smaller than about a kilometer, associated with cumulus clouds with an effective radius less than a few hundred meters, have a distribution of cloud centers that is almost indepedent in the horizontal plane and show a tendency for the formation of clumps. Larger spacings of up to thirty kilometers occur and are associated with the larger clouds. These latter spacings are not independent.

  4. Towards Realistic Cumulus Cloud Resolving Simulations at Supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Laar, T.; Schemann, V.; Neggers, R.

    2015-12-01

    Realistic fine-scale shallow cumulus cloud resolving simulations are performed to improve our understanding of the interactions between surface heterogeneity and boundary-layer cloud fields. For this purpose we apply the ICON (ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic) model on a regional domain. ICON has been partly developed by the ongoing project HD(CP)2 (High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Climate Prediction), which has the aim of getting a better grip on cloud and precipitation processes and their implication for climate prediction. The model domain is centred around JOYCE, an observational supersite in Jülich (Germany). To optimize the realism of the simulation, use is made of heterogeneous surface forcings and non-periodic boundary conditions. A number of prototype cumulus days is simulated, the results of which are evaluated against observations. The focus lies on bulk cloud properties and the vertical structure of the boundary layer. The ICON results are intercompared with available idealized LES results. Sensitivity of the results to the model set-up (e.g. resolution) is assessed.

  5. 76 FR 56797 - United States v. Cumulus Media Inc., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. Cumulus Media Inc., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive... United States District Court for the District of Columbia in United States of America v. Cumulus Media... Complaint alleging that Cumulus Media Inc.'s proposed acquisition of Citadel Broadcasting Corporation...

  6. R and T report: Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald A. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) flight projects; (2) space sciences including cosmology, high energy, stars and galaxies, and the solar system; (3) earth sciences including process modeling, hydrology/cryology, atmospheres, biosphere, and solid earth; (4) networks, planning, and information systems including support for mission operations, data distribution, advanced software and systems engineering, and planning/scheduling; and (5) engineering and materials including spacecraft systems, material and testing, optics and photonics and robotics.

  7. The Goddard program of gamma-ray transient astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Goddard program of gamma-ray burst studies is briefly reviewed. The past results, present status and future expectations are outlined regarding our endeavors using experiments on balloons. IMP-6 and IMP-7, OGO-3, ISEE-1 and ISEE-3, Helios-2, Solar Maximum Mission, the Einstein Observatory, Solar Polar and the Gamma Ray Observatory, and with the interplanetary gamma-ray burst networks, to which some of these spacecraft sensors contribute. Additional emphasis is given to the recent discovery of a new type of gamma-ray transient, detected on 5 March, 1979.

  8. The 1987 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, George (Editor); Yi, Thomas Y. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the 20th annual Battery Workshop held at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland on November 4-5, 1987. The workshop attendees included manufacturers, users, and government representatives interested in the latest developments in battery technology as they relate to high reliability operations and aerospace use. The subjects covered included lithium cell technology and safety improvements, nickel-cadmium electrode technology along with associated modifications, flight experience and life testing of nickel-cadmium cells, and nickel-hydrogen applications and technology.

  9. Robert Goddard Young, DC, ND: Searching for a better way

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M.

    2009-01-01

    This biographical study tracks the life of Robert Goddard Young; a member of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College’s (CMCC) Class of 1950. The paper begins with an overview of Robert Young’s origins, his childhood and early training, moves to his tour of duty in World War II, followed by his education at CMCC, before converging on the core of this matter; Robert Young’s professional career, which spanned over half a century. Now in his twilight years, the paper ends with a discussion on the substance of Dr. Young’s largely-forgotten contributions. PMID:19714235

  10. The 1988 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Thomas Y. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the 21st annual Battery Workshop held at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland on November 1-3, 1988. The Workshop attendees included manufacturers, users, and government representatives interested in the latest developments in battery technology as they relate to high reliability operations and aerospace use. The subjects covered included battery testing methodologies and criteria, life testing of nickel-cadmium cells, testing and operation of nickel-hydrogen batteries in low earth orbit, and nickel-hydrogen technology issues and concerns.

  11. Ground System Harmonization Efforts at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the efforts made at Goddard Space Flight Center in harmonizing the ground systems to assist in collaboration in space ventures. The key elements of this effort are: (1) Moving to a Common Framework (2) Use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Standards (3) Collaboration Across NASA Centers (4) Collaboration Across Industry and other Space Organizations. These efforts are working to bring into harmony the GSFC systems with CCSDS standards to allow for common software, use of Commercial Off the Shelf Software and low risk development and operations and also to work toward harmonization with other NASA centers

  12. The 1991 research and technology report, Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Montgomery, Harry (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The 1991 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) earth sciences including upper atmosphere, lower atmosphere, oceans, hydrology, and global studies; (2) space sciences including solar studies, planetary studies, Astro-1, gamma ray investigations, and astrophysics; (3) flight projects; (4) engineering including robotics, mechanical engineering, electronics, imaging and optics, thermal and cryogenic studies, and balloons; and (5) ground systems, networks, and communications including data and networks, TDRSS, mission planning and scheduling, and software development and test.

  13. Precision orbit determination at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Smith, D.; Dunn, P.; Torrence, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the GEODYN computer program developed by the Geodynamics Branch at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and outlines the procedure for accurate satellite orbit and tracking-data analyses. The capabilities of the program allow the development of gravity fields as large as 90 by 90, and a complete modeling of tidal parameters. It is also feasible to numerically integrate a continuous orbit of a satellite such as Lageos for up to 12 years. The evolution of the orbit can be studied, and, by comparison with locally determined orbits, force model improvements can be made. The GEODYN flow diagrams are presented.

  14. Effects of selected endocrine disruptors on meiotic maturation, cumulus expansion, synthesis of hyaluronan and progesterone by porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes.

    PubMed

    Mlynarcíková, Alzbeta; Nagyová, Eva; Ficková, Mária; Scsuková, Sona

    2009-04-01

    In most mammals, before ovulation, cumulus cells synthesize a large amount of hyaluronan (HA) that is organized into an extracellular matrix (ECM), which provides an essential microenvironment for in vivo oocyte fertilization. This process is called cumulus expansion. The present study assessed effects of selected endocrine disruptors (bisphenol A, BPA; 4-chloro-3-methyl phenol, CMP; di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, DEHP; and benzyl butyl phthalate, BBP) in a range of 100pM-100microM, on follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced meiotic maturation and cumulus expansion of porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCC) cultured in vitro. Moreover, FSH-stimulated production of hyaluronic acid (HA) and progesterone by cumulus cells was measured. Both phenols, BPA and CMP (100microM), significantly affected meiotic maturation of oocytes. The number of oocytes that underwent germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) (78.7% and 72.4%, respectively) as well as the rate of oocytes that reached metaphase II stage (MII) (50% and 53.6%, respectively) after 44h culture were decreased compared to control (89.6% for GVBD and 81.5% for MII). FSH-stimulated expansion of cumulus was altered by the highest concentration of BPA and CMP (70% and 64%, respectively vs. 80.3% in control). Although BPA did not alter FSH-stimulated HA synthesis by cumulus cells, its incorporation within the complex was reduced to a half of control value. Progesterone production by OCC was significantly changed in the presence of BPA or DEHP. Finally, our results provide valuable information that oocyte meiotic progression was adversely affected during in vitro culture with endocrine disruptors. PMID:19162163

  15. Rhesus Monkey Cumulus Cells Revert to a Mural Granulosa Cell State After an Ovulatory Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Chaffin, Charles L.; Lee, Young S.; Patel, Bela G.; Latham, Keith E.

    2012-01-01

    Follicular somatic cells (mural granulosa cells and cumulus cells) and the oocyte communicate through paracrine interactions and through direct gap junctions between oocyte and cumulus cells. Considering that mural and cumulus cells arise through a common developmental pathway and that their differentiation is essential to reproductive success, understanding how these cells differ is a key aspect to understanding their critical functions. Changes in global gene expression before and after an ovulatory stimulus were compared between cumulus and mural granulosa cells to test the hypothesis that mural and cumulus cells are highly differentiated at the time of an ovulatory stimulus and further differentiate during the periovulatory interval. The transcriptomes of the two cell types were markedly different (>1500 genes) before an ovulatory hCG bolus but converged after ovulation to become completely overlapping. The predominant transition was for the cumulus cells to become more like mural cells after hCG. This indicates that the differentiated phenotype of the cumulus cell is not stable and irreversibly established but may rather be an ongoing physiological response to the oocyte. PMID:23008515

  16. Rhesus monkey cumulus cells revert to a mural granulosa cell state after an ovulatory stimulus.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Charles L; Lee, Young S; VandeVoort, Catherine A; Patel, Bela G; Latham, Keith E

    2012-11-01

    Follicular somatic cells (mural granulosa cells and cumulus cells) and the oocyte communicate through paracrine interactions and through direct gap junctions between oocyte and cumulus cells. Considering that mural and cumulus cells arise through a common developmental pathway and that their differentiation is essential to reproductive success, understanding how these cells differ is a key aspect to understanding their critical functions. Changes in global gene expression before and after an ovulatory stimulus were compared between cumulus and mural granulosa cells to test the hypothesis that mural and cumulus cells are highly differentiated at the time of an ovulatory stimulus and further differentiate during the periovulatory interval. The transcriptomes of the two cell types were markedly different (>1500 genes) before an ovulatory hCG bolus but converged after ovulation to become completely overlapping. The predominant transition was for the cumulus cells to become more like mural cells after hCG. This indicates that the differentiated phenotype of the cumulus cell is not stable and irreversibly established but may rather be an ongoing physiological response to the oocyte.

  17. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  18. Interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells during in vitro maturation of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes in a chemically defined medium: effect of denuded oocytes on cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Somfai, T; Nakai, M; Bodó, S; Maes, D; Kikuchi, K; Van Soom, A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) on the level of cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation during IVM of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in a chemically defined medium using a system that allows individual tracking of oocytes. Especially, the influence of oocyte-secreted factors was investigated by the aid of addition of denuded oocytes (DOs) as a possible approach to improve the IVM system. The basic maturation medium was porcine oocyte medium with addition of gonadotropins only during the first 20 hours of IVM. During IVM, COCs were kept fixed to the bottom of culture dish by adhesive Cell-Tak coating, which enabled individual tracking of COCs during IVM. Size changes in COCs during IVM were measured by digital image analysis. Cumulus expansion in a porcine oocyte medium of intact COCs increased in a typical manner until 20 hours and decreased in size subsequently until 48 hours of IVM (P < 0.05). Removal of oocytes from COCs by oocytectomy allowed the expansion of CCs to some extent, although their expansion ability was lower than that of COCs (P < 0.05). Addition of DOs (COCs to DOs ratio of 9:16) did not improve cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation rates of intact COCs (P > 0.05) but did enhance cumulus expansion of oocytectomized complexes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, removal of CCs before IVM increased oocyte maturation rates compared with COCs (52.3% and 32.9%, respectively) (P < 0.05) and a similar effect was observed in COCs when the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone was added to the IVM medium: carbenoxolone repressed the expansion of COCs at 20 hours of IVM. In conclusion, the porcine oocyte enhances cumulus expansion both by gap junctional communications and presumably by oocyte-secreted factor production. Nevertheless, the presence of oocytes is not a prerequisite for this process. In return, CCs maintain meiotic arrest in cumulus-enclosed oocytes during the initial culture

  19. Interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells during in vitro maturation of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes in a chemically defined medium: effect of denuded oocytes on cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Somfai, T; Nakai, M; Bodó, S; Maes, D; Kikuchi, K; Van Soom, A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) on the level of cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation during IVM of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in a chemically defined medium using a system that allows individual tracking of oocytes. Especially, the influence of oocyte-secreted factors was investigated by the aid of addition of denuded oocytes (DOs) as a possible approach to improve the IVM system. The basic maturation medium was porcine oocyte medium with addition of gonadotropins only during the first 20 hours of IVM. During IVM, COCs were kept fixed to the bottom of culture dish by adhesive Cell-Tak coating, which enabled individual tracking of COCs during IVM. Size changes in COCs during IVM were measured by digital image analysis. Cumulus expansion in a porcine oocyte medium of intact COCs increased in a typical manner until 20 hours and decreased in size subsequently until 48 hours of IVM (P < 0.05). Removal of oocytes from COCs by oocytectomy allowed the expansion of CCs to some extent, although their expansion ability was lower than that of COCs (P < 0.05). Addition of DOs (COCs to DOs ratio of 9:16) did not improve cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation rates of intact COCs (P > 0.05) but did enhance cumulus expansion of oocytectomized complexes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, removal of CCs before IVM increased oocyte maturation rates compared with COCs (52.3% and 32.9%, respectively) (P < 0.05) and a similar effect was observed in COCs when the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone was added to the IVM medium: carbenoxolone repressed the expansion of COCs at 20 hours of IVM. In conclusion, the porcine oocyte enhances cumulus expansion both by gap junctional communications and presumably by oocyte-secreted factor production. Nevertheless, the presence of oocytes is not a prerequisite for this process. In return, CCs maintain meiotic arrest in cumulus-enclosed oocytes during the initial culture

  20. Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies held in Sep. 1992 are included. The conference served as an informational exchange forum for topics primarily relating to the ingestion and management of massive amounts of data and the attendant problems (data ingestion rates now approach the order of terabytes per day). Discussion topics include the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model, data archiving standards, high-performance storage devices, magnetic and magneto-optic storage systems, magnetic and optical recording technologies, high-performance helical scan recording systems, and low end helical scan tape drives. Additional topics addressed the evolution of the identifiable unit for processing purposes as data ingestion rates increase dramatically, and the present state of the art in mass storage technology.

  1. Observing system simulation experiments at NASA. Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.; Susskind, J.; Reuter, D.; Halem, M.

    1985-01-01

    A series of realistic simulation studies is being conducted as a cooperative effort between the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the National Meteorological Center (NMC), and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA), to provide a quantitative assessment of the potential impact of future observing systems on large scale numerical weather prediction. A special objective is to avoid the unrealistic character of earlier simulation studies. Following a brief review of previous simulation studies and real data impact tests, the methodology for the current simulation system will be described. Results from an assessment of the realism of the simulation system and of the potential impact of advanced observing systems on numerical weather prediction and preliminary results utilizing this system will be presented at the conference.

  2. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeff; Walden, Harvey; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the development of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair, including its history and outgrowth from the traditional regional science fairs supported by NASA. The results of the 1999 Virtual Science Fair pilot program, the mechanics of running the 2000 Virtual Science Fair and its results, and comments and suggestions for future Virtual Science Fairs are provided. The appendices to the report include the original proposal for this project, the judging criteria, the user's guide and the judge's guide to the Virtual Science Fair Web site, the Fair publicity brochure and the Fair award designs, judges' and students' responses to survey questions about the Virtual Science Fair, and lists of student entries to both the 1999 and 2000 Fairs.

  3. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeff; Walden, Harvey; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the development of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair, including its history and outgrowth from the traditional regional science fairs supported by NASA. The results of the 1999 Virtual Science Fair pilot program, the mechanics of running the 2000 Virtual Science Fair and its results, and comments and suggestions for future Virtual Science Fairs are provided. The appendices to the report contain supporting documentation, including the original proposal for this project, the judging criteria, the user's guide and the judge's guide to the Virtual Science Fair Web site, the Fair publicity brochure and the Fair award designs, judges' and students' responses to survey questions about the Virtual Science Fair, and lists of student entries to both the 1999 and 2000 Fairs.

  4. Fourth NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains copies of all those technical papers received in time for publication just prior to the Fourth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage and Technologies, held March 28-30, 1995, at the University of Maryland, University College Conference Center, in College Park, Maryland. This series of conferences continues to serve as a unique medium for the exchange of information on topics relating to the ingestion and management of substantial amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. This year's discussion topics include new storage technology, stability of recorded media, performance studies, storage system solutions, the National Information infrastructure (Infobahn), the future for storage technology, and lessons learned from various projects. There also will be an update on the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model Version 5, on which the final vote was taken in July 1994.

  5. CCSDS telemetry systems experience at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Richard D.; Stallings, William H., III

    1990-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) designs, builds, manages, and operates science and applications spacecraft in near-earth orbit, and provides data capture, data processing, and flight control services for these spacecraft. In addition, GSFC has the responsibility of providing space-ground and ground-ground communications for near-earth orbiting spacecraft, including those of the manned spaceflight programs. The goal of reducing both the developmental and operating costs of the end-to-end information system has led the GSFC to support and participate in the standardization activities of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), including those for packet telemetry. The environment in which such systems function is described, and the GSFC experience with CCSDS packet telemetry in the context of the Gamma-Ray Observatory project is discussed.

  6. CCSDS telemetry systems experience at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carper, Richard D.; Stallings, William H., III

    1990-09-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) designs, builds, manages, and operates science and applications spacecraft in near-earth orbit, and provides data capture, data processing, and flight control services for these spacecraft. In addition, GSFC has the responsibility of providing space-ground and ground-ground communications for near-earth orbiting spacecraft, including those of the manned spaceflight programs. The goal of reducing both the developmental and operating costs of the end-to-end information system has led the GSFC to support and participate in the standardization activities of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), including those for packet telemetry. The environment in which such systems function is described, and the GSFC experience with CCSDS packet telemetry in the context of the Gamma-Ray Observatory project is discussed.

  7. An evaluation of the Goddard Space Flight Center Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herner, S.; Lancaster, F. W.; Wright, N.; Ockerman, L.; Shearer, B.; Greenspan, S.; Mccartney, J.; Vellucci, M.

    1979-01-01

    The character and degree of coincidence between the current and future missions, programs, and projects of the Goddard Space Flight Center and the current and future collection, services, and facilities of its library were determined from structured interviews and discussions with various classes of facility personnel. In addition to the tabulation and interpretation of the data from the structured interview survey, five types of statistical analyses were performed to corroborate (or contradict) the survey results and to produce useful information not readily attainable through survey material. Conclusions reached regarding compatability between needs and holdings, services and buildings, library hours of operation, methods of early detection and anticipation of changing holdings requirements, and the impact of near future programs are presented along with a list of statistics needing collection, organization, and interpretation on a continuing or longitudinal basis.

  8. Growth hormone pathway gene expression varies in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiyu; Liu, Shujuan; Jiang, Yunliang; Yang, Honghua; Li, Jinlian

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays important roles in oocyte development and facilitates the successful production of competent oocytes in many species both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism of GH action on oocyte maturation is not well known. In this paper, the temporospatial messenger ribonucleic acid expression patterns of GH and several other GH-related factors were quantitatively analyzed in porcine cumulus-oocytes complex throughout in vitro maturation (IVM). GH expression was decreased in oocytes during IVM while absent in cumulus cells. GH receptor, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and IGF-1 receptor expressions were also downregulated in oocytes. In cumulus cells, the expression of IGF-1 decreased significantly while IGF-1 receptor expression remained constant. The transcripts of Janus kinase 2 increased in both oocytes and cumulus cells during IVM. The current precise gene expression information provides further evidence to explain the complex network of GH signaling involved in IVM of porcine oocyte.

  9. The radiative impact of cumulus cloudiness in a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeng, C. H.; Randall, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cumulus cloudiness on the radiational heating and, on other aspects of the climate were simulated by the GLAS Climate Model. An experiment in which the cumulus cloudiness is neglected completely for purposes of the solar and terrestrial radiation parameterizations was performed. The results are compared with those of a control run, in which 100% cumulus cloud cover is assumed. The net solar radiation input into the Earth atmosphere system is more realistic in the experiment, and the model's underprediction of the global mean outgoing thermal radiation at the top of the atmosphere is reduced. The results suggest that there is a positive feedback between cumulus convection and the radiation field. The upper troposphere is warmer in the experiment, the surface air temperature increases over land, and the thermal lows over the continents intensity.

  10. Did the Germans learn from Goddard? An examination of whether the rocketry of R.H. Goddard influenced German Pre-World-War II missile development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Frank H.

    2016-10-01

    Ever since a few months before the death of American rocket pioneer Dr. Robert H. Goddard, on 10 August 1945, it has been widely claimed he was the true source of the development of the infamous V-2 rocket of World War II - the world's first large-scale liquid-propellant rocket. It is thus alleged the German developers of the V-2 had "stolen" ideas from Goddard to create the V-2 that was also the forerunner of the world's first space launch vehicles. The question of the validity of this claim thus becomes far more significant than first appears and is the subject of this article. But we must first briefly examine other popular conceptions, or rather, misconceptions, about Goddard in our own Space Age. This helps establish a "bigger picture" that identifies some of the problems in overall misinterpretations of Goddard that also applies to his supposed role in the development of the V-2.1

  11. Effects of cumulus cells on rabbit oocyte in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Cao, C; Zhang, M; Fang, F; Liu, Y; Zhang, Y; Ding, J; Zhang, X

    2008-08-01

    Cumulus cells (CCs) are of great importance in oocyte development and maturation in many species, but detailed influence of CCs has not been extensively examined, especially on rabbit. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of CCs and the elongation of in vitro maturation (IVM) time on rabbit oocyte nuclear and ooplasmic maturation and survival. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) and naked oocytes (NOs) were recovered directly from rabbits super-ovulated with eCG. Corona-enclosed oocytes (COs) and denuded oocytes (DOs) were obtained from COCs after removing a part or whole of CCs. The oocytes were cultured in the following seven groups. (i) Cumulus cell enclosed oocytes (CEOs) were cultured alone (CEOs); (ii) COs were cultured alone (COs); (iii) DOs were cultured alone (DOs); (iv) NOs were cultured alone; (v) DOs were co-cultured with COCs [DOs(COCs)]; (vi) DOs were co-cultured with CCs [DOs(CCs)]; (vii) NOs were co-cultured with CCs [NOs(CCs)]. After the oocytes were cultured for 24 and 30 h, the nuclear maturation was evaluated by first polar body (PB1) extrusion while the ooplasmic maturation was evaluated by the cleavage rate after parthenogenetic activation. The results showed that the nuclear maturation rate of CEOs, COs, DOs(COCs) and DOs(CCs) after 24 h incubation were significantly different from each other (p < or = 0.05), the rate of DOs(CCs) was similar to that of DOs (p > or = 0.05). The cleavage rates in the first two groups were significantly higher than those of the others (p < 0.05). For oocytes cultured for 30 h, the nuclear maturation rates were significantly different for each culture model (p < 0.05). The cleavage rates in first two groups were significantly higher than those of others (p < 0.05). Both the nuclear and cleavage rates significantly increased when the culture time of DOs(COCs) was prolonged from 24 to 30 h. DOs(CCs) nuclear maturation was significantly improved when the culture time was prolonged from 24 to 30 h

  12. Cleavage capability of water buffalo follicular oocytes classified by cumulus cells and fertilized in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Singla, S K; Sujata, J; Madan, M L

    1991-06-01

    Water buffalo (Murrah) oocytes were collected from ovaries obtained from the slaughter house. They were classified according to the character of the cumulus cells under a stereomicroscope, and cultured in 25 mM Hepes buffered Tissue Culture Medium-199 (TCM-199) supplemented with 5% estrous water buffalo serum in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2 in air at 39 degrees C. After 20-24 hr of in vitro maturation, the oocytes were fertilized using capacitated sperm obtained from 4 different bulls. For cleavage the oocytes were cultured at 39 degrees C in TCM-199 supplemented with 1% estrous water buffalo serum and in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2 in air. The good oocytes, with compact and dense cumulus cells cleaved significantly higher (p less than 0.01, 67.3%), than those of fair. partially naked oocytes with thin cumulus layers (27.5%, 25/91) or small remnants of cumulus cells and poor naked oocytes (3/100). A substantial variation cumulus layers (27.5% 25/91) or small remnants of cumulus cells and poor naked oocytes (3/100). A substantial variation in fertilization and developmental rates (16.0% to 43.8%) was observed among 4 different bulls. Late non-surgically into 14 buffalo recipients on day 6 or 7 of their estrous cycle. One recipient was diagnosed to be pregnant by rectal palpation on day 60 and confirmed to be so on day 90 post-estrus.

  13. Rainfall results, 1970-1975: Florida area cumulus experiment.

    PubMed

    Woodley, W L; Simpson, J; Biondini, R; Berkeley, J

    1977-02-25

    The latest rainfall results of the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment (FACE) are discussed after a review of the background, design, and early results of this experiment. Analysis without the benefit of data stratification and appropriate covariates of the 48 random experimentation days obtained through 1975 provided no evidence that dynamic seeding appreciably altered the rainfall over the fixed target area (1.3 x 10(4) square kilometers). Partitioning of the experimentation days according to whether the convective echoes moved across the Florida peninsula or developed in situ was more informative. Use of this echo motion covariate with five meaningful predictor models of natural rainfall in a stepwise regression program produced persuasive evidence for an effect of seeding in both echo motion categories. For days with moving echoes, there is evidence for a positive, statistically significant treatment effect on the rainfall from the subject clouds (the floating target) and in the overall target area. The results for days with stationary echoes, although considerably more tentative, suggest that seeding produces more rainfall in the floating target but with no net change of the precipitation in the overall target area. The ramifications of this result and a possible explanation are discussed. Corroborative statistical analyses and discussion are presented, including a discussion of the physical bases and history of the echo motion covariate and the meteorological predictors, analysis that is supportive of the rain-gage-adjusted radar measurements of precipitation in FACE and results of relevant cloud physics measurements in Florida.

  14. Aerosol Impacts on the Growth of Cumulus Congestus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, A. M.; van den Heever, S. C.; Saleeby, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical convection has been observed to contain three modes of convection, the middle mode of which is cumulus congestus clouds. This study investigates the impacts of aerosol, specifically those aerosols that can serve as cloud condensation nuclei, on the growth and development of congestus clouds observed within idealized cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations conducted under a state of radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE). The model employed here is the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). RAMS CRM simulations were completed using a large two-dimensional domain (7200 km) at fine resolution (1 km) and long duration (100 days). Results indicate that congestus in more polluted conditions extend to greater heights more frequently than those developing in clean cases. Greater cloud water mass and ice mass forms in more polluted conditions, though ice forms at a fraction of the rate of the cloud mass. The importance of vapor diffusional growth of cloud droplets in the more polluted conditions is highlighted as one such process contributing to congestus development through latent heat release.

  15. Aerosol-induced mechanisms for cumulus congestus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Amanda M.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Heever, Susan C.

    2015-09-01

    Tropical convection has been observed to contain three cloud modes, the middle of which is cumulus congestus clouds. Congestus clouds act to moisten the tropical atmosphere, may be mixed-phase, and on occasion surpass the freezing level inversion from where they may develop into deeper convection. This study investigates the impacts of enhanced aerosol concentrations on the growth of congestus clouds produced in idealized cloud-resolving model simulations run under a state of radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). High-resolution, long-duration simulations were completed using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Aerosol concentrations between 2 and 4 km above ground level were varied from clean to polluted conditions in order to represent the advection of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean. The congestus populations within each aerosol simulation are statistically analyzed using 10 days of model output after the simulation reaches RCE. Results indicate that congestus in more polluted conditions produce greater amounts of cloud water and ice mass, enhanced updraft strengths, and an increase in the number of congestus cloud tops that extend above the freezing level. Enhanced vapor depositional growth on the populations of more numerous, smaller cloud droplets in the polluted conditions, and the subsequent increase in latent heat release in the warm phase regions of the cloud, is found to be important factors in convective invigoration of these cloud systems. Aerosol feedbacks associated with cold pools and condensate loading also influence the updraft strength and act in opposition to the warm phase invigoration processes.

  16. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; Endo, Satoshi

    2014-12-17

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasingmore » scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.« less

  17. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; Endo, Satoshi

    2014-12-17

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasing scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.

  18. Field Experiment Data Support at the Goddard DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubiak, P. L.; Yang, R.; Ahmad, S.; Chiu, L.; Teng, W.; Liu, Z.; Serafino, G.; Rui, H.; Bonk, J.; Pollack, N.

    2001-12-01

    Historically, field experiment data support at the data center level has been sketchy, but in the last decade, because of rapid growth of electronic capabilities throughout the science community, the data center has become the resolution of choice to the problems of campaign data distribution and archival. Even so, field campaign data, being inherently non-uniform, require significant adaptation on the part of the archive. The participant complement for a campaign ranges widely-from one to three dozen investigators. Each has his/her own instrument, organizational affiliation, and funding. Many are academics with class schedules to consider, an office staff composed of graduate students and a correspondingly high turnover rate. Some are operating with very limited resources and lack the programming staff to tailor their data to archive specifications. Data delivery schedules, formatting and documentation are all driven by these factors. Planning for data volume also requires flexibility. Campaign data acquisition is sensitive to weather and a variety of logistical problems. Planning for campaign data volume is therefore a matter of determining thresholds. Since most campaign data sets tend to be small by data center standards, distribution is mainly from anonymous ftp sites front-ended by web sites. The Goddard DAAC opened its campaign archive in 1994 with data from the TRMM oriented TOGA-COARE campaign of 1992-93, and has most recently archived the TRMM global validation campaigns, designed to evaluate the physical assumptions made by TRMM rainfall algorithms, initialize and validate the cloud resolving models, test latent heating retrievals from TRMM measurements, and evaluate methods to estimate rainfall and latent heating from ground based radars. Launched by the TRMM Office in 1998, the TRMM campaigns were designed as a group so that specific measurements could be compared between experiments in order to gain insight into the regional dependence of any findings

  19. AIRS Data Support at NASA Goddard Earth Science DISC DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S.; Qin, J.; Sharma, A.

    2002-05-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is selected by NASA to fly on the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar orbiting platform, EOS Aqua, which is launched in April 2002. AIRS, together with Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB), is designed to meet the requirements of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise climate research program and the NOAA operational weather forecasting The data products from the AIRS/AMSU/HSB will be archived and distributed at the Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (GDAAC) located in the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DAAC) in later 2002. This new dataset consists of radiances, geo-locations and atmospheric products, such as, temperature, humidity, cloud and ozone, providing measurements for temperature at an accuracy of 1 o C in layers 1 km thick and humidity with an accuracy of 20 % in layers 2 km thick in the troposphere. The data will be freely available via WWW interfaces, or an FTP containing subsetted and reformatted data products. The GES DISC DAAC Search and Order allows users to search for data by following particular paths down the hierarchy. This simple point-and- click navigational web interface shows temporal and spatial coverage, item size, description and browse images for AIRS data and one can customize search using spatial,temporal, attribute and parameter search. The EOS Data Gateway (EDG) is another user interface for searching and ordering the AIRS data together with other data products obtained from EOS instruments. The Atmospheric Dynamics Data Support Team (ADDST) at the GES DISC/DAAC will provide various services to assist users in understanding, accessing, and using AIRS data product. The ADDST has been developing tools to read, visualize and analyze the AIRS data, channel/parameter subsetting of AIRS HDF-EOS data products and supplying documentation and readme et al. Other services provided by the ADDST will contain assistance

  20. Transcriptomic Diversification of Developing Cumulus and Mural Granulosa Cells in Mouse Ovarian Follicles1

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, Karen; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Emori, Chihiro; Sugiura, Koji; Eppig, John J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cumulus cells and mural granulosa cells (MGCs) have functionally distinct roles in antral follicles, and comparison of their transcriptomes at a global and systems level can propel future studies on mechanisms underlying their functional diversity. These cells were isolated from small and large antral follicles before and after stimulation of immature mice with gonadotropins, respectively. Both cell types underwent dramatic transcriptomic changes, and differences between them increased with follicular growth. Although cumulus cells of both stages of follicular development are competent to undergo expansion in vitro, they were otherwise remarkably dissimilar with transcriptomic changes quantitatively equivalent to those of MGCs. Gene ontology analysis revealed that cumulus cells of small follicles were enriched in transcripts generally associated with catalytic components of metabolic processes, while those from large follicles were involved in regulation of metabolism, cell differentiation, and adhesion. Contrast of cumulus cells versus MGCs revealed that cumulus cells were enriched in transcripts associated with metabolism and cell proliferation while MGCs were enriched for transcripts involved in cell signaling and differentiation. In vitro and in vivo models were used to test the hypothesis that higher levels of transcripts in cumulus cells versus MGCs is the result of stimulation by oocyte-derived paracrine factors (ODPFs). Surprisingly ∼48% of transcripts higher in cumulus cells than MGCs were not stimulated by ODPFs. Those stimulated by ODPFs were mainly associated with cell division, mRNA processing, or the catalytic pathways of metabolism, while those not stimulated by ODPFs were associated with regulatory processes such as signaling, transcription, phosphorylation, or the regulation of metabolism. PMID:25376232

  1. Transcriptomic diversification of developing cumulus and mural granulosa cells in mouse ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Wigglesworth, Karen; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Emori, Chihiro; Sugiura, Koji; Eppig, John J

    2015-01-01

    Cumulus cells and mural granulosa cells (MGCs) have functionally distinct roles in antral follicles, and comparison of their transcriptomes at a global and systems level can propel future studies on mechanisms underlying their functional diversity. These cells were isolated from small and large antral follicles before and after stimulation of immature mice with gonadotropins, respectively. Both cell types underwent dramatic transcriptomic changes, and differences between them increased with follicular growth. Although cumulus cells of both stages of follicular development are competent to undergo expansion in vitro, they were otherwise remarkably dissimilar with transcriptomic changes quantitatively equivalent to those of MGCs. Gene ontology analysis revealed that cumulus cells of small follicles were enriched in transcripts generally associated with catalytic components of metabolic processes, while those from large follicles were involved in regulation of metabolism, cell differentiation, and adhesion. Contrast of cumulus cells versus MGCs revealed that cumulus cells were enriched in transcripts associated with metabolism and cell proliferation while MGCs were enriched for transcripts involved in cell signaling and differentiation. In vitro and in vivo models were used to test the hypothesis that higher levels of transcripts in cumulus cells versus MGCs is the result of stimulation by oocyte-derived paracrine factors (ODPFs). Surprisingly ∼48% of transcripts higher in cumulus cells than MGCs were not stimulated by ODPFs. Those stimulated by ODPFs were mainly associated with cell division, mRNA processing, or the catalytic pathways of metabolism, while those not stimulated by ODPFs were associated with regulatory processes such as signaling, transcription, phosphorylation, or the regulation of metabolism.

  2. Goddard problem in presence of a dynamic pressure limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seywald, Hans; Cliff, Eugene M.

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard problem is that of maximizing the final altitude for a vertically ascending, rocket-powered vehicle under the influence of an inverse square gravitational field and atmospheric drag. The present paper deals with the effects of two additional constraints, namely, a dynamic pressure limit and specified final time. Nine different switching structures involving zero-thrust arcs, full-thrust arcs, singular-thrust arcs, and state-constrained arcs are obtained when the value of the dynamic pressure limit is varied between zero and infinity and the final time is specified between the minimum possible time within which all of the fuel can be burned and the natural final time that emerges for the problem with final time unspecified. For all points in the aforementioned domain of dynamic pressure limit and prescribed final time, the associated optimal switching structure is clearly identified. Finally, a simple intuitive feedback law is presented for the free time problem. For all values of prescribed dynamic pressure limit, this strategy yields a loss in final altitude of less than 3 percent with respect to the associated optimal solution.

  3. Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Turnkey Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) data acquisition systems typically perform well and meet most of the objectives of the manufacturer. The problem is that they seldom meet most of the objectives of the end user. The analysis software, if any, is unlikely to be tailored to the end users specific application; and there is seldom the chance of incorporating preferred algorithms to solve unique problems. Purchasing a customized system allows the end user to get a system tailored to the actual application, but the cost can be prohibitive. Once the system has been accepted, future changes come with a cost and response time that's often not workable. When it came time to replace the primary digital data acquisition system used in the Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Test Section, the decision was made to use a combination of COTS hardware and in-house developed software. The COTS hardware used is the DataMAX II Instrumentation Recorder built by R.C. Electronics Inc. and a desktop Pentium 4 computer system. The in-house software was developed using MATLAB from The MathWorks. This paper will describe the design and development of the new data acquisition and analysis system.

