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Sample records for 2d goddard cumulus

  1. Microphysics, Radiation and Surface Processes in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, J.; Baker, D.; Braun, S.; Chou, M.-D.; Ferrier, B.; Johnson, D.; Khain, A.; Lang, S.; Lynn, B.

    2001-01-01

    The response of cloud systems to their environment is an important link in a chain of processes responsible for monsoons, frontal depression, El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes and other climate variations (e.g., 30-60 day intra-seasonal oscillations). Numerical models of cloud properties provide essential insights into the interactions of clouds with each other, with their surroundings, and with land and ocean surfaces. Significant advances are currently being made in the modeling of rainfall and rain-related cloud processes, ranging in scales from the very small up to the simulation of an extensive population of raining cumulus clouds in a tropical- or midlatitude-storm environment. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model is a multi-dimensional nonhydrostatic dynamic/microphysical cloud resolving model. It has been used to simulate many different mesoscale convective systems that occurred in various geographic locations. In this paper, recent GCE model improvements (microphysics, radiation and surface processes) will be described as well as their impact on the development of precipitation events from various geographic locations. The performance of these new physical processes will be examined by comparing the model results with observations. In addition, the explicit interactive processes between cloud, radiation and surface processes will be discussed.

  2. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model (GCE): Improvements and Applications for Studying Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Zeng, Xiping; Li, Xiaowen; Matsui, Toshi; Mohr, Karen; Posselt, Derek; Chern, Jiundar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Norris, Peter M.; Kang, In-Sik; Choi, Ildae; Hou, Arthur; Lau, K.-M.; Yang, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Convection is the primary transport process in the Earth's atmosphere. About two-thirds of the Earth's rainfall and severe floods derive from convection. In addition, two-thirds of the global rain falls in the tropics, while the associated latent heat release accounts for three-fourths of the total heat energy for the Earth's atmosphere. Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) have been used to improve our understanding of cloud and precipitation processes and phenomena from micro-scale to cloud-scale and mesoscale as well as their interactions with radiation and surface processes. CRMs use sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes and can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems. CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) has been developed and improved at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center over the past three decades. It is amulti-dimensional non-hydrostatic CRM that can simulate clouds and cloud systems in different environments. Early improvements and testing were presented in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003a). A review on the application of the GCE to the understanding of precipitation processes can be found in Simpson and Tao (1993) and Tao (2003). In this paper, recent model improvements (microphysics, radiation and land surface processes) are described along with their impact and performance on cloud and precipitation events in different geographic locations via comparisons with observations. In addition, recent advanced applications of the GCE are presented that include understanding the physical processes responsible for diurnal variation, examining the impact of aerosols (cloud condensation nuclei or CCN and ice nuclei or IN) on

  3. Microphysics, Radiation and Surface Processes in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (size about 2-200 km). The CRMs also allow explicit interaction between out-going longwave (cooling) and in-coming solar (heating) radiation with clouds. Observations can provide the initial conditions and validation for CRM results. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model, a CRM, has been developed and improved at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center over the past two decades. The GCE model has been used to understand the following: 1) water and energy cycles and their roles in the tropical climate system; 2) the vertical redistribution of ozone and trace constituents by individual clouds and well organized convective systems over various spatial scales; 3) the relationship between the vertical distribution of latent heating (phase change of water) and the large-scale (pre-storm) environment; 4) the validity of assumptions used in the representation of cloud processes in climate and global circulation models; and 5) the representation of cloud microphysical processes and their interaction with radiative forcing over tropical and midlatitude regions. Four-dimensional cloud and latent heating fields simulated from the GCE model have been provided to the TRMM Science Data and Information System (TSDIS) to develop and improve algorithms for retrieving rainfall and latent heating rates for TRMM and the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). More than 90 referred papers using the GCE model have been published in the last two decades. Also, more than 10 national and international universities are currently using the GCE model for research and teaching. In this talk, five specific major GCE improvements: (1

  4. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model: Model Description and Its Application for Studying the TOGA COARE and GATE Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was utilized in two and three dimensions in order to examine the behavior and response of simulated deep tropical cloud systems occurred in west Pacific warm pool region and Atlantic ocean. The periods chosen for simulation were convectively active period over the TOGA-COARE IFA (19-27 December 1992) and GATE (September 1 to 7, 1974). The TOGA COARE IFA period was also in the framework of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) WG4 case 2. We will examine the differences between the microphysics (warm rain and ice processes, evaporation/sublimation and condensation/deposition), Q1 (Temperature) and Q2 (Water vapor) budgets between these two convective events occurred in different large-scale environments. The contribution of stratiform precipitation and its relationship to the vertical shear of the large-scale horizontal wind will also be examined. The results from GCSS model intercomparsion will be presented. The new improvements (i.e., microphysics, cloud radiation interaction, surface processes and numerical advection scheme) of the GCE model as well as their sensitivity to the model results will be discussed.

  5. Summary of Cumulus Parameterization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Starr, David OC.; Hou, Arthur; Newman, Paul; Sud, Yogesh

    2002-01-01

    A workshop on cumulus parameterization took place at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from December 3-5, 2001. The major objectives of this workshop were (1) to review the problem of representation of moist processes in large-scale models (mesoscale models, Numerical Weather Prediction models and Atmospheric General Circulation Models), (2) to review the state-of-the-art in cumulus parameterization schemes, and (3) to discuss the need for future research and applications. There were a total of 31 presentations and about 100 participants from the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, France and South Korea. The specific presentations and discussions during the workshop are summarized in this paper.

  6. The NASA-Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling Framework - Land Information System: Global Land/atmosphere Interaction with Resolved Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen Irene; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2013-01-01

    The present generation of general circulation models (GCM) use parameterized cumulus schemes and run at hydrostatic grid resolutions. To improve the representation of cloud-scale moist processes and landeatmosphere interactions, a global, Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) coupled to the Land Information System (LIS) has been developed at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center. The MMFeLIS has three components, a finite-volume (fv) GCM (Goddard Earth Observing System Ver. 4, GEOS-4), a 2D cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble, GCE), and the LIS, representing the large-scale atmospheric circulation, cloud processes, and land surface processes, respectively. The non-hydrostatic GCE model replaces the single-column cumulus parameterization of fvGCM. The model grid is composed of an array of fvGCM gridcells each with a series of embedded GCE models. A horizontal coupling strategy, GCE4fvGCM4Coupler4LIS, offered significant computational efficiency, with the scalability and I/O capabilities of LIS permitting landeatmosphere interactions at cloud-scale. Global simulations of 2007e2008 and comparisons to observations and reanalysis products were conducted. Using two different versions of the same land surface model but the same initial conditions, divergence in regional, synoptic-scale surface pressure patterns emerged within two weeks. The sensitivity of largescale circulations to land surface model physics revealed significant functional value to using a scalable, multi-model land surface modeling system in global weather and climate prediction.

  7. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2008-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. The following is presented in this report: (1) a brief review of the GCE model and its applications on the impact of aerosols on deep precipitation processes, (2) the Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) a discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  8. Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model: Application for Understanding Preciptation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to climate system interactions and the key to understanding their behavior. Rainfall and its associated precipitation processes are a key link in the hydrologic cycle. Fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability can exert a large impact upon the structure of the upper ocean layer. In addition, approximately two-thirds of the global rain falls in the Tropics, while the associated latent heat release accounts for about three-fourths of the total heat energy for the Earth's atmosphere. Precipitation from convective cloud systems comprises a large portion of tropical heating and rainfall. Furthermore, the vertical distribution of convective latent-heat releases modulates large-scale tropical circulations (e.g., the 30-60-day intraseasonal oscillation), which, in turn, impacts midlatitude weather through teleconnection patterns such as those associated with El Nino. Shifts in these global circulations can result in prolonged periods of droughts and floods, thereby exerting a tremendous impact upon the biosphere and human habitation. And yet, monthly rainfall over the tropical oceans is still not known within a factor of two over large (5 degrees latitude by 5 degrees longitude) areas. Hence, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), a joint U.S./Japan space project, can provide a more accurate measurement of rainfall as well as estimate the four-dimensional structure of diabatic heating over the global tropics. The distributions of rainfall and inferred heating can be used to advance our understanding of the global energy and water cycle. In addition, this information can be used for global circulation and climate models for testing and improving their parameterizations.

  9. Goddard Welcomes SISTER

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., hosted a weeklong summer institute, SISTER, for the purpose of increasing the awareness of and providing opportunities for middle school girls to ...

  10. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the ph ysical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems.

  11. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems. In addition, high - resolution (spatial. 2km, and temporal, I minute) visualization showing the model results will be presented.

  12. Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

  13. Goddard Summer Interns: Danielle Wood

    NASA Video Gallery

    Profile of Goddard intern Danielle Wood. Danielle is interning at Goddard in the Innovative Partnerships Program and at NASA Headquarters in the Office of the Chief Technologist in the summer of 20...

  14. Hinners moves to Goddard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Noel W. Hinners, president-elect of AGU's Planetology Section and director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum, has been appointed director of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. He succeeds A. Thomas Young, who left Goddard in late March; Leslie Meredith, AGU General Secretary, is serving as acting director until Hinners' appointment becomes effective in mid-June.Looking back at his 3 years as director of the museum, Hinners told Eos that he believed one of his most important accomplishments was to increase the historical and archival programs. His aim was to ensure that the histories of space physics, astronomy, and aeronautics will not be lost. Documentation on the evolution of ideas in these areas was scattered, improperly indexed, or nonexistent, Hinners explained, so he brought to the museum several professional historians to organize the existing information and to glean additional information through oral histories from scientists involved in such events as the International Geophysical Year.

  15. Goddard Ground System Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center's work in providing the Ground System Infrastructure to allow for standard interfaces, and allow for a mix of heritage and new components. This software has been used by NASA and other Government users. Telemetry and command services are also provided as are mission planning and scheduling systems. Other areas that the presentation covers are work on trending systems, and data management system.

  16. Goddard Robotic Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Donato, Davide; Gehrels, Neil; Okajima, Takashi; Ukwatta, Tilan N.

    2009-05-25

    We are constructing the 14'' fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up the Swift/Fermi Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our telescope system consists of the 14'' Celestron Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Astro-Physics 1200GTO mount, the Apogee U47 CCD camera, the JMI's electronic focuser, and the Finger Lake Instrumentation's color filter wheel with U, B, V, R and I filters. With the focal reducer, 20'x20' field of view has been achieved. The observatory dome is the Astro Haven's 7 ft clam-shell dome. We started the scientific observations on mid-November 2008. While not observing our primary targets (GRBs and AGNs), we are planning to open our telescope time to the public for having a wider use of our telescope in both a different research field and an educational purpose.

  17. Red-based cumulus.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    2015-02-01

    Observations and model simulations of cumulus clouds whose bases are tinted red when the Sun is well above the horizon are presented. Conditions for seeing red bases include (1) a red underlying surface (which may consist of dust clouds, as from haboobs) with high albedo, (2) small fractional cloud cover when the Sun is far enough below the zenith for direct sunlight to illuminate much of the surface directly below and around cloud base, (3) optically thick clouds so that the bases are dark, and (4) clouds with bases that are near enough to the observer to appear high in the sky so that the admixture of scattered light from the intervening atmosphere is minimized.

  18. Goddard Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Under this Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, USRA was expected to provide short term (from I day up to I year) personnel as required to provide a Visiting Scientists Program to support the Earth Sciences Directorate (Code 900) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The Contractor was to have a pool, or have access to a pool, of scientific talent, both domestic and international, at all levels (graduate student to senior scientist), that would support the technical requirements of the following laboratories and divisions within Code 900: 1) Global Change Data Center (902); 2) Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910); 3) Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics (Code 920); 4) Space Data and Computing Division (Code 930); 5) Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes (Code 970). The research activities described below for each organization within Code 900 were intended to comprise the general scope of effort covered under the Visiting Scientist Program.

  19. Astronaut Steve Swanson Visits Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Tuesday, 3 March 2015, a special guest visited NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during his time back on Earth. Steven Swanson, NASA astronaut, intrigued the audience by highlighting his adventur...

  20. Explore at NASA Goddard Promo

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., will again open its gates to welcome the regional community for a day of fun-filled activities, hands-on demonstrations, entertainment, and foo...

  1. Goddard Virtual Tour: Part 1

    NASA Video Gallery

    Goddard Chief Scientist Jim Garvin takes us on a tour of the life of a spacecraft, from the idea to the collection of data in orbit. Each segment looks at a different phase of the spacecraft and it...

  2. Goddard Summer Interns: Alejandro Arambula

    NASA Video Gallery

    Alejandro Arambula is an aerospace engineering student at M.I.T. and a 2011 summer intern in Goddard's Propulsion Lab. This summer he is working with his mentor Khary Parker in building a test asse...

  3. Simulated KWAJEX Convective Systems Using a 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model and Their Comparisons with Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 1999 Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX), one of several major TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments, has successfully obtained a wealth of information and observation data on tropical convective systems over the western Central Pacific region. In this paper, clouds and convective systems that developed during three active periods (Aug 7-12, Aug 17-21, and Aug 29-Sep 13) around Kwajalein Atoll site are simulated using both 2D and 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) models. Based on numerical results, the clouds and cloud systems are generally unorganized and short lived. These features are validated by radar observations that support the model results. Both the 2D and 3D simulated rainfall amounts and their stratiform contribution as well as the heat, water vapor, and moist static energy budgets are examined for the three convective episodes. Rainfall amounts are quantitatively similar between the two simulations, but the stratiform contribution is considerably larger in the 2D simulation. Regardless of dimension, fo all three cases, the large-scale forcing and net condensation are the two major physical processes that account for the evolution of the budgets with surface latent heat flux and net radiation solar and long-wave radiation)being secondary processes. Quantitative budget differences between 2D and 3D as well as between various episodes will be detailed.Morover, simulated radar signatures and Q1/Q2 fields from the three simulations are compared to each other and with radar and sounding observations.

  4. Marshall Team Recreates Goddard Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In honor of the Centernial of Flight celebration and commissioned by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a team of engineers from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) built a replica of the first liquid-fueled rocket. The original rocket, designed and built by rocket engineering pioneer Robert H. Goddard in 1926, opened the door to modern rocketry. Goddard's rocket reached an altitude of 41 feet while its flight lasted only 2.5 seconds. The Marshall design team's plan was to stay as close as possible to an authentic reconstruction of Goddard's rocket. The same propellants were used - liquid oxygen and gasoline - as available during Goddard's initial testing and firing. The team also tried to construct the replica using the original materials and design to the greatest extent possible. By purposely using less advanced techniques and materials than many that are available today, the team encountered numerous technical challenges in testing the functional hardware. There were no original blueprints or drawings, only photographs and notes. However, this faithful adherence to historical accuracy has also allowed the team to experience many of the same challenges Goddard faced 77 years ago, and more fully appreciate the genius of this extraordinary man. The replica will undergo ground tests at MSFC this summer.

  5. Regional-Scale Modeling at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Adler, R.; Baker, D.; Braun, S.; Chou, M.-D.; Jasinski, M. F.; Jia, Y.; Kakar, R.; Karyampudi, M.; Lang, S.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Goddard Mesoscale Modeling and Dynamics Group has used a popular regional scale model, MM5, to study precipitation processes. Our group is making contributions to the MM5 by incorporating the following physical and numerical packages: improved Goddard cloud processes, a land processes model (Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange - PLACE), efficient but sophisticated radiative processes, conservation of hydrometeor mass (water budget), four-dimensional data assimilation for rainfall, and better computational methods for trace gas transport. At NASA Goddard, the MM5 has been used to study: (1) the impact of initial conditions, assimilation of satellite-derived rainfall, and cumulus parameterizations on rapidly intensifying oceanic cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, (2) the dynamic and thermodynamic processes associated with the development of narrow cold frontal rainbands, (3) regional climate and water cycles, (4) the impact of vertical transport by clouds and lightning on trace gas distributiodproduction associated with South and North American mesoscale convective systems, (5) the development of a westerly wind burst (WWB) that occurred during the TOGA COARE and the diurnal variation of precipitation in the tropics, (6) a Florida sea breeze convective event and a Mid-US flood event using a sophisticated land surface model, (7) the influence of soil heterogeneity on land surface energy balance in the southwest GCIP region, (8) explicit simulations (with 1.33 to 4 km horizontal resolution) of hurricanes Bob (1991) and Bonnie (1998), (9) a heavy precipitation event over Taiwan, and (10) to make real time forecasts for a major NASA field program. In this paper, the modifications and simulated cases will be described and discussed.

  6. Contributions to the implementation of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization in the GLA GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Chao, W. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1989-01-01

    The AS scheme in the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres General Circulation Model is used to address two fundamental problems of simulated cumulus convection and rainfall. The first problem is that of too much rainfall in the tropics at initial time and the second is the problem of too vigorous a hydrologic cycle in the tropics even after the initial adjustment period. A number of experiments were performed, including an investigation of the influence of the prescribed limiting values of critical cloud work formation (CCWF). It is concluded that the CCWF plays a useful role in the apportionment of the rainfall into convective and large-scale components. Related experiments reveal the nature of the interaction between atmospheric circulation and the cumulus processes.

  7. Parameterization of GCM Subgrid nonprecipitating cumulus and stratocumulus clouds using stochastic/phenomenological methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, R.B.

    1992-08-26

    A theory was developed for the fraction of near-surface air likely to form forced and active cumulus clouds. This stochastic method is based on a 2-D frequency distribution of the occurrence of various buoyancy and condensation levels in air near the surface, and the relationship of this distribution to the mean temperature profile. An alternative form of this theory utilizes a 2-D distribution of convective available potential energies (CAPE) instead of virtual potential temperatures.

  8. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  9. Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical parameters and the technical staff of the VLBI system at the fundamental station GGAO. It also gives an overview about the VLBI activities during the report year. The Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) consists of a 5-meter radio telescope for VLBI, a new 12-meter radio telescope for VLBI2010 development, a 1-meter reference antenna for microwave holography development, an SLR site that includes MOBLAS-7, the NGSLR development system, and a 48" telescope for developmental two-color Satellite Laser Ranging, a GPS timing and development lab, a DORIS system, meteorological sensors, and a hydrogen maser. In addition, we are a fiducial IGS site with several IGS/IGSX receivers. GGAO is located on the east coast of the United States in Maryland. It is approximately 15 miles NNE of Washington, D.C. in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  10. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes the activities of the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST), a consortium of scientists and engineers led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), during the contract reporting period. Topics covered include: new programs, eligibility and selection criteria, Goddard Coastal Research Graduate Fellowship Program and staffing changes.

  11. The macroscopic behavior of cumulus ensembles simulated by a cumulus ensemble model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuan-Man Xu; Akio Arakawa; Krueger, S.K. )

    1992-12-15

    The two-dimensional UCLA cumulus ensemble model (CEM), which covers a large horizontal area with a sufficiently small horizontal grid size, is used in this study. A number of simulation experiments are performed with the CEM to study the macroscopic behavior of cumulus convection under a variety of different large-scale and underlying surface conditions. Specifically, the modulation of cumulus activity by the imposed large-scale processes and the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) budget are investigated in detail. In all simulations, cumulus convection is rather strongly modulated by large-scale advective processes in spite of the existence of some nonmodulated high-frequency fluctuations. The modulation exhibits some phase delays, however, when the basic wind shear is strong. This is presumably associated with the existence of mesoscale convective organization. The EKE budget analysis shows that the net eddy buoyancy generation rate is nearly zero for a wide range of cumulus ensembles. 34 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  13. Shallow cumulus rooted in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H.; Horn, G.; Sikma, M.; Jacobs, C. M.; Baldocchi, D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between plant evapotranspiration, controlled by photosynthesis (for a low vegetation cover by C3 and C4 grasses), and the moist thermals that are responsible for the formation and development of shallow cumulus clouds (SCu). We perform systematic numerical experiments at fine spatial scales using large-eddy simulations explicitly coupled to a plant-physiology model. To break down the complexity of the vegetation-atmospheric system at the diurnal scales, we design the following experiments with increasing complexity: (a) clouds that are transparent to radiation, (b) clouds that shade the surface from the incoming shortwave radiation and (c) plant stomata whose apertures react with an adjustment in time to cloud perturbations. The shading by SCu leads to a strong spatial variability in photosynthesis and the surface energy balance. As a result, experiment (b) simulates SCu that are characterized by less extreme and less skewed values of the liquid water path and cloud-base height. These findings are corroborated by the calculation of characteristics lengths scales of the thermals and clouds using autocorrelation and spectral analysis methods. We find that experiments (a) and (b) are characterized by similar cloud cover evolution, but different cloud population characteristics. Experiment (b), including cloud shading, is characterized by smaller clouds, but closer to each other. By performing a sensitivity analysis on the exchange of water vapor and carbon dioxide at the canopy level, we show that the larger water-use efficiency of C4 grass leads to two opposing effects that directly influence boundary-layer clouds: the thermals below the clouds are more vigorous and deeper driven by a larger buoyancy surface flux (positive effect), but are characterized by less moisture content (negative effect). We conclude that under the investigated mid-latitude atmospheric and well-watered soil conditions, SCu over C4 grass fields is characterized

  14. Observations of rapid aerosol optical depth enhancements in the vicinity of polluted cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Arola, A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Crumeyrolle, S. N.; Berkoff, T. A.; Welton, E. J.; Lolli, S.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Anderson, B. E.; Thornhill, K. L.; Minnis, P.; Pickering, K. E.; Loughner, C. P.; Smirnov, A.; Sinyuk, A.

    2014-11-01

    During the July 2011 Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field experiment in Maryland, significant enhancements in Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometer measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) were observed in the immediate vicinity of non-precipitating cumulus clouds on some days. Both measured Ångström exponents and aerosol size distribution retrievals made before, during and after cumulus development often suggest little change in fine mode particle size; therefore, implying possible new particle formation in addition to cloud processing and humidification of existing particles. In addition to sun-sky radiometer measurements of large enhancements of fine mode AOD, lidar measurements made from both ground-based and aircraft-based instruments during the experiment also measured large increases in aerosol signal at altitudes associated with the presence of fair weather cumulus clouds. These data show modifications of the aerosol vertical profile as a result of the aerosol enhancements at and below cloud altitudes. The airborne lidar data were utilized to estimate the spatial extent of these aerosol enhancements, finding increased AOD, backscatter and extinction out to 2.5 km distance from the cloud edge. Furthermore, in situ measurements made from aircraft vertical profiles over an AERONET site during the experiment also showed large increases in aerosol scattering and aerosol volume after cloud formation as compared to before. The 15-year AERONET database of AOD measurements at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Maryland site, was investigated in order to obtain a climatological perspective of this phenomenon of AOD enhancement. Analysis of the diurnal cycle of AOD in summer showed significant increases in AOD from morning to late afternoon, corresponding to the diurnal cycle of cumulus development.

  15. A Lifeline Home: Goddard's Final Shuttle Mission

    NASA Video Gallery

    Controllers at Goddard's Network Integration Center share their thoughts as the 30-year-old Shuttle Program comes to an end with the final flight of STS-135, which concluded with a textbook landing...

  16. The 2003 Goddard Rocket Replica Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca A.

    2003-01-01

    A group of volunteers from Marshall Space Flight Center using information and records available,construct a working, flying replica of Robert Goddard's 1926 liquid rocket as well as accurate static display version. Document the effort for posterity.

  17. Goddard trajectory determination subsystem: Mathematical specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. E. (Editor); Velez, C. E. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical specifications of the Goddard trajectory determination subsystem of the flight dynamics system are presented. These specifications include the mathematical description of the coordinate systems, dynamic and measurement model, numerical integration techniques, and statistical estimation concepts.

  18. Indiana School for the Blind Visits Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows highlights of the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Indian Creek Public High School visit to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June 2011. Both blind a...

  19. Parameterization of Cumulus Convective Cloud Systems in Mesoscale Forecast Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Parameterization of Cumulus Convective Cloud Systems in...parameterization of cumulus convective clouds in mesoscale numerical weather prediction models OBJECTIVES Conduct detailed studies of cloud ...microphysical processes in order to develop a unified parameterization of boundary layer stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus convective clouds . Develop

  20. Anomalous scaling of cumulus cloud boundaries

    PubMed

    Siebesma; Jonker

    2000-07-03

    The geometrical properties of cumulus clouds modeled by a numerical technique called large-eddy simulation are investigated. Surface-volume analyses reconfirm previous scaling results based on satellite data. This technique allows for the first time a direct analysis of the scaling behavior of cloud boundaries of individual clouds.

  1. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Anderson, D.; Atlas, R.; Chern, J.; Houser, P.; Hou, A.; Lang, S.; Lau, W.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kakar, R.; Kumar, S.; Lapenta, W.; Li, X.; Matsui, T.; Rienecker, M.; Shen, B.W.; Shi, J.J.; Simpson, J.; Zeng, X.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical cloud resolving models (CRMs), which are based the non-hydrostatic equations of motion, have been extensively applied to cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that CRMs agree with observations in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and regional scale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a szrper-parameterization or multi-scale modeling -framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign can provide initial conditions as well as validation through utilizing the Earth Satellite simulators. At Goddard, we have developed a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics. The modeling system consists a coupled GCM-CRM (or MMF); a state-of-the-art weather research forecast model (WRF) and a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model). In these models, the same microphysical schemes (2ICE, several 3ICE), radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models are applied. In addition, a comprehensive unified Earth Satellite

  2. Marshall Team Fires Recreated Goddard Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In honor of the Centernial of Flight Celebration and commissioned by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a team of engineers from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) built a replica of the first liquid-fueled rocket. The original rocket, designed and built by rocket engineering pioneer Robert H. Goddard in 1926, opened the door to modern rocketry. Goddard's rocket reached an altitude of 41 feet while its flight lasted only 2.5 seconds. The Marshall design team's plan was to stay as close as possible to an authentic reconstruction of Goddard's rocket. The same propellants were used - liquid oxygen and gasoline - as available during Goddard's initial testing and firing. The team also tried to construct the replica using the original materials and design to the greatest extent possible. By purposely using less advanced techniques and materials than many that are available today, the team encountered numerous technical challenges in testing the functional hardware. There were no original blueprints or drawings, only photographs and notes. However, this faithful adherence to historical accuracy has allowed the team to experience many of the same challenges Goddard faced 77 years ago, and more fully appreciate the genius of this extraordinary man. In this photo, the replica is shown firing in the A-frame launch stand in near-flight configuration at MSFC's Test Area 116 during the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 39th Joint Propulsion Conference on July 23, 2003.

  3. The GISS model of the global atmosphere. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Stone, P. H.; Halem, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Hogan, J. S.; Druyan, L. M.; Quirk, W. J.; Russell, G.; Lacis, A. A.; Tenenbaum, J.

    1974-01-01

    A description and numerical results are presented for a global atmospheric circulation model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS). The model version described is a 9-level primitive-equation model in sigma coordinates. It includes a realistic distribution of continents, oceans and topography. Detailed calculations of energy transfer by solar and terrestrial radiation make use of cloud and water vapor fields calculated by the model. The model hydrologic cycle includes two precipitation mechanisms: large-scale supersaturation and a parameterization of subgrid-scale cumulus convection. Results are presented both from a comparison of the 13th to the 43rd days (January) of one integration with climatological statistics, and from five short-range forecasting experiments. In the extended integration, the near-equilibrium January-mean model atmosphere exhibits an energy cycle in good agreement with observational estimates, together with generally realistic zonal mean fields of winds, temperature, humidity, transports, diabatic heating, evaporation, precipitation, and cloud cover.

  4. Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Processes over Warm Pool: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.- K.; Johnson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle as well as the primary heat source for the atmosphere, The vertical distribution of convective latent-heat release modulates the large-scale circulations of the tropics, Furthermore, changes in the moisture distribution at middle and upper levels of the troposphere can affect cloud distributions and cloud liquid water and ice contents. How the incoming solar and outgoing longwave radiation respond to these changes in clouds is a major factor in assessing climate change. Present large-scale weather and climate models simulate cloud processes only crudely, reducing confidence in their predictions on both global and regional scales. One of the most promising methods to test physical parameterizations used in General Circulation Models (GCMS) and climate models is to use field observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes, and allow for their complex interactions with solar and infrared radiative transfer processes. The CRMs can reasonably well resolve the evolution, structure, and life cycles of individual clouds and cloud systems, The major objective of this paper is to investigate the latent heating, moisture and momenti,im budgets associated with several convective systems developed during the TOGA COARE IFA - westerly wind burst event (late December, 1992). The tool for this study is the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (CCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (using 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km depth) in the vertical, The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations are performed over a 7 day time period. We will examine (1) the precipitation processes (i.e., condensation/evaporation) and their interaction with warm pool; (2) the heating and moisture budgets in the convective and

  5. Satellite Multiangle Cumulus Geometry Retrieval: Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail

    2003-02-08

    Most satellite-based analyses have been conducted using near nadir-viewing sensors. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), recently launched on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Terra platform, provides high-resolution measurements of reflectance at nine different viewing angles. In this study, we examine the possible retrieval of detailed cumulus geometry using the new and unique MISR datasets. We suggested one approach and apply it to an early MISR dataset of small marine cumulus clouds. This paper also presents validation analysis of this technique with both independent ground-based radar measurements and a model-output inverse problem. Collocated and coincident MISR data and ground-based observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site form the basis of this validation. Future work will attempt to test the suggested approach with additional MISR scenes.

  6. Cumulus Cells Block Oocyte Meiotic Resumption via Gap Junctions in Cumulus Oocyte Complexes Subjected to DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Hong; Zheng, Jie; Xie, Feng-Yun; Shen, Wei; Yin, Shen; Ma, Jun-Yu

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian oocyte growth, genomic DNA may accumulate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by factors such as reactive oxygen species. Recent evidence demonstrated that slight DSBs do not activate DNA damage checkpoint proteins in denuded oocytes. These oocytes, even with DNA DSBs, can resume meiosis and progress to metaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic resumption in oocytes is also controlled by the surrounding cumulus cells; accordingly, we analyzed whether cumulus-cell enclosed oocytes (CEOs) with DNA damage are able to resume meiosis. Compared with DNA-damaged denuded oocytes, we found that meiotic resumption rates of CEOs significantly decreased. To assess the mechanism by which cumulus cells block meiotic resumption in CEOs with DNA DSBs, we treated the cumulus oocyte complex with the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone and found that carbenoxolone can rescue the block in CEO meiosis induced by DNA DSBs. Since cumulus cell-synthesized cAMPs can pass through the gap junctions between oocyte and cumulus cell to block oocyte meiosis, we measured the expression levels of adenylate cyclase 1 (Adcy1) in cumulus cells, and G-protein coupled receptor 3 (Gpr3) and phosphodiesterase 3A (Pde3a) in oocytes, and found that the mRNA expression level of Adcy1 increased significantly in DNA-damaged cumulus cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that DNA DSBs promote cAMP synthesis in cumulus cells, and cumulus cAMPs can inhibit meiotic resumption of CEOs through gap junctions.

  7. Cumulus cloud formulations for longwave radiation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D.; Ellingson, R.G.

    1999-03-15

    Longwave radiative transfer under broken cloud conditions is often treated as a problem in cloud bulk geometry, especially for cumulus clouds, because individual clouds are nearly black. However, climate models ignore cloud geometry and estimate the effects of broken cumulus clouds as the cloud amount weighted average of clear and black cloud overcast conditions. To overcome the simplicity of the black plate approximation, the authors developed a more generalized form of cloud geometrical effects on the effective cloud fraction. Following previous work, this form includes parameters that allow a more precise specification of cloud size and spatial distributions. The sensitivity of the generalized form to the variation in cloud bulk geometrical shapes, aspect ratio, size distribution, and side inclination angle are the primary factors significantly affecting the effective cloud fraction. These parameters are important at all cloud amounts with greatest sensitivity when the cloud amount is between 0.2 and 0.8. On the other hand, cloud spatial distributions do not significantly influence the effective cloud fraction when absolute cloud amount is less than 0.2 and/or when the cloud aspect ratio is less than 0.5. However, in the range of greatest sensitivity with large aspect ratio and absolute amount, model comparisons show large intermodel differences. The model discussed herein is cloud size dependent and applies most directly to small cumulus clouds.

  8. Dual effects of hydrogen sulfide donor on meiosis and cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Nevoral, Jan; Petr, Jaroslav; Gelaude, Armance; Bodart, Jean-Francois; Kucerova-Chrpova, Veronika; Sedmikova, Marketa; Krejcova, Tereza; Kolbabova, Tereza; Dvorakova, Marketa; Vyskocilova, Alena; Weingartova, Ivona; Krivohlavkova, Lenka; Zalmanova, Tereza; Jilek, Frantisek

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been revealed to be a signal molecule with second messenger action in the somatic cells of many tissues, including the reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to address how exogenous H2S acts on the meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes, including key maturation factors such as MPF and MAPK, and cumulus expansion intensity of cumulus-oocyte complexes. We observed that the H2S donor, Na2S, accelerated oocyte in vitro maturation in a dose-dependent manner, following an increase of MPF activity around germinal vesicle breakdown. Concurrently, the H2S donor affected cumulus expansion, monitored by hyaluronic acid production. Our results suggest that the H2S donor influences oocyte maturation and thus also participates in the regulation of cumulus expansion. The exogenous H2S donor apparently affects key signal pathways of oocyte maturation and cumulus expansion, resulting in faster oocyte maturation with little need of cumulus expansion.

  9. The Rocket Experiments of Robert H. Goddard, 1911 to 1930.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    Recounts the contributions of Robert Goddard from the years of 1911 to 1930 to the development of the physics of rocketry. Discusses the results of Goddard's series of rocket experiments endorsed by the Smithsonian Institute, and Goddard's claims to priority in the development of rocket theory. (MDH)

  10. Ozone conservation and entrainment in cumulus congestus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R., Jr.; Weaver, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    This study demonstrates that ozone mixing ratio is conserved during moist convection and can be used as a tracer for cloud entrainment studies. The approach is to apply mixing line analysis to pairs of liquid water potential temperature, total water mixing ratio, O3 and pseudo-equivalent potential temperature derived from aircraft penetrations of growing cumulus congestus. Conclusions about entrainment from the mixing diagrams employing O3 agree with those using thermodynamic quantities. Any disagreement uncovered deficiencies in the water substance measurement technique.

  11. Cumulus cell-expressed type I interferons induce cumulus expansion in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, You-Jee; Park, Jae-Il; Moon, Won-Jin; Dam, Phuong T M; Cho, Moon-Kyoung; Chun, Sang-Young

    2015-01-01

    Ovulation resembles the inflammatory response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the expression and role of type I interferons (IFNs) Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta in mouse ovaries during the process of ovulation. An in vivo injection of equine chorionic gonadotropin (CG)-human CG (hCG) stimulated Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) within 6 h. Type I IFN receptor (Ifnar1 and Ifnar2) genes were also expressed in preovulatory follicles without a change by hCG. Immunofluorescent study revealed the expression of protein signals of Ifnalpha, Ifnbeta, and Ifnar1 in cumulus cells. Treatment of COCs with Ifnalpha or Ifnbeta in vitro induced cumulus expansion that was comparable to that mediated by epiregulin. In cultured COCs, the levels of Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA increased by epiregulin and follicle-stimulating hormone, but not by prostaglandin E2. Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta activated multiple signaling events (signal transducer and activator of transcription-1/3, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2) and stimulated the expression of genes known to impact COC expansion (Has2, Ptx3, Tnfaip6, and Ptgs2). Interestingly, treatment of COCs with Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 ligands (lipopolysaccharides, Pam3Cys, and hyaluronan fragments) increased Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA, while coculture with anti-TLR2/4 neutralizing antibody abolished these effects. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the type I IFN system is operating in mouse cumulus cells and plays a role in the induction of cumulus expansion during the ovulatory process in mice.

  12. Oxygen-regulated gene expression in murine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Kind, Karen L; Tam, Kimberley K Y; Banwell, Kelly M; Gauld, Ashley D; Russell, Darryl L; Macpherson, Anne M; Brown, Hannah M; Frank, Laura A; Peet, Daniel J; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important component of the environment of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC), both in vivo within the ovarian follicle and during in vitro oocyte maturation (IVM). Cumulus cells have a key role in supporting oocyte development, and cumulus cell function and gene expression are known to be altered when the environment of the COC is perturbed. Oxygen-regulated gene expression is mediated through the actions of the transcription factors, the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). In the present study, the effect of oxygen on cumulus cell gene expression was examined following in vitro maturation of the murine COC at 2%, 5% or 20% oxygen. Increased expression of HIF-responsive genes, including glucose transporter-1, lactate dehydrogenase A and BCL2/adenovirus E1B interacting protein 3, was observed in cumulus cells matured at 2% or 5%, compared with 20% oxygen. Stabilisation of HIF1α protein in cumulus cells exposed to low oxygen was confirmed by western blot and HIF-mediated transcriptional activity was demonstrated using a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein under the control of a promoter containing hypoxia response elements. These results indicate that oxygen concentration influences cumulus cell gene expression and support a role for HIF1α in mediating the cumulus cell response to varying oxygen.

  13. Parameterization of GCM Subgrid nonprecipitating cumulus and stratocumulus clouds using stochastic/phenomenological methods. Annual technical progress report, 1 December 1991--30 November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, R.B.

    1992-08-26

    A theory was developed for the fraction of near-surface air likely to form forced and active cumulus clouds. This stochastic method is based on a 2-D frequency distribution of the occurrence of various buoyancy and condensation levels in air near the surface, and the relationship of this distribution to the mean temperature profile. An alternative form of this theory utilizes a 2-D distribution of convective available potential energies (CAPE) instead of virtual potential temperatures.

  14. Motility contrast imaging of live porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David

    2013-02-01

    Freshly-harvested porcine oocytes are invested with cumulus granulosa cells in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). The cumulus cell layer is usually too thick to image the living oocyte under a conventional microscope. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the oocyte viability. The low success rate of implantation is the main problem for in vitro fertilization. In this paper, we demonstrate our dynamic imaging technique called motility contrast imaging (MCI) that provides a non-invasive way to monitor the COCs before and after maturation. MCI shows a change of intracellular activity during oocyte maturation, and a measures dynamic contrast between the cumulus granulosa shell and the oocytes. MCI also shows difference in the spectral response between oocytes that were graded into quality classes. MCI is based on shortcoherence digital holography. It uses intracellular motility as the endogenous imaging contrast of living tissue. MCI presents a new approach for cumulus-oocyte complex assessment.

  15. Contribution of CBX4 to cumulus oophorus cell phenotype in mice and attendant effects in cumulus cell cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lanping; Midic, Uros; Garriga, Judith; Latham, Keith E

    2014-01-15

    Cumulus oophorus cells play an essential role in oocyte development. They are also widely employed as donor cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Our previous studies revealed that Cbx4 mRNA was overexpressed in cloned two-cell embryos. These data indicated that CBX4 may regulate normal cumulus cell differentiation and that its overexpression in clones could contribute to aberrant gene regulation. We used siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cbx4 to assess its role in determining cumulus cell phenotype and compared the effects of this knockdown to published data for aberrant gene regulation in cloned embryos. We observed widespread effects on the expression of genes related to diverse processes in cultured cumulus cells, including cell assembly/proliferation and DNA replication/repair, endocrine function, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, inflammation, and cell morphology, with apparent effects of CBX4 in promoting cumulus cell proliferation and survival and inhibiting differentiation. Overall, the data implicate CBX4 as a key component in the pathway integrating endocrine signals, intraovarian paracrine factors, and oocyte-derived factors in the control of cumulus cell functions. We also observed altered expression of 25 cumulus cell markers of oocyte quality, indicating an important role of CBX4 in production of high quality oocytes. Finally, we found that about one-quarter of the genes showing aberrant transcription in cloned embryos are sensitive to Cbx4 knockdown in cumulus cells, consistent with a role for aberrant Cbx4 regulation in elaborating abnormal cloned embryo characteristics.

  16. Remembering Robert Goddard's vision 100 years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, David P.

    “Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” —such are the goals of most of us.Yet a few always exist who feel called by a higher purpose. Society often owes them a great deal.Robert Hutchins Goddard, whose work made spaceflight possible, found his vision 100 years ago this October as a youth of 17. His family was staying on the farm of a relative, when he was asked to trim the branches of a cherry tree behind the barn.

  17. Cloud condensation nuclei near marine cumulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive airborne measurements of cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectra and condensation nuclei below, in, between, and above the cumulus clouds near Hawaii point to important aerosol-cloud interactions. Consistent particle concentrations of 200/cu cm were found above the marine boundary layer and within the noncloudy marine boundary layer. Lower and more variable CCN concentrations within the cloudy boundary layer, especially very close to the clouds, appear to be a result of cloud scavenging processes. Gravitational coagulation of cloud droplets may be the principal cause of this difference in the vertical distribution of CCN. The results suggest a reservoir of CCN in the free troposphere which can act as a source for the marine boundary layer.

  18. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  19. Non-precipitating cumulus cloud study

    SciTech Connect

    Alkezweeny, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    This document describes the field experiment that was conducted in Kentucky during the period from July 20 to August 24, 1983. The objectives were to determine the vertical transport of acidic pollutants by cumulus convection and formation of acidic substances in non-precipitating clouds. The study is a research component of Task Group C (Atmospheric Processes) of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program. To examine the vertical transport, an SF/sub 6/ tracer was released from one aircraft, sampled by another aircraft, and sampled on the ground. The results show that pollutants from the boundary layer are lifted to the cloud layer. From there, they are intermittently transported both to the ground and to higher elevations, possibly in the vertical updrafts of towering cumulus clouds. A series of instrumented aircraft flights around the clouds were conducted to study the formation of acidic aerosols. The concentrations of SO/sub 2/, SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 3/, NH/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/, HNO/sub 3/ and trace metals were measured by filter techniques. Furthermore, NO/sub x/, O/sub 3/, light scattering, and basic meteorological parameters were measured in real-time. Detailed chemical composition of aerosols and NH/sub 3/ was also measured on the ground. Preliminary results show that the molar ratio of SO/sub 2//SO/sub 2/ + SO/sub 4/) at cloud tops is higher than at cloud bases. This indicates that sulfate aerosols were formed in the clouds. The NH/sub 3/ concentration shows higher values at nighttime than daytime and decreases sharply with increasing altitude. 3 references.

  20. Dr. Goddard and a 1918 version of 'Bazooka'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard loading a 1918 version of the Bazooka of World War II. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  1. Oocyte-dependent activation of MTOR in cumulus cells controls the development and survival of cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Shi, Lanying; Gong, Xuhong; Jiang, Mengjie; Yin, Yaoxue; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Yin, Hong; Li, Hui; Emori, Chihiro; Sugiura, Koji; Eppig, John J; Su, You-Qiang

    2016-08-15

    Communication between oocytes and their companion somatic cells promotes the healthy development of ovarian follicles, which is crucial for producing oocytes that can be fertilized and are competent to support embryogenesis. However, how oocyte-derived signaling regulates these essential processes remains largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that oocyte-derived paracrine factors, particularly GDF9 and GDF9-BMP15 heterodimer, promote the development and survival of cumulus-cell-oocyte complexes (COCs), partly by suppressing the expression of Ddit4l, a negative regulator of MTOR, and enabling the activation of MTOR signaling in cumulus cells. Cumulus cells expressed less Ddit4l mRNA and protein than mural granulosa cells, which is in striking contrast to the expression of phosphorylated RPS6 (a major downstream effector of MTOR). Knockdown of Ddit4l activated MTOR signaling in cumulus cells, whereas inhibition of MTOR in COCs compromised oocyte developmental competence and cumulus cell survival, with the latter likely to be attributable to specific changes in a subset of transcripts in the transcriptome of COCs. Therefore, oocyte suppression of Ddit4l expression allows for MTOR activation in cumulus cells, and this oocyte-dependent activation of MTOR signaling in cumulus cells controls the development and survival of COCs.