  4. Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Turnkey Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) data acquisition systems typically perform well and meet most of the objectives of the manufacturer. The problem is that they seldom meet most of the objectives of the end user. The analysis software, if any, is unlikely to be tailored to the end users specific application; and there is seldom the chance of incorporating preferred algorithms to solve unique problems. Purchasing a customized system allows the end user to get a system tailored to the actual application, but the cost can be prohibitive. Once the system has been accepted, future changes come with a cost and response time that's often not workable. When it came time to replace the primary digital data acquisition system used in the Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Test Section, the decision was made to use a combination of COTS hardware and in-house developed software. The COTS hardware used is the DataMAX II Instrumentation Recorder built by R.C. Electronics Inc. and a desktop Pentium 4 computer system. The in-house software was developed using MATLAF3 from The Mathworks. This paper will describe the design and development of the new data acquisition and analysis system.

  5. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote earth field sensing magnetometer and servo control building; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils are 42-foot in diameter and a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils accommodates spacecraft access to the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  6. Prototype software reuse environment at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt

    1989-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) work is organized into four phases and includes participation by a contractor, CTA, Inc. The first phase was an automation study, which began with a comprehensive survey of software development automation technologies. Eight technical areas were analyzed for goals, current capabilities, and obstacles. The study documented current software development practice in GSFC Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate, and presented short- and long-term recommendations that included focus on reuse and object-oriented development. The second phase, which has been completed, developed a prototype reuse environment with tools supporting object-oriented requirements analysis and design. This phase addressed the operational concept of software reuse, i.e., it attempted to understand how software can be reused. This environment has two semantic networks: object and keywords, and includes automated search, interactive browsing and a graphical display of database contents. Phase 3 was a domain analysis of Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) software. The goal in this phase was to create an initial repository of reusable components and techniques. Seven existing Operations Control Centers at GSFC were studied, but the domain analysis proved to be very slow. A lesson learned from this was that senior people who understand the environment and the functionality of the area are needed to perform successful domain analyses.

  7. Earth alert: a NASA Goddard tech transfer success story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Thomas F.

    1994-10-01

    The historically high toll in human lives lost to natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and other progressive events signals the need for some type of personal warning that alerts people to the need to evacuate or otherwise protect themselves in the face of an advancing threat. Traditional warning services, which rely on broadcasts by the mass media in the metropolitan areas of the United States, achieve measurable success in disseminating warnings. However, warnings to isolated populations that exist in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world may be poor to effectively nonexistent, especially in the many archipelagoes. Earth Alert, a joint project of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Scientific and Commercial Systems Corporation, is targeted at development of a simple, low-cost means for providing timely warning to otherwise isolated populations. The project uses appropriate relay capabilities of U.S. satellites already in orbit, and thus avoids the high-cost development and launch of dedicated resources.

  8. Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph SV/GTO Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbets, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Contract number NAS5-30433, known at Ball Aerospace as the GHRS SV/GTO project, supported our participation in the post-launch activities of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The period of performance was December 1988 through December 1998. The contract supported the involvement of Dr Dennis Ebbets in the work of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team, and several of the Ball people in the documentation and publication of results. Three main categories of tasks were covered by this contract; in-orbit calibration of the GHRS, guaranteed time observations, and education and public outreach. The nature and accomplishments of these tasks are described in the report. This summary makes many references to publications in the scientific and technical literature. Appendix A is extracted from a complete bibliography, and lists those papers that are directly related to work performed under this GHRS contract. The tasks related to the in-orbit calibration of the GHRS were by far the largest responsibility during the first six years of the project. During this period Dr. Ebbets was responsible for the definition of calibration requirements, design of experiments, preparation of observing proposals, tracking their implementation and execution, and coordinating the analysis and publication of the results. Prior to the launch of HST in 1990 the observing proposals were developed in cooperation with the scientists on the GHRS DDT, engineers at Ball Aerospace, the operations staff at the STScI, and project coordinators at GSFC.

  9. Orbital Anomalies in Goddard Spacecraft for Calendar Year 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Walter B.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes and updates the annual on-orbit performance between January I and December 31, 1994, for spacecraft built by or managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). During 1994, GSFC had 27 active orbiting satellites and I Shuttle-launched and retrieved 'free flyer.' There were 310 reported anomalies among 21 satellites and one GSFC instrument (TOMS). GOES-8 accounted for 66 anomalies, and SAMPES reported 155 'anomalies'. Of the 155 anomalies reported for all but SAMPEX, only 4 affected the spacecraft missions 'substantially' or greater, that is, presented a loss of more than 33% of the total missions. The most frequent subsystem anomalies were Instrument/Payload(44), Timing Command and Control(40), and Attitude Control Systems(33). Of the non-SAMPEX anomalies, 29% had no effect on the missions and 28% caused subsystem or instrument degradation and, for another 28%, no anomaly effect on the mission could be determined. Fifty-three percent of non-SAMPEX anomalies could not be classified according to 'type'; the other most common types were 'systemic'(35), 'random'(19), and 'normal or expected operation'(15). Forty percent of the anomalies were not classified according to failure category; the remaining most frequent occurrences were 'design problems'(50) and 'other known problems'(35).

  10. Improved Goddard Microphysics for simulating Typhoon Morakot 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W.; Shi, J. J.; Lin, P.

    2010-12-01

    Typhoon Morakot struck Taiwan on the night of Friday August 7th, 2009 as a category 2 storm with sustained winds of 85 knots (92 mph). Although the center made landfall in Hualien county along the central east coast of Taiwan and passed over the central northern part of the island, it was southern Taiwan that received the worst effects of the storm where locally as much as 2200 mm (2.2 m) of rain were reported, resulting in the worst flooding there in 50 years. The result of the enormous amount of rain has been massive flooding and devastating mudslides. More than 600 people are confirmed dead. In this paper, we will present the results from high-resolution (2-km) WRF with improved Goddard microphysics for this typhoon case. The results showed that the improved microphysical scheme captured both in terms of maximum rainfall area and intensity. The model results also showed that the heavy amounts of rain over the southern portion of the island is due to persistent southwesterly flow associated with Morakot and it's circulation was able to draw up copious amounts of moisture from the South China Sea into southern Taiwan where it was able to interact with the steep topography. In addition, tracer and trajectory calculations (high resolution visualization) will be conducted to identify the origins of air parcels coming in and getting out eye/eye wall and spiral bands.

  11. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  12. Robust, Radiation Tolerant Command and Data Handling and Power System Electronics from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hanson C.; Fraction, James; Ortiz-Acosta, Melyane; Dakermanji, George; Kercheval, Bradford P.; Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Kim, David S.; Jung, David S.; Meyer, Steven E.; Mallik, Udayan; Rush, Kurt D.; Farid, Faramarz; Olsen, James C.; Sparacino, Pietro A.

    2016-01-01

    The Goddard Modular Smallsat Architecture (GMSA) is developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to address future reliability along with minimizing cost and schedule challenges for NASA Cubesat and Smallsat missions.

  13. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  14. Production of Cloned Mice by Nuclear Transfer of Cumulus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurd, Soleiman; Zarei, Mohammad Ali; Fathi, Fardin; Ghadimi, Tayyeb; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Jalili, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past several years, mammals have been successfully cloned by either the splitting of an early stage embryo or nuclear transfer of adult somatic cells (NT) into oocytes. Although it has been 15 years since the generation of the first cloned mammals from somatic cells by NT, the success rate for producing live offspring by this technique is low regardless of the cell type and animal species used. However, these techniques have the potential to be important tools for future research in basic biology. In the present study, we described our experiences in producing successfully cloned mouse using NT method and piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Methods B6D2F1 mice, 8-12 weeks old, were superovulated with injections of 5 IU of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and 5 IU of human chorionic gonadotropin administered 48 hr apart. Enucleation and donor nuclei cumulus cell injection were performed with a piezo-actuated micromanipulator after which activation and trichostatin A treatment were used for reconstructed oocytes. Two-cell stage cloned embryos that developed in the mWM medium were transferred into the oviducts of pseudopregnant NMRI mice. Results Of 367 oocytes collected, 131 (69%) developed into 2-cell stage embryos. Of these, 5 (1%) live pups were successfully delivered. We used NMRI foster mother to raise the pups by lactation. One adult cloned mouse was mated, after which she delivered and raised normal offspring. Conclusion For mouse cloning, the present study also successfully tested the capability of somatic cell nuclear transfer SCNT using a piezo unit. PMID:23919122

  15. Embryo quality predictive models based on cumulus cells gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Burnik Papler, T; Verdenik, I; Fon Tacer, K; Vrtačnik Bokal, E

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Since the introduction of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in clinical practice of infertility treatment, the indicators for high quality embryos were investigated. Cumulus cells (CC) have a specific gene expression profile according to the developmental potential of the oocyte they are surrounding, and therefore, specific gene expression could be used as a biomarker. The aim of our study was to combine more than one biomarker to observe improvement in prediction value of embryo development. In this study, 58 CC samples from 17 IVF patients were analyzed. This study was approved by the Republic of Slovenia National Medical Ethics Committee. Gene expression analysis [quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)] for five genes, analyzed according to embryo quality level, was performed. Two prediction models were tested for embryo quality prediction: a binary logistic and a decision tree model. As the main outcome, gene expression levels for five genes were taken and the area under the curve (AUC) for two prediction models were calculated. Among tested genes, AMHR2 and LIF showed significant expression difference between high quality and low quality embryos. These two genes were used for the construction of two prediction models: the binary logistic model yielded an AUC of 0.72 ± 0.08 and the decision tree model yielded an AUC of 0.73 ± 0.03. Two different prediction models yielded similar predictive power to differentiate high and low quality embryos. In terms of eventual clinical decision making, the decision tree model resulted in easy-to-interpret rules that are highly applicable in clinical practice. PMID:27785402

  16. Analysis of cumulus solar irradiance reflectance (CSIR) events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardhan

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at Earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When Sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using UVA and UVB pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Win -2 and 0.0169 Wm -2 were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of Sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed. C 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Analysis of Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflectance (CSIR) Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardham

    1996-01-01

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at the earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using Yankee Environmental Systems UVA-1 and UVB-1 pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Wm(exp -2) and 0.069 Wm(exp -2) were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed.

  18. Impact of Prunus Cerasus on PGR and HAS2 in Cumulus Cells and Fertility Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Namvar Vansofla, Fatemeh; Roshangar, Leila; Montaseri, Azadeh; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cumulus cells have a critical role in normal oocyte development and fertilization. Prunus cerasus is an anthocyanin rich berry and performs strong antioxidant activity. The present study set to determine if Prunus cerasus can affect expression of HAS2 (hyaluronan synthase 2) and progesterone receptor in Cumulus cells and its consequences outcome of the in vitro fertilization. Methods: 60 female and 15 male adult mice were used for mating and IVF (in vitro fertilization). Prunus cerasus extraction was added to the diet of female mice for 30 days. Ovulation induction and oocytes collection were done as routine. The cumulus cells were dissected apart, and the expression of progesterone receptor and HAS2 was detected using RT-PCR (real-time polymerase chain reaction). Fertilization rate was evaluated by IVF. All data were analyzed using t-test. Results: Data was showed that expression of progesterone receptor and HAS2 in cumulus cells of mice that received prunus cerasus increased. Moreover, oocyte fertilization rate also increased significantly. Conclusion: Prunus cerasus as an antioxidant natural can become an important medication for improving oocyte quality and opening new opportunities for infertility treatment. It is concluded that Prunus cerasus consumption could improve fertility rate by increasing progesterone receptor and HAS2 activity in cumulus cells. PMID:27123419

  19. The fine structure of the cumulus oophorus during follicular development in sheep.

    PubMed

    Cran, D G; Hay, M F; Moor, R M

    1979-11-01

    The cumulus and membrana granulosa of non-atretic ovarian follicles from primordial up to a stage shortly before ovulation were studied by electron microscopy. The follicular cells of primordial follicles were undifferentiated and rested on a thick basal lamina. In secondary follicles the endoplasmic reticulum had proliferated forming an anastomosing network. In early antral and antral follicles (0.5--2.0 mm dia.) the ER was composed of short cisternae, the mitochondria had elongated and gap junctions were first observed. In late antral follicles (3.0--5.9 mm dia.) gap junctions were frequent. In the cumulus the glycogen was associated with electron lucent areas whereas in the granulosa it was invariably associated with membranes. In large antral follicles large membrane bound bodies were present in the basal cells of the cumulus. At early oestrus a distinctive mitochondrial morphology was noted in the granulosa but not elsewhere in the follicles. At mid oestrus numerous annular nexuses were present in the granulosa but not in the cumulus. At late oestrus numerous lipid droplets were formed in both cumulus and granulosa, the boundary with theca interna became indistinct and the basal lamina became incomplete. PMID:574800

  20. Constraints on Cumulus Parameterization from Simulations of Observed MJO Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Genio, Anthony; Wu, Jingbo; Wolf, Audrey B.; Chen, Yonghua; Yao, Mao-Sung; Kim, Daehyun

    2015-01-01

    Two recent activities offer an opportunity to test general circulation model (GCM) convection and its interaction with large-scale dynamics for observed Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events. This study evaluates the sensitivity of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM to entrainment, rain evaporation, downdrafts, and cold pools. Single Column Model versions that restrict weakly entraining convection produce the most realistic dependence of convection depth on column water vapor (CWV) during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment at Gan Island. Differences among models are primarily at intermediate CWV where the transition from shallow to deeper convection occurs. GCM 20-day hindcasts during the Year of Tropical Convection that best capture the shallow–deep transition also produce strong MJOs, with significant predictability compared to Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission data. The dry anomaly east of the disturbance on hindcast day 1 is a good predictor of MJO onset and evolution. Initial CWV there is near the shallow–deep transition point, implicating premature onset of deep convection as a predictor of a poor MJO simulation. Convection weakly moistens the dry region in good MJO simulations in the first week; weakening of large-scale subsidence over this time may also affect MJO onset. Longwave radiation anomalies are weakest in the worst model version, consistent with previous analyses of cloud/moisture greenhouse enhancement as the primary MJO energy source. The authors’ results suggest that both cloud-/moisture-radiative interactions and convection–moisture sensitivity are required to produce a successful MJO simulation.

  1. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  2. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground-testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  3. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Scientific Support Contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1988, Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) was selected as the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) Scientific Support Contractor (SSC). This was to have been a few months before the launch of NASA's first Great Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As one of five scientific instruments on HST, the GHRS was designed to obtain spectra in the 1050-3300 A ultraviolet wavelength region with a resolving power, lambda/Delta(lambda) , of up to 100,000 and relative photometric accuracy to 1%. It was built by Ball AeroSpace Systems Group under the guidance of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team (IDT), comprised of 16 scientists from the US and Canada. After launch, the IDT was to perform the initial instrument calibration and execute a broad scientific program during a five-year Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) period. After a year's delay, the launch of HST occurred in April 1990, and CSC participated in the in-orbit calibration and first four years of GTO observations with the IDT. The HST primary mirror suffered from spherical aberration, which reduced the spatial and spectral resolution of Large Science Aperture (LSA) observations and decreased the throughput of the Small Science Aperture (SSA) by a factor of two. Periodic problems with the Side 1 carrousel electronics and anomalies with the low-voltage power supply finally resulted in a suspension of the use of Side 1 less than two years after launch. At the outset, the GHRS SSC task involved work in four areas: 1) to manage and operate the GHRS Data Analysis Facility (DAF); 2) to support the second Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV) program, as well as perform system engineering analysis of the GHRS as nesessary; 3) to assist the GHRS IDT with their scientific research programs, particularly the GSFC members of the team, and 4) to provide administrative and logistic support for GHRS public information and educational activities.

  4. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalosky, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  5. Ocean Data from MODIS at the NASA Goddard DAAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Wharton, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Terra satellite carrying the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was successfully launched on December 18, 1999. Some of the 36 different wavelengths that MODIS samples have never before been measured from space. New ocean data products, which have not been derived on a global scale before, are made available for research to the scientific community. For example, MODIS uses a new split window in the four-micron region for the better measurement of Sea Surface Temperature (SST), and provides the unprecedented ability (683 nm band) to measure chlorophyll fluorescence. At full ocean production, more than a thousand different ocean products in three major categories (ocean color, sea surface temperature, and ocean primary production) are archived at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) at the rate of approx. 230GB/day. The challenge is to distribute such large volumes of data to the ocean community. It is achieved through a combination of public and restricted EOS Data Gateways, the GES DAAC Search and Order WWW interface, and an FTP site that contains samples of MODIS data. A new Search and Order WWW interface at http://acdisx.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ developed at the GES DAAC is based on a hierarchical organization of data, will always return non-zero results. It has a very convenient geographical representation of five-minute data granule coverage for each day MODIS Data Support Team (MDST) continues the tradition of quality support at the GES DAAC for the ocean color data from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) and the Sea Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) by providing expert assistance to users in accessing data products, information on visualization tools, documentation for data products and formats (Hierarchical Data Format-Earth Observing System (HDF-EOS)), information on the scientific content of products and metadata. Visit the MDST website at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/CAMPAIGN DOCS/MODIS/index.html

  6. Specific antibody against the Aujeszky's disease virus in the complex cumulus oophorus-oocyte of sows.

    PubMed

    Jerábek, J; Horký, D; Trávník, P; Rodák, L

    1989-01-01

    Oocytes collected from sows vaccinated and revaccinated with an inactivated vaccine against Aujeszky's disease (AD) were examined for the presence of specific antibodies of the IgG class against AD virus in the complex cumulus oophorus-oocyte by means of immunocytochemical methods. No specific antibody of the IgG class was detected in the cumulus-oocyte complexes collected from sows before vaccination. On the other hand, the specific IgG antibody was found in all immunocytochemically examined complexes cumulus-oocyte collected from revaccinated sows. The specific antibody of the IgG class against AD virus and the porcine IgG were immunocytochemically visualized under both light and electron microscopes as a fine granular product disseminated in oocytes and follicular cells.

  7. Importance of the GDF9 signaling pathway on cumulus cell expansion and oocyte competency in sheep.

    PubMed

    Varnosfaderani, Sh Rouhollahi; Ostadhosseini, S; Hajian, M; Hosseini, S M; Khashouei, E Asadi; Abbasi, H; Hosseinnia, P; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2013-09-15

    Acquisition of developmental competency in cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) is derived from endocrine hormones and oocyte secreted factors. The contribution of these factors in oocyte maturation and development is an active area of research. The objective of this research was to investigate whether growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) that is secreted by oocyte affects cumulus expansion and oocyte development in sheep. Immature ovine COCs were cultured in the presence of recombinant human GDF9 (rhGDF9), denuded oocytes, SB-431542, a specific inhibitor of activin-like kinase 4/5/7; or a combination of these factors. Routine in vitro maturation of COCs and denuded oocytes were used as external control samples. Cultured COCs were used for assessment of (1) cumulus expansion; (2) expression of cumulus-related transcripts including pentraxin 3, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6, prostaglandin synthase 2, B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), and Bcl2-associated X (BAX); and (3) yield and quality of embryo development. It was observed that cumulus expansion was not affected by any of these treatments. HAS2 mRNA expression confirmed this observation. In the presence of exogenous GDF9, cleavage rate was reduced, blastocyst rate did not differ from other groups, and trophectoderm cell number significantly increased. This suggests that exogenous GDF9 could improve embryo quality. It was also observed that oocyte secreted factors reduced proapoptotic BAX mRNA, and BCL2 mRNA expression was not significantly different from other groups. This study provides evidence that GDF9 signaling might have a minor influence on ovine cumulus expansion and oocyte development and that other signaling pathway(s) might have a dominant role.

  8. Effects of aerosols and relative humidity on cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Li, Guohui; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-07-01

    The influences of the aerosol type and concentration and relative humidity (RH) on cumulus clouds have been investigated using a two-dimensional spectral-bin cloud model. Three simulations are conducted to represent the polluted continental, clean continental, and marine aerosol types. Under the same initial dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, the maritime aerosol case results in more intensive radar reflectivity in both developing and mature stages than the continental aerosol cases, because of enhanced warm rain by collisions and ice processes by deposition growth due to larger droplet sizes and higher supersaturation, respectively. The considerable delay in convective development due to reduced droplet condensation is responsible for the longer cloud lifetime in the marine aerosol case. For the continental case, the most noticeable effects of increasing aerosol number concentrations (with 15 different initial values) are the increases of the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud water content but a decrease in the effective droplet radius. More latent heat release from increasing condensation results in stronger convection and more melting precipitation at the higher aerosol concentrations. Melting precipitation and secondary clouds primarily contribute to enhanced precipitation with increasing aerosols. The precipitation, however, decreases with increasing aerosol in the extremely high aerosol cases (over 5 × 104 cm-3) due to suppression of convection from depleted water vapor and inefficient coalescence. When the initial aerosol concentration exceeds a critical level, most of the cloud properties become less sensitive to aerosols, implying that the aerosol effect on deep convection is more pronounced in relatively clean air than in heavily polluted air. The aerosol effect on the cloud properties is strongly dependent on RH. As the surface RH increases from 40 to 70%, the cloud changes from shallow warm to deep convective types due to a significant

  9. A Regulation of Tropical Climate by Radiative Cooling as Simulated in a Cumulus Ensemble Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Lau, K.-M.; Li, X.; Chou, M.-D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Responses of tropical atmosphere to low-boundary forcing are investigated in a 2-D cumulus ensemble model (CEM) with an imposed warm-pool and cold-pool SST contrast (deltaSST). The domain-mean vertical motion is constrained to produce heat sink and moisture source as in the observed tropical climate. In a series of experiments, the warm pool SST is specified at different values while the cold pool SST is specified at 26 C. The strength of the circulation increases with increasing deltaSST until deltaSST reaches 3.5 C, and remains unchanged as deltaSST exceeds 3.5 C. The regulation of tropical convection by zonal SST gradient is constrained by the radiative cooling over the cold pool. For deltaSST less than 3.5 C, an enhanced subsidence warming is balanced by a reduced condensation heating over the cold pool. For deltaSST greater than 3.5 C, the subsidence regime expands over the entire cold pool where no condensation heating exist so that a further enhanced subsidence warming can no longer be sustained. The above regulation mechanism is also evident in the change of energy at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) that is dominated by cloud and water vapor greenhouse effect (c (sub LW)) and G (sub clear). The change in shortwave radiation at TOA is largely cancelled between the warm pool and cold pool, likely due to the same imposed vertical motion in our experiments. For deltaSST less than 3.5 C, an increase of deltaSST is associated with a large increase in c (sub Lw) due to increased total clouds in response to enhanced SST-induced circulation. For deltaSST greater than 3.5 C, clouds over the warm pool decrease with increasing SST, and the change in c (sub LW) is much smaller. In both dSST regimes, the change in CLW is larger than the change in G(sub clear) which is slightly negative. However, in the case of uniform warming (deltaSST=0), DeltaG(sub clear), is positive, approximately 5 W per square meters per degree change of SST.

  10. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  11. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  12. The 1995 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Information Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1995 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Information Technologies held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, on May 9-11, 1995. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  13. Payload test philosophy. [implications of STS development at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arman, A.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of STS development for payload testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center are reviewed. The biggest impact of STS may be that instead of testing the entire payload, most of the testing may have to be limited to the subsystem or subassembly level. Particular consideration is given to the Goddard protoflight concept in which the test is geared to the design qualification levels, the test durations being those that are expected during the actual launch sequence.

  14. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  15. New data and capabilities in the NASA Goddard Giovanni system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, H.; Farley, J.; Leptoukh, G.; Berrick, S. W.

    2007-12-01

    Giovanni, the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure, is the underlying infrastructure for a growing family of Web interfaces that allows users to analyze gridded and swath data interactively online without having to download any data. Giovanni is a simple but powerful tool for researchers to explore and analyze data without having to deal with original data format, volume, and complexity. Since 2002, Giovanni has served many users worldwide with TRMM and MODIS data visualization and analysis. With increasing size and complexity of Earth and Space Science data holdings and growing demands for better, faster, and less costly tools for data exploration, visualization and analysis, Giovanni has been extended to serve CALIPSO, CloudSat, SeaWiFS, TOMS, AIRS, OMI, MLS-Aura, HIRDLS, and HALOE data to the Atmospheric Composition, Aerosol, Air Quality, and other research communities. To further improve Giovanni extendibility, accessibility, and performance, Giovanni version 3 (G3) has been developed and is currently in operation at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). In addition to the existing Giovanni instances, several new G3 instances have been released, including (1) A-Train Data Depot that is capable to allow access to, visualize, analyze and correlate distributed atmospheric measurements from A-Train instruments; (2) NEESPI, a multi-sensor multi-disciplinary instance dedicated to the studies of the environment of the Northern Eurasia; (3) Data Fusion, a prototype Giovanni instance that demonstrates the G3 capability for fusing Earth Science data from multiple sensors. Giovanni capabilities have also been extended to include direct access via WMS protocol, and to provide output in various popular formats, like KML for Google Earth. With much progress in data visualization, data analysis, and easy-to-use toolkits, G3 has simplified and strengthened its capabilities of providing closer links between

  16. Update on the Fabrication and Performance of 2-D Arrays of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Thermal Detectors for Outer-Planets Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook; Aslam, S.

    2011-01-01

    Detectors with better performance than the current thermopile detectors that operate at room temperature will be needed at the focal plane of far-infrared instruments on future planetary exploration missions. We will present an update on recent results from the 2-D array of MgB2 thermal detectors being currently developed at NASA Goddard. Noise and sensitivity results will be presented and compared to thermal detectors currently in use on planetary missions.

  17. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  18. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  19. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  20. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  1. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  2. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  3. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  4. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  5. Radar Reflectivity Simulated by a 2-D Spectra Bin Model: Sensitivity of Cloud-aerosol Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Kiaowen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Khain, Alexander; Simpson, Joanne; Johnson, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model with bin spectra microphysics is used to simulate mesoscale convective systems.The model uses explicit bins to represent size spectra of cloud nuclei, water drops, ice crystals, snow and graupel. Each hydrometeorite category is described by 33 mass bins. The simulations provide a unique data set of simulated raindrop size distribution in a realistic dynamic frame. Calculations of radar parameters using simulated drop size distribution serve as an evaluation of numerical model performance. In addition, the GCE bin spectra modes is a very useful tool to study uncertainties related to radar observations; all the environmental parameters are precisely known. In this presentation, we concentrate on the discussion of Z-R (ZDR-R) relation in the simulated systems. Due to computational limitations, the spectra bin model has been run in two dimensions with 31 stretched vertical layers and 1026 horizontal grid points (1 km resolution). Two different cases, one in midlatitude continent, the other in tropical ocean, have been simulated. The continental case is a strong convection which lasted for two hours. The oceanic case is a persistent system with more than 10 hours' life span. It is shown that the simulated Z-R (ZDR-R) relations generally agree with observations using radar and rain gauge data. The spatial and temporal variations of Z-R relation in different locations are also analyzed. Impact of aerosols on cloud formation and raindrop size distribution was studied. Both clean (low CCN) and dirty (high CCN) cases are simulated. The Z-R relation is shown to vary considerable in the initial CCN concentrations.

  6. Effect of Acrylamide on Oocyte Nuclear Maturation and Cumulus Cells Apoptosis in Mouse In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuzhen; Jiang, Ligang; Zhong, Tao; Kong, Shuhui; Zheng, Rongbin; Kong, Fengyun; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Lei; An, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a chemical compound with severe neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Recent studies showed that ACR impairs the function of reproductive organs, e.g., epididymis and testes. In vitro maturation of mouse oocyte is a sensitive assay to identify potential chemical hazard to female fertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects of ACR on the nuclear maturation and cumulus cells apoptosis of mouse oocytes in vitro. Cumulus–oocyte complexes were incubated in a maturation medium containing 0, 5, 10 and 20 μM of ACR. Chromosome alignment and spindle morphology of oocytes was determined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Our results showed that oocytes exposed to different doses of ACR in vitro were associated with a significant decrease of oocyte maturation, significant increase of chromosome misalignment rate, occurrence of abnormal spindle configurations, and the inhibition of oocyte parthenogenetic activation. Furthermore, apoptosis of cumulus cells was determined by TUNEL and CASPASE-3 assay. Results showed that apoptosis in cumulus cells was enhanced and the expression of CASPASE-3 was increased after cumulus–oocyte complexes were exposed to ACR. Therefore, ACR may affect the nuclear maturation of oocytes via the apoptosis of cumulus cells in vitro. PMID:26275143

  7. Interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, A.; Schubert, W.

    1973-01-01

    Large-scale modification of the environment by cumulus clouds is discussed in terms of entrainment, detrainment, evaporation, and subsidence. Drying, warming, and condensation by vertical displacement of air are considered as well as budget equations for mass, static energy, water vapor, and liquid water.

  8. Effect of oil overlay on inhibition potential of roscovitine in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, L F; Marques Filho, W C; Ulian, C M V; Branchini, N S; Silva, D T; Ackermann, C L; Landim-Alvarenga, F C; Bicudo, S D

    2015-06-01

    Inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases, as roscovitine, have been used to prevent the spontaneous resumption of meiosis in vitro and to improve the oocyte developmental competence. In this study, the interference of oil overlay on the reversible arrest capacity of roscovitine in sheep oocytes as well as its effects on cumulus expansion was evaluated. For this, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were cultured for 20 h in TCM 199 with 10% foetal bovine serum (Control) containing 75 μm roscovitine (Rosco). Subsequently, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for further 18 h in inhibitor-free medium with LH and FSH. The culture was performed in Petri dishes under mineral oil (+) or in 96 well plates without oil overlay (-) at 38.5°C and 5% CO2 . At 20 and 38 h, the cumulus expansion and nuclear maturation were evaluated under stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. No group presented cumulus expansion at 20 h. After additional culture with gonadotrophins, a significant rate of COCs from both Control groups (+/-) exhibited total expansion while in both Rosco groups (+/-) the partial expansion prevailed. Among the oocytes treated with roscovitine, 65.2% were kept at GV in the absence of oil overlay while 40.6% of them reached MII under oil cover (p < 0.05). This meiotic arrest was reversible, and proper meiosis progression also occurred in the Control groups (+/-). So, the culture system without oil overlay improved the meiotic inhibition promoted by roscovitine without affecting the cumulus expansion rate or the subsequent meiosis progression.

  9. Sub-grid Parameterization of Cumulus Vertical Velocities for Climate and Numerical Weather Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, William; Donner, Leo

    2015-04-01

    Microphysical and aerosol processes determine the magnitude of climate forcing by aerosol-cloud interactions, are central aspects of cloud-climate feedback, and are important elements in weather systems for which accurate forecasting is a major goal of numerical weather prediction. Realistic simulation of these processes demands not only accurate microphysical and aerosol process representations but also realistic simulation of the vertical motions in which the aerosols and microphysics act. Aerosol activation, for example, is a strong function of vertical velocity. Cumulus parameterizations for climate and numerical weather prediction models have recently begun to include vertical velocities among the statistics they predict. These vertical velocities have been subject to only limited evaluation using observed vertical velocities. Deployments of multi-Doppler radars and dual-frequency profilers in recent field campaigns have substantially increased the observational base of cumulus vertical velocities, which for decades had been restricted mostly to GATE observations. Observations from TWP-ICE (Darwin, Australia) and MC3E (central United States) provide previously unavailable information on the vertical structure of cumulus vertical velocities and observations in differing synoptic contexts from those available in the past. They also provide an opportunity to independently evaluate cumulus parameterizations with vertical velocities tuned to earlier GATE observations. This presentation will compare vertical velocities observed in TWP-ICE and MC3E with cumulus vertical velocities using the parameterization in the GFDL CM3 climate model. Single-column results indicate parameterized vertical velocities are frequently greater than observed. Errors in parameterized vertical velocities exhibit similarities to vertical velocities explicitly simulated by cloud-system resolving models, and underlying issues in the treatment of microphysics may be important for both. The

  10. Kinematics of hamster sperm during penetration of the cumulus cell matrix.

    PubMed

    Drobnis, E Z; Yudin, A I; Cherr, G N; Katz, D F

    1988-12-01

    During capacitation, mammalian spermatozoa gain the ability to penetrate the cumulus cell matrix (CCM). The role of hyperactivated motility for this capacity is uncertain. In the present study, hamster sperm were observed during penetration and progression through the CCM, and flagellar beat patterns were quantitated by characterization of the underlying flagellar bends. Small numbers of sperm were added to cumulus masses slightly compressed on a slide (150 micron depth), and penetration was videorecorded using interference contrast optics. During penetration of the cumulus surface, sperm did not generate the large flagellar bends and asymmetric beats that are hallmarks of hyperactivation in low viscosity media. Instead, they entered slowly using high-frequency, low-amplitude sinusoidal flagellar motions. Within the CCM, sperm continued to move slowly, and they exhibited three distinct patterns of motility. The first was sinusoidal, produced by alternating, propagated bends: principal bends (PB) moved the head away from the beat midline, with the convex edge of the head leading, and reverse bends (RB) had the opposite curvature. The second pattern was asymmetric and sinusoidal: an extreme RB developed in the distal flagellum, was propagated distally, and was followed by a PB of less curvature. The third motility pattern was a hatchet-like stroke of the sperm head which resulted when an extreme, nonpropagated PB developed slowly in the proximal midpiece, and was released rapidly. In this mode there were no reverse bends, and sperm did not progress. There were subpopulations of capacitating sperm in free-swimming medium which had these same bend types and motility patterns, suggesting that qualitative flagellar movement may not change during CCM penetration. Sperm velocity in the CCM was not strongly correlated with flagellar beat kinematics, suggesting local heterogeneity in cumulus mechanical resistance and/or differences in interaction of the matrix with the

  11. Estrogen promotes the development of mouse cumulus cells in coordination with oocyte-derived GDF9 and BMP15.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Koji; Su, You-Qiang; Li, Qinglei; Wigglesworth, Karen; Matzuk, Martin M; Eppig, John J

    2010-12-01

    The differentiation and function of cumulus cells depend upon oocyte-derived paracrine factors, but studies on the estrogen receptor knockout mice suggested that estrogen also participates in these processes. This study investigates the possible coordination of estrogen and oocytes in the development and function of cumulus cells using cumulus expansion and the expression of transcripts required for expansion as functional endpoints. Preantral granulosa cell-oocyte complexes developed in vitro with 17β-estradiol (E2) exhibited increased levels of cumulus expansion and Has2 transcripts, encoding hyaluronan synthase 2, compared with those developed without E2. Moreover, cumulus cell-oocyte complexes (COCs) isolated from antral follicles and maintained in culture without E2 exhibited reduced cumulus expansion and Has2 mRNA levels compared with freshly isolated COCs. Exogenous E2, provided during the maintenance culture, alleviated these deficiencies. However, when oocytes were removed from COCs, E2 supplementation did not maintain competence to undergo expansion; the presence in culture of either fully grown oocytes or recombinant growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) was required. Recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 15, but not fibroblast growth factor 8, augmented the GDF9 effect. Oocytes or GDF9 suppressed cumulus cell levels of Nrip1 transcripts encoding nuclear receptor-interacting protein 1, a potential inhibitor of estrogen receptor signals. Therefore, E2 and oocyte-derived paracrine factors GDF9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 coordinate to promote the development of cumulus cells and maintain their competence to undergo expansion. Furthermore, suppression of Nrip1 expression in cumulus cells by oocyte may be one mechanism mediating cross talk between oocyte and E2 signals that promotes follicular development.

  12. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  13. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  14. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  15. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  16. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  17. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  18. Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, L. K.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Dubey, M.; Andrews, E.; Coulter, R. L.; Hair, J. W.; Hubbe, J. M.Lee, Y. N.; Mazzoleni, C; Olfert, J; Springston, SR; Environmental Science Division; PNNL; NOAA Earth System Research Lab.; NASA Langley Research Center; LANL; BNL; Univ.of Alberta; Univ. of Colorado

    2009-11-01

    Aerosols influence climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation and indirectly through their influence on cloud microphysical and dynamical properties. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded that the global radiative forcing due to aerosols is large and in general cools the planet. But the uncertainties in these estimates are also large due to our poor understanding of many of the important processes related to aerosols and clouds. To address this uncertainty an integrated strategy for addressing issues related to aerosols and aerosol processes was proposed. Using this conceptual framework, the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) is a stage 1 activity, that is, a detailed process study. The specific focus of CHAPS was to provide concurrent observations of the chemical composition of the activated [particles that are currently serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)] and nonactivated aerosols, the scattering and extinction profiles, and detailed aerosol and droplet size spectra in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during June 2007. Numerous campaigns have examined aerosol properties downwind from large pollution sources, including the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign and the two of the three Aerosol Characterization Experiments, ACE-2 and ACE-Asia. Other studies conducted near cities have examined changes in both aerosols and clouds downwind of urban areas. For example wintertime stratiform clouds associated with the urban plumes of Denver, Colorado, and Kansas City, Missouri, have a larger number concentration and smaller median volume diameter of droplets than clouds that had not been affected by the urban plume. Likewise, a decrease in precipitation in polluted regions along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains was discovered. In a modeling study, it was found that precipitation downwind of urban areas may be influenced by changes in aerosols as well as the

  19. Individual bovine in vitro embryo production and cumulus cell transcriptomic analysis to distinguish cumulus-oocyte complexes with high or low developmental potential.

    PubMed

    Bunel, A; Jorssen, E P; Merckx, E; Leroy, J L; Bols, P E; Sirard, M A

    2015-01-15

    Studying cumulus cell (CC) transcriptome is of great interest as it could provide a noninvasive method to assess oocyte quality. In cattle, the search for quality markers has not been done with cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) cultured individually from maturation to blastocyst stage. Here, differences between high- and low-potential COCs were examined by transcriptomic analysis of CC biopsies obtained from COCs of 2 to 6 mm follicles (n = 249; eight replicates) before individual in vitro maturation, fertilization, and culture until Day 8 after fertilization. Each COC was individually tracked and categorized based on his fate: embryo at blastocyst stage (CC-Blast) or embryo arrested at 2- to 8-cell stage (CC-2-8-cells). Average blastocyst rates were 27.7% for individual culture and 31.2% for group control (not significantly different). For transcriptomic analysis, five cumulus biopsies per replicate were pooled for each fate. Three CC replicates underwent transcriptomic analysis using RNA microarray assay. Some clear differences in gene expression between the CC-Blast and the CC-2-8-cell groups were identified. Considering a 1.5-fold change (P < 0.05), 68 genes were differentially expressed between the CC-Blast and CC-2-8-cells. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction validations were performed for 12 selected genes: six upregulated genes for each COC fate. Higher expression of 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 9 (AGPAT9) (lipid metabolism), Chloride intracellular channel 3 (CLIC3), Keratin 8 (KRT8), and Lumican (LUM) (molecular transport) was observed in CC-2-8-cells (P < 0.05). The CC-Blast fate analysis revealed a significantly higher expression of Glycine amidinotransferase (L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase) (GATM) (posttranslational modification, amino acid metabolism, and free radical scavenging). This newly identified set of genes could provide new markers to distinguish COCs associated with good quality embryos from COCs

  20. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  1. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  2. Transcript of proceedings: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, 1972 GSFC Battery Workshop, first day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of the 1972 NASA/Goddard Battery Workshop are reported. Topics discussed include: separators, materials and processing, test and storage experience, and improved energy density systems.

  3. The Macroscopic Entrainment Processes of Simulated Cumulus Ensemble. Part II: Testing the Entraining-Plume Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chichung; Arakawa, Akio

    1997-04-01

    According to Part I of this paper, it seems that ignoring the contribution from descendent cloud air in a cloud model for cumulus parameterization (CMCP), such as the spectral cumulus ensemble model in the Arakawa-Schubert parameterization, is an acceptable simplification for tropical deep convection. Since each subensemble in the spectral cumulus ensemble model is formally analogous to an entraining plume, the latter is examined using the simulated data from a cloud-resolving model (CRM). The authors first follow the analysis procedure of Warner. With the data from a nonprecipitating experiment, the authors show that the entraining-plume model cannot simultaneously predict the mean liquid water profile and cloud top height of the clouds simulated by the CRM. However, the mean properties of active elements of clouds, which are characterized by strong updrafts, can be described by an entraining plume of similar top height.With the data from a precipitating experiment, the authors examine the spectral cumulus ensemble model using the Paluch diagram. It is found that the spectral cumulus ensemble model appears adequate if different types of clouds in the spectrum are interpreted as subcloud elements with different entrainment characteristics. The resolved internal structure of clouds can thus be viewed as a manifestation of a cloud spectrum. To further investigate whether the fractional rate of entrainment is an appropriate parameter for characterizing cloud types in the spectral cumulus ensemble model, the authors stratify the simulated saturated updrafts (subcloud elements) into different types according to their eventual heights and calculate the cloud mass flux and mean moist static energy for each type. Entrainment characteristics are then inferred through the cloud mass flux and in-cloud moist static energy. It is found that different types of subcloud elements have distinguishable thermodynamic properties and entrainment characteristics. However, for each cloud

  4. Glenn Goddard TDRSS Waveform 1.1.3 On-Orbit Performance Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed is to study the development, testing, and operation of software defined radios (SDRs) and their associated appliations in the operational space environment to reduce cost and risk for future space missions. This report covers the results of on-orbit performance testing completed using the Glenn Goddard Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) waveform version 1.1.3 in the ground and space environments. The Glenn Goddard TDRSS (GGT) waveform, operating on the SCaN Testbed Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) SDR, is capable of a variety of data rates and frequencies, operating using Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK).

  5. Recent progress in the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center atomic hydrogen standards program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and through associated contractors, a broad spectrum of work is being carried out to develop improved hydrogen maser frequency standards for field use, improved experimental hydrogen maser frequency standards, and improved frequency and time distribution and measurement systems for hydrogen maser use. Recent progress in the following areas is reported: results on the Nr masers built by the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University, the development of a low cost hydrogen maser at Goddard Space Flight Center, and work on a low noise phase comparison system and digitally phase locked crystal oscillator called the distribution and measurement system.

  6. A study of the longevity and operational reliability of Goddard Spacecraft, 1960-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shockey, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    Compiled data regarding the design lives and lifetimes actually achieved by 104 orbiting satellites launched by the Goddard Spaceflight Center between the years 1960 and 1980 is analyzed. Historical trends over the entire 21 year period are reviewed, and the more recent data is subjected to an examination of several key parameters. An empirical reliability function is derived, and compared with various mathematical models. Data from related studies is also discussed. The results provide insight into the reliability history of Goddard spacecraft an guidance for estimating the reliability of future programs.

  7. 1988 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence, Greenbelt, MD, May 24, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1988 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland on May 24, 1988. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed. The papers in these proceedings fall into the following areas: mission operations support, planning and scheduling; fault isolation/diagnosis; image processing and machine vision; data management; modeling and simulation; and development tools methodologies.

  8. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  9. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  10. Impact of a scale-aware cumulus parameterization in an operational NWP system modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baode; Yang, Yuhua; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-05-01

    To better understand the behavior of convective schemes across the grey zone, we carried out one-month (July of 2013) realtime-like experiment with an operational NWP system modeling system which includes the ADAS data assimilation scheme and WRF forecast model. The Grell-Freitas cumulus parameterization scheme, which is a scale-aware convective parameterization scheme and has been developed to better handle the transition in behavior of the sub-grid scale convective processes through the grey zone, was used in different resolution (15km, 9km and 3km) model set-up. Subjective and quantitative evaluations of the forecasts were conducted and the skills of the different experimental forecasts relatively to existing forecasting guidance were compared. A summary of the preliminary findings about the proportion of resolved vs unresolved physical processes in the gray zone will be presented along with a discussion of the potential operational impacts of the cumulus parameterization.

  11. A cumulus parameterization scheme designed for nested grid meso-{beta} scale models

    SciTech Connect

    Weissbluth, M.J.; Cotton, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    A generalized cumulus parameterization based upon higher order turbulence closure has been incorporated into one dimensional simulations. The scheme consists of a level 2.5w turbulence closure scheme mated with a convective adjustment scheme. The convective adjustment scheme includes a gradient term which can be interpreted as either a subsidence term when the scheme is used in large scale models or a mesoscale compensation term when the scheme is used in mesoscale models. The scheme also includes a convective adjustment term which is interpreted as a detrainment term in large scale models. In mesoscale models, the mesoscale compensation term and the advection by the mean vertical motions combine to yield no net advection which is desirable since the convective moistening and heating is now wholly accomplished by the convective adjustment term; double counting is then explicitly eliminated. One dimensional simulations indicate satisfactory performance of the cumulus parameterization scheme for a non-entraining updraft.

  12. A cumulus parameterization scheme designed for nested grid meso-. beta. scale models

    SciTech Connect

    Weissbluth, M.J.; Cotton, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    A generalized cumulus parameterization based upon higher order turbulence closure has been incorporated into one dimensional simulations. The scheme consists of a level 2.5w turbulence closure scheme mated with a convective adjustment scheme. The convective adjustment scheme includes a gradient term which can be interpreted as either a subsidence term when the scheme is used in large scale models or a mesoscale compensation term when the scheme is used in mesoscale models. The scheme also includes a convective adjustment term which is interpreted as a detrainment term in large scale models. In mesoscale models, the mesoscale compensation term and the advection by the mean vertical motions combine to yield no net advection which is desirable since the convective moistening and heating is now wholly accomplished by the convective adjustment term; double counting is then explicitly eliminated. One dimensional simulations indicate satisfactory performance of the cumulus parameterization scheme for a non-entraining updraft.

  13. Measured and modeled cloud-aerosol radiative effects in polluted cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K. S.; Feingold, G.; Pilewskie, P.; Jiang, H.; Coddington, O.

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the need to consider aerosol particles and clouds as an entity rather than artificially separating aerosol and cloud radiative forcing. A particularly difficult situation is that of cumulus clouds in a polluted background where radiative effects from heterogeneous clouds, aerosol particles, and surface albedo can only be distinguished by their spectral signature. We have used spectral irradiance measurements from the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study, and extensive three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations applied to the output of large eddy simulations, to show that measurements below clouds or cloud gaps are only reproduced when including aerosol particles in the calculations. Our technique enables the derivation of measurement-based spectral forcing and absorption of the cloud-aerosol-system. Furthermore, we present a new spectral effect caused by a combination of molecular scattering and cumulus cloud effects that is also relevant to cloud remote sensing.

  14. Dependence of entrainment in shallow cumulus convection on vertical velocity and distance to cloud edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yang; Kuang, Zhiming

    2016-04-01

    The dependence of entrainment rate on environmental conditions and cloud characteristics is investigated using large eddy simulations (LES) of the response of shallow cumulus convection to a small-amplitude temperature perturbation that is horizontally uniform and localized in height. The simulated cumulus fields are analyzed in the framework of an ensemble of entraining plumes by tracking a large number of Lagrangian parcels embedded in the LES and grouping them into different plumes based on their detrainment heights. The results show that fractional entrainment rate per unit height of a plume is inversely proportional to the plume's vertical velocity and its distance to the cloud edge, while changes in environmental stratification and relative humidity, the plume's buoyancy, or the vertical gradient of its buoyancy due to the temperature perturbation have little effect on the plume's entrainment rate.

  15. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  16. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  17. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  18. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  19. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  20. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  1. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  2. Modification of cumulus convection and planetary boundary layer schemes in the GRAPES global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Chen, Qiying; Sun, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Cumulus convection is a key linkage between hydrological cycle and large-scale atmospheric circulation. Cumulus parameterization scheme is an important component in numerical weather and climate modeling studies. In the Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction Enhanced System (GRAPES), turbulent mixing and diffusion approach is applied in its shallow convection scheme. This method overestimates the vertical transport of heat and moisture fluxes but underestimates cloud water mixing ratio over the region of stratocumulus clouds. As a result, the simulated low stratocumulus clouds are less than observations. To overcome this problem, a mass flux method is employed in the shallow convection scheme to replace the original one. Meanwhile, the deep convection scheme is adjusted correspondingly. This modification is similar to that in the US NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS), which uses the simplified Arakawa Schubert Scheme (SAS). The planetary boundary layer scheme (PBL) is also revised by considering the coupling between the PBL and stratocumulus clouds. With the modification of both the cumulus and PBL schemes, the GRAPES simulation of shallow convective heating rate becomes more reasonable; total amounts of stratocumulus clouds simulated over the eastern Pacific and their vertical structure are more consistent with observations; the underestimation of stratocumulus clouds simulated by original schemes is less severe with the revised schemes. Precipitation distribution in the tropics becomes more reasonable and spurious precipitation is effectively suppressed. The westward extension and northward movement of the western Pacific subtropical high simulated with the revised schemes are more consistent with Final Operational Global Analysis (FNL) than that simulated with the original schemes. The statistical scores for the global GRAPES forecast are generally improved with the revised schemes, especially for the simulation of geopotential height in the Northern

  3. Cumulus Cell Transcripts Transit to the Bovine Oocyte in Preparation for Maturation.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, Angus D; Gilbert, Isabelle; Scantland, Sara; Fournier, Eric; Ashkar, Fazl; Bastien, Alexandre; Saadi, Habib A Shojaei; Gagné, Dominic; Sirard, Marc-André; Khandjian, Édouard W; Richard, François J; Hyttel, Poul; Robert, Claude

    2016-01-01

    So far, the characteristics of a good quality egg have been elusive, similar to the nature of the physiological, cellular, and molecular cues leading to its production both in vivo and in vitro. Current understanding highlights a strong and complex interdependence between the follicular cells and the gamete. Secreted factors induce cellular responses in the follicular cells, and direct exchange of small molecules from the cumulus cells to the oocyte through gap junctions controls meiotic arrest. Studying the interconnection between the cumulus cells and the oocyte, we previously demonstrated that the somatic cells also contribute transcripts to the gamete. Here, we show that these transcripts can be visualized moving down the transzonal projections (TZPs) to the oocyte, and that a time course analysis revealed progressive RNA accumulation in the TZPs, indicating that RNA transfer occurs before the initiation of meiosis resumption under a timetable fitting with the acquisition of developmental competence. A comparison of the identity of the nascent transcripts trafficking in the TZPs, with those in the oocyte increasing in abundance during maturation, and that are present on the oocyte's polyribosomes, revealed transcripts common to all three fractions, suggesting the use of transferred transcripts for translation. Furthermore, the removal of potential RNA trafficking by stripping the cumulus cells caused a significant reduction in maturation rates, indicating the need for the cumulus cell RNA transfer to the oocyte. These results offer a new perspective to the determinants of oocyte quality and female fertility, as well as provide insight that may eventually be used to improve in vitro maturation conditions.

  4. Cumulus Cell Transcripts Transit to the Bovine Oocyte in Preparation for Maturation.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, Angus D; Gilbert, Isabelle; Scantland, Sara; Fournier, Eric; Ashkar, Fazl; Bastien, Alexandre; Saadi, Habib A Shojaei; Gagné, Dominic; Sirard, Marc-André; Khandjian, Édouard W; Richard, François J; Hyttel, Poul; Robert, Claude

    2016-01-01

    So far, the characteristics of a good quality egg have been elusive, similar to the nature of the physiological, cellular, and molecular cues leading to its production both in vivo and in vitro. Current understanding highlights a strong and complex interdependence between the follicular cells and the gamete. Secreted factors induce cellular responses in the follicular cells, and direct exchange of small molecules from the cumulus cells to the oocyte through gap junctions controls meiotic arrest. Studying the interconnection between the cumulus cells and the oocyte, we previously demonstrated that the somatic cells also contribute transcripts to the gamete. Here, we show that these transcripts can be visualized moving down the transzonal projections (TZPs) to the oocyte, and that a time course analysis revealed progressive RNA accumulation in the TZPs, indicating that RNA transfer occurs before the initiation of meiosis resumption under a timetable fitting with the acquisition of developmental competence. A comparison of the identity of the nascent transcripts trafficking in the TZPs, with those in the oocyte increasing in abundance during maturation, and that are present on the oocyte's polyribosomes, revealed transcripts common to all three fractions, suggesting the use of transferred transcripts for translation. Furthermore, the removal of potential RNA trafficking by stripping the cumulus cells caused a significant reduction in maturation rates, indicating the need for the cumulus cell RNA transfer to the oocyte. These results offer a new perspective to the determinants of oocyte quality and female fertility, as well as provide insight that may eventually be used to improve in vitro maturation conditions. PMID:26586844

  5. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  6. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  7. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  8. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  9. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  10. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  12. Cumulus cell gene expression associated with pre-ovulatory acquisition of developmental competence in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bunel, A; Nivet, A L; Blondin, P; Vigneault, C; Richard, F J; Sirard, M A

    2014-01-01

    The final days before ovulation impact significantly on follicular function and oocyte quality. This study investigated the cumulus cell (CC) transcriptomic changes during the oocyte developmental competence acquisition period. Six dairy cows were used for 24 oocyte collections and received FSH twice daily over 3 days, followed by FSH withdrawal for 20, 44, 68 and 92 h in four different oestrous cycles for each of the six cows. Half of the cumulus-oocyte complexes were subjected to in vitro maturation, fertilisation and culture to assess blastocyst rate. The other half of the CC underwent microarray analysis (n=3 cows, 12 oocyte collections) and qRT-PCR (n=3 other cows, 12 oocyte collections). According to blastocyst rates, 20 h of FSH withdrawal led to under-differentiated follicles (49%), 44 and 68 h to the most competent follicles (71% and 61%) and 92 h to over-differentiated ones (51%). Ten genes, from the gene lists corresponding to the three different follicular states, were subjected to qRT-PCR. Interestingly, CYP11A1 and NSDHL gene expression profiles reflected the blastocyst rate. However most genes were associated with the over-differentiated status: GATM, MAN1A1, VNN1 and NRP1. The early period of FSH withdrawal has a minimal effect on cumulus gene expression, whereas the longest period has a very significant one and indicates the beginning of the atresia process.

  13. FSH in vitro versus LH in vivo: similar genomic effects on the cumulus.

    PubMed

    Assidi, Mourad; Richard, François J; Sirard, Marc-André

    2013-01-01

    The use of gonadotropins to trigger oocyte maturation both in vivo and in vitro has provided precious and powerful knowledge that has significantly increased our understanding of the ovarian function. Moreover, the efficacy of most assisted reproductive technologies (ART) used in both humans and livestock species relies on gonadotropin input, mainly FSH and LH. Despite the significant progress achieved and the huge impact of gonadotropins, the exact molecular pathways of the two pituitary hormones, FSH and LH, still remain poorly understood. Moreover, these pathways may not be the same when moving from the in vivo to the in vitro context. This misunderstanding of the intricate synergy between these two hormones leads to a lack of consensus about their use mainly in vitro or in ovulation induction schedules in vivo. In order to optimize their use, additional work is thus required with a special focus on comparing the in vitro versus the in vivo effects. In this context, this overview will briefly summarize the downstream gene expression pathways induced by both FSH in vitro and LH in vivo in the cumulus compartment. Based on recent microarray comparative analysis, we are reporting that in vitro FSH stimulation on cumulus cells appears to achieve at least part of the gene expression activity after in vivo LH stimulation. We are then proposing that the in vitro FSH-response of cumulus cells have similitudes with the in vivo LH-response. PMID:24066945

  14. Cumulus Moistening, the Diurnal Cycle, and Initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, J. H.; Johnson, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric soundings, cloud radar, and air-sea flux measurements collected during DYNAMO (Dynamics of the MJO) are employed to study the initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) over the tropical Indian Ocean. Findings indicate that moistening of the troposphere during MJO initiation occurs in two stages: low-to-midlevel moistening in the suppressed phase (i.e., prior to the onset of deep convection), followed by deep-column moistening during the early active phase. The first stage of moistening occurs as the drying by large-scale subsidence and horizontal advection wane and convective clouds increase in areal coverage and deepen from shallow to congestus. Analysis of the suppressed phase reveals the striking degree to which the moistening characteristic of this period is accomplished by the diurnal cycle of cumulus clouds. This diurnal cycle is driven by the cycle in sea surface temperature and air-sea fluxes linked to shallow oceanic diurnal warm layers. This coupled diurnal cycle, and the associated afternoon peak in convective cloud depth, cloud areal coverage, and cumulus moistening, likely drives more vigorous overall moistening than would occur without this diurnal cycle. A conspicuous finding pertaining to the suppressed phase convection is the prominence of mesoscale cloud organization (i.e., open cells and horizontal convective rolls), which is hypothesized to enhance convective instability in localized patches, thereby promoting deeper, more vigorous cumulus moistening than would otherwise occur.

  15. Repeated superovulation may affect mitochondrial functions of cumulus cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Juan-Ke; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Yin, Shen; Zhang, Cui-Lian; Ge, Zhao-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Controlled ovarian stimulation by exogenous gonadotrophins is a key procedure during the in vitro fertilization cycle to obtain a sufficient number of oocytes in humans. Previous studies demonstrated that repeated superovulation had deleterious effects on the ovaries. However, whether repeated superovulation adversely affects the mitochondrial functions of cumulus cells remains unclear. In this study, mice were divided into three groups: superovulation once (R1); superovulation three times (R3), and superovulation five times (R5). We evaluated the effects of repeated superovulation on mitochondrial DNA copies (mtDNA) and observed decreased mtDNA copies per cell with increasing number of superovulation cycles. Further, we investigated the DNA methylation status in exon 2 and the mRNA expression level of nuclear-encoded DNA polymerase gamma A (PolgA). The results showed that the DNA methylation levels of PolgA in R1 and R5 were slightly lower than in R3. Additionally, the altered DNA methylation in PolgA coincided with the changes in PolgA expression in cumulus cells. We also found that the mRNA expression of COX1, CYTB, ND2, and ND4 was altered by repeated superovulation in cumulus cells. Thus, repeated superovulation had adverse effects on mitochondrial function. PMID:27698360

  16. Direct entrainment and detrainment rate distributions of individual shallow cumulus clouds in an LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawe, J. T.; Austin, P. H.

    2013-02-01

    Probability distribution functions of shallow cumulus cloud core entrainment and detrainment rates are calculated using 4362 individual cumulus clouds isolated from LES using a cloud tracking algorithm. Calculation of the mutual information between fractional entrainment/detrainment and a variety of mean cloud core properties suggests that fractional entrainment rate is best predicted by the mean cloud buoyancy B and the environmental buoyancy lapse rate dθρdz at that level, while fractional detrainment is best predicted by the mean vertical velocity w and the critical mixing fraction χc. Fractional entrainment and detrainment rates are relatively insensitive to cloud core horizontal area, and the circumference of horizontal cloud core sections display an a0.69 dependence. This implies that cloud core mass entrainment flux E is proportional to cloud core cross-sectional area instead of cloud core surface area, as is generally assumed. Empirical best-fit relations for ε(B, dθρdz and δ(w, χc) are found for both individual shallow cumulus clouds and cloud ensembles. It is found that clouds with high buoyancy in strong stratification experience low entrainment rates, while clouds with high vertical velocities and critical mixing fractions experience low detrainment rates.

  17. Direct entrainment and detrainment rate distributions of individual shallow cumulus clouds in an LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawe, J. T.; Austin, P. H.

    2013-08-01

    Probability distribution functions of shallow cumulus cloud core entrainment and detrainment rates are calculated using 4362 individual cumulus clouds isolated from LES (large eddy simulation) using a cloud tracking algorithm. Calculation of the mutual information between fractional entrainment/detrainment and a variety of mean cloud core properties suggests that fractional entrainment rate is best predicted by the mean cloud buoyancy B and the environmental buoyancy lapse rate dθρ/dz at that level, while fractional detrainment is best predicted by the mean vertical velocity w and the critical mixing fraction χc. Fractional entrainment and detrainment rates are relatively insensitive to cloud core horizontal area, and the perimeter of horizontal cloud core sections display an a0.73 dependence. This implies that cloud core mass entrainment flux E is proportional to cloud core cross-sectional area instead of cloud core surface area, as is generally assumed. Empirical best-fit relations for ɛ(B, dθρ/dz and δ(w, χc) are found for both individual shallow cumulus clouds and cloud ensembles. It is found that clouds with high buoyancy in strong stratification experience low entrainment rates, while clouds with high vertical velocities and critical mixing fractions experience low detrainment rates.

  18. Statistical analysis of an LES shallow cumulus cloud ensemble using a cloud tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawe, J. T.; Austin, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for the tracking of individual clouds in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is presented. We use this technique on an LES of a shallow cumulus cloud field based upon the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX) to calculate statistics of cloud height, lifetime, and other physical properties for individual clouds in the model. We also examine the question of nature versus nurture in shallow cumulus clouds: do properties at cloud base determine the upper-level properties of the clouds (nature), or are cloud properties determined by the environmental conditions they encounter (nurture). We find that clouds which ascend through an environment that has been pre-moistened by previous cloud activity are no more likely to reach the inversion than clouds that ascend through a drier environment. Cloud base thermodynamic properties are uncorrelated with upper-level cloud properties, while mean fractional entrainment and detrainment rates display moderate correlations with cloud properties up to the inversion. Conversely, cloud base area correlates well with upper-level cloud area and maximum cloud height. We conclude that cloud thermodynamic properties are primarily influenced by entrainment and detrainment processes, cloud area and height are primarily influenced by cloud base area, and thus nature and nurture both play roles in the dynamics of BOMEX shallow cumulus clouds.

  19. Statistical analysis of a LES shallow cumulus cloud ensemble using a cloud tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawe, J. T.; Austin, P. H.

    2011-08-01

    A technique for the tracking of individual clouds in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is presented. We use this technique on a LES of a shallow cumulus cloud field based upon the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX) to calculate statistics of cloud height, lifetime, and other physical properties for individual clouds in the model. We also examine the question of nature versus nurture in shallow cumulus clouds: do properties at cloud base determine the upper-level properties of the clouds (nature), or are cloud properties determined by the environmental conditions they encounter (nurture). We find that clouds which ascend through an environment that has been pre-moistened by previous cloud activity are no more likely to reach the inversion than clouds that ascend through a drier environment. Cloud base thermodynamic properties are uncorrelated with upper-level cloud properties, while mean fractional entrainment and detrainment rate displays moderate correlations with cloud properties up to the inversion. Conversely, cloud base area correlates well with upper-level cloud area and maximum cloud height. We conclude that cloud thermodynamic properties are primarily influenced by entrainment and detrainment processes, cloud area and height are primarily influenced by cloud base area, and thus nature and nurture both play roles in the dynamics of BOMEX shallow cumulus clouds.

  20. Rocket pioneer Robert Goddard: A micro-biography (pt 3/3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Archive footage of Robert Goddard, rocket pioneer of the 1920's and '30's. Ahead of his time, and the first to use liquid propellant. From the 'Moonwalk Series: Episode 1 - 'The Day Before''. A four part documentary series made in the 1970's about the Apollo 11 mission.

  1. Rocket pioneer Robert Goddard: A micro-biography (pt 1/3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Archive footage of Robert Goddard, rocket pioneer of the 1920's and '30's. Ahead of his time, and the first to use liquid propellant. From the 'Moonwalk Series: Episode 1 - 'The Day Before''. A four part documentary series made in the 1970's about the Apollo 11 mission.

  2. Rocket pioneer Robert Goddard: A micro-biography (pt 2/3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Archive footage of Robert Goddard, rocket pioneer of the 1920's and '30's. Ahead of his time, and the first to use liquid propellant. From the 'Moonwalk Series: Episode 1 - 'The Day Before''. A four part documentary series made in the 1970's about the Apollo 11 mission.

  3. The NASA Library and Researchers at Goddard: A Visitor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Jill H.

    2014-01-01

    Jill Powell, engineering librarian from Cornell University, visited the library at NASA Goddard in Greenbelt, Maryland in July 2013, interviewing library staff and selected NASA scientists. She studied the library's digital projects, publications, services, and operations. She also interviewed several NASA scientists on information-seeking…

  4. Report on the flight data of the Goddard, University of Maryland Proton Helium Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, J. A.; Yodh, G. B.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Balasubrahmanyan, U. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Vishwanath, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    The Goddard, University of Maryland Proton Helium Spectrometer (GUMPHS) was flown on June 13, 1979 from Palestine, Texas. The flight lasted 90 minutes and reached an altitude of 58,000 feet. The exposure, while short, was sufficient to test the capabilities of the instrument up to energies of the order of 7 TeV.

  5. Guidance, Navigation and Control Innovations at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, Aprille Joy

    2002-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on guidance navigation and control innovations at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The topics include: 1) NASA's vision; 2) NASA's Mission; 3) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE); 4) Guidance, Navigation and Control Division (GN&C); 5) Landsat-7 Earth Observer-1 Co-observing Program; and 6) NASA ESE Vision.

  6. Guidance, Navigation and Control Innovations at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, Aprille Joy; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses NASA's role in sponsoring on-going research projects involving innovations in spacecraft guidance, navigation and control systems. Topics covered include: partnerships, ESE Spaceborne Missions, spacecraft systems supported and designed by NASA Goddard Flight Center, NASA's changing mission, Large Aperture Sensing Spectrum, Distributed Spacecraft Systems, Landsat-7/ Earth Observer-1 Co-observing Program, and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna program.

  7. The time-of-flight system on the Goddard medium energy gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. W.; Chesney, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillation counter time of flight system, incorporated into the Goddard 50 cm by 50 cm spark chamber gamma ray telescope is described. The system, which utilizes constant fractions timing and particle position compensation and digitizes up to 10 ns time differences to six bit accuracy in less than 500 ns is analyzed. The performance of this system during balloon flight is discussed.

  8. Studying Precipitation Processes in WRF with Goddard Bulk Microphysics in Comparison with Other Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Shi, J.J.; Braun, S.; Simpson, J.; Chen, S.S.; Lang, S.; Hong, S.Y.; Thompson, G.; Peters-Lidard, C.

    2009-01-01

    A Goddard bulk microphysical parameterization is implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. This bulk microphysical scheme has three different options, 2ICE (cloud ice & snow), 3ICE-graupel (cloud ice, snow & graupel) and 3ICE-hail (cloud ice, snow & hail). High-resolution model simulations are conducted to examine the impact of microphysical schemes on different weather events: a midlatitude linear convective system and an Atlantic hurricane. The results suggest that microphysics has a major impact on the organization and precipitation processes associated with a summer midlatitude convective line system. The Goddard 3ICE scheme with the cloud ice-snow-hail configuration agreed better with observations ill of rainfall intensity and having a narrow convective line than did simulations with the cloud ice-snow-graupel and cloud ice-snow (i.e., 2ICE) configurations. This is because the Goddard 3ICE-hail configuration has denser precipitating ice particles (hail) with very fast fall speeds (over 10 m/s) For an Atlantic hurricane case, the Goddard microphysical scheme (with 3ICE-hail, 3ICE-graupel and 2ICE configurations) had no significant impact on the track forecast but did affect the intensity slightly. The Goddard scheme is also compared with WRF's three other 3ICE bulk microphysical schemes: WSM6, Purdue-Lin and Thompson. For the summer midlatitude convective line system, all of the schemes resulted in simulated precipitation events that were elongated in southwest-northeast direction in qualitative agreement with the observed feature. However, the Goddard 3ICE-hail and Thompson schemes were closest to the observed rainfall intensities although the Goddard scheme simulated more heavy rainfall (over 48 mm/h). For the Atlantic hurricane case, none of the schemes had a significant impact on the track forecast; however, the simulated intensity using the Purdue-Lin scheme was much stronger than the other schemes. The vertical distributions of

  9. Performance tuning Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Xeon Phi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, is a designed for dual use for forecasting and research. WRF offers multiple physics options that can be combined in any way. One of the physics options is radiance computation. The major source for energy for the earth's climate is solar radiation. Thus, it is imperative to accurately model horizontal and vertical distribution of the heating. Goddard solar radiative transfer model includes the absorption duo to water vapor,ozone, ozygen, carbon dioxide, clouds and aerosols. The model computes the interactions among the absorption and scattering by clouds, aerosols, molecules and surface. Finally, fluxes are integrated over the entire longwave spectrum.In this paper, we present our results of optimizing the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is the first product based on Intel MIC architecture, and it consists of up to 61 cores connected by a high performance on-die bidirectional interconnect. The coprocessor supports all important Intel development tools. Thus, the development environment is familiar one to a vast number of CPU developers. Although, getting a maximum performance out of MICs will require using some novel optimization techniques. Those optimization techniques are discusses in this paper. The optimizations improved the performance of the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 2.2x. Furthermore, the same optimizations improved the performance of the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on a dual socket configuration of eight core Intel Xeon E5-2670 CPUs by a factor of 2.1x compared to the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme code.

  10. Cloud Condensation Nuclei in Cumulus Humilis — selected Case Study During the CHAPS Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X.; Lee, Y.; Berg, L.; Berkowitz, C.; Alexander, L.; Laskin, A.; Ogren, J.; Andrews, E.

    2010-03-15

    The Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) provided a unique opportunity to study aerosol and cloud processing. Clouds play an active role in the processing and cycling of atmospheric constituents. Gases and particles can partition to cloud droplets by absorption and condensation as well as activation and impact scavenging. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used as one of the main platforms in CHAPS. Flight tracks were designed and implemented to characterize freshly emitted aerosols at cloud top and cloud base as well as within the cloud, i.e., cumulus humilis (or fair-weather cumulus), in the vicinity of Oklahoma City. Measurements of interstitial aerosols and residuals of activated condensation cloud nuclei were conducted simultaneously. The interstitial aerosols were measured downstream of an isokinetic inlet, and the activated particles downstream of a counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI). The sampling line to the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was switched between the isokinetic inlet and the CVI to allow characterization of non-activated interstitial particles outside of clouds in contrast to particles activated in clouds. Trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also measured, as were key meteorological state parameters including liquid water content, cloud drop size, and dew point. We will report on the CCN properties in cumulus humilis. Several approaches will be taken. The first is single-particle analysis of particles collected by the Time-Resolved Aerosol Sampler (TRAC) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy disperse X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Specifically, we examine differences between activated and interstitial ones, such as differences in chemical composition and morphology. The second analysis will link in situ measurements by AMS and PTRMS with the observations by TRAC. For

  11. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  12. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  13. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  14. New data and capabilities in the NASA Goddard Hurricane Data Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Leptoukh, G.; Ostrenga, D.; Savtchenko, C.; Kempler, S.

    2007-12-01

    .ecs.nasa.gov/OPS/mirador/) is another in-house developed tool that offers a simplified interface for searching, browsing, and ordering Earth science data at NASA GES DICS. Users can do event based (e.g., entering a hurricane name) search and order data. · Hurricane viewer: provides users with a view of the hurricane track that overlays TRMM 3-hourly precipitation data. The interface provides users with the storm track, wind speeds, pressure, intensity and view of the data of the lifespan of the storm in an animated series. The Hurricane Viewer will be enhanced to allow users to select from multiple data parameters to view in the background of the track. · There are a number of other resources for hurricane related activities at the DISC, such as, viewing and exploring NASA 2-D and 3-D data (TRMM, CloudSat, AIRS, etc.) via Google Earth. Details and examples will be presented.

  15. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  16. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  17. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  18. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  19. Regulation of gap-junctional communication between cumulus cells during in vitro maturation in swine, a gap-FRAP study.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas W; Develle, Yann; Laroche, Anthony; Robert, Claude; Richard, François J

    2012-08-01

    Intercellular gap-junctional communication (GJC) plays an important role in ovarian cell physiology. Closure of GJC has been proposed to be involved in oocyte maturation, particularly in the resumption of meiosis, both in vivo and in vitro, by controlling the flow of meiosis inhibitors, such as cAMP and cGMP. Understanding how GJC dynamics are regulated during in vitro maturation (IVM) could provide a powerful tool for controlling meiotic resumption and oocyte maturation in vitro. Since little is known about the GJC dynamic regulation between cumulus cells, we have developed an assay based on recovery of calcein fluorescence in photobleached cumulus cells, a gap-FRAP assay. The GJC profile has been characterized during the first hours of porcine IVM. We showed that equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) down-regulated GJC effectiveness between cumulus cells. However, human chorionic gonadotropin was not down-regulating GJC effectiveness. We also showed that the GJC network expanded during this period and that this effect was not regulated by gonadotropins. Porcine follicular fluid present in the maturation medium also had an impact on GJC regulation, increasing GJC network establishment and the effectiveness of calcein transfer rate between cumulus cells. These results show that both eCG and EGF are regulating the decrease in GJC effectiveness after 4.5 h of IVM, while the network extension is gonadotropin independent. Regulation of GJC between cumulus cells would then be specifically regulated during in vitro IVM.