  2. Research and Technology, 1987, Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerny, Gene (Editor); Moe, Karen (Editor); Paddack, Steven (Editor); Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Ballard, Jan (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Research at Goddard Space Flight Center during 1987 is summarized. Topics addressed include space and earth sciences, technology, flight projects and mission definition studies, and institutional technology.

  3. Robert H. Goddard and His Liquid-Gasoline Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Goddard's 1926 rocket configuration. Dr. Goddard's liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  4. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  5. Science at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2012-01-01

    The Sciences and Exploration Directorate of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is the largest Earth and space science research organization in the world. Its scientists advance understanding of the Earth and its life-sustaining environment, the Sun, the solar system, and the wider universe beyond. Researchers in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate work with engineers, computer programmers, technologists, and other team members to develop the cutting-edge technology needed for space-based research. Instruments are also deployed on aircraft, balloons, and Earth's surface. I will give an overview of the current research activities and programs at GSFC including the James Web Space Telescope (JWST), future Earth Observing programs, experiments that are exploring our solar system and studying the interaction of the Sun with the Earth's magnetosphere.

  6. NASA/Goddard Thermal Technology Overview 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Daniel; Swanson, Theodore D.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the current plans and efforts at NASA Goddard to develop new thermal control technology for anticipated future missions. It will also address some of the programmatic developments currently underway at NASA, especially with respect to the Technology Development Program at NASA. While funding for basic technology development is still scarce, significant efforts are being made in direct support of flight programs. New technology development continues to be driven by the needs of future missions, and applications of these technologies to current Goddard programs will be addressed. Many of these technologies also have broad applicability to DOD, DOE, and commercial programs. Partnerships have been developed with the Air Force, Navy, and various universities to promote technology development. In addition, technology development activities supported by internal research and development (IRAD) program, the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program, and the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), are reviewed in this presentation. Specific technologies addressed include; two-phase systems applications and issues on NASA missions, latest developments of electro-hydrodynamically pumped systems, development of high electrical conductivity coatings, and various other research activities. New Technology program underway at NASA, although funding is limited center dot NASA/GSFC's primary mission of science satellite development is healthy and vibrant, although new missions are scarce - now have people on overhead working new missions and proposals center dot Future mission applications promise to be thermally challenging center dot Direct technology funding is still very restricted - Projects are the best source for direct application of technology - SBIR thermal subtopic resurrected in FY 14 - Limited Technology development underway via IRAD, NESC, other sources - Administrator pushing to revive technology and educational programs at NASA

  7. Simulation of solar radiative transfer in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    This work presents a 3-D model of radiative transfer which is used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds and fluxes (albedo and transmittance) of visible solar radiation.

  8. Cumulus cloud properties derived using Landsat satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, B. A.; Welch, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) digital data are used to remotely sense cumulus cloud properties such as cloud fraction and cloud reflectance, along with the distribution of cloud number and cloud fraction as a function of cloud size. The analysis is carried out for four cumulus fields covering regions approximately 150 km square. Results for these initial cloud fields indicate that: (1) the common intuitive model of clouds as nearly uniform reflecting surfaces is a poor representation of cumulus clouds, (2) the cumulus clouds were often multicelled, even for clouds as small as 1 km in diameter, (3) cloud fractional coverage derived using a simple reflectance threshold is sensitive to the chosen threshold even for 57-meter resolution Landsat data, (4) the sensitivity of cloud fraction to changes in satellite sensor resolution is less sensitive than suggested theoretically, and (5) the Landsat derived cloud size distributions show encouraging similarities among the cloud fields examined.

  9. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  10. Extracellular Vesicles from Bovine Follicular Fluid Support Cumulus Expansion.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Ting; Hong, Xioman; Christenson, Lane K; McGinnis, Lynda K

    2015-11-01

    Expansion of the cumulus complex surrounding the oocyte is critical for ovulation of a fertilizable egg. The ovulation-inducing surge of luteinizing hormone leads to an increased expression of genes such as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Ptgs2), pentraxin-related protein 3 (Ptx3), and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6 (Tnfaip6) that support cumulus expansion. Factors released by mural granulosa and cumulus granulosa cells into the follicular fluid induce paracrine signaling within the follicular compartment. The follicular fluid that separates these distinct granulosa cell types is an enriched fluid containing numerous proteins, nucleic acids, and other macromolecules. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are also present; however, no physiologically relevant functions of follicular EVs have yet been demonstrated. In our study, the effect of follicular EVs on cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) expansion and relevant gene expression was assayed. Follicular EVs were isolated using ultracentrifugation from follicular fluid of small (3-5 mm) and large (>9 mm) antral bovine follicles, then characterized by nanoparticle tracking analysis, electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. To test for bioactivity, mouse and bovine COCs were cultured with follicular EVs. Cumulus expansion and Ptgs2, Ptx3, and Tnfaip6 gene expression were measured following COC maturation culture. The results demonstrated that follicular EVs can support both measurable cumulus expansion and increased gene expression.

  11. Extracellular Vesicles from Bovine Follicular Fluid Support Cumulus Expansion1

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wei-Ting; Hong, Xioman; Christenson, Lane K.; McGinnis, Lynda K.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of the cumulus complex surrounding the oocyte is critical for ovulation of a fertilizable egg. The ovulation-inducing surge of luteinizing hormone leads to an increased expression of genes such as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Ptgs2), pentraxin-related protein 3 (Ptx3), and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6 (Tnfaip6) that support cumulus expansion. Factors released by mural granulosa and cumulus granulosa cells into the follicular fluid induce paracrine signaling within the follicular compartment. The follicular fluid that separates these distinct granulosa cell types is an enriched fluid containing numerous proteins, nucleic acids, and other macromolecules. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are also present; however, no physiologically relevant functions of follicular EVs have yet been demonstrated. In our study, the effect of follicular EVs on cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) expansion and relevant gene expression was assayed. Follicular EVs were isolated using ultracentrifugation from follicular fluid of small (3–5 mm) and large (>9 mm) antral bovine follicles, then characterized by nanoparticle tracking analysis, electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. To test for bioactivity, mouse and bovine COCs were cultured with follicular EVs. Cumulus expansion and Ptgs2, Ptx3, and Tnfaip6 gene expression were measured following COC maturation culture. The results demonstrated that follicular EVs can support both measurable cumulus expansion and increased gene expression. PMID:26423123

  12. The 1993 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1993 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD on May 10-13, 1993. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  13. Intersatellite communications optoelectronics research at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A review is presented of current optoelectronics research and development at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for high-power, high-bandwidth laser transmitters; high-bandwidth, high-sensitivity optical receivers; pointing, acquisition, and tracking components; and experimental and theoretical system modeling at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Program hardware and space flight opportunities are presented.

  14. On Trade-wind cumulus cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, P.; Li, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow, precipitating, cumuli within the easterly trades were investigated using ship-board measurements, scanning radar data, and visible satellite imagery from two weeks in January 2005 of the Rain in Cumulus over Ocean experiment. One focus was to identify the mechanism(s) triggering convection. Shipboard rainfall rates of up to 2 mm hr-1 were recorded almost daily, if only for 10-30 minutes typically, almost always from clouds within mesoscale arcs. The precipitating cumuli, capable of reaching above 4 km, cooled surface air by 1-2 K, in all cases lowered surface specific humidities by up to 1.5 g kg-1, reduced surface equivalent potential temperatures by up to 6 K, and were often associated with short-lived increases in wind speed of up to 4 m s-1. Cohesive downdrafts producing surface air drier than the environment differed from previous observations of moist cold pools under stratocumulus. Upper-level downdrafts were also inferred to explain double-lobed moisture and temperature sounding profiles, as well as multiple inversions in wind profiler data. In two cases investigated further, the precipitating convection propagated faster westward than the mean surface wind by ˜ 2-3 m s-1, consistent with a density current of depth ˜ 200 m. In the cold pool recovery zones of the two cases, the surface air temperatures equilibrated with time to the sea surface temperatures, but the surface air specific humidities stayed relatively constant after initial quick recoveries. This suggested entrainment of drier air from above fully compensated moistening from surface latent heat fluxes as the new surface-based mixed-layer deepened. Recovery zone surface wind speeds and latent heat fluxes were not higher than environmental values. Non-precipitating shallow clouds were observed after the surface buoyancy had sufficiently recovered (barring encroachment of other convection from outside the original cold pool). The mesoscale arcs favored atmospheres with higher water vapor

  15. First radar echoes from cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Charles A.; Miller, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    In attempting to use centimeter-wavelength radars to investigate the early stage of precipitation formation in clouds, 'mantle echoes' are rediscovered and shown to come mostly from scattering by small-scale variations in refractive index, a Bragg kind of scattering mechanism. This limits the usefulness of single-wavelength radar for studies of hydrometeor growth, according to data on summer cumulus clouds in North Dakota, Hawaii, and Florida, to values of reflectivity factor above about 10 dBZe with 10-cm radar, 0 dBZe with 5-cm radar, and -10 dBZe with 3-cm radar. These are limits at or above which the backscattered radar signal from the kinds of clouds observed can be assumed to be almost entirely from hydrometeors or (rarely) other particulate material such as insects. Dual-wavelength radar data can provide the desired information about hydrometeors at very low reflectivity levels if assumptions can be made about the inhomogeneities responsible for the Bragg scattering. The Bragg scattering signal itself probably will be a useful way to probe inhomogeneities one-half the radar wavelength in scale for studying cloud entrainment and mixing processes. However, this use is possible only before scattering from hydrometeors dominates the radar return.

  16. Cumulus cloud transport of transient tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidel, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed for including cumulus cloud transport, rainout of water soluble gases, and aqueous phase chemistry into gas phase photochemical models. Cloud populations are represented as ensemble distributions of individual clouds of various heights. An individual cloud is represented as a one-dimensional, steady state plume with height-independent radius entraining air from the boundary of the cloud. The model is applied to several hypothetical atmospheric tracers to show how clouds may affect the tropospheric distributions of ozone, NO(y), SO2, peroxyacetylnitrate, hydrocarbons, and other gases. Although the numerical experiments were based on cloud mass fluxes from diagnostic studies in the tropics and thus are not representative of the entire globe, it was found that an increasing mixing ratio with height in the free troposphere can be produced for some gases with only a surface source when clouds are present. This suggests that some reactive tropospheric species with primarily surface sources may play a somewhat more important role in tropospheric chemistry than is presently believed depending on the global distribution of cloud mass fluxes. Deficiencies in existing photochemical models due to the way clouds are typically treated are discussed.

  17. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca(2+)) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence.

  18. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  19. GLOW: The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huailin; Li, Steven X.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    GLOW (Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds) is a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. The system is contained in a modified van to allow deployment in field operations. The lidar system uses a Nd:YAG laser transmitter to measure winds using either aerosol backscatter at 1064 nm or molecular backscatter at 355 nm. The receiver telescope is a 45 cm Dall-Kirkham which is fiber coupled to separate Doppler receivers, one optimized for the aerosol backscatter wind measurement and another optimized for the molecular backscatter wind measurement. The receivers are implementations of the 'double edge' technique and use high spectral resolution Fabry-Perot etalons to measure the Doppler shift. A 45 cm aperture azimuth-over-elevation scanner is mounted on the roof of the van to allow full sky access and a variety of scanning options. GLOW is intended to be used as a deployable field system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. In addition, it can be used for calibration/validation activities following launch of spaceborne wind lidar systems. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the examples of lidar wind profiles obtained with the system.

  20. GLOW- The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huailin; Li, Steven X.

    2000-01-01

    GLOW (Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds) is a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. The system is contained in a modified van to allow deployment in field operations. The lidar system uses a Nd:YAG laser transmitter to measure winds using either aerosol backscatter at 1064 nm or molecular backscatter at 355 nm. The receiver telescope is a 45 cm Dall-Kirkham which is fiber coupled to separate Doppler receivers, one optimized for the aerosol backscatter wind measurement and another optimized for the molecular backscatter wind measurement. The receivers are implementations of the 'double edge' technique and use high spectral resolution Fabry-Perot etalons to measure the Doppler shift. A 45 cm aperture azimuth-over-elevation scanner is mounted on the roof of the van to allow full sky access and a variety of scanning options. GLOW is intended to be used as a deployable field system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. In addition, it can be used for calibration/validation activities following launch of spaceborne wind lidar systems. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the examples of lidar wind profiles obtained with the system.

  1. NASA Goddard Thermal Technology Overview 2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Swanson, Ted

    2016-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the current plans and efforts at NASA Goddard to develop new thermal control technology for anticipated future missions. It will also address some of the programmatic developments currently underway at NASA, especially with respect to the NASA Technology Development Program. The effects of the recently enacted FY 16 NASA budget, which includes a sizeable increase, will also be addressed. While funding for basic technology development is still tight, significant efforts are being made in direct support of flight programs. Thermal technology implementation on current flight programs will be reviewed, and the recent push for Cube-sat mission development will also be addressed. Many of these technologies also have broad applicability to DOD, DOE, and commercial programs. Partnerships have been developed with the Air Force, Navy, and various universities to promote technology development. In addition, technology development activities supported by internal research and development (IRAD) program and the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program are reviewed in this presentation. Specific technologies addressed include; two-phase systems applications and issues on NASA missions, latest developments of electro-hydrodynamically pumped systems, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Micro-scale Heat Transfer, and various other research activities.

  2. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  3. Satellite-tracked cumulus velocities. [for determining wind velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.; Pearl, E. W.; Shenk, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    The research indicates that extreme caution must be exercised in converting cloud velocities into winds. The motion of fair-weather cumuli obtained by tracking their shadows over Springfield, Missouri revealed that the standard deviation in the individual cloud motion is several times the tracking error. The motion of over-ocean cumuli near Barbados clearly indicated the complicated nature of cumulus velocities. Analysis of whole-sky images obtained near Tampa, Florida failed to show significant continuity and stability of cumulus plumes, less than 0.3 mile in diameter. Cumulus turrets with 0.3 to 2 mile in size appear to be the best target to infer the mean wind within the subcloud layers. Cumulus or stratocumulus cells consisting of x number of turrets do not always move with wind. The addition and deletion of turrets belonging to a specific cell appear to be the cause of the erratic motion of a tracer cell. It may by concluded that the accuracy of wind estimates is unlikely to be better than 2m/sec unless the physical and dynamical characteristics of cumulus motion is futher investigated.

  4. Seeding cumulus in Florida: new 1970 results.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J; Woodley, W L

    1971-04-09

    In the Florida single cloud experiments, the main result of the statistical analyses is that the dynamic seeding effect on rainfall is large, positive, and significant. From all the 1968 and 1970 data together, the seeding effect is estimated to be larger than a factor of 3; that is, the seeded clouds rained more than three times as much as the controls after the seeding run. On fair days, defined objectively by percentage of area covered by showers, the seeding effect is shown to be larger than the overall average, but it may be negative on rainy days. Rainy days in the tropics are about 10 percent of the days with rain, but they produce about half the total rainfall. The applicability of our single cloud results to other areas is not established but seems hopeful for many tropical and subtropical regions. It can be assessed by cloud population studies together with our numerical model (25). Guidance for the next steps toward practical rainfall enhancement and toward the understanding and modification of cloud systems in storms may be provided by our study of merger clouds. Mergers are shown often to produce more than an order of magnitude more rain than isolated clouds on the same day, probably owing to dynamic invigoration of the merged cloud circulations. Results of our first small attempt toward inducing and documenting mergers in a multiple cloud seeding experiment appear promising. Although far from statistically conclusive, they have opened a new frontier in the science and technology of dynamic cloud modification. It is also hoped that the multiple cumulus seeding experiments will help to clarify the formation of "cloud clusters" and their role in large-scale circulations, thus contributing to the focal subject of the Global Atmospheric Research Program in the tropics.

  5. Derivation of Cumulus Cloud Dimensions and Shape from the Airborne Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Ottaviani, Matteo; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.

    2016-01-01

    The Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is an airborne instrument, whose measurements have been extensively used for retrievals of microphysical properties of clouds. In this study we show that for cumulus clouds the information content of the RSP data can be extended by adding the macroscopic parameters of the cloud, such as its geometric shape, dimensions, and height above the ground. This extension is possible by virtue of the high angular resolution and high frequency of the RSP measurements, which allow for geometric constraint of the cloud's 2D cross section between a number of tangent lines of view. The retrieval method is tested on realistic 3D radiative transfer simulations and applied to actual RSP data.

  6. The Goddard Space Flight Center preferred parts list, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, N. E. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    A listing is presented of preferred electronic parts, part upgrading procedures, part derating guidelines, and part screening procedures to be used in the selection, procurement, and application of parts for Goddard Space Flight Center space systems and ground support equipment.

  7. ISS Update: NBL Orion Flight Lead Tim Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Tim Goddard, Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) Orion Flight Lead, about how the NBL is used to train rescue and recovery personnel for future Orio...

  8. Hubble 25th Anniversary: NASA Social at Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 25th anniversary on April 24, 2015. To mark the occasion, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland -- home of Hubble operations -- host...

  9. On the cumulus diurnal cycle over the tropical warm pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, James H.; Johnson, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    An idealized cloud-resolving model experiment is executed to study the prominent cumulus diurnal cycle in suppressed regimes over the tropical warm pool. These regimes are characterized by daytime cumulus invigoration and cloud-layer moistening connected with enhanced diurnal cycles in shortwave radiative heating (SW) and sea surface temperature (SST). The relative roles of diurnally varying SW and SST in this cumulus diurnal cycle are assessed, wherein radiation is modeled and SST is prescribed. Large-scale subsidence is parameterized using the spectral weak temperature gradient (WTG) scheme, such that large-scale vertical motion (wwtg), and hence subsidence drying, is modulated by diurnal changes in diabatic heating. A control simulation exhibits daytime cumulus invigoration that closely matches observations, including midday cloud-layer moistening. This cumulus invigoration is composed of two distinct modes: (1) a midday nonprecipitating ("forced") mode of predominately shallow clouds, driven by the peak in SST and surface fluxes as the mixed layer deepens and dries; and (2) a precipitating late-afternoon ("active") mode characterized by deeper clouds in connection with a more moist cloud layer. This cloud-layer moistening is driven by the daytime relaxation of wwtg subsidence, which is prompted by the midday peak in SW. The transition from the surface flux-driven forced mode to the active precipitating mode is accompanied by a transition from relatively small-scale boundary layer circulation cells to larger cells that are highly modulated by cold pools, consistent with observations. When the diurnal cycle is removed, clouds are persistently shallower with virtually no rainfall, emphasizing the inherent nonlinearity of the cumulus diurnal cycle.

  10. Status of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Participation in SNAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Dr. Rauscher will present programatic status and high-level/summary information on the technical status of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's participation in the SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Goddard's participation falls into four areas, and status in each of these will be covered. These areas are as follows: (I) focal plane array and packaging, (2) Teledyne HAWAII-4RG sensor chip assembly, (3) communications studies, and (4) integration and test studies.

  11. The beneficial effects of cumulus cells and oocyte-cumulus cell gap junctions depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Wu, Sha-Na; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Wang, Dong-Hui; Kong, Xiang-Wei; Lu, Angeleem; Li, Yan-Jiao; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Yue-Fang; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Cumulus cells are a group of closely associated granulosa cells that surround and nourish oocytes. Previous studies have shown that cumulus cells contribute to oocyte maturation and fertilization through gap junction communication. However, it is not known how this gap junction signaling affects in vivo versus in vitro maturation of oocytes, and their subsequent fertilization and embryonic development following insemination. Therefore, in our study, we performed mouse oocyte maturation and insemination using in vivo- or in vitro-matured oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCCs, which retain gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes co-cultured with cumulus cells (DCs, which lack gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), and in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes without cumulus cells (DOs). Using these models, we were able to analyze the effects of gap junction signaling on oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. We found that gap junctions were necessary for both in vivo and in vitro oocyte maturation. In addition, for oocytes matured in vivo, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization and blastocyst formation, and this improvement was strengthened by gap junctions. Moreover, for oocytes matured in vitro, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization, but not blastocyst formation, and this improvement was independent of gap junctions. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the beneficial effect of gap junction signaling from cumulus cells depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods.

  12. Effects of Cumulus Convection on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Effects Of Cumulus Convection On Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones M.K. Yau and R. R. Rogers Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences McGill...N00014-96-1-0746 LONG-TERM GOAL Our long term goal is to contribute to our understanding of the physics and dynamics of marine convection and mesoscale...00-00-1999 to 00-00-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects Of Cumulus Convection On Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  13. Advancing Models and Evaluation of Cumulus, Climate and Aerosol Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, Andrew

    2015-10-27

    This project was successfully able to meet its’ goals, but faced some serious challenges due to personnel issues. Nonetheless, it was largely successful. The Project Objectives were as follows: 1. Develop a unified representation of stratifom and cumulus cloud microphysics for NCAR/DOE global community models. 2. Examine the effects of aerosols on clouds and their impact on precipitation in stratiform and cumulus clouds. We will also explore the effects of clouds and precipitation on aerosols. 3. Test these new formulations using advanced evaluation techniques and observations and release

  14. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Divsion Annual Report 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD, Code 660) is one of the world's largest and most diverse astronomical organizations. Space flight missions are conceived, built and launched to observe the entire range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to centimeter waves. In addition, experiments are flown to gather data on high-energy cosmic rays, and plans are being made to detect gravitational radiation from space-borne missions. To enable these missions, we have vigorous programs of instrument and detector development. Division scientists also carry out preparatory theoretical work and subsequent data analysis and modeling. In addition to space flight missions, we have a vibrant suborbital program with numerous sounding rocket and balloon payloads in development or operation. The ASD is organized into five labs: the Astroparticle Physics Lab, the X-ray Astrophysics Lab, the Gravitational Astrophysics Lab, the Observational Cosmology Lab, and the Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Lab. The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is an Office at the Division level. Approximately 400 scientists and engineers work in ASD. Of these, 80 are civil servant scientists, while the rest are resident university-based scientists, contractors, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and administrative staff. We currently operate the Swift Explorer mission and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In addition, we provide data archiving and operational support for the XMM mission (jointly with ESA) and the Suzaku mission (with JAXA). We are also a partner with Caltech on the NuSTAR mission. The Hubble Space Telescope Project is headquartered at Goddard, and ASD provides Project Scientists to oversee operations at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Projects in development include the Neutron Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission, an X-ray timing experiment for the International Space Station; the Transiting Exoplanet Sky Survey (TESS

  15. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  16. Evaluation of a New Parameterization for Fair-Weather Cumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Stull, Roland B.

    2006-05-25

    A new parameterization for boundary layer cumulus clouds, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, is introduced. This scheme uses joint probability density functions (JPDFs) of virtual potential temperature and water-vapor mixing ratio, as well as the mean vertical profiles of virtual potential temperature, to predict the amount and size distribution of boundary layer cloud cover. This model considers the diversity of air parcels over a heterogeneous surface, and recognizes that some parcels rise above their lifting condensation level to become cumulus, while other parcels might rise as clear updrafts. This model has several unique features: 1) surface heterogeneity is represented using the boundary layer JPDF of virtual potential temperature versus water-vapor mixing ratio, 2) clear and cloudy thermals are allowed to coexist at the same altitude, and 3) a range of cloud-base heights, cloud-top heights, and cloud thicknesses are predicted within any one cloud field, as observed. Using data from Boundary Layer Experiment 1996 and a model intercomparsion study using large eddy simulation (LES) based on Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX), it is shown that the CuP model does a good job predicting cloud-base height and cloud-top height. The model also shows promise in predicting cloud cover, and is found to give better cloud-cover estimates than three other cumulus parameterizations: one based on relative humidity, a statistical scheme based on the saturation deficit, and a slab model.

  17. Recirculation and growth of raindrops in simulated shallow cumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, A. K.; Seifert, A.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates growth processes of raindrops and the role of recirculation of raindrops for the formation of precipitation in shallow cumulus. Two related cases of fields of lightly precipitating shallow cumulus are simulated using Large-Eddy Simulation combined with a Lagrangian drop model for raindrop growth and a cloud tracking algorithm. Statistics from the Lagrangian drop model yield that most raindrops leave the cloud laterally and then evaporate in the subsaturated cloud environmental air. Only 1%-3% of the raindrops contribute to surface precipitation. Among this subsample of raindrops that contribute to surface precipitation, two growth regimes are identified: those raindrops that are dominated by accretional growth from cloud water, and those raindrops that are dominated by selfcollection among raindrops. The mean cloud properties alone are not decisive for the growth of an individual raindrop but the in-cloud variability is crucial. Recirculation of raindrops is found to be common in shallow cumulus, especially for those raindrops that contribute to surface precipitation. The fraction of surface precipitation that is attributed to recirculating raindrops differs from cloud to cloud but can be larger than 50%. This implies that simple conceptual models of raindrop growth that neglect the effect of recirculation disregard a substantial portion of raindrop growth in shallow cumulus.

  18. Semiprognostic tests of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization using simulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kuan-Man; Arakawa, Akio

    1992-01-01

    Semiprognostic tests are performed against data simulated by a cumulus ensemble model to evaluate the Arakawa-Schubert (A-S) cumulus parametrization. It is found that the A-S cumulus parametrization is generally valid despite the existence of mesoscale organization in cumulus convection. The nondiagnostic and nondeterministic aspects of the A-S cumulus parametrization are examined by testing the sensitivity of the parametrization to the horizontal grid resolution. It is also shown that the inclusion of convective-scale downdrafts improves the results of semiprognostic tests.

  19. High-resolution NU-WRF simulations of a deep convective-precipitation system during MC3E: Further improvements and comparisons between Goddard microphysics schemes and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Di; Lang, Stephen; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Fridlind, Ann; Matsui, Toshihisa

    2016-02-01

    The Goddard microphysics was recently improved by adding a fourth ice class (frozen drops/hail). This new 4ICE scheme was developed and tested in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model for an intense continental squall line and a moderate, less organized continental case. Simulated peak radar reflectivity profiles were improved in intensity and shape for both cases, as were the overall reflectivity probability distributions versus observations. In this study, the new Goddard 4ICE scheme is implemented into the regional-scale NASA Unified-Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model, modified and evaluated for the same intense squall line, which occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). NU-WRF simulated radar reflectivities, total rainfall, propagation, and convective system structures using the 4ICE scheme modified herein agree as well as or significantly better with observations than the original 4ICE and two previous 3ICE (graupel or hail) versions of the Goddard microphysics. With the modified 4ICE, the bin microphysics-based rain evaporation correction improves propagation and in conjunction with eliminating the unrealistic dry collection of ice/snow by hail can replicate the erect, narrow, and intense convective cores. Revisions to the ice supersaturation, ice number concentration formula, and snow size mapping, including a new snow breakup effect, allow the modified 4ICE to produce a stronger, better organized system, more snow, and mimic the strong aggregation signature in the radar distributions. NU-WRF original 4ICE simulated radar reflectivity distributions are consistent with and generally superior to those using the GCE due to the less restrictive domain and lateral boundaries.

  20. High-Resolution NU-WRF Simulations of a Deep Convective-Precipitation System During MC3E. Part 1; Comparisons Between Goddard Microphysics Schemes and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Di; Lang, Stephen; Chern, Jiundar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Fridlind, Ann; Matsui, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard microphysics scheme was recently improved by adding a 4th ice class (frozen dropshail). This new 4ICE scheme was implemented and tested in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) for an intense continental squall line and a moderate,less-organized continental case. Simulated peak radar reflectivity profiles were improved both in intensity and shape for both cases as were the overall reflectivity probability distributions versus observations. In this study, the new Goddard 4ICE scheme is implemented into the regional-scale NASA Unified - Weather Research and Forecasting model (NU-WRF) and tested on an intense mesoscale convective system that occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The NU42WRF simulated radar reflectivities, rainfall intensities, and vertical and horizontal structure using the new 4ICE scheme agree as well as or significantly better with observations than when using previous versions of the Goddard 3ICE (graupel or hail) schemes. In the 4ICE scheme, the bin microphysics-based rain evaporation correction produces more erect convective cores, while modification of the unrealistic collection of ice by dry hail produces narrow and intense cores, allowing more slow-falling snow to be transported rearward. Together with a revised snow size mapping, the 4ICE scheme produces a more horizontally stratified trailing stratiform region with a broad, more coherent light rain area. In addition, the NU-WRF 4ICE simulated radar reflectivity distributions are consistent with and generally superior to those using the GCE due to the less restrictive open lateral boundaries

  1. Ground-Based Remote Retrievals of Cumulus Entrainment Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy J.; Turner, David D.; Berg, Larry K.; Krueger, Steven K.

    2013-07-26

    While fractional entrainment rates for cumulus clouds have typically been derived from airborne observations, this limits the size and scope of available data sets. To increase the number of continental cumulus entrainment rate observations available for study, an algorithm for retrieving them from ground-based remote sensing observations has been developed. This algorithm, called the Entrainment Rate In Cumulus Algorithm (ERICA), uses the suite of instruments at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility as inputs into a Gauss-Newton optimal estimation scheme, in which an assumed guess of the entrainment rate is iteratively adjusted through intercomparison of modeled liquid water path and cloud droplet effective radius to their observed counterparts. The forward model in this algorithm is the Explicit Mixing Parcel Model (EMPM), a cloud parcel model that treats entrainment as a series of discrete entrainment events. A quantified value for measurement uncertainty is also returned as part of the retrieval. Sensitivity testing and information content analysis demonstrate the robust nature of this method for retrieving accurate observations of the entrainment rate without the drawbacks of airborne sampling. Results from a test of ERICA on three months of shallow cumulus cloud events show significant variability of the entrainment rate of clouds in a single day and from one day to the next. The mean value of 1.06 km-¹ for the entrainment rate in this dataset corresponds well with prior observations and simulations of the entrainment rate in cumulus clouds.

  2. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  3. Expression of focal adhesion kinase in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes, and effect of phosphorylation at Tyr397 on cumulus expansion.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Jun; Sakurai, Masahiro; Hoshino, Yumi; Tanemura, Kentaro; Sato, Eimei

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), as well as the role of FAK phosphorylation at Tyr397 during oocyte maturation. The effect of inhibiting FAK phosphorylation at Tyr397 during in vitro maturation (IVM) on subsequent fertilization and preimplantation embryo development was also examined. Western blotting analyses revealed that total and Tyr397-phosphorylated FAK were expressed in vivo in both cumulus cells and oocytes. Immunocytochemical studies localized this kinase throughout the cytoplasm of cumulus cells and oocytes; in particular, Tyr397-phosphorylated FAK tended to accumulate in regions where cumulus cells contact each other. Interestingly, the in vivo level of Tyr397 phosphorylation in cumulus cells was significantly lower after compared to before cumulus expansion. Addition of FAK inhibitor 14, which specifically blocks phosphorylation at Tyr397, stimulated oocyte meiotic maturation and cumulus expansion during IVM in the absence of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Reverse-transcriptase PCR showed that the mRNA expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2), a marker of cumulus expansion, was significantly induced in cumulus cells. Subsequent in vitro fertilization and culture showed that more oocytes developed to the blastocyst stage when they were treated with FAK inhibitor 14 during IVM, although the blastocyst total cell number was lower than in oocytes stimulated with FSH. These results indicate that FAK is involved in the maturation of COCs; specifically, phosphorylation at Tyr397 may regulate cumulus expansion via the expression of Has2 mRNA in cumulus cells, which could affect the developmental competence of oocytes.

  4. The 1988 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James (Editor); Hughes, Peter (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1988 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland on May 24, 1988. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed. The papers in these proceedings fall into the following areas: mission operations support, planning and scheduling; fault isolation/diagnosis; image processing and machine vision; data management; modeling and simulation; and development tools/methodologies.

  5. The Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST Center)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The following is a technical report of the progress made under Cooperative Agreement NCC5494, the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST). The period covered by this report is October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001. GEST is a consortium of scientists and engineers, led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to conduct scientific research in Earth and information sciences and related technologies in collaboration with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). GEST was established through a cooperative agreement signed May 11, 2000, following a competitive procurement process initiated by GSFC.

  6. Cooperative effects of 17β-estradiol and oocyte-derived paracrine factors on the transcriptome of mouse cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Emori, Chihiro; Wigglesworth, Karen; Fujii, Wataru; Naito, Kunihiko; Eppig, John J; Sugiura, Koji

    2013-12-01

    Oocyte-derived paracrine factors (ODPFs) and estrogens are both essential for the development and function of ovarian follicles in mammals. Cooperation of these two factors was assessed in vitro using intact cumulus-oocyte complexes, cumulus cells cultured after the removal of oocytes [oocytectomized (OOX) cumulus cells], and OOX cumulus cells cocultured with denuded oocytes, all in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol (E2). Effects on the cumulus cell transcriptome were assessed by microarray analysis. There was no significant difference between the cumulus cell transcriptomes of either OOX cumulus cells cocultured with oocytes or intact cumulus-oocyte complexes. Therefore, oocyte-mediated regulation of the cumulus cell transcriptome is mediated primarily by ODPFs and not by gap junctional communication between oocytes and cumulus cells. Gene ontology analysis revealed that both ODPFs and E2 strongly affected the biological processes associated with cell proliferation in cumulus cells. E2 had limited effects on ODPF-regulated biological processes. However, in sharp contrast, ODPFs significantly affected biological processes regulated by E2 in cumulus cells. For example, only in the presence of ODPFs did E2 significantly promote the biological processes related to phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction in cumulus cells, such as the signaling pathways of epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor. Therefore, ODPFs and E2 cooperate to regulate the cumulus cell transcriptome and, in general, oocytes modulate the effects of estrogens on cumulus cell function.

  7. A New Scheme for Predicting Fair-Weather Cumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Stull, Roland B.

    2007-04-01

    A new parameterization for boundary layer cumulus clouds, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, is introduced. Unlike many other parameterizations, the CuP scheme explicitly links the fair-weather clouds to the boundary-layer turbulence and accounts for the non-local nature of the turbulence. This scheme uses joint probability density functions (JPDFs) of virtual potential temperature and water-vapor mixing ratio, as well as the mean vertical profiles of virtual potential temperature, to predict the amount and size distribution of boundary layer cloud cover. This model considers the diversity of air parcels over a heterogeneous surface, and recognizes that some parcels rise above their lifting condensation level to become cumulus, while other parcels might rise as clear updrafts. This model has several unique features: 1) surface heterogeneity and boundary-layer turbulence is represented using the boundary layer JPDF of virtual potential temperature versus water-vapor mixing ratio, 2) clear and cloudy thermals are allowed to coexist at the same altitude, and 3) a range of cloud-base heights, cloud-top heights, and cloud thicknesses are predicted within any one cloud field, as observed. Using data from Boundary Layer Experiment 1996 and a model intercomparsion study using large eddy simulation (LES) based on the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX), the CuP scheme is compared to three other cumulus parameterizations: one based on relative humidity, a statistical scheme based on the saturation deficit, and a slab model. It is shown that the CuP model does a better job predicting the cloud-base height and the cloud-top height than three other parameterizations. The model also shows promise in predicting cloud cover, and is found to give better cloud-cover estimates than the three other cumulus parameterizations. In ongoing work supported by the US Department of Energy¹s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, the CuP scheme is being

  8. The importance of having zinc during in vitro maturation of cattle cumulus-oocyte complex: role of cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Anchordoquy, J M; Anchordoquy, J P; Sirini, M A; Picco, S J; Peral-García, P; Furnus, C C

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of zinc (Zn) on the health of cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) during in vitro maturation (IVM). Experiments were designed to evaluate the effect of Zn added to IVM medium on: DNA integrity, apoptosis, cumulus expansion and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of cumulus cells (CC). Also, role of CC on Zn transport during IVM was evaluated on oocyte developmental capacity. DNA damage and early apoptosis were higher in CC matured with 0 μg/ml Zn compared with 0.7, 1.1 and 1.5 μg/ml Zn (p < 0.05). Cumulus expansion did not show differences in COC matured with or without Zn supplementation (p > 0.05). Superoxide dismutase activity was higher in COC matured with 1.5 μg/ml Zn than with 0 μg/ml Zn (p < 0.05). Cleavage and blastocyst rates were recorded after IVM in three maturation systems: intact COCs, denuded oocytes with cumulus cells monolayer (DO + CC) and denuded oocytes (DO). Cleavage rates were similar when COC, DO + CC or DO were matured with 1.5 μg/ml Zn compared with control group (p > 0.05). Blastocyst rates were significantly higher in COC than in DO + CC and DO with the addition of 1.5 μg/ml Zn during IVM (p < 0.01). Blastocyst quality was enhanced in COC and DO + CC compared with DO when Zn was added to IVM medium (p < 0.001). The results of this study indicate that Zn supplementation to IVM medium (i) decreased DNA damage and apoptosis in CC; (ii) increased SOD activity in CC; (iii) did not modify cumulus expansion and cleavage rates after in vitro fertilization; (iv) improved subsequent embryo development up to blastocyst stage; and (v) enhanced blastocyst quality when CC were present either in intact COC or in coculture during IVM.

  9. Stabilization functions of unforced cumulus clouds - Their nature and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Bras, Rafael L.; Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and the spatial distribution of cumuli within an unforced cumulus cloud field are investigated. The thermodynamic effects of convection are quantified as functions of changes of convective available potential energy (CAPE) induced by the convective overturning, and the time rate of change of CAPE is parameterized in terms of a kernel of influence or stabilization function. A three-dimensional cloud model is used to infer and quantify stabilization functions by performing single-cloud experiments. On the basis of the results obtained, a new hypothesis with respect to the spatial distribution of cumuli is postulated, which states that, under completely homogeneous external conditions and assuming a spatially random distribution of cloud-triggering mechanisms, the spatial distribution of cumuli in the resulting cloud field must be regular, as opposed to either random or clustered, because cumulus clouds tend to reduce the available energy for convection, thereby inhibiting further convection nearby.

  10. Cumulus and granulosa cell markers of oocyte and embryo quality

    PubMed Central

    Uyar, Asli; Torrealday, Saioa; Seli, Emre

    2013-01-01

    Lack of an objective, accurate, and noninvasive embryo assessment strategy remains one of the major challenges encountered in in vitro fertilization. Cumulus and mural granulosa cells reflect the characteristics of the oocyte, providing a noninvasive means to assess oocyte quality. Specifically, transcriptomic profiling of follicular cells may help identify biomarkers of oocyte and embryo competence. Current transcriptomics technologies include quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for analysis of individual genes and microarrays and high-throughput deep sequencing for whole genome expression profiling. Recently, using qRT-PCR and microarray technologies, a multitude of studies correlated changes in cumulus or granulosa cell gene expression with clinically relevant outcome parameters, including in vitro embryo development and pregnancy. While the initial findings are promising, a clinical benefit from the use of identified biomarker genes remains to be demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:23498999

  11. Influence of fair-weather cumulus clouds on isoprene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Barth, M. C.; Trainer, M.

    2012-05-01

    Fair-weather cumulus clouds are not resolved in regional- and global-scale atmospheric chemistry models because their horizontal extent is less than the horizontal resolution of the model. A Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model, with finer grid resolution, can resolve the energy containing turbulent eddies and fair-weather cumulus clouds. Isoprene, which is mainly emitted from deciduous forests and plays a significant role in producing ozone, has a chemical lifetime similar to the boundary layer turbulence turnover time, indicating that turbulent transport, cloud processes, and chemistry are all potentially important for the prediction of ambient isoprene concentrations. The LES model coupled with chemistry developed in this study is an ideal tool to examine the influence of fair-weather cumulus clouds on isoprene chemistry. With a LES model that includes a moderately complex gas-phase chemical mechanism of isoprene oxidation, we find enhancement of isoprene, methacrolein, and methylvinyl ketone in the cloud layer while changes in these chemical species' mixing ratios in the subcloud layer relative to the cloud-free case vary depending on the chemical lifetimes. We demonstrate that nitrogen oxides put into the system can modulate the chemical lifetimes of isoprene and related chemical species, which in turn changes the vertical distribution of the chemical species. For high NOx conditions, ozone in the subcloud layer for the cloudy case is ˜5 ppbv lower than that for the cloud-free case, suggesting potential positive ozone bias in large-scale models that do not include fair-weather cumulus cloud processes.

  12. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Supply Chain Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the working of the Supplier Assessment Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The program supports many GSFC projects to ensure suppliers are aware of and are following the contractual requirements, to provide an independent assessment of the suppliers' processes, and provide suppliers' safety and mission assurance organizations information to make the changes within their organization.

  13. Geographic information systems at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    The basic functions of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and the different ways that a GIS may be implemented are described. It surveys that GIS software packages that are currently in operation at the Goddard Space Flight Center and discusses the types of applications for which they are best suited. Future plans for in-house GIS research and development are outlined.

  14. Research and Technology Report. Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Maran, Stephen (Editor); Walter, Lou (Editor); Brown, Mitch (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of Goddard Space Flight Center's annual report highlights the importance of mission operations and data systems covering mission planning and operations; TDRSS, positioning systems, and orbit determination; ground system and networks, hardware and software; data processing and analysis; and World Wide Web use. The report also includes flight projects, space sciences, Earth system science, and engineering and materials.

  15. Carrier account utilization at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, W. E.; Langmead, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The system in use at Goddard Space Flight Center for the utilization of the Common Use Service Carrier Account and the R&D Inventory Carrier Account technique for budgeting, accounting, financial control, and management reporting, both for the individual functional area and on a Center-wide basis, is documented.

  16. The NASA Library and Researchers at Goddard: A Visitor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Jill H.

    2014-01-01

    Jill Powell, engineering librarian from Cornell University, visited the library at NASA Goddard in Greenbelt, Maryland in July 2013, interviewing library staff and selected NASA scientists. She studied the library's digital projects, publications, services, and operations. She also interviewed several NASA scientists on information-seeking…

  17. Technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, Henry H.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presented to Civil Space Technology Development workshop on technology transfer and effectiveness are provided. Topics covered include: obstacles to technology transfer; technology transfer improvement program at GSFC: communication between technology developers and users; and user feedback to technologists.

  18. The 1994 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1994 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence held at the NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland, on 10-12 May 1994. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  19. Performance of the Goddard Multiscale Modeling Framework with Goddard Ice Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Li, J.-L.; Mohr, Karen I.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2016-01-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount, total cloud fractions, net radiation, and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow and graupel. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with subgrid processes, cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs, and momentum transport remain and will require future improvement.

  20. Performance of the Goddard multiscale modeling framework with Goddard ice microphysical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Li, J.-L. F.; Mohr, Karen I.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2016-03-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount, total cloud fractions, net radiation, and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow and graupel. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with subgrid processes, cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs, and momentum transport remain and will require future improvement.

  1. Performance of the Goddard Multiscale Modeling Framework with Goddard Ice Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, J. D.; Tao, W. K.; Lang, S. E.; Matsui, T.; Li, J. L. F.; Mohr, K. I.

    2015-12-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products, CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud fractions, and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow/graupel as functions of temperature and mixing ratio. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with sub-grid processes and cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs remain and will require future improvement.