  20. Identification of hyaluronic acid-binding proteins and their expressions in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Masaki; Miyahayashi, Yasunori; Naganuma, Takako; Kimura, Naoko; Sasada, Hiroshi; Sato, Eimei

    2002-10-01

    Hyaluronic acid-binding proteins (HABPs) are necessary for expansion of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) during oocyte maturation. In this study, to obtain the detailed information of HABPs during cumulus expansion, we examined the expression of HABPs in porcine COCs during in vitro maturation (IVM). After maturation culture, proteins were extracted from porcine COCs and separated by SDS-PAGE and then transferred to polyvinylidene fluoride membranes. After transfer, the membranes were subjected to ligand blotting with biotinylated hyaluronic acid (bHA) or fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled hyaluronic acid (FITC-HA). Furthermore, the extracted proteins were subjected to immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis to dissect the HABPs. Ligand blotting with FITC-HA could detect HABPs. Using this ligand-blotting method, 13 and 14 bands of HABPs were detected in porcine COCs after 0 and 48 h in culture, respectively. Of these, the level of expression of 85-kDa HABP increased with cumulus expansion during IVM and was newly detected after culture. Immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescent analysis confirmed that the 85-kDa HABP corresponded to CD44 and that it existed on/in the membrane of cumulus cells. The present results indicated that HABP expressed in porcine COCs during IVM, particularly CD44, may form a network of the matrices in the extracellular space of the oocyte with cumulus expansion during IVM.

  1. Momentum Transport: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to investigate the momentum budgets associated with several convective systems that developed during the TOGA COARE IOP (west Pacific warm pool region) and GATE (east Atlantic region). The tool for this study is the improved Goddard Cumulas Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, explicit cloud radiative interactive processes and air-sea interactive surface processes. The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (with 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km) in the vertical. The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations were performed over a 7-day time period (December 19-26, 1992, for TOGA COARE and September 1-7, 1994 for GATE). Cyclic literal boundary conditions are required for this type of long-term integration. Two well organized squall systems (TOGA, COARE February 22, 1993, and GATE September 12, 1994) were also simulated using the 3D GCE model. Only 9 h simulations were required to cover the life time of the squall systems. the lateral boundary conditions were open for these two squall systems simulations. the following will be examined: (1) the momentum budgets in the convective and stratiform regions, (2) the relationship between momentum transport and cloud organization (i.e., well organized squall lines versus less organized convective), (3) the differences and similarities in momentum transport between 2D and 3D simulated convective systems, and (4) the differences and similarities in momentum budgets between cloud systems simulated with open and cyclic lateral boundary conditions. Preliminary results indicate that there are only small differences between 2D and 3D simulated momentum budgets. Major differences occur, however, between momentum budgets associated with squall systems simulated using different lateral boundary conditions.

  2. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  3. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  4. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  5. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  6. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  7. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  8. Gravity model and structural implications of the Goddard Pendant, Sierra Nevada, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, E.A.; Oliver, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    A subsurface model for the Goddard pendant is constructed from a residual gravity high of about 7mGal over the pendant. The model, which is the simplest and most geologically reasonable possibility, shows a metamorphic block that tapers with depth and extends about 3.5km below the surface. The structures in the Goddard pendant are similar in style and orientation to those in other Sierra Nevada pendants, indicating that the country rock was neither deformed nor rotated during pluton emplacement. Consequently, emplacement must have been a passive rather than a forceful process. The pendant itself represents a piece of country rock trapped between plutons which are dome shaped in cross section. -Authors

  9. Goddard's New Approach to Information Technology: The Information Systems Center an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kea, Howard E.

    1994-01-01

    The Information Center (ISC) at Goddard was created as part of the Goddard reorganization and was located within the Applied Engineering and Technology (AET) Directorate. The creation of ISC was to: (1) focus expertise and leadership in information system development; (2) Promote organizational collaboration, partnerships, and resource sharing; (3) Stimulate design/development of seamless end-to-end flight and ground systems; (4) Enable flexibility to effectively support many simultaneous projects by improved access to critical mass of discipline expertise; (5) Enhance career growth and opportunities including multi-disciplinary opportunities; and (6) to improve communications among information system professionals. This paper presents a general overview of the Information Systems Center as well as the role of the Software Engineering Laboratory within the center.

  10. Stray Light Suppression in the Goddard IRAM 2-Millimeter Observer (GISMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, E. H.; Benford, D. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Staguhn, J. G.; Wollack, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer (GISMO) is an 8xl6 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) array of bolometers built as a pathfinder for TES detector development efforts at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. GISMO has been used annually at the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) 30 meter telescope since 2007 under engineering time and was opened in the spring of 2012 to the general astronomical community. The spring deployment provided an opportunity to modify elements of the room temperature optics before moving the instrument to its new permanent position in the telescope receiver cabin. This allowed for the possibility to extend the cryostat, introduce improved cold baffling and thus further optimize the stray light performance for final astronomical use of the instrument, which has been completed and validated. We will demonstrate and discuss several of the methods used to quantify and limit the influence of stray light in the GISMO camera.

  11. The microstructure of selected, small, isolated, cumulus clouds near Red Deer, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochtubajda, B.

    Physical experiments designed to explore the potential of rain augmentation through airborne glaciogenic seeding on small, isolated non-precipitating cumuliform clouds near Red Deer, Alberta were carried out during the period 1982-1985. The microstructure of 90 cumulus congestus clouds have been documented through repeated in-situ sampling using a cloud physics instrumented aircraft platform. Observations from the inspection passes of 57 clouds seeded with either dry ice pellets or silver iodide pyrotechnics, and all the passes of 33 natural clouds are presented. Measurements of the cloud droplet concentration indicate that Alberta cumulus clouds are typically continental in nature, with an average droplet concentration of 535 cm -3 and an average droplet diameter of 10.6 μm. Alberta clouds have average liquid water contents of 0.57 g m -3, with a peak 1-sec value of 3.17 g m -3. The 1-km average liquid water contents are 0.83 g m -3, with a peak value of 2.81 g m -3. Cloud lifetimes vary between 11 and 20 minutes. Concentrations of naturally occurring ice crystals are found to be low. The average maximum 1-km ice concentration was 31 -1, and the peak 1-km concentration was 73.11 -1 in the natural cloud dataset. Evidence of precipitation-sized particles was detected in 21% (7 of 33) of the clouds, and precipitation below cloud base was detected in 6% (2 of 33) of the clouds. A comparison of the Alberta cloud characteristics to the cumulus clouds from different locations showed that there are some distinct differences between Alberta clouds and the clouds from the other regions.

  12. New airborne retrieval approach for trade wind cumulus properties under overlying cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, F.; Siebert, H.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmeissner, T.; Shaw, R. A.; Wendisch, M.

    2013-05-01

    A new retrieval method is presented to derive the optical thickness τ and effective droplet radius reff of shallow cumulus in the presence of overlying thin cirrus. This new approach allows for a retrieval without a priori knowledge of the microphysical and optical properties of the overlying cirrus. The retrieval is applied to helicopter-borne solar spectral reflectivity measurements gathered by the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurements sysTem (SMART-HELIOS) above trade wind cumuli near Barbados. Collocated microphysical cumulus properties (liquid water content, effective droplet radius, droplet number concentration) were measured by in situ instruments installed on the Airborne Cloud Turbulence Observation System (ACTOS). Cloud inhomogeneities lead to an underestimation of retrieved τ of up to 114%, while reff is biased by up to 27%. Moreover, misrepresentation of the overlying cirrus may cause an overestimation of the classically retrieved cumulus reff of up to 50% and an underestimation of τof up to 6%. The new retrieval, effectively correcting for the influence of overlying cirrus, enables reliable estimates of τ of the cumuli for optically thin, overcast cirrus conditions and reduces the retrieval error for reff of the cumuli by almost 50%. Agreement between in situ measured and retrieved reff is in the range of ±1 μm. The retrieval can also reproduce the wide range of in situ measured mean reff (7-18 μm), which is a result of different aerosol load and cloud top heights on the different flight days. The observed τ ranges between 5 and 36.

  13. Observational estimates of detrainment and entrainment in non-precipitating shallow cumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgren, M. S.; Small, J. D.; Jonsson, H. H.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2014-08-01

    Vertical transport associated with cumulus clouds is important to the redistribution of gases, particles and energy, with subsequent consequences for many aspects of the climate system. Previous studies have suggested that detrainment from clouds can be comparable to the updraft mass flux, and thus represents an important contribution to vertical transport. In this study, we describe a new method to deduce the amounts of gross detrainment and entrainment experienced by non-precipitating cumulus clouds using aircraft observations. The method utilizes equations for three conserved variables: cloud mass, total water and moist static energy. Optimizing these three equations leads to estimates of the mass fractions of adiabatic mixed-layer air, entrained air and detrained air that the sampled cloud has experienced. The method is applied to six flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter during the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) which took place in the Houston, Texas region during the summer of 2006 during which 176 small, non-precipitating cumulus were sampled. Our analysis suggests that, on average, these clouds were comprised of 30 to 70% mixed-layer air, with entrained air comprising most of the remainder. The mass fraction of detrained air was less than 2% for a majority of the clouds, although 15% of them did exhibit detrained air fractions larger than 10%. Entrained and detrained air mass fractions both increased with altitude, and the largest detrainment events were almost all associated with air that was at their level of neutral buoyancy, findings that are consistent with previous studies.

  14. Effects of cumulus parameterization closures on simulations of summer precipitation over the continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Fengxue; Liang, Xin-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the effects of five cumulus closure assumptions on simulations of summer precipitation in the continental U.S. by utilizing an ensemble cumulus parameterization (ECP) that incorporates multiple alternate closure schemes into a single cloud model formulation. Results demonstrate that closure algorithms significantly affect the summer mean, daily frequency and intensity, and diurnal variation of precipitation, with strong regional dependence. Overall, the vertical velocity (W) closure produces the smallest summer mean biases, while the moisture convergence (MC) closure most realistically reproduces daily variability. Both closures have advantages over others in simulating U.S. daily rainfall frequency distribution, though both slightly overestimate intense rain events. The MC closure is superior at capturing summer rainfall amount, daily variability, and heavy rainfall frequency over the Central U.S., but systematically produces wet biases over the North American Monsoon (NAM) region and Southeast U.S., which can be reduced by using the W closure. The instability tendency (TD) and the total instability adjustment (KF) closures are better at capturing observed diurnal signals over the Central U.S. and the NAM, respectively. The results reasonably explain the systematic behaviors of several major cumulus parameterizations. A preliminary experiment combining two optimal closures (averaged moisture convergence and vertical velocity) in the ECP scheme significantly reduced the wet (dry) biases over the Southeast U.S. in the summer of 1993 (2003), and greatly improved daily rainfall correlations over the NAM. Further improved model simulation skills may be achieved in the future if optimal closures and their appropriate weights can be derived at different time scales based on specific climate regimes.

  15. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  16. Evolution of the Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Thomas C., III; Brumfield, Mark D.; Jamison, Donald E.; Granata, Raymond L.; Casey, Carolyn A.; Heller, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center develops systems engineers from existing discipline engineers. The program has evolved significantly since the report to INCOSE in 2003. This paper describes the SEED Program as it is now, outlines the changes over the last year, discusses current status and results, and shows the value of human systems and leadership skills for practicing systems engineers.

  17. Down and up with PERT at Goddard. [computer graphics applications for Program Evaluation and Review Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerega, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    During the 1960s NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) used the Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) as its principal schedule planning and control tool in flight projects. After a temporary replacement of PERT by other techniques, PERT has been reinstituted on all but one of GSFC's flight projects. PERT has been combined with a computer graphics program which makes it possible to produce PERT drawings in only a few hours' time.

  18. Space applications of artificial intelligence; 1990 Goddard Conference, Greenbelt, MD, May 1, 2, 1990, Selected Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The papers presented at the 1990 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence are given. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed. The proceedings fall into the following areas: Planning and Scheduling, Fault Monitoring/Diagnosis, Image Processing and Machine Vision, Robotics/Intelligent Control, Development Methodologies, Information Management, and Knowledge Acquisition.

  19. A visiting scientist program in atmospheric sciences for the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    A visiting scientist program was conducted in the atmospheric sciences and related areas at the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres. Research was performed in mathematical analysis as applied to computer modeling of the atmospheres; development of atmospheric modeling programs; analysis of remotely sensed atmospheric, surface, and oceanic data and its incorporation into atmospheric models; development of advanced remote sensing instrumentation; and related research areas. The specific research efforts are detailed by tasks.

  20. CYP2D6*36 gene arrangements within the cyp2d6 locus: association of CYP2D6*36 with poor metabolizer status.

    PubMed

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Bradford, L Dianne; Alander, Sarah W; Leeder, J Steven

    2006-04-01

    Unexplained cases of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype discordance continue to be discovered. In previous studies, several African Americans with a poor metabolizer phenotype carried the reduced function CYP2D6*10 allele in combination with a nonfunctional allele. We pursued the possibility that these alleles harbor either a known sequence variation (i.e., CYP2D6*36 carrying a gene conversion in exon 9 along the CYP2D6*10-defining 100C>T single-nucleotide polymorphism) or novel sequences variation(s). Discordant cases were evaluated by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to test for gene rearrangement events, and a 6.6-kilobase pair PCR product encompassing the CYP2D6 gene was cloned and entirely sequenced. Thereafter, allele frequencies were determined in different study populations comprising whites, African Americans, and Asians. Analyses covering the CYP2D7 to 2D6 gene region established that CYP2D6*36 did not only exist as a gene duplication (CYP2D6*36x2) or in tandem with *10 (CYP2D6*36+*10), as previously reported, but also by itself. This "single" CYP2D6*36 allele was found in nine African Americans and one Asian, but was absent in the whites tested. Ultimately, the presence of CYP2D6*36 resolved genotype/phenotype discordance in three cases. We also discovered an exon 9 conversion-positive CYP2D6*4 gene in a duplication arrangement (CYP2D6*4Nx2) and a CYP2D6*4 allele lacking 100C>T (CYP2D6*4M) in two white subjects. The discovery of an allele that carries only one CYP2D6*36 gene copy provides unequivocal evidence that both CYP2D6*36 and *36x2 are associated with a poor metabolizer phenotype. Given a combined frequency of between 0.5 and 3% in African Americans and Asians, genotyping for CYP2D6*36 should improve the accuracy of genotype-based phenotype prediction in these populations.

  1. Detection of RUNX2 gene expression in cumulus cells in women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RUNX2 is a transcription factor, whose expression has been recently identified in the mouse ovary. Regulation of RUNX2 expression and its function in the human ovary have not been determined yet. The aim of the present study is the investigation of the possible correlation between RUNX2 gene expression in cumulus cells and controlled ovarian stimulation and pregnancy outcomes after ART treatment. Methods A total of 41 patients undergoing ICSI treatment for male factor infertility were enrolled into a specific ART program, during which cumulus cells were collected. The expression of RUNX2 gene in cumulus cells was examined by real-time PCR. Results Concerning RUNX2 gene expression, 12 out of 41 women were detected with RUNX2 expression, with ratios ranging from 0.84 to 1.00, while 28 out of 41 women had no expression (ratio = 0). Only 1 woman presented a weak RUNX2 gene expression (ratio = 0.52). From 8 women that proceeded to pregnancy, 7 of them did not express RUNX2 gene in cumulus cells, while one was the woman with weak gene expression that also achieved pregnancy. The group of women without RUNX2 expression presented higher number of follicles (p = 0.013), higher number of retrieved oocytes (p = 0.016), higher basal LH serum levels (p = 0.016) and higher peak estradiol levels (p = 0.013), while the number of fertilized oocytes differed marginally between the two groups (p = 0.089). Moreover, RUNX2 expression was negatively associated with LH levels (OR = 0.22, p = 0.021) and E2 levels (OR = 0.25, p = 0.026). Conclusions Consequently, based on the preliminary findings of the present pilot study a potential inhibitory mechanism of RUNX2 gene is observed in the ovary when high mRNA levels are detected, suggesting that RUNX2 could possibly be used as a candidate genetic marker in the monitoring of the outcome of an ART treatment. PMID:23186169

  2. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  3. A microphysical connection among biomass burning, cumulus clouds, and stratospheric moisture.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Steven

    2002-02-15

    A likely causal chain is established here that connects humidity in the stratosphere, relative humidity near the tropical tropopause, ice crystal size in towering cumulus clouds, and aerosols associated with tropical biomass burning. The connections are revealed in satellite-observed fluctuations of each quantity on monthly to yearly time scales. More aerosols lead to smaller ice crystals and more water vapor entering the stratosphere. The connections are consistent with physical reasoning, probably hold on longer time scales, and may help to explain why stratospheric water vapor appears to have been increasing for the past five decades. PMID:11847336

  4. A microphysical connection among biomass burning, cumulus clouds, and stratospheric moisture.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Steven

    2002-02-15

    A likely causal chain is established here that connects humidity in the stratosphere, relative humidity near the tropical tropopause, ice crystal size in towering cumulus clouds, and aerosols associated with tropical biomass burning. The connections are revealed in satellite-observed fluctuations of each quantity on monthly to yearly time scales. More aerosols lead to smaller ice crystals and more water vapor entering the stratosphere. The connections are consistent with physical reasoning, probably hold on longer time scales, and may help to explain why stratospheric water vapor appears to have been increasing for the past five decades.

  5. Boundary-layer cumulus over land: Some observations and conceptual models

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, R.B.

    1993-09-01

    Starting in 1980, the Boundary Layer Research Team at the University of Wisconsin has been systematically studying the formation and evolution of nonprecipitating boundary-layer cumulus clouds (BLCu) in regions of fair weather (anticyclones) over land (Stull, 1980). Our approach is to quantify the average statistical characteristics of the surface, thermals, boundary layer, and clouds over horizontal regions of roughly 20 km in diameter. Within such a region over land, there is typically quite a variation in land use, and associated variations in surface albedo and moisture.

  6. Sensitivity of PBL and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction over an Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Charan Mohanty, Uma; Kumar, Krishan

    2015-04-01

    The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme) and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme) have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6, and KF schemes

  7. Si:Bi array detectors and astronomical applications of the Goddard 10 micron camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Gerald; Gezari, Daniel; Shu, Peter; Tresch-Fienberg, Richard; Fazio, Giovanni; Hoffmann, William

    1983-01-01

    An improved 4 to 18 micron array camera system was developed at NASA Goddard SFC for astronomical photometry, using an Aerojet Electro Systems Corp. 16 x 16 Si:Bi accumulation mode charge injection device (AMCID) which could be suitable for eventual low-background spaceflight applications. An astronomical observing program using this device was carried out as a collaboration between NASA Goddard (Infrared and Radio Astronomy Branch and Micro Electronics Branch), the Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and Steward Observatory of the University of Arizona. In 1983 the camera system was revised, and a new Aeroject Si:Bi array with 16 x 16 active pixels was obtained from NASA/Ames Research Center as part of a new scientific collaboration between the Ames and Goddard infrared array research groups. The 16 x 16 device had sufficiently good sensitivity, uniformity and noise characteristics to be used for successful observations at the Mt. Lemmon 60 and 61 inch telescopes in May 1983. Complete laboratory characterization of the 16 x 16 array was carried out in summer of 1983. Initial results indicate that this detector has sensitivity and noise characteristics comparable to other devices from the same generation of Aerojet arrays.

  8. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  9. A case study of cumulus formation beneath a stratocumulus sheet: Its structure and effect on boundary layer budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Roy W.; Nicholls, S.

    1990-01-01

    On several occasions during the FIRE Marine Stratocumulus IFO off the California coast, small cumulus were observed to form during the morning beneath the main stratocumulus (Sc) deck. This occurs in the type of situation described by Turton and Nicholls (1987) in which there is insufficient generation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) from the cloudtop or the surface to sustain mixing throughout the layer, and a separation of the surface and cloud layers occurs. The build up of humidity in the surface layer allows cumuli to form, and the more energetic of these may penetrate back into the Sc deck, reconnecting the layers. The results presented were collected by the UKMO C-130 aircraft flying in a region where these small cumulus had grown to the extent that they had penetrated into the main Sc deck above. The structure of these penetrative cumulus are examined and their implications on the layer flux and radiation budget discussed.

  10. Non-invasive assessment of porcine oocyte quality by supravital staining of cumulus-oocyte complexes with lissamine green B.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Rahul; Li, Shun; Fischer, Konrad; Kind, Alexander; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Rottmann, Oswald; Schnieke, Angelika

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of lissamine green B (LB) staining of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) as a non-invasive method of predicting maturational and developmental competence of slaughterhouse-derived porcine oocytes cultured in vitro. Cumulus cells of freshly aspirated COCs were evaluated either morphologically on the basis of thickness of cumulus cell layers, or stained with LB, which penetrates only non-viable cells. The extent of cumulus cell staining was taken as an inverse indicator of membrane integrity. The two methods of COC grading were then examined as predictors of nuclear maturation and development after parthenogenetic activation. In both cases LB staining proved a more reliable indicator than morphological assessment (P < 0.05). The relationship between LB staining and cumulus cell apoptosis was also examined. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for DNA fragmentation revealed that oocytes within COCs graded as low quality by either LB staining or visual morphology showed significantly greater DNA fragmentation (P < 0.05) than higher grades, and that LB and visual grading were of similar predictive value. Expression of the stress response gene TP53 showed significantly higher expression in COCs graded as low quality by LB staining. However expression of the apoptosis-associated genes BAK and CASP3 was not significantly different between high or low grade COCs, suggesting that mRNA expression of BAK and CASP3 is not a reliable method of detecting apoptosis in porcine COCs. Evaluation of cumulus cell membrane integrity by lissamine green B staining thus provides a useful new tool to gain information about the maturational and developmental competence of porcine oocytes. PMID:27172057

  11. The four cumulus cloud modes and their progression during rainfall events: A C-band polarimetric radar perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vickal V.; Jakob, Christian; Protat, Alain; May, Peter T.; Davies, Laura

    2013-08-01

    There is no objective definition to separate cumulus congestus clouds from the shallow cumulus and deep clouds. This has generated misinterpretation about the role of congestus clouds to promote deep convection through the potential of moistening the middle troposphere. In this study, an objective identification for the different tropical cumulus modes is found by examining the occurrence frequency of the cloud cell top heights (CTHs) and near-ground (at 2.5 km height) rainfall properties of these cells using a three-season database of the Darwin C-band polarimetric radar. Four cumulus modes were identified, namely a shallow cumulus mode with CTH in the trade inversion layer (1-3 km), a congestus mode with tops in the highly stable middle troposphere (3-6.5 km), a deep convective mode with tops in the region of free convection (6.5-15 km), and an overshooting convection mode with tops in the tropical tropopause layer (CTH >15 km). The study also investigates the connections between these cumulus modes during heavy rainfall events. The congestus mode occurs predominantly from ~10 h prior to the peak rainfall event to ~2 h past the event. The deep cloud populations (Modes 3 and 4) have their maxima at and shortly after the time of the rainfall peak, with maximum occurrence just below the tropical tropopause layer. A comparison of the heavy rainfall events occurring in morning (oceanic) conditions against the afternoon (continental) conditions revealed a higher ratio of the shallow to the deep cloud population and a shorter transition time from the shallow to the onset of deep population in the morning-oceanic conditions than the afternoon-land conditions. It is also found through the analysis of the large-scale moisture budget data set that for both the morning and afternoon events, the moistening peaked before the peak in the congestus populations.

  12. New, Improved Goddard Bulk-Microphysical Schemes for Studying Precipitation Processes in WRF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    An improved bulk microphysical parameterization is implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting ()VRF) model. This bulk microphysical scheme has three different options, 2ICE (cloud ice & snow), 3ICE-graupel (cloud ice, snow & graupel) and 3ICE-hail (cloud ice, snow & hail). High-resolution model simulations are conducted to examine the impact of microphysical schemes on two different weather events (a midlatitude linear convective system and an Atlantic hurricane). The results suggest that microphysics has a major impact on the organization and precipitation processes associated with a summer midlatitude convective line system. The Goddard 3ICE scheme with a cloud ice-snow-hail configuration agreed better with observations in terms of rainfall intensity and a narrow convective line than did simulations with a cloud ice-snow-graupel or cloud ice-snow (i.e., 2ICE) configuration. This is because the 3ICE-hail scheme includes dense ice precipitating (hail) particle with very fast fall speed (over 10 in For an Atlantic hurricane case, the Goddard microphysical schemes had no significant impact on the track forecast but did affect the intensity slightly. The improved Goddard schemes are also compared with WRF's three other 3ICE bulk microphysical schemes: WSM6, Purdue-Lin and Thompson. For the summer midlatitude convective line system, all of the schemes resulted in simulated precipitation events that were elongated in the southwest-northeast direction in qualitative agreement with the observed feature. However, the Goddard 3ICE scheme with the hail option and the Thompson scheme agree better with observations in terms of rainfall intensity, expect that the Goddard scheme simulated more heavy rainfall (over 48 mm/h). For the Atlantic hurricane case, none of the schemes had a significant impact on the track forecast; however, the simulated intensity using the Purdue-Lin scheme was much stronger than the other schemes. The vertical distributions of model

  13. Dreams, Hopes, Realities: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the First Forty Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Lane E.

    1999-01-01

    Throughout history, the great achievements of civilizations and cultures have been recorded in lists of dates and events. But to look only at the machinery, discoveries, or milestones is to miss the value of these achievements. Each goal achieved or discovery or made represents a supreme effort on the part of individual people who came and worked together for a purpose greater than themselves. Driven by an innate curiosity of the spirit, we have built civilizations and discovered new worlds, always reaching out beyond what we knew or thought was possible. These efforts may have used ships or machinery, but the achievement was that of the humans who made those machines possible- remarkable people willing to endure discomfort, frustration, fatigue, and the risk of failure in the hope of finding out something new. This is the case with the history of the Goddard Space Flight Center. This publication traces the legacy of successes, risks, disappointments and internationally recognized triumphs of the Center's first 40 years. It is a story of technological achievement and scientific discovery; of reaching back to the dawn of time and opening up a new set of eyes on our own planet Earth. In the end, it is not a story about machinery or discoveries, but a story about ourselves. If we were able to step off our planet, and if we continue to discover new mysteries and better technology, it is because the people who work at Goddard always had a passion for exploration and the dedication to make it happen. The text that follows is a testimony to the challenges people at the Goddard Space Flight Center have faced and overcome over almost half a century. Today, we stand on the threshold of a new and equally challenging era. It will once again test our ingenuity, skills, and flexibility as we find new ways of working with our colleagues in industry, government, and academia. Doing more with less is every bit as ambitious as designing the first science instrument to study the

  14. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  15. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  16. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  17. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  18. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  19. Implication of the oligomeric state of the N-terminal PTX3 domain in cumulus matrix assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ievoli, Elena; Lindstedt, Ragnar; Inforzato, Antonio; Camaioni, Antonella; Palone, Francesca; Day, Anthony J.; Mantovani, Alberto; Salvatori, Giovanni; Salustri, Antonietta

    2011-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) plays a key role in the formation of the hyaluronan-rich matrix of the cumulus oophorus surrounding ovulated eggs that is required for successful fertilization and female fertility. PTX3 is a multimeric protein consisting of eight identical protomers held together by a combination of non-covalent interactions and disulfide bonds. Recent findings suggest that the oligomeric status of PTX3 is important for stabilizing the cumulus matrix. Because the role of PTX3 in the cumulus resides in the unique N-terminal sequence of the protomer, we investigated further this issue by testing the ability of distinct Cys/Ser mutants of recombinant N-terminal region of PTX3 (N_PTX3) with different oligomeric arrangement to promote in vitro normal expansion in cumuli from Ptx3-null mice. Here we report that the dimer of the N_PTX3 is unable to rescue cumulus matrix organization, and that the tetrameric assembly of the protein is the minimal oligomeric state required for accomplishing this function. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 binds to HCs of IαI and TSG-6, which are essential for cumulus matrix formation and able to interact with hyaluronan. Interestingly, here we show by solid-phase binding experiments that the dimer of the N_PTX3 retains the ability to bind to both IαI and TSG-6, suggesting that the octameric structure of PTX3 provides multiple binding sites for each of these ligands. These findings support the hypothesis that PTX3 contributes to cumulus matrix organization by cross-linking HA polymers through interactions with multiple HCs of IαI and/or TSG-6. The N-terminal PTX3 tetrameric oligomerization was recently reported to be also required for recognition and inhibition of FGF2. Given that this growth factor has been detected in the mammalian preovulatory follicle, we wondered whether FGF2 negatively influences cumulus expansion and PTX3 may also serve in vivo to antagonize its activity. We found that a molar excess of FGF2, above PTX3

  20. Aerosol and gas re-distribution by shallow cumulus clouds: An investigation using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, Anna; Sorooshian, Armin; Ervens, Barbara; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Feingold, Graham; Murphy, Shane M.; de Gouw, Joost; Warneke, Carsten; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2012-09-01

    Aircraft measurements during the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) are used to examine the influence of shallow cumulus clouds on vertical profiles of aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and secondary aerosol precursor gases. The data show signatures of convective transport of particles, gases and moisture from near the surface to higher altitudes, and of aqueous-phase production of aerosol mass (sulfate and organics) in cloud droplets and aerosol water. In cloudy conditions, the average aerosol volume concentration at an altitude of 2850 m, above typical cloud top levels, was found to be 34% of that at 450 m; for clear conditions, the same ratio was 13%. Both organic and sulfate mass fractions were on average constant with altitude (around 50%); however, the ratio of oxalate to organic mass increased with altitude (from 1% at 450 m to almost 9% at 3450 m), indicative of the influence of in-cloud production on the vertical abundance and characteristics of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass. A new metric termed "residual cloud fraction" is introduced as a way of quantifying the "cloud processing history" of an air parcel. Results of a parcel model simulating aqueous phase production of sulfate and organics reproduce observed trends and point at a potentially important role of SOA production, especially oligomers, in deliquesced aerosols. The observations emphasize the importance of shallow cumulus clouds in altering the vertical distribution of aerosol properties that influence both their direct and indirect effect on climate.

  1. What does nature tell us about aerosol effects in a trade cumulus regime?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.; Wang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-term degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show modifications of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount are associated with volcanic aerosols. In addition we find significantly higher cloud tops for polluted clouds. We demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. Idealized large eddy simulations reproduce some key observed features of the cloud response to aerosol perturbations, which helps us further understand the underlying mechanisms. The "total shortwave aerosol forcing", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount, is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. Furthermore, the precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange and trade wind boundary layer. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  2. Laboratory simulations show diabatic heating drives cumulus-cloud evolution and entrainment.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Roddam; Diwan, Sourabh Suhas; Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; Sreenivas, K R; Bhat, G S

    2011-09-27

    Clouds are the largest source of uncertainty in climate science, and remain a weak link in modeling tropical circulation. A major challenge is to establish connections between particulate microphysics and macroscale turbulent dynamics in cumulus clouds. Here we address the issue from the latter standpoint. First we show how to create bench-scale flows that reproduce a variety of cumulus-cloud forms (including two genera and three species), and track complete cloud life cycles--e.g., from a "cauliflower" congestus to a dissipating fractus. The flow model used is a transient plume with volumetric diabatic heating scaled dynamically to simulate latent-heat release from phase changes in clouds. Laser-based diagnostics of steady plumes reveal Riehl-Malkus type protected cores. They also show that, unlike the constancy implied by early self-similar plume models, the diabatic heating raises the Taylor entrainment coefficient just above cloud base, depressing it at higher levels. This behavior is consistent with cloud-dilution rates found in recent numerical simulations of steady deep convection, and with aircraft-based observations of homogeneous mixing in clouds. In-cloud diabatic heating thus emerges as the key driver in cloud development, and could well provide a major link between microphysics and cloud-scale dynamics.

  3. Project Overview: Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS): Proposed Summer 2007 ASP Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Berg, Larry K.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard

    2006-05-18

    This white paper presents the scientific motivation and preliminary logistical plans for a proposed ASP field campaign to be carried out in the summer of 2007. The primary objective of this campaign is to use the DOE Gulfstream-1 aircraft to make measurements characterizing the chemical, physical and optical properties of aerosols below, within and above large fields of fair weather cumulus and to use the NASA Langley Research Center’s High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to make independent measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles in the vicinity of these fields. Separate from the science questions to be addressed by these observations will be information to add in the development of a parameterized cumulus scheme capable of including multiple cloud fields within a regional or global scale model. We will also be able to compare and contrast the cloud and aerosol properties within and outside the Oklahoma City plume to study aerosol processes within individual clouds. Preliminary discussions with the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) science team have identified overlap between the science questions posed for the CLASIC Intensive Operation Period (IOP) and the proposed ASP campaign, suggesting collaboration would benefit both teams.

  4. Multi-summer Cumulus-Radiation-Aerosol Climatology at SGP site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Berg, L. K.; Flynn, C.; Long, C.; Barnard, J.

    2010-12-01

    Compared to other cloud types, shallow cumulus clouds are relatively small in size and have large variations over time/space that are poorly captured by current large-scale models of the atmosphere. Since these small-scale variations are very difficult to monitor and accurately describe, models improvement is hampered, in part, by the lack of appropriate observational constraints, including cloud and aerosol properties, surface parameters and radiative fluxes. To address this issue, a multi-summer (2000-2007) cumulus-radiation-aerosol climatology has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site. In particular, this climatology is applied to illustrate that positive values of shortwave cloud radiative forcing occur frequently and are characterized by fluctuations with a small temporal scale; the duration for the majority of events with positive radiative forcing is less than 5 minutes. In this presentation, the developed climatology will be described and several important applications will be shown.

  5. Impact of Anthropogenic Aerosol on the Properties of Shallow Maritime Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Wilcox, E. M.; Shan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Indian Ocean region is frequently covered by cumulus clouds that are responsible for moistening the boundary layer and contribute to tropical deep convection. Because this region is uniquely located close to the highly polluted Indian plateau, air mass with high aerosol concentration can be easily transported to this area. These small cumulus clouds, coupled with the effects of aerosol, have a large potential to affect the regional and global albedo. The aerosol effects on cloud properties and atmospheric structures are examined in this work, using the UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) data that are observed from CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) and MAC (Maldives Autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle Campaign). On average, the high polluted cases show warmer temperature through the entire atmospheric column and higher relative humidity in boundary layer. The maximum temperature difference between high and low polluted cases can be found around the cloud layer altitude. In addition, the height of sub-cloud mixed layer is higher in low polluted cases. Clouds in high polluted cases are generally becoming narrower and taller than those in low polluted cases, and are associated with greater cloud water content and higher cloud droplet number concentrations, especially in small droplet range (diameters less than 10 micrometers). Meanwhile, the effective radius of cloud droplets decreases as the aerosol concentration increases. These facts indicate that the high polluted clouds are on average brighter with higher albedo.

  6. Development of Two-Moment Cloud Microphysics for Liquid and Ice Within the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, Donifan; Molod, Andrea M.; Bacmeister, Julio; Nenes, Athanasios; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Phillips, Vaughan,; Eichmann, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the development of a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme within the version 5 of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5). The scheme includes the implementation of a comprehensive stratiform microphysics module, a new cloud coverage scheme that allows ice supersaturation and a new microphysics module embedded within the moist convection parameterization of GEOS-5. Comprehensive physically-based descriptions of ice nucleation, including homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing, and liquid droplet activation are implemented to describe the formation of cloud particles in stratiform clouds and convective cumulus. The effect of preexisting ice crystals on the formation of cirrus clouds is also accounted for. A new parameterization of the subgrid scale vertical velocity distribution accounting for turbulence and gravity wave motion is developed. The implementation of the new microphysics significantly improves the representation of liquid water and ice in GEOS-5. Evaluation of the model shows agreement of the simulated droplet and ice crystal effective and volumetric radius with satellite retrievals and in situ observations. The simulated global distribution of supersaturation is also in agreement with observations. It was found that when using the new microphysics the fraction of condensate that remains as liquid follows a sigmoidal increase with temperature which differs from the linear increase assumed in most models and is in better agreement with available observations. The performance of the new microphysics in reproducing the observed total cloud fraction, longwave and shortwave cloud forcing, and total precipitation is similar to the operational version of GEOS-5 and in agreement with satellite retrievals. However the new microphysics tends to underestimate the coverage of persistent low level stratocumulus. Sensitivity studies showed that the simulated cloud properties are robust to moderate variation in cloud microphysical parameters

  7. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  8. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  9. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  10. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  11. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  12. Position control using 2D-to-2D feature correspondences in vision guided cell micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanliang; Han, Mingli; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2007-01-01

    Conventional camera calibration that utilizes the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the camera and the objects has certain limitations for micro-level cell operations due to the presence of hardware deviations and external disturbances during the experimental process, thereby invalidating the extrinsic parameters. This invalidation is often neglected in macro-world visual servoing and affects the visual image processing quality, causing deviation from the desired position in micro-level cell operations. To increase the success rate of vision guided biological micromanipulations, a novel algorithm monitoring the changing image pattern of the manipulators including the injection micropipette and cell holder is designed and implemented based on 2 dimensional (2D)-to 2D feature correspondences and can adjust the manipulator and perform position control simultaneously. When any deviation is found, the manipulator is retracted to the initial focusing plane before continuing the operation.

  13. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  14. 'Brukin2D': a 2D visualization and comparison tool for LC-MS data

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Zerefos, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Vlahou, Antonia; Baumann, Marc; Kossida, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) is a commonly used technique to resolve complex protein mixtures. Visualization of large data sets produced from LC-MS, namely the chromatogram and the mass spectra that correspond to its compounds is the focus of this work. Results The in-house developed 'Brukin2D' software, built in Matlab 7.4, which is presented here, uses the compound data that are exported from the Bruker 'DataAnalysis' program, and depicts the mean mass spectra of all the chromatogram compounds from one LC-MS run, in one 2D contour/density plot. Two contour plots from different chromatograph runs can then be viewed in the same window and automatically compared, in order to find their similarities and differences. The results of the comparison can be examined through detailed mass quantification tables, while chromatogram compound statistics are also calculated during the procedure. Conclusion 'Brukin2D' provides a user-friendly platform for quick, easy and integrated view of complex LC-MS data. The software is available at . PMID:19534737

  15. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) by methadone.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D; Otton, S V; Sproule, B A; Busto, U; Inaba, T; Kalow, W; Sellers, E M

    1993-01-01

    1. In microsomes prepared from three human livers, methadone competitively inhibited the O-demethylation of dextromethorphan, a marker substrate for CYP2D6. The apparent Ki value of methadone ranged from 2.5 to 5 microM. 2. Two hundred and fifty-two (252) white Caucasians, including 210 unrelated healthy volunteers and 42 opiate abusers undergoing treatment with methadone were phenotyped using dextromethorphan as the marker drug. Although the frequency of poor metabolizers was similar in both groups, the extensive metabolizers among the opiate abusers tended to have higher O-demethylation metabolic ratios and to excrete less of the dose as dextromethorphan metabolites than control extensive metabolizer subjects. These data suggest inhibition of CYP2D6 by methadone in vivo as well. 3. Because methadone is widely used in the treatment of opiate abuse, inhibition of CYP2D6 activity in these patients might contribute to exaggerated response or unexpected toxicity from drugs that are substrates of this enzyme. PMID:8448065

  16. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  17. Earth Science Microwave Remote Sensing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) was established as NASA's first space flight center in 1959. Its 12,000 personnel are active in the Earth and space sciences, astronomy, space physics, tracking and communications. GSFC's mission is to expand our knowledge of the Earth and its environment, the solar system, and the universe through observations from space. The main Goddard campus is located in Greenbelt, Maryland, USA, just north of Washington, D.C. The Wallops Flight Facility (operational since 1945), located on the Atlantic coast of Virginia was consolidated with the Goddard Space Flight Center in 1982. Wallops is now NASA's principal facility for management and implementation of suborbital research programs, and supports a wide variety of airborne science missions as well. As the lead Center for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE)--a long-term, coordinated research effort to study the Earth as a global environmental system--GSFC scientists and engineers are involved in a wide range of Earth Science remote sensing activities. Their activities range from basic geoscience research to the development of instruments and technology for space missions, as well as the associated Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) work. The shear breadth of work in these areas precludes an exhaustive description here. Rather, this article presents selected brief overviews of microwave-related Earth Science applications and the ground-based, airborne, and space instruments that are in service, under development, or otherwise significantly involving GSFC. Likewise, contributing authors are acknowledged for each section, but the results and projects they describe represent the cumulative efforts of many persons at GSFC as well as at collaborating institutions. For further information, readers are encouraged to consult the listed websites and references.

  18. Comparison of a 2D Photochemical Model to Data Using Statistical Trend Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Stolarski, Richard; Jackman, Charles; Fleming, Eric; Frith, Stacey Hollandsworth

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed our 23-year merged ozone data set for variability and trends with a statistical time-series model. To assist in that analysis, we have analyzed the Goddard 2D photochemical model for the same time period with the same time-series model. Multiple runs of the photochemical model allow us to separate the effects of various terms on ozone, such as solar cycle and volcanic eruptions. We use this to help us separate those signals from each other in the data. We also used a smoothed version of the photochemical model's prediction of global ozone change in place of a simple linear trend. We find a number of interesting results. This particular photochemical model is more sensitive to chlorine perturbations than the atmosphere appears to be. It is less sensitive to solar cycle. It predicts an effect from the Pinatubo eruption that is nearly symmetric in the two hemispheres, but the data appears to have not responded to Pinatubo in the southern mid-latitudes. These results and their uncertainties will be discussed.

  19. Storage Information Management System (SIMS) Spaceflight Hardware Warehousing at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubicko, Richard M.; Bingham, Lindy

    1995-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) on site and leased warehouses contain thousands of items of ground support equipment (GSE) and flight hardware including spacecraft, scaffolding, computer racks, stands, holding fixtures, test equipment, spares, etc. The control of these warehouses, and the management, accountability, and control of the items within them, is accomplished by the Logistics Management Division. To facilitate this management and tracking effort, the Logistics and Transportation Management Branch, is developing a system to provide warehouse personnel, property owners, and managers with storage and inventory information. This paper will describe that PC-based system and address how it will improve GSFC warehouse and storage management.

  20. Goddard Atmospheric Composition Data Center: Aura Data and Services in One Place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, G.; Kempler, S.; Gerasimov, I.; Ahmad, S.; Johnson, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Goddard Atmospheric Composition Data and Information Services Center (AC-DISC) is a portal to the Atmospheric Composition specific, user driven, multi-sensor, on-line, easy access archive and distribution system employing data analysis and visualization, data mining, and other user requested techniques for the better science data usage. It provides convenient access to Atmospheric Composition data and information from various remote-sensing missions, from TOMS, UARS, MODIS, and AIRS, to the most recent data from Aura OMI, MLS, HIRDLS (once these datasets are released to the public), as well as Atmospheric Composition datasets residing at other remote archive site.

  1. Goddard Space Flight Center: 1994 Maryland/GSFC Earth and Environmental Science Teacher Ambassador Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, James

    1995-01-01

    The Maryland/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth and Environmental Science Teacher Ambassador Program was designed to enhance classroom instruction in the Earth and environmental science programs in the secondary schools of the state of Maryland. In October 1992, more than 100 school system administrators from the 24 local Maryland school systems, the Maryland State Department of Education, and the University of Maryland met with NASA GSFC scientists and education officers to propose a cooperative state-wide secondary school science teaching enhancement initiative.

  2. Implementation of NASA Materials and Processes Requirements at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the history and current practices of the Materials Engineering Branch (MEB) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Included in the presentation is a review of the general Materials and Processes (M&P) requirements in the NASA-STD-6016. The work that the Materials Engineering Branch does to support GSFC Projects is also reviewed. The Materials Engineering Branch capabilities are listed, the expertise that is available to GSFC projects is also listed. Included in the backup slides are forms that the MEB uses to identify the materials in the spacecraft under development.

  3. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  4. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  5. The NCEP-NCAR Stratocumulus-to-Cumulus Transition Climate Process Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, C. S.; Teixeira, J.; Blossey, P. N.; Caldwell, P.; Fletcher, J. K.; Han, J.; Jones, C. R.; Klein, S. A.; Mechoso, C. R.; Pan, H.; Park, S.; Sun, R.; Suselj, K.; Witek, M. L.; Xiao, H.

    2012-12-01

    The NCEP-NCAR Stratocumulus-to-Cumulus Transition Climate Process Team (Sc-Cu CPT) is a NOAA-funded collaboration started in 2010 between two universities, two climate modeling centers, and two other national labs to improve the representation of low clouds in the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) and the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5). Highlights of CPT activities will be presented. The GFS is not only the U.S. operational global weather forecast model, it is also periodically used as a starting point for the Climate Forecast System (CFS), NCEP's operational coupled seasonal-to-interannual forecast model. As strategic preparation for developing version 3 of the CFS, two CPT goals were (1) to evaluate the free-running climate of GFS coupled to an ocean model using customary metrics for climate modeling, and (2) to reduce model biases in subtropical low cloud cover. The AMWG diagnostics package used for evaluating CAM5 was adapted to 50-year coupled GFS simulations, as well as to version 2 of the CFS. Both models had low overall circulation, precipitation and temperature biases, but had serious global energy conservation errors and cloud radiative forcing 40-50% too small in global mean. Using short coupled runs, the first issue was addressed by adding missing heating due to dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and the second issue has been partly addressed through a suite of minor changes to the moist physics parameterizations. Improvements to the boundary-layer scheme are also under development. CPT members also have refined the moist physics parameterizations in the CAM5, including unification of shallow and deep cumulus convection, improvement of cloud fraction and microphysics schemes, and diagnosis of systematic biases in the simulation of aerosol indirect effects in precipitating boundary-layer clouds. Lastly, CPT members have performed LES simulations of boundary-layer cloud sensitivities and of the stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that help

  6. Stochastic and scale-adaptive shallow cumulus parameterization (EDMF-DualM-S in ICON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakradzija, M.; Seifert, A.; Heus, T.; Dipankar, A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical cloud-resolving studies of cumulus clouds reveal the small-scale variability of convection that is not fully controlled by the large scale environment. From the parameterization point of view, this means that there is a whole distribution of the sub-grid convective states that can correspond to the same large scale forcing. Moreover, the stochastic variability becomes higher with the increasing model resolution. As the cloud sample within a model grid box becomes smaller, the most probable realization of the sub-grid convection deviates further away from the convective ensemble mean. Therefore, as the atmospheric models approach higher and higher resolution, it becomes more important to develop stochastic schemes that sub-sample the convective cloud ensemble and adapt to the model resolution. We propose an approach to represent the stochastic variability of the unresolved shallow-convective states, and the dependence of the distribution of sub-grid states on the model horizontal resolution. We combine the theory of fluctuations in a convective ensemble based on a statistical mechanics approach and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of shallow cumulus clouds of an idealized case over the ocean. Based on the empirical and theoretical findings, a stochastic cloud generator is developed and coupled to the EDMF-DualM cloud scheme in the ICON model as a stochastic process that runs simultaneously with the EDMF scheme. The stochastic scheme adds more complexity to the cloud parameterization in EDMF, but on the other side, the cloud mass flux profiles are locally sampled instead of using the buoyancy sorting closure for the bulk vertical profile. The scheme also relaxes the statistical equilibrium assumption by applying it only at the scale at which it is appropriate and by including the memory component. Preliminary results show that the variability is well reproduced and that the scheme is scale-adaptive. Impact on the mean profiles is small, except for a significant

  7. Scale-Dependence of the Response of Tropopause Height to Deep Cumulus Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E.; Wong, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deep cumulus convection can influence the height of the tropopause either through plumes which penetration into the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) or by forcing broad-scale vertical motion. This study uses the unique capabilities of satellite-based cross-track sounders to provide three-dimensional images of temperature in the TTL. These are used to derive thermal tropopause height and to study the scale-dependence of tropopause height variability and its relation to distance and intensity of deep convection. The data used in this study are 10 years of tropical Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) swath (level 2) temperature profile data. Localized spatial power spectra are derived from swaths of tropopause height, which are ordered relative to the timing of deep convective clouds. The relative contributions of small-scale and large-scale power are use to characterize the influence of the scale of the vertical motion in the TTL. The highest spatial scales sampled by the AIRS temperature field are mesoscale systems of deep cumulus convection approximately 200 to 400 km across because the horizontal spatial resolution of the AIRS temperature profile product is approximately 50 km. AIRS temperature profiles have state-dependent errors correlated with cloud amount, but are more useful than temperature profiles from microwave sounders because of their higher vertical resolution. TTL temperature has less sampling error then mid and lower troposphere temperature, and the time binning is used to characterize and reduce these errors. The intensity of cumulus convection is inferred from the derived cloud properties, specifically cloud-top height, cloud-ice effective diameter and their power. The height difference between tropopause and cloud-top is used to characterize the likelihood that vertical motions extend to the tropopause, while the cloud-ice effective diameter provides a measure of the intensity of the convective vertical velocity and its ability to lift larger ice

  8. Embryonic Poly(A)-Binding Protein (EPAB) Is Required for Granulosa Cell EGF Signaling and Cumulus Expansion in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cai-Rong; Lowther, Katie M; Lalioti, Maria D; Seli, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (EPAB) is the predominant poly(A)-binding protein in Xenopus, mouse, and human oocytes and early embryos before zygotic genome activation. EPAB is required for translational activation of maternally stored mRNAs in the oocyte and Epab(-/-) female mice are infertile due to impaired oocyte maturation, cumulus expansion, and ovulation. The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanism of follicular somatic cell dysfunction in Epab(-/-) mice. Using a coculture system of oocytectomized cumulus oophorus complexes (OOXs) with denuded oocytes, we found that when wild-type OOXs were cocultured with Epab(-/-) oocytes, or when Epab(-/-) OOXs were cocultured with WT oocytes, cumulus expansion failed to occur in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF). This finding suggests that oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) from Epab(-/-) mice fail to send and receive the necessary signals required for cumulus expansion. The abnormalities in Epab(-/-) CCs are not due to lower expression of the oocyte-derived factors growth differentiation factor 9 or bone morphogenetic protein 15, because Epab(-/-) oocytes express these proteins at comparable levels with WT. Epab(-/-) granulosa cells (GCs) exhibit decreased levels of phosphorylated MEK1/2, ERK1/2, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase in response to lutenizing hormone and EGF treatment, as well as decreased phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. In conclusion, EPAB, which is oocyte specific, is required for the ability of CCs and GCs to become responsive to LH and EGF signaling. These results emphasize the importance of oocyte-somatic communication for GC and CC function.

  9. Mean and Turbulence Structure of the Shallow Cumulus-topped Boundary Layers in the DYNAMO Measurement Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alappattu, D. P.; Wang, Q.; Khelif, D.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: Extensive measurements were collected using NOAA's WP-3D Orion aircraft (P3) on 19 November 2011 over the Topical Indian Ocean (TIO; 8E-EQ and 72E-81E) as a part of DYNAMO (Dynamics of Madden Julian Oscillation) field campaign. On this mission P3 conducted five vertically stacked level legs each having 4-5 levels of measurements. Boundary layer profiling also performed after each vertically stacked leg. A total of 6 hour 18 minutes of high frequency (25 Hz) data of temperature, humidity and three components of wind were collected. Sea surface temperature (SST) and liquid water content also were measured. Average sampling levels of the vertically stacked legs were at 60 m, 120 m, 350 m, 475 m and 650 m. The lowest three levels were well inside the boundary layer while the next two levels were at the cloud base and within the cloud respectively. Aircraft penetrated through a minimum of one trade wind cumulus in each vertically stacked leg. A few of the observed trade wind cumuli were precipitating during the measurements. The case to be presented is the only flight were shallow precipitating cumulus clouds were sampled intensively before the active phase of the November MJO event. We will discuss the mean vertical structure and the horizontal variability of this cumulus-topped boundary layer. Fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat estimated using the eddy correlation method will be presented to illustrate the energy and water vapor transport in this type of boundary layer in the DYNAMO domain. Variation of drag coefficient and heat exchange coefficients with wind speed is also presented. Spectral analysis performed on the data will reveal the dominant turbulent eddy size in the presence of cumulus clouds. Finally, we will discuss the observed differences in vertical velocity, buoyancy and entrainment/detrainment eddy fluxes in the precipitating and non-precipitating cumulus clouds.

  10. 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent up-regulation of phosphodiesterase type 3A in porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Côté, Nancy; Vigneault, Christian; Guillemette, Christine; Richard, François J

    2007-04-01

    The means by which cumulus cells react to gonadotropin stimulation and regulate the subsequent production and degradation of cAMP are largely unknown. In this article, we report that cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 3A (Pde3a) is transcriptionally regulated in porcine cumulus cells by a cAMP-dependent pathway during in vitro maturation (IVM). cAMP-PDE activity was increased in the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) after 10 h of IVM, and 78% of this increase was sensitive to a Pde3-specific inhibitor, cilostamide. Although no variation was observed in the oocyte, cilostamide-sensitive cAMP-PDE activity increased in the cumulus cells after IVM. This was supported by Western blotting, which showed that the intensity of a 135-kDa anti-Pde3a immunoreactive band was increased in COC after IVM. The Pde3a mRNA level was up-regulated 28-fold in the COC after 4 h of IVM and remained high up to 12 h. The mRNA up-regulation and increased activity were inhibited by an RNA synthesis inhibitor, alpha-amanitin. The cilostamide-sensitive increase in PDE activity was inhibited by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) caused dose-dependent activation of Pde3. The PMSG-dependent increase in Pde3 activity and Pde3a mRNA were mimicked by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin or prostaglandin E2. PMSG-dependent Pde3 activation was inhibited by the protein kinase A-specific inhibitor H89. Collectively, our results show for the first time that degradation of the intracellular cyclic nucleotide by Pde3a is transcriptionally up-regulated via a cAMP-dependent pathway in cumulus cells, suggesting that it has a functional role during the ovulatory gonadotropin surge.

  11. Precipitation susceptibility in marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus from airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Sorooshian, Armin; Zuidema, Paquita; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2016-09-01

    Precipitation tends to decrease as aerosol concentration increases in warm marine boundary layer clouds at fixed liquid water path (LWP). The quantitative nature of this relationship is captured using the precipitation susceptibility (So) metric. Previously published works disagree on the qualitative behavior of So in marine low clouds: So decreases monotonically with increasing LWP or cloud depth (H) in stratocumulus clouds (Sc), while it increases and then decreases in shallow cumulus clouds (Cu). This study uses airborne measurements from four field campaigns on Cu and Sc with similar instrument packages and flight maneuvers to examine if and why So behavior varies as a function of cloud type. The findings show that So increases with H and then decreases in both Sc and Cu. Possible reasons for why these results differ from those in previous studies of Sc are discussed.

  12. Optical properties of continental haze and cumulus and orographic clouds based on Space Shuttle polarimetric observations.

    PubMed

    Egan, W G; Israel, S; Sidran, M; Hindman, E E; Johnson, W R; Whitehead, V S

    1993-11-20

    Digitized Space Shuttle imagery in the red, green, and blue spectral regions (0.600, 0.540, and 0.435 µm, respectively) is used to characterize the mean radius and the index of refraction of droplets in cumulus and orographic clouds. The clouds are shown to consist concurrently of submicrometer and supermicrometer droplets, with the percent polarization indicative of the dominant sizes. Cloud development from haze as well as inhomogeneities in the cloud decks can be traced remotely. The absorption properties of clouds can also be determined remotely. An optical depth of continental haze in the same three spectral regions as the clouds is computed from the polarimetric and photometric contributions. Both Mie and Rayleigh scattering are included in the model.

  13. Three-dimensional simulations of cumulus congestus clouds on GATE day 261

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J.; Van Helvoirt, G.; Mccumber, M.

    1982-01-01

    Schlesinger's (1978) three-dimensional cumulus model is applied to showering congestus clouds on day 261 of GATE. Model results are compared with each other and with observations to analyze the effects of varying shear and altered sounding. Relationships between shear, mesovortices and dynamic entrainment are examined, as well as the model clouds' impact on the environment as a function of shear. The simulations appear to resemble reality in many important aspects. Altostratus layers observed on day 261 are found to be a by-product of convection in three-dimensional shear. Rapid erosion of cloud base to 3.6 km is related to the ambient thermal structure, with wind shear and initial perturbation playing a secondary role. Some of the apparent conflict regarding lateral versus cloud-top entrainment is clarified, as well as some factors governing convective downdraft structure and intensity.

  14. A unified view of convective transports by stratocumulus clouds, shallow cumulus clouds, and deep convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David A.

    1990-01-01

    A bulk planetary boundary layer (PBL) model was developed with a simple internal vertical structure and a simple second-order closure, designed for use as a PBL parameterization in a large-scale model. The model allows the mean fields to vary with height within the PBL, and so must address the vertical profiles of the turbulent fluxes, going beyond the usual mixed-layer assumption that the fluxes of conservative variables are linear with height. This is accomplished using the same convective mass flux approach that has also been used in cumulus parameterizations. The purpose is to show that such a mass flux model can include, in a single framework, the compensating subsidence concept, downgradient mixing, and well-mixed layers.

  15. Observational evidence for aerosol invigoration in shallow cumulus downstream of Mount Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, G. G.; Abernathy, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of how marine boundary layer (MBL) shallow cumulus clouds respond to changes in aerosol is central to understanding how MBL clouds modulate the climate system. Mount Kilauea on the island of Hawaii began erupting in 2008 injecting substantial SO2 into the marine boundary layer creating a unique natural laboratory. Examining data from approximately 600 passes of the A-Train downstream of Mount Kilauea over a 3 year period and separating data into aerosol optical depth quartiles, we find an unambiguous increase in marine boundary cloud top height and an increase in surface wind speed as aerosol increases while the radar reflectivity does not change substantially. We conclude that increased aerosols may have caused invigoration of the MBL clouds. Additionally, we find that increases in sub 1 km cloud fraction combined with increasing aerosol explain the increased visible reflectance suggesting that evidence for the so-called first aerosol indirect effect should be reexamined.

  16. Patterns of intercellular connectivity in the mammalian cumulus-oocyte complex.

    PubMed

    Albertini, D F; Rider, V

    1994-02-01

    Electron and fluorescence microscopic techniques have been used in a complementary fashion to study the patterns of follicle cell-oocyte interactions within cumulus-oocyte-complexes of various mammals. The principal findings are: (1) two distinct types of transzonal processes exist that are distinguishable on the basis of cytoskeletal composition; (2) in some of the species examined (pig, goat, primate), corkscrew-shaped processes rich in tubulin, traverse the zona pellucida and are invaginated into the oocyte cortex; (3) actin-rich processes either ramify as a network at the outer surface of the zona pellucida or penetrate the zona and make contact with the oolemma in a species specific manner. These results are discussed with respect both to the need to employ complementary optical methods in assessing connectivity patterns within COC and to the possible role that extracellular matrix-cell interactions play in the homeostatic control of oocyte growth and maturation.

  17. Interactions between a tropical mixed boundary layer and cumulus convection in a radiative-convective model

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, C.L.

    1993-05-01

    This report details a radiative-convective model, combining previously developed cumulus, stable cloud and radiation parameterizations with a boundary layer scheme, which was developed in the current study. The cloud model was modified to incorporate the effects of both small and large clouds. The boundary layer model was adapted from a mixed layer model was only slightly modified to couple it with the more sophisticated cloud model. The model was tested for a variety of imposed divergence profiles, which simulate the regions of the tropical ocean from approximately the intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to the subtropical high region. The sounding used to initialize the model for most of the runs is from the trade wind region of ATEX. For each experiment, the model was run with a timestep of 300 seconds for a period of 7 days.

  18. Active immunization of rats with cumulus-free mouse ova: induction of infertility and antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R J; Richardson, D W

    1981-04-01

    Active immunization of rats with cross-reacting zona pellucida antigens derived from cumulus-free mouse ova resulted in the induction in fertility without adverse side effects. Half of the immunized animals never regained their fertility despite repeated matings with fertile males. Two of the remaining animals conceived when antibody titers fell to basal levels and gave birth to litters of normal healthy young. Post mortem examination of immunized animals 24 hours after finding sperm in the vaginal smears resulted in the recovery of tubal ova exhibiting the presence of a precipitate on the outer surface of the zona pellucida. Some of these ova appeared to have been fertilized, suggesting that anti-zona antibodies may also inhibit fertility through a post-fertilization mechanism of action. PMID:7288384

  19. Preliminary assessment of energy conservation opportunities at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, L.; Parker, G.B.

    1993-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is encouraging energy efficiency in its buildings and facilities as part of an overall strategy to meet the requirements of the Executive Order on Energy Efficiency and the Comprehensive Energy Policy Act of 1992. NASA requested technical assistance from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct a site visit, examine selected buildings and facilities, and suggest appropriate and economically acceptable energy efficiency measures and future actions at NASA`s Goddard Space Flight Center. PNL was also tasked to investigate the current and future demand-side management (DSM) programs offered by the servicing electric utility that would be applicable for the site. The information for this assessment was collected during site visits to the Goddard Space Flight Center during September and October 1992. The assessment addresses energy supply and cost, estimated energy distribution and use, and cost-effective options to reduce energy consumption at the center. Applicable utility DSM programs are also identified. A recommended strategy is identified to undertake a more comprehensive long-term energy reduction program at the site. A model approach is also given for the site to develop a partnership with the serving electric utility to implement a ``custom`` site-wide DSM program incorporating the several incentives offered by the utility to governmental agencies.

  20. The Impact of British Airways Wind Observations on the Goddard Earth Observing System Analyses and Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rukhovets, Leonid; Sienkiewicz, M.; Tenenbaum, J.; Kondratyeva, Y.; Owens, T.; Oztunali, M.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    British Airways flight data recorders can provide valuable meteorological information, but they are not available in real-time on the Global Telecommunication System. Information from the flight recorders was used in the Global Aircraft Data Set (GADS) experiment as independent observations to estimate errors in wind analyses produced by major operational centers. The GADS impact on the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS) analyses was investigated using GEOS-1 DAS version. Recently, a new Data Assimilation System (fvDAS) has been developed at the Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard. Using fvDAS , the, GADS impact on analyses and forecasts was investigated. It was shown the GADS data intensify wind speed analyses of jet streams for some cases. Five-day forecast anomaly correlations and root mean squares were calculated for 300, 500 hPa and SLP for six different areas: Northern and Southern Hemispheres, North America, Europe, Asia, USA These scores were obtained as averages over 21 forecasts from January 1998. Comparisons with scores for control experiments without GADS showed a positive impact of the GADS data on forecasts beyond 2-3 days for all levels at the most areas.

  1. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Evaporative Cooling at the Lateral Boundary of Shallow Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heus, T.; Abma, D.; Mellado, J.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates the dynamics of a narrow region of subsiding air at the lateral boundary of cumulus clouds, focusing on the role of evaporative cooling. Previous observational and large-eddy simulations showed the relevance of this subsiding shell in cloud dynamics, but have also showed that the size of this shell is well below what large-eddy simulations can resolve. Therefore, we have performed direct numerical simulations of an idealized subsiding shell to investigate accurately the complete turbulent field. The system develops a self-similar, Reynolds number independent flow which allows for the determination of explicit scaling laws relating the characteristic length, time and velocity scales of the shell. In particular, it is found that the shell width grows quadratically in time, and linearly with decreasing height. The magnitude of these growth rates confirm the importance of the subsiding shell because of the relatively fast development of entrainment-determining scales: for typical thermodynamic conditions in cumulus clouds, a velocity of the order of 1~m~s-1 and a thickness of the order of 10 meters are established in about 2 minutes. This fits well within the typical cloud life time, suggesting that our idealization is an adequate framework for the analysis of relevant aspects in the subsiding shell associated with buoyancy reversal. It also indicates that the scaling laws derived here can be used to estimate the potential strength of a subsiding shell and the mean lateral entrainment associated with it, provided an estimate of the local thermodynamical state of the cloud boundary. It is shown that the dominant parameter of this system is the saturation buoyancy, whereas the effect of the saturation mixing fraction is minor.uoyancy field in the subsiding shell. Blue colors are low values, red colors are high values.

  3. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation in cumulus cells support oocyte maturation in bovine.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lazo, Laura; Brisard, Daphné; Elis, Sébastien; Maillard, Virginie; Uzbekov, Rustem; Labas, Valérie; Desmarchais, Alice; Papillier, Pascal; Monget, Philippe; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    Oocyte meiotic maturation requires energy from various substrates including glucose, amino acids, and lipids. Mitochondrial fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation (FAO) in the oocyte is required for meiotic maturation, which is accompanied by differential expression of numerous genes involved in FAs metabolism in surrounding cumulus cells (CCs) in vivo. The objective was to elucidate components involved in FAs metabolism in CCs during oocyte maturation. Twenty-seven genes related to lipogenesis, lipolysis, FA transport, and FAO were chosen from comparative transcriptome analysis of bovine CCs before and after maturation in vivo. Using real-time PCR, 22 were significantly upregulated at different times of in vitro maturation (IVM) in relation to oocyte meiosis progression from germinal vesicle breakdown to metaphase-II. Proteins FA synthase, acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase, perilipin 2, and FA binding protein 3 were detected by Western blot and immunolocalized to CCs and oocyte cytoplasm, with FA binding protein 3 concentrated around oocyte chromatin. By mass spectrometry, CCs lipid profiling was shown to be different before and after IVM. FAO inhibitors etomoxir and mildronate dose-dependently decreased the oocyte maturation rate in vitro. In terms of viability, cumulus enclosed oocytes were more sensitive to etomoxir than denuded oocytes. In CCs, etomoxir (150 μM) led to downregulation of lipogenesis genes and upregulated lipolysis and FAO genes. Moreover, the number of lipid droplets decreased, whereas several lipid species were more abundant compared with nontreated CCs after IVM. In conclusion, FAs metabolism in CCs is important to maintain metabolic homeostasis and may influence meiosis progression and survival of enclosed oocytes. PMID:25058602

  4. Absence of cumulus cells during in vitro maturation affects lipid metabolism in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Uzbekov, Rustem; Elis, Sébastien; Sanchez, Laura; Kireev, Igor; Lardic, Lionel; Dalbies-Tran, Rozenn; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2013-03-15

    Cumulus cells (CC) surround the oocyte and are coupled metabolically through regulation of nutrient intake. CC removal before in vitro maturation (IVM) decreases bovine oocyte developmental competence without affecting nuclear meiotic maturation. The objective was to investigate the influence of CC on oocyte cytoplasmic maturation in relation to energy metabolism. IVM with either cumulus-enclosed (CEO) or -denuded (DO) oocytes was performed in serum-free metabolically optimized medium. Transmission electron microscopy revealed different distribution of membrane-bound vesicles and lipid droplets between metaphase II DO and CEO. By Nile Red staining, a significant reduction in total lipid level was evidenced in DO. Global transcriptomic analysis revealed differential expression of genes regulating energy metabolism, transcription, and translation between CEO and DO. By Western blot, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and hormone-sensitive phospholipase (HSL) proteins were detected in oocytes and in CC, indicating a local lipogenesis and lypolysis. FAS protein was significantly less abundant in DO that in CEO and more highly expressed in CC than in the oocytes. On the contrary, HSL protein was more abundant in oocytes than in CC. In addition, active Ser⁵⁶³-phosphorylated HSL was detected in the oocytes only after IVM, and its level was similar in CEO and DO. In conclusion, absence of CC during IVM affected lipid metabolism in the oocyte and led to suboptimal cytoplasmic maturation. Thus, CC may influence the oocyte by orienting the consumption of nutritive storage via regulation of local fatty acid synthesis and lipolysis to provide energy for maturation. PMID:23321473

  5. Improving Forecasts of Cumulus: An Intersection of the Renewable Energy and Climate Science Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, L. K.; Gustafson, W. I., Jr.; Kassianov, E.; Long, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of broken cloud fields and their associated impact on the downwelling solar irradiance has remained a challenge to the renewable energy industry. Likewise, shallow cumulus play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget and hydrologic cycle and are of interest to the weather forecasting and climate science communities. The main challenge associated with predicting these clouds are their relatively small size (on the order of a kilometer or less) relative to the model grid spacing. Recently, however, there have been significant efforts put into improving forecasts of shallow clouds and the associated temporal and spatial variability of the solar irradiance that they induce. As an example of these efforts, we will describe recent modifications to the standard Kain-Fritsch parameterization as applied within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that are designed to improve predictions of the macroscale and microscale structure of shallow cumulus. These modifications are shown to lead to a realistic increase in the simulated cloud fraction and associated decrease in the solar irradiance. We will evaluate our results using data collected at the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site, which is located in north-central Oklahoma. Our team has analyzed over 5 years of data collected at this site to document the macroscale structure of the clouds (including cloud fraction, cloud-base and cloud-top height) as well as their impact on the downwelling shortwave and longwave irradiance. One particularly interesting impact of shallow cumuli is the enhancement of the diffuse radiation, such that during periods in which the sun is not blocked, the observed irradiance can be significantly larger than the corresponding clear sky case. To date, this feature is not accurately represented by models that apply the plane-parallel assumption applied in the standard radiation parameterizations.