  2. Continuous growth of cloud droplets in cumulus cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Suehiro, Tamotsu; Saito, Izumi

    2016-04-01

    A new method to seamlessly simulate the continuous growth of droplets advected by turbulent flow inside a cumulus cloud was developed from first principle. A cubic box ascending with a mean updraft inside a cumulus cloud was introduced and the updraft velocity was self-consistently determined in such a way that the mean turbulent velocity within the box vanished. All the degrees of freedom of the cloud droplets and turbulence fields were numerically integrated. The box ascended quickly inside the cumulus cloud due to the updraft and the mean radius of the droplets grew from 10 to 24 μm for about 10 min. The turbulent flow tended to slow down the time evolutions of the updraft velocity, the box altitude and the mean cloud droplet radius. The size distribution of the cloud droplets in the updraft case was narrower than in the absence of the updraft. It was also found that the wavenumeber spectra of the variances of the temperature and water vapor mixing ratio were nearly constant in the low wavenumber range. The future development of the new method was argued.

  3. Entrainment in Laboratory Simulations of Cumulus Cloud Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha, R.; Diwan, S.; Subrahmanyam, D.; Sreenivas, K. R.; Bhat, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    A variety of cumulus cloud flows, including congestus (both shallow bubble and tall tower types), mediocris and fractus have been generated in a water tank by simulating the release of latent heat in real clouds. The simulation is achieved through ohmic heating, injected volumetrically into the flow by applying suitable voltages between diametral cross-sections of starting jets and plumes of electrically conducting fluid (acidified water). Dynamical similarity between atmospheric and laboratory cloud flows is achieved by duplicating values of an appropriate non-dimensional heat release number. Velocity measurements, made by laser instrumentation, show that the Taylor entrainment coefficient generally increases just above the level of commencement of heat injection (corresponding to condensation level in the real cloud). Subsequently the coefficient reaches a maximum before declining to the very low values that characterize tall cumulus towers. The experiments also simulate the protected core of real clouds. Cumulus Congestus : Atmospheric cloud (left), simulated laboratory cloud (right). Panels below show respectively total heat injected and vertical profile of heating in the laboratory cloud.

  4. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  5. MicroRNA-378 regulates oocyte maturation via the suppression of aromatase in porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bo; Toms, Derek; Shen, Wei; Li, Julang

    2015-03-15

    We sought to investigate whether miR-378 plays a role in cumulus cells and whether the manipulation of miRNA levels in cumulus cells influences oocyte maturation in vitro. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from ovarian follicles had significantly lower levels of precursor and mature miR-378 in cumulus cells surrounding metaphase II (MII) oocytes than cumulus cells surrounding germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes, suggesting a possible role of miR-378 during COC maturation. Overexpression of miR-378 in cumulus cells impaired expansion and decreased expression of genes associated with expansion (HAS2, PTGS2) and oocyte maturation (CX43, ADAMTS1, PGR). Cumulus cell expression of miR-378 also suppressed oocyte progression from the GV to MII stage (from 54 ± 2.7 to 31 ± 5.1%), accompanied by a decrease of growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), zona pellucida 3 (ZP3), and CX37 in the oocytes. Subsequent in vitro fertilization resulted in fewer oocytes from COCs overexpressing miR-378 reaching the blastocyst stage (7.3 ± 0.7 vs. 16.6 ± 0.5%). miR-378 knockdown led to increased cumulus expansion and oocyte progression to MII, confirming a specific effect of miR-378 in suppressing COC maturation. Aromatase (CYP19A1) expression in cumulus cells was also inhibited by miR-378, leading to a significant decrease in estradiol production. The addition of estradiol to IVM culture medium reversed the effect of miR-378 on cumulus expansion and oocyte meiotic progression, suggesting that decreased estradiol production via suppression of aromatase may be one of the mechanisms by which miR-378 regulates the maturation of COCs. Our data suggest that miR-378 alters gene expression and function in cumulus cells and influences oocyte maturation, possibly via oocyte-cumulus interaction and paracrine regulation.

  6. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  7. Method for collecting and immobilizing individual cumulus cells enabling quantitative immunofluorescence analysis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Maes, D; Van Soom, A

    2015-07-01

    Most immunofluorescence methods rely on techniques dealing with a very large number of cells. However, when the number of cells in a sample is low (e.g., when cumulus cells must be analyzed from individual cumulus-oocyte complexes), specific techniques are required to conserve, fix, and analyze cells individually. We established and validated a simple and effective method for collecting and immobilizing low numbers of cumulus cells that enables easy and quick quantitative immunofluorescence analysis of proteins from individual cells. To illustrate this technique, we stained proprotein of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin-like repeats-1 (proADAMTS-1) and analyzed its levels in individual porcine cumulus cells.

  8. Selective binding of human cumulus cell-secreted glycoproteins to human spermatozoa during capacitation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, J.; Kopecny, V.; Dvorak, M.

    1984-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that glycoproteins manufactured by human cumulus cells can be detected bound to human spermatozoa incubated in capacitational medium containing the labeled cumulus-cell secretions. Cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins were labeled with a mixture of /sup 3/H-methionine and /sup 3/H-tryptophan or with 3H-fucose, and the binding of the labeled compounds to spermatozoa was evaluated by autoradiography. The binding was highly selective, involving only approximately 1% of the samples of spermatozoa used. The results suggest that the binding of cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins to spermatozoa may represent a final and highly selective step in human sperm capacitation.

  9. A rain evaporation and downdraft parameterization to complement a cumulus updraft scheme and its evaluation using GATE data

    SciTech Connect

    Sud, Y.C. ); Walker, G.K. )

    1993-11-01

    A rain evaporation and downdraft parameterization is designed to complement the cumulus convection scheme of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres General Circulation Model (GLA GCM). The scheme invokes (1) a diagnostic determination of the commencement level of rain-evaporation-induced downdrafts, (2) a method for calculating downdraft mass fluxes emanating from different levels of the atmosphere, and (3) an explicitly prescribed overall fraction of rain evaporation within the downdraft. The parameterization was tested with the GATE [GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment] phase 3 data in a fully prognostic mode and with the entire atmospheric and surface forcings prescribed with data. It was found that the near-surface downdraft cooling largely mitigates the observed surface sensible heating. In the absence of this cooling, the boundary layer must get rid of the surface heat flux by spurious turbulent transport, which becomes significant in simulations that ignore both the rain evaporation and downdrafts. The time mean as well as root-mean-square errors in the vertical temperature profiles are somewhat larger for simulations without downdrafts and are much larger for simulations without both downdrafts and rain evaporation. The downdrafts are found to produce a useful correction in the simulated near-surface temperature and humidity in GCM simulations, and in that way, the parameterization improves the simulation of tropospheric temperature and humidity. In a one-year comparison of GLA GCM simulations with and without downdrafts, the former produced better precipitation climatology and surface temperatures. 70 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  11. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  12. Research and technology, 1990: Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Goddard celebrates 1990 as a banner year in space based astronomy. From above the Earth's obscuring atmosphere, four major orbiting observatories examined the heavens at wavelengths that spanned the electromagnetic spectrum. In the infrared and microwave, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), measured the spectrum and angular distribution of the cosmic background radiation to extraordinary precision. In the optical and UV, the Hubble Space Telescope has returned spectacular high resolution images and spectra of a wealth of astronomical objects. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph has resolved dozens of UV spectral lines which are as yet unidentified because they have never before been seen in any astronomical spectrum. In x rays, the Roentgen Satellite has begun returning equally spectacular images of high energy objects within our own and other galaxies.

  13. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph: Instrument, goals, and science results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Heap, S. R.; Beaver, E. A.; Boggess, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Ebbets, D. C.; Hutchings, J. B.; Jura, M.; Leckrone, D. S.; Linsky, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), currently in Earth orbit on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), operates in the wavelength range 1150-3200 A with spectral resolutions (lambda/delta lambda) of approximately 2 x 10(exp 3), 2 x 10(exp 4), and 1 x 10(exp 3). The instrument and its development from inception, its current status, the approach to operations, representative results in the major areas of the scientific goals, and prospects for the future are described.

  14. Satellite laser ranging work at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgunigal, T. E.; Carrion, W. J.; Caudill, L. O.; Grant, C. R.; Johnson, T. S.; Premo, D. A.; Spadin, P. L.; Winston, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes the satellite laser ranging system at the Goddard Space Flight Center, its range and accuracy capabilities, and planned improvements for future systems. Major subsystems are described, including the laser, optical/mechanical, receiver, computer/software, timing, and laser data preprocessing subsystems. Operational considerations are examined, with attention given the mobile station layout, manpower requirements, and transportability. System performance is considered, with emphasis on system accuracy (calibration, stability, clock synchronization, atmospheric propagation correction) and range capability.

  15. Reliability Practice at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruessner, Paula S.; Li, Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes in brief the Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) Programs performed directly by the reliability branch at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The mission assurance requirements flow down is explained. GSFC practices for PRA, reliability prediction/fault tree analysis/reliability block diagram, FMEA, part stress and derating analysis, worst case analysis, trend analysis, limit life items are presented. Lessons learned are summarized and recommendations on improvement are identified.

  16. Aerospace Battery Activities at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2006-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has "pioneered" rechargeable secondary battery design, test, infusion and in-orbit battery management among NASA installations. Nickel cadmium batteries of various designs and sizes have been infused for LEO, GEO and Libration Point spacecraft. Nickel-Hydrogen batteries have currently been baselined for the majority of our missions. Li-Ion batteries from ABSL, JSB, SaFT and Lithion have been designed and tested for aerospace application.

  17. The 1990 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The papers presented at the 1990 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence are given. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed. The proceedings fall into the following areas: Planning and Scheduling, Fault Monitoring/Diagnosis, Image Processing and Machine Vision, Robotics/Intelligent Control, Development Methodologies, Information Management, and Knowledge Acquisition.

  18. The 1977 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The papers presented were derived from transcripts taken at the Tenth Annual Battery Workshop held at the Goddard Space Flight Center, November 15-17, 1977. The Workshop was attended by manufacturers, users, and government representatives interested in the latest results of testing, analysis, and development of the sealed nickel cadmium cell system. The purpose of the Workshop was to share flight and test experience, stimulate discussion on problem areas, and to review the latest technology improvements.

  19. RFI Risk Reduction Activities Using New Goddard Digital Radiometry Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Kim, Ed; Young, Peter; Miles, Lynn; Wong, Mark; Morris, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard Radio-Frequency Explorer (GREX) is the latest fast-sampling radiometer digital back-end processor that will be used for radiometry and radio-frequency interference (RFI) surveying at Goddard Space Flight Center. The system is compact and deployable, with a mass of about 40 kilograms. It is intended to be flown on aircraft. GREX is compatible with almost any aircraft, including P-3, twin otter, C-23, C-130, G3, and G5 types. At a minimum, the system can function as a clone of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) ground-based development unit [1], or can be a completely independent system that is interfaced to any radiometer, provided that frequency shifting to GREX's intermediate frequency is performed prior to sampling. If the radiometer RF is less than 200MHz, then the band can be sampled and acquired directly by the system. A key feature of GREX is its ability to simultaneously sample two polarization channels simultaneously at up to 400MSPS, 14-bit resolution each. The sampled signals can be recorded continuously to a 23 TB solid-state RAID storage array. Data captures can be analyzed offline using the supercomputing facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition, various Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) - amenable radiometer signal processing and RFI detection algorithms can be implemented directly on the GREX system because it includes a high-capacity Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA prototyping system that is user customizable.

  20. Sensitivity of land surface and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Mohanty, U. C.; Kumar, Krishan

    2016-06-01

    The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme) and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme) have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6, and KF schemes

  1. An Empirical Cumulus Parameterization Scheme for a Global Spectral Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajendran, K.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Misra, V.; Tao, W.-K.

    2004-01-01

    Realistic vertical heating and drying profiles in a cumulus scheme is important for obtaining accurate weather forecasts. A new empirical cumulus parameterization scheme based on a procedure to improve the vertical distribution of heating and moistening over the tropics is developed. The empirical cumulus parameterization scheme (ECPS) utilizes profiles of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) based heating and moistening derived from the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis. A dimension reduction technique through rotated principal component analysis (RPCA) is performed on the vertical profiles of heating (Q1) and drying (Q2) over the convective regions of the tropics, to obtain the dominant modes of variability. Analysis suggests that most of the variance associated with the observed profiles can be explained by retaining the first three modes. The ECPS then applies a statistical approach in which Q1 and Q2 are expressed as a linear combination of the first three dominant principal components which distinctly explain variance in the troposphere as a function of the prevalent large-scale dynamics. The principal component (PC) score which quantifies the contribution of each PC to the corresponding loading profile is estimated through a multiple screening regression method which yields the PC score as a function of the large-scale variables. The profiles of Q1 and Q2 thus obtained are found to match well with the observed profiles. The impact of the ECPS is investigated in a series of short range (1-3 day) prediction experiments using the Florida State University global spectral model (FSUGSM, T126L14). Comparisons between short range ECPS forecasts and those with the modified Kuo scheme show a very marked improvement in the skill in ECPS forecasts. This improvement in the forecast skill with ECPS emphasizes the importance of incorporating realistic vertical distributions of heating and drying in the model cumulus scheme. This

  2. Interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment. III - Semi-prognostic test of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    The verification of the Arakawa and Schubert (1974) cumulus parameterization is continued using a semiprognostic approach. Observed data from Phase III of GATE are used to provide estimates of the large-scale forcing of a cumulus ensemble at each observation time. Instantaneous values of the precipitation and the warming and drying due to cumulus convection are calculated using the parameterization. The results show that the calculated precipitation agrees very well with estimates from the observed large-scale moisture budget and from radar observations. The calculated vertical profiles of cumulus warming and drying also are quite similar to the observed. It is shown that the closure assumption adopted in the parameterization (the cloud-work function quasi-equilibrium) results in errors of generally less than 10% in the calculated precipitation. The sensitivity of the parameterization to some assumptions of the cloud ensemble model and the solution method for the cloud-base mass flux is investigated.

  3. A cumulus parameterization including mass fluxes, vertical momentum dynamics, and mesoscale effects

    SciTech Connect

    Donner, L.J. )

    1993-03-15

    A formulation for parameterizing cumulus convection, which treats cumulus vertical momentum dynamics and mass fluxes consistently, is presented. This approach predicts the penetrative extent of cumulus updrafts on the basis of their vertical momentum and provides a basis for treating cumulus microphysics using formulations that depend on vertical velocity. Treatments for cumulus microphysics are essential if the water budgets of convective systems are to be evaluated for treating mesoscale stratiform processes associated with convection, which are important for radiative interactions influencing climate. The water budget of the cumulus updrafts is used to drive a semi-empirical parameterization for the large-scale effects of the mesoscale circulations associated with deep convection. The parameterization was applied to two tropical thermodynamic profiles whose diagnosed forcing by convective systems differed significantly. The deepest of the updrafts penetrated the upper troposphere, while the shallower updrafts penetrated into the region of the mesoscale anvil. The relative numbers of cumulus updrafts of characteristic vertical velocities comprising the parameterized ensemble corresponded well with available observations. The large-scale heating produced by the ensemble without mesoscale circulations was concentrated at lower heights than observed or was characterized by excessive peak magnitudes. An unobserved large-scale source of water vapor was produced in the middle troposphere. When the parameterization for mesoscale effects was added, the large-scale thermal and moisture forcing predicted by the parameterization agreed well with observations for both cases. The significance of mesoscale processes suggests that future cumulus parameterization development will need to treat some radiative processes.

  4. Mouse cumulus-denuded oocytes restore developmental capacity completely when matured with optimal supplementation of cysteamine, cystine, and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Wu, Yan-Guang; Wei, De-Li; Li, Qing; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Tan, Jing-He

    2010-04-01

    Our objectives were to study how cysteamine, cystine, and cumulus cells (CCs), as well as oocytes interact to increase oocyte intracellular glutathione (GSH) and thereby to establish an efficient in vitro maturation system for cumulus-denuded oocytes (DOs). Using M16 that contained no thiol as maturation medium, we showed that when supplemented alone, neither cystine nor cysteamine promoted GSH synthesis of mouse DOs, but they did when used together. Although goat CCs required either cysteamine or cystine to promote GSH synthesis, mouse CCs required both. In the presence of cystine, goat CCs produced cysteine but mouse CCs did not. Cysteamine reduced cystine to cysteine in cell-free M16. When TCM-199 that contained 83 microM cystine was used as maturation medium, supplementation with cysteamine alone had no effect, but supplementation with 100 microM cysteamine and 200 microM cystine increased blastulation of DOs matured with CC coculture to a level as high as achieved in cumulus-surrounded oocytes (COCs). Similar numbers of young were produced after two-cell embryos from mouse COCs or CC-cocultured DOs matured with optimal thiol supplementation were transferred to pseudopregnant recipients. It is concluded that 1) mouse CCs can use neither cysteamine nor cystine to promote GSH synthesis, but goat CCs can use either one; 2) goat CCs promote mouse oocyte GSH synthesis by reducing cystine to cysteine, but how they use cysteamine requires further investigation; and 3) mouse DOs can use neither cystine nor cysteamine for GSH synthesis, but they restore developmental capacity completely when matured in the presence of optimum supplementation of cysteamine, cystine, and CCs.

  5. Interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, A.; Schuber, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A theory of the interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment is developed. In this theory, the large-scale environment is divided into the subcloud mixed layer and the region above. The time changes of the environment are governed by the heat and moisture budget equations for the subcloud mixed layer and for the region above, and by a prognostic equation for the depth of the mixed layer. In the environment above the mixed layer, the cumulus convection affects the temperature and moisture fields through cumulus-induced subsidence and detrainment of saturated air containing liquid water which evaporates in the environment. In the subcloud mixed layer, the cumulus convection does not act directly on the temperature and moisture fields, but it affects the depth of the mixed layer through cumulus-induced subsidence.

  6. Protein profiling the differences between diabetic and normal mouse cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guang-Jian; Ma, Jun-Yu; Zhang, Guang-Li; Mo, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Dong-Wei; Gao, Si-Hua; Li, Xiu-Li

    2014-12-01

    As the number of young people suffering from diabetes increases worldwide, the impact of this disease on human reproduction urgently needs to be addressed. Here we compared the proteomes of cumulus cells of super-ovulated cumulus-oocyte complexes from diabetic and normal mice. We identified 57 up-regulated and 74 down-regulated proteins in diabetic cumulus cells; among these groups were proteins associated with cell cycle, cellular communication, epigenetic regulation, protein localization, and chromatin organization - all in accordance with type I diabetes. The poor-quality follicles derived from diabetic mice were further enforced by the presence of glycoproteins that are specifically expressed by the oocyte or oviductal epithelial cells in the cumulus-cell samples. In conclusion, the proteomic differences between diabetic and normal cumulus cells provide targets for improving the reproduction health of type I diabetic patients.

  7. Hampered cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes by excessive presence of alpha2 -macroglobulin is likely mediated via inhibition of zinc-dependent metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, Ruth; Beek, Josine; Maes, Dominiek; Bijttebier, Jo; Van Steendam, Katleen; Nauwynck, Hans; Van Soom, Ann

    2017-01-26

    In vitro maturation (IVM) in serum causes hampered expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) due to excessive alpha2 -macroglobulin (A2M). This study investigated two hypotheses that could explain the effect of A2M: (i) binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to A2M, followed by its decreased availability; and (ii) inhibition of zinc-dependent metalloproteases. Cumulus expansion was evaluated based on the diameter of the COCs, the proportion of COCs participating in a floating cloud and the proportion of COCs with loss of cumulus cells. The first hypothesis of decreased EGF availability was tested by increasing the EGF concentration (20 and 50 ng/mL vs. 10 ng/mL), but was not confirmed because cumulus expansion did not improve. To verify the second hypothesis of inhibited zinc-dependent metalloproteases, the effect of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-3 (TIMP-3) on cumulus expansion during IVM with and without A2M was investigated. To immuno-neutralize A2M, serum was pre-incubated with A2M antibodies. Impaired cumulus expansion because of TIMP-3 could only be observed during IVM in 10% of serum with A2M antibodies. No effect of TIMP-3 was observed in medium without A2M antibodies. These results indicate that A2M and TIMP-3 share a common target, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease. Future research is directed toward the identification of the protease involved.

  8. Nearest neighbor spacing of fair weather cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Joachim H.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    Histograms of nearest neighbor spacings of fair weather cumulus at 15 locations over the world's oceans are presented based on the analysis of high resolution Landsat 3 Multispectral Scanner images for amounts of cloud cover ranging from 0.6 to 37.6 percent. These histograms are found to be essentially the same at all locations analyzed, similarly to previous findings on the size distributions and the fractal dimensions of the perimeters for this cloud type. The nearest neighbor spacings are linearly dependent on the effective cloud radii, with a proportionality factor ranging from five to twenty. The histograms peak at about 0.5 km. Nearest-neighbor spacings smaller than about a kilometer, associated with cumulus clouds with an effective radius less than a few hundred meters, have a distribution of cloud centers that is almost indepedent in the horizontal plane and show a tendency for the formation of clumps. Larger spacings of up to thirty kilometers occur and are associated with the larger clouds. These latter spacings are not independent.

  9. Steroid production by the cumulus: relationship to fertilization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hartshorne, G M

    1989-10-01

    Insemination media were collected from 92 follicles of 14 patients stimulated to undergo oocyte retrieval for in-vitro fertilization. Levels of progesterone and oestradiol in the insemination drops were assayed, corrected for carry-over from follicular fluid and volume and expressed as production per microgram of protein in the cumulus. Significantly higher progesterone production per unit protein was associated with oocytes which fertilized in vitro (P less than 0.02). Oocytes fertilizing with subsequent fragmentation or degeneration showed progesterone levels significantly higher than oocytes fertilizing normally (P less than 0.05). Polyspermic oocytes (n = 3) were associated with very high levels of progesterone production but were not significantly different due to the low numbers. Oestradiol production per unit protein was significantly greater in oocytes which fertilized normally than in those which degenerated (P less than 0.05). The protein content of cumuli whose oocytes fertilized appeared to be significantly lower than those which did not (P less than 0.05). These results probably reflect the maturity of the follicle, although direct actions of cumulus products upon the gametes cannot be ruled out.

  10. The Defensive Role of Cumulus Cells Against Reactive Oxygen Species Insult in Metaphase II Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N; Ali, Iyad; Thakur, Mili; Saed, Mohammed G; Dai, Jing; Awonuga, Awoniyi O; Banerjee, Jashoman; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the ability of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hydroxyl radical ((·)OH), and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), to overcome the defensive capacity of cumulus cells and elucidate the mechanism through which ROS differentially deteriorate oocyte quality. Metaphase II mouse oocytes with (n = 1634) and without cumulus cells (n = 1633) were treated with increasing concentration of ROS, and the deterioration in oocyte quality was assessed by the changes in the microtubule morphology and chromosomal alignment. Oocyte and cumulus cell viability and cumulus cell number were assessed by indirect immunofluorescence, staining of gap junction protein, and trypan blue staining. The treated oocytes showed decreased quality as a function of increasing concentrations of ROS when compared to controls. Cumulus cells show protection against H(2)O(2) and (·)OH insult at lower concentrations, but this protection was lost at higher concentrations (>50 μmol/L). At higher H(2)O(2) concentrations, treatment dramatically influenced the cumulus cell number and viability with resulting reduction in the antioxidant capacity making the oocyte more susceptible to oxidative damage. However, cumulus cells offered no significant protection against HOCl at any concentration used. In all circumstances in which cumulus cells did not offer protection to the oocyte, both cumulus cell number and viability were decreased. Therefore, the deterioration in oocyte quality may be caused by one or more of the following: a decrease in the antioxidant machinery by the loss of cumulus cells, the lack of scavengers for specific ROS, and/or the ability of the ROS to overcome these defenses.

  11. The 1988 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Thomas Y. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the 21st annual Battery Workshop held at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland on November 1-3, 1988. The Workshop attendees included manufacturers, users, and government representatives interested in the latest developments in battery technology as they relate to high reliability operations and aerospace use. The subjects covered included battery testing methodologies and criteria, life testing of nickel-cadmium cells, testing and operation of nickel-hydrogen batteries in low earth orbit, and nickel-hydrogen technology issues and concerns.

  12. The 1991 research and technology report, Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Montgomery, Harry (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The 1991 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) earth sciences including upper atmosphere, lower atmosphere, oceans, hydrology, and global studies; (2) space sciences including solar studies, planetary studies, Astro-1, gamma ray investigations, and astrophysics; (3) flight projects; (4) engineering including robotics, mechanical engineering, electronics, imaging and optics, thermal and cryogenic studies, and balloons; and (5) ground systems, networks, and communications including data and networks, TDRSS, mission planning and scheduling, and software development and test.

  13. The 1987 Goddard Space Flight Center Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, George (Editor); Yi, Thomas Y. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the 20th annual Battery Workshop held at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland on November 4-5, 1987. The workshop attendees included manufacturers, users, and government representatives interested in the latest developments in battery technology as they relate to high reliability operations and aerospace use. The subjects covered included lithium cell technology and safety improvements, nickel-cadmium electrode technology along with associated modifications, flight experience and life testing of nickel-cadmium cells, and nickel-hydrogen applications and technology.

  14. Ground System Harmonization Efforts at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the efforts made at Goddard Space Flight Center in harmonizing the ground systems to assist in collaboration in space ventures. The key elements of this effort are: (1) Moving to a Common Framework (2) Use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Standards (3) Collaboration Across NASA Centers (4) Collaboration Across Industry and other Space Organizations. These efforts are working to bring into harmony the GSFC systems with CCSDS standards to allow for common software, use of Commercial Off the Shelf Software and low risk development and operations and also to work toward harmonization with other NASA centers

  15. Robert Goddard Young, DC, ND: Searching for a better way

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M.

    2009-01-01

    This biographical study tracks the life of Robert Goddard Young; a member of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College’s (CMCC) Class of 1950. The paper begins with an overview of Robert Young’s origins, his childhood and early training, moves to his tour of duty in World War II, followed by his education at CMCC, before converging on the core of this matter; Robert Young’s professional career, which spanned over half a century. Now in his twilight years, the paper ends with a discussion on the substance of Dr. Young’s largely-forgotten contributions. PMID:19714235

  16. R and T report: Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald A. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) flight projects; (2) space sciences including cosmology, high energy, stars and galaxies, and the solar system; (3) earth sciences including process modeling, hydrology/cryology, atmospheres, biosphere, and solid earth; (4) networks, planning, and information systems including support for mission operations, data distribution, advanced software and systems engineering, and planning/scheduling; and (5) engineering and materials including spacecraft systems, material and testing, optics and photonics and robotics.

  17. Specific gene expression differences in cumulus cells as potential biomarkers of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Burnik Papler, Tanja; Vrtačnik Bokal, Eda; Maver, Aleš; Lovrečić, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The development of an objective and accurate test that could help select embryos with the highest chance of achieving pregnancy in IVF procedures is an important goal of reproductive medicine. For this purpose, cumulus cell gene expression is being studied to find biomarkers of pregnancy. Several recent studies have proposed potential biomarkers of pregnancy expressed in cumulus cells; however, these have mostly not been validated on an independent set of samples. The aim of this study was to analyse the expression of EFNB2, RGS2 and VCAN genes proposed as biomarkers of pregnancy in cumulus cells by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Gene expression was evaluated in 43 individual cumulus cell samples, derived from a highly homogenous group of 43 women. The same protocol for ovarian stimulation was used for all women, and elective single embryo transfer was performed. Expression levels of RGS2 and VCAN did not differ between cumulus cells of implanted and non-implanted embryos. EFNB2 showed borderline higher expression in cumulus cells of non-implanted embryos, which is contradictory to previous studies. Altogether, the results of previous studies in which EFNB2, RGS2 and VCAN were proposed as biomarkers of pregnancy could not be replicated in our set of cumulus cell samples.

  18. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  19. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  20. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  1. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  2. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  3. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  4. Small-Scale Variability in Warm Continental Cumulus Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, P. H.; Baker, M. B.; Blyth, A. M.; Jensen, J. B.

    1985-06-01

    We have analyzed small-scale fluctuations in microphysical, dynamical and thermodynamical parameters measured in two warm cumulus clouds during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) project (1981) in light of predictions of several recent models. The measurements show the existence at all levels throughout the sampling period of two statistically distinct kinds of cloudy regions, termed `variable' and `steady,' often separated by transition zones of less than ten meters. There is some evidence for microphysical variability induced by local fluctuations in thermodynamic and dynamic parameters; however, the predominant variations are of a nature consistent with laboratory evidence suggesting that mixing is dominated by large structures. Entrainment appears to occur largely near cloud top but the data presented here do not permit identification of a mechanism for transport of the entrained air throughout the cloud.

  5. A New Approach for Estimating Entrainment Rate in Cumulus Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lu C.; Liu, Y.; Yum, S. S.; Niu, S.; Endo, S.

    2012-02-16

    A new approach is presented to estimate entrainment rate in cumulus clouds. The new approach is directly derived from the definition of fractional entrainment rate and relates it to mixing fraction and the height above cloud base. The results derived from the new approach compare favorably with those obtained with a commonly used approach, and have smaller uncertainty. This new approach has several advantages: it eliminates the need for in-cloud measurements of temperature and water vapor content, which are often problematic in current aircraft observations; it has the potential for straightforwardly connecting the estimation of entrainment rate and the microphysical effects of entrainment-mixing processes; it also has the potential for developing a remote sensing technique to infer entrainment rate.

  6. Cumulus convection as observed from an airborne infrared radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szejwach, G.; Simpson, J.

    1982-01-01

    The implementation of high resolution passive radiative remote sensing of the cloudiness volume in the atmospheric window between 10.5-12.5 microns is described. Airborne radiometers, the NASA/Cloud Top Scanner, were used to obtain radiances during several passages over two merging cumulus clouds, with the data being converted into equivalent blackbody temperatures. Data were also gathered in the 0.55-0.70 micron visible bands as part of the SESAME-79 experiment. The number of points observed in the IR channel were adjusted to account for the viewing angle and areal extents were calculated. A relationship was assumed to exist between the brightness temperatures of the cloud surface and the level of cloudiness at a given atmospheric altitude. Further measurements with lidar scans are indicated in order to reduce the error levels associated with the method.

  7. Diurnal timescale feedbacks in the tropical cumulus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, James H.

    2016-09-01

    Although the importance of the diurnal cycle in modulating clouds and precipitation has long been recognized, its impact on the climate system at longer timescales has remained elusive. Mounting evidence indicates that the diurnal cycle may substantially affect leading climate modes through nonlinear rectification. In this study, an idealized cloud-resolving model experiment is executed to isolate a diurnal timescale feedback in the shallow cumulus regime over the tropical warm pool. This feedback is isolated by modifying the period of the diurnal cycle (or removing it), which proportionally scales (or removes) the diurnal thermodynamic forcing that clouds respond to. This diurnal forcing is identified as covarying cycles of static stability and humidity in the lower troposphere, wherein the most unstable conditions coincide with greatest humidity each afternoon. This diurnal forcing yields deeper clouds and greater daily-mean cumulus heating than would otherwise occur, in turn reducing large-scale subsidence from day to day according to the "weak temperature gradient" approximation. This diurnal forcing therefore manifests as a timescale feedback by accelerating the onset of deep convection. The longwave cloud-radiation effect is found to amplify this timescale feedback, since the resulting invigoration of clouds (increased upper-cloud radiative cooling, with suppressed cooling below) scales with cloud depth (i.e., optical thickness), and hence with the magnitude of diurnal forcing. These findings highlight the pressing need to remedy longstanding problems related to the diurnal cycle in many climate models. Given the evident sensitivity of climate variability to diurnal processes, doing so may yield advances in climate prediction at longer timescales.

  8. Interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells during in vitro maturation of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes in a chemically defined medium: effect of denuded oocytes on cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Somfai, T; Nakai, M; Bodó, S; Maes, D; Kikuchi, K; Van Soom, A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) on the level of cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation during IVM of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in a chemically defined medium using a system that allows individual tracking of oocytes. Especially, the influence of oocyte-secreted factors was investigated by the aid of addition of denuded oocytes (DOs) as a possible approach to improve the IVM system. The basic maturation medium was porcine oocyte medium with addition of gonadotropins only during the first 20 hours of IVM. During IVM, COCs were kept fixed to the bottom of culture dish by adhesive Cell-Tak coating, which enabled individual tracking of COCs during IVM. Size changes in COCs during IVM were measured by digital image analysis. Cumulus expansion in a porcine oocyte medium of intact COCs increased in a typical manner until 20 hours and decreased in size subsequently until 48 hours of IVM (P < 0.05). Removal of oocytes from COCs by oocytectomy allowed the expansion of CCs to some extent, although their expansion ability was lower than that of COCs (P < 0.05). Addition of DOs (COCs to DOs ratio of 9:16) did not improve cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation rates of intact COCs (P > 0.05) but did enhance cumulus expansion of oocytectomized complexes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, removal of CCs before IVM increased oocyte maturation rates compared with COCs (52.3% and 32.9%, respectively) (P < 0.05) and a similar effect was observed in COCs when the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone was added to the IVM medium: carbenoxolone repressed the expansion of COCs at 20 hours of IVM. In conclusion, the porcine oocyte enhances cumulus expansion both by gap junctional communications and presumably by oocyte-secreted factor production. Nevertheless, the presence of oocytes is not a prerequisite for this process. In return, CCs maintain meiotic arrest in cumulus-enclosed oocytes during the initial culture

  9. Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Processes Over Warm Pool: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Johnson, D.; Simpson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle as well as the primary heat source for the atmosphere. The vertical distribution of convective latent-heat release modulates the large-scale circulations of the topics. Furthermore, changes in the moisture distribution at middle and upper levels of the troposphere can affect cloud distributions and cloud liquid water and ice contents. How the incoming solar and outgoing longwave radiation respond to these changes in clouds is a major factor in assessing climate change. Present large-scale weather and climate model simulate processes only crudely, reducing confidence in their predictions on both global and regional scales. One of the most promising methods to test physical parameterizations used in General Circulation Models (GCMs) and climate models is to use field observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes, and allow for their complex interactions with solar and infrared radiative transfer processes. The CRMs can reasonably well resolve the evolution, structure, and life cycles of individual clouds and clouds systems. The major objective of this paper is to investigate the latent heating, moisture and momentum budgets associated with several convective systems developed during the TOGA COARE IFA - westerly wind burst event (late December, 1992). The tool for this study is the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysics scheme.

  10. Clustered or regular cumulus cloud fields - The statistical character of observed and simulated cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1990-01-01

    The spatial distribution of cumulus clouds is assumed to be the result of the effects of convective activity on the thermodynamic environment. The effects can be parameterized in terms of a stabilization function representing the time rate of change of convective available potential energy. Using these results, a new inhibition hypothesis explaining the expected characteristics of the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds is postulated. This paper performs a verification of the inhibition hypothesis on real and simulated cloud fields. In order to do so, an objective measure of the spatial characteristics of cumulus clouds is introduced. Multiple cloud experiments are performed with a three-dimensional numerical cloud model. Skylab pictures of real cumuli are also used in the verification. Results of applying this measure to simulated and observed cumulus cloud fields confirm the inhibition hypothesis.

  11. The possible FAT1-mediated apoptotic pathways in porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinhui; Fu, Yao; Sun, Xulei; Liu, Chang; Chai, Menglong; Chen, Chengzhen; Dai, Lisheng; Gao, Yan; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Jiabao

    2017-01-01

    Porcine cumulus cells are localized around oocytes and act as a specific type of granulosa that plays essential roles in the development and maturation of oocytes, the development and atresia of follicles, and the development of embryos. Studies of FAT1 have demonstrated its functions in cell-cell contact, actin dynamics, and cell growth suppression. To understand whether the FAT1 gene affects the apoptosis of porcine cumulus cells and to elucidate the mechanism of this potential action, FAT1 was knocked down using RNA interference. The lack of FAT1 resulted in stable expression of CTNNB, enhanced expression of cleaved CASP3, but decreased the BCL2/BAX ratios at both the mRNA and protein levels. These results indicated that FAT1 inhibited porcine cumulus cell apoptosis via different pathways. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the mechanisms of the association between FAT1 and porcine cumulus cell apoptosis.

  12. Satellite laser ranging work at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgunigal, T. E.; Carrion, W. J.; Caudill, L. O.; Grant, C. R.; Johnson, T. S.; Premo, D. A.; Spadin, P. L.; Winston, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The pulsed-laser satellite ranging systems presently being operated by the Goddard Space Flight Center are described along with their range and accuracy capabilities. The major subsystems are outlined, operation of the fixed system and the two mobile systems is discussed, and the performance of all three systems is evaluated. It is noted that these systems have an accuracy of better than 10 cm on a carefully surveyed range as well as in regular satellite ranging operations and are capable of ranging to all currently launched retroreflector-equipped satellites with the exception of Timation III. Future improvements discussed include a third mobile system which will be able to range distant satellites, such as Timation III, with an accuracy of better than 5 cm and the use of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser in place of the ruby lasers now being employed.

  13. TOMS Data Products at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. P.; Johnson, J. E.; Serafino, G. N.; McPeters, R. D.

    2002-05-01

    mid 2003 (the third mission in NASA's Earth Observing System program), in conjunction with the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) slated for launch in late 2002. Standard products from TOMS and UARS sensors and ancillary correlative data sets are archived at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the public. Data products from future upper atmospheric research missions, e.g., the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) aboard Aura, as well as SORCE will also be archived at the Goddard DAAC. To facilitate the use of multiyear data sets, a number of tools and server-side capabilities for data access, visualization, and analysis have been developed at the Goddard DAAC. For detailed information please visit http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/. This presentation will provide highlights of the TOMS data products available from the Goddard DAAC, including several data applications, and the services provided by the DAAC Upper Atmosphere Data Support Team (DST) in support of the users of the data.

  14. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeff; Walden, Harvey; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the development of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair, including its history and outgrowth from the traditional regional science fairs supported by NASA. The results of the 1999 Virtual Science Fair pilot program, the mechanics of running the 2000 Virtual Science Fair and its results, and comments and suggestions for future Virtual Science Fairs are provided. The appendices to the report contain supporting documentation, including the original proposal for this project, the judging criteria, the user's guide and the judge's guide to the Virtual Science Fair Web site, the Fair publicity brochure and the Fair award designs, judges' and students' responses to survey questions about the Virtual Science Fair, and lists of student entries to both the 1999 and 2000 Fairs.

  15. An evaluation of the Goddard Space Flight Center Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herner, S.; Lancaster, F. W.; Wright, N.; Ockerman, L.; Shearer, B.; Greenspan, S.; Mccartney, J.; Vellucci, M.

    1979-01-01

    The character and degree of coincidence between the current and future missions, programs, and projects of the Goddard Space Flight Center and the current and future collection, services, and facilities of its library were determined from structured interviews and discussions with various classes of facility personnel. In addition to the tabulation and interpretation of the data from the structured interview survey, five types of statistical analyses were performed to corroborate (or contradict) the survey results and to produce useful information not readily attainable through survey material. Conclusions reached regarding compatability between needs and holdings, services and buildings, library hours of operation, methods of early detection and anticipation of changing holdings requirements, and the impact of near future programs are presented along with a list of statistics needing collection, organization, and interpretation on a continuing or longitudinal basis.

  16. Fourth NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains copies of all those technical papers received in time for publication just prior to the Fourth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage and Technologies, held March 28-30, 1995, at the University of Maryland, University College Conference Center, in College Park, Maryland. This series of conferences continues to serve as a unique medium for the exchange of information on topics relating to the ingestion and management of substantial amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. This year's discussion topics include new storage technology, stability of recorded media, performance studies, storage system solutions, the National Information infrastructure (Infobahn), the future for storage technology, and lessons learned from various projects. There also will be an update on the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model Version 5, on which the final vote was taken in July 1994.

  17. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeff; Walden, Harvey; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the development of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair, including its history and outgrowth from the traditional regional science fairs supported by NASA. The results of the 1999 Virtual Science Fair pilot program, the mechanics of running the 2000 Virtual Science Fair and its results, and comments and suggestions for future Virtual Science Fairs are provided. The appendices to the report include the original proposal for this project, the judging criteria, the user's guide and the judge's guide to the Virtual Science Fair Web site, the Fair publicity brochure and the Fair award designs, judges' and students' responses to survey questions about the Virtual Science Fair, and lists of student entries to both the 1999 and 2000 Fairs.

  18. Goddard Space Flight Center solar array missions, requirements and directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Edward; Day, John

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) develops and operates a wide variety of spacecraft for conducting NASA's communications, space science, and earth science missions. Some are 'in house' spacecraft for which the GSFC builds the spacecraft and performs all solar array design, analysis, integration, and test. Others are 'out of house' spacecraft for which an aerospace contractor builds the spacecraft and develops the solar array under direction from GSFC. The experience of developing flight solar arrays for numerous GSFC 'in house' and 'out of house' spacecraft has resulted in an understanding of solar array requirements for many different applications. This presentation will review those solar array requirements that are common to most GSFC spacecraft. Solar array technologies will be discussed that are currently under development and that could be useful to future GSFC spacecraft.

  19. Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies held in Sep. 1992 are included. The conference served as an informational exchange forum for topics primarily relating to the ingestion and management of massive amounts of data and the attendant problems (data ingestion rates now approach the order of terabytes per day). Discussion topics include the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model, data archiving standards, high-performance storage devices, magnetic and magneto-optic storage systems, magnetic and optical recording technologies, high-performance helical scan recording systems, and low end helical scan tape drives. Additional topics addressed the evolution of the identifiable unit for processing purposes as data ingestion rates increase dramatically, and the present state of the art in mass storage technology.

  20. Prolactin affects bovine oocytes through direct and cumulus-mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Irina Y; Singina, Galina N; Volkova, Natalia A; Vejlsted, Morten; Zinovieva, Natalia A; Schmidt, Mette

    2014-11-01

    The available evidence points to participation of PRL in regulation of mammalian oocyte maturation. The aim of the present study was to characterize pathways of PRL action on bovine oocytes. We analyzed (1) the presence of the PRL receptor and its mRNA isoforms in oocytes and cumulus cells; (2) the effect of PRL on meiosis resumption and the role of cumulus cells, the NO/NO synthase system, protein kinase C, and tyrosine kinases in this effect; and (3) PRL effects in the presence of gonadotropins on the developmental capacity of cumulus-free and cumulus-enclosed oocytes. The transcript and protein expression of the PRL receptor in the cells were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The nuclear status of oocytes was assessed after culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and denuded oocytes (DOs) with or without PRL (5-500 ng/mL) for 7, 14, or 24 hours. Besides, DOs were incubated for 7 hours in the absence or the presence of PRL (50 ng/mL) and/or L-NAME (an inhibitor of NO synthase), genistein (an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases), or calpostin C (a protein kinase C inhibitor). After IVM in 2 different systems containing PRL (50 ng/mL) and/or gonadotropic hormones, a part of oocytes underwent IVF and IVC and the embryo development was tracked until the blastocyst stage. Messenger RNA of long and short isoforms of the PRL receptor was revealed in both oocytes and cumulus cells. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of the PRL receptor in oocytes and the cumulus investment. In the absence of gonadotropins (system 1), PRL retarded meiosis resumption in DOs but not in cumulus-enclosed oocytes, with this effect being short term, dose dependent, suppressed by L-NAME and genistein, and unaffected by calpostin. In systems containing gonadotropins, PRL did not affect nuclear maturation and the cleavage rate of cumulus-free and cumulus-enclosed oocytes. However, in the case of COCs, it raised the blastocyst

  1. A statistical analysis of the dependency of closure assumptions in cumulus parameterization on the horizontal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, K.M.