  6. Distribution of cortical granules in bovine oocytes classified by cumulus complex.

    PubMed

    Hosoe, M; Shioya, Y

    1997-11-01

    The present study was conducted to examine distributional changes of cortical granules (CGs) during meiotic maturation and fertilisation in vitro and the developmental ability in bovine oocytes classified by cumulus cells. The oocytes were classified by the morphology of their cumulus cell layers as follows: class A, compact and thick; class B, compact but thin; class C, naked; and class D, expanded. Some of the oocytes were stained with Lens curinalis agglutinin (LCA) before and after maturation in vitro and after insemination, and then stained with orcein to observe their nuclear stages. The others were left in culture. Distributional patterns of the CGs were classified into four types: type I, CGs distributed in clusters; type II, CGs dispersed and partly clustered; type III, all CGs dispersed; and type IV, no CGs. Most of the oocytes before culture showed a type I pattern, but this decreased after maturation culture, whereas type III increased in class A. The oocytes of class B showed similar changes while the oocytes of class C did not. In class C, many oocytes showed type I after culture, indicating that cytoplasmic maturation was not completed. In class D, 80.4% of the oocytes exhibited type III before maturation culture, indicating that their cytoplasmic maturation was different from classes A-C. And about 70% of the class D oocytes were at the nuclear stage of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) before culture. The developmental rates to blastocysts in classes A-D were 28.7%, 23.1%, 0.5% and 3.4% respectively. PMID:9563685

  7. A Fractal Dimensional Analysis on the Cloud Shape Parameters of Cumulus over Land.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Kazuo; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    1998-10-01

    High-resolution Landsat thematic mapper image data were employed in the present study to estimate the influence of regional wind systems on the macrophysical properties of cumulus clouds, such as perimeter fractal dimension, orientation angle, and cloud-base height. As a case study, an image of cumulus clouds was chosen in which small- and large-sized clouds prevail over the land in the presence of local winds. Cloud extraction from backgrounds becomes difficult when the background comprises various brightnesses. Furthermore, the surface brightness of a cloud is not uniform when shadows appear on the surface. These effects contribute to errors in cloud extraction only using a simple threshold. To address these problems, technical improvements in processing, including the combination of clustering, dynamic threshold, and edge detection, are presented and shown to produce more accurate cloud outlines seen from the zenith direction.The clouds' statistical area-perimeter relation was shown to confirm that the fractal dimension of the cumuli follows the double power law: two different perimeter fractal dimensions exist for larger clouds and for smaller clouds. Correspondence of the bending point (around 0.7 km2) in the area-perimeter relation with the bending point in the area-major axis relation was also demonstrated. Analysis of cloud orientation showed that larger clouds (>0.7 km2) indicate the approximate direction of the local wind, whereas smaller clouds do not show clear tendencies in their directions, suggesting that there is a difference in formation between larger and smaller clouds. These findings suggest that in the presence of horizontal local wind, larger clouds are likely to be formed by aggregation of smaller cloud cells (unicellular clouds) during the process of alignment to become long- and roll-shaped clouds (multicellular clouds).Uneven distribution of cloud-base height was also demonstrated in this study. Clouds with higher base levels are found to

  8. Observational estimates of detrainment and entrainment in non-precipitating shallow cumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgren, M. S.; Small, J. D.; Jonsson, H. H.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical transport associated with cumulus clouds is important to the redistribution of gases, particles, and energy, with subsequent consequences for many aspects of the climate system. Previous studies have suggested that detrainment from clouds can be comparable to the updraft mass flux, and thus represents an important contribution to vertical transport. In this study, we describe a new method to deduce the amounts of gross detrainment and entrainment experienced by non-precipitating cumulus clouds using aircraft observations. The method utilizes equations for three conserved variables: cloud mass, total water, and moist static energy. Optimizing these three equations leads to estimates of the mass fractions of adiabatic mixed-layer air, entrained air and detrained air that the sampled cloud has experienced. The method is applied to six flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter during the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) which took place in the Houston, Texas region during the summer of 2006 during which 176 small, non-precipitating cumuli were sampled. Using our novel method, we find that, on average, these clouds were comprised of 30 to 70 % mixed-layer air, with entrained air comprising most of the remainder. The mass fraction of detrained air was usually very small, less than 2 %, although values larger than 10 % were found in 15 % of clouds. Entrained and detrained air mass fractions both increased with altitude, consistent with some previous observational studies. The largest detrainment events were almost all associated with air that was at their level of neutral buoyancy, which has been hypothesized in previous modeling studies. This new method could be readily used with data from other previous aircraft campaigns to expand our understanding of detrainment for a variety of cloud systems.

  9. Safety of brilliant cresyl blue staining protocols on human granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego Duarte; Conzatti, Maiara; Ferreira, Gustavo Dias; Pimentel, Anita Mylius; Kussler, Ana Paula; Capp, Edison; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2016-02-01

    The selection of human immature oocytes destined for in vitro maturation (IVM) is performed according to their cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) morphology. In animal models, oocyte pre-selection with brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining improves fertilization and blastocyst rates and even increases the number of calves born. As the granulosa cells and cumulus cells (GCs and CCs) have a close relationship with the oocyte and are available in in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, applying BCB staining to these cells may help to elucidate whether BCB shows toxicity to human oocytes and to determine the safest protocol for this dye. GCs and CCs were isolated from 24 patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation. After 48 h, cells were exposed to: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) with or without phenol red, DPBS and mDPBS for 60 min; 13, 20 and 26 μM BCB for 60 min; and 60, 90 or 120 min to 13 μM BCB. Cellular viability was tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The 20 and 26 μM BCB exposures resulted in lower cell viability, similar to when cells were exposed to BCB for 90 or 120 min. GCs and CCs viabilities were equal among control group and 13 μM BCB group after 60 min. BCB staining was not toxic to GCs and CCs when the regime of 13 μM BCB for 60 min was used. Due to the close molecular/biochemical relationship between these cells and the gamete, we propose that it is unlikely that the use of BCB could interfere with the viability/health of human oocytes. PMID:25921213

  10. Safety of brilliant cresyl blue staining protocols on human granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego Duarte; Conzatti, Maiara; Ferreira, Gustavo Dias; Pimentel, Anita Mylius; Kussler, Ana Paula; Capp, Edison; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2016-02-01

    The selection of human immature oocytes destined for in vitro maturation (IVM) is performed according to their cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) morphology. In animal models, oocyte pre-selection with brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining improves fertilization and blastocyst rates and even increases the number of calves born. As the granulosa cells and cumulus cells (GCs and CCs) have a close relationship with the oocyte and are available in in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, applying BCB staining to these cells may help to elucidate whether BCB shows toxicity to human oocytes and to determine the safest protocol for this dye. GCs and CCs were isolated from 24 patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation. After 48 h, cells were exposed to: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) with or without phenol red, DPBS and mDPBS for 60 min; 13, 20 and 26 μM BCB for 60 min; and 60, 90 or 120 min to 13 μM BCB. Cellular viability was tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The 20 and 26 μM BCB exposures resulted in lower cell viability, similar to when cells were exposed to BCB for 90 or 120 min. GCs and CCs viabilities were equal among control group and 13 μM BCB group after 60 min. BCB staining was not toxic to GCs and CCs when the regime of 13 μM BCB for 60 min was used. Due to the close molecular/biochemical relationship between these cells and the gamete, we propose that it is unlikely that the use of BCB could interfere with the viability/health of human oocytes.

  11. Small RNA profile of the cumulus-oocyte complex and early embryos in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cai-Xia; Du, Zhi-Qiang; Wright, Elane C; Rothschild, Max F; Prather, Randall S; Ross, Jason W

    2012-11-01

    Small RNA represent several unique noncoding RNA classes that have important function in the development of germ cells and early embryonic development. Deep sequencing was performed on small RNA from cumulus cells (recovered from germinal vesicle [GV] and metaphase II-arrested [MII] oocytes), GV and MII oocytes, in vitro fertilization-derived embryos at 60 h postfertilization (4- to 8-cell stage), and Day 6 blastocysts. Additionally, a heterologous miRNA microarray method was also used to identify miRNA expressed in the oocyte during in vitro maturation. Similar to the results of expression analysis of other species, these data demonstrate dynamic expression regulation of multiple classes of noncoding RNA during oocyte maturation and development to the blastocyst stage. Mapping small RNA to the pig genome indicates dynamic distribution of small RNA organization across the genome. Additionally, a cluster of miRNA and Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) was discovered on chromosome 6. Many of the small RNA mapped to annotated repetitive elements in the pig genome, of which the SINE/tRNA-Glu and LINE/L1 elements represented a large proportion. Two piRNA (piR84651 and piR16993) and seven miRNA (MIR574, MIR24, LET7E, MIR23B, MIR30D, MIR320, and MIR30C) were further characterized using quantitative RT-PCR. Secretory carrier membrane protein 4 (SCAMP4) was predicted to be subject to posttranscriptional gene regulation mediated by small RNA, by annotating small RNA reads mapped to exonic regions in the pig genome. Consistent with the prediction results, SCAMP4 was further confirmed to be differentially expressed at both transcriptional and translational levels. These data establish a small RNA expression profile of the pig cumulus-oocyte complex and early embryos and demonstrate their potential capacity to be utilized for predictions of functional posttranscriptional regulatory events.

  12. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei spectra within maritime cumulus cloud droplets: Implications for mixing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, Cynthia H.; Hudson, James G.

    1995-01-01

    In a cloud formed during adiabatic expansion, the droplet size distribution will be systematically related to the critical supersaturation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CNN), but this relationship can be complicated in entraining clouds. Useful information about cloud processes, such as mixing, can be obtained from direct measurements of the CNN involved in droplet nucleation. This was accomplished by interfacing two instruments for a series of flights in maritime cumulus clouds. One instrument, the counterflow virtual impactor, collected cloud droplets, and the nonvolatile residual nuclei of the droplets was then passed to a CCN spectrometer, which measured the critical supersaturation (S(sub c)) spectrum of the droplet nuclei. The measured S(sub c) spectra of the droplet nuclei were compared with the S(sub c) spectra of ambient aerosol particles in order to identify which CCN were actually incorporated into droplets and to determine when mixing processes were active at different cloud levels. The droplet nuclei nearly always exhibited lower median S(sub c)'s than the ambient aerosol, as expected since droplets nucleate perferentially on particles with lower critical supersaturations. Critical supersaturation spectra from nuclei of droplets near cloud base were similar to those predicted for cloud regions formed adiabatically, but spectra of droplet nuclei from middle cloud levels showed some evidence that mixing had occurred. Near cloud top, the greatest variation in the spectra of the droplet nuclei was observed, and nuclei with high S(sub c)'s were sometimes present even within relatively large droplets. This suggests that the extent of mixing increases with height in cumulus clouds and that inhomogeneous mixing may be important near cloud top. These promising initial results suggest improvements to the experimental technique that will permit more quantitative results in future experiments.

  13. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  14. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  15. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  16. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) (2dFGRS Team, 1998-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, M.; Dalton, G.; Maddox, S.; Sutherland, W.; Norberg, P.; Cole, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bridges, T.; Cannon, R.; Collins, C.; Couch, W.; Cross, N.; Deeley, K.; de Propris, R.; Driver, S. P.; Efstathiou, G.; Ellis, R. S.; Frenk, C. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Jackson, C.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, I.; Lumsden, S.; Madgwick, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Price, I.; Seaborne, M.; Taylor, K.

    2007-11-01

    The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is a major spectroscopic survey taking full advantage of the unique capabilities of the 2dF facility built by the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The 2dFGRS is integrated with the 2dF QSO survey (2QZ, Cat. VII/241). The 2dFGRS obtained spectra for 245591 objects, mainly galaxies, brighter than a nominal extinction-corrected magnitude limit of bJ=19.45. Reliable (quality>=3) redshifts were obtained for 221414 galaxies. The galaxies cover an area of approximately 1500 square degrees selected from the extended APM Galaxy Survey in three regions: a North Galactic Pole (NGP) strip, a South Galactic Pole (SGP) strip, and random fields scattered around the SGP strip. Redshifts are measured from spectra covering 3600-8000 Angstroms at a two-pixel resolution of 9.0 Angstrom and a median S/N of 13 per pixel. All redshift identifications are visually checked and assigned a quality parameter Q in the range 1-5; Q>=3 redshifts are 98.4% reliable and have an rms uncertainty of 85 km/s. The overall redshift completeness for Q>=3 redshifts is 91.8% but this varies with magnitude from 99% for the brightest galaxies to 90% for objects at the survey limit. The 2dFGRS data base is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/. (6 data files).

  18. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  19. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-01

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs. PMID:27537619

  20. CVMAC 2D Program: A method of converting 3D to 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Lown, J.

    1990-06-20

    This paper presents the user with a method of converting a three- dimensional wire frame model into a technical illustration, detail, or assembly drawing. By using the 2D Program, entities can be mapped from three-dimensional model space into two-dimensional model space, as if they are being traced. Selected entities to be mapped can include circles, arcs, lines, and points. This program prompts the user to digitize the view to be mapped, specify the layers in which the new two-dimensional entities will reside, and select the entities, either by digitizing or windowing. The new two-dimensional entities are displayed in a small view which the program creates in the lower left corner of the drawing. 9 figs.

  1. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  2. Supporting Research at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Through Focused Education and Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F.; Closs, J.

    2003-12-01

    NASA research scientists work closely with Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI) personnel at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) on a large variety of education and public outreach (E/PO) initiatives. This work includes assistance in conceptualizing E/PO plans, then carrying through in the development of materials, publication, cataloging, warehousing, and product distribution. For instance, outreach efforts on the Terra, Aqua, and Aura-still in development-EOS missions, as well as planetary and visualization programs, have been coordinated by SSAI employees. E/PO support includes convening and taking part in sessions at professional meetings and workshops. Also included is the coordination of exhibits at professional meetings such as the AGU, AAAS, AMS and educational meetings such as the National Science Teachers Association. Other E/PO efforts include the development and staffing of booths; arranges for booth space and furnishings; shipping of exhibition materials and products; assembling, stocking, and disassembling of booths. E/PO personnel work with organizations external to NASA such as the Smithsonian museum, Library of Congress, U.S. Geological Survey, and associations or societies such as the AGU, American Chemical Society, and National Science Teachers Association to develop products and programs that enhance NASA mission E/PO efforts or to provide NASA information for use in their programs. At GSFC, E/PO personnel coordinate the efforts of the education and public outreach sub-committees in support of the Space and Earth Sciences Data Analysis (SESDA) contract within the GSFC Earth Sciences Directorate. The committee acts as a forum for improving communication and coordination among related Earth science education projects, and strives to unify the representation of these programs among the science and education communities. To facilitate these goals a Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate Education and Outreach Portal has been developed to provide

  3. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  4. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  5. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  6. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  7. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  8. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  9. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  10. The Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpati, Gabriel; Martin, John; Steiner, Mark; Reinhardt, K.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Goddard has used its Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) to perform more than 150 mission concept studies. The IMDC performs rapid development of high-level, end-to-end mission concepts, typically in just 4 days. The approach to the studies varies, depending on whether the proposed mission is near-future using existing technology, mid-future using new technology being actively developed, or far-future using technology which may not yet be clearly defined. The emphasis and level of detail developed during any particular study depends on which timeframe (near-, mid-, or far-future) is involved and the specific needs of the study client. The most effective mission studies are those where mission capabilities required and emerging technology developments can synergistically work together; thus both enhancing mission capabilities and providing impetus for ongoing technology development.

  11. Large-Scale Hollow Retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Alix

    2012-01-01

    Laser ranging to the retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Luna missions have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Although the precision of the range measurements has historically been limited by the ground station capabilities, advances in the APOLLO instrument at the Apache Point facility in New Mexico is beginning to be limited by errors associated with the lunar arrays. We report here on efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center to develop the next generation of lunar retroreflectors. We will describe a new facility that is being used to design, assemble, and test large-scale hollow retroreflectors. We will also describe results from investigations into various bonding techniques used to assemble the open comer cubes and mirror coatings that have dust mitigation properties.

  12. Hollow Retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Alix M.; Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser ranging to the retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Luna missions have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Although the precision of the range measurements has historically been limited by the ground station capabilities, advances in the APOLLO instrument at the Apache Point facility in New Mexico is beginning to be limited by errors associated with the lunar arrays. At Goddard Space Flight Center, we have developed a facility where we can design, build, and test next-generation hollow retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging. Here we will describe this facility as well as report on the bonding techniques used to assemble the retroreflectors. Results from investigations into different high reflectivity mirror coatings, as well as dust mitigation coatings will also be presented.

  13. First results from the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph - The chromosphere of Alpha Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Robinson, Richard D.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Ake, Thomas B.; Ebbets, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    The K5 III star Alpha Tau was observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on November 27, 1990 as part of the Science Assessment Program for the HST. The spectra show intersystem and permitted chromospheric emission lines of semiforbidden C II and Si II, Fe II, Fe I, Ni II, and Co II. Resolved profiles of the semiforbidden C II lines indicate a complex chromospheric turbulent velocity distribution with mean value of roughly 24 km/s, while their observed wavelengths indicate a 4 km/s downflow of the semiforbidden C II plasma. Twenty-five new emission lines have been found in the 2320-2370 A region, 17 of which have been identified with the aid of Skylab data obtained above the solar limb, including four lines from Co II (UV 8) and an Fe I (UV 12) line.

  14. The Third NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies held in October 1993. The conference served as an informational exchange forum for topics primarily relating to the ingestion and management of massive amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. Discussion topics include the necessary use of computers in the solution of today's infinitely complex problems, the need for greatly increased storage densities in both optical and magnetic recording media, currently popular storage media and magnetic media storage risk factors, data archiving standards including a talk on the current status of the IEEE Storage Systems Reference Model (RM). Additional topics addressed System performance, data storage system concepts, communications technologies, data distribution systems, data compression, and error detection and correction.

  15. Global climate changes as forecast by Goddard Institute for Space Studies three-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J.; Fung, I.; Lacis, A.; Rind, D.; Lebedeff, S.; Ruedy, R.; Russell, G.

    1988-01-01

    The global climate effects of time-dependent atmospheric trace gas and aerosol variations are simulated by NASA-Goddard's three-dimensional climate model II, which possesses 8 x 10-deg horizontal resolution, for the cases of a 100-year control run and three different atmospheric composition scenarios in which trace gas growth is respectively a continuation of current exponential trends, a reduced linear growth, and a rapid curtailment of emissions due to which net climate forcing no longer increases after the year 2000. The experiments begin in 1958, run to the present, and encompass measured or estimated changes in CO2, CH4, N2O, chlorofluorocarbons, and stratospheric aerosols. It is shown that the greenhouse warming effect may be clearly identifiable in the 1990s.

  16. Version 2 Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.; Shie, Chung-Lin; Starr, David O'C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Information on the turbulent fluxes of momentum, moisture, and heat at the air-sea interface is essential in improving model simulations of climate variations and in climate studies. We have derived a 13.5-year (July 1987-December 2000) dataset of daily surface turbulent fluxes over global oceans from the Special Sensor Mcrowave/Imager (SSM/I) radiance measurements. This dataset, version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF2), has a spatial resolution of 1 degree x 1 degree latitude-longitude and a temporal resolution of 1 day. Turbulent fluxes are derived from the SSM/I surface winds and surface air humidity, as well as the 2-m air and sea surface temperatures (SST) of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a bulk aerodynamic algorithm based on the surface layer similarity theory.

  17. Upgrades to Electronic Speckle Interferometer (ESPI) Operation and Data Analysis at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, Joseph; Blake, Peter; Jones, Joycelyn

    2008-01-01

    The authors report operational upgrades and streamlined data analysis of a commissioned electronic speckle interferometer (ESPI) in a permanent in-house facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Our ESPI was commercially purchased for use by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) development team. We have quantified and reduced systematic error sources, improved the software operability with a user-friendly graphic interface, developed an instrument simulator, streamlined data analysis for long-duration testing, and implemented a turn-key approach to speckle interferometry. We also summarize results from a test of the JWST support structure (previously published), and present new results from several pieces of test hardware at various environmental conditions.

  18. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's testbed for CCSDS compatible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A testbed for flight and ground systems compatible with the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Recommendations has been developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The subsystems of an end-to-end CCSDS based data system are being developed. All return link CCSDS telemetry services (except Internet) and both versions of the CCSDS frame formats are being implemented. In key areas of uncertainty, multiple design approaches are being performed. In addition, key flight-qualifiable hardware components, such as Reed-Solomon encoders, are being developed to complement the testbed element development. The testbed and its capabilities are described. The method of dissemination of the testbed results are given, as are plans to make the testbed capabilities available to outside users. Plans for the development of standardized conformance and compatibility tests are provided.

  19. Documentation and Validation of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System, Version 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); daSilva, Arlindo; Dee, Dick; Bloom, Stephen; Bosilovich, Michael; Pawson, Steven; Schubert, Siegfried; Wu, Man-Li; Sienkiewicz, Meta; Stajner, Ivanka

    2005-01-01

    This document describes the structure and validation of a frozen version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS): GEOS-4.0.3. Significant features of GEOS-4 include: version 3 of the Community Climate Model (CCM3) with the addition of a finite volume dynamical core; version two of the Community Land Model (CLM2); the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS); and an interactive retrieval system (iRET) for assimilating TOVS radiance data. Upon completion of the GEOS-4 validation in December 2003, GEOS-4 became operational on 15 January 2004. Products from GEOS-4 have been used in supporting field campaigns and for reprocessing several years of data for CERES.

  20. Large-Scale Hollow Retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Alix M.

    2012-05-01

    Laser ranging to the retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Luna missions have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Although the precision of the range measurements has historically been limited by the ground station capabilities, advances in the APOLLO instrument at the Apache Point facility in New Mexico is beginning to be limited by errors associated with the lunar arrays. We report here on efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center to develop the next generation of lunar retroreflectors. We will describe a new facility that is being used to design, assemble, and test large-scale hollow retroreflectors. We will also describe results from investigations into various bonding techniques used to assemble the open corner cubes and mirror coatings that have dust mitigation properties.

  1. Astronomical applications of the new Goddard Si:Bi 16 x 16 array camera system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, G.; Gezari, D.; Shu, P.; Tresch-Fienberg, R.; Fazio, G.; Hoffmann, W.; Mccreight, C.

    1984-01-01

    An improved 4-18 micron array camera system has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for astronomical protometry, using 16 x 16 Si:Bi (bismuth dope silicon) accumulation mode charge injection device (AMCID) with 256 active pixels. An astronomical observing program using this device has been carried out. The 16 x 16 device had sufficiently good sensitivity, uniformity and noise characteristics to be used for successful observations at the Steward Observatory Mt. Lemmon 60 and 61-inch telescopes in May 1983, and at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Mauna Kea in August 1983. Initial results indicate that this detector has sensitivity and noise characteristics comparable to other devices from the same generation of Aerojet arrays.

  2. Photonic Component Qualification and Implementation Activities at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Jin, Xiaodan Linda; Chuska, Richard F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; MacMurphy, Shawn L.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Zellar, Ronald S.; Friedberg, Patricia R.; Malenab, Mary C.

    2006-01-01

    The photonics group in Code 562 at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center supports a variety of space flight programs at NASA including the: International Space Station (ISS), Shuttle Return to Flight Mission, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Express Logistics Carrier, and the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program (NEPP). Through research, development, and testing of the photonic systems to support these missions much information has been gathered on practical implementations for space environments. Presented here are the highlights and lessons learned as a result of striving to satisfy the project requirements for high performance and reliable commercial optical fiber components for space flight systems. The approach of how to qualify optical fiber components for harsh environmental conditions, the physics of failure and development lessons learned will be discussed.

  3. From Bonaventure to Goddard: How I Got to NASA and What I Am Doing There

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin H.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation, accompanied by slides when appropriate, will describe how a young physics major travelled from the classrooms of Saint Bonaventure, to the graduate research laboratories of the University of Florida in Gainesville, and finally to the government laboratories of NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center just north of Washington, D.C. The main portion of the presentation concerns NASA missions of interest to the general public and supported in part by research work he does. Such, for example, is the current flagship mission of NASA, the James Webb Space Telescope that is destined to replace very soon the Hubble Space Telescope. In addition to these NASA telescope missions, a mission to an asteroid, coined the OSIRIS REX program, is in process and will be described.

  4. The 2003 Goddard Rocket Replica Project: A Reconstruction of the World's First Functional Liquid Rocket System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, R. A.; Elam, S. K.; Hicks, G. D.; Sanders, T. M.; London, J. R.; Mayne, A. W.; Christensen, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of NASA s 2003 Centennial of Flight celebration, engineers and technicians at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, in cooperation with the Alabama-Mississippi AIAA Section, have reconstructed historically accurate, functional replicas of Dr. Robert H. Goddard s 1926 first liquid- fuel rocket. The purposes of this project were to clearly understand, recreate, and document the mechanisms and workings of the 1926 rocket for exhibit and educational use, creating a vital resource for researchers studying the evolution of liquid rocketry for years to come. The MSFC team s reverse engineering activity has created detailed engineering-quality drawings and specifications describing the original rocket and how it was built, tested, and operated. Static hot-fire tests, as well as flight demonstrations, have further defined and quantified the actual performance and engineering actual performance and engineering challenges of this major segment in early aerospace history.

  5. Fifth NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies.. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Fifth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies. As one of an ongoing series, this conference continues to serve as a unique medium for the exchange of information on topics relating to the ingestion and management of substantial amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. This year's discussion topics include storage architecture, database management, data distribution, file system performance and modeling, and optical recording technology. There will also be a paper on Application Programming Interfaces (API) for a Physical Volume Repository (PVR) defined in Version 5 of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Reference Model (RM). In addition, there are papers on specific archives and storage products.

  6. ECMWF MACC-II evaluation of performances with MPLNET Lidar network at NASA Goddard Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Simone; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Benedetti, Angela; Lewis, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol vertical distribution is a critical parameter for most of the common aerosol forecast models. In this study are evaluated the performances of the MACC-II ECMWF aerosol model in forecasting aerosol extinction profiles and planetary boundary layer height versus the new V3 measured MPLNET Lidar extinction retrievals taken as reference at continuous operational site Goddard Space Flight Center, MD, USA. The model is evaluated at different assimilation stages: no assimilation, MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) assimilation and MODIS AOD plus lidar CALIPSO assimilation. The sensitivity study of the model is also investigated respect to the assimilation process..Assessing the model performances it is the first step for future near-real time lidar data assimilation into MACC-II aerosol model forecast.

  7. Upgrade of the Goddard Space Flight Center's Mass Properties Measuring Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brian P.; McLeod, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has a Mass Properties Measuring Facility (MPMF), which is used to measure weight, center of gravity, moment of inertia, and product of inertia of satellites and space flight hardware. The system was originally purchased more than 30 years ago. While the MPMF was still in good mechanical condition, the measurement and control subsystem had begun to experience more frequent component failures. Many of the outdated, discrete components in the system are no longer available for replacement. A decision was made to upgrade the measurement and control subsystem of the MPMF to improve its reliability and reduce the chance of component failures leading to extended facility outages. This paper will describe details of the upgraded subsystems and summarize the new performance capabilities of the system.

  8. The 1994 research and technology report at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Halem, Milton (Editor); Green, James (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Maran, Stephen (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor); Truszlowski, Walter (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The breadth of subject material in this 1994 edition of the Research and Technology Report illustrates the broad scope of activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The numerous entries dealing with data processing and visualization show the strong emphasis on data and its interpretation. Reports are presented in the following sections: data processing and visualization; space sciences - high energy astronomy, solar system, and new techniques; earth system science - atmospheres, oceans and ice, solid earth, and soils and vegetation; networks, planning, and information systems - mission scheduling and operations, spacecraft operation and status, software engineering, and infrastructure support; engineering and materials - spacecraft subsystems, launch vehicles, thermal control, new mechanisms, and testing and evaluation; and flight projects.

  9. Fifth NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Fifth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies held September 17 - 19, 1996, at the University of Maryland, University Conference Center in College Park, Maryland. As one of an ongoing series, this conference continues to serve as a unique medium for the exchange of information on topics relating to the ingestion and management of substantial amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. This year's discussion topics include storage architecture, database management, data distribution, file system performance and modeling, and optical recording technology. There will also be a paper on Application Programming Interfaces (API) for a Physical Volume Repository (PVR) defined in Version 5 of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Reference Model (RM). In addition, there are papers on specific archives and storage products.

  10. Failure rate analysis of Goddard Space Flight Center spacecraft performance during orbital life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, H. P.; Timmins, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Space life performance data on 57 Goddard Space Flight Center spacecraft are analyzed from the standpoint of determining an appropriate reliability model and the associated reliability parameters. Data from published NASA reports, which cover the space performance of GSFC spacecraft launched in the 1960-1970 decade, form the basis of the analyses. The results of the analyses show that the time distribution of 449 malfunctions, of which 248 were classified as failures (not necessarily catastrophic), follow a reliability growth pattern that can be described with either the Duane model or a Weibull distribution. The advantages of both mathematical models are used in order to: identify space failure rates, observe chronological trends, and compare failure rates with those experienced during the prelaunch environmental tests of the flight model spacecraft.

  11. The Scientific Visualization Studio at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. A.; Strong, J. E.; Pape, D. E.; Mitchell, H. G.; McConnell, A.; Cavallo, J. M.; Twiddy, R. L.; Rais, H.

    1993-05-01

    The Scientific Visualization Studio is a part of the Scientific Applications and Visualization Branch of the Space Data and Computing Division at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. It is tasked to provide advanced data visualization support to users of the NASA Center for the Computational Sciences and other NASA funded scientific researchers in both the space and Earth Sciences. Such support includes providing both software and expertise in visualizing large, complex, multidimensional data sets, and in creating videos, films, and other forms of hardcopy of the results. Hardware and software tools include a Cray Y/MP, a Convex C3240, a MasPar MP-1, a family of SGI workstations, video disks and recorders in all the international standards, color printers, photographic and movie transfer tools, and IDL, AVS, and FAST. We demonstrate these capabilities, as applied to various Earth and space science data sets, through a variety of annotated images and a video.

  12. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  13. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  14. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter. PMID:25943116

  15. Aerosol-Cloud microphysical closure in warm tropical cumulus during CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, W. C.; Lu, M.; Vanreken, T.; Rissman, T.; Varutbangkul, V.; Jonsson, H. H.; Nenes, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Delia, A. E.; Bahreini, R.; Roberts, G. C.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a closure study between aerosol and warm-cloud microphysics using field data collected during the NASA CRYSTAL-FACE campaign. CRYSTAL-FACE was conducted in continental and marine environments near southern Florida in July, 2002. Detailed profiles of thirteen cumulus clouds were made by the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft, which was equipped with four aerosol sizing systems, two CCN counters operated at 0.4% and 0.7% supersaturation, an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, a MOUDI filter sampler system, two cloud drop sizing probes, and two turbulence probes. A wide range of CCN (300 to >3500 cm-3) and cloud drop concentrations (200 to >1600 cm-3) provides an ideal case study for aerosol-cloud interactions and the first and second indirect effects. Vertical characterization of the young and mature cumulus clouds are obtained from multiple horizontal passes from below cloud base to cloud top. A detailed adiabatic cloud activation model accurately predicts the cloud drop concentration 100 m above cloud base. The model is constrained by observed updraft velocity and below-cloud aerosol properties (i.e. concentration, size distribution, composition, and supersaturation spectrum). Each cloud contains a core often exceeding 500 m in height in which the equivalent potential temperature follows a moist-adiabatic vertical profile. Effective radius most often follows an adiabatic profile, even in regions where liquid water content and/or equivalent potential temperature are sub-adiabatic. Large cloud-to-cloud variations in the vertical profile of effective radius are primarily driven by below-cloud aerosol concentration and to a lesser degree by cloud dynamics (i.e. vertical velocity). Six of the thirteen clouds are simulated using the RAMS large-eddy-simulation model. RAMS is integrated with bulk and bin microphysical models and is coupled to an offline 3-D radiative transfer model to study the aerosol effects on cloud microphysics and radiative properties. More

  16. Tropical Cumulus Convection and Upward Propagating Waves in Middle Atmospheric GCMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horinouchi, T.; Pawson, S.; Shibata, K.; Langematz, U.; Manzini, E.; Giorgetta, M. A.; Sassi, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Hamilton, K. P.; deGranpre, J.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is recognized that the resolved tropical wave spectrum can vary considerably between general circulation models (GCMs) and that these differences can have an important impact on the simulated climate. A comprehensive comparison of the waves is presented for the December-January-February period using high-frequency (three-hourly) data archives from eight GCMs and one simple model participating in the GCM Reality Intercomparison Project for SPARC (GRIPS). Quantitative measures of the structure and causes of the wavenumber-frequency structure of resolved waves and their impacts on the climate are given. Space-time spectral analysis reveals that the wave spectrum throughout the middle atmosphere is linked to variability of convective precipitation, which is determined by the parameterized convection. The variability of the precipitation spectrum differs by more than an order of magnitude between the models, with additional changes in the spectral distribution (especially the frequency). These differences can be explained primarily by the choice of different, cumulus par amet erizations: quasi-equilibrium mass-flux schemes tend to produce small variability, while the moist-convective adjustment scheme is most active. Comparison with observational estimates of precipitation variability suggests that the model values are scattered around the truth. This result indicates that a significant portion of the forcing of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is provided by waves with scales that are not resolved in present-day GCMs, since only the moist convective adjustment scheme (which has the largest transient variability) can force a QBO in models that have no parameterization of non-stationary gravity waves. Parameterized cumulus convection also impacts the nonmigrating tides in the equatorial region. In most of the models, momentum transport by diurnal nonmigrating tides in the mesosphere is larger than that by Kelvin waves, being more significant than has

  17. Competence Classification of Cumulus and Granulosa Cell Transcriptome in Embryos Matched by Morphology and Female Age

    PubMed Central

    Thuesen, Lea Langhoff; Andersen, Claus Yding; Nyboe-Andersen, Anders; Ziebe, Søren; Winther, Ole; Grøndahl, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objective By focussing on differences in the mural granulosa cell (MGC) and cumulus cell (CC) transcriptomes from follicles resulting in competent (live birth) and non-competent (no pregnancy) oocytes the study aims on defining a competence classifier expression profile in the two cellular compartments. Design: A case-control study. Setting: University based facilities for clinical services and research. Patients: MGC and CC samples from 60 women undergoing IVF treatment following the long GnRH-agonist protocol were collected. Samples from 16 oocytes where live birth was achieved and 16 age- and embryo morphology matched incompetent oocytes were included in the study. Methods MGC and CC were isolated immediately after oocyte retrieval. From the 16 competent and non-competent follicles, mRNA was extracted and expression profile generated on the Human Gene 1.0 ST Affymetrix array. Live birth prediction analysis using machine learning algorithms (support vector machines) with performance estimation by leave-one-out cross validation and independent validation on an external data set. Results We defined a signature of 30 genes expressed in CC predictive of live birth. This live birth prediction model had an accuracy of 81%, a sensitivity of 0.83, a specificity of 0.80, a positive predictive value of 0.77, and a negative predictive value of 0.86. Receiver operating characteristic analysis found an area under the curve of 0.86, significantly greater than random chance. When applied on 3 external data sets with the end-point outcome measure of blastocyst formation, the signature resulted in 62%, 75% and 88% accuracy, respectively. The genes in the classifier are primarily connected to apoptosis and involvement in formation of extracellular matrix. We were not able to define a robust MGC classifier signature that could classify live birth with accuracy above random chance level. Conclusion We have developed a cumulus cell classifier, which showed a promising performance on

  18. Effects of needle tip bevel and aspiration procedure on the morphology and developmental capacity of bovine compact cumulus oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Bols, P E; Ysebaert, M T; Van Soom, A; de Kruif, A

    1997-04-15

    Effects of the needle tip bevel and the aspiration procedure on the morphology of cumulusoocyte-complexes (COCs) and the developmental capacity of the oocytes after IVF were studied in 2 in vitro oocyte pick-up (OPU) simulations using a disposable ovum pick-up needle guidance system. In Experiment 1, the influence of the length of the needle bevel was investigated using a short and a long bevelled 20-g disposable needle. After being aspirated from slaughterhouse ovaries, the retrieved COCs were divided into 3 categories: 1) oocytes surrounded by a compact cumulus, 2) oocytes with an expanded cumulus, 3) partially naked oocytes. In Experiment 2, the influence of 5 different levels of aspiration vacuum for 3 different needle diameters (18-g, 19-g, 20-g) and 2 different needle bevels (long, short) was tested on the recovery and on the morphology of the cumulus investment of a fixed number of previously scored compact cumulus oocytes complexes (CCOCs), retrieved after slicing slaughterhouse ovaries. The re-retrieved COCs were allocated to Categories 1 and 3. The results show that the length of the needle bevel has a significant effect on oocyte recovery, in favor of the long-bevelled needle. As soon as higher aspiration vacua are used, a decrease of the number of CCOCs can be observed, which is less prominent for the short-bevelled needle compared to the long-bevelled one. The final number of blastocysts is similar for both needle types. In Experiment 2, the disposable needle system proved to be highly effective since nearly 80% of the CCOCs were retrieved. At low aspiration vacuum, up to 90% of the CCOCs withstand the aspiration procedure undamaged. Increasing the aspiration vacuum results in a decrease of the number of CCOCs, which is less pronounced using thinner needles. Averaged over all needle types, the prevalence of blastocysts expressed relative to the number of recovered oocytes decreases with higher aspiration vacuum. PMID:16728071

  19. The Effect of Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes and Atmospheric Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.; Evans, K. Franklin; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Cumulus clouds can become tilted or elongated in the presence of wind shear. Nevertheless, most studies of the interaction of cumulus clouds and radiation have assumed these clouds to be isotropic. This paper describes an investigation of the effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain-averaged solar fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of cloud scenes from a large eddy simulation. Progressively greater degrees of x-z plane tilting and horizontal stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes was produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. The mechanisms by which anisotropy interacts with solar fluxes were investigated by comparisons to independent pixel approximation and tilted independent pixel approximation computations for the same scenes. Cumulus anisotropy was found to most strongly impact solar radiative transfer by changing the effective cloud fraction, i.e., the cloud fraction when the field is projected on a surface perpendicular to the direction of the incident solar beam.