    1994-12-01

    Simulated data from the UCLA cumulus ensemble model are used to investigate the quasi-universal validity of closure assumptions used in existing cumulus parameterizations. A closure assumption is quasi-universally valid if it is sensitive neither to convective cloud regimes nor to horizontal resolutions of large-scale/mesoscale models. The dependency of three types of closure assumptions, as classified by Arakawa and Chen, on the horizontal resolution is addressed in this study. Type I is the constraint on the coupling of the time tendencies of large-scale temperature and water vapor mixing ratio. Type II is the constraint on the coupling of cumulus heating and cumulus drying. Type III is a direct constraint on the intensity of a cumulus ensemble. The macroscopic behavior of simulated cumulus convection is first compared with the observed behavior in view of Type I and Type II closure assumptions using `quick-look` and canonical correlation analyses. It is found that they are statistically similar to each other. The three types of closure assumptions are further examined with simulated data averaged over selected subdomain sizes ranging from 64 to 512 km. It is found that the dependency of Type I and Type II closure assumptions on the horizontal resolution is very weak and that Type III closure assumption is somewhat dependent upon the horizontal resolution. The influences of convective and mesoscale processes on the closure assumptions are also addressed by comparing the structures of canonical components with the corresponding vertical profiles in the convective and stratiform regions of cumulus ensembles analyzed directly from simulated data. The implication of these results for cumulus parameterization is discussed.

  2. Did the Germans learn from Goddard? An examination of whether the rocketry of R.H. Goddard influenced German Pre-World-War II missile development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Frank H.

    2016-10-01

    Ever since a few months before the death of American rocket pioneer Dr. Robert H. Goddard, on 10 August 1945, it has been widely claimed he was the true source of the development of the infamous V-2 rocket of World War II - the world's first large-scale liquid-propellant rocket. It is thus alleged the German developers of the V-2 had "stolen" ideas from Goddard to create the V-2 that was also the forerunner of the world's first space launch vehicles. The question of the validity of this claim thus becomes far more significant than first appears and is the subject of this article. But we must first briefly examine other popular conceptions, or rather, misconceptions, about Goddard in our own Space Age. This helps establish a "bigger picture" that identifies some of the problems in overall misinterpretations of Goddard that also applies to his supposed role in the development of the V-2.1

  3. Characterization of the human cumulus cell transcriptome during final follicular maturation and ovulation.

    PubMed

    Yerushalmi, G M; Salmon-Divon, M; Yung, Y; Maman, E; Kedem, A; Ophir, L; Elemento, O; Coticchio, G; Dal Canto, M; Mignini Renzinu, M; Fadini, R; Hourvitz, A

    2014-08-01

    Cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation are central processes in ovulation. Knowledge gained from rodent and other mammalian models has revealed some of the molecular pathways associated with these processes. However, the equivalent pathways in humans have not been thoroughly studied and remain unidentified. Compact cumulus cells (CCs) from germinal vesicle cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were obtained from patients undergoing in vitro maturation (IVM) procedures. Expanded CCs from metaphase 2 COC were obtained from patients undergoing IVF/ICSI. Global transcriptome profiles of the samples were obtained using state-of-the-art RNA sequencing techniques. We identified 1746 differentially expressed (DE) genes between compact and expanded CCs. Most of these genes were involved in cellular growth and proliferation, cellular movement, cell cycle, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, extracellular matrix and steroidogenesis. Out of the DE genes, we found 89 long noncoding RNAs, of which 12 are encoded within introns of genes known to be involved in granulosa cell processes. This suggests that unique noncoding RNA transcripts may contribute to the regulation of cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation. Using global transcriptome sequencing, we were able to generate a library of genes regulated during cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation processes. Analysis of these genes allowed us to identify important new genes and noncoding RNAs potentially involved in COC maturation and cumulus expansion. These results may increase our understanding of the process of oocyte maturation and could ultimately improve the efficacy of IVM treatment.

  4. Effect of gonadotrophins, oestradiol and insulin on cumulus expansion of Nili Ravi buffalo oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Beenish; Jalali, Samina; Khan, Muhamad Ijaz; Shami, Sa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the cumulus expansions of Nili Ravi buffalo oocytes during cultured in TCM-199 supplemented with 2 μg/ml oestradiol (E(2)), 0.05 IU/ml recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (rhFSH), 2IU/ml human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), and 0.12 IU/ml insulin (I). The cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) were collected from 2-8mm follicles from local abattoir ovaries. Supplementation of medium with single hormones showed significant (P<0.0001) increase in mean diameter of COCs with rhFSH except E(2), hCG and insulin after 24 hours compared to the increase in the mean diameter of COCs matured in TCM-199 without any hormonal supplementation. With rhFSH even at 8th hour, significant increase (P<0.001) in cumulus expansion was observed. In combination of hormones the significant (P<0.0001) cumulus expansion was achieved in E(2)+rhFSH treatment group. The non significant (P>0.05) cumulus expansion was observed in treatment groups viz. E(2)+hCG, E(2)+Insulin, rhFSH+hCG, rhFSH+Insulin, hCG+Insulin, E(2)+rhFSH+hCG and E(2)+rhFSH+hCG+Insulin after 24 hours. In conclusion, supplementation of rhFSH alone and in combination with E(2)in TCM-199 has highly significant effect on cumulus expansion.

  5. Effect of Acrylamide on Oocyte Nuclear Maturation and Cumulus Cells Apoptosis in Mouse In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuzhen; Jiang, Ligang; Zhong, Tao; Kong, Shuhui; Zheng, Rongbin; Kong, Fengyun; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Lei; An, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a chemical compound with severe neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Recent studies showed that ACR impairs the function of reproductive organs, e.g., epididymis and testes. In vitro maturation of mouse oocyte is a sensitive assay to identify potential chemical hazard to female fertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects of ACR on the nuclear maturation and cumulus cells apoptosis of mouse oocytes in vitro. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were incubated in a maturation medium containing 0, 5, 10 and 20 μM of ACR. Chromosome alignment and spindle morphology of oocytes was determined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Our results showed that oocytes exposed to different doses of ACR in vitro were associated with a significant decrease of oocyte maturation, significant increase of chromosome misalignment rate, occurrence of abnormal spindle configurations, and the inhibition of oocyte parthenogenetic activation. Furthermore, apoptosis of cumulus cells was determined by TUNEL and CASPASE-3 assay. Results showed that apoptosis in cumulus cells was enhanced and the expression of CASPASE-3 was increased after cumulus-oocyte complexes were exposed to ACR. Therefore, ACR may affect the nuclear maturation of oocytes via the apoptosis of cumulus cells in vitro.

  6. Effects of Trichostatin A on Cumulus Expansion during Mouse Oocyte Maturation.

    PubMed

    Du, Ming; Fu, Xiangwei; Zhou, Yanhua; Zhu, Shien

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of Trichostatin A (TSA) on cumulus expansion during mouse oocyte maturation. TSA treatment inhibited cumulus expansion and significantly reduced the cumulus expansion index (CEI) (p<0.05). To determine the underlying mechanism, the expression levels of several key factors that play crucial roles in cumulus expansion including components of extracellular matrix (ECM) (Has2, Ptgs2, Ptx3, and Tnfaip6) and Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) were measured in control and TSA treated samples by real-time PCR. The effect of TSA on ERK phosphorylation (p-ERK1/2) in cumulus cells and GDF9 protein level in fully grown oocytes (FGOs) were detected by Western blotting. The expression levels of the ECM genes were significantly decreased (p<0.05) by TSA treatment while GDF9 expression did not response to TSA (p>0.05). TSA treatment blocked the activation of ERK1/2 (p<0.05) and had no significant effect on GDF9 protein expression (p>0.05). Collectively, these results suggested that TSA treatment altered ECM gene expression and blocked ERK1/2 activation to inhibit cumulus expansion in the mouse.

  7. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  8. Shallow Cumulus Sensitivity to Aerosol within a Fixed Meteorology Framework (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigel, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow cumulus clouds are critically important to the global energy budget and the general circulation of the earth. These clouds occupy up to a quarter of the global cloud fraction and they play a crucial role in mixing boundary layer properties with the free troposphere. As such, shallow cumulus clouds have a large effect on the vertical thermodynamic structure of the lower atmosphere, which then directly impacts larger scale circulations. Therefore, changes to the vertical mixing rates of cumulus clouds by forcing mechanisms such as aerosol loading can result in significant consequences for the general circulation of the Earth. This study aims to isolate changes in cumulus vertical mixing by a single forcing mechanism - aerosol loading. In order to isolate aerosol induced changes in cumulus mixing that are solely due to microphysical-dynamical interactions and not from mean-state thermodynamic instability changes caused by aerosol-cloud-precipitation feedbacks, this study uses a new approach of forcing shallow cumulus clouds in large eddy simulations (LESs). Nine (9) LESs with systematic variations in aerosol concentration and model domain size are initialized with the well-studied trade cumulus regime of the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX). However, rather than using the standard BOMEX forcing functions for each of the nine (9) simulations, which can result in different mean thermodynamic states when variations in aerosol concentration are imposed, the horizontal mean states of the following four (4) model prognosed variables are held fixed: liquid potential temperature (θl), total water (qt), zonal wind (u) and meridional wind (v). This guarantees that all variations of the cloud populations and their role in mixing are strictly the result of local microphysical-dynamical changes that result from changes in aerosol concentrations and not from changes to bulk conditional instability. Results from the nine (9) simulations show

  9. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; ...

    2014-12-17

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasingmore » scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.« less

  10. Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Isabelle; Bony, Sandrine; Holloway, Chris E.; Grandpeix, Jean-Yves; Sèze, Geneviève; Coppin, David; Woolnough, Steve J.; Roca, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    Tropical deep convection exhibits a variety of levels of aggregation over a wide range of scales. Based on a multisatellite analysis, the present study shows at mesoscale that different levels of aggregation are statistically associated with differing large-scale atmospheric states, despite similar convective intensity and large-scale forcings. The more aggregated the convection, the dryer and less cloudy the atmosphere, the stronger the outgoing longwave radiation, and the lower the planetary albedo. This suggests that mesoscale convective aggregation has the potential to affect couplings between moisture and convection and between convection, radiation, and large-scale ascent. In so doing, aggregation may play a role in phenomena such as "hot spots" or the Madden-Julian Oscillation. These findings support the need for the representation of mesoscale organization in cumulus parameterizations; most parameterizations used in current climate models lack any such representation. The ability of a cloud system-resolving model to reproduce observed relationships suggests that such models may be useful to guide attempts at parameterizations of convective aggregation.

  11. Rainfall results, 1970-1975: Florida area cumulus experiment.

    PubMed

    Woodley, W L; Simpson, J; Biondini, R; Berkeley, J

    1977-02-25

    The latest rainfall results of the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment (FACE) are discussed after a review of the background, design, and early results of this experiment. Analysis without the benefit of data stratification and appropriate covariates of the 48 random experimentation days obtained through 1975 provided no evidence that dynamic seeding appreciably altered the rainfall over the fixed target area (1.3 x 10(4) square kilometers). Partitioning of the experimentation days according to whether the convective echoes moved across the Florida peninsula or developed in situ was more informative. Use of this echo motion covariate with five meaningful predictor models of natural rainfall in a stepwise regression program produced persuasive evidence for an effect of seeding in both echo motion categories. For days with moving echoes, there is evidence for a positive, statistically significant treatment effect on the rainfall from the subject clouds (the floating target) and in the overall target area. The results for days with stationary echoes, although considerably more tentative, suggest that seeding produces more rainfall in the floating target but with no net change of the precipitation in the overall target area. The ramifications of this result and a possible explanation are discussed. Corroborative statistical analyses and discussion are presented, including a discussion of the physical bases and history of the echo motion covariate and the meteorological predictors, analysis that is supportive of the rain-gage-adjusted radar measurements of precipitation in FACE and results of relevant cloud physics measurements in Florida.

  12. Entrainment and detrainment in a simple cumulus cloud model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.; Huffman, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    A cumulus cloud model, analogous to the mixed-layer models of the planetary boundary layer and the upper ocean, is developed using a single, unitary entrainment process in which the motion of the cloud boundary relative to the mean flow is permitted, produced, and controlled by turbulent processes. An alternate theory to the mixing-length theory of Asai and Kasahara (1967) is proposed which completely removes the strong scale-dependence of the Asai-Kasahara model. The model reintroduces scale-dependence by introducing including the pe5turbation pressure term of the equation of vertical motion. It is shown that the model predicts deeper clouds than the Asai-Kasahara model for a given sounding, due to the entrainment assumption and the effects of the perturbation pressure. Lateral entrainment dominates cloud-top entrainment, although finite-difference errors increase the cloud-top entrainment rate from zero to a positive value in actual situations. The fractional entrainment rate for updrafts is determined to vary only slightly with height and to decrease only slowly as the cloud radius increases, while the fractional detrainment rate for updrafts increases with height.

  13. Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Ogren, John A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Andrews, Elizabeth; Coulter, Richard L.; Hair, John; Hubbe, John M.; Lee, Yin-Nan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Olfert, Jason N.; Springston, Stephen R.

    2009-11-30

    The primary goal of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) was to characterize and contrast freshly emitted aerosols below, above, and within fields of cumuli, and to study changes to the cloud microphysical structure within these same cloud fields. The CHAPS is one of very few studies that have had an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) sampling downstream of a counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet on an aircraft, allowing the examination of the chemical composition of the nucleated aerosols within the cumuli. The results from the CHAPS will provide insights into changes in the aerosol chemical and optical properties as aerosols move through shallow cumuli downwind of a moderately sized city. Three instrument platforms were employed during the CHAPS, including the U.S. Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft, which was equipped for in situ sampling of aerosol optical and chemical properties; the NASA-Langley King Air B200, which carried the downward looking NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to measure profiles of aerosol backscatter, extinction, and depolarization between the King Air and the surface; and a surface site equipped for continuous in situ measurements of aerosol properties, profiles of aerosol backscatter, and meteorological conditions including total sky cover and thermodynamic profiles of the atmosphere. In spite of record precipitation over central Oklahoma, a total of eight research flights were made by the G-1, and eighteen by the B200, including special satellite verification flights timed to coincide with NASA satellite A-Train overpasses.

  14. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; Endo, Satoshi

    2014-12-17

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasing scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.

  15. Aerosol-induced mechanisms for cumulus congestus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Amanda M.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Heever, Susan C.

    2015-09-01

    Tropical convection has been observed to contain three cloud modes, the middle of which is cumulus congestus clouds. Congestus clouds act to moisten the tropical atmosphere, may be mixed-phase, and on occasion surpass the freezing level inversion from where they may develop into deeper convection. This study investigates the impacts of enhanced aerosol concentrations on the growth of congestus clouds produced in idealized cloud-resolving model simulations run under a state of radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). High-resolution, long-duration simulations were completed using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Aerosol concentrations between 2 and 4 km above ground level were varied from clean to polluted conditions in order to represent the advection of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean. The congestus populations within each aerosol simulation are statistically analyzed using 10 days of model output after the simulation reaches RCE. Results indicate that congestus in more polluted conditions produce greater amounts of cloud water and ice mass, enhanced updraft strengths, and an increase in the number of congestus cloud tops that extend above the freezing level. Enhanced vapor depositional growth on the populations of more numerous, smaller cloud droplets in the polluted conditions, and the subsequent increase in latent heat release in the warm phase regions of the cloud, is found to be important factors in convective invigoration of these cloud systems. Aerosol feedbacks associated with cold pools and condensate loading also influence the updraft strength and act in opposition to the warm phase invigoration processes.

  16. Involvement of the serine protease inhibitor, SERPINE2, and the urokinase plasminogen activator in cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chung-Hao; Lee, Robert Kuo-Kuang; Hwu, Yuh-Ming; Lin, Ming-Huei; Yeh, Ling-Yu; Chen, Ying-Jie; Lin, Shau-Ping; Li, Sheng-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    The serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E, member 2 (SERPINE2) inhibits urokinase-type plasminogen activator (PLAU) and tissue-type plasminogen activator. Higher SERPINE2 expression levels were detected in cumulus cells of human immature oocytes than in those of mature oocytes. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether high SERPINE2 levels in cumulus cells are associated with oocyte immaturity. Using the mouse cumulus-oocyte complex as an experimental model, the effects of elimination and overexpression of SERPINE2 in cumulus cells on cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation were assayed by in vitro maturation. Serpine2 and PLAU transcripts were the most highly expressed serpins and plasminogen activators, respectively. Their expression was coordinately regulated in cumulus cells during gonadotropin-induced oocyte maturation. Silencing of Serpine2 expression using small interfering RNAs or blockage of SERPINE2 protein using a specific antibody had no effect on oocyte maturation. However, overexpression of Serpine2 or exogenous supplementation with high levels of SERPINE2 impaired cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation, probably by decreasing hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2) and versican (Vcan) mRNA expression. Amiloride, a specific PLAU inhibitor, also suppressed these processes. PLAU supplementation of the oocyte in vitro maturation medium caused earlier and more extensive expansion of cumulus cells and oocyte maturation that may be mediated by increased Has2 mRNA expression. However, these effects were neutralized by coincubation with SERPINE2 or amiloride and PLAU. In conclusion, SERPINE2 and PLAU are involved in cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation. High SERPINE2 levels impair these processes, probably by decreasing cumulus matrix gene expression as well as reducing cumulus hyaluronan contents and inhibiting PLAU activity. These findings may explain why cumulus cells surrounding immature human oocytes express high SERPINE2 levels.

  17. Shallow cumulus processes deduced from subcloud flux measurements and parameterization schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Oetles, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to improve understanding of shallow cumulus in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), to quantitatively measure their subcloud root processes, and to link those measurements to estimates of cloud layer processes. Subcloud aircraft turbulence data for three days from the 1986 HAPEX project in southwest France is extensively analyzed. Various parameterizations of cloud layer processes are used to estimate cumulus layer effects by employing the subcloud fluxes as boundary conditions. Case 1 (5/21/86) had active cumuli; over the forest they were deep and large in diameter, but clouds over farmland were shallow and small in diameter. Case 2 (5/9/86) has also weak active cumulus with a smaller vertical depth and case 3 (6/13/86) had only forced cumuli. Four methods of decomposition of turbulence data have been employed: by land surface-cumulus regime, by proximity to clouds and clear areas, by scale, and by turbulence process types. In the presence strong active cumuli from case 1, the turbulent fluxes and energy are intensified, due to the cloud [open quotes]root[close quotes] effects. The strong active cumuli are initiated by warm-moist thermals. Since cumulus layer flux measurements were not made during the HAPEX experiment, different parameterization schemes have been used to estimate cloud layer fluxes. The schemes are: the simple cumulus flux scheme, the Betts-Miller adjustment scheme, an eddy diffusion scheme, and a new eddy diffusion scheme with counter-gradient term which is developed as a part of this study. For the strong active cumulus regime from case 1, the liquid water potential temperature and total water fluxes obtained from different parameterization schemes yield very similar results. Unlike the other parameterization schemes, the new eddy diffusion scheme with a counter-gradient term yields upward buoyancy fluxes which are in a good agreement with earlier studies.

  18. Transcriptomic diversification of developing cumulus and mural granulosa cells in mouse ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Wigglesworth, Karen; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Emori, Chihiro; Sugiura, Koji; Eppig, John J

    2015-01-01

    Cumulus cells and mural granulosa cells (MGCs) have functionally distinct roles in antral follicles, and comparison of their transcriptomes at a global and systems level can propel future studies on mechanisms underlying their functional diversity. These cells were isolated from small and large antral follicles before and after stimulation of immature mice with gonadotropins, respectively. Both cell types underwent dramatic transcriptomic changes, and differences between them increased with follicular growth. Although cumulus cells of both stages of follicular development are competent to undergo expansion in vitro, they were otherwise remarkably dissimilar with transcriptomic changes quantitatively equivalent to those of MGCs. Gene ontology analysis revealed that cumulus cells of small follicles were enriched in transcripts generally associated with catalytic components of metabolic processes, while those from large follicles were involved in regulation of metabolism, cell differentiation, and adhesion. Contrast of cumulus cells versus MGCs revealed that cumulus cells were enriched in transcripts associated with metabolism and cell proliferation while MGCs were enriched for transcripts involved in cell signaling and differentiation. In vitro and in vivo models were used to test the hypothesis that higher levels of transcripts in cumulus cells versus MGCs is the result of stimulation by oocyte-derived paracrine factors (ODPFs). Surprisingly ∼48% of transcripts higher in cumulus cells than MGCs were not stimulated by ODPFs. Those stimulated by ODPFs were mainly associated with cell division, mRNA processing, or the catalytic pathways of metabolism, while those not stimulated by ODPFs were associated with regulatory processes such as signaling, transcription, phosphorylation, or the regulation of metabolism.

  19. Effects of mesoscale convective organization and vertical wind shear on the cumulus-environment interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaoqing.

    1992-01-01

    This study is made to understand the thermodynamic and dynamic aspects of cumulus-environment interaction. Specifically, the author examines (1) the similarities and differences of cumulus-environment interactions in the tropical and midlatitude convective systems (2) the impact of the presence of mesoscale circulations on the interpretation of cumulus-environment interaction, and (3) the effects of vertical wind shear on the dynamic interaction of cumulus convection with the large-scale motion. Analysis of PRE-STORM and GATE data show larger moist convective instability, large-scale forcing and vertical wind shear in the mid-latitude MCCs and squall lines than in the tropical non-squall clusters. The interaction mechanism based on the cumulus-induced subsidence and detrainment is capable of explaining most of the observed heating and drying under widely different environment conditions. The Arakawa-Schubert (A-S) quasi-equilibrium assumption is valid. Both the cumulus and stratiform cloud effects are stronger in midlatitude convective systems than in tropical systems. The heat and moisture budget results using the fine resolution SESAME data show pronounced dipole patterns in the horizontal distributions of vertically integrated heat source and moisture sink. Further analysis shows that the dipole pattern is closely related to the horizontal fluxes of heat and moisture due to mesoscale circulations. The quasi-equilibrium assumption becomes more accurate for the data resolving mesoscale circulation. The inclusion of downdrafts is required to accurately predict the cumulus heating and drying. Significant differences are found in vertical transport of horizontal momentum between the MCC and squall line. A new cloud momentum model which includes the convective-scale horizontal pressure gradient force has been developed. The application of the new cloud momentum model shows that the new model can simulate both the upgradient and downgradient transport of cloud momentum.

  20. Molecular analysis of the cumulus matrix: insights from mice with O-glycan-deficient oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ploutarchou, Panayiota; Melo, Pedro; Day, Anthony J; Milner, Caroline M; Williams, Suzannah A

    2015-05-01

    During follicle development, oocytes secrete factors that influence the development of granulosa and cumulus cells (CCs). In response to oocyte and somatic cell signals, CCs produce extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules resulting in cumulus expansion, which is essential for ovulation, fertilisation, and is predictive of oocyte quality. The cumulus ECM is largely made up of hyaluronan (HA), TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6, also known as TNFAIP6), pentraxin-3 (PTX3), and the heavy chains (HCs) of serum-derived inter-α-inhibitor proteins. In contrast to other in vivo models where modified expansion impairs fertility, the cumulus mass of C1galt1 Mutants, which have oocyte-specific deletion of core 1-derived O-glycans, is modified without impairing fertility. In this report, we used C1galt1 Mutant (C1galt1(FF):ZP3Cre) and Control (C1galt1(FF)) mice to investigate how cumulus expansion is affected by oocyte-specific deletion of core 1-derived O-glycans without adversely affecting oocyte quality. Mutant cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) are smaller than Controls, with fewer CCs. Interestingly, the CCs in Mutant mice are functionally normal as each cell produced normal levels of the ECM molecules HA, TSG-6, and PTX3. However, HC levels were elevated in Mutant COCs. These data reveal that oocyte glycoproteins carrying core 1-derived O-glycans have a regulatory role in COC development. In addition, our study of Controls indicates that a functional COC can form provided all essential components are present above a minimum threshold level, and thus some variation in ECM composition does not adversely affect oocyte development, ovulation or fertilisation. These data have important implications for IVF and the use of cumulus expansion as a criterion for oocyte assessment.

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 10 markedly improves in vitro maturation of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Son, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Eun; Hyun, Hyuk; Shin, Min-Young; Park, Yun-Gwi; Jeong, Sang-Gi; Kim, Eun-Young; Park, Se-Pill

    2017-01-01

    Growth factors synthesized by ovarian somatic cells affect cumulus cell expansion and oocyte maturation in vitro. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10), for example, is a known regulator of mammalian cumulus-oocyte complex maturation. In this study, we investigated the effects of 0, 5, 10, 50, and 100 ng/mL FGF10 (5F, 10F, 50F, and 100F, respectively) on in vitro cumulus cell expansion, oocyte maturation, and embryo development. The percentage of fully expanded cumulus cells at the oocyte's metaphase-II (MII) stage was significantly higher in the 10F-treated group than in the control. Transcript abundance of the cumulus cell expansion-related gene encoding hyaluronian synthase 2 (HAS2) in cumulus cells at oocyte germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) was significantly higher in the 10F- and 50F-treated groups compared to untreated controls, whereas the mRNA abundance of the protease cathepsin B (CTSB) at the oocyte MII stage was remarkably decreased in the 10F-treated group. The percentage of oocytes with normal spindles was greater in the 10F- and 50F-treated group at GVBD than in the other groups; the 5F-, 10F-, and 100F-treated groups were higher than the control; and the 50F-treated group was highest at MII. The abundance of GDF9 and BMP15 transcript at GVBD and BMP15 and CCNB1 transcripts at MII increased in the 10F-treated group. Cleavage rate, blastocyst formation rate, and total cell number were significantly higher in the 5F- to 50F-treated groups. These results demonstrate that FGF10 markedly improves cumulus cell expansion, oocyte maturation, and subsequent embryo development. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 84: 67-75, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Robust, Radiation Tolerant Command and Data Handling and Power System Electronics from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hanson C.; Fraction, James; Ortiz-Acosta, Melyane; Dakermanji, George; Kercheval, Bradford P.; Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Kim, David S.; Jung, David S.; Meyer, Steven E.; Mallik, Udayan; Rush, Kurt D.; Farid, Faramarz; Olsen, James C.; Sparacino, Pietro A.

    2016-01-01

    The Goddard Modular Smallsat Architecture (GMSA) is developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to address future reliability along with minimizing cost and schedule challenges for NASA Cubesat and Smallsat missions.

  3. Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Turnkey Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) data acquisition systems typically perform well and meet most of the objectives of the manufacturer. The problem is that they seldom meet most of the objectives of the end user. The analysis software, if any, is unlikely to be tailored to the end users specific application; and there is seldom the chance of incorporating preferred algorithms to solve unique problems. Purchasing a customized system allows the end user to get a system tailored to the actual application, but the cost can be prohibitive. Once the system has been accepted, future changes come with a cost and response time that's often not workable. When it came time to replace the primary digital data acquisition system used in the Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Test Section, the decision was made to use a combination of COTS hardware and in-house developed software. The COTS hardware used is the DataMAX II Instrumentation Recorder built by R.C. Electronics Inc. and a desktop Pentium 4 computer system. The in-house software was developed using MATLAF3 from The Mathworks. This paper will describe the design and development of the new data acquisition and analysis system.

  4. Goddard Space Flight Center's Partnership with Florida International University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rishe, N. D.; Graham, S. C.; Gutierrez, M. E.

    2004-12-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been collaborating with Florida International University's High Performance Database Research Center (FIU HPDRC) for nearly ten years. Much of this collaboration was funded through a NASA Institutional Research Award (IRA). That award involved research in the Internet dissemination of geospatial data, and in recruiting and training student researchers. FIU's TerraFly web service presently serves more than 10,000 unique users per day by providing an easy-to-use mechanism for exploring geospatial data and imagery. IRA-supported students have received 47 Bachelor's degrees, 20 Master's degrees, and 2 Doctoral degrees at FIU. FIU leveraged IRA funding into over \\$19 million in other funding and donations for their research and training activities and has published nearly 150 scientific papers acknowledging the NASA IRA award. GSFC has worked closely with FIU HPDRC in the development of their geospatial data storage and dissemination research. TerraFly presents many NASA datasets such as the nationwide mosaic of LandSat 5, the PRISM precipitation model, the TRMM accumulated rainfall worldwide; as well as USGS aerial photography nationwide at 30cm to 1m resolutions, demographic data, Ikonos satellite imagery, and many more. Our presentation will discuss the lessons learned during the collaboration between GSFC and FIU as well as our current research projects.

  5. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote earth field sensing magnetometer and servo control building; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils are 42-foot in diameter and a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils accommodates spacecraft access to the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  6. Orbital Anomalies in Goddard Spacecraft for Calendar Year 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Walter B.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes and updates the annual on-orbit performance between January I and December 31, 1994, for spacecraft built by or managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). During 1994, GSFC had 27 active orbiting satellites and I Shuttle-launched and retrieved 'free flyer.' There were 310 reported anomalies among 21 satellites and one GSFC instrument (TOMS). GOES-8 accounted for 66 anomalies, and SAMPES reported 155 'anomalies'. Of the 155 anomalies reported for all but SAMPEX, only 4 affected the spacecraft missions 'substantially' or greater, that is, presented a loss of more than 33% of the total missions. The most frequent subsystem anomalies were Instrument/Payload(44), Timing Command and Control(40), and Attitude Control Systems(33). Of the non-SAMPEX anomalies, 29% had no effect on the missions and 28% caused subsystem or instrument degradation and, for another 28%, no anomaly effect on the mission could be determined. Fifty-three percent of non-SAMPEX anomalies could not be classified according to 'type'; the other most common types were 'systemic'(35), 'random'(19), and 'normal or expected operation'(15). Forty percent of the anomalies were not classified according to failure category; the remaining most frequent occurrences were 'design problems'(50) and 'other known problems'(35).

  7. Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Data Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Turnkey Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) data acquisition systems typically perform well and meet most of the objectives of the manufacturer. The problem is that they seldom meet most of the objectives of the end user. The analysis software, if any, is unlikely to be tailored to the end users specific application; and there is seldom the chance of incorporating preferred algorithms to solve unique problems. Purchasing a customized system allows the end user to get a system tailored to the actual application, but the cost can be prohibitive. Once the system has been accepted, future changes come with a cost and response time that's often not workable. When it came time to replace the primary digital data acquisition system used in the Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Test Section, the decision was made to use a combination of COTS hardware and in-house developed software. The COTS hardware used is the DataMAX II Instrumentation Recorder built by R.C. Electronics Inc. and a desktop Pentium 4 computer system. The in-house software was developed using MATLAB from The MathWorks. This paper will describe the design and development of the new data acquisition and analysis system.

  8. An improved gravity model for Mars: Goddard Mars Model 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Zuber, M. T.; Patel, G. B.; Fricke, S. K.; Lemoine, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    Doppler tracking data of three orbiting spacecraft have been reanalyzed to develop a new gravitational field model for the planet Mars, Goddard Mars Model 1 (GMM-1). This model employs nearly all available data, consisting of approximately 1100 days of S band tracking data collected by NASA's Deep Space Network from the Mariner 9 and Viking 1 and Viking 2 spacecraft, in seven different orbits, between 1971 and 1979. GMM-1 is complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 50, which corresponds to a half-wavelength spatial resolution of 200-300 km where the data permit. GMM-1 represents satellite orbits with considerably better accuracy than previous Mars gravity models and shows greater resolution of identifiable geological structures. The notable improvement in GMM-1 over previous models is a consequence of several factors: improved computational capabilities, the use of otpimum weighting and least squares collocation solution techniques which stabilized the behavior of the solution at high degree and order, and the use of longer satellite arcs than employed in previous solutions that were made possible by improved force and measurement models. The inclusion of X band tracking data from the 379-km altitude, nnear-polar orbiting Mars Observer spacecraft should provide a significant improvement over GMM-1, particularly at high latitudes where current data poorly resolve the gravitational signature of the planet.

  9. Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph SV/GTO Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbets, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Contract number NAS5-30433, known at Ball Aerospace as the GHRS SV/GTO project, supported our participation in the post-launch activities of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The period of performance was December 1988 through December 1998. The contract supported the involvement of Dr Dennis Ebbets in the work of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team, and several of the Ball people in the documentation and publication of results. Three main categories of tasks were covered by this contract; in-orbit calibration of the GHRS, guaranteed time observations, and education and public outreach. The nature and accomplishments of these tasks are described in the report. This summary makes many references to publications in the scientific and technical literature. Appendix A is extracted from a complete bibliography, and lists those papers that are directly related to work performed under this GHRS contract. The tasks related to the in-orbit calibration of the GHRS were by far the largest responsibility during the first six years of the project. During this period Dr. Ebbets was responsible for the definition of calibration requirements, design of experiments, preparation of observing proposals, tracking their implementation and execution, and coordinating the analysis and publication of the results. Prior to the launch of HST in 1990 the observing proposals were developed in cooperation with the scientists on the GHRS DDT, engineers at Ball Aerospace, the operations staff at the STScI, and project coordinators at GSFC.

  10. Knockdown of TrkA in cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) inhibits EGF-induced cumulus expansion by down-regulation of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liang, Ning; Yao, Guidong; Tian, Hui; Zhai, Yiwen; Yin, Yimeng; Sun, Fei

    2014-02-15

    Tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA), the high-affinity receptor of nerve growth factor (NGF), is known to play key roles in ovarian follicular development, such as assembly of early follicles and follicular ovulation. However, little is known about the roles of TrkA in cumulus oocyte complex (COC) expansion. In this study, we found that TrkA was abundant in large antral follicles and knockdown of TrkA in COCs attenuated epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced COC expansion and further decreased the ovulation rate. The effect of TrkA on COC expansion was not mediated through downstream EGF effectors, phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) or drosophila mothers against decapentaplegic protein (SMAD), or through up-regulation of COC expansion-related transcripts such as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Ptgs2), hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2), TNF-induced protein 6 (Tnfaip6) or pentraxin 3 (Ptx3). However, pharmacological blockade of TrkA transducing activity (K252α) in COCs decreased the mRNA expression and protein secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), identified from mRNA microarray of K252α-treated COCs. Meanwhile, knockdown of IL-6 attenuated EGF-induced COC expansion. In addition, IL-6 rescued the inhibitory effect of K252α on EGF-induced cumulus expansion. Therefore, IL-6 may act as a new potential cumulus expansion-related transcript, which may be involved in the integration of TrkA and EGF signaling in affecting COC expansion. Here, we provide mechanistic insights into the roles of TrkA in EGF-induced cumulus expansion. Understanding potential cross-points between TrkA and EGF affecting cumulus expansion will help in the discovery of new therapeutic targets in ovulation-related diseases.

  11. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  12. Impact of Prunus Cerasus on PGR and HAS2 in Cumulus Cells and Fertility Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Namvar Vansofla, Fatemeh; Roshangar, Leila; Montaseri, Azadeh; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cumulus cells have a critical role in normal oocyte development and fertilization. Prunus cerasus is an anthocyanin rich berry and performs strong antioxidant activity. The present study set to determine if Prunus cerasus can affect expression of HAS2 (hyaluronan synthase 2) and progesterone receptor in Cumulus cells and its consequences outcome of the in vitro fertilization. Methods: 60 female and 15 male adult mice were used for mating and IVF (in vitro fertilization). Prunus cerasus extraction was added to the diet of female mice for 30 days. Ovulation induction and oocytes collection were done as routine. The cumulus cells were dissected apart, and the expression of progesterone receptor and HAS2 was detected using RT-PCR (real-time polymerase chain reaction). Fertilization rate was evaluated by IVF. All data were analyzed using t-test. Results: Data was showed that expression of progesterone receptor and HAS2 in cumulus cells of mice that received prunus cerasus increased. Moreover, oocyte fertilization rate also increased significantly. Conclusion: Prunus cerasus as an antioxidant natural can become an important medication for improving oocyte quality and opening new opportunities for infertility treatment. It is concluded that Prunus cerasus consumption could improve fertility rate by increasing progesterone receptor and HAS2 activity in cumulus cells. PMID:27123419

  13. Expression and localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    García, Daniela C; Miceli, Dora C; Rizo, Gabriela; García, Elina V; Valdecantos, Pablo A; Roldán-Olarte, Mariela

    2016-04-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease involved in extracellular matrix remodeling through plasmin generation. uPA usually binds to its receptor, uPAR, which is anchored to the plasma membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. uPA/uPAR binding increases proteolytic activity in the neighborhood of the cells containing uPAR and activates intracellular signaling pathways involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, cell migration and proliferation. The aim of this work was to study the expression of uPA, uPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in immature and in vitro matured bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). uPA is only expressed in the cumulus cells of immature and in vitro matured COCs, while uPAR and PAI-1 are expressed in both the cumulus cells and the immature and in vitro matured oocytes. In addition, uPAR protein was localized by confocal microscopy in the plasma membrane of oocytes and cumulus cells of immature COCs. Results from this research led us to hypothesize that the uPA/uPAR interaction could cause the local production of uPA-mediated plasmin over oocyte and cumulus cell surface; plasmin formation could also be regulated by PAI-1.

  14. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Cumulus Parameterizations under Summertime Midlatitude Continental Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.; Cederwall, R.T.; Yio, J.J.; Xu, K.M.

    2001-05-17

    Parameterization of cumulus convection in general circulation model (GCM) has been recognized as one of the most important and complex issues in the model physical parameterizations. In earlier studies, most cumulus parameterizations were developed and evaluated using data observed over tropical oceans, such as the GATE (the Global Atmospheric Research Program's Atlantic Tropical Experiment) data. This is partly due to inadequate field measurements in the midlatitudes. In this study, we compare and evaluate a total of eight types of the state-of-the-art cumulus parameterizations used in fifteen Single-Column Models (SCM) under the summertime midlatitude continental conditions using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) summer 1997 Intensive Operational Period (IOP) data, which covers several continental convection events. The purpose is to systematically compare and evaluate the performance of these cumulus parameterizations under summertime midlatitude continental conditions. Through the study we hope to identify strengths and weaknesses of these cumulus parameterizations that will lead to further improvements. Here, we briefly present our most interesting results. A full description of this study can be seen in Xie et al. (2001).

  15. Analysis of Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflectance (CSIR) Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardham

    1996-01-01

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at the earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using Yankee Environmental Systems UVA-1 and UVB-1 pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Wm(exp -2) and 0.069 Wm(exp -2) were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed.

  16. Analysis of cumulus solar irradiance reflectance (CSIR) events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardhan

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at Earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When Sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using UVA and UVB pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Win -2 and 0.0169 Wm -2 were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of Sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed. C 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  18. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  19. 182 MATURATION OF BOVINE CUMULUS-OOCYTE COMPLEXES WITH FOLLICLE FLUID VARYING IN ESTRADIOL CONTENT AFFECTS CUMULUS CELL EXPANSION WITHOUT AFFECTING SUBSEQUENT EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT IN VITRO.

    PubMed

    Harl, A W; Larimore, E L; Al Naib, A; Wooldridge, L K; Ealy, A D; Perry, G A; Rhoads, M L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine how characteristics of bovine follicle fluid (FF; especially oestradiol content) affect cumulus cell expansion and oocyte competence. In the first study, FF was collected from abattoir-derived ovaries and pooled separately for large follicles (≥10mm) and small follicles (≤3mm). A portion of the FF from each category was charcoal stripped. These 4 types of FF were then used as the primary ingredient (75% vol/vol) in oocyte maturation media. A separate control group lacking FF but containing BSA was included to monitor potential impacts of protein on outcomes (control; without FF). Some of the cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC; n=250) were matured in individual drops for analysis of cumulus expansion (photographed and measured at 0 and 21h of maturation). Other COC (n=770) were matured in groups of 12 to 25 in the previously described media, and then subjected to IVF procedures. Cleavage rates were recorded on Day 3, and blastocyst rates were recorded on Day 8 post-fertilization. Cumulus cell expansion was greatest when COC were matured in medium containing FF from large follicles, wherein it even exceeded the controls (P<0.02). Maturation in FF from small follicles resulted in cumulus expansion that was intermediate between large and control. Maturation in charcoal-stripped FF severely restricted cumulus cell expansion (P<0.05) compared with those matured in untreated FF. Despite the observed improvement in cumulus cell expansion, COC that had been matured in media containing FF were less likely to cleave (P<0.05) and also less likely to develop to the blastocyst stage (P<0.01) than those matured in control medium. Cleavage and blastocyst rates did not differ among any of the maturation media containing FF. In the second study, oestrous cycles of 9 crossbred cows were synchronized and FF samples were collected 36 to 42h after prostaglandin F2α injection. Samples from individual cows were categorized as having high

  20. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground-testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  1. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalosky, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  2. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Scientific Support Contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1988, Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) was selected as the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) Scientific Support Contractor (SSC). This was to have been a few months before the launch of NASA's first Great Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As one of five scientific instruments on HST, the GHRS was designed to obtain spectra in the 1050-3300 A ultraviolet wavelength region with a resolving power, lambda/Delta(lambda) , of up to 100,000 and relative photometric accuracy to 1%. It was built by Ball AeroSpace Systems Group under the guidance of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team (IDT), comprised of 16 scientists from the US and Canada. After launch, the IDT was to perform the initial instrument calibration and execute a broad scientific program during a five-year Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) period. After a year's delay, the launch of HST occurred in April 1990, and CSC participated in the in-orbit calibration and first four years of GTO observations with the IDT. The HST primary mirror suffered from spherical aberration, which reduced the spatial and spectral resolution of Large Science Aperture (LSA) observations and decreased the throughput of the Small Science Aperture (SSA) by a factor of two. Periodic problems with the Side 1 carrousel electronics and anomalies with the low-voltage power supply finally resulted in a suspension of the use of Side 1 less than two years after launch. At the outset, the GHRS SSC task involved work in four areas: 1) to manage and operate the GHRS Data Analysis Facility (DAF); 2) to support the second Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV) program, as well as perform system engineering analysis of the GHRS as nesessary; 3) to assist the GHRS IDT with their scientific research programs, particularly the GSFC members of the team, and 4) to provide administrative and logistic support for GHRS public information and educational activities.

  3. Constraints on Cumulus Parameterization from Simulations of Observed MJO Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Genio, Anthony; Wu, Jingbo; Wolf, Audrey B.; Chen, Yonghua; Yao, Mao-Sung; Kim, Daehyun

    2015-01-01

    Two recent activities offer an opportunity to test general circulation model (GCM) convection and its interaction with large-scale dynamics for observed Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events. This study evaluates the sensitivity of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM to entrainment, rain evaporation, downdrafts, and cold pools. Single Column Model versions that restrict weakly entraining convection produce the most realistic dependence of convection depth on column water vapor (CWV) during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment at Gan Island. Differences among models are primarily at intermediate CWV where the transition from shallow to deeper convection occurs. GCM 20-day hindcasts during the Year of Tropical Convection that best capture the shallow–deep transition also produce strong MJOs, with significant predictability compared to Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission data. The dry anomaly east of the disturbance on hindcast day 1 is a good predictor of MJO onset and evolution. Initial CWV there is near the shallow–deep transition point, implicating premature onset of deep convection as a predictor of a poor MJO simulation. Convection weakly moistens the dry region in good MJO simulations in the first week; weakening of large-scale subsidence over this time may also affect MJO onset. Longwave radiation anomalies are weakest in the worst model version, consistent with previous analyses of cloud/moisture greenhouse enhancement as the primary MJO energy source. The authors’ results suggest that both cloud-/moisture-radiative interactions and convection–moisture sensitivity are required to produce a successful MJO simulation.

  4. Contributions to the implementation of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization in the GLA GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Chao, Winston C.; Walker, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    The roles of the Critical Cloud Work Function (CCWF) data set and the upper and lower bounds on entrainment by cumulus plumes in the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization (ASCP) in the GLA GCM (Geller et al., 1988) were investigated in two sets of experiments. It was found that the horizontal and vertical distribution of cumulus heating can be altered in ASCP by adjusting these parameters. These changes can have a strong influence on the vertical structure of condensation heating, water vapor distribution, temperature, and rainfall. The CCWF is an important limiting parameter that controls the onset of different cloud types; increasing the threshold values of CCWF for all clouds tends to concentrate the rainfall into a narrower ITCZ and affects the rainfall during the initial adjustment period.

  5. Effects of exosome-like vesicles on cumulus expansion in pigs in vitro

    PubMed Central

    MATSUNO, Yuta; ONUMA, Asuka; FUJIOKA, Yoshie A; YASUHARA, Kazuma; FUJII, Wataru; NAITO, Kunihiko; SUGIURA, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Cell-secreted vesicles, such as exosomes, have recently been recognized as mediators of cell communication. A recent study in cattle showed the involvement of exosome-like vesicles in the control of cumulus expansion, a prerequisite process for normal ovulation; however, whether this is the case in other mammalian species is not known. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the presence of exosome-like vesicles in ovarian follicles and their effects on cumulus expansion in vitro in pigs. The presence of exosome-like vesicles in porcine follicular fluid (pFF) was confirmed by transmission electron microscopic observation, the detection of marker proteins, and RNA profiles specific to exosomes. Fluorescently labeled exosome-like vesicles isolated from pFF were incorporated into both cumulus and mural granulosa cells in vitro. Exosome-like vesicles were not capable of inducing cumulus expansion to a degree comparable to that induced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Moreover, exosome-like vesicles had no significant effects on the expression levels of transcripts required for the normal expansion process (HAS2, TNFAIP6, and PTGS2). Interestingly, FSH-induced expression of HAS2 and TNFAIP6 mRNA, but not of PTGS2 mRNA, was significantly increased by the presence of exosome-like vesicles; however, the degree of FSH-induced expansion was not affected. In addition, porcine exosome-like vesicles had no significant effects on the expansion of mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes. Collectively, the present results suggest that exosome-like vesicles are present in pFF, but they are not efficient in inducing cumulus expansion in pigs. PMID:28163264

  6. Effects of exosome-like vesicles on cumulus expansion in pigs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yuta; Onuma, Asuka; Fujioka, Yoshie A; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Fujii, Wataru; Naito, Kunihiko; Sugiura, Koji

    2017-02-16

    Cell-secreted vesicles, such as exosomes, have recently been recognized as mediators of cell communication. A recent study in cattle showed the involvement of exosome-like vesicles in the control of cumulus expansion, a prerequisite process for normal ovulation; however, whether this is the case in other mammalian species is not known. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the presence of exosome-like vesicles in ovarian follicles and their effects on cumulus expansion in vitro in pigs. The presence of exosome-like vesicles in porcine follicular fluid (pFF) was confirmed by transmission electron microscopic observation, the detection of marker proteins, and RNA profiles specific to exosomes. Fluorescently labeled exosome-like vesicles isolated from pFF were incorporated into both cumulus and mural granulosa cells in vitro. Exosome-like vesicles were not capable of inducing cumulus expansion to a degree comparable to that induced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Moreover, exosome-like vesicles had no significant effects on the expression levels of transcripts required for the normal expansion process (HAS2, TNFAIP6, and PTGS2). Interestingly, FSH-induced expression of HAS2 and TNFAIP6 mRNA, but not of PTGS2 mRNA, was significantly increased by the presence of exosome-like vesicles; however, the degree of FSH-induced expansion was not affected. In addition, porcine exosome-like vesicles had no significant effects on the expansion of mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes. Collectively, the present results suggest that exosome-like vesicles are present in pFF, but they are not efficient in inducing cumulus expansion in pigs.

  7. The macroscopic entrainment processes of simulated cumulus ensemble. Part II: Testing the entraining-plume model

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chichung; Arakawa, Akio

    1997-04-15

    According to Part I of this paper, is seems that ignoring the contribution from descendent cloud air in a cloud model for cumulus parameterization (CMCP), such as the spectral cumulus ensemble model in the Arakawa-Schubert parameterization, is an acceptable simplification for tropical deep convection. Since each subensemble in the spectral cumulus ensemble model is formally analogous to an entraining plume, the latter is examined using the simulated data from a cloud-resolving model (CRM). The authors first follow the analysis procedure of Warner. With the data from a nonprecipitating experiment, the authors show that the entraining-plume model cannot simultaneously predict the mean liquid water profile and cloud top height of the clouds simulated by the CRM. However, the mean properties of active elements of clouds, which are characterized by strong updrafts, can be described by an entraining plume of similar top height. With data from a precipitating experiment, the authors examine the spectral cumulus ensemble model using the Paluch diagram. It is found that the spectral cumulus ensemble model appears adequate if different types of clouds in the spectrum are interpreted as subcloud elements with different entrainment characteristics. The resolved internal structure of clouds can thus be viewed as a manifestation of a cloud spectrum. To further investigate whether the fractional rate of entrainment is an appropriate parameter for characterizing cloud types in the spectral cumulus ensemble model, the authors stratify the simulated saturated updrafts (subcloud elements) into different types according to their eventual heights and calculate the cloud mass flux and mean moist static energy for each type. Entrainment characteristics are then inferred through the cloud mass flux and in-cloud moist static energy. It is found that different types of subcloud elements have distinguishable thermodynamic properties and entrainment characteristics. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Time course of the meiotic arrest in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes treated with roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, Letícia Ferrari; Marques Filho, Wolff Camargo; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Paschoal, Daniela Martins; Guastali, Midyan Daroz; Dias Maziero, Rosiára Rosária; Sudano, Mateus José; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda da Cruz; Bicudo, Sony Dimas

    2016-04-01

    Temporary meiosis arrest with cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors has been proposed in order to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes. In sheep, however, this phenomenon has been rarely investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different incubation times with roscovitine on nuclear maturation and cumulus cell expansion of sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). For this, COCs were cultured for 0, 6, 12 or 20 h in basic maturation medium (Control) containing 75 μM roscovitine (Rosco). After, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for 18 h in the presence of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). At the end of each treatment, cumulus cell expansion and nuclear maturation were assessed under a stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. In the Control and Rosco groups, the absence of cumulus cell expansion prevailed at 0, 6, 12 and 20 h. After IVM for 18 h, total cumulus cell expansion in the Rosco treatments was dependent on the exposure time to roscovitine. A significantly high percentage of oocytes treated with roscovitine for 6 h (87%), 12 h or 20 h (65%) were arrested at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. In contrast, 23% GVBD, 54% metaphase I (MI) and 61% MII oocytes were observed in the Control groups at 6, 12 and 20 h, respectively. In all treatments, a significant percentage of oocytes reached MII after IVM for 18 h. Therefore, roscovitine reversibly arrested the meiosis of sheep oocytes during different culture times with the maximal efficiency of meiotic inhibition reached at 6 h. In addition, reversibility of its inhibitory action on cumulus cells was exposure-time dependent.

  9. Semiprognostic test of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization using simulated data

    SciTech Connect

    Kuan-Man Xu; Aki Arakawa )

    1992-12-15

    The Arakawa-Schubert (A-S) cumulus parameterization is evaluated by performing semiprognostic tests against data simulated by a cumulus ensemble model (CEM). The CEM is a two-dimensional cloud model for simulating the formation of an ensemble of cumulus clouds under prescribed large-scale conditions. Three simulations, two with vertical wind shear and one without, are performed with identical (time-varying) large-scale advective effects. Detailed comparisons were made between the results of simulation and parameterization. The results include comparisions of surface precipitation rate, apparent heat source, apparent moisture sink, updraft mass flux, and downdraft mass flux. Two different sets of tests were performed. One was the standard A-S parameterization with the cloud work function (CWF) quasi equilibrium, and the other allowed CWF nonequilibrium by accounting for the simulated time change of the CWF. The tests show that the A-S parameterization is valid despite mesoscale organization in cumulus convection. The assumption of CWF quasi equilibrium is more accurate for inputs averaged over smaller subdomain sizes that resolve some mesoscale processes. Errors due to the nondiagnostic aspect of cumulus convection are more significant for inputs averaged over larger subdomain sizes. Errors due to the inherent nondeterministic aspect of cumulus convection appear to be more significant for inputs averaged over smaller subdomain sizes. A modified A-S parameterization with a convective-scale downdraft formulation was also tested against the simulated data. The inclusion of downdrafts slightly improves the results of semiprognostic tests. The impact of downdrafts on the subcloud layer may depend significantly on the subdomain size. 20 refs., 16 figs.

  10. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on bovine cumulus-oocyte complex in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nikoloff, Noelia; Pascua, Ana M; Anchordoquy, Juan M; Anchordoquy, Juan P; Sirini, Matías A; Seoane, Analia; Furnus, Cecilia C

    2017-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation during in vitro maturation (IVM) of bovine oocytes. The concentrations tested in all experiments were 1 nM, 1 μM and 1 mM EPA. The effect of EPA was evaluated on cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) by oocyte maturation [cumulus expansion area and oocyte nuclear maturation], genotoxicity [single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)] and cytotoxicity [apoptosis, viability and MTT assays] end points. The maturation parameters were affected by exposure of COC to different EPA concentrations in the IVM medium. Cumulus expansion area increased in the presence of 1 nM EPA (P < 0.05) whereas addition of 1 nM EPA (P < 0.05) decreased cumulus expansion after 24 h of IVM. Moreover, the maturation rate significantly decreased when 1 mM of EPA was assayed (P < 0.001). EPA at 1 nM induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on bovine cumulus cells (CC) and primary DNA lesions (P < 0.001). A significant increase in the frequency of apoptotic (P < 0.01) and necrotic (P < 0.001) cells was observed after 24 h of treatment with 1 nM, 1 μM and 1 mM EPA. Mitochondrial activity was altered with 1 mM EPA (P < 0.001). We inferred that optimal oocyte quality was partially dependent on the presence of adequate EPA concentrations; EPA could be beneficial to improve oocyte quality in the maturation process, because low concentration tested (1 nM EPA) improved cumulus expansion.

  11. The cumulus cell layer protects the bovine maturing oocyte against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Francesca; Brouwers, Jos F; de Lest, Chris H A van; Wubbolts, Richard; Aardema, Hilde; Priore, Paola; Roelen, Bernard A J; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress increases the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and is associated with impaired female fertility. In a previous report, we described the effects of the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitate and stearate and unsaturated oleate) on oocyte maturation and quality. In the current study, the effects of elevated fatty acid levels on cumulus cells were investigated. In a dose-dependent manner, the three fatty acids induced lipid storage in cumulus cells accompanied by an enhanced immune labeling of perilipin-2, a marker for lipid droplets. Lipidomic analysis confirmed incorporation of the administered fatty acids into triglyceride, resulting in a 3- to 6-fold increase of triglyceride content. In addition, palmitate selectively induced ceramide formation, which has been implicated in apoptosis. Indeed, of the three fatty acids tested, palmitate induced reactive oxygen species formation, caspase 3 activation, and mitochondria deterioration, leading to degeneration of the cumulus cell layers. This effect could be mimicked by addition of the ceramide-C2 analog and could be inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin-B1. Interfering with the intactness of the cumulus cell layers, either by mechanical force or by palmitate treatment, resulted in enhanced uptake of lipids in the oocyte and increased radical formation. Our results show that cumulus cells act as a barrier, protecting oocytes from in vitro induced lipotoxic effects. We suggest that this protective function of the cumulus cell layers is important for the developmental competence of the oocyte. The relevance of our findings for assisted reproduction technologies is discussed.

  12. EPA settlement with NASA resolves environmental violations at Goddard Space Flight Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (November 10, 2015) -The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has agreed to pay a $50,660 penalty to settle alleged violations of federal environmental regulations at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Island, Va.,

  13. The 1995 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Information Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1995 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Information Technologies held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, on May 9-11, 1995. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  14. Payload test philosophy. [implications of STS development at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arman, A.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of STS development for payload testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center are reviewed. The biggest impact of STS may be that instead of testing the entire payload, most of the testing may have to be limited to the subsystem or subassembly level. Particular consideration is given to the Goddard protoflight concept in which the test is geared to the design qualification levels, the test durations being those that are expected during the actual launch sequence.

  15. A Regulation of Tropical Climate by Radiative Cooling as Simulated in a Cumulus Ensemble Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Lau, K.-M.; Li, X.; Chou, M.-D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Responses of tropical atmosphere to low-boundary forcing are investigated in a 2-D cumulus ensemble model (CEM) with an imposed warm-pool and cold-pool SST contrast (deltaSST). The domain-mean vertical motion is constrained to produce heat sink and moisture source as in the observed tropical climate. In a series of experiments, the warm pool SST is specified at different values while the cold pool SST is specified at 26 C. The strength of the circulation increases with increasing deltaSST until deltaSST reaches 3.5 C, and remains unchanged as deltaSST exceeds 3.5 C. The regulation of tropical convection by zonal SST gradient is constrained by the radiative cooling over the cold pool. For deltaSST less than 3.5 C, an enhanced subsidence warming is balanced by a reduced condensation heating over the cold pool. For deltaSST greater than 3.5 C, the subsidence regime expands over the entire cold pool where no condensation heating exist so that a further enhanced subsidence warming can no longer be sustained. The above regulation mechanism is also evident in the change of energy at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) that is dominated by cloud and water vapor greenhouse effect (c (sub LW)) and G (sub clear). The change in shortwave radiation at TOA is largely cancelled between the warm pool and cold pool, likely due to the same imposed vertical motion in our experiments. For deltaSST less than 3.5 C, an increase of deltaSST is associated with a large increase in c (sub Lw) due to increased total clouds in response to enhanced SST-induced circulation. For deltaSST greater than 3.5 C, clouds over the warm pool decrease with increasing SST, and the change in c (sub LW) is much smaller. In both dSST regimes, the change in CLW is larger than the change in G(sub clear) which is slightly negative. However, in the case of uniform warming (deltaSST=0), DeltaG(sub clear), is positive, approximately 5 W per square meters per degree change of SST.

  16. Update on the Fabrication and Performance of 2-D Arrays of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Thermal Detectors for Outer-Planets Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook; Aslam, S.

    2011-01-01

    Detectors with better performance than the current thermopile detectors that operate at room temperature will be needed at the focal plane of far-infrared instruments on future planetary exploration missions. We will present an update on recent results from the 2-D array of MgB2 thermal detectors being currently developed at NASA Goddard. Noise and sensitivity results will be presented and compared to thermal detectors currently in use on planetary missions.

  17. Gravitational model improvement at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F. J.; Putney, B. H.; Felsentreger, T. L.; Sanchez, B. V.; Smith, D. E.; Klosko, S. M.; Pavlis, E. C.; Robbins, J. W.; Williamson, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Major new computations of terrestrial gravitational field models were performed by the Geodynamics Branch of Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This development has incorporated the present state of the art results in satellite geodesy and have relied upon a more consistent set of reference constants than was heretofore utilized in GSFC's GEM models. The solutions are complete in spherical harmonic coefficients out to degree 50 for the gravity field parameters. These models include adjustment for a subset of 66 ocean tidal coefficients for the long wavelength components of 12 major ocean tides. This tidal adjustment was made in the presence of 550 other fixed ocean tidal terms representing 32 major and minor ocean tides and the Wahr frequency dependent solid earth tidal model. In addition 5-day averaged values for Earth rotation and polar motion were derived for the time period of 1980 onward. Two types of models were computed. These are satellite only models relying exclusively on tracking data and combination models which have incorporated satellite altimetry and surface gravity data. The satellite observational data base consists of over 1100 orbital arcs of data on 31 satellites. A large percentage of these observations were provided by third generation laser stations (less than 5 cm). A calibration of the model accuracy of the GEM-T2 satellite only solution indicated that it was a significant improvement over previous models based solely upon tracking data. The rms geoid error for this field is 110 cm to degree and order 36. This is a major advancement over GEM-T1 whose errors were estimated to be 160 cm. An error propagation using the covariances of the GEM-T2 model for the TOPEX radial orbit component indicates that the rms radial errors are expected to be 12 cm. The combination solution, PGS-3337, is a preliminary effort leading to the development of GEM-T3. PGS-3337 has incorporated global sets of surface gravity data and the Seasat altimetry to produce a

  18. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  19. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  20. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  1. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  2. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  3. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  4. Supplementation with cumulus cell masses improves the in vitro meiotic competence of porcine cumulus-oocytes complexes derived from small follicles.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, R; Funahashi, H

    2017-03-30

    The present study was conducted to examine the supplemented effect of cumulus cell masses (CCMs) derived from middle follicle (MF; 3-6 mm diameter) on the morphology and the meiotic or developmental competence of oocytes from small follicles (SF; 1-2 mm diameter). The number of cumulus cells surrounding oocytes just after collection was also lower in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from SF than MF. The ooplasmic diameter of oocytes was significantly smaller in SF-derived oocytes than MF-derived ones before and after in vitro maturation (IVM), whereas the diameter significantly increased during the culture. Co-culture of SF-derived COCs with MF-derived CCMs during IVM significantly improved the meiotic competence of the oocytes to the metaphase-II stage. Furthermore, the ooplasmic diameter of SF-derived COCs during IVM was increased to the similar size of MF-derived those in the presence of MF-derived CCMs. The abilities of oocytes to be penetrated, to form male pronuclear formation and to cleave or develop to the blastocyst stage were not affected by the co-culture with CCMs. Electrophoretic analysis of CCM secretions clearly showed the presence of more protein(s) approximately 27.6 kDa in the conditioned medium when supplemented with MF-derived CCMs. In conclusion, we demonstrate that supplementation with MF-derived CCMs improves the ooplasmic diameter and meiotic competence of SF-derived oocytes.

  5. Interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, A.; Schubert, W.

    1973-01-01

    Large-scale modification of the environment by cumulus clouds is discussed in terms of entrainment, detrainment, evaporation, and subsidence. Drying, warming, and condensation by vertical displacement of air are considered as well as budget equations for mass, static energy, water vapor, and liquid water.

  6. Effects of Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 Inhibition by Genipin in Human Cumulus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hongshan; Zhang, Fan; Shan, Dan; Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaona; Ling, Chao; Xi, HaiTao; Huang, Jianying; Zhu, ChunFang; Lv, Jeiqiang

    2015-01-01

    UCP2 plays a physiological role by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis, maintaining energy balance, ROS elimination, and regulating cellular autophagy in numerous tissues. But the exact roles of UCP2 in cumulus cells are still not clear. Genipin, a special UCP2 inhibitor, was added into the cultural medium to explore the roles of UCP2 in human cumulus cells. There were no significant differences in ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential levels in cumulus cells from UCP2 inhibiting groups as compared with the control. The levels of ROS and Mn-SOD were markedly elevated after UCP2 inhibited Genipin. However, the ratio of reduced GSH to GSSG significantly declined after treatment with Genipin. UCP2 inhibition by Genipin also resulted in obvious increase in the active caspase-3, which accompanied the decline of caspase-3 mRNA. The level of progesterone in culture medium declined obviously after Genipin treatment. But there was no significant difference in estradiol concentrations. This study indicated that UCP2 is expressed in human cumulus cells and plays important roles on mediate ROS production, apoptotic process, and steroidogenesis, suggesting UCP2 may be involved in regulation of follicle development and oocyte maturation and quality. PMID:26356408

  7. Effect of Acrylamide on Oocyte Nuclear Maturation and Cumulus Cells Apoptosis in Mouse In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuzhen; Jiang, Ligang; Zhong, Tao; Kong, Shuhui; Zheng, Rongbin; Kong, Fengyun; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Lei; An, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a chemical compound with severe neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Recent studies showed that ACR impairs the function of reproductive organs, e.g., epididymis and testes. In vitro maturation of mouse oocyte is a sensitive assay to identify potential chemical hazard to female fertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects of ACR on the nuclear maturation and cumulus cells apoptosis of mouse oocytes in vitro. Cumulus–oocyte complexes were incubated in a maturation medium containing 0, 5, 10 and 20 μM of ACR. Chromosome alignment and spindle morphology of oocytes was determined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Our results showed that oocytes exposed to different doses of ACR in vitro were associated with a significant decrease of oocyte maturation, significant increase of chromosome misalignment rate, occurrence of abnormal spindle configurations, and the inhibition of oocyte parthenogenetic activation. Furthermore, apoptosis of cumulus cells was determined by TUNEL and CASPASE-3 assay. Results showed that apoptosis in cumulus cells was enhanced and the expression of CASPASE-3 was increased after cumulus–oocyte complexes were exposed to ACR. Therefore, ACR may affect the nuclear maturation of oocytes via the apoptosis of cumulus cells in vitro. PMID:26275143

  8. Bidirectional communication between cumulus cells and the oocyte: Old hands and new players?

    PubMed

    Russell, Darryl L; Gilchrist, Robert B; Brown, Hannah M; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2016-07-01

    Cumulus cell-oocyte communication is an essential feature of mammalian reproduction. Established mechanisms involve the bidirectional transfer of ions and small molecules through gap junctions that fundamentally regulate the process of oocyte maturation. Also, well established is the paracrine signaling from the oocyte to the cumulus, which regulates much of the flow of ions and molecules to the oocyte and orchestrates many of the associated local signaling events around ovulation, which is the key to establishing oocyte competence to sustain early embryo development. Less well-characterized and new potential players include exosomal transfer of noncoding RNAs from cumulus to oocytes and the recent observations of the presence of hemoglobin in oocytes and cumulus cells. The impact of these new communication pathways is either poorly defined or even unknown. Finally, signaling between the two cell types most likely continues after ovulation and even fertilization; however, this too is largely undefined but may play roles in substrate transport, sperm chemotaxis and "trapping", and potential signaling to the rest of the reproductive tract.

  9. Characteristics of small tropical cumulus clouds and their impact on the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, T.C.; Curry, J.A.

    1998-11-01

    This study uses a number of data sets (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Airborne Simulator data, space shuttle photography, Radiation Measurement System data, aircraft data, and shipboard soundings) to investigate the characteristics of small tropical cumulus clouds and their impact on their environment. The goal is to uncover useful information with application to radiative transfer simulation and satellite remote sensing. In fields of small cumulus clouds, size distributions are found to decrease in number with increasing diameter according to a double power law relation, often with a clear break diameter. Fractal dimensions corresponding to the horizontal area and perimeter of the clouds are greater for the larger clouds than for the smaller clouds, with the same break diameter as the size distributions, meaning that the larger clouds have more ragged perimeters. These two results suggest a characteristic horizontal length scale dividing larger and smaller boundary layer cumuli. Spatial distributions show a clear tendency toward clustering. Smaller cumuli appear to grow upward more quickly with increasing horizontal size than do larger cumuli. Albedo is found to increase with greater cloud fraction and higher solar zenith angle. Even sparse fields of small cumulus cause significant shortwave forcing at the ocean surface. Simulation suggests that small cumulus may introduce significant errors into sea surface temperature retrievals and that such clouds can be difficult to remove with operational cloud-filtering schemes. Clouds smaller than about 1 km in diameter are not seen to precipitate. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  10. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Cumulus Parameterizations under Summertime Midlatitude Continental Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S; Cederwall, R T; Yio, J; Xu, K-M

    2001-05-17

    Parameterization of cumulus convection in general circulation model (GCM) has been recognized as one of the most important and complex issues in the model physical parameterizations. In earlier studies, most cumulus parameterizations were developed and evaluated using data observed over tropical oceans, such as the GATE (the Global Atmospheric Research Program's Atlantic Tropical Experiment) data. This is partly due to inadequate field measurements in the midlatitudes. In this study, we compare and evaluate a total of eight types of the state-of-the-art cumulus parameterizations used in fifteen Single-Column Models (SCM) under the summertime midlatitude continental conditions using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) summer 1997 Intensive Operational Period (IOP) data, which covers several continental convection events. The purpose is to systematically compare and evaluate the performance of these cumulus parameterizations under summertime midlatitude continental conditions. Through the study we hope to identify strengths and weaknesses of these cumulus parameterizations that will lead to further improvements. Here, we briefly present our most interesting results. A full description of this study can be seen in Xie et al. (2001). The authors conclude that: (1) The SCM simulation errors are closely related to problems with model cumulus parameterizations. The schemes with triggering based on CAPE generally produce more active cumulus convection than the schemes with triggering based on local parcel buoyancy over land surface at midlatitudes since CAPE is usually large and is mainly determined by the strong solar diurnal heating there. The use of positive CAPE to trigger model convection can lead to an overestimation of convection during the daytime. This results in warmer/drier atmospheres in the former and cooler/more moist atmospheres in the latter. (2) A non-penetrative convection scheme can underestimate the depth of

  11. Effect of oil overlay on inhibition potential of roscovitine in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, L F; Marques Filho, W C; Ulian, C M V; Branchini, N S; Silva, D T; Ackermann, C L; Landim-Alvarenga, F C; Bicudo, S D

    2015-06-01

    Inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases, as roscovitine, have been used to prevent the spontaneous resumption of meiosis in vitro and to improve the oocyte developmental competence. In this study, the interference of oil overlay on the reversible arrest capacity of roscovitine in sheep oocytes as well as its effects on cumulus expansion was evaluated. For this, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were cultured for 20 h in TCM 199 with 10% foetal bovine serum (Control) containing 75 μm roscovitine (Rosco). Subsequently, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for further 18 h in inhibitor-free medium with LH and FSH. The culture was performed in Petri dishes under mineral oil (+) or in 96 well plates without oil overlay (-) at 38.5°C and 5% CO2 . At 20 and 38 h, the cumulus expansion and nuclear maturation were evaluated under stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. No group presented cumulus expansion at 20 h. After additional culture with gonadotrophins, a significant rate of COCs from both Control groups (+/-) exhibited total expansion while in both Rosco groups (+/-) the partial expansion prevailed. Among the oocytes treated with roscovitine, 65.2% were kept at GV in the absence of oil overlay while 40.6% of them reached MII under oil cover (p < 0.05). This meiotic arrest was reversible, and proper meiosis progression also occurred in the Control groups (+/-). So, the culture system without oil overlay improved the meiotic inhibition promoted by roscovitine without affecting the cumulus expansion rate or the subsequent meiosis progression.

  12. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Cumulus Parameterizations under Summertime Midlatitude Continental Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cederwall, Richard T.; Bechtold, Peter; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Klein, Stephen A.; Cripe, Douglas G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Gregory, David; Iacobellis, Sam F.; Krueger, Steven K.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Petch, Jon C.; Randall, David A.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Somerville, Richard C.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wolf, Audrey; Yio, Juhan J.; Zhang, Guang J.; Zhang, Minghua

    2002-04-01

    This study reports the Single-Column Model (SCM) part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) / the Global Energy and Water-cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study (GCSS) joint SCM and Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Case 3 intercomparison study, with a focus on evaluation of cumulus parameterizations used in SCMs. Eight types of state-of-the-art cumulus parameterizations used in thirteen SCMs are evaluated under summertime midlatitude continental conditions using data collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer 1997 Intensive Operational Period (IOP). Cumulus mass fluxes estimated from ten CRMs are also used to diagnose problems in the SCMs. It is found that the cumulus parameterizations based on spectral cloud ensemble models are generally more active than those based on a bulk cloud model over midlatitude lands. Differences in the approaches that are used in determining the atmospheric instability in these two types of schemes are thought to be th e main reason. Most models with the former category of the parameterizations consistently show large systematic warm/dry biases in the troposphere. The errors are relatively small in those with the bulk mass flux schemes except for a model with a non-penetrative convection scheme, which shows large systematic cold/moist biases in the troposphere. It is also shown that surface precipitation rates produced by the models are mainly from cumulus clouds and surface stratiform precipitation rates are significantly underestimated. Finally, sensitivity of the results to different forcing approaches is briefly discussed. Results from the National Center for Atmospheric Research?s Community Climate Model (CCM3) SCM with improved triggering and closure assumptions are also discussed.

  13. The macroscopic entrainment processes of simulated cumulus ensemble. Part I: Entrainment sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chichung; Arakawa, A.

    1997-04-15

    Parameterization of cumulus convection requires a model that describes the statistical properties of a cumulus ensemble under given large-scale conditions. Such a model is called a cloud model for cumulus parameterization (CMCP). It would be best if the development of a CMCP were guided by synchronous observations covering a population of clouds. Unfortunately, observations for cumulus clouds are usually confined to individual clouds, leaving many uncertainties in designing a CMCP. In an attempt to improve the formulation of entrainment effects in a CMCP, the data simulated by a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model are used to investigate sources of entrainment into cumulus clouds. The authors first plot the Paluch diagram using the data from a nonprecipitating experiment. It is found that typical patterns on the Paluch diagram obtained by observational studies can be reproduced using the simulated data and can be interpreted in ways other than two-point mixing. The authors further examine entrainment sources through extensive trajectory analysis using the data from a precipitating experiment. They find that cloud air parcels at one level usually originate from locations of various heights, indicating a continuous series of entrainment events occurring throughout the cloud depth. However, the authors do not find a cloud air parcel decending more than several hundred meters. Penetrative downdrafts produced by mixing between cloud air and entrained air are not observed in the cases simulated. It seems that, as far as tropical deep convection is concerned, ignoring the contribution from descendent cloud air in a CMCP is an acceptable simplification. 52 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Characterization of FSH signalling networks in bovine cumulus cells: a perspective on oocyte competence acquisition.

    PubMed

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating oocyte developmental competence is essential to enhance the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction. FSH orchestrates the acquisition of oocyte competence, both in vivo and in vitro. Multiple pathways are implicated in FSH signalling; however, their precise coordination remains unresolved. A robust system to investigate FSH signalling is oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) and we have previously demonstrated better bovine embryo development after FSH addition for the first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated FSH signalling in cumulus through transcriptomic and pharmacological tools. We demonstrate modulation of cumulus transcriptome by FSH mainly through protein kinase A (PKA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathways. Differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism and oocyte competence. FSH required rouse-sarcoma oncogene (SRC) for EGF receptor transactivation. PKA and EGF pathway crosstalk was investigated using extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) phosphorylation as the functional end-point. FSH enhanced ERK1/2 activation by the EGF pathway with a simultaneous diminution through PKA. More specifically, FSH increased dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) transcripts via PKA although DUSP1 protein did not change since EGF was required to prevent degradation. Our findings implicate FSH in PKA and EGF pathway activation, which interact to maintain appropriate levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and eventually cumulus expansion, metabolism and steroidogenesis. Moreover, considering the implication of the EGF pathway in GDF9 and BMP15 actions, our findings suggest that FSH may have a role in modulation of the cumulus response to oocyte-secreted factors. This information has implications for improvement of IVM and hence oocyte developmental competence.

  15. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  16. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  17. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  18. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  19. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  20. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  1. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  3. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  4. A study of intraseasonal variability in a one-dimensional version of the Goddard atmospheric global climate model. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ortiz, C.U.

    1994-01-01

    A series of numerical experiments using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres Global Climate Model (GLA-AGCM) are designed to study intraseasonal variabilities of the Madden-Julian (1972) type for an idealized tropical oceanic-atmospheric environment. A commentary on the GLA-AGCM parameterizations is presented as a means to justify the adaptation of the full three dimensional AGCM to a simpler model of a dynamically isolated vertical column. The remaining portions of the model include physical parameterizations for cumulus convection, turbulent fluxes at the planetary boundary layer and short and longwave radiative interactions. The set of model experiments use prescribed values for the sea surface temperature and the upper air wind profile, over an assumed warm and uncoupled tropical ocean. The predominant time scales and the structure of the most noticeable fluctuations are dependent on the vertically integrated water vapor mass. Under low surface evaporation, a convective fast time scale of about 42 hours dominates the lower half of the troposphere and the transport of moisture to the upper layers. This convective regime tends to be warmer and moist all throughout, with a longer residence time. As the upper layers moisten, the absorption of shortwave radiation by water vapor aloft, and a reduced cooling due to longwave radiation emission, induce an overturning of the layers at the top of the troposphere, and a sudden transition to a colder and drier climate regime. The entire column is convectively active for a sustained period of time. For larger amounts of precipitable water the system fluctuates nonperiodically between two similarly defined regimes, but in time scales of about 20 to 60 days. In this case the drier regime has a longer residence time. A comparison of experiments with and without diurnal and seasonal solar cycles reveals that the predominant fluctuations and transitions occur even in the absence of the cyclic solar forcing.

  5. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  6. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  7. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  8. Transcript of proceedings: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, 1972 GSFC Battery Workshop, first day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of the 1972 NASA/Goddard Battery Workshop are reported. Topics discussed include: separators, materials and processing, test and storage experience, and improved energy density systems.

  9. Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, L. K.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Dubey, M.; Andrews, E.; Coulter, R. L.; Hair, J. W.; Hubbe, J. M.Lee, Y. N.; Mazzoleni, C; Olfert, J; Springston, SR; Environmental Science Division; PNNL; NOAA Earth System Research Lab.; NASA Langley Research Center; LANL; BNL; Univ.of Alberta; Univ. of Colorado

    2009-11-01

    Aerosols influence climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation and indirectly through their influence on cloud microphysical and dynamical properties. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded that the global radiative forcing due to aerosols is large and in general cools the planet. But the uncertainties in these estimates are also large due to our poor understanding of many of the important processes related to aerosols and clouds. To address this uncertainty an integrated strategy for addressing issues related to aerosols and aerosol processes was proposed. Using this conceptual framework, the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) is a stage 1 activity, that is, a detailed process study. The specific focus of CHAPS was to provide concurrent observations of the chemical composition of the activated [particles that are currently serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)] and nonactivated aerosols, the scattering and extinction profiles, and detailed aerosol and droplet size spectra in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during June 2007. Numerous campaigns have examined aerosol properties downwind from large pollution sources, including the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign and the two of the three Aerosol Characterization Experiments, ACE-2 and ACE-Asia. Other studies conducted near cities have examined changes in both aerosols and clouds downwind of urban areas. For example wintertime stratiform clouds associated with the urban plumes of Denver, Colorado, and Kansas City, Missouri, have a larger number concentration and smaller median volume diameter of droplets than clouds that had not been affected by the urban plume. Likewise, a decrease in precipitation in polluted regions along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains was discovered. In a modeling study, it was found that precipitation downwind of urban areas may be influenced by changes in aerosols as well as the

  10. Individual bovine in vitro embryo production and cumulus cell transcriptomic analysis to distinguish cumulus-oocyte complexes with high or low developmental potential.

    PubMed

    Bunel, A; Jorssen, E P; Merckx, E; Leroy, J L; Bols, P E; Sirard, M A

    2015-01-15

    Studying cumulus cell (CC) transcriptome is of great interest as it could provide a noninvasive method to assess oocyte quality. In cattle, the search for quality markers has not been done with cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) cultured individually from maturation to blastocyst stage. Here, differences between high- and low-potential COCs were examined by transcriptomic analysis of CC biopsies obtained from COCs of 2 to 6 mm follicles (n = 249; eight replicates) before individual in vitro maturation, fertilization, and culture until Day 8 after fertilization. Each COC was individually tracked and categorized based on his fate: embryo at blastocyst stage (CC-Blast) or embryo arrested at 2- to 8-cell stage (CC-2-8-cells). Average blastocyst rates were 27.7% for individual culture and 31.2% for group control (not significantly different). For transcriptomic analysis, five cumulus biopsies per replicate were pooled for each fate. Three CC replicates underwent transcriptomic analysis using RNA microarray assay. Some clear differences in gene expression between the CC-Blast and the CC-2-8-cell groups were identified. Considering a 1.5-fold change (P < 0.05), 68 genes were differentially expressed between the CC-Blast and CC-2-8-cells. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction validations were performed for 12 selected genes: six upregulated genes for each COC fate. Higher expression of 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 9 (AGPAT9) (lipid metabolism), Chloride intracellular channel 3 (CLIC3), Keratin 8 (KRT8), and Lumican (LUM) (molecular transport) was observed in CC-2-8-cells (P < 0.05). The CC-Blast fate analysis revealed a significantly higher expression of Glycine amidinotransferase (L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase) (GATM) (posttranslational modification, amino acid metabolism, and free radical scavenging). This newly identified set of genes could provide new markers to distinguish COCs associated with good quality embryos from COCs

  11. Glenn Goddard TDRSS Waveform 1.1.3 On-Orbit Performance Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed is to study the development, testing, and operation of software defined radios (SDRs) and their associated appliations in the operational space environment to reduce cost and risk for future space missions. This report covers the results of on-orbit performance testing completed using the Glenn Goddard Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) waveform version 1.1.3 in the ground and space environments. The Glenn Goddard TDRSS (GGT) waveform, operating on the SCaN Testbed Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) SDR, is capable of a variety of data rates and frequencies, operating using Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK).

  12. A study of the longevity and operational reliability of Goddard Spacecraft, 1960-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shockey, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    Compiled data regarding the design lives and lifetimes actually achieved by 104 orbiting satellites launched by the Goddard Spaceflight Center between the years 1960 and 1980 is analyzed. Historical trends over the entire 21 year period are reviewed, and the more recent data is subjected to an examination of several key parameters. An empirical reliability function is derived, and compared with various mathematical models. Data from related studies is also discussed. The results provide insight into the reliability history of Goddard spacecraft an guidance for estimating the reliability of future programs.

  13. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  14. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  15. Dynamic changes of connexin-43, gap junctional protein, in outer layers of cumulus cells are regulated by PKC and PI 3-kinase during meiotic resumption in porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shimada, M; Maeda, T; Terada, T

    2001-04-01

    Mammalian oocytes are surrounded by numerous layers of cumulus cells, and the loss of gap junctional communication in the outer layers of cumulus cells induces meiotic resumption in oocytes. In this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in the gap junctional protein connexin-43 in cumulus cells during the meiotic resumption of porcine oocytes. The amount of connexin-43 in all layers of cumulus cells recovered from cumulus-oocyte complexes was increased after 4-h cultivation. However, at 12-h cultivation, the positive signal for connexin-43 immunoreactivity was markedly reduced in the outer layers of cumulus cells. When these reductions of connexin-43 were blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) or phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase inhibitor, networks of filamentous bivalents (i.e., advanced chromosomal status) were undetectable in the germinal vesicle of the oocyte. After 28-h cultivation, when the majority of oocytes were reaching the metaphase I (MI) stage, the connexin-43 in the inner layers of cumulus cells was phosphorylated, regardless of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. These results suggest that the initiation of meiotic resumption, namely, the formation of networks of filamentous bivalents in germinal vesicle, is associated with the reduction of gap junctional protein connexin-43 in the outer layers of cumulus cells via the PKC and/or PI 3-kinase pathway. Moreover, the connexin-43 in the inner layers of cumulus cells is phosphorylated during meiotic progression beyond the MI stage, regardless of MAP kinase activation in cumulus cells surrounding the oocyte.

  16. Bidirectional about 1 MeV/amu ion intervals in 1973-1991 observed by the Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on IMP 8 and ISEE 3/ICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Reames, D. V.

    1993-01-01

    Bidirectional energetic ion flows (BIFs) in the solar wind at 1AU during 1973-1991 are examined on the basis of about 1 MeV/amu data from the Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on ISEE3/ICE and IMP 8. BIFs are observed more frequently around solar maximum, when they are observed about 12 percent of the time compared with about 5 percent at solar minimum. Intervals with durations greater than 4 hr are observed on average approximately every 3-4 d at solar maximum and every 2 wk at solar minimum, with about 33 percent of these intervals following within 2 d of an interplanetary shock. Various coronal mass ejection signatures and BIFs greater than 1 MeV/amu usually do not coincide exactly, and additional bidirectional ion events are identified.

  17. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  18. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  19. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  20. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  1. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  2. A study of conditional instability of the second kind /CISK/. [tropical storm cumulus cloud activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of interaction between the cumulus clouds and the large-scale field proposed by Arakawa and Schubert (1974) is used to reexamine the CISK mechanism. After a qualitative discussion, a quantitative study is presented, using a three-level approach. The difference between the cases with conditional and unconditional heating formulations are discussed, and growth rate is treated as an eigenvalue problem. To confirm the results obtained and to extend the study to a case where the basic thermodynamic structure varies in the horizontal direction, the CISK mechanism is analyzed by an initial-value-problem approach. One of the findings is that the cumulus heating formulation of Arakawa and Schubert, through its scale dependence, is an improvement over previous CISK studies.

  3. Dependence of entrainment in shallow cumulus convection on vertical velocity and distance to cloud edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yang; Kuang, Zhiming

    2016-04-01

    The dependence of entrainment rate on environmental conditions and cloud characteristics is investigated using large eddy simulations (LES) of the response of shallow cumulus convection to a small-amplitude temperature perturbation that is horizontally uniform and localized in height. The simulated cumulus fields are analyzed in the framework of an ensemble of entraining plumes by tracking a large number of Lagrangian parcels embedded in the LES and grouping them into different plumes based on their detrainment heights. The results show that fractional entrainment rate per unit height of a plume is inversely proportional to the plume's vertical velocity and its distance to the cloud edge, while changes in environmental stratification and relative humidity, the plume's buoyancy, or the vertical gradient of its buoyancy due to the temperature perturbation have little effect on the plume's entrainment rate.

  4. Interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, S. J.; Arakawa, A.

    1980-01-01

    The closure assumption of the Arakawa-Schubert (1974) cumulus parameterization is examined with attention to the kinetic energy budget of a cumulus subensemble. It is concluded that dissipation should depend primarily on cloud type, and that cloud-work functions calculated under different synoptic conditions should consequently be quasi-constant for each cloud type. Observational evidence for the cloud-work function quasi-equilibrium is presented. Cloud-work functions are calculated from a variety of data sets in the tropics and subtropics. The results demonstrate that the cloud-work functions fall into a well-defined narrow range for each subensemble, although the thermodynamical vertical structures for each data set are quite different.

  5. Derivation of Patient Specific Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Clinically Discarded Cumulus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Lin, Chen-Ju; Wang, Sheng-Wen; Cheng, An-Sheng; Lu, Jean; Lu, Chung-Hao; Sung, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are powerful tools for basic and translational research, as well as regenerative medicine. In routine human in vitro fertilization (IVF) practices, cumulus cells (CCs) are discarded, representing a potential source of biological materials for regenerative medicine. In this study, we derived patient-specific iPSCs using CCs from human infertility clinics for the first time. The human cumulus cell derived iPSCs (hc-iPSCs) were characterized for growth, karyotype, expression of pluripotency genes, and were subjected to embryoid bodies (EBs) and teratoma assays to evaluate their differentiation capacity. Hc-iPSCs display typical iPSC characteristics, and are capable of differentiating into all germ layers in vitro and in vivo. We further show that putative primordial germ cell like cells (PGCLCs) can be derived using hc-iPSCs. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of deriving patient-specific pluripotent stem cells using CCs. PMID:27802323

  6. The Role of Cloud-Scale Resolution on Radiative Properties of Oceanic Cumulus Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Kollias, Pavlos

    2005-03-01

    Both individual and combined effects of the horizontal and vertical variability of cumulus clouds on solar radiative transfer were investigated using a two-dimensional (x- and z-directions) cloud radar dataset. This high-resolution dataset of typical fair-weather marine cumulus was derived from ground-based 94-GHz cloud radar observations. The domain-averaged (along x-direction) radiative properties were computed by a Monte Carlo method. It is shown that (1) different cloud-scale resolutions can be used for accurate calculations of the mean absorption, upward and downward fluxes; (2) the resolution effects can depend strongly on the solar zenith angle; and (3) a few cloud statistics can be successfully applied for calculating the averaged radiative properties.