  20. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins and receptors in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiyu; Guo, Bingran; Pan, Dengke; Mu, Yulian; Feng, Shutang

    2008-03-01

    In vitro oocyte growth is the essential technology which enables oocytes to achieve maturation and acquire the competence for subsequent manipulation. There is increasing evidence that members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily are expressed in a variety of cell types within the ovary in a developmental stage-related manner and function as crucial factors in oocyte growth and follicular development. However, the expression of TGF-beta family members has been studied extensively in follicular compartment cells in the ovaries while poorly explored in the cumulus-oocytes complex (COC) within culture systems. Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we investigated the temporal and spatial expression patterns of several bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-4, BMP-6, BMP-15 and GDF-9), as well as BMP receptors (BMPRIA, BMPRIB, BMPRII and ActRII), in porcine COCs throughout in vitro maturation (IVM). In oocytes, the transcription of BMP-6, BMP-15, GDF-9 and BMPRII were down-regulated, while BMP-4, BMPRIA and BMPRIB remained unchanged during IVM. In cumulus cells, BMP-4 mRNA expression increased significantly, while BMP-6 and ActRII was down-regulated during IVM. Nevertheless, mRNAs of BMPRIA, BMPRIB and BMPRII were constantly expressed in cumulus cells in the process. However, BMP-15 was absent in cumulus cells and ActRII was not detected in oocytes. In addition, hardly any transcription of BMP-2, BMP-5, BMP-7, ActRIA was found in porcine COCs throughout IVM. These data demonstrate a complex BMP-signaling system for member gene expression within porcine COCs during IVM and indicate the need for further functional characterization of these factors during oocyte maturation.

  1. Simulation of the Summer Monsoon Rainfall over East Asia using the NCEP GFS Cumulus Parameterization at Different Horizontal Resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Hong, Song You; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Han, Jongil

    2014-10-01

    The most recent version of Simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) cumulus scheme in National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecast System (GFS) (GFS SAS) has been implemented into the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model with a modification of triggering condition and convective mass flux to become depending on model’s horizontal grid spacing. East Asian Summer Monsoon of 2006 from June to August is selected to evaluate the performance of the modified GFS SAS scheme. Simulated monsoon rainfall with the modified GFS SAS scheme shows better agreement with observation compared to the original GFS SAS scheme. The original GFS SAS scheme simulates the similar ratio of subgrid-scale precipitation, which is calculated from a cumulus scheme, against total precipitation regardless of model’s horizontal grid spacing. This is counter-intuitive because the portion of resolved clouds in a grid box should be increased as the model grid spacing decreases. This counter-intuitive behavior of the original GFS SAS scheme is alleviated by the modified GFS SAS scheme. Further, three different cumulus schemes (Grell and Freitas, Kain and Fritsch, and Betts-Miller-Janjic) are chosen to investigate the role of a horizontal resolution on simulated monsoon rainfall. The performance of high-resolution modeling is not always enhanced as the spatial resolution becomes higher. Even though improvement of probability density function of rain rate and long wave fluxes by the higher-resolution simulation is robust regardless of a choice of cumulus parameterization scheme, the overall skill score of surface rainfall is not monotonically increasing with spatial resolution.

  2. Prolactin and growth hormone affect metaphase-II chromosomes in aging oocytes via cumulus cells using similar signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Irina Y.; Singina, Galina N.; Lopukhov, Alexander V.; Shedova, Ekaterina N.; Zinovieva, Natalia A.

    2015-01-01

    General senescence of the adult organism is closely connected with reproductive one. Meanwhile, the age-related reduction in the female fertility is primarily associated with a decline in the gamete quality. Molecular and cellular changes in oocytes of old mammalian females are very similar to those occurring during aging of matured ova of their young counterparts, suggesting similarities in underlying mechanisms. The aim of the present work was to study actions of two related pituitary hormones, prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH), on age-associated modifications of metaphase-II (M-II) chromosomes in bovine oocytes using a model of the prolonged culture. We analyzed: (1) effects of PRL and GH on abnormal changes in the chromosome morphology in aging matured oocytes and the role of cumulus cells in these effects and (2) signaling pathways involved in the hormone actions. During the prolonged culture of oocytes, a gradual rise in the frequency of destructive modifications of M-II chromosomes was revealed. In the case of cumulus-enclosed oocytes (CEOs), PRL and GH exerted dose-dependent biphasic effects on the frequency of these modifications. Both PRL (50 ng/ml) and GH (10 ng/ml) decelerated the abnormal chromosome changes in CEOs, but did not affect the chromosome configuration in denuded oocytes. Concurrently, the presence of PRL and GH receptors in cumulus cells surrounding matured oocytes was demonstrated. Attenuating effects of both hormones on the chromosome modifications in aging CEOs were abolished by PP2 (an inhibitor of Src-family tyrosine kinases), triciribine (an inhibitor of Akt kinase), and calphostin C (a protein kinase C inhibitor). Our findings indicate that PRL and GH can exert the similar decelerating action on age-associated alterations in the M-II chromosome morphology in bovine ova, which is mediated by cumulus cells and may be related to activation of Src-family tyrosine kinases as well as Akt- and protein kinase C-dependent signal

  3. Daily differential expression of melatonin-related genes and clock genes in rat cumulus-oocyte complex: changes after pinealectomy.

    PubMed

    Coelho, L A; Peres, R; Amaral, F G; Reiter, R J; Cipolla-Neto, J

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the maturational stage (immature and mature ovaries) differences of mRNA expression of melatonin-forming enzymes (Aanat and Asmt), melatonin membrane receptors (Mt1 and Mt2) and putative nuclear (Rorα) receptors, and clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2) in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) from weaning Wistar rats. We also examined the effects of pinealectomy and of melatonin pharmacological replacement on the daily expression of these genes in COC. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that in oocytes, the mRNA expression of Asmt, Mt2, Clock, Bmal1, Per2, and Cry1 were higher (P < 0.05) in immature ovaries than in the mature ones. In cumulus cells, the same pattern of mRNA expression for Asmt, Aanat, Rorα, Clock, Per1, Cry1, and Cry2 genes was observed. In oocytes, pinealectomy altered the daily mRNA expression profiles of Asmt, Mt1, Mt2, Clock, Per1, Cry1, and Cry2 genes. In cumulus cells, removal of the pineal altered the mRNA expression profiles of Mt1, Mt2, Rorα, Aanat, Asmt, Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Cry2 genes. Melatonin treatment partially or completely re-established the daily mRNA expression profiles of most genes studied. The mRNA expression of melatonin-related genes and clock genes in rat COC varies with the maturational stage of the meiotic cellular cycle in addition to the hour of the day. This suggests that melatonin might act differentially in accordance with the maturational stage of cumulus/oocyte complex. In addition, it seems that circulating pineal melatonin is very important in the design of the daily profile of mRNA expression of COC clock genes and genes related to melatonin synthesis and action.

  4. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  5. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 and fibroblast growth factor 10 enhance cumulus expansion, glucose uptake, and expression of genes in the ovulatory cascade during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Caixeta, Ester S; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Gilchrist, Robert B; Thompson, Jeremy G; Price, Christopher A; Machado, Mariana F; Lima, Paula F; Buratini, José

    2013-07-01

    Oocyte-secreted factors (OSFs) regulate differentiation of cumulus cells and are of pivotal relevance for fertility. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) are OSFs and enhance oocyte competence by unknown mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that BMP15 and FGF10, alone or combined in the maturation medium, enhance cumulus expansion and expression of genes in the preovulatory cascade and regulate glucose metabolism favouring hyaluronic acid production in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). BMP15 or FGF10 increased the percentage of fully expanded COCs, but the combination did not further stimulate it. BMP15 increased cumulus cell levels of mRNA encoding a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10), ADAM17, amphiregulin (AREG), and epiregulin (EREG) at 12 h of culture and of prostaglandin (PG)-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), pentraxin 3 (PTX3) and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6 (TNFAIP6 (TSG6)) at 22 h of culture. FGF10 did not alter the expression of epidermal growth factor-like factors but enhanced the mRNA expression of PTGS2 at 4 h, PTX3 at 12 h, and TNFAIP6 at 22 h. FGF10 and BMP15 stimulated glucose consumption by cumulus cells but did not affect lactate production or levels of mRNA encoding glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase and lactate dehydrogenase A. Each growth factor increased mRNA encoding glucosamine:fructose-6-PO4 transaminases, key enzymes in the hexosamine pathway leading to hyaluronic acid production, and BMP15 also stimulated hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) mRNA expression. This study provides evidence that BMP15 and FGF10 stimulate expansion of in vitro-matured bovine COCs by driving glucose metabolism toward hyaluronic acid production and controlling the expression of genes in the ovulatory cascade, the first acting upon ADAM10, ADAM17, AREG, and EREG and the second on downstream genes, particularly PTGS2.

  6. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  7. Practical Algorithm For Computing The 2-D Arithmetic Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Choi, Y. Y.; Yu, Xiaoli

    1989-05-01

    Recently, Tufts and Sadasiv [10] exposed a method for computing the coefficients of a Fourier series of a periodic function using the Mobius inversion of series. They called this method of analysis the Arithmetic Fourier Transform(AFT). The advantage of the AFT over the FN 1' is that this method of Fourier analysis needs only addition operations except for multiplications by scale factors at one stage of the computation. The disadvantage of the AFT as they expressed it originally is that it could be used effectively only to compute finite Fourier coefficients of a real even function. To remedy this the AFT developed in [10] is extended in [11] to compute the Fourier coefficients of both the even and odd components of a periodic function. In this paper, the improved AFT [11] is extended to a two-dimensional(2-D) Arithmetic Fourier Transform for calculating the Fourier Transform of two-dimensional discrete signals. This new algorithm is based on both the number-theoretic method of Mobius inversion of double series and the complex conjugate property of Fourier coefficients. The advantage of this algorithm over the conventional 2-D FFT is that the corner-turning problem needed in a conventional 2-D Discrete Fourier Transform(DFT) can be avoided. Therefore, this new 2-D algorithm is readily suitable for VLSI implementation as a parallel architecture. Comparing the operations of 2-D AFT of a MxM 2-D data array with the conventional 2-D FFT, the number of multiplications is significantly reduced from (2log2M)M2 to (9/4)M2. Hence, this new algorithm is faster than the FFT algorithm. Finally, two simulation results of this new 2-D AFT algorithm for 2-D artificial and real images are given in this paper.

  8. Using microsoft excel applications in the graduate intern program at Goddard Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, Lisa

    1992-01-01

    An outline of the Project Operations Branch at Goddard Space Flight Center is presented that describes the management of the division and each subgroup's responsibility. The paper further describes the development of software tools for the Macintosh personal computer, and their impending implementation. A detailed step by step procedure is given for using these software tools.

  9. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  10. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  11. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  12. Long-term Statistics of Continental Cumuli: Does Aerosol Trigger Cumulus Variability?

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Turner, David D.

    2009-02-01

    Atmospheric aerosols may control the formation, maintenance, and dissipation of cumuli by changing their microphysics. Recent observational and modeling results exist both in support and against strong potential impacts of aerosol [1-3]. Typically, the aerosol impact on water clouds has been investigated for regions with high aerosol loading and/or large atmospheric moisture [4]. Can we provide observational evidence of the aerosol-cloud relationship for a relatively dry continental region with low/moderate aerosol burden? To address this question, we revisit the aerosol-cloud relationship at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. In comparison with highly polluted regions, the SGP site is characterized by relatively small-to-moderate aerosol loading. Also, moisture content is small-to-moderate (compared to marine and coastal regions) for the SGP site. Because cumulus clouds have important impacts on climate forcing estimations [5] and are susceptible to aerosol effects [6], we focus on fair-weather cumuli (FWC) and their association with aerosol concentration and other potentially important factors. This association is investigated using a new 8-year aerosol and cloud climatology (2000-2007) developed with collocated and coincident surface and satellite observations.

  13. On the sensitivity of droplet size relative dispersion to warm cumulus cloud evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, E.; Koren, I.; Altaratz, O.

    2012-07-01

    Relative dispersion (ɛ), defined as the ratio between cloud droplet size distribution width (σ) and cloud droplet average radius (), is a key factor used to parameterize various cloud processes in global circulation models (GCMs) and bulk microphysical scheme models (BSMs). Recent studies indicate that the impact of aerosol loading (N) and atmospheric thermodynamic conditions on ɛ are far from fully understood. Currently, a fixed value per hydrometeor type is used in most BSMs and GCMs, which imposes significant limitations on our ability to model and predict cloud processes and their impact on the environment, on regional to global scales. In this study, we use a detailed bin microphysics single cloud model to investigate the combined impact of atmospheric thermodynamic conditions and N on ɛ, in warm cumulus clouds. As initial conditions, we used different lapse-rates combined with 8 scenarios of aerosol loading, representing very clean (N = 25 cm-3) to heavily polluted (N = 1600 cm-3) conditions. Moreover, the results are analyzed per cloud evolutionary stage according to the dominance of microphysical processes. The use of this method indicated a different pattern of ɛ at each stage. Specifically, during the mature stage fitting of ɛ to rv is relatively resilient to changes in the environmental conditions. Such findings suggest a new view of the effect of aerosols on clouds, via changes in the cloud evolution patterns and a new approach to parameterization of ɛ based on rv, which can significantly improve the prediction of cloud processes by GCMs and BSMs.

  14. Lightning Optical Pulse Statistics from Storm Overflights During the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2004-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect time resolved optical pulse data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We divided our data into two amplitude groups based on prior NASA U2 aircraft optical data and our pulse characteristics. The group of large pulses with radiance greater than 2.1 mW /sq m sr had mean and median 10 - 10% optical pulse widths of 765 and 735 microns respectively, the 50-50% pulse widths of 396 and 355 microns respectively, and 10-90% rise times of 290 and 260 microns. These values are very similar to the previous U2 based optical results The other group of pulses consisting of slightly more than a quarter of the total pulses observed had radiances less than the minimum values detected in the U2 study. The small pulses were narrower than the large pulses with 5040% mean and median values of 198 and 160 ps respectively. Only 12 % of the flashes contained only small pulses, minimizing the impact of this data on the estimates of detection efficiencies of the orbital instruments, the Lightning Imaging Sensor and Optical Transient Detector.

  15. Quantifying the transport of subcloud layer reactants by shallow cumulus clouds over the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouwersloot, H. G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; van Stratum, B. J. H.; Krol, M. C.; Lelieveld, J.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the vertical transport of atmospheric chemical reactants from the subcloud layer to the cumulus cloud layer driven by shallow convection over the Amazon during the dry season. The dynamical and chemical assumptions needed for mesoscale and global chemistry transport model parametrizations are systematically analyzed using a Large Eddy Simulation model. We quantify the mass flux transport contribution to the temporal evolution of reactants. Isoprene, a key atmospheric compound over the tropical rain forest, decreases by 8.5% h-1 on average and 15% h-1 at maximum due to mass‒flux‒induced removal. We apply mass flux parametrizations for the transport of chemical reactants and obtain satisfactory agreement with numerically resolved transport, except for some reactants like O3, NO, and NO2. The latter is caused by the local partitioning of reactants, influenced by UV radiation extinction by clouds and small‒scale variability of ambient atmospheric compounds. By considering the longer‒lived NOx (NO + NO2), the transport is well represented by the parametrization. Finally, by considering heterogeneous surface exchange conditions, it is demonstrated that the parametrizations are sensitive to boundary conditions due to changes in the boundary layer dynamics.

  16. From large-eddy simulation to multi-UAVs sampling of shallow cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamraoui, Fayçal; Roberts, Greg; Burnet, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    In-situ sampling of clouds that can provide simultaneous measurements at satisfying spatio-temporal resolutions to capture 3D small scale physical processes continues to present challenges. This project (SKYSCANNER) aims at bringing together cloud sampling strategies using a swarm of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) based on Large-eddy simulation (LES). The multi-UAV-based field campaigns with a personalized sampling strategy for individual clouds and cloud fields will significantly improve the understanding of the unresolved cloud physical processes. An extensive set of LES experiments for case studies from ARM-SGP site have been performed using MesoNH model at high resolutions down to 10 m. The carried out simulations led to establishing a macroscopic model that quantifies the interrelationship between micro- and macrophysical properties of shallow convective clouds. Both the geometry and evolution of individual clouds are critical to multi-UAV cloud sampling and path planning. The preliminary findings of the current project reveal several linear relationships that associate many cloud geometric parameters to cloud related meteorological variables. In addition, the horizontal wind speed indicates a proportional impact on cloud number concentration as well as triggering and prolonging the occurrence of cumulus clouds. In the framework of the joint collaboration that involves a Multidisciplinary Team (including institutes specializing in aviation, robotics and atmospheric science), this model will be a reference point for multi-UAVs sampling strategies and path planning.

  17. A model of the effect of cumulus clouds on the redistribution and transformation of pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. R.; Niewiadomski, M.; Iribarne, J. V.; Melo, O.

    1989-01-01

    A one-dimensional time-dependent cumulus model was developed to study the effects of convective clouds on air pollutants. The model contains two drafts, core and periphery, surrounded by a stagnant environment. There are exchanges between the two drafts and between cloud and environment, both by dynamic entrainment/detrainment and by turbulence. Application to a "base case" with given initial conditions and producing a cloud 7 km thick is analyzed. Microphysical exchanges involved mainly cloud water, rain, and graupel. The warm rain mechanism seems to dominate, including a frozen drop stage. At lower temperatures the ice mechanism is also effective. Only a minor fraction of the SO2 entering the cloud becomes oxidized and is partly rained out to the ground as sulfate. Although H2O2 is the main and faster oxidant, O3 also contributes in a rather large proportion. Oxidation of NOx with subsequent dissolution of the acids is negligible, unless the OH radical concentration in the air is very high. Production and deposition of acidity depends on SO2 concentration in a very nonlinear way, but approximately linearly on H2O2 concentration. The acidity concentration of precipitation varies substantially under different regions of the cloud. Consideration of solutes in solid phase is shown to appreciably influence the results. The model was also applied to small, 2-km-thick cumuli, and the results compared with those of a three-dimensional model and with observations, with reasonable agreement.

  18. Aging of recipient oocytes reduces the development of cloned embryos receiving cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohui; Kato, Yoko; Tsunoda, Yukio

    2007-08-01

    Parthenogenetic activation is an important factor in successful production of cloned mammals. Because it has been reported that aged oocytes are more sensitive to parthenogenetic activation than young oocytes, the present study examined the effects of oocyte aging on the in vitro and in vivo developmental potential of nuclear-transferred (NT) mouse oocytes receiving cumulus cells. The potentials of young NT oocytes (14 h after human chorionic gonadotrophin [hCG] injection) to develop into blastocysts was, however, significantly higher than that of aged oocytes (20 h after hCG injection; 16% vs 6%). When the nuclei of NT oocytes at the 2-cell stage were fused with enucleated fertilized 2-cell embryos, the potentials of the serial NT embryos to develop into blastocysts were no different for both young and aged oocytes (74% vs 74%). Live young, however, were obtained only after transfer of serial NT blastocysts developed from young NT oocytes (2%). In contrast to a report using embryonic nuclei as the nuclear donors, the results of the present study indicate that young oocytes are superior to aged oocytes as a source of recipient cytoplasm for mouse somatic cell cloning. PMID:17389775

  19. Integrated cumulus ensemble and turbulence (ICET): An integrated parameterization system for general circulation models (GCMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.L.; Frank, W.M.; Young, G.S.

    1996-04-01

    Successful simulations of the global circulation and climate require accurate representation of the properties of shallow and deep convective clouds, stable-layer clouds, and the interactions between various cloud types, the boundary layer, and the radiative fluxes. Each of these phenomena play an important role in the global energy balance, and each must be parameterized in a global climate model. These processes are highly interactive. One major problem limiting the accuracy of parameterizations of clouds and other processes in general circulation models (GCMs) is that most of the parameterization packages are not linked with a common physical basis. Further, these schemes have not, in general, been rigorously verified against observations adequate to the task of resolving subgrid-scale effects. To address these problems, we are designing a new Integrated Cumulus Ensemble and Turbulence (ICET) parameterization scheme, installing it in a climate model (CCM2), and evaluating the performance of the new scheme using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites.

  20. Airborne observations of electric fields around growing and decaying cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, K. L.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne electric field data were gathered in an atmospheric electrification study near Cape Canaveral, FL. A Learjet 36A was instrumented with eight electric field meters (mills) and five different particle probes. The local electric field enhancements at each field mill site were determined under lab conditions and verified using in-flight data. The overdetermined system of eight equations (one for each field mill) was solved using a weighted least squares algorithm to compute the magnitude and direction of the ambient electric field. The signal processing system allowed the measured data to be expressed in terms of earth coordinates, regardless of the attitude of the aircraft. Thus, it was possible to take maximum advantage of the Learjet's speed and maneuverability in studying the electric field structure in the vicinity of the clouds. Data gathered while circling just outside the boundary of a growing cumulus cloud show a nonsymmetric pattern of electric field strength. Field intensity grew rapidly over a period of less than 10 minutes. The observed direction of the ambient electric field vector can be explained by an ascending motion of the charge centers of a classic tripole model of a thunderstorm.

  1. Transcriptomic Analysis and Meta-Analysis of Human Granulosa and Cumulus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burnik Papler, Tanja; Vrtacnik Bokal, Eda; Maver, Ales; Kopitar, Andreja Natasa; Lovrečić, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Specific gene expression in oocytes and its surrounding cumulus (CC) and granulosa (GC) cells is needed for successful folliculogenesis and oocyte maturation. The aim of the present study was to compare genome-wide gene expression and biological functions of human GC and CC. Individual GC and CC were derived from 37 women undergoing IVF procedures. Gene expression analysis was performed using microarrays, followed by a meta-analysis. Results were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. There were 6029 differentially expressed genes (q < 10−4); of which 650 genes had a log2 FC ≥ 2. After the meta-analysis there were 3156 genes differentially expressed. Among these there were genes that have previously not been reported in human somatic follicular cells, like prokineticin 2 (PROK2), higher expressed in GC, and pregnancy up-regulated nonubiquitous CaM kinase (PNCK), higher expressed in CC. Pathways like inflammatory response and angiogenesis were enriched in GC, whereas in CC, cell differentiation and multicellular organismal development were among enriched pathways. In conclusion, transcriptomes of GC and CC as well as biological functions, are distinctive for each cell subpopulation. By describing novel genes like PROK2 and PNCK, expressed in GC and CC, we upgraded the existing data on human follicular biology. PMID:26313571

  2. Stratocumulus to Cumulus Transition Capped by a Light-Absorbing Smoke Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Feingold, G.; Kazil, J.; McComiskey, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning aerosol emitted from Africa seasonally advects over the eastern Atlantic and forms a layer of light-absorbing smoke above stratocumulus clouds, which influences heating profiles, dynamics, and cloud microphysics. In this study, large-eddy simulation is used to investigate the effect of the absorbing smoke layer on the stratocumulus to cumulus transition (SCT). A prognostic absorbing smoke model incorporates humidity effects on optical properties, and is coupled with a two-moment bulk microphysics scheme and an interactive radiation code. Smoke both absorbs shortwave radiation and acts as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Simulations are of three day duration. The simulations assess sensitivity of the SCT to distance of the smoke layer from the cloud top, aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo, and precipitation. Our simulations show that 1) As a shortwave absorber, the smoke stabilizes the free atmosphere and strengthens the temperature jump at the boundary layer top, which limits entrainment; 2) Smoke helps evaporate cloud during daytime, which amplifies the diurnal cycle of cloud cover; 3) As a source of CCN, the entrained smoke suppresses rain formation, which inhibits precipitation-generated cloud breakup. The net effect of smoke is modification of heating profiles to limit the deepening of the planetary boundary layer, and suppression of precipitation. This leads to enhancement of the diurnal cycle of cloudiness but a delay in the SCT.

  3. Growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins in interactions of cumulus-oocyte complex, spermatozoa and oviduct.

    PubMed

    Einspanier, R; Gabler, C; Bieser, B; Einspanier, A; Berisha, B; Kosmann, M; Wollenhaupt, K; Schams, D

    1999-01-01

    The expression and localization of selected growth factor systems and extracellular matrix (ECM) components that may influence oocyte maturation and fertilization within the mammalian oviduct are reported. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) systems could be detected by use of RT-PCR, RNase protection assay (RPA) and immunohistochemistry in bovine follicles, bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) and bovine and marmoset oviducts. Two different subtypes of the FGF receptor (FGFR-1 and -2) were identified in distinct cell types, indicating a functional difference. A complete epidermal growth factor (EGF) system was found in the porcine, but not in the bovine, oviduct. There were additional differences between bovine and primate oviducts: FGF-1/2 and FGFR were increased in the marmoset around ovulation, in contrast to an increase in FGF-1 in the cow. Immunohistochemistry revealed accumulation and storage of FGF and VEGF on the surface of the epithelium, possibly due to their binding property on heparanglycoproteins. Other ECM components, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), were found to be modulated in the ovarian follicle, COC and oviduct during the cycle. An oviduct-mediated depletion of sperm surface proteins (BSP1-3) was discovered as well as a sperm-induced novel oviductal mRNA related to an anti-oxidant protein family. Associated systems of growth factors and ECM components can be suggested as paracrine or autocrine mediators during fertilization in a species-, cycle- and tissue-dependent manner.

  4. Higher SOD1 Gene Expression in Cumulus Cells From Infertile Women With Moderate and Severe Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Donabela, Flávia Cappello; Meola, Juliana; Padovan, Cristiana Carolina; de Paz, Cláudia Cristina Paro; Navarro, Paula Andrea

    2015-11-01

    It is questioned whether worsening of oocyte quality and oxidative stress (OS) are involved in the pathogenesis of infertility related to endometriosis and in compromised intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes. Cumulus cells (CCs) protect oocytes from entering apoptosis induced by OS. Thus, we carried out a case-control study comparing expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), and glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4; genes encoding for the main antioxidant enzymes) in CCs from mature oocytes of 26 infertile patients with minimal/mild endometriosis, 14 patients with moderate/severe endometriosis, and 41 controls undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for ICSI, using real-time polymerase chain reaction. As a secondary objective, we investigated the interaction between the expression of these genes and clinical pregnancy (CP) by a statistical model. Only infertile women with moderate/severe endometriosis showed increased expression of the SOD1 in CCs compared to women with minimal/mild endometriosis and controls, with a positive interaction between increased expression and the occurrence of CP, suggesting that SOD1 might be a potential biomarker of CP following ICSI.

  5. Comparative gene expression profiling in human cumulus cells according to ovarian gonadotropin treatments.

    PubMed

    Assou, Said; Haouzi, Delphine; Dechaud, Hervé; Gala, Anna; Ferrières, Alice; Hamamah, Samir

    2013-01-01

    In in vitro fertilization cycles, both HP-hMG and rFSH gonadotropin treatments are widely used to control human follicle development. The objectives of this study are (i) to characterize and compare gene expression profiles in cumulus cells (CCs) of periovulatory follicles obtained from patients stimulated with HP-hMG or rFSH in a GnRH antagonist cycle and (ii) to examine their relationship with in vitro embryo development, using Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Genes that were upregulated in HP-hMG-treated CCs are involved in lipid metabolism (GM2A) and cell-to-cell interactions (GJA5). Conversely, genes upregulated in rFSH-treated CCs are implicated in cell assembly and organization (COL1A1 and COL3A1). Interestingly, some genes specific to each gonadotropin treatment (NPY1R and GM2A for HP-hMG; GREM1 and OSBPL6 for rFSH) were associated with day 3 embryo quality and blastocyst grade at day 5, while others (STC2 and PTX3) were related to in vitro embryo quality in both gonadotropin treatments. These genes may prove valuable as biomarkers of in vitro embryo quality. PMID:24151596

  6. The effect of cumulus cloud field anisotropy on solar radiative fluxes and atmospheric heating rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.

    The effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain average surface fluxes and atmospheric heating profiles was studied. Causes of anisotropy were investigated using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Cloud formation under a variety of environmental conditions was simulated and the degree of anisotropy in the output fields was calculated. Wind shear was found to be the single greatest factor in the development of both vertically tilted and horizontally stretched cloud structures. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of the LES cloud scenes. Progressively greater degrees of tilt and stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes were produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. For nearly all solar geometries, domain-averaged fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles calculated using the Independent Pixel Approximation differed substantially from the corresponding three-dimensional Monte Carlo results.

  7. Optimizing the Betts-Miller-Janjic cumulus parameterization with Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Melin; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.-L.

    2015-10-01

    The schemes of cumulus parameterization are responsible for the sub-grid-scale effects of convective and/or shallow clouds, and intended to represent vertical fluxes due to unresolved updrafts and downdrafts and compensating motion outside the clouds. Some schemes additionally provide cloud and precipitation field tendencies in the convective column, and momentum tendencies due to convective transport of momentum. The schemes all provide the convective component of surface rainfall. Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) is one scheme to fulfill such purposes in the weather research and forecast (WRF) model. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) has tried to optimize the BMJ scheme for operational application. As there are no interactions among horizontal grid points, this scheme is very suitable for parallel computation. With the advantage of Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture, efficient parallelization and vectorization essentials, it allows us to optimize the BMJ scheme. If compared to the original code respectively running on one CPU socket (eight cores) and on one CPU core with Intel Xeon E5-2670, the MIC-based optimization of this scheme running on Xeon Phi coprocessor 7120P improves the performance by 2.4x and 17.0x, respectively.

  8. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  9. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  10. 2D hexagonal quaternion Fourier transform in color image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel concept of the quaternion discrete Fourier transform on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, which we call the two-dimensional hexagonal quaternion discrete Fourier transform (2-D HQDFT). The concept of the right-side 2D HQDFT is described and the left-side 2-D HQDFT is similarly considered. To calculate the transform, the image on the hexagonal lattice is described in the tensor representation when the image is presented by a set of 1-D signals, or splitting-signals which can be separately processed in the frequency domain. The 2-D HQDFT can be calculated by a set of 1-D quaternion discrete Fourier transforms (QDFT) of the splitting-signals.

  11. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  12. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  13. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices. PMID:26839956

  14. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  15. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  16. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  17. Anisotropic 2D Materials for Tunable Hyperbolic Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Nemilentsau, Andrei; Low, Tony; Hanson, George

    2016-02-12

    Motivated by the recent emergence of a new class of anisotropic 2D materials, we examine their electromagnetic modes and demonstrate that a broad class of the materials can host highly directional hyperbolic plasmons. Their propagation direction can be manipulated on the spot by gate doping, enabling hyperbolic beam reflection, refraction, and bending. The realization of these natural 2D hyperbolic media opens up a new avenue in dynamic control of hyperbolic plasmons not possible in the 3D version.

  18. A simultaneous 2D/3D autostereo workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Dennis; McGinnis, Bradley; Talandis, Jonas; Leigh, Jason; Peterka, Tom; Knoll, Aaron; Sumer, Aslihan; Papka, Michael; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel immersive workstation environment that scientists can use for 3D data exploration and as their everyday 2D computer monitor. Our implementation is based on an autostereoscopic dynamic parallax barrier 2D/3D display, interactive input devices, and a software infrastructure that allows client/server software modules to couple the workstation to scientists' visualization applications. This paper describes the hardware construction and calibration, software components, and a demonstration of our system in nanoscale materials science exploration.

  19. QUENCH2D. Two-Dimensional IHCP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, A.; Beck, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    QUENCH2D* is developed for the solution of general, non-linear, two-dimensional inverse heat transfer problems. This program provides estimates for the surface heat flux distribution and/or heat transfer coefficient as a function of time and space by using transient temperature measurements at appropriate interior points inside the quenched body. Two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric geometries such as turnbine disks and blades, clutch packs, and many other problems can be analyzed using QUENCH2D*.

  20. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  1. Goddard DEVELOP Students: Using NASA Remote Sensing Technology to Study the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The DEVELOP National Program is an Earth Science research internship, operating under NASA s Applied Sciences Program. Each spring, summer, and fall, DEVELOP interns form teams to investigate Earth Science related issues. Since the Fall of 2003, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been home to one of 10 national DEVELOP teams. In past terms, students completed a variety of projects related to the Applied Sciences Applications of National Priority, such as Public Health, Natural Disasters, Water Resources, and Ecological Forecasting. These projects have focused on areas all over the world, including the United States, Africa, and Asia. Recently, Goddard DEVELOP students have turned their attention to a local environment, the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Chesapeake Bay Watershed is a complex and diverse ecosystem, spanning approximately 64,000 square miles. The watershed encompasses parts of six states: Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, as well as the District of Columbia. The Bay itself is the biggest estuary in the United States, with over 100,000 tributaries feeding into it. The ratio of fresh water to salt water varies throughout the Bay, allowing for a variety of habitats. The Bay s wetlands, marshes, forests, reefs, and rivers support more than 3,600 plant and animal species, including birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and crabs. The Bay is also commercially significant. It is ranked third in the nation in fishery catch, and supplies approximately 500 million pounds of seafood annually. In addition to its abundant flora and fauna, the Chesapeake Bay watershed is home to approximately 16.6 million people, who live and work throughout the watershed, and who use its diverse resources for recreational purposes. Over the past several decades, the population throughout the watershed has increased rapidly, resulting in land use changes, and ultimately decreasing the health of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Over the

  2. Effects of Cloud on Goddard Lidar Observatory for Wind (GLOW) Performance and Analysis of Associated Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacha, Tulu

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Wind (GLOW), a mobile direct detection Doppler LIDAR based on molecular backscattering for measurement of wind in the troposphere and lower stratosphere region of atmosphere is operated and its errors characterized. It was operated at Howard University Beltsville Center for Climate Observation System (BCCOS) side by side with other operating instruments: the NASA/Langely Research Center Validation Lidar (VALIDAR), Leosphere WLS70, and other standard wind sensing instruments. The performance of Goddard Lidar Observatory for Wind (GLOW) is presented for various optical thicknesses of cloud conditions. It was also compared to VALIDAR under various conditions. These conditions include clear and cloudy sky regions. The performance degradation due to the presence of cirrus clouds is quantified by comparing the wind speed error to cloud thickness. The cloud thickness is quantified in terms of aerosol backscatter ratio (ASR) and cloud optical depth (COD). ASR and COD are determined from Howard University Raman Lidar (HURL) operating at the same station as GLOW. The wind speed error of GLOW was correlated with COD and aerosol backscatter ratio (ASR) which are determined from HURL data. The correlation related in a weak linear relationship. Finally, the wind speed measurements of GLOW were corrected using the quantitative relation from the correlation relations. Using ASR reduced the GLOW wind error from 19% to 8% in a thin cirrus cloud and from 58% to 28% in a relatively thick cloud. After correcting for cloud induced error, the remaining error is due to shot noise and atmospheric variability. Shot-noise error is the statistical random error of backscattered photons detected by photon multiplier tube (PMT) can only be minimized by averaging large number of data recorded. The atmospheric backscatter measured by GLOW along its line-of-sight direction is also used to analyze error due to atmospheric variability within the volume of measurement

  3. Activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase blocks cumulus cell expansion through inhibition of protein synthesis during in vitro maturation in Swine.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Sasseville, Maxime; Laforest, Martin; Guillemette, Christine; Gilchrist, Robert B; Richard, François J

    2014-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric protein known as a metabolic switch, is involved in oocyte nuclear maturation in mice, cattle, and swine. The present study analyzed AMPK activation in cumulus cell expansion during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) is a well-known activator of AMPK. It inhibited oocyte meiotic resumption in COC. Moreover, cumulus cell expansion did not occur in the presence of AICAR, demonstrating its marked impact on cumulus cells. Activation of AMPK was supported by AICAR-mediated phosphorylation of alpha AMPK subunits. Furthermore, the presence of AICAR increased glucose uptake, a classical response to activation of this metabolic switch in response to depleted cellular energy levels. Neither nuclear maturation nor cumulus expansion was reversed by glucosamine, an alternative substrate in hyaluronic acid synthesis, through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which ruled out possible depletion of substrates. Both increased gap junction communication and phosphodiesterase activity in COC are dependent on protein synthesis during the initial hours of IVM; however, both were inhibited in the presence of AICAR, which supports the finding that activation of AMPK by AICAR mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, this protein synthesis inhibition was equivalent to that of the well-known protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, as observed on cumulus expansion and protein concentration. Finally, the phosphorylation level of selected kinases was investigated. The pattern of raptor phosphorylation is supportive of activation of AMPK-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. In conclusion, AICAR-mediated AMPK activation in porcine COC inhibited cumulus cell expansion and protein synthesis. These results bring new considerations to the importance of this kinase in ovarian

  4. Fibroblast growth factor 17 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 enhance cumulus expansion and improve quality of in vitro-produced embryos in cattle.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mariana Fernandes; Caixeta, Ester Siqueira; Sudiman, Jaqueline; Gilchrist, Robert B; Thompson, Jeremy G; Lima, Paula Fernanda; Price, Christopher A; Buratini, José

    2015-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family are expressed by the oocyte and are involved in the control of cumulus cell function. We tested the hypothesis that FGF17, alone or combined with BMP15 in the maturation medium, enhances cumulus expansion, meiosis progression, embryonic development, and expression of mRNA encoding key genes regulating expansion (prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 [PTGS2], hyaluronan synthase 2 [HAS2], tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6 [TNFAIP6], and pentraxin 3 [PTX3]) and markers of oocyte developmental competence (phosphofructokinase [PFKP], gremlin [GREM1], versican [VCAN], and the genomic progesterone receptor [nPR]) in cumulus cells. Fibroblast growth factor 17 and BMP15 increased the percentage of fully expanded cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), but there was no additive effect when both were combined. Neither FGF17 nor BMP15 altered the percentage of oocytes reaching meiosis II at the end of COC culture or cleavage and blastocyst rates after IVF. However, embryo quality, as assessed by the number of cells in the inner cell mass, was improved by the combination of FGF17 with BMP15. Fibroblast growth factor 17 alone did not alter gene expression in cumulus cells at the end of IVM, whereas BMP15 increased PTGS2 and PTX3 mRNA levels. The combination of FGF17 and BMP15 increased nPR mRNA abundance in cumulus cells but did not change the expression of other markers of developmental competence. This study provides novel evidence that FGF17 enhances cumulus expansion in bovine COCs submitted to IVM and that the supplementation of the IVM medium with FGF17 and BMP15 may improve embryo quality.