  7. Impact of a scale-aware cumulus parameterization in an operational NWP system modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baode; Yang, Yuhua; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-05-01

    To better understand the behavior of convective schemes across the grey zone, we carried out one-month (July of 2013) realtime-like experiment with an operational NWP system modeling system which includes the ADAS data assimilation scheme and WRF forecast model. The Grell-Freitas cumulus parameterization scheme, which is a scale-aware convective parameterization scheme and has been developed to better handle the transition in behavior of the sub-grid scale convective processes through the grey zone, was used in different resolution (15km, 9km and 3km) model set-up. Subjective and quantitative evaluations of the forecasts were conducted and the skills of the different experimental forecasts relatively to existing forecasting guidance were compared. A summary of the preliminary findings about the proportion of resolved vs unresolved physical processes in the gray zone will be presented along with a discussion of the potential operational impacts of the cumulus parameterization.

  8. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  9. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  10. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  11. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  12. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  13. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  14. Cumulus Cell Transcripts Transit to the Bovine Oocyte in Preparation for Maturation1

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Angus D.; Gilbert, Isabelle; Scantland, Sara; Fournier, Eric; Ashkar, Fazl; Bastien, Alexandre; Saadi, Habib A. Shojaei; Gagné, Dominic; Sirard, Marc-André; Khandjian, Édouard W.; Richard, François J.; Hyttel, Poul; Robert, Claude

    2015-01-01

    So far, the characteristics of a good quality egg have been elusive, similar to the nature of the physiological, cellular, and molecular cues leading to its production both in vivo and in vitro. Current understanding highlights a strong and complex interdependence between the follicular cells and the gamete. Secreted factors induce cellular responses in the follicular cells, and direct exchange of small molecules from the cumulus cells to the oocyte through gap junctions controls meiotic arrest. Studying the interconnection between the cumulus cells and the oocyte, we previously demonstrated that the somatic cells also contribute transcripts to the gamete. Here, we show that these transcripts can be visualized moving down the transzonal projections (TZPs) to the oocyte, and that a time course analysis revealed progressive RNA accumulation in the TZPs, indicating that RNA transfer occurs before the initiation of meiosis resumption under a timetable fitting with the acquisition of developmental competence. A comparison of the identity of the nascent transcripts trafficking in the TZPs, with those in the oocyte increasing in abundance during maturation, and that are present on the oocyte's polyribosomes, revealed transcripts common to all three fractions, suggesting the use of transferred transcripts for translation. Furthermore, the removal of potential RNA trafficking by stripping the cumulus cells caused a significant reduction in maturation rates, indicating the need for the cumulus cell RNA transfer to the oocyte. These results offer a new perspective to the determinants of oocyte quality and female fertility, as well as provide insight that may eventually be used to improve in vitro maturation conditions. PMID:26586844

  15. Transition Metal Chelator Induces Progesterone Production in Mouse Cumulus-Oocyte Complexes and Corpora Lutea.

    PubMed

    Tian, X; Anthony, K; Diaz, Francisco J

    2017-04-01

    Progesterone production is upregulated in granulosa cells (cumulus and mural) after the LH surge, but the intra-follicular mechanisms regulating this transition are not completely known. Recent findings show that the transition metal chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylenediamine (TPEN), impairs ovarian function. In this study, we provide evidence that chelating transition metals, including zinc, enhances progesterone production. The findings show that TPEN (transition metal chelator) increases abundance of Cyp11a1 and Star messenger RNA (mRNA) between 8- and 20-fold and progesterone production more than 3-fold in cultured cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). Feeding a zinc-deficient diet for 10 days, but not 3 days, increased Star, Hsd3b, and prostaglandin F2 alpha receptor (Ptgfr) mRNA ~2.5-fold, suggesting that the effect of TPEN is through modulation of zinc availability. Progesterone from cumulus cells promotes oocyte developmental potential. Blocking progesterone production with epostane during maturation reduced subsequent blastocyst formation from 89 % in control to 18 % in epostane-treated complexes, but supplementation with progesterone restored blastocyst developmental potential to 94 %. Feeding a zinc-deficient diet for 5 days before ovulation did not affect the number of CL, STAR protein, or serum progesterone. However, incubating luteal tissue with TPEN increased abundance of Star, Hsd3b, and Ptgfr mRNA 2-3-fold and increased progesterone production 3-fold. TPEN is known to abolish SMAD2/3 signaling in cumulus cells. However, treatment of COC with the SMAD2/3 phosphorylation inhibitor, SB421542, did not by itself induce steroidogenic transcripts but did potentiate EGF-induced Star mRNA expression. Collectively, the results show that depletion of transition metals with TPEN acutely enhances progesterone biosynthesis in COC and luteal tissue.

  16. Cumulus Cell Transcripts Transit to the Bovine Oocyte in Preparation for Maturation.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, Angus D; Gilbert, Isabelle; Scantland, Sara; Fournier, Eric; Ashkar, Fazl; Bastien, Alexandre; Saadi, Habib A Shojaei; Gagné, Dominic; Sirard, Marc-André; Khandjian, Édouard W; Richard, François J; Hyttel, Poul; Robert, Claude

    2016-01-01

    So far, the characteristics of a good quality egg have been elusive, similar to the nature of the physiological, cellular, and molecular cues leading to its production both in vivo and in vitro. Current understanding highlights a strong and complex interdependence between the follicular cells and the gamete. Secreted factors induce cellular responses in the follicular cells, and direct exchange of small molecules from the cumulus cells to the oocyte through gap junctions controls meiotic arrest. Studying the interconnection between the cumulus cells and the oocyte, we previously demonstrated that the somatic cells also contribute transcripts to the gamete. Here, we show that these transcripts can be visualized moving down the transzonal projections (TZPs) to the oocyte, and that a time course analysis revealed progressive RNA accumulation in the TZPs, indicating that RNA transfer occurs before the initiation of meiosis resumption under a timetable fitting with the acquisition of developmental competence. A comparison of the identity of the nascent transcripts trafficking in the TZPs, with those in the oocyte increasing in abundance during maturation, and that are present on the oocyte's polyribosomes, revealed transcripts common to all three fractions, suggesting the use of transferred transcripts for translation. Furthermore, the removal of potential RNA trafficking by stripping the cumulus cells caused a significant reduction in maturation rates, indicating the need for the cumulus cell RNA transfer to the oocyte. These results offer a new perspective to the determinants of oocyte quality and female fertility, as well as provide insight that may eventually be used to improve in vitro maturation conditions.

  17. Modification of cumulus convection and planetary boundary layer schemes in the GRAPES global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Chen, Qiying; Sun, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Cumulus convection is a key linkage between hydrological cycle and large-scale atmospheric circulation. Cumulus parameterization scheme is an important component in numerical weather and climate modeling studies. In the Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction Enhanced System (GRAPES), turbulent mixing and diffusion approach is applied in its shallow convection scheme. This method overestimates the vertical transport of heat and moisture fluxes but underestimates cloud water mixing ratio over the region of stratocumulus clouds. As a result, the simulated low stratocumulus clouds are less than observations. To overcome this problem, a mass flux method is employed in the shallow convection scheme to replace the original one. Meanwhile, the deep convection scheme is adjusted correspondingly. This modification is similar to that in the US NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS), which uses the simplified Arakawa Schubert Scheme (SAS). The planetary boundary layer scheme (PBL) is also revised by considering the coupling between the PBL and stratocumulus clouds. With the modification of both the cumulus and PBL schemes, the GRAPES simulation of shallow convective heating rate becomes more reasonable; total amounts of stratocumulus clouds simulated over the eastern Pacific and their vertical structure are more consistent with observations; the underestimation of stratocumulus clouds simulated by original schemes is less severe with the revised schemes. Precipitation distribution in the tropics becomes more reasonable and spurious precipitation is effectively suppressed. The westward extension and northward movement of the western Pacific subtropical high simulated with the revised schemes are more consistent with Final Operational Global Analysis (FNL) than that simulated with the original schemes. The statistical scores for the global GRAPES forecast are generally improved with the revised schemes, especially for the simulation of geopotential height in the Northern

  18. Can in situ measurements be used to estimate the age of shallow cumulus clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2010-12-01

    Cumulus clouds exhibit a life cycle that consists of: a) the growth phase (increasing size, most notably in the vertical direction); b) mature phase (growth no longer occurs; any precipitation that develops is strongest during this period); and c) dissipation phase (cloud dissipates because of precipitation and/or entrainment; no more dynamical support). Radar can track clouds over time and give some sense of the age of each cloud, but most aircraft measurements are without a temporal context. If it is possible, determining the cloud age (even if it is approximate, i.e. determining the phase in its life cycle) based solely on in situ measurements could provide important context information. The existence of such a measure would be a useful tool for interpreting past and future in situ cloud measurements. We use LES model simulations of trade wind cumulus cloud fields from one case during the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX) to test several potential cumulus cloud “clocks.” One key metric is the in-cloud buoyancy perturbation from the clear air mean as a function of time, as measured by virtual potential temperature. In general, the mean buoyancy of a cloud initially increases from zero with time, peaks, and decreases to become negatively buoyant during the latter third of its life cycle, with the amplitude of buoyancy dependent on cloud size. In some cases (more commonly for larger clouds), multiple pulses of buoyancy occur, which complicate any potential cumulus clock (as also reported by Heus et al., 2009). Since the buoyancy perturbation is not single-valued over the life of a given cloud, nor is the magnitude of the perturbation sufficient to differentiate between a mature small cloud or a growing larger cloud, other parameters must be used in addition to cloud buoyancy to construct a useful in situ cloud clock.

  19. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  20. Daidzein does affect progesterone secretion by pig cumulus cells but it does not impair oocytes IVM.

    PubMed

    Galeati, Giovanna; Vallorani, Claudia; Bucci, Diego; Bernardini, Chiara; Tamanini, Carlo; Parmeggiani, Albamaria; Spinaci, Marcella

    2010-08-01

    Daidzein, an isoflavone abundant in soybeans and other legumes, displays estrogen like properties. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of daidzein (1 and 10 microM) on nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation of pig oocytes and on steroidogenic activity of cumulus cells. Daidzein supplementation during IVM had no effect on nuclear maturation and on fertilization traits. By contrast, both concentrations significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited progesterone production by cumulus cells after 24 and 48 h of culture while they did not induce any effect on estradiol production. Furthermore, daidzein did not exert any effect on the percentage of embryos that developed to blastocyst stage, on the number of blastomeres per blastocyst, or on the level of Hsp-70 and -90 gene transcript. Overall, our data demonstrate that daidzein added during oocyte maturation does not affect pig embryo development even if it markedly inhibits progesterone production by cumulus cells. Further studies are needed to evaluate the possible effect of daidzein during embryonic development.

  1. [Biomarkers of the cumulus cells in medically assisted procreation: State-of-the-art].

    PubMed

    Pourret, E; Hamamah, S; Aït-Ahmed, O

    2016-11-01

    The oocyte grows within a follicle composed of layers of somatic cells. It undergoes with the cumulus cells that form the innermost layer a dialogue that is critical for its maturation. Based on the assumption that the transcriptome of the cumulus cells reflects the physiology of the oocyte, it may prove a useful non-invasive tool in embryo selection to improve assisted reproduction outcomes. During the past decade, various studies have been conducted with the objective of identifying cumulus biomarker genes as prognosis tools for oocyte quality and competence. Remarkably no common biomarkers stand out among all these studies. In this review we perform a critical analysis of the literature in order to reveal some of the parameters that may account for these discrepancies, such as patients' inclusion criteria (maternal age, stimulation protocols), day of embryo transfer (day 3 or 5), outcome criteria (oocyte potential, embryo competence, pregnancy). Moreover there is a lack of standardization in the experimental designs used for RNA extraction and gene expression assessment (microarrays, RT-qPCR) and for the statistical analyses. In conclusion, critical analyses such as the present one are indispensable to pave the way for future searches of predictive biomarkers of pregnancy.

  2. Direct entrainment and detrainment rate distributions of individual shallow cumulus clouds in an LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawe, J. T.; Austin, P. H.

    2013-08-01

    Probability distribution functions of shallow cumulus cloud core entrainment and detrainment rates are calculated using 4362 individual cumulus clouds isolated from LES (large eddy simulation) using a cloud tracking algorithm. Calculation of the mutual information between fractional entrainment/detrainment and a variety of mean cloud core properties suggests that fractional entrainment rate is best predicted by the mean cloud buoyancy B and the environmental buoyancy lapse rate dθρ/dz at that level, while fractional detrainment is best predicted by the mean vertical velocity w and the critical mixing fraction χc. Fractional entrainment and detrainment rates are relatively insensitive to cloud core horizontal area, and the perimeter of horizontal cloud core sections display an a0.73 dependence. This implies that cloud core mass entrainment flux E is proportional to cloud core cross-sectional area instead of cloud core surface area, as is generally assumed. Empirical best-fit relations for ɛ(B, dθρ/dz and δ(w, χc) are found for both individual shallow cumulus clouds and cloud ensembles. It is found that clouds with high buoyancy in strong stratification experience low entrainment rates, while clouds with high vertical velocities and critical mixing fractions experience low detrainment rates.

  3. Statistical analysis of an LES shallow cumulus cloud ensemble using a cloud tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawe, J. T.; Austin, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for the tracking of individual clouds in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is presented. We use this technique on an LES of a shallow cumulus cloud field based upon the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX) to calculate statistics of cloud height, lifetime, and other physical properties for individual clouds in the model. We also examine the question of nature versus nurture in shallow cumulus clouds: do properties at cloud base determine the upper-level properties of the clouds (nature), or are cloud properties determined by the environmental conditions they encounter (nurture). We find that clouds which ascend through an environment that has been pre-moistened by previous cloud activity are no more likely to reach the inversion than clouds that ascend through a drier environment. Cloud base thermodynamic properties are uncorrelated with upper-level cloud properties, while mean fractional entrainment and detrainment rates display moderate correlations with cloud properties up to the inversion. Conversely, cloud base area correlates well with upper-level cloud area and maximum cloud height. We conclude that cloud thermodynamic properties are primarily influenced by entrainment and detrainment processes, cloud area and height are primarily influenced by cloud base area, and thus nature and nurture both play roles in the dynamics of BOMEX shallow cumulus clouds.

  4. Statistical analysis of a LES shallow cumulus cloud ensemble using a cloud tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawe, J. T.; Austin, P. H.

    2011-08-01

    A technique for the tracking of individual clouds in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is presented. We use this technique on a LES of a shallow cumulus cloud field based upon the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX) to calculate statistics of cloud height, lifetime, and other physical properties for individual clouds in the model. We also examine the question of nature versus nurture in shallow cumulus clouds: do properties at cloud base determine the upper-level properties of the clouds (nature), or are cloud properties determined by the environmental conditions they encounter (nurture). We find that clouds which ascend through an environment that has been pre-moistened by previous cloud activity are no more likely to reach the inversion than clouds that ascend through a drier environment. Cloud base thermodynamic properties are uncorrelated with upper-level cloud properties, while mean fractional entrainment and detrainment rate displays moderate correlations with cloud properties up to the inversion. Conversely, cloud base area correlates well with upper-level cloud area and maximum cloud height. We conclude that cloud thermodynamic properties are primarily influenced by entrainment and detrainment processes, cloud area and height are primarily influenced by cloud base area, and thus nature and nurture both play roles in the dynamics of BOMEX shallow cumulus clouds.

  5. Rocket pioneer Robert Goddard: A micro-biography (pt 1/3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Archive footage of Robert Goddard, rocket pioneer of the 1920's and '30's. Ahead of his time, and the first to use liquid propellant. From the 'Moonwalk Series: Episode 1 - 'The Day Before''. A four part documentary series made in the 1970's about the Apollo 11 mission.

  6. Rocket pioneer Robert Goddard: A micro-biography (pt 3/3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Archive footage of Robert Goddard, rocket pioneer of the 1920's and '30's. Ahead of his time, and the first to use liquid propellant. From the 'Moonwalk Series: Episode 1 - 'The Day Before''. A four part documentary series made in the 1970's about the Apollo 11 mission.

  7. Rocket pioneer Robert Goddard: A micro-biography (pt 2/3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Archive footage of Robert Goddard, rocket pioneer of the 1920's and '30's. Ahead of his time, and the first to use liquid propellant. From the 'Moonwalk Series: Episode 1 - 'The Day Before''. A four part documentary series made in the 1970's about the Apollo 11 mission.

  8. Experimental Use of A Programming Language (APL) at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creveling, Cyrus J., Ed.

    This document explains A Programming Language (APL) and describes the experiment that the Information Processing Division has undertaken to introduce APL to the Goddard Scientific Community. A brief historical sketch of steps taken to date is included and appendices giving illustrative examples of how APL actually has been used at the Goddard…

  9. Guidance, Navigation and Control Innovations at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, Aprille Joy

    2002-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on guidance navigation and control innovations at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The topics include: 1) NASA's vision; 2) NASA's Mission; 3) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE); 4) Guidance, Navigation and Control Division (GN&C); 5) Landsat-7 Earth Observer-1 Co-observing Program; and 6) NASA ESE Vision.

  10. The time-of-flight system on the Goddard medium energy gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. W.; Chesney, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillation counter time of flight system, incorporated into the Goddard 50 cm by 50 cm spark chamber gamma ray telescope is described. The system, which utilizes constant fractions timing and particle position compensation and digitizes up to 10 ns time differences to six bit accuracy in less than 500 ns is analyzed. The performance of this system during balloon flight is discussed.

  11. Henry Herbert Goddard and the Politics of Mental Measurement (1910-1920).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalves, Linda

    The history of the study of human mental ability is an example of the dialectic in social science between those who interpret data within the framework of existing social inequities and those who look for perspectives that might eventually dissolve inequities. The dedication of Henry Herbert Goddard to a belief in the scientific proof of…

  12. Training Early Career Scientists in Flight Instrument Design Through Experiential Learning: NASA Goddard's Planetary Science Winter School.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Lakew, B.; Bracken, J.; Brown, T.; Rivera, R.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Planetary Science Winter School (PSWS) is a Goddard Space Flight Center-sponsored training program, managed by Goddard's Solar System Exploration Division (SSED), for Goddard-based postdoctoral fellows and early career planetary scientists. Currently in its third year, the PSWS is an experiential training program for scientists interested in participating on future planetary science instrument teams. Inspired by the NASA Planetary Science Summer School, Goddard's PSWS is unique in that participants learn the flight instrument lifecycle by designing a planetary flight instrument under actual consideration by Goddard for proposal and development. They work alongside the instrument Principal Investigator (PI) and engineers in Goddard's Instrument Design Laboratory (IDL; idc.nasa.gov), to develop a science traceability matrix and design the instrument, culminating in a conceptual design and presentation to the PI, the IDL team and Goddard management. By shadowing and working alongside IDL discipline engineers, participants experience firsthand the science and cost constraints, trade-offs, and teamwork that are required for optimal instrument design. Each PSWS is collaboratively designed with representatives from SSED, IDL, and the instrument PI, to ensure value added for all stakeholders. The pilot PSWS was held in early 2015, with a second implementation in early 2016. Feedback from past participants was used to design the 2017 PSWS, which is underway as of the writing of this abstract.

  13. Studying Precipitation Processes in WRF with Goddard Bulk Microphysics in Comparison with Other Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Shi, J.J.; Braun, S.; Simpson, J.; Chen, S.S.; Lang, S.; Hong, S.Y.; Thompson, G.; Peters-Lidard, C.

    2009-01-01

    A Goddard bulk microphysical parameterization is implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. This bulk microphysical scheme has three different options, 2ICE (cloud ice & snow), 3ICE-graupel (cloud ice, snow & graupel) and 3ICE-hail (cloud ice, snow & hail). High-resolution model simulations are conducted to examine the impact of microphysical schemes on different weather events: a midlatitude linear convective system and an Atlantic hurricane. The results suggest that microphysics has a major impact on the organization and precipitation processes associated with a summer midlatitude convective line system. The Goddard 3ICE scheme with the cloud ice-snow-hail configuration agreed better with observations ill of rainfall intensity and having a narrow convective line than did simulations with the cloud ice-snow-graupel and cloud ice-snow (i.e., 2ICE) configurations. This is because the Goddard 3ICE-hail configuration has denser precipitating ice particles (hail) with very fast fall speeds (over 10 m/s) For an Atlantic hurricane case, the Goddard microphysical scheme (with 3ICE-hail, 3ICE-graupel and 2ICE configurations) had no significant impact on the track forecast but did affect the intensity slightly. The Goddard scheme is also compared with WRF's three other 3ICE bulk microphysical schemes: WSM6, Purdue-Lin and Thompson. For the summer midlatitude convective line system, all of the schemes resulted in simulated precipitation events that were elongated in southwest-northeast direction in qualitative agreement with the observed feature. However, the Goddard 3ICE-hail and Thompson schemes were closest to the observed rainfall intensities although the Goddard scheme simulated more heavy rainfall (over 48 mm/h). For the Atlantic hurricane case, none of the schemes had a significant impact on the track forecast; however, the simulated intensity using the Purdue-Lin scheme was much stronger than the other schemes. The vertical distributions of

  14. Role of PTGS2-generated PGE2 during gonadotrophin-induced bovine oocyte maturation and cumulus cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Marei, Waleed F; Abayasekara, D Robert E; Wathes, D Claire; Fouladi-Nashta, Ali A

    2014-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an autocrine/paracrine factor which mediates gonadotrophin (Gn) stimulation of cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation in rodents. Its role in bovine oocyte maturation is less characterized. This study detected PTGS2 (COX2) and PGE synthases (PTGES1, PTGES2 and PTGES3) in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). Only PTGS2 and PTGES1 expression changed during maturation. In Gn-free media, no cumulus expansion and ∼45% nuclear maturation was achieved, while Gn-induced maturation showed full cumulus expansion (score 3) and ∼87% maturation. PGE2 supplementation without Gn induced mild cumulus expansion (score 0.5-1) but increased nuclear maturation to levels similar to those obtained with Gn alone. In the presence of Gn, exogenous PGE2 did not affect expansion or nuclear maturation and subsequent embryo development. Treatment with PTGS2 selective inhibitor (NS398), PTGS2-specific siRNA or PTGER2-receptor antagonist (AH6809) resulted in ∼20-25% reduction in nuclear maturation. NS398 and AH6809 did not affect cumulus expansion. Most oocytes not reaching metaphase of second meiosis (MII) following NS398, AH6809 and PTGS2-specific siRNA treatments were at MI. After longer maturation, NS398-treated oocytes had normal MII rate and uncompromised embryo development. PGE2 has a limited role in cumulus expansion in bovine COC but is important for the timing of Gn-induced nuclear maturation. We confirmed that genes involved in the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are expressed by cumulus-oocyte complexes (or eggs) of cows and that PGE2 is synthesized during oocyte maturation in the presence of gonadotrophin hormones. When we inhibited synthesis of PGE2 or blocked its receptors, oocyte maturation, but not cumulus expansion, was compromised. Further investigation showed that oocyte maturation is delayed but not arrested when PGE2 synthesis is inhibited. On the other hand, addition of exogenous PGE2 induced a high maturation rate and mild cumulus

  15. Performance tuning Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Xeon Phi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, is a designed for dual use for forecasting and research. WRF offers multiple physics options that can be combined in any way. One of the physics options is radiance computation. The major source for energy for the earth's climate is solar radiation. Thus, it is imperative to accurately model horizontal and vertical distribution of the heating. Goddard solar radiative transfer model includes the absorption duo to water vapor,ozone, ozygen, carbon dioxide, clouds and aerosols. The model computes the interactions among the absorption and scattering by clouds, aerosols, molecules and surface. Finally, fluxes are integrated over the entire longwave spectrum.In this paper, we present our results of optimizing the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is the first product based on Intel MIC architecture, and it consists of up to 61 cores connected by a high performance on-die bidirectional interconnect. The coprocessor supports all important Intel development tools. Thus, the development environment is familiar one to a vast number of CPU developers. Although, getting a maximum performance out of MICs will require using some novel optimization techniques. Those optimization techniques are discusses in this paper. The optimizations improved the performance of the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 2.2x. Furthermore, the same optimizations improved the performance of the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on a dual socket configuration of eight core Intel Xeon E5-2670 CPUs by a factor of 2.1x compared to the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme code.

  16. Cloud Condensation Nuclei in Cumulus Humilis — selected Case Study During the CHAPS Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X.; Lee, Y.; Berg, L.; Berkowitz, C.; Alexander, L.; Laskin, A.; Ogren, J.; Andrews, E.

    2010-03-15

    The Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) provided a unique opportunity to study aerosol and cloud processing. Clouds play an active role in the processing and cycling of atmospheric constituents. Gases and particles can partition to cloud droplets by absorption and condensation as well as activation and impact scavenging. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used as one of the main platforms in CHAPS. Flight tracks were designed and implemented to characterize freshly emitted aerosols at cloud top and cloud base as well as within the cloud, i.e., cumulus humilis (or fair-weather cumulus), in the vicinity of Oklahoma City. Measurements of interstitial aerosols and residuals of activated condensation cloud nuclei were conducted simultaneously. The interstitial aerosols were measured downstream of an isokinetic inlet, and the activated particles downstream of a counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI). The sampling line to the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was switched between the isokinetic inlet and the CVI to allow characterization of non-activated interstitial particles outside of clouds in contrast to particles activated in clouds. Trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also measured, as were key meteorological state parameters including liquid water content, cloud drop size, and dew point. We will report on the CCN properties in cumulus humilis. Several approaches will be taken. The first is single-particle analysis of particles collected by the Time-Resolved Aerosol Sampler (TRAC) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy disperse X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Specifically, we examine differences between activated and interstitial ones, such as differences in chemical composition and morphology. The second analysis will link in situ measurements by AMS and PTRMS with the observations by TRAC. For

  17. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  18. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  19. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  20. Influence of manganese on apoptosis and glutathione content of cumulus cells during in vitro maturation in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Anchordoquy, Juan Patricio; Anchordoquy, Juan Mateo; Picco, Sebastián J; Sirini, Matías A; Errecalde, Ana Lía; Furnus, Cecilia C

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of different Mn concentrations on (1) DNA integrity of cumulus cells by olive tail moment (OTM); (2) cumulus cells apoptosis by Annexin V staining assay; (3) intracellular total glutathione (GSH-GSSG) content; and (4) oocyte nuclear maturation and embryo cleavage after in vitro fertilisation (IVF). For this purpose, 0 (control), 2 (Mn1), 5 (Mn2) and 6 ng/mL (Mn3) Mn concentrations were added to IVM medium. Comet assay analysed by OTM was significantly higher in cumulus cells arising from COCs matured without Mn (control, P < 0.01) respect to cumulus cells obtained from COCs matured with Mn (control: 5.18 ± 2.3; Mn1: 2.93 ± 2.2; Mn2: 2.63 ± 2.4; Mn3: 2.92 ± 2.4). The frequency of apoptotic cells was higher in the control group (control: 6.63 ± 0.59; Mn1: 5.05 ± 0.5; Mn2: 4.61 ± 0.49; Mn3: 3.33 ± 0.42). Intracellular concentration of GSH-GSSG increased in oocytes and cumulus cells matured in the presence of Mn (P < 0.01). There were no differences in percentages of nuclear maturation when Mn was added to IVM medium at any concentration, but at 6 ng/mL Mn a higher cleavage rate was observed respect to the control group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, deficiency in Mn concentration during in vitro maturation increased the damage in the DNA molecule and the frequency of apoptotic cumulus cells. However, the addition of an adequate Mn concentration (6 ng/mL Mn) to IVM medium improved the health of cumulus-oocyte complexes and produced more cleaved embryos 48 h after IVF.

  1. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  2. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  3. New data and capabilities in the NASA Goddard Hurricane Data Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Leptoukh, G.; Ostrenga, D.; Savtchenko, C.; Kempler, S.

    2007-12-01

    .ecs.nasa.gov/OPS/mirador/) is another in-house developed tool that offers a simplified interface for searching, browsing, and ordering Earth science data at NASA GES DICS. Users can do event based (e.g., entering a hurricane name) search and order data. · Hurricane viewer: provides users with a view of the hurricane track that overlays TRMM 3-hourly precipitation data. The interface provides users with the storm track, wind speeds, pressure, intensity and view of the data of the lifespan of the storm in an animated series. The Hurricane Viewer will be enhanced to allow users to select from multiple data parameters to view in the background of the track. · There are a number of other resources for hurricane related activities at the DISC, such as, viewing and exploring NASA 2-D and 3-D data (TRMM, CloudSat, AIRS, etc.) via Google Earth. Details and examples will be presented.

  4. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  5. Regulation of fatty acid oxidation in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes during maturation and modulation by PPAR agonists.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Kylie R; Anastasi, Marie R; Zhang, Voueleng J; Russell, Darryl L; Robker, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation is an important energy source for the oocyte; however, little is known about how this metabolic pathway is regulated in cumulus-oocyte complexes. Analysis of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation showed that many are regulated by the luteinizing hormone surge during in vivo maturation, including acyl-CoA synthetases, carnitine transporters, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and acetyl-CoA transferase, but that many are dysregulated when cumulus-oocyte complexes are matured under in vitro maturation conditions using follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor. Fatty acid oxidation, measured as production of ³H₂O from [³H]palmitic acid, occurs in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes in response to the luteinizing hormone surge but is significantly reduced in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro. Thus we sought to determine whether fatty acid oxidation in cumulus-oocyte complexes could be modulated during in vitro maturation by lipid metabolism regulators, namely peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) agonists bezafibrate and rosiglitazone. Bezafibrate showed no effect with increasing dose, while rosiglitazone dose dependently inhibited fatty acid oxidation in cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation. To determine the impact of rosiglitazone on oocyte developmental competence, cumulus-oocyte complexes were treated with rosiglitazone during in vitro maturation and gene expression, oocyte mitochondrial activity and embryo development following in vitro fertilization were assessed. Rosiglitazone restored Acsl1, Cpt1b and Acaa2 levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes and increased oocyte mitochondrial membrane potential yet resulted in significantly fewer embryos reaching the morula and hatching blastocyst stages. Thus fatty acid oxidation is increased in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vivo and deficient during in vitro maturation, a known model of poor oocyte quality. That rosiglitazone further decreased fatty acid

  6. Momentum Transport: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to investigate the momentum budgets associated with several convective systems that developed during the TOGA COARE IOP (west Pacific warm pool region) and GATE (east Atlantic region). The tool for this study is the improved Goddard Cumulas Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, explicit cloud radiative interactive processes and air-sea interactive surface processes. The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (with 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km) in the vertical. The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations were performed over a 7-day time period (December 19-26, 1992, for TOGA COARE and September 1-7, 1994 for GATE). Cyclic literal boundary conditions are required for this type of long-term integration. Two well organized squall systems (TOGA, COARE February 22, 1993, and GATE September 12, 1994) were also simulated using the 3D GCE model. Only 9 h simulations were required to cover the life time of the squall systems. the lateral boundary conditions were open for these two squall systems simulations. the following will be examined: (1) the momentum budgets in the convective and stratiform regions, (2) the relationship between momentum transport and cloud organization (i.e., well organized squall lines versus less organized convective), (3) the differences and similarities in momentum transport between 2D and 3D simulated convective systems, and (4) the differences and similarities in momentum budgets between cloud systems simulated with open and cyclic lateral boundary conditions. Preliminary results indicate that there are only small differences between 2D and 3D simulated momentum budgets. Major differences occur, however, between momentum budgets associated with squall systems simulated using different lateral boundary conditions.

  7. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  8. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  9. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  10. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  11. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  12. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  13. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  14. cyclic GMP Mediated Inhibition of Spontaneous Germinal Vesicle Breakdown Both with and without Cumulus in Mouse Oocyte.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Heekyung; Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2016-12-01

    Intact germinal vesicle (GV) arrest and release are essential for maintaining the fertility of mammals inducing human. Intact germinal vesicle release, maturation of oocytes is maintained by very complex procedures along with folliculogenesis and is a critical step for embryonic development. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) has been suggested a key factor for meiotic arrest but so far its mechanisms are controversy. In this study we examine the effects of cGMP on germinal vesicle breakdown in cumulus-enclosed oocytes and denuded oocytes. Spontaneous maturation was inhibited by a cGMP agonist, 8-Br-cGMP with concentration dependent manners both in cumulus-enclosed oocytes and denuded oocytes. The inhibitory effect was more severe in denuded oocytes than cumulus-enclosed oocytes. The Rp-8-Br-cGMP and Rp-pCPT-8-Br-cGMP did not severely block GVB compared to 8-Br-cGMP. The spontaneous GVB inhibitory effects were different by the existence of cumulus. Based on them it is suggested that the cumulus modulates the role of cGMP in GV arrest.

  15. Mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in porcine oocytes and cumulus cells--A search for developmental competence marker.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Piotr; Chabowska, Agnieszka; Malyszka, Natalia; Lechniak, Dorota

    2016-03-01

    The development of mammalian oocytes is dependent on bidirectional signaling with the surrounding cumulus cells. Among the numerous factors that contribute to oocyte developmental competence, the mitochondria and the mitochondrial DNA play pivotal roles. Although these highly abundant organelles have been well-studied in oocytes, their roles, abundance and metabolism remain elusive in cumulus cells. Therefore, the aim of our study was to analyze the correlation between the mtDNA copy number in cumulus cells and oocytes, as well as the mitochondrial distribution patterns in oocytes, using two groups of animals that differ in terms of the developmental competence of their oocytes. We determined a positive correlation between the mtDNA copy number in the cumulus cells and mtDNA copy number in oocytes of prepubertal pigs and negative correlation in cyclic gilts. These opposing correlations may reflect the differences in the developmental competence of the prepubertal and cyclic oocytes. We also hypothesize that observed differences may reflect different metabolism and energy requirements of the cumulus-oocyte complexes from prepubertal and cyclic gilts. The mitochondrial distribution patterns in the prepubertal and cyclic gilts were not different.

  16. Generation of rats from vitrified oocytes with surrounding cumulus cells via in vitro fertilization with cryopreserved sperm.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuyoshi; Kamoshita, Maki; Kato, Tsubasa; Ito, Junya; Kashiwazaki, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate fertility and full-term development of rat vitrified oocytes after in vitro fertilization (IVF) with cryopreserved sperm. Oocytes with or without surrounding cumulus cells were vitrified with 30% ethylene glycol + 0.5 mol/L sucrose + 20% fetal calf serum by using the Cryotop method. The warmed oocytes were co-cultured with sperm. Although the denuded/vitrified oocytes were not fertilized, some of the oocytes vitrified with cumulus cells were fertilized (32.7%) after IVF with fresh sperm. When IVF was performed with cryopreserved sperm, vitrified or fresh oocytes with cumulus cells were fertilized (62.9% or 41.1%, respectively). In addition, to confirm the full-term development of the vitrified oocytes with surrounding cumulus cells after IVF with cryopreserved sperm, 108 vitrified oocytes with two pronuclei (2PN) were transferred into eight pseudopregnant females, and eight pups were obtained from three recipients. The present work demonstrates that vitrified rat oocytes surrounded by cumulus cells can be fertilized in vitro with cryopreserved sperm, and that 2PN embryos derived from cryopreserved gametes can develop to term. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful generation of rat offspring derived from vitrified oocytes that were fertilized in vitro with cryopreserved sperm.

  17. cyclic GMP Mediated Inhibition of Spontaneous Germinal Vesicle Breakdown Both with and without Cumulus in Mouse Oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Heekyung; Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intact germinal vesicle (GV) arrest and release are essential for maintaining the fertility of mammals inducing human. Intact germinal vesicle release, maturation of oocytes is maintained by very complex procedures along with folliculogenesis and is a critical step for embryonic development. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) has been suggested a key factor for meiotic arrest but so far its mechanisms are controversy. In this study we examine the effects of cGMP on germinal vesicle breakdown in cumulus-enclosed oocytes and denuded oocytes. Spontaneous maturation was inhibited by a cGMP agonist, 8-Br-cGMP with concentration dependent manners both in cumulus-enclosed oocytes and denuded oocytes. The inhibitory effect was more severe in denuded oocytes than cumulus-enclosed oocytes. The Rp-8-Br-cGMP and Rp-pCPT-8-Br-cGMP did not severely block GVB compared to 8-Br-cGMP. The spontaneous GVB inhibitory effects were different by the existence of cumulus. Based on them it is suggested that the cumulus modulates the role of cGMP in GV arrest. PMID:28144640

  18. The effects of discontinuities in the Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme on four-dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupanski, Dušanka

    1993-10-01

    A tangent linear and an adjoint of the large-scale precipitation and the cumulus convection processes in the National Meteorological Center's NMC/ETA regional forecast model are developed. The effects of discontinuities in the Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme are examined and applicability of derivative minimization methods in four-dimensional variational (4D VAR) data assimilation is considered. It is demonstrated that discontinuities present in the control Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme increase linearization errors to a large extent and have adverse effects on 4D VAR data assimilation. In the experiments performed, discontinuities in the cumulus convection scheme have the most serious effect in low layers. These problems can be reduced by modifying the scheme to make it more continuous in low layers. Positive effects of inclusion of cumulus convection in 4D VAR data assimilation are found in upper layers, especially in humidity fields. The "observations" used are optimal interpolation analyses of temperature, surface pressure, wind and specific humidity. By inclusion of other data, more closely related to the convective processes, such as precipitation and clouds, more benefits should be expected. Even with the difficulties caused by discontinuities, derivative minimization techniques appear to work for the data assimilation problems. In order to get more general conclusions, more experiments are needed with different synoptic situations. The inclusion of other important physical processes such as radiation, surface friction and turbulence in the forecast and the corresponding adjoint models could alter the results since they may reinforce the effects of discontinuities.

  19. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  20. Tropospheric Wind Measurements Obtained with the Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW): Validation and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. GLOW is intended to be used as a field deployable system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. In September of 2000 GLOW participated in a three week intercomparison experiment at the GroundWinds facility in North Glen, NE. More than 50 hours of line-of-sight wind profile data was obtained in a wide variety of conditions including both day and night operation. Typical clear air lidar wind profiles extended to altitudes of 20 km with a 1 Ian vertical resolution and I minute averaging. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the examples of lidar wind profiles obtained with the Goddard system during the New Hampshire experiment.

  1. Tropospheric Wind Measurements Obtained with the Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW): Validation and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huai-Lin; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. GLOW is intended to be used as a field deployable system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. In September of 2000 GLOW participated in a three week intercomparison experiment at the GroundWinds facility in North Glen, NH. More than 50 hours of line-of-sight wind profile data were obtained in a wide variety of conditions including both day and night operation. Typical clear air lidar wind profiles extended to altitudes of 20 kin with a 1 km vertical resolution and 1 minute averaging. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the examples of lidar wind profiles obtained with the Goddard system during the New Hampshire experiment.

  2. Stray Light Suppression in the Goddard IRAM 2-Millimeter Observer (GISMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, E. H.; Benford, D. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Staguhn, J. G.; Wollack, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer (GISMO) is an 8xl6 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) array of bolometers built as a pathfinder for TES detector development efforts at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. GISMO has been used annually at the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) 30 meter telescope since 2007 under engineering time and was opened in the spring of 2012 to the general astronomical community. The spring deployment provided an opportunity to modify elements of the room temperature optics before moving the instrument to its new permanent position in the telescope receiver cabin. This allowed for the possibility to extend the cryostat, introduce improved cold baffling and thus further optimize the stray light performance for final astronomical use of the instrument, which has been completed and validated. We will demonstrate and discuss several of the methods used to quantify and limit the influence of stray light in the GISMO camera.

  3. Goddard's New Approach to Information Technology: The Information Systems Center an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kea, Howard E.

    1994-01-01

    The Information Center (ISC) at Goddard was created as part of the Goddard reorganization and was located within the Applied Engineering and Technology (AET) Directorate. The creation of ISC was to: (1) focus expertise and leadership in information system development; (2) Promote organizational collaboration, partnerships, and resource sharing; (3) Stimulate design/development of seamless end-to-end flight and ground systems; (4) Enable flexibility to effectively support many simultaneous projects by improved access to critical mass of discipline expertise; (5) Enhance career growth and opportunities including multi-disciplinary opportunities; and (6) to improve communications among information system professionals. This paper presents a general overview of the Information Systems Center as well as the role of the Software Engineering Laboratory within the center.

  4. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  5. Applications of ANSYS/Multiphysics at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughlin, Jim

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the uses that the ANSYS/Multiphysics system is used for at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Some of the uses of the ANSYS system is used for is MEMS Structural Analysis of Micro-mirror Array for the James Web Space Telescope (JWST), Micro-shutter Array for JWST, MEMS FP Tunable Filter, AstroE2 Micro-calorimeter. Various views of these projects are shown in this presentation.

  6. A visiting scientist program in atmospheric sciences for the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    A visiting scientist program was conducted in the atmospheric sciences and related areas at the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres. Research was performed in mathematical analysis as applied to computer modeling of the atmospheres; development of atmospheric modeling programs; analysis of remotely sensed atmospheric, surface, and oceanic data and its incorporation into atmospheric models; development of advanced remote sensing instrumentation; and related research areas. The specific research efforts are detailed by tasks.

  7. Down and up with PERT at Goddard. [computer graphics applications for Program Evaluation and Review Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerega, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    During the 1960s NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) used the Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) as its principal schedule planning and control tool in flight projects. After a temporary replacement of PERT by other techniques, PERT has been reinstituted on all but one of GSFC's flight projects. PERT has been combined with a computer graphics program which makes it possible to produce PERT drawings in only a few hours' time.

  8. Space applications of artificial intelligence; 1990 Goddard Conference, Greenbelt, MD, May 1, 2, 1990, Selected Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The papers presented at the 1990 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence are given. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed. The proceedings fall into the following areas: Planning and Scheduling, Fault Monitoring/Diagnosis, Image Processing and Machine Vision, Robotics/Intelligent Control, Development Methodologies, Information Management, and Knowledge Acquisition.

  9. Evolution of the Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Thomas C., III; Brumfield, Mark D.; Jamison, Donald E.; Granata, Raymond L.; Casey, Carolyn A.; Heller, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center develops systems engineers from existing discipline engineers. The program has evolved significantly since the report to INCOSE in 2003. This paper describes the SEED Program as it is now, outlines the changes over the last year, discusses current status and results, and shows the value of human systems and leadership skills for practicing systems engineers.

  10. The microstructure of selected, small, isolated, cumulus clouds near Red Deer, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochtubajda, B.

    Physical experiments designed to explore the potential of rain augmentation through airborne glaciogenic seeding on small, isolated non-precipitating cumuliform clouds near Red Deer, Alberta were carried out during the period 1982-1985. The microstructure of 90 cumulus congestus clouds have been documented through repeated in-situ sampling using a cloud physics instrumented aircraft platform. Observations from the inspection passes of 57 clouds seeded with either dry ice pellets or silver iodide pyrotechnics, and all the passes of 33 natural clouds are presented. Measurements of the cloud droplet concentration indicate that Alberta cumulus clouds are typically continental in nature, with an average droplet concentration of 535 cm -3 and an average droplet diameter of 10.6 μm. Alberta clouds have average liquid water contents of 0.57 g m -3, with a peak 1-sec value of 3.17 g m -3. The 1-km average liquid water contents are 0.83 g m -3, with a peak value of 2.81 g m -3. Cloud lifetimes vary between 11 and 20 minutes. Concentrations of naturally occurring ice crystals are found to be low. The average maximum 1-km ice concentration was 31 -1, and the peak 1-km concentration was 73.11 -1 in the natural cloud dataset. Evidence of precipitation-sized particles was detected in 21% (7 of 33) of the clouds, and precipitation below cloud base was detected in 6% (2 of 33) of the clouds. A comparison of the Alberta cloud characteristics to the cumulus clouds from different locations showed that there are some distinct differences between Alberta clouds and the clouds from the other regions.

  11. Observational estimates of detrainment and entrainment in non-precipitating shallow cumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgren, M. S.; Small, J. D.; Jonsson, H. H.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2014-08-01

    Vertical transport associated with cumulus clouds is important to the redistribution of gases, particles and energy, with subsequent consequences for many aspects of the climate system. Previous studies have suggested that detrainment from clouds can be comparable to the updraft mass flux, and thus represents an important contribution to vertical transport. In this study, we describe a new method to deduce the amounts of gross detrainment and entrainment experienced by non-precipitating cumulus clouds using aircraft observations. The method utilizes equations for three conserved variables: cloud mass, total water and moist static energy. Optimizing these three equations leads to estimates of the mass fractions of adiabatic mixed-layer air, entrained air and detrained air that the sampled cloud has experienced. The method is applied to six flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter during the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) which took place in the Houston, Texas region during the summer of 2006 during which 176 small, non-precipitating cumulus were sampled. Our analysis suggests that, on average, these clouds were comprised of 30 to 70% mixed-layer air, with entrained air comprising most of the remainder. The mass fraction of detrained air was less than 2% for a majority of the clouds, although 15% of them did exhibit detrained air fractions larger than 10%. Entrained and detrained air mass fractions both increased with altitude, and the largest detrainment events were almost all associated with air that was at their level of neutral buoyancy, findings that are consistent with previous studies.

  12. Ejaculated Mouse Sperm Enter Cumulus-Oocyte Complexes More Efficiently In Vitro than Epididymal Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    The mouse is an established and popular animal model for studying reproductive biology. Epididymal mouse sperm, which lack exposure to secretions of male accessory glands and do not precisely represent ejaculated sperm for the study of sperm functions, have been almost exclusively used in studies. We compared ejaculated and epididymal sperm in an in vitro fertilization setting to examine whether ejaculated sperm enter cumulus-oocyte complexes more efficiently. In order to prepare sperm for fertilization, they were incubated under capacitating conditions. At the outset of incubation, ejaculated sperm stuck to the glass surfaces of slides and the incidences of sticking decreased with time; whereas, very few epididymal sperm stuck to glass at any time point, indicating differences in surface charge. At the end of the capacitating incubation, when sperm were added to cumulus-oocyte complexes, the form of flagellar movement differed dramatically; specifically, ejaculated sperm predominantly exhibited increased bending on one side of the flagellum (a process termed pro-hook hyperactivation), while epididymal sperm equally exhibited increased bending on one or the other side of the flagellum (pro-hook or anti-hook hyperactivation). This indicates that accessory sex gland secretions might have modified Ca2+ signaling activities in sperm, because the two forms of hyperactivation are reported to be triggered by different Ca2+ signaling patterns. Lastly, over time, more ejaculated than epididymal sperm entered the cumulus oocyte complexes. We concluded that modification of sperm by male accessory gland secretions affects the behavior of ejaculated sperm, possibly providing them with an advantage over epididymal sperm for reaching the eggs in vivo. PMID:25996155

  13. Effects of cumulus parameterization closures on simulations of summer precipitation over the continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Fengxue; Liang, Xin-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the effects of five cumulus closure assumptions on simulations of summer precipitation in the continental U.S. by utilizing an ensemble cumulus parameterization (ECP) that incorporates multiple alternate closure schemes into a single cloud model formulation. Results demonstrate that closure algorithms significantly affect the summer mean, daily frequency and intensity, and diurnal variation of precipitation, with strong regional dependence. Overall, the vertical velocity (W) closure produces the smallest summer mean biases, while the moisture convergence (MC) closure most realistically reproduces daily variability. Both closures have advantages over others in simulating U.S. daily rainfall frequency distribution, though both slightly overestimate intense rain events. The MC closure is superior at capturing summer rainfall amount, daily variability, and heavy rainfall frequency over the Central U.S., but systematically produces wet biases over the North American Monsoon (NAM) region and Southeast U.S., which can be reduced by using the W closure. The instability tendency (TD) and the total instability adjustment (KF) closures are better at capturing observed diurnal signals over the Central U.S. and the NAM, respectively. The results reasonably explain the systematic behaviors of several major cumulus parameterizations. A preliminary experiment combining two optimal closures (averaged moisture convergence and vertical velocity) in the ECP scheme significantly reduced the wet (dry) biases over the Southeast U.S. in the summer of 1993 (2003), and greatly improved daily rainfall correlations over the NAM. Further improved model simulation skills may be achieved in the future if optimal closures and their appropriate weights can be derived at different time scales based on specific climate regimes.

  14. A stochastic scale-aware parameterization of shallow cumulus convection across the convective gray zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakradzija, Mirjana; Seifert, Axel; Dipankar, Anurag

    2016-06-01

    The parameterization of shallow cumuli across a range of model grid resolutions of kilometre-scales faces at least three major difficulties: (1) closure assumptions of conventional parameterization schemes are no longer valid, (2) stochastic fluctuations become substantial and increase with grid resolution, and (3) convective circulations that emerge on the model grids are under-resolved and grid-scale dependent. Here we develop a stochastic parameterization of shallow cumulus clouds to address the first two points, and we study how this stochastic parameterization interacts with the under-resolved convective circulations in a convective case over the ocean. We couple a stochastic model based on a canonical ensemble of shallow cumuli to the Eddy-Diffusivity Mass-Flux parameterization in the icosahedral nonhydrostatic (ICON) model. The moist-convective area fraction is perturbed by subsampling the distribution of subgrid convective states. These stochastic perturbations represent scale-dependent fluctuations around the quasi-equilibrium state of a shallow cumulus ensemble. The stochastic parameterization reproduces the average and higher order statistics of the shallow cumulus case adequately and converges to the reference statistics with increasing model resolution. The interaction of parameterizations with model dynamics, which is usually not considered when parameterizations are developed, causes a significant influence on convection in the gray zone. The stochastic parameterization interacts strongly with the model dynamics, which changes the regime and energetics of the convective flows compared to the deterministic simulations. As a result of this interaction, the emergence of convective circulations in combination with the stochastic parameterization can even be beneficial on the high-resolution model grids.

  15. MicroRNA-224 delays oocyte maturation through targeting Ptx3 in cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiufang; Wang, Huidan; Sheng, Yan; Wang, Zhongqing

    2017-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been improved to regulate oocyte development in a cell- or stage-specific manner. In this study, we aimed to clarify microRNA-224's (miR-224) role in cumulus cells (CCs), to find out whether a change level of miR-224 in CCs could influence the maturation of oocyte. We found that overexpression of miR-224 of CCs led to the impairment of cell expansion, along with a decrease in the gene expression associated with cell expansion and maturation of oocyte. The increased expression of miR-224 in CC interrupted oocyte cell cycle at the GV stage. The GDF9, BMP15 and ZP3 of the oocytes were also down-regulated. The following in vitro fertilization had yielded a lower number of oocytes from cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) overexpressing miR-224 when reaching the blastocyst stage. The suppressive effect of miR-224 in the maturation of COC is validated by the miR-224 knockdown model, where the expansion of cumulus cell was increased and oocyte was developed to MII stage. In addition, the expression of aromatase in CCs was down-regulated by miR-224, resulting in a decreased level of estradiol (E2). A further investigation found that miR-224 down-regulated the expression of protein and mRNA of Ptx3 by targeting its 3'UTR. Our study revealed that miR-224 regulates the gene expression and function of CCs, which influences the maturation of oocyte, at least in part, via targeting Ptx3.

  16. Boundary-layer cumulus over land: Some observations and conceptual models

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, R.B.

    1993-09-01

    Starting in 1980, the Boundary Layer Research Team at the University of Wisconsin has been systematically studying the formation and evolution of nonprecipitating boundary-layer cumulus clouds (BLCu) in regions of fair weather (anticyclones) over land (Stull, 1980). Our approach is to quantify the average statistical characteristics of the surface, thermals, boundary layer, and clouds over horizontal regions of roughly 20 km in diameter. Within such a region over land, there is typically quite a variation in land use, and associated variations in surface albedo and moisture.

  17. Interaction of the ABL with stratocumulus and cumulus cloud layers, appendix N

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The role of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the oceans which in the general circulation of the atmosphere is to supply moisture to cumulus and stratus clouds is outlined. In extreme weather events, such as powerful storms and intense droughts, the primary role of the ABL is to supply or deny moisture to the weather system. Even for routine weather regimes, cloudiness and precipitation are key elements of any forecast. The premier problem for ABL parameterization is to formulate the physical coupling between the ABL turbulence and the clouds.

  18. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  19. Sensitivity of PBL and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction over an Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Charan Mohanty, Uma; Kumar, Krishan

    2015-04-01

    The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme) and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme) have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6, and KF schemes

  20. Boundary-layer cumulus over heterogeneous landscapes: A subgrid GCM parameterization. Final report, December 1991--November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, R.B.; Tripoli, G.

    1996-01-08

    The authors developed single-column parameterizations for subgrid boundary-layer cumulus clouds. These give cloud onset time, cloud coverage, and ensemble distributions of cloud-base altitudes, cloud-top altitudes, cloud thickness, and the characteristics of cloudy and clear updrafts. They tested and refined the parameterizations against archived data from Spring and Summer 1994 and 1995 intensive operation periods (IOPs) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM CART site near Lamont, Oklahoma. The authors also found that: cloud-base altitudes are not uniform over a heterogeneous surface; tops of some cumulus clouds can be below the base-altitudes of other cumulus clouds; there is an overlap region near cloud base where clear and cloudy updrafts exist simultaneously; and the lognormal distribution of cloud sizes scales to the JFD of surface layer air and to the shape of the temperature profile above the boundary layer.

  1. The importance of manganese in the cytoplasmic maturation of cattle oocytes: blastocyst production improvement regardless of cumulus cells presence during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Anchordoquy, Juan Patricio; Anchordoquy, Juan Mateo; Sirini, Matias Angel; Testa, Juan Alberto; Peral-García, Pilar; Furnus, Cecilia Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Adequate dietary intake of manganese (Mn) is required for normal reproductive performance in cattle. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of Mn during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) on apoptosis of cumulus cells, cumulus expansion, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the COC. The role of cumulus cells on Mn transport and subsequent embryo development was also evaluated. Early apoptosis decreased in cumulus cells matured with Mn compared with medium alone. Cumulus expansion did not show differences in COC matured with or without Mn supplementation. SOD activity was higher in COC matured with 6 ng/ml Mn than with 0 ng/ml Mn. Cleavage rates were higher in COC and denuded oocytes co-cultured with cumulus cells, either with or without Mn added to in vitro maturation (IVM) medium. Regardless of the presence of cumulus cells during IVM, the blastocyst rates were higher when 6 ng/ml Mn was supplemented into IVM medium compared with growth in medium alone. Blastocyst quality was enhanced when COC were matured in medium with Mn supplementation. The results of the present study indicated that Mn supplementation to IVM medium enhanced the 'health' of COC, and improved subsequent embryo development and embryo quality.

  2. Contributions to the implementation of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization in the GLA GCM. [GCM (general circulation model)

    SciTech Connect

    Sud, Y.C.; Chao, W.C.; Walker, G.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Several integrations were made with a coarse version of the GLA GCM, which has the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization, predicted fractional cloud cover, and a parameterization of evaporation of falling rainfall. All model simulation experiments started from ECMWF analysis for 15 December 1982 and were integrated until 31 January 1983 using climatological boundary conditions. The first ten days of model integrations show that the model-simulated tropics dries and warms as a result of excessive precipitation. Three types of model development-cum-analysis studies were made with the cumulus scheme. First, the Critical Cloud Work Function (CCWF) dataset for different sigma layers were reworked using the Cloud Work Function (CWF) database of lord et al. as representative of time-average CWF and not the actual CCWF values as in the Arakawa-Schubert implementation of cumulus convection. The experiments with the new CCWF dataset helped to delineate influence of changing CCWF on model simulations. Larger values of CCWF partially alleviated the problem of excessive heating and drying during spinup and sharpened the tropical ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone). Second, by comparing two simulations, one with and one without cumulus convection, the role of cumulus convection in maintaining observed tropical rainfall and 850 mb easterly winds is clarified. Third, relations between cloud radii and cumulus entrainment parameter, [lambda], realistic upper and lower bounds on [lambda] were obtained. This improvement had a great impact on the time evolution of tropical temperature and humidity simulation. It also suppressed excessive rainfall during spinup. Finally, by invoking [lambda][sub min] = 0.0002 m[sup [minus]1] (R[sub max] = 1.00 km) another simulation was made. In this simulation, not only the excessive initial rainfall was virtually eliminated, but a more realistic vertical distribution of specific humidity in the tropics was produced. 22 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Non-invasive assessment of porcine oocyte quality by supravital staining of cumulus-oocyte complexes with lissamine green B.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Rahul; Li, Shun; Fischer, Konrad; Kind, Alexander; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Rottmann, Oswald; Schnieke, Angelika

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of lissamine green B (LB) staining of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) as a non-invasive method of predicting maturational and developmental competence of slaughterhouse-derived porcine oocytes cultured in vitro. Cumulus cells of freshly aspirated COCs were evaluated either morphologically on the basis of thickness of cumulus cell layers, or stained with LB, which penetrates only non-viable cells. The extent of cumulus cell staining was taken as an inverse indicator of membrane integrity. The two methods of COC grading were then examined as predictors of nuclear maturation and development after parthenogenetic activation. In both cases LB staining proved a more reliable indicator than morphological assessment (P < 0.05). The relationship between LB staining and cumulus cell apoptosis was also examined. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for DNA fragmentation revealed that oocytes within COCs graded as low quality by either LB staining or visual morphology showed significantly greater DNA fragmentation (P < 0.05) than higher grades, and that LB and visual grading were of similar predictive value. Expression of the stress response gene TP53 showed significantly higher expression in COCs graded as low quality by LB staining. However expression of the apoptosis-associated genes BAK and CASP3 was not significantly different between high or low grade COCs, suggesting that mRNA expression of BAK and CASP3 is not a reliable method of detecting apoptosis in porcine COCs. Evaluation of cumulus cell membrane integrity by lissamine green B staining thus provides a useful new tool to gain information about the maturational and developmental competence of porcine oocytes.

  4. Dreams, Hopes, Realities: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the First Forty Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Lane E.

    1999-01-01

    Throughout history, the great achievements of civilizations and cultures have been recorded in lists of dates and events. But to look only at the machinery, discoveries, or milestones is to miss the value of these achievements. Each goal achieved or discovery or made represents a supreme effort on the part of individual people who came and worked together for a purpose greater than themselves. Driven by an innate curiosity of the spirit, we have built civilizations and discovered new worlds, always reaching out beyond what we knew or thought was possible. These efforts may have used ships or machinery, but the achievement was that of the humans who made those machines possible- remarkable people willing to endure discomfort, frustration, fatigue, and the risk of failure in the hope of finding out something new. This is the case with the history of the Goddard Space Flight Center. This publication traces the legacy of successes, risks, disappointments and internationally recognized triumphs of the Center's first 40 years. It is a story of technological achievement and scientific discovery; of reaching back to the dawn of time and opening up a new set of eyes on our own planet Earth. In the end, it is not a story about machinery or discoveries, but a story about ourselves. If we were able to step off our planet, and if we continue to discover new mysteries and better technology, it is because the people who work at Goddard always had a passion for exploration and the dedication to make it happen. The text that follows is a testimony to the challenges people at the Goddard Space Flight Center have faced and overcome over almost half a century. Today, we stand on the threshold of a new and equally challenging era. It will once again test our ingenuity, skills, and flexibility as we find new ways of working with our colleagues in industry, government, and academia. Doing more with less is every bit as ambitious as designing the first science instrument to study the

  5. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  6. SEM signal emulation for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Evgenii; Muelders, Thomas; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Braylovska, Mariya

    2016-03-01

    The application of accurate and predictive physical resist simulation is seen as one important use model for fast and efficient exploration of new patterning technology options, especially if fully qualified OPC models are not yet available at an early pre-production stage. The methodology of using a top-down CD-SEM metrology to extract the 3D resist profile information, such as the critical dimension (CD) at various resist heights, has to be associated with a series of presumptions which may introduce such small, but systematic CD errors. Ideally, the metrology effects should be carefully minimized during measurement process, or if possible be taken into account through proper metrology modeling. In this paper we discuss the application of a fast SEM signal emulation describing the SEM image formation. The algorithm is applied to simulated resist 3D profiles and produces emulated SEM image results for 1D and 2D patterns. It allows estimating resist simulation quality by comparing CDs which were extracted from the emulated and from the measured SEM images. Moreover, SEM emulation is applied for resist model calibration to capture subtle error signatures through dose and defocus. Finally, it should be noted that our SEM emulation methodology is based on the approximation of physical phenomena which are taking place in real SEM image formation. This approximation allows achieving better speed performance compared to a fully physical model.

  7. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  8. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  9. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  10. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) sounding-rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidotti, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    An overall introduction to the NASA sounding rocket program as managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The various sounding rockets, auxiliary systems (telemetry, guidance, etc.), launch sites, and services which NASA can provide are briefly described.

  11. Development of Two-Moment Cloud Microphysics for Liquid and Ice Within the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, Donifan; Molod, Andrea M.; Bacmeister, Julio; Nenes, Athanasios; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Phillips, Vaughan,; Eichmann, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the development of a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme within the version 5 of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5). The scheme includes the implementation of a comprehensive stratiform microphysics module, a new cloud coverage scheme that allows ice supersaturation and a new microphysics module embedded within the moist convection parameterization of GEOS-5. Comprehensive physically-based descriptions of ice nucleation, including homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing, and liquid droplet activation are implemented to describe the formation of cloud particles in stratiform clouds and convective cumulus. The effect of preexisting ice crystals on the formation of cirrus clouds is also accounted for. A new parameterization of the subgrid scale vertical velocity distribution accounting for turbulence and gravity wave motion is developed. The implementation of the new microphysics significantly improves the representation of liquid water and ice in GEOS-5. Evaluation of the model shows agreement of the simulated droplet and ice crystal effective and volumetric radius with satellite retrievals and in situ observations. The simulated global distribution of supersaturation is also in agreement with observations. It was found that when using the new microphysics the fraction of condensate that remains as liquid follows a sigmoidal increase with temperature which differs from the linear increase assumed in most models and is in better agreement with available observations. The performance of the new microphysics in reproducing the observed total cloud fraction, longwave and shortwave cloud forcing, and total precipitation is similar to the operational version of GEOS-5 and in agreement with satellite retrievals. However the new microphysics tends to underestimate the coverage of persistent low level stratocumulus. Sensitivity studies showed that the simulated cloud properties are robust to moderate variation in cloud microphysical parameters

  12. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  13. Impact of Anthropogenic Aerosol on the Properties of Shallow Maritime Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Wilcox, E. M.; Shan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Indian Ocean region is frequently covered by cumulus clouds that are responsible for moistening the boundary layer and contribute to tropical deep convection. Because this region is uniquely located close to the highly polluted Indian plateau, air mass with high aerosol concentration can be easily transported to this area. These small cumulus clouds, coupled with the effects of aerosol, have a large potential to affect the regional and global albedo. The aerosol effects on cloud properties and atmospheric structures are examined in this work, using the UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) data that are observed from CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) and MAC (Maldives Autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle Campaign). On average, the high polluted cases show warmer temperature through the entire atmospheric column and higher relative humidity in boundary layer. The maximum temperature difference between high and low polluted cases can be found around the cloud layer altitude. In addition, the height of sub-cloud mixed layer is higher in low polluted cases. Clouds in high polluted cases are generally becoming narrower and taller than those in low polluted cases, and are associated with greater cloud water content and higher cloud droplet number concentrations, especially in small droplet range (diameters less than 10 micrometers). Meanwhile, the effective radius of cloud droplets decreases as the aerosol concentration increases. These facts indicate that the high polluted clouds are on average brighter with higher albedo.

  14. Absence of cumulus cells during in vitro maturation affects lipid metabolism in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Uzbekov, Rustem; Elis, Sébastien; Sanchez, Laura; Kireev, Igor; Lardic, Lionel; Dalbies-Tran, Rozenn; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2013-03-15

    Cumulus cells (CC) surround the oocyte and are coupled metabolically through regulation of nutrient intake. CC removal before in vitro maturation (IVM) decreases bovine oocyte developmental competence without affecting nuclear meiotic maturation. The objective was to investigate the influence of CC on oocyte cytoplasmic maturation in relation to energy metabolism. IVM with either cumulus-enclosed (CEO) or -denuded (DO) oocytes was performed in serum-free metabolically optimized medium. Transmission electron microscopy revealed different distribution of membrane-bound vesicles and lipid droplets between metaphase II DO and CEO. By Nile Red staining, a significant reduction in total lipid level was evidenced in DO. Global transcriptomic analysis revealed differential expression of genes regulating energy metabolism, transcription, and translation between CEO and DO. By Western blot, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and hormone-sensitive phospholipase (HSL) proteins were detected in oocytes and in CC, indicating a local lipogenesis and lypolysis. FAS protein was significantly less abundant in DO that in CEO and more highly expressed in CC than in the oocytes. On the contrary, HSL protein was more abundant in oocytes than in CC. In addition, active Ser⁵⁶³-phosphorylated HSL was detected in the oocytes only after IVM, and its level was similar in CEO and DO. In conclusion, absence of CC during IVM affected lipid metabolism in the oocyte and led to suboptimal cytoplasmic maturation. Thus, CC may influence the oocyte by orienting the consumption of nutritive storage via regulation of local fatty acid synthesis and lipolysis to provide energy for maturation.

  15. Laboratory simulations show diabatic heating drives cumulus-cloud evolution and entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha, Roddam; Diwan, Sourabh Suhas; Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; Sreenivas, K. R.; Bhat, G. S.

    2011-01-01

    Clouds are the largest source of uncertainty in climate science, and remain a weak link in modeling tropical circulation. A major challenge is to establish connections between particulate microphysics and macroscale turbulent dynamics in cumulus clouds. Here we address the issue from the latter standpoint. First we show how to create bench-scale flows that reproduce a variety of cumulus-cloud forms (including two genera and three species), and track complete cloud life cycles—e.g., from a “cauliflower” congestus to a dissipating fractus. The flow model used is a transient plume with volumetric diabatic heating scaled dynamically to simulate latent-heat release from phase changes in clouds. Laser-based diagnostics of steady plumes reveal Riehl–Malkus type protected cores. They also show that, unlike the constancy implied by early self-similar plume models, the diabatic heating raises the Taylor entrainment coefficient just above cloud base, depressing it at higher levels. This behavior is consistent with cloud-dilution rates found in recent numerical simulations of steady deep convection, and with aircraft-based observations of homogeneous mixing in clouds. In-cloud diabatic heating thus emerges as the key driver in cloud development, and could well provide a major link between microphysics and cloud-scale dynamics. PMID:21918112

  16. Laboratory simulations show diabatic heating drives cumulus-cloud evolution and entrainment.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Roddam; Diwan, Sourabh Suhas; Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; Sreenivas, K R; Bhat, G S

    2011-09-27

    Clouds are the largest source of uncertainty in climate science, and remain a weak link in modeling tropical circulation. A major challenge is to establish connections between particulate microphysics and macroscale turbulent dynamics in cumulus clouds. Here we address the issue from the latter standpoint. First we show how to create bench-scale flows that reproduce a variety of cumulus-cloud forms (including two genera and three species), and track complete cloud life cycles--e.g., from a "cauliflower" congestus to a dissipating fractus. The flow model used is a transient plume with volumetric diabatic heating scaled dynamically to simulate latent-heat release from phase changes in clouds. Laser-based diagnostics of steady plumes reveal Riehl-Malkus type protected cores. They also show that, unlike the constancy implied by early self-similar plume models, the diabatic heating raises the Taylor entrainment coefficient just above cloud base, depressing it at higher levels. This behavior is consistent with cloud-dilution rates found in recent numerical simulations of steady deep convection, and with aircraft-based observations of homogeneous mixing in clouds. In-cloud diabatic heating thus emerges as the key driver in cloud development, and could well provide a major link between microphysics and cloud-scale dynamics.

  17. Effects of cumulus parameterization closures on simulations of summer precipitation over the United States coastal oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Fengxue; Liang, Xin-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluates the effects of major cumulus parameterization closures on summer precipitation simulations over the U.S. Atlantic Coasts and Gulf of Mexico. A series of mesoscale regional climate model simulations using an Ensemble Cumulus Parameterization (ECP) that incorporates multiple alternate closure schemes into a single cloud model formulation are conducted and compared to determine the systematic errors and relative performances of individual and combined closures in capturing precipitation spatiotemporal variations. The results show that closure algorithms largely affect precipitation's geographic distribution, frequency and intensity, and diurnal cycle. The quasi-equilibrium and total instability adjustment closures simulate widespread wet biases, while the instability tendency closure produces systematic dry biases. Two closure algorithms based on the average vertical velocity at the cloud base and column moisture convergence complementarily reproduce the observed precipitation pattern and amount, and capture the frequency of heavy rainfall events better than other closures. In contrast, the instability tendency closures are better at capturing the diurnal phase but yield much larger deficits in amount. Therefore, cloud base vertical velocity and moisture convergence may be the primary factors controlling precipitation seasonal mean and daily variation, while the instability tendency may play a critical role in regulating the diurnal cycle phase.

  18. Project Overview: Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS): Proposed Summer 2007 ASP Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Berg, Larry K.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard

    2006-05-18

    This white paper presents the scientific motivation and preliminary logistical plans for a proposed ASP field campaign to be carried out in the summer of 2007. The primary objective of this campaign is to use the DOE Gulfstream-1 aircraft to make measurements characterizing the chemical, physical and optical properties of aerosols below, within and above large fields of fair weather cumulus and to use the NASA Langley Research Center’s High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to make independent measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles in the vicinity of these fields. Separate from the science questions to be addressed by these observations will be information to add in the development of a parameterized cumulus scheme capable of including multiple cloud fields within a regional or global scale model. We will also be able to compare and contrast the cloud and aerosol properties within and outside the Oklahoma City plume to study aerosol processes within individual clouds. Preliminary discussions with the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) science team have identified overlap between the science questions posed for the CLASIC Intensive Operation Period (IOP) and the proposed ASP campaign, suggesting collaboration would benefit both teams.

  19. Aerosol and gas re-distribution by shallow cumulus clouds: An investigation using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, Anna; Sorooshian, Armin; Ervens, Barbara; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Feingold, Graham; Murphy, Shane M.; de Gouw, Joost; Warneke, Carsten; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2012-09-01

    Aircraft measurements during the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) are used to examine the influence of shallow cumulus clouds on vertical profiles of aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and secondary aerosol precursor gases. The data show signatures of convective transport of particles, gases and moisture from near the surface to higher altitudes, and of aqueous-phase production of aerosol mass (sulfate and organics) in cloud droplets and aerosol water. In cloudy conditions, the average aerosol volume concentration at an altitude of 2850 m, above typical cloud top levels, was found to be 34% of that at 450 m; for clear conditions, the same ratio was 13%. Both organic and sulfate mass fractions were on average constant with altitude (around 50%); however, the ratio of oxalate to organic mass increased with altitude (from 1% at 450 m to almost 9% at 3450 m), indicative of the influence of in-cloud production on the vertical abundance and characteristics of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass. A new metric termed "residual cloud fraction" is introduced as a way of quantifying the "cloud processing history" of an air parcel. Results of a parcel model simulating aqueous phase production of sulfate and organics reproduce observed trends and point at a potentially important role of SOA production, especially oligomers, in deliquesced aerosols. The observations emphasize the importance of shallow cumulus clouds in altering the vertical distribution of aerosol properties that influence both their direct and indirect effect on climate.

  20. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  1. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  2. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  3. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  4. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  5. Earth Science Microwave Remote Sensing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) was established as NASA's first space flight center in 1959. Its 12,000 personnel are active in the Earth and space sciences, astronomy, space physics, tracking and communications. GSFC's mission is to expand our knowledge of the Earth and its environment, the solar system, and the universe through observations from space. The main Goddard campus is located in Greenbelt, Maryland, USA, just north of Washington, D.C. The Wallops Flight Facility (operational since 1945), located on the Atlantic coast of Virginia was consolidated with the Goddard Space Flight Center in 1982. Wallops is now NASA's principal facility for management and implementation of suborbital research programs, and supports a wide variety of airborne science missions as well. As the lead Center for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE)--a long-term, coordinated research effort to study the Earth as a global environmental system--GSFC scientists and engineers are involved in a wide range of Earth Science remote sensing activities. Their activities range from basic geoscience research to the development of instruments and technology for space missions, as well as the associated Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) work. The shear breadth of work in these areas precludes an exhaustive description here. Rather, this article presents selected brief overviews of microwave-related Earth Science applications and the ground-based, airborne, and space instruments that are in service, under development, or otherwise significantly involving GSFC. Likewise, contributing authors are acknowledged for each section, but the results and projects they describe represent the cumulative efforts of many persons at GSFC as well as at collaborating institutions. For further information, readers are encouraged to consult the listed websites and references.

  6. The Effect of Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes and Atmospheric Heating Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkelman, Laura M.; Evans, K. Franklin; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2007-10-01

    Cumulus clouds can become tilted or elongated in the presence of wind shear. Nevertheless, most studies of the interaction of cumulus clouds and radiation have assumed these clouds to be isotropic. This paper describes an investigation of the effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain-averaged solar fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce 20 three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of cloud scenes from a large eddy simulation. Progressively greater degrees of x–z plane tilting and horizontal stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes was produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Domain-averaged transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. The mechanisms by which anisotropy interacts with solar fluxes were investigated by comparisons to independent pixel approximation and tilted independent pixel approximation computations for the same scenes. Finally, cumulus anisotropy was found to most strongly impact solar radiative transfer by changing the effective cloud fraction (i.e., the cloud fraction with respect to the solar beam direction).

  7. Down-regulation of the CYP19A1 gene in cumulus cells of infertile women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Ionara Diniz E S; Donabella, Flávia Capello; Ribas, Cristiana Padovan; Meola, Juliana; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; de Paz, Cláudia Cristina Paro; Navarro, Paula A

    2015-05-01

    Aromatase plays a fundamental role in the establishment of oocyte quality, which might be compromised in infertile women with endometriosis. The expression of the CYP19A1 gene (that encodes aromatase) was compared in cumulus cells and oestradiol concentrations in the follicular fluid of infertile women with and without endometriosis submitted to ovarian stimulation for intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Cumulus cells were isolated and the expression of the CYP19A1 was quantitated through real-time polymerase chain reaction. Oestradiol concentrations in follicular fluid were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay. A lower expression of the CYP19A1 in the cumulus cells of infertile women with endometriosis was observed compared with controls (0.17 ± 0.13 and 0.56 ± 0.12, respectively), and no significant difference in the follicular fluid oestradiol concentrations was observed between groups. Our results show reduced expression of the CYP19A1 in cumulus cells of infertile women with endometriosis, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis-related infertility.

  8. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  9. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  10. Goddard Space Flight Center: 1994 Maryland/GSFC Earth and Environmental Science Teacher Ambassador Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, James

    1995-01-01

    The Maryland/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth and Environmental Science Teacher Ambassador Program was designed to enhance classroom instruction in the Earth and environmental science programs in the secondary schools of the state of Maryland. In October 1992, more than 100 school system administrators from the 24 local Maryland school systems, the Maryland State Department of Education, and the University of Maryland met with NASA GSFC scientists and education officers to propose a cooperative state-wide secondary school science teaching enhancement initiative.

  11. Optoelectronics research for communication programs at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Current optoelectronics research and development of high-power, high-bandwidth laser transmitters, high-bandwidth, high-sensitivity optical receivers, pointing, acquisition and tracking components, and experimental and theoretical system modeling at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is reviewed. Program hardware and space flight milestones are presented. It is believed that these experiments will pave the way for intersatellite optical communications links for both the NASA Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System and commercial users in the 21st century.

  12. Assimilation of (A) TOVS data at the NASA Goddard Data Assimilation Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Rokke, Laurie; daSilva, Arlindo; Partyka, Gary; Todling, Ricardo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    At the NASA Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO), a 1D variational radiance assimilation system has been developed. This system, called DAOTOVS (Tiros operational vertical sounder (TOVS)), uses (A)TOVS level 1b radiances. It has been implemented within the DAO's semi-operational system as well as within the next generation data assimilation system that uses a finite-volume dynamical core. We will show results from (A)TOVS assimilation, including stratospheric analyses and validation. We will also describe our systematic error correction scheme which is based on collocated radiosondes.

  13. Goddard Atmospheric Composition Data Center: Aura Data and Services in One Place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, G.; Kempler, S.; Gerasimov, I.; Ahmad, S.; Johnson, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Goddard Atmospheric Composition Data and Information Services Center (AC-DISC) is a portal to the Atmospheric Composition specific, user driven, multi-sensor, on-line, easy access archive and distribution system employing data analysis and visualization, data mining, and other user requested techniques for the better science data usage. It provides convenient access to Atmospheric Composition data and information from various remote-sensing missions, from TOMS, UARS, MODIS, and AIRS, to the most recent data from Aura OMI, MLS, HIRDLS (once these datasets are released to the public), as well as Atmospheric Composition datasets residing at other remote archive site.

  14. Storage Information Management System (SIMS) Spaceflight Hardware Warehousing at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubicko, Richard M.; Bingham, Lindy

    1995-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) on site and leased warehouses contain thousands of items of ground support equipment (GSE) and flight hardware including spacecraft, scaffolding, computer racks, stands, holding fixtures, test equipment, spares, etc. The control of these warehouses, and the management, accountability, and control of the items within them, is accomplished by the Logistics Management Division. To facilitate this management and tracking effort, the Logistics and Transportation Management Branch, is developing a system to provide warehouse personnel, property owners, and managers with storage and inventory information. This paper will describe that PC-based system and address how it will improve GSFC warehouse and storage management.

  15. Implementation of NASA Materials and Processes Requirements at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the history and current practices of the Materials Engineering Branch (MEB) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Included in the presentation is a review of the general Materials and Processes (M&P) requirements in the NASA-STD-6016. The work that the Materials Engineering Branch does to support GSFC Projects is also reviewed. The Materials Engineering Branch capabilities are listed, the expertise that is available to GSFC projects is also listed. Included in the backup slides are forms that the MEB uses to identify the materials in the spacecraft under development.

  16. Regional Scale/Regional Climate Model Development and Its Applications at Goddard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lau, W.; Qian, J.; Jia, Y.; Wetzel, P.; Chou, M.-D.; Wang, Y.; Lynn, B.

    2000-01-01

    A Regional Land-Atmosphere Climate Simulation System (RELACS) is being developed and implemented at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. One of the major goals of RELACS is to use a regional scale model (Penn State/NCAR MM5) with improved physical processes and in particular land-related processes, to understand the role of the land surface and its interaction with convection and radiation as well as the water/energy cycles in the Indo-China/South China Sea (SCS)/China, N. America and S. America region.

  17. Clustering, randomness, and regularity in cloud fields: 2. Cumulus cloud fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Lee, J.; Weger, R. C.; Welch, R. M.

    1992-12-01

    During the last decade a major controversy has been brewing concerning the proper characterization of cumulus convection. The prevailing view has been that cumulus clouds form in clusters, in which cloud spacing is closer than that found for the overall cloud field and which maintains its identity over many cloud lifetimes. This "mutual protection hypothesis" of Randall and Huffman (1980) has been challenged by the "inhibition hypothesis" of Ramirez et al. (1990) which strongly suggests that the spatial distribution of cumuli must tend toward a regular distribution. A dilemma has resulted because observations have been reported to support both hypotheses. The present work reports a detailed analysis of cumulus cloud field spatial distributions based upon Landsat, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, and Skylab data. Both nearest-neighbor and point-to-cloud cumulative distribution function statistics are investigated. The results show unequivocally that when both large and small clouds are included in the cloud field distribution, the cloud field always has a strong clustering signal. The strength of clustering is largest at cloud diameters of about 200-300 m, diminishing with increasing cloud diameter. In many cases, clusters of small clouds are found which are not closely associated with large clouds. As the small clouds are eliminated from consideration, the cloud field typically tends towards regularity. Thus it would appear that the "inhibition hypothesis" of Ramirez and Bras (1990) has been verified for the large clouds. However, these results are based upon the analysis of point processes. A more exact analysis also is made which takes into account the cloud size distributions. Since distinct clouds are by definition nonoverlapping, cloud size effects place a restriction upon the possible locations of clouds in the cloud field. The net effect of this analysis is that the large clouds appear to be randomly distributed, with only weak tendencies towards

  18. Inhibitors of zinc-dependent metalloproteases hinder sperm passage through the cumulus oophorus during porcine fertilization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Beek, J; Nauwynck, H; Maes, D; Van Soom, A

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we report for the first time on a possible contribution of metalloproteases in sperm passage through the cumulus matrix in pigs. The presence of 20 μM 1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-PHEN), inhibitor of zinc-dependent metalloproteases, strongly inhibited the degree of sperm penetration in cumulus-intact (CI), but not in cumulus-free (CF), porcine oocytes during IVF. The inhibitory effect of 1,10-PHEN was due to the chelation of metal ions as a non-chelating analog (1,7-PHEN) did not affect IVF rates. Furthermore, incubation with 1,10-PHEN did not affect sperm binding to the zona pellucida nor sperm motility, membrane integrity, or acrosomal status. These findings led to the assumption that 1,10-PHEN interacts with a sperm- or cumulus-derived metalloprotease. Metalloproteases are key players in physiological processes involving degradation or remodeling of extracellular matrix. In vivo, their proteolytic activity is regulated by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMP1-TIMP4). We tested the effect of TIMP3 on fertilization parameters after porcine IVF. Similar to 1,10-PHEN, TIMP3 inhibited total fertilization rate of CI but not CF oocytes and did not influence sperm quality parameters. Although the inhibitory effect was stronger in CI oocytes, TIMP3 also reduced the degree of sperm penetration in CF oocytes, suggesting the involvement of a metalloprotease in a subsequent step during fertilization. In conclusion, our results indicate the involvement of TIMP3-sensitive, zinc-dependent metalloprotease activity in sperm passage through the cumulus oophorus in pigs. The results should provide the basis for further biochemical research toward the localization and identification of the metalloprotease involved.

  19. Follicle-stimulating hormone-induced rescue of cumulus cell apoptosis and enhanced development ability of buffalo oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jain, A; Jain, T; Kumar, P; Kumar, M; De, S; Gohain, M; Kumar, R; Datta, T K

    2016-04-01

    The effect of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on apoptotic status of cumulus cells, expression of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes, and development rate of in vitro fertilization-produced buffalo embryos were investigated. FSH supplementation in in vitro maturation-medium resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the expression of proapoptotic genes namely, BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), cytochrome c, and caspase-3 and increase in the expression of antiapoptotic genes such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) in cumulus cells of mature oocyte. Cumulus expansion, oocyte maturation, cleavage, and blastocyst development rates were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in 5 and 10-μg/mL FSH-supplemented groups as compared with control. Significant increase in the expression of FSH receptor messenger RNA was also found with 5 and 10-μg/mL FSH (P < 0.05). Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay confirmed that the population of apoptotic cumulus cells of matured oocytes was reduced in the FSH-treated groups as compared with control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest that FSH may attenuate apoptosis in cumulus cells via mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway by increasing XIAP expression, resulting in a more favorable ratio of BCL2/BAX expression and decreasing the cytochrome c and caspase-3 expression, eventually contributing to developmental competence of oocytes. The information generated will help in improving the in vitro embryo production program in buffalo.

  20. Expression and cellular distribution of estrogen and progesterone receptors and the real-time proliferation of porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Piotrowska, Hanna; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Brüssow, Klaus P; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Although the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors within porcine ovary and cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) is well recognized, still little information is known regarding expression of the progesterone receptor (PGR), PGR membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) and of estrogen-related receptors (ERRγ and ERRβ/γ) in separated cumulus cells in relation to real-time proliferation. In this study, a model of oocytes-separated cumulus cells was used to analyze the cell proliferation index and the expression PGR, PGRMC1 and of ERRγ and ERRβ/γ during 96-h cultivation in vitro using real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and confocal microscopic observation. We found that PGR protein expression was increased at 0 h, compared with PGR protein expression after 96 h of culture (P < 0.001). The expression of PGRMC1, ERRγ and ERRβ/γ was unchanged. After using qRT-PCR we did not found statistical differences in expression of PGR, PGRMC1, ERRγ and ERRβ/γ during 96 h of cumulus cells in vitro culture (IVC). We supposed that the differential expression of the PGR protein at 0 h and after 96 h is related to a time-dependent down-regulation, which may activate a negative feedback. The distribution of PGR, PGRMC1 proteins may be linked with the translocation of receptors to the cytoplasm after the membrane binding of respective agonists and intra-cytoplasmic signal transduction. Furthermore, cumulus cells analyzed at 0 h were characterized by decreased proliferation index, whereas those after 96 h of culture revealed a significant increase of proliferation index, which may be associated with differentiation/luteinization of these cells during real-time proliferation.

  1. Embryonic Poly(A)-Binding Protein (EPAB) Is Required for Granulosa Cell EGF Signaling and Cumulus Expansion in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cai-Rong; Lowther, Katie M; Lalioti, Maria D; Seli, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (EPAB) is the predominant poly(A)-binding protein in Xenopus, mouse, and human oocytes and early embryos before zygotic genome activation. EPAB is required for translational activation of maternally stored mRNAs in the oocyte and Epab(-/-) female mice are infertile due to impaired oocyte maturation, cumulus expansion, and ovulation. The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanism of follicular somatic cell dysfunction in Epab(-/-) mice. Using a coculture system of oocytectomized cumulus oophorus complexes (OOXs) with denuded oocytes, we found that when wild-type OOXs were cocultured with Epab(-/-) oocytes, or when Epab(-/-) OOXs were cocultured with WT oocytes, cumulus expansion failed to occur in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF). This finding suggests that oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) from Epab(-/-) mice fail to send and receive the necessary signals required for cumulus expansion. The abnormalities in Epab(-/-) CCs are not due to lower expression of the oocyte-derived factors growth differentiation factor 9 or bone morphogenetic protein 15, because Epab(-/-) oocytes express these proteins at comparable levels with WT. Epab(-/-) granulosa cells (GCs) exhibit decreased levels of phosphorylated MEK1/2, ERK1/2, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase in response to lutenizing hormone and EGF treatment, as well as decreased phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. In conclusion, EPAB, which is oocyte specific, is required for the ability of CCs and GCs to become responsive to LH and EGF signaling. These results emphasize the importance of oocyte-somatic communication for GC and CC function.

  2. Functional role of the bovine oocyte-specific protein JY-1 in meiotic maturation, cumulus expansion, and subsequent embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Bon; Wee, Gabbine; Zhang, Kun; Folger, Joseph K; Knott, Jason G; Smith, George W

    2014-03-01

    Oocyte-expressed genes regulate key aspects of ovarian follicular development and early embryogenesis. We previously demonstrated a requirement of the oocyte-specific protein JY-1 for bovine early embryogenesis. Given that JY-1 is present in oocytes throughout folliculogenesis, and oocyte-derived JY-1 mRNA is temporally regulated postfertilization, we hypothesized that JY-1 levels in oocytes impact nuclear maturation and subsequent early embryogenesis. A novel model system, whereby JY-1 small interfering RNA was microinjected into cumulus-enclosed germinal vesicle-stage oocytes and meiotic arrest maintained for 48 h prior to in vitro maturation (IVM), was validated and used to determine the effect of reduced oocyte JY-1 expression on nuclear maturation, cumulus expansion, and embryonic development after in vitro fertilization. Depletion of JY-1 protein during IVM effectively reduced cumulus expansion, percentage of oocytes progressing to metaphase II, proportion of embryos that cleaved early, total cleavage rates and development to 8- to 16-cell stage, and totally blocked development to the blastocyst stage relative to controls. Supplementation with JY-1 protein during oocyte culture rescued effects of JY-1 depletion on meiotic maturation, cumulus expansion, and early cleavage, but did not rescue development to 8- to 16-cell and blastocyst stages. However, effects of JY-1 depletion postfertilization on development to 8- to 16-cell and blastocyst stages were rescued by JY-1 supplementation during embryo culture. In conclusion, these results support an important functional role for oocyte-derived JY-1 protein during meiotic maturation in promoting progression to metaphase II, cumulus expansion, and subsequent embryonic development.

  3. Human sperm acrosome reaction-initiating activity associated with the human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Siiteri, J E; Dandekar, P; Meizel, S

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the detection and partial characterization of preovulatory human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cell-associated activity capable of initiating the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. Fragments of preovulatory human cumulus (cells plus extracellular matrix) were washed 3 times, incubated for 24 hr and the spent media and washes assayed for their ability to initiate the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. AR activity was present in the first two washes but not the third wash; however, AR activity was recovered in the spent medium after 3 X-washed fragments were incubated for 24 hr under conditions which maintained the viability of the cumulus cells. The spent media of preovulatory human mural granulosa cells contained AR-initiating activity after 1-3, 3-6, and 6-9 days of culture. The properties of the AR activity present in spent media of human cumulus fragments included resistance to loss of activity during treatment with pronase; resistance to loss of activity during treatment with chondroitinase ABC or bacterial hyaluronidase; heat stability after overnight incubation; lack of extraction by chloroform-methanol; an apparent molecular weight (MW) of 50,000, as determined by Sephadex G-75 column chromatography; conversion to a lower apparent MW activity by incubation with pronase. These properties are also characteristic of a fraction derived by Sephadex G-75 chromatography of preovulatory human follicular fluid which also has been shown to stimulate the human sperm acrosome reaction in vitro. The AR activity from spent media of human mural granulosa cells is also found in a 50,000 MW Sephadex G-75 fraction. We propose that the sources of the 50,000 MW human follicular fluid AR activity are the cumulus oophorus and the mural granulosa cells.

  4. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  5. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  6. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  7. Interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment. IV - The discrete model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, S. J.; Chao, W. C.; Arakawa, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Arakawa-Schubert (1974) parameterization is applied to a prognostic model of large-scale atmospheric circulations and used to analyze data in a general circulation model (GCM). The vertical structure of the large-scale model and the solution for the cloud subensemble thermodynamical properties are examined to choose cloud levels and representative regions. A mass flux distribution equation is adapted to formulate algorithms for calculating the large-scale forcing and the mass flux kernel, using either direct solution or linear programming. Finally, the feedback of the cumulus ensemble on the large-scale environment for a given subensemble mass flux is calculated. All cloud subensemble properties were determined from the conservation of mass, moist static energy, and total water.

  8. Optical properties of continental haze and cumulus and orographic clouds based on Space Shuttle polarimetric observations.

    PubMed

    Egan, W G; Israel, S; Sidran, M; Hindman, E E; Johnson, W R; Whitehead, V S

    1993-11-20

    Digitized Space Shuttle imagery in the red, green, and blue spectral regions (0.600, 0.540, and 0.435 µm, respectively) is used to characterize the mean radius and the index of refraction of droplets in cumulus and orographic clouds. The clouds are shown to consist concurrently of submicrometer and supermicrometer droplets, with the percent polarization indicative of the dominant sizes. Cloud development from haze as well as inhomogeneities in the cloud decks can be traced remotely. The absorption properties of clouds can also be determined remotely. An optical depth of continental haze in the same three spectral regions as the clouds is computed from the polarimetric and photometric contributions. Both Mie and Rayleigh scattering are included in the model.

  9. Observational evidence for aerosol invigoration in shallow cumulus downstream of Mount Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, G. G.; Abernathy, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of how marine boundary layer (MBL) shallow cumulus clouds respond to changes in aerosol is central to understanding how MBL clouds modulate the climate system. Mount Kilauea on the island of Hawaii began erupting in 2008 injecting substantial SO2 into the marine boundary layer creating a unique natural laboratory. Examining data from approximately 600 passes of the A-Train downstream of Mount Kilauea over a 3 year period and separating data into aerosol optical depth quartiles, we find an unambiguous increase in marine boundary cloud top height and an increase in surface wind speed as aerosol increases while the radar reflectivity does not change substantially. We conclude that increased aerosols may have caused invigoration of the MBL clouds. Additionally, we find that increases in sub 1 km cloud fraction combined with increasing aerosol explain the increased visible reflectance suggesting that evidence for the so-called first aerosol indirect effect should be reexamined.

  10. Cumulus cloud field morphology and spatial patterns derived from high spatial resolution Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, S. K.; Welch, R. M.; Navar, M. S.; Berendes, T. A.; Chen, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    Using high-spatial-resolution Landsat MSS imagery, the cumulus cloud morphology, cloud nearest-neighbor distributions, and cloud clumping scales were investigated. It is shown that the cloud-size distribution can be represented by a mixture of two power laws; clouds of diameters less than 1 km have power-law slope range of 1.4-2.3, while larger clouds have slopes from 2.1 to 4.75. The break in power-law slope occurs at the cloud size that makes the largest contribution to cloud cover. Results suggest that larger clouds grow at the expense of smaller clouds. It was also found that the cloud inhomogeneities have significant impact on radiative fluxes.

  11. Precipitation susceptibility in marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus from airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Sorooshian, Armin; Zuidema, Paquita; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2016-09-01

    Precipitation tends to decrease as aerosol concentration increases in warm marine boundary layer clouds at fixed liquid water path (LWP). The quantitative nature of this relationship is captured using the precipitation susceptibility (So) metric. Previously published works disagree on the qualitative behavior of So in marine low clouds: So decreases monotonically with increasing LWP or cloud depth (H) in stratocumulus clouds (Sc), while it increases and then decreases in shallow cumulus clouds (Cu). This study uses airborne measurements from four field campaigns on Cu and Sc with similar instrument packages and flight maneuvers to examine if and why So behavior varies as a function of cloud type. The findings show that So increases with H and then decreases in both Sc and Cu. Possible reasons for why these results differ from those in previous studies of Sc are discussed.

  12. Clustering, randomness and regularity in cloud fields. I - Theoretical considerations. II - Cumulus cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weger, R. C.; Lee, J.; Zhu, Tianri; Welch, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    The current controversy existing in reference to the regularity vs. clustering in cloud fields is examined by means of analysis and simulation studies based upon nearest-neighbor cumulative distribution statistics. It is shown that the Poisson representation of random point processes is superior to pseudorandom-number-generated models and that pseudorandom-number-generated models bias the observed nearest-neighbor statistics towards regularity. Interpretation of this nearest-neighbor statistics is discussed for many cases of superpositions of clustering, randomness, and regularity. A detailed analysis is carried out of cumulus cloud field spatial distributions based upon Landsat, AVHRR, and Skylab data, showing that, when both large and small clouds are included in the cloud field distributions, the cloud field always has a strong clustering signal.

  13. Pre-Cumulus zoning, Residual Porosity, and Impermeable Barriers in Igneous Cumulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    As Maaløe noted in 1976 the basal Skaergaard cumulates commonly contain plagioclase crystals with zoning and resorption that preceded their accumulation on the floor. This conclusion follows from the observation that neighboring grains are unassociated with each other in their zoning. Such crystals, he reasoned, have been tossed about from cooler to hotter regimes in a way that we might call a hailstone history. By contrast, associated grains zoned from trapped liquid have a common junction, easily signaled in troctolites by a scrap of augite or opaque oxide. In a compilation of the An-range (max - min) in Kiglapait grain mounts, samples sorted by increasing values when examined reveal a dominance of unassociated pre-cumulus grains up to values of 5.5 to 7.5 (median 6.65) mole % in the An range, beyond which increasing evidence for intercumulus growth sets in. The pre-cumulus samples occur among other types in stratigraphic levels from 10 to 83 PCS and include rare samples with cumulus augite. A conservative threshold for intercumulus growth is taken as 6 mole %, above which the An-range minus 6 defines residual porosity p(r) >0 (Morse, AGU JA Abstr. 2009). In the presence of pre-cumulus zoning, the threshold criterion for adcumulus growth rises even higher, for example to An range 8 or even 9 mole %, allowing for the fact that even imperfect adcumulates have had a major amount of isothermal adcumulus growth before or after trapping a small amount of residual liquid. At the conservative end of this range, 75 % of the Kiglapait cumulates are practical adcumulates, 17 % are mesocumulates, and 8% are orthocumulates, the latter dominating both lowermost and highest parts of the stratigraphy. From this intrusion-wide distribution, the overall probability that a given rock sample is an adcumulate is 0.75. But the scarcity of mesocumulates in the LZ above 30 PCS and in the UZ from 95 to 99.9 PCS means that the probability of finding an adcumulate is much greater

  14. Influence of radiative heating and cumulus convection on development of mean monsoon circulation in July

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, H. L.; Qian, Y. F.; Chen, Y. J.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical simulations of July mean monsoon circulation in the tropics are described. The model used in the simulations was based on a series of primitive equations for the combined effects of variations of solar radiation, radiative diurnal warming, and large-scale and deep cumulus condensation, and the kinematic effects of topography. The initial states of the model were derived from the observed mean distributions of pressure and humidity. Analysis of the numerical results showed that the large-scale features of the mean July monsoon circulation in the tropics are created mainly by differential diabatic heating under the influence of the specific topography. The time necessary to establish the large scale features was only about 5 days when the diurnal variation of solar radiation was taken into account. Graphic illustrations of the simulated mean July flow conditions are provided.

  15. Interactions between a tropical mixed boundary layer and cumulus convection in a radiative-convective model

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Caryn L.

    1993-05-01

    This report details a radiative-convective model, combining previously developed cumulus, stable cloud and radiation parameterizations with a boundary layer scheme, which was developed in the current study. The cloud model was modified to incorporate the effects of both small and large clouds. The boundary layer model was adapted from a mixed layer model was only slightly modified to couple it with the more sophisticated cloud model. The model was tested for a variety of imposed divergence profiles, which simulate the regions of the tropical ocean from approximately the intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to the subtropical high region. The sounding used to initialize the model for most of the runs is from the trade wind region of ATEX. For each experiment, the model was run with a timestep of 300 seconds for a period of 7 days.

  16. Analysis of spatial inhomogeneities in cumulus clouds using high spatial resolution Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Lindsay; Welch, R. M.; Musil, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Aircraft observations and high resolution Landsat MSS digital data are used to determine the sizes of spatial inhomogeneities ('holes') in cumulus clouds. The majority of holes are found near cloud edges, but the larger holes tend to be found in cloud interiors. Aircraft measurements show these cloud spatial inhomogeneities in the range of 100 to 500 m, while Landsat data show them in the range of 100 m to 3 km. The number of holes per cloud decreases exponentially with increasing hole diameter. Small clouds not only have smaller holes, but also fewer holes than large clouds. Large clouds have large holes in them, as well as large numbers of the smaller holes. The total cloud area occupied by holes increases with increasing cloud size.

  17. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  18. Observational estimates of detrainment and entrainment in non-precipitating shallow cumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgren, M. S.; Small, J. D.; Jonsson, H. H.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical transport associated with cumulus clouds is important to the redistribution of gases, particles, and energy, with subsequent consequences for many aspects of the climate system. Previous studies have suggested that detrainment from clouds can be comparable to the updraft mass flux, and thus represents an important contribution to vertical transport. In this study, we describe a new method to deduce the amounts of gross detrainment and entrainment experienced by non-precipitating cumulus clouds using aircraft observations. The method utilizes equations for three conserved variables: cloud mass, total water, and moist static energy. Optimizing these three equations leads to estimates of the mass fractions of adiabatic mixed-layer air, entrained air and detrained air that the sampled cloud has experienced. The method is applied to six flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter during the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) which took place in the Houston, Texas region during the summer of 2006 during which 176 small, non-precipitating cumuli were sampled. Using our novel method, we find that, on average, these clouds were comprised of 30 to 70 % mixed-layer air, with entrained air comprising most of the remainder. The mass fraction of detrained air was usually very small, less than 2 %, although values larger than 10 % were found in 15 % of clouds. Entrained and detrained air mass fractions both increased with altitude, consistent with some previous observational studies. The largest detrainment events were almost all associated with air that was at their level of neutral buoyancy, which has been hypothesized in previous modeling studies. This new method could be readily used with data from other previous aircraft campaigns to expand our understanding of detrainment for a variety of cloud systems.

  19. Safety of brilliant cresyl blue staining protocols on human granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego Duarte; Conzatti, Maiara; Ferreira, Gustavo Dias; Pimentel, Anita Mylius; Kussler, Ana Paula; Capp, Edison; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2016-02-01

    The selection of human immature oocytes destined for in vitro maturation (IVM) is performed according to their cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) morphology. In animal models, oocyte pre-selection with brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining improves fertilization and blastocyst rates and even increases the number of calves born. As the granulosa cells and cumulus cells (GCs and CCs) have a close relationship with the oocyte and are available in in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, applying BCB staining to these cells may help to elucidate whether BCB shows toxicity to human oocytes and to determine the safest protocol for this dye. GCs and CCs were isolated from 24 patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation. After 48 h, cells were exposed to: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) with or without phenol red, DPBS and mDPBS for 60 min; 13, 20 and 26 μM BCB for 60 min; and 60, 90 or 120 min to 13 μM BCB. Cellular viability was tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The 20 and 26 μM BCB exposures resulted in lower cell viability, similar to when cells were exposed to BCB for 90 or 120 min. GCs and CCs viabilities were equal among control group and 13 μM BCB group after 60 min. BCB staining was not toxic to GCs and CCs when the regime of 13 μM BCB for 60 min was used. Due to the close molecular/biochemical relationship between these cells and the gamete, we propose that it is unlikely that the use of BCB could interfere with the viability/health of human oocytes.

  20. Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-29

    A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

  1. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei spectra within maritime cumulus cloud droplets: Implications for mixing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, Cynthia H.; Hudson, James G.

    1995-01-01

    In a cloud formed during adiabatic expansion, the droplet size distribution will be systematically related to the critical supersaturation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CNN), but this relationship can be complicated in entraining clouds. Useful information about cloud processes, such as mixing, can be obtained from direct measurements of the CNN involved in droplet nucleation. This was accomplished by interfacing two instruments for a series of flights in maritime cumulus clouds. One instrument, the counterflow virtual impactor, collected cloud droplets, and the nonvolatile residual nuclei of the droplets was then passed to a CCN spectrometer, which measured the critical supersaturation (S(sub c)) spectrum of the droplet nuclei. The measured S(sub c) spectra of the droplet nuclei were compared with the S(sub c) spectra of ambient aerosol particles in order to identify which CCN were actually incorporated into droplets and to determine when mixing processes were active at different cloud levels. The droplet nuclei nearly always exhibited lower median S(sub c)'s than the ambient aerosol, as expected since droplets nucleate perferentially on particles with lower critical supersaturations. Critical supersaturation spectra from nuclei of droplets near cloud base were similar to those predicted for cloud regions formed adiabatically, but spectra of droplet nuclei from middle cloud levels showed some evidence that mixing had occurred. Near cloud top, the greatest variation in the spectra of the droplet nuclei was observed, and nuclei with high S(sub c)'s were sometimes present even within relatively large droplets. This suggests that the extent of mixing increases with height in cumulus clouds and that inhomogeneous mixing may be important near cloud top. These promising initial results suggest improvements to the experimental technique that will permit more quantitative results in future experiments.

  2. Improving Forecasts of Cumulus: An Intersection of the Renewable Energy and Climate Science Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, L. K.; Gustafson, W. I., Jr.; Kassianov, E.; Long, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of broken cloud fields and their associated impact on the downwelling solar irradiance has remained a challenge to the renewable energy industry. Likewise, shallow cumulus play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget and hydrologic cycle and are of interest to the weather forecasting and climate science communities. The main challenge associated with predicting these clouds are their relatively small size (on the order of a kilometer or less) relative to the model grid spacing. Recently, however, there have been significant efforts put into improving forecasts of shallow clouds and the associated temporal and spatial variability of the solar irradiance that they induce. As an example of these efforts, we will describe recent modifications to the standard Kain-Fritsch parameterization as applied within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that are designed to improve predictions of the macroscale and microscale structure of shallow cumulus. These modifications are shown to lead to a realistic increase in the simulated cloud fraction and associated decrease in the solar irradiance. We will evaluate our results using data collected at the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site, which is located in north-central Oklahoma. Our team has analyzed over 5 years of data collected at this site to document the macroscale structure of the clouds (including cloud fraction, cloud-base and cloud-top height) as well as their impact on the downwelling shortwave and longwave irradiance. One particularly interesting impact of shallow cumuli is the enhancement of the diffuse radiation, such that during periods in which the sun is not blocked, the observed irradiance can be significantly larger than the corresponding clear sky case. To date, this feature is not accurately represented by models that apply the plane-parallel assumption applied in the standard radiation parameterizations.

  3. Observations of the variability of shallow trade wind cumulus cloudiness and mass flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamer, K.; Kollias, P.; Nuijens, L.

    2015-06-01

    Two years of ground-based remote sensing observations are used to study the vertical structure of marine cumulus near the island of Barbados, including their cloud fraction and mass flux profile. Daily radar derived cloud fraction profiles peak at different height levels depending on the depth of the cumuli and thus the extent to which they precipitate. Nonprecipitating cumuli have a peak cloud fraction of about 5% near mean cloud base (700 m), whereas precipitating cumuli tend to have a peak of only 2% near cloud base. Nineteen percent of the precipitating cumuli are accompanied by large cloud fractions near the detrainment level of cumulus tops (~1700 m). Day-to-day variations in cloud fraction near cloud base are modest (~3%). Nonprecipitating cumuli have their largest reflectivities near cloud top and an ascending core surrounded by a subsiding shell. Precipitating cumuli with enhanced elevated cloudiness (stratiform outflow) are deeper and contain larger vertical gradients in reflectivity and Doppler velocity than precipitating cumuli without such outflow. Bulk (3 h) statistics reveal that nonprecipitating shallow cumuli are active and organized. They contain on average 79% in-cloud updrafts with 86% of them being organized in large coherent structures contributing to a maximum updraft mass flux of 8-36 gm-2 s-1 just above cloud base. Alternatively, downdrafts contribute insignificantly to the mass flux and show little vertical and temporal variability (0-7 gm-2 s-1). Complementary Raman lidar information suggests that updraft mass flux profile slope is inversely related to environmental relative humidity.

  4. Improving ENSO periodicity simulation by adjusting cumulus entrainment in BCC_CSMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Ren, Hong-Li

    2016-12-01

    The simulation of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon is a challenging issue for coupled climate models. This study focuses on the ENSO periodicity simulated by Beijing Climate Center Climate System Models (BCC_CSM1.1 and BCC_CSM1.1m) which can reproduce reasonably well ENSO amplitude as observations. However, the major period of ENSO simulated by the BCC_CSMs is around 2.4 years, which is much shorter than that in observations. Compared with other 24 coupled models in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), BCC_CSMs produce a very unrealistic ENSO peak period. Such a bias in simulating periodicity is suggested as a consequence of the severely underestimated air-sea coupling intensity in BCC_CSMs. To test this hypothesis, a quantitative method is developed to diagnose the linear ENSO frequency. As an effort to improve the ENSO simulation in BCC_CSMs, three experiments are performed with varying entrainment rates in the cumulus convection parameterization scheme of BCC_CSM1.1m. A more realistic ENSO period of about 3.3 years can be generated by the model with an inflated entrainment rate. When the cumulus entrainment is increased by 10%, the ENSO-related convective precipitation will enhance in the equatorial central to eastern Pacific. This anomalous convective heating induces an intensified surface westerly wind stress to the west of the anomalous convection center and as a result, the air-sea coupling intensity becomes larger, which contributes to a longer period of ENSO based on previous theories. In addition, the pronounced eastward extension of ENSO-related surface wind stress could also be the secondary factor to generate a lower frequency of ENSO in BCC_CSMs. Our study proposes a method to reduce the biases in ENSO periodicity simulation and puts more insights into the importance of adjusting atmospheric convection to reproduce ENSO properties in coupled model.

  5. Dynamics, thermodynamics, radiation, and cloudiness associated with cumulus-topped marine boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghate, Virendra P.; Miller, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The overall goal of this project was to improve the understanding of marine boundary clouds by using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites, so that they can be better represented in global climate models (GCMs). Marine boundary clouds are observed regularly over the tropical and subtropical oceans. They are an important element of the Earth’s climate system because they have substantial impact on the radiation budget together with the boundary layer moisture, and energy transports. These clouds also have an impact on large-scale precipitation features like the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Because these clouds occur at temporal and spatial scales much smaller than those relevant to GCMs, their effects and the associated processes need to be parameterized in GCM simulations aimed at predicting future climate and energy needs. Specifically, this project’s objectives were to (1) characterize the surface turbulent fluxes, boundary layer thermodynamics, radiation field, and cloudiness associated with cumulus-topped marine boundary layers; (2) explore the similarities and differences in cloudiness and boundary layer conditions observed in the tropical and trade-wind regions; and (3) understand similarities and differences by using a simple bulk boundary layer model. In addition to working toward achieving the project’s three objectives, we also worked on understanding the role played by different forcing mechanisms in maintaining turbulence within cloud-topped boundary layers We focused our research on stratocumulus clouds during the first phase of the project, and cumulus clouds during the rest of the project. Below is a brief description of manuscripts published in peer-reviewed journals that describe results from our analyses.

  6. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  7. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  8. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-07

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs.

  9. Circular photogalvanic effect caused by the transitions between edge and 2D states in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron absorption and the edge photocurrent of a 2D topological insulator are studied for transitions between edge states to 2D states. The circular polarized light is found to produce the edge photocurrent, the direction of which is determined by light polarization and edge orientation. It is shown that the edge-state current is found to exceed the 2D current owing to the topological protection of the edge states.

  10. Supporting Research at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Through Focused Education and Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F.; Closs, J.

    2003-12-01

    NASA research scientists work closely with Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI) personnel at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) on a large variety of education and public outreach (E/PO) initiatives. This work includes assistance in conceptualizing E/PO plans, then carrying through in the development of materials, publication, cataloging, warehousing, and product distribution. For instance, outreach efforts on the Terra, Aqua, and Aura-still in development-EOS missions, as well as planetary and visualization programs, have been coordinated by SSAI employees. E/PO support includes convening and taking part in sessions at professional meetings and workshops. Also included is the coordination of exhibits at professional meetings such as the AGU, AAAS, AMS and educational meetings such as the National Science Teachers Association. Other E/PO efforts include the development and staffing of booths; arranges for booth space and furnishings; shipping of exhibition materials and products; assembling, stocking, and disassembling of booths. E/PO personnel work with organizations external to NASA such as the Smithsonian museum, Library of Congress, U.S. Geological Survey, and associations or societies such as the AGU, American Chemical Society, and National Science Teachers Association to develop products and programs that enhance NASA mission E/PO efforts or to provide NASA information for use in their programs. At GSFC, E/PO personnel coordinate the efforts of the education and public outreach sub-committees in support of the Space and Earth Sciences Data Analysis (SESDA) contract within the GSFC Earth Sciences Directorate. The committee acts as a forum for improving communication and coordination among related Earth science education projects, and strives to unify the representation of these programs among the science and education communities. To facilitate these goals a Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate Education and Outreach Portal has been developed to provide

  11. Energy Efficiency of D2D Multi-User Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zufan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-28

    The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication system is an important part of heterogeneous networks. It has great potential to improve spectrum efficiency, throughput and energy efficiency cooperation of multiple D2D users with the advantage of direct communication. When cooperating, D2D users expend extraordinary energy to relay data to other D2D users. Hence, the remaining energy of D2D users determines the life of the system. This paper proposes a cooperation scheme for multiple D2D users who reuse the orthogonal spectrum and are interested in the same data by aiming to solve the energy problem of D2D users. Considering both energy availability and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is introduced in the cooperation scheme to solve relay selection problems. Thus, the cooperation issue is transformed into a maximum weighted matching (MWM) problem. In order to enhance energy efficiency without the deterioration of Quality of Service (QoS), the link outage probability is derived according to the Shannon Equation by considering the data rate and delay. The simulation studies the relationships among the number of cooperative users, the length of shared data, the number of data packets and energy efficiency.

  12. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  13. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  14. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  15. Levels of cyclic-AMP and cyclic-GMP in porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes and cumulus-free oocytes derived from small and middle follicles during the first 24-hour period of in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, Yuichi; Wakai, Takuya; Funahashi, Hiroaki

    2017-02-23

    The objective of this study was to compare the cAMP and cGMP levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) derived from the middle follicles (MFs, 3-6 mm in diameter) and small follicles (SFs, 1-3 mm in diameter) of pre-pubertal gilts during the first 24-h period of maturation in vitro (IVM). Both cAMP and cGMP levels in MF- and SF-derived oocytes did not change during this period. Although the cAMP levels increased in the COCs at 10 and 20 h after the start of IVM, the levels of cAMP were significantly higher in MF-derived COCs than in SF-derived COCs at 20 h after the start of IVM. On the other hand, the cGMP levels in COCs decreased to basal levels between 10 and 20 h after the start of the IVM, whereas cGMP levels were lower in SF-derived COCs than in MF-derived COCs during the first 10 h. The number of cumulus cells was larger in the MF-derived COCs than in the SF-derived COCs during the first 20-h period of IVM. The estimated cAMP level per cumulus cell at 10 h after the start of the IVM was higher in SF-derived COCs than in MF-derived COCs, whereas the estimated cGMP level per cumulus cell was no different between MF- and SF-derived COCs. From these results, we conclude that cAMP and cGMP levels in COCs, but not in oocytes, drastically change during the first 20-h period of IVM, and that both cAMP and cGMP levels significantly differ between MF- and SF-derived COCs.

  16. Organization of the expanded cumulus-extracellular matrix in preovulatory follicles: a role for inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nagyova, E

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that following endogenous gonadotropin surge, oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCC) synthesize hyaluronan (HA) in a process called cumulus expansion. During this process, HA associates with proteins and proteoglycans to form the expanded HA-rich oocyte-cumulus extracellular matrix (ECM), where the heavy chains of the serum derived inter-α-trypsin inhibitor family (IαI) bind covalently to HA. No study has been performed on the occurrence and regulation of this process during oocyte maturation in species other than mouse and pig, although, the heavy chains (of IαI)-HA complex was purified from human amniotic membrane. The present review pointing out that: 1/ formation of expanded HA-rich oocyte-cumulus ECM is dependent on the presence of IαI molecules, 2/ the heavy chains of IαI molecules identified in the serum are covalently linked to HA during cumulus expansion in mouse and pig, 3/ the family of IαI molecules can freely cross the blood-follicle barrier, and the follicular fluid collected at any stage of folliculogenesis can be successfully used instead of serum to form expanded cumulus ECM in pig, and 4/ proteins of the IαI family can affect reproductive process by modulating the expression of a large number of cellular genes during a preovulatory period. Finally, this review provides clear evidence that IαI family members present in the serum or follicular fluid become responsible for cumulus expansion, as without these proteins, expanded cumulus HA-rich ECM is not formed and HA is released into medium.

  17. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  18. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  19. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  20. Stellar chromospheric and transition region studies using the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A.

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is providing ultraviolet spectra of cool star chromospheres, transition regions, and coronae of a quality previously unobtainable for stars other than the Sun. This instrument offers greatly improved sensitivity, spectral resolution, and temporal resolution over previous satellites. These capabilities are illustrated with examples of stellar spectra obtained during the Science Verification and Cycle 0 phases of the HST mission. These spectra allow investigation of the ranges of plasma temperature and density and dynamic effects such as flows, turbulence, and flares occurring in cool star outer atmospheres. Stars for which GHRS spectra have been obtained include Capella (α Aur, G9 III+G0 III), γ Dra (K5 III), Aldebaran (α Tau, K0 III), Betelguese (α Ori, M2 I), AR Lac (RS CVn binary), and AD Leo (M4 flare star).

  1. Two color satellite laser ranging upgrades at Goddard's 1.2m telescope facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Mcgarry, Jan F.; Degnan, John J.; Varghese, Thomas K.

    1993-01-01

    The ranging laboratory at Goddard's 1.2 m telescope tracking facility has recently been upgraded to include a single photoelectron sensitive Hamamatsu streak camera-based range receiver which uses doubled and tripled Nd:YAG frequencies for satellite laser ranging. Other ranging system upgrades include a new continuum laser, which will deliver up to 30 millijoules (mJ) at both 532 and 355 nm at a pulsewidth of 30 picoseconds (FWHM), and replacement of both ranging and tracking computers with COMPAQ 386 based systems. Preliminary results using a photomultiplier-tube based receiver and waveform digitizer indicate agreement within the accuracy of the measurement with the theoretical Marini and Murray model for atmospheric refraction. Two color streak camera measurements are used to further analyze the accuracy of these and other atmospheric refraction models.

  2. The 2003 Goddard Rocket Replica Project: A Reconstruction of the World's First Functional Liquid Rocket System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, R. A.; Elam, S. K.; Hicks, G. D.; Sanders, T. M.; London, J. R.; Mayne, A. W.; Christensen, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of NASA s 2003 Centennial of Flight celebration, engineers and technicians at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, in cooperation with the Alabama-Mississippi AIAA Section, have reconstructed historically accurate, functional replicas of Dr. Robert H. Goddard s 1926 first liquid- fuel rocket. The purposes of this project were to clearly understand, recreate, and document the mechanisms and workings of the 1926 rocket for exhibit and educational use, creating a vital resource for researchers studying the evolution of liquid rocketry for years to come. The MSFC team s reverse engineering activity has created detailed engineering-quality drawings and specifications describing the original rocket and how it was built, tested, and operated. Static hot-fire tests, as well as flight demonstrations, have further defined and quantified the actual performance and engineering actual performance and engineering challenges of this major segment in early aerospace history.

  3. The Scientific Visualization Studio at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. A.; Strong, J. E.; Pape, D. E.; Mitchell, H. G.; McConnell, A.; Cavallo, J. M.; Twiddy, R. L.; Rais, H.

    1993-05-01

    The Scientific Visualization Studio is a part of the Scientific Applications and Visualization Branch of the Space Data and Computing Division at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. It is tasked to provide advanced data visualization support to users of the NASA Center for the Computational Sciences and other NASA funded scientific researchers in both the space and Earth Sciences. Such support includes providing both software and expertise in visualizing large, complex, multidimensional data sets, and in creating videos, films, and other forms of hardcopy of the results. Hardware and software tools include a Cray Y/MP, a Convex C3240, a MasPar MP-1, a family of SGI workstations, video disks and recorders in all the international standards, color printers, photographic and movie transfer tools, and IDL, AVS, and FAST. We demonstrate these capabilities, as applied to various Earth and space science data sets, through a variety of annotated images and a video.

  4. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar Developments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, Seung Kuk; Du Toit, Cornelis F.; Perrine, Martin; Ranson, K. Jon; Sun, Guoqing; Deshpande, Manohar; Beck, Jaclyn; Lu, Daniel; Bollian, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Digital Beamforming (DBF) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology is an area of research and development pursued at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Advanced SAR architectures enhances radar performance and opens a new set of capabilities in radar remote sensing. DBSAR-2 and EcoSAR are two state-of-the-art radar systems recently developed and tested. These new instruments employ multiple input-multiple output (MIMO) architectures characterized by multi-mode operation, software defined waveform generation, digital beamforming, and configurable radar parameters. The instruments have been developed to support several disciplines in Earth and Planetary sciences. This paper describes the radars advanced features and report on the latest SAR processing and calibration efforts.

  5. Progress on Space Borne Laser Risk Reduction at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie

    2004-01-01

    At the direction of NASA Headquarters NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) undertook in 2002 a program in fundamental research on laser manufacturing technologies aimed at improving the performance and lifetime of lasers sent into space for remote sensing applications. The work at GSFC has concentrated on three areas: 1) development of high power 1 micron lasers, 2) lifetime and reliability testing for 808 nm pump diodes, and 3) efficient conversion of 1 micron radiation to wavelengths needed for various remote sensing tasks. After almost 2 years of development interesting results in all three areas are beginning to emerge. Some of these results will be described along with discussion of future directions.

  6. The Third NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies held in October 1993. The conference served as an informational exchange forum for topics primarily relating to the ingestion and management of massive amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. Discussion topics include the necessary use of computers in the solution of today's infinitely complex problems, the need for greatly increased storage densities in both optical and magnetic recording media, currently popular storage media and magnetic media storage risk factors, data archiving standards including a talk on the current status of the IEEE Storage Systems Reference Model (RM). Additional topics addressed System performance, data storage system concepts, communications technologies, data distribution systems, data compression, and error detection and correction.

  7. First results from the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph - The chromosphere of Alpha Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Robinson, Richard D.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Ake, Thomas B.; Ebbets, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    The K5 III star Alpha Tau was observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on November 27, 1990 as part of the Science Assessment Program for the HST. The spectra show intersystem and permitted chromospheric emission lines of semiforbidden C II and Si II, Fe II, Fe I, Ni II, and Co II. Resolved profiles of the semiforbidden C II lines indicate a complex chromospheric turbulent velocity distribution with mean value of roughly 24 km/s, while their observed wavelengths indicate a 4 km/s downflow of the semiforbidden C II plasma. Twenty-five new emission lines have been found in the 2320-2370 A region, 17 of which have been identified with the aid of Skylab data obtained above the solar limb, including four lines from Co II (UV 8) and an Fe I (UV 12) line.

  8. Version 2 Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.; Shie, Chung-Lin; Starr, David O'C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Information on the turbulent fluxes of momentum, moisture, and heat at the air-sea interface is essential in improving model simulations of climate variations and in climate studies. We have derived a 13.5-year (July 1987-December 2000) dataset of daily surface turbulent fluxes over global oceans from the Special Sensor Mcrowave/Imager (SSM/I) radiance measurements. This dataset, version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF2), has a spatial resolution of 1 degree x 1 degree latitude-longitude and a temporal resolution of 1 day. Turbulent fluxes are derived from the SSM/I surface winds and surface air humidity, as well as the 2-m air and sea surface temperatures (SST) of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a bulk aerodynamic algorithm based on the surface layer similarity theory.

  9. Fifth NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Fifth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies held September 17 - 19, 1996, at the University of Maryland, University Conference Center in College Park, Maryland. As one of an ongoing series, this conference continues to serve as a unique medium for the exchange of information on topics relating to the ingestion and management of substantial amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. This year's discussion topics include storage architecture, database management, data distribution, file system performance and modeling, and optical recording technology. There will also be a paper on Application Programming Interfaces (API) for a Physical Volume Repository (PVR) defined in Version 5 of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Reference Model (RM). In addition, there are papers on specific archives and storage products.

  10. Fifth NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies.. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Fifth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies. As one of an ongoing series, this conference continues to serve as a unique medium for the exchange of information on topics relating to the ingestion and management of substantial amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. This year's discussion topics include storage architecture, database management, data distribution, file system performance and modeling, and optical recording technology. There will also be a paper on Application Programming Interfaces (API) for a Physical Volume Repository (PVR) defined in Version 5 of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Reference Model (RM). In addition, there are papers on specific archives and storage products.

  11. Detecting protostellar jets with the Goddard Fabry-Perot coronagraph, and modification for adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Grady, Carol A.; Wassell, Edward J.; Palunas, Povilas

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Fabry-Perot has been used at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope to diagnose jets from young Herbig Ae (HD163296) and T Tauri stars (DL Tau and CW Tau), detected by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The additional spectral discrimination of the Fabry-Perot allows these faint jets to be detected from the ground, to obtain velocities and densities, and to find further extensions. In order to plan what measurements require space coronagraphs, we need to explore the extent to which coronagraphic detections can be made from the ground, including using adaptive optics. Modifications to the Fabry-Perot tunable narrow band coronagraph for possible use with the AEOS 3.65-m telescope will be described.

  12. Detecting Protostellar Jets with the Goddard Fabry-Perot Coronagraph, and Modification for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Grady, Carol A.; Wassell, Edward J.; Palunas, Povilas

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Fabry-Perot has been used at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope to diagnose jets from young Herbig Ae (HD163296) and T Tauri stars (DL Tau and CW Tau), detected by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The additional spectral discrimination of the Fabry-Perot allows these faint jets to be detected from the ground, to obtain velocities and densities, and to find further extensions. In order to plan what measurements require space coronagraphs, we need to explore the extent to which coronagraphic detections can be made from the ground, including using adaptive optics. Modifications to the Fabry-Perot tunable narrow band coronagraph for possible use with the AEOS 3.65-m telescope will be described.

  13. Computations on the massively parallel processor at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, James P.

    1991-01-01

    Described are four significant algorithms implemented on the massively parallel processor (MPP) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Two are in the area of image analysis. Of the other two, one is a mathematical simulation experiment and the other deals with the efficient transfer of data between distantly separated processors in the MPP array. The first algorithm presented is the automatic determination of elevations from stereo pairs. The second algorithm solves mathematical logistic equations capable of producing both ordered and chaotic (or random) solutions. This work can potentially lead to the simulation of artificial life processes. The third algorithm is the automatic segmentation of images into reasonable regions based on some similarity criterion, while the fourth is an implementation of a bitonic sort of data which significantly overcomes the nearest neighbor interconnection constraints on the MPP for transferring data between distant processors.

  14. Large-Scale Hollow Retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Alix M.

    2012-05-01

    Laser ranging to the retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Luna missions have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Although the precision of the range measurements has historically been limited by the ground station capabilities, advances in the APOLLO instrument at the Apache Point facility in New Mexico is beginning to be limited by errors associated with the lunar arrays. We report here on efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center to develop the next generation of lunar retroreflectors. We will describe a new facility that is being used to design, assemble, and test large-scale hollow retroreflectors. We will also describe results from investigations into various bonding techniques used to assemble the open corner cubes and mirror coatings that have dust mitigation properties.

  15. Lidar Wind Measurements with the Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Chen, Hualilin; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report on the development of GLOW (Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds), a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. The system employs a Nd:YAG laser transmitter to measure winds using either aerosol backscatter at a wavelength of 1064 run or molecular backscatter at 355 nm. The system is modular in design to allow the incorporation of new technologies as they become available. GLOW is intended to be used as a deployable field system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. Finally it can be used for calibration/validation activities following launch of spaceborne wind lidar systems. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the first validated lidar wind profiles obtained with the system using a new molecular 'double edge' receiver.

  16. Large-Scale Hollow Retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Alix

    2012-01-01

    Laser ranging to the retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Luna missions have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Although the precision of the range measurements has historically been limited by the ground station capabilities, advances in the APOLLO instrument at the Apache Point facility in New Mexico is beginning to be limited by errors associated with the lunar arrays. We report here on efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center to develop the next generation of lunar retroreflectors. We will describe a new facility that is being used to design, assemble, and test large-scale hollow retroreflectors. We will also describe results from investigations into various bonding techniques used to assemble the open comer cubes and mirror coatings that have dust mitigation properties.

  17. Hollow Retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Alix M.; Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser ranging to the retroreflector arrays placed on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts and the Soviet Luna missions have dramatically increased our understanding of gravitational physics along with Earth and Moon geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics. Although the precision of the range measurements has historically been limited by the ground station capabilities, advances in the APOLLO instrument at the Apache Point facility in New Mexico is beginning to be limited by errors associated with the lunar arrays. At Goddard Space Flight Center, we have developed a facility where we can design, build, and test next-generation hollow retroreflectors for Lunar Laser Ranging. Here we will describe this facility as well as report on the bonding techniques used to assemble the retroreflectors. Results from investigations into different high reflectivity mirror coatings, as well as dust mitigation coatings will also be presented.

  18. Photonic Component Qualification and Implementation Activities at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Jin, Xiaodan Linda; Chuska, Richard F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; MacMurphy, Shawn L.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Zellar, Ronald S.; Friedberg, Patricia R.; Malenab, Mary C.

    2006-01-01

    The photonics group in Code 562 at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center supports a variety of space flight programs at NASA including the: International Space Station (ISS), Shuttle Return to Flight Mission, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Express Logistics Carrier, and the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program (NEPP). Through research, development, and testing of the photonic systems to support these missions much information has been gathered on practical implementations for space environments. Presented here are the highlights and lessons learned as a result of striving to satisfy the project requirements for high performance and reliable commercial optical fiber components for space flight systems. The approach of how to qualify optical fiber components for harsh environmental conditions, the physics of failure and development lessons learned will be discussed.

  19. ECMWF MACC-II evaluation of performances with MPLNET Lidar network at NASA Goddard Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Simone; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Benedetti, Angela; Lewis, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol vertical distribution is a critical parameter for most of the common aerosol forecast models. In this study are evaluated the performances of the MACC-II ECMWF aerosol model in forecasting aerosol extinction profiles and planetary boundary layer height versus the new V3 measured MPLNET Lidar extinction retrievals taken as reference at continuous operational site Goddard Space Flight Center, MD, USA. The model is evaluated at different assimilation stages: no assimilation, MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) assimilation and MODIS AOD plus lidar CALIPSO assimilation. The sensitivity study of the model is also investigated respect to the assimilation process..Assessing the model performances it is the first step for future near-real time lidar data assimilation into MACC-II aerosol model forecast.

  20. Documentation and Validation of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System, Version 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); daSilva, Arlindo; Dee, Dick; Bloom, Stephen; Bosilovich, Michael; Pawson, Steven; Schubert, Siegfried; Wu, Man-Li; Sienkiewicz, Meta; Stajner, Ivanka

    2005-01-01

    This document describes the structure and validation of a frozen version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS): GEOS-4.0.3. Significant features of GEOS-4 include: version 3 of the Community Climate Model (CCM3) with the addition of a finite volume dynamical core; version two of the Community Land Model (CLM2); the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS); and an interactive retrieval system (iRET) for assimilating TOVS radiance data. Upon completion of the GEOS-4 validation in December 2003, GEOS-4 became operational on 15 January 2004. Products from GEOS-4 have been used in supporting field campaigns and for reprocessing several years of data for CERES.

  1. From Bonaventure to Goddard: How I Got to NASA and What I Am Doing There

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin H.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation, accompanied by slides when appropriate, will describe how a young physics major travelled from the classrooms of Saint Bonaventure, to the graduate research laboratories of the University of Florida in Gainesville, and finally to the government laboratories of NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center just north of Washington, D.C. The main portion of the presentation concerns NASA missions of interest to the general public and supported in part by research work he does. Such, for example, is the current flagship mission of NASA, the James Webb Space Telescope that is destined to replace very soon the Hubble Space Telescope. In addition to these NASA telescope missions, a mission to an asteroid, coined the OSIRIS REX program, is in process and will be described.

  2. Global climate changes as forecast by Goddard Institute for Space Studies three-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J.; Fung, I.; Lacis, A.; Rind, D.; Lebedeff, S.; Ruedy, R.; Russell, G.

    1988-01-01

    The global climate effects of time-dependent atmospheric trace gas and aerosol variations are simulated by NASA-Goddard's three-dimensional climate