  5. Use of the 'Precessions' process for prepolishing and correcting 2D & 2(1/2)D form.

    PubMed

    Walker, David D; Freeman, Richard; Morton, Roger; McCavana, Gerry; Beaucamp, Anthony

    2006-11-27

    The Precessions process polishes complex surfaces from the ground state preserving the ground-in form, and subsequently rectifies measured form errors. Our first paper introduced the technology and focused on the novel tooling. In this paper we describe the unique CNC machine tools and how they operate in polishing and correcting form. Experimental results demonstrate both the '2D' and '2(1/2)D' form-correction modes, as applied to aspheres with rotationally-symmetric target-form.

  6. Regional climate change predictions from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies high resolution GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert G.; Hewitson, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Model simulations of global climate change are seen as an essential component of any program aimed at understanding human impact on the global environment. A major weakness of current general circulation models (GCMs), however, is their inability to predict reliably the regional consequences of a global scale change, and it is these regional scale predictions that are necessary for studies of human/environmental response. This research is directed toward the development of a methodology for the validation of the synoptic scale climatology of GCMs. This is developed with regard to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM Model 2, with the specific objective of using the synoptic circulation form a doubles CO2 simulation to estimate regional climate change over North America, south of Hudson Bay. This progress report is specifically concerned with validating the synoptic climatology of the GISS GCM, and developing the transfer function to derive grid-point temperatures from the synoptic circulation. Principal Components Analysis is used to characterize the primary modes of the spatial and temporal variability in the observed and simulated climate, and the model validation is based on correlations between component loadings, and power spectral analysis of the component scores. The results show that the high resolution GISS model does an excellent job of simulating the synoptic circulation over the U.S., and that grid-point temperatures can be predicted with reasonable accuracy from the circulation patterns.

  7. TRMM Data from the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) DISC DAAC: Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Tropical rainfall affects the lives and economies of a majority of the Earth's population. Tropical rain systems, such as hurricanes, typhoons, and monsoons, are crucial to sustaining the livelihoods of those living in the tropics. Excess rainfall can cause floods and great property and crop damage, whereas too little rainfall can cause drought and crop failure. The latent heat release during the process of precipitation is a major source of energy that drives the atmospheric circulation. This latent heat can intensify weather systems, affecting weather thousands of kilometers away, thus making tropical rainfall an important indicator of atmospheric circulation and short-term climate change. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, provides visible, infrared, and microwave observations of tropical and subtropical rain systems. The satellite observations are complemented by ground radar and rain gauge measurements to validate satellite rain estimation techniques. Goddard Space Flight Center's involvement includes the observatory, four instruments, integration and testing of the observatory, data processing and distribution, and satellite operations. TRMM has a design lifetime of three years. It is currently in its fifth year of operation. Data generated from TRMM and archived at the GES DAAC are useful not only for hydrologists, atmospheric scientists, and climatologists, but also for the health community studying infectious diseases, the ocean research community, and the agricultural community.

  8. An improved gravity model for Mars: Goddard Mars Model-1 (GMM-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Zuber, M. T.; Patel, G. B.; Fricke, S. K.; Lemoine, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    Doppler tracking data of three orbiting spacecraft have been reanalyzed to develop a new gravitational field model for the planet Mars, GMM-1 (Goddard Mars Model-1). This model employs nearly all available data, consisting of approximately 1100 days of S-bank tracking data collected by NASA's Deep Space Network from the Mariner 9, and Viking 1 and Viking 2 spacecraft, in seven different orbits, between 1971 and 1979. GMM-1 is complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 50, which corresponds to a half-wavelength spatial resolution of 200-300 km where the data permit. GMM-1 represents satellite orbits with considerably better accuracy than previous Mars gravity models and shows greater resolution of identifiable geological structures. The notable improvement in GMM-1 over previous models is a consequence of several factors: improved computational capabilities, the use of optimum weighting and least-squares collocation solution techniques which stabilized the behavior of the solution at high degree and order, and the use of longer satellite arcs than employed in previous solutions that were made possible by improved force and measurement models. The inclusion of X-band tracking data from the 379-km altitude, near-polar orbiting Mars Observer spacecraft should provide a significant improvement over GMM-1, particularly at high latitudes where current data poorly resolves the gravitational signature of the planet.

  9. In-flight performance of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph of the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troeltzsch, J.; Ebbets, D.; Garner, H.; Tuffli, A.; Breyer, R.; Kinsey, J.; Peck, C.; Lindler, D.; Feggans, J.

    1991-09-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) has completed Orbital Verification and is well into the Science Verification phase of its mission. The instrument performance has been flawless, and many significant early science observations have been completed. The GHRS digicon detectors are well calibrated including the determination of operating parameters, detector geometry, and noise sensitivity. Tests using calibration lamps and standard UV stars have confirmed the instrument sensitivity and spectral resolving powers of Lambda/Delta-Lambda = 2000, 20,000, and 90,000. The sensitivity has not changed since the 1984 baseline ground based calibration. The GHRS flight software has been thoroughly tested, and is controlling all instrument observing as expected. Basic target acquisition testing and GHRS alignment calibrations have been successfully completed, and targets are routinely being located within 2-3 arcsecs of the initial pointing. Observations have been successfully performed using both the 2.0 x 2.0 arcsec aperture, and the smaller 0.25 x 0.25 arcsec aperture. The extended point spread function caused by the spherical aberration of the HST primary mirror has been well measured, and observing methods to deal with it have been developed. The aberrated image allows approximately 70 percent of the total energy into the large science aperture, and 15 percent of the total energy into the smaller aperture. Numerous science assessment observations of interesting astronomical targets have been completed, and indicate the extreme usefulness of the GHRS to the scientific community.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope: Goddard high resolution spectrograph instrument handbook. Version 2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Ebbets, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) is an ultraviolet spectrometer which has been designed to exploit the imaging and pointing capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope. It will obtain observations of astronomical sources with greater spectral, spatial and temporal resolution than has been possible with previous space-based instruments. Data from the GHRS will be applicable to many types of scientific investigations, including studies of the interstellar medium, stellar winds, chromospheres and coronae, the byproducts and endproducts of stellar evolution, planetary atmospheres, comets, and many kinds of extragalactic sources. This handbook is intended to introduce the GHRS to potential users. The main purpose is to provide enough information to explore the feasibility of possible research projects and to plan, propose and execute a set of observations. An overview of the instrument performance, which should allow one to evaluate the suitability of the GHRS to specific projects, and a somewhat more detailed description of the GHRS hardware are given. How observing programs will be carried out, the various operating modes of the instrument, and the specific information about the performance of the instrument needed to plan an observation are discussed.

  11. KDD Services at the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Mack, Robert; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC) processes, stores and distributes earth science data from a variety of remote sensing satellites. End users of the data range from instrument scientists to global change and climate researchers to federal agencies and foreign governments. Many of these users apply data mining techniques to large volumes of data (up to 1 TB) received from the GES DAAC. However, rapid advances in processing power are enabling increases in data processing that are outpacing tape drive performance and network capacity. As a result, the proportion of data that can be distributed to users continues to decrease. As mitigation, we are migrating more data mining and mining preparation activities into the data center in order to reduce the data volume that needs to be distributed and to offer the users a more useful and manageable product. This migration of activities faces a number of technical and human-factor challenges. As data reduction and mining algorithms are normally quite specific to the user's research needs, the user's algorithm must be integrated virtually unchanged into the archive environment. Also, the archive itself is busy with everyday data archive and distribution activities and cannot be dedicated to, or even impacted by, the mining activities. Therefore, we schedule KDD 'campaigns' (similar to reprocessing campaigns), during which we schedule a wholesale retrieval of specific data products, offering users the opportunity to extract information from the data being retrieved during the campaign.

  12. Climate forcings in Goddard Institute for Space Studies SI2000 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Nazarenko, L.; Ruedy, R.; Lacis, A.; Koch, D.; Tegen, I.; Hall, T.; Shindell, D.; Santer, B.; Stone, P.; Novakov, T.; Thomason, L.; Wang, R.; Wang, Y.; Jacob, D.; Hollandsworth, S.; Bishop, L.; Logan, J.; Thompson, A.; Stolarski, R.; Lean, J.; Willson, R.; Levitus, S.; Antonov, J.; Rayner, N.; Parker, D.; Christy, J.

    2002-09-01

    We define the radiative forcings used in climate simulations with the SI2000 version of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) global climate model. These include temporal variations of well-mixed greenhouse gases, stratospheric aerosols, solar irradiance, ozone, stratospheric water vapor, and tropospheric aerosols. Our illustrations focus on the period 1951-2050, but we make the full data sets available for those forcings for which we have earlier data. We illustrate the global response to these forcings for the SI2000 model with specified sea surface temperature and with a simple Q-flux ocean, thus helping to characterize the efficacy of each forcing. The model yields good agreement with observed global temperature change and heat storage in the ocean. This agreement does not yield an improved assessment of climate sensitivity or a confirmation of the net climate forcing because of possible compensations with opposite changes of these quantities. Nevertheless, the results imply that observed global temperature change during the past 50 years is primarily a response to radiative forcings. It is also inferred that the planet is now out of radiation balance by 0.5 to 1 W/m2 and that additional global warming of about 0.5°C is already ``in the pipeline.''

  13. The City University of New York and NASA Goddard Space Fight Center Heliophysics Education Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. P.; Marchese, P.; Ng, C.; Austin, S. A.; Frost, J.; Cheung, T. K.; Tremberger, G.; Robbins, I.; Paglione, T.; Damas, C.; Steiner, J. C.; Rudolph, E.

    2010-12-01

    The City University of New York and NASA Goddard Space Fight Center Heliophysics Education Consortium provides undergraduate student research, curriculum enhancement and academic program development, and professional development for faculty in order to support two of NASA’s Heliophysics Science objectives: a) understand the physical processes of the space environment from the Sun to Earth; and b) understand how human society, technological systems and the habitability of Earth are affected by solar variability. Research projects include Electron Density: Interaction between the Solar Wind and the Earth’s Ionosphere/Magnetosphere, Microsatellite-based Monitoring of Ion Density in the Ionosphere, D-Layer Ionosphere & EM pulses from Sun, Solar Weather and Tropical Cyclone Activity, Ratio Plot Analysis of Jupiter’s Stratosphere and Building of VLF Antenna Systems and Monitoring Solar Activity using the Stanford University Solar Weather monitor known as “Super-SID”. Faculty development began with a workshop at the Space Weather Action Center (SWAC) at GSFC. The project is supported by NASA award NNX10AE72G.

  14. The volcanic signal in Goddard Institute for Space Studies three-dimensional model simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Robock, A.; Liu, Y. )

    1994-01-01

    Transient calculations of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model for the climatic signal of volcanic eruptions are analyzed. By compositing the output for two different volcanoes for scenario A and five different volcanos for scenario B, the natural variability is suppressed and the volcanic signals are extracted. Significant global means surface air temperature cooling and precipitation reduction are found for several years following the eruptions, with larger changes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) than in the Southern Hemisphere. The global-average temperature response lasts for more than four years, but the precipitation response disappears after three years. The largest cooling in the model occurs in the NH summer of the year after spring eruptions. Significant zonal-average temperature reductions begin in the tropics immediately after the eruptions and extend to 45[degrees]S-45[degrees]N in the year after the eruptions. In the second year, cooling is still seen from 30[degrees]S to 30[degrees]N. Because of the low variability in this model as compared to the real world, these signals may appear more significant here than they would be attempting to isolate them using real data. The results suggest that volcanoes can enhance the drought in the Sahel. No evidence was found that stratospheric aerosols from the low-latitude volcanic eruptions can trigger ENSO events in this model.

  15. A Linearized Prognostic Cloud Scheme in NASAs Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Errico, Ronald M.; Gelaro, Ronald; Kim, Jong G.; Mahajan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    A linearized prognostic cloud scheme has been developed to accompany the linearized convection scheme recently implemented in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation tools. The linearization, developed from the nonlinear cloud scheme, treats cloud variables prognostically so they are subject to linearized advection, diffusion, generation, and evaporation. Four linearized cloud variables are modeled, the ice and water phases of clouds generated by large-scale condensation and, separately, by detraining convection. For each species the scheme models their sources, sublimation, evaporation, and autoconversion. Large-scale, anvil and convective species of precipitation are modeled and evaporated. The cloud scheme exhibits linearity and realistic perturbation growth, except around the generation of clouds through large-scale condensation. Discontinuities and steep gradients are widely used here and severe problems occur in the calculation of cloud fraction. For data assimilation applications this poor behavior is controlled by replacing this part of the scheme with a perturbation model. For observation impacts, where efficiency is less of a concern, a filtering is developed that examines the Jacobian. The replacement scheme is only invoked if Jacobian elements or eigenvalues violate a series of tuned constants. The linearized prognostic cloud scheme is tested by comparing the linear and nonlinear perturbation trajectories for 6-, 12-, and 24-h forecast times. The tangent linear model performs well and perturbations of clouds are well captured for the lead times of interest.

  16. ASTEC and MODEL: Controls software development at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, John P.; Bauer, Frank H.; Surber, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    The ASTEC (Analysis and Simulation Tools for Engineering Controls) software is under development at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The design goal is to provide a wide selection of controls analysis tools at the personal computer level, as well as the capability to upload compute-intensive jobs to a mainframe or supercomputer. In the last three years the ASTEC (Analysis and Simulation Tools for Engineering Controls) software has been under development. ASTEC is meant to be an integrated collection of controls analysis tools for use at the desktop level. MODEL (Multi-Optimal Differential Equation Language) is a translator that converts programs written in the MODEL language to FORTRAN. An upgraded version of the MODEL program will be merged into ASTEC. MODEL has not been modified since 1981 and has not kept with changes in computers or user interface techniques. This paper describes the changes made to MODEL in order to make it useful in the 90's and how it relates to ASTEC.

  17. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Acceleration of the Goddard Earth Observing System Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Williama

    2011-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System 5 (GEOS-5) is the atmospheric model used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) for a variety of applications, from long-term climate prediction at relatively coarse resolution, to data assimilation and numerical weather prediction, to very high-resolution cloud-resolving simulations. GEOS-5 is being ported to a graphics processing unit (GPU) cluster at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS). By utilizing GPU co-processor technology, we expect to increase the throughput of GEOS-5 by at least an order of magnitude, and accelerate the process of scientific exploration across all scales of global modeling, including: The large-scale, high-end application of non-hydrostatic, global, cloud-resolving modeling at 10- to I-kilometer (km) global resolutions Intermediate-resolution seasonal climate and weather prediction at 50- to 25-km on small clusters of GPUs Long-range, coarse-resolution climate modeling, enabled on a small box of GPUs for the individual researcher After being ported to the GPU cluster, the primary physics components and the dynamical core of GEOS-5 have demonstrated a potential speedup of 15-40 times over conventional processor cores. Performance improvements of this magnitude reduce the required scalability of 1-km, global, cloud-resolving models from an unfathomable 6 million cores to an attainable 200,000 GPU-enabled cores.

  18. Global climate changes at forecast by Goddard Institute for Space studies three-dimensional model

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.; Fung, I.; Lacis, A.; Rind, D.; Lebedeff, S.; Ruedy, R.; Russell, G.; Stone, P.

    1988-08-20

    We use a three-dimensional climate model, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) model II with 8/sup 0/ by 10/sup 0/ horizontal resolution, to simulate the global climate effects of time-dependent variations at atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Horizontal heat transport by the ocean is fixed at values estimated for today's climate, and the uptake of heat perturbations by the ocean beneath the mixed layer is approximated as vertical diffusion. We make a 100-year control run and perform experiments for three scenarios of atmospheric composition. These experiments begin in 1958 and include measured or estimated changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, N/sub 2/O, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and stratospheric aerosols for the period from 1958 to the present. Scenario A assumes continued exponential trace gas growth, scenario B assumes a reduced linear growth of trace gases, and scenario C assumes a rapid curtailment of trace gas emissions such that the net climate forcing ceases to increase after the year 2000.

  19. Station report on the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 1.2 meter telescope facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Jan F.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Abbott, Arnold; Degnan, John J.; Cheek, Jack W.; Chabot, Richard S.; Grolemund, David A.; Fitzgerald, Jim D.

    1993-01-01

    The 1.2 meter telescope system was built for the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in 1973-74 by the Kollmorgen Corporation as a highly accurate tracking telescope. The telescope is an azimuth-elevation mounted six mirror Coude system. The facility has been used for a wide range of experimentation including helioseismology, two color refractometry, lunar laser ranging, satellite laser ranging, visual tracking of rocket launches, and most recently satellite and aircraft streak camera work. The telescope is a multi-user facility housed in a two story dome with the telescope located on the second floor above the experimenter's area. Up to six experiments can be accommodated at a given time, with actual use of the telescope being determined by the location of the final Coude mirror. The telescope facility is currently one of the primary test sites for the Crustal Dynamics Network's new UNIX based telescope controller software, and is also the site of the joint Crustal Dynamics Project / Photonics Branch two color research into atmospheric refraction.

  20. Dynamic secretion during meiotic reentry integrates the function of the oocyte and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Hakan; Franciosi, Federica; Zamah, A Musa; Cedars, Marcelle I; Conti, Marco

    2016-03-01

    The differentiation of the female gamete into a developmentally competent oocyte relies on the protected environment of the ovarian follicle. The oocyte plays a key role in establishing this microenvironment by releasing paracrine factors that control the functions of surrounding somatic cells. Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) are secreted during follicle growth and play pivotal roles in this local regulation. The current view is that the function of these secreted factors declines in the periovulatory period when the oocyte reenters the meiotic cell cycle. Here, we provide evidence that oocyte reentry into meiosis is instead associated with a shift in the pattern of secretion with a new set of bioactive molecules synthesized before ovulation. Using interleukin 7 (IL7) as a prototypic secreted factor, we show that its secretion is dependent on activation of mRNA translation in synchrony with the cell cycle and that its translation is under the control of somatic cells. IL7 is part of a local feedback loop with the soma because it regulates cumulus cell replication. Similar conclusions are reached when IL7 secretion is measured in human follicular fluid during in vitro fertilization cycles. IL7 concentration in the follicular fluid correlates with the oocyte ability to reach the MII stage of maturation. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a new set of local factors is secreted by the oocyte during ovulation. These dynamic secretions are likely critical for promoting the final stages of maturation and oocyte developmental competence. PMID:26864200

  1. Preliminary Optical And Electric Field Pulse Statistics From Storm Overflights During The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. A.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect high resolution optical pulse and electric field data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses with associated electric field changes. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We found filtered mean and median 10-10% optical pulse widths of 875 and 830 microns respectively while the 50-50% mean and median optical pulse widths are 422 and 365 microns respectively. These values are similar to previous results as are the 10-90% mean and median rise times of 327 and 265 microns. The peak electrical to optical pulse delay mean and median were 209 and 145 microns which is longer than one would expect from theoretical results. The results of the pulse analysis will contribute to further validation of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellites. Pre-launch estimates of the flash detection efficiency were based on a small sample of optical pulse measurements associated with less than 350 lightning discharges collected by NASA U-2 aircraft in the early 1980s. Preliminary analyses of the ACES measurements show that we have greatly increased the number of optical pulses available for validation of the LIS and other orbital lightning optical sensors. Since the Altus was often close to the cloud tops, many of the optical pulses are from low-energy pulses. From these low-energy pulses, we can determine the fraction of optical lightning pulses below the thresholds of LIS, OTD, and any future satellite-based optical sensors such as the geostationary Lightning Mapping Sensor.

  2. Towards an Understanding of Aerosol Redistribution by Shallow Cumulus Clouds with a Focus on Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Murphy, S. M.; Ervens, B.; Chuang, P. Y.; Feingold, G.; Jonsson, H. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2010-12-01

    The extent to which clouds alter the vertical distribution of aerosols and concentrations of various inorganic and organic species has important implications for gas phase chemistry, air quality, and radiative forcing of climate. Models have been shown to inaccurately predict the vertical concentrations of organic aerosol mass and its oxidation state, especially in the free troposphere, where measurements usually exceed predictions of mass and underestimate O:C ratios. This work uses an airborne data set from the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) to address the convective redistribution of aerosols by small cumulus clouds, and also to quantify the contribution of aqueous chemistry to the vertical profiles of inorganic and organic particle species. There is evidence for convective pumping of aerosols in regions above cloud tops, where enhanced particle concentrations are observed in addition to high levels of sulfate and organics. Pre-conditioned areas in clear air that were recently processed by clouds exhibit enhanced levels of sulfate and organic acids as compared to other clear air regions. There is a trend towards enrichment of water-soluble organic aerosols (relative to both total organic and inorganic mass) as a function of both altitude (up to 4 km) and relative humidity. The most plausible explanation is that these species are produced by multi-phase chemistry. Modeling analysis will be presented to constrain the chemical aging processes in clouds and aqueous particles in the summertime southeastern Texas atmosphere. The usefulness of utilizing aerosol tracers for estimating the vertical profile of convective mass flux due to clouds is also explored.

  3. LH-Receptor Gene Expression in Human Granulosa and Cumulus Cells from Antral and Preovulatory Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, Janni Vikkelsø; Kristensen, Stine Gry; Nielsen, Maria Eilsø; Humaidan, Peter; Dal Canto, Maria; Fadini, Rubens; Schmidt, Kirsten T.; Ernst, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Context: Human granulosa cells (GC) acquire LH receptor (LHR) expression during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Currently, the precise follicular stage is unknown, and specific roles of LH in the follicular development are not fully understood. Objective: Our objective was to measure LHR gene expression on GC and cumulus cells (CC) from normal human follicles with diameters form 3–20 mm. Design, Setting, and Patients: At a university hospital, GC, CC, and the corresponding follicular fluid (FF) were collected from patients undergoing fertility preservation by having one ovary frozen and patients undergoing infertility treatment. Interventions: Cells and fluids were isolated from surgically excised ovaries or from aspirated preovulatory follicles. Main Outcome Measures: We evaluated gene expression of LHR, FSHR, androgen receptor (AR), aromatase (CYP19a1), and AMHR2 normalized to the GAPDH expression and associated with FF levels of anti-Mullerian hormone, inhibin-B, and steroids. Results: LHR expression was maximal in GC from preovulatory follicles before ovulation induction. A majority of 150 antral follicles (3–10 mm in diameter) showed LHR expression at approximately 10% of the maximum, and LHR expression showed significant associations with FSHR, AR, CYP19a1, and AMHR2 and with FF estradiol and progesterone. Levels of FSHR continued to decline in GC as the follicular diameter increased. Conclusions: The LHR gene is expressed in GC of human antral follicles throughout the follicular phase and is significantly associated with expression of the CYP19a1 gene and with the corresponding FF concentrations of estradiol and progesterone. LH appears to affect human follicular development during most the follicular phase in normal women. PMID:22659248

  4. The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES): A UAV-Based Science Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Croskey, C. L.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Houser, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Mach, D. M.; Mitchell, J. D.; Stoneburner, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)- based project that investigated thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES was conducted to investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and to validate satellite-based lightning measurements. In addition, as part of the NASA sponsored UAV-based science demonstration program, this project provided a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. ACES employed the Altus II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload included electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES contributed important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) provided cloud-top perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the Altus was flown near, and when possible, over (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time that allowed investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. An innovative real time weather system was used to identify and vector the aircraft to selected thunderstorms and safely fly around these storms, while, at the same time monitor the weather near our base of operations. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations that included radar (Miami and Key West WSRBD, NASA NPOL), satellite imagery, and lightning (NALDN and Los Alamos EDOT) enable the UAV measurements to be more completely

  5. Dynamic secretion during meiotic reentry integrates the function of the oocyte and cumulus cells

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Hakan; Franciosi, Federica; Zamah, A. Musa; Cedars, Marcelle I.; Conti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of the female gamete into a developmentally competent oocyte relies on the protected environment of the ovarian follicle. The oocyte plays a key role in establishing this microenvironment by releasing paracrine factors that control the functions of surrounding somatic cells. Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) are secreted during follicle growth and play pivotal roles in this local regulation. The current view is that the function of these secreted factors declines in the periovulatory period when the oocyte reenters the meiotic cell cycle. Here, we provide evidence that oocyte reentry into meiosis is instead associated with a shift in the pattern of secretion with a new set of bioactive molecules synthesized before ovulation. Using interleukin 7 (IL7) as a prototypic secreted factor, we show that its secretion is dependent on activation of mRNA translation in synchrony with the cell cycle and that its translation is under the control of somatic cells. IL7 is part of a local feedback loop with the soma because it regulates cumulus cell replication. Similar conclusions are reached when IL7 secretion is measured in human follicular fluid during in vitro fertilization cycles. IL7 concentration in the follicular fluid correlates with the oocyte ability to reach the MII stage of maturation. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a new set of local factors is secreted by the oocyte during ovulation. These dynamic secretions are likely critical for promoting the final stages of maturation and oocyte developmental competence. PMID:26864200

  6. Impact of Cumulus Cloud Spacing on Landsat Atmospheric Correction and Aerosol Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Oreopoulos, Lazaros

    2001-01-01

    A Landsat-7 ETM+ image acquired over the Southern Great Plains DoE/ARM site during the ARESE II experiment is used to study the effect of clouds on reflected radiation in clear patches of a cumulus cloud field. The result shows that the apparent path radiance in the clear patches is enhanced by nearby clouds in both band 1 (blue) and band 3 (red) of ETM+. More importantly, the magnitude of the enhancement depends on the mean cloud-free distance in the clear patches. For cloud-free distance less than 0.5 km, the enhancement of apparent path radiance is more than 0.025 and 0.015 (reflectance units) in band 1 and band 3 respectively, which corresponds to an enhancement of apparent aerosol optical thickness of approximately 0.25 and approximately 0.15. Neglecting of the 3-D cloud effect would lead to underestimates of surface reflectance of approximately 0.025 and approximately 0.015 in the blue and red band respectively, if the true aerosol optical thickness is 0.2 and the surface reflectance is 0.05. The enhancement decreases exponentially with mean cloud-free distance, reaching asymptotic values of 0.09 for band 1 and 0.027 for band 3 at a mean cloud-free distance about 2 km. The asymptotic values are slightly larger than the mean path radiances retrieved from a completely clear region -- 0.086 and 0.024 for the blue and red band respectively.

  7. Multi-Scale Interaction between Cumulus Convection and its Environment in the Tropical Indian Ocean during CINDY/DYNAMO as Revealed by High-Resolution Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The activity of cumulus convection in the tropical oceanic regions is strongly regulated by the larger-scale environmental atmosphere, while at the same time cumulus convection influences the larger-scale atmosphere. It is recognized that the spatial and temporal variability of moisture content play an important role in determining such multi-scale interaction processes: the down-scale regulation and up-scale influence. This study investigates the interaction between tropical cumulus convection and its environment in the tropical Indian Ocean during the active and in-active phases of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) by conducting 100-m-mesh numerical simulations intended to sufficiently resolve mixing processes between cumulus clouds and their environments. The cases from the Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2012)/Dynamics of MJO (DYNAMO) are examined. Numerical simulations are conducted with the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the nesting capability to resolve the area of interest at high resolutions. The nested computational domains cover the area of 2500 km by 2250 km, 1200 km by 1000 km, 300 km by 300 km, and 100 km by 60 km at 12.5-km, 2.5-km, 500-m, and 100-m horizontal grid spacing, respectively. The computational domains at the 500-m and 100-m grids are centered at the R/V Mirai observation site. The relationship among the tropospheric moisture variation, the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer, and the development and evolution of cumulus convection is specifically focused. Downscale regulation of environmental conditions on cumulus convection and upscale organization from boundary-layer disturbances to mesoscale convective systems are investigated. The vertical development of cumulus clouds are closely related to the relative humidity of the environment at levels lower than the cloud-top height. It is shown that the development and organization of cumulus

  8. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future.

  9. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  10. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  11. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  12. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  13. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  14. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future. PMID:27506268

  15. Pregnancies established from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) blastocysts derived from in vitro matured, in vitro fertilized oocytes and co-cultured with cumulus and oviductal cells.

    PubMed

    Madan, M L; Chauhan, M S; Singla, S K; Manik, R S

    1994-09-01

    Buffalo ovaries were collected immediately after slaughter and were transported to laboratory in sterile saline at 37 degrees C. Follicular oocytes with the cumulus mass aspirated from 2 to 6 mm in diameter follicles were cultured in TCM-199 medium supplemented with 10% buffalo estrus serum (BES) in 5% CO(2) at 38.5 degrees C. After 20 to 24 h of incubation, the oocytes were inseminated with precapacitated frozen thawed spermatozoa for 6 h. The fertilization rate was 78.15% of the matured oocytes. Over an in vitro culture period of 3 to 9 d, 4.02% of the inseminated oocytes developed to the morula stage when cultured with cumulus cells alone and 17.83% when cumulus cells plus oviductal epithelial cells were used. The percentage of developed blastocysts was very low (0.57%) when the oocytes were co-cultured with cumulus cells from the original oocytes. However, 8% of the inseminated oocytes that were denuded 3 d after insemination developed to the blastocyst stage when they were co-cultured with cumulus and oviductal epithelial cells. Sixteen early/expanded blastocysts were transferred non-surgically to 16 recipients. Four of the 16 recipients became pregnant, of which 2 delivered normal buffalo male calves.

  16. Graphene based 2D-materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniselvam, Thangavelu; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-09-01

    Ever-increasing energy demands and the depletion of fossil fuels are compelling humanity toward the development of suitable electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices to attain a more sustainable society with adequate renewable energy and zero environmental pollution. In this regard, supercapacitors are being contemplated as potential energy storage devices to afford cleaner, environmentally friendly energy. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, including 2D graphene and its inorganic analogues (transition metal double layer hydroxides, chalcogenides, etc), as potential electrodes for the development of supercapacitors with high electrochemical performance. This review provides an overview of the recent progress in using these graphene-based 2D materials as potential electrodes for supercapacitors. In addition, future research trends including notable challenges and opportunities are also discussed.

  17. Perception-based reversible watermarking for 2D vector maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Chaoguang; Cao, Liujuan; Li, Xiang

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an effective and reversible watermarking approach for digital copyright protection of 2D-vector maps. To ensure that the embedded watermark is insensitive for human perception, we only select the noise non-sensitive regions for watermark embedding by estimating vertex density within each polyline. To ensure the exact recovery of original 2D-vector map after watermark extraction, we introduce a new reversible watermarking scheme based on reversible high-frequency wavelet coefficients modification. Within the former-selected non-sensitive regions, our watermarking operates on the lower-order vertex coordinate decimals with integer wavelet transform. Such operation further reduces the visual distortion caused by watermark embedding. We have validated the effectiveness of our scheme on our real-world city river/building 2D-vector maps. We give extensive experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art methods, including embedding capability, invisibility, and robustness over watermark attacking.

  18. Secretory pathways generating immunosuppressive NKG2D ligands

    PubMed Central

    Baragaño Raneros, Aroa; Suarez-Álvarez, Beatriz; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural Killer Group 2 member D (NKG2D) activating receptor, present on the surface of various immune cells, plays an important role in activating the anticancer immune response by their interaction with stress-inducible NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) on transformed cells. However, cancer cells have developed numerous mechanisms to evade the immune system via the downregulation of NKG2DL from the cell surface, including the release of NKG2DL from the cell surface in a soluble form. Here, we review the mechanisms involved in the production of soluble NKG2DL (sNKG2DL) and the potential therapeutic strategies aiming to block the release of these immunosuppressive ligands. Therapeutically enabling the NKG2D-NKG2DL interaction would promote immunorecognition of malignant cells, thus abrogating disease progression. PMID:25050215

  19. 2D bifurcations and Newtonian properties of memristive Chua's circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalek, W.; Podhaisky, H.

    2016-01-01

    Two interesting properties of Chua's circuits are presented. First, two-parameter bifurcation diagrams of Chua's oscillatory circuits with memristors are presented. To obtain various 2D bifurcation images a substantial numerical effort, possibly with parallel computations, is needed. The numerical algorithm is described first and its numerical code for 2D bifurcation image creation is available for free downloading. Several color 2D images and the corresponding 1D greyscale bifurcation diagrams are included. Secondly, Chua's circuits are linked to Newton's law φ ''= F(t,φ,φ')/m with φ=\\text{flux} , constant m > 0, and the force term F(t,φ,φ') containing memory terms. Finally, the jounce scalar equations for Chua's circuits are also discussed.

  20. Focusing surface wave imaging with flexible 2D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Fu, Junqiang; Li, Zhe; Xu, Chunguang; Xiao, Dingguo; Wang, Shaohan

    2016-04-01

    Curved surface is widely exist in key parts of energy and power equipment, such as, turbine blade cylinder block and so on. Cycling loading and harsh working condition of enable fatigue cracks appear on the surface. The crack should be found in time to avoid catastrophic damage to the equipment. A flexible 2D array transducer was developed. 2D Phased Array focusing method (2DPA), Mode-Spatial Double Phased focusing method (MSDPF) and the imaging method using the flexible 2D array probe are studied. Experiments using these focusing and imaging method are carried out. Surface crack image is obtained with both 2DPA and MSDPF focusing method. It have been proved that MSDPF can be more adaptable for curved surface and more calculate efficient than 2DPA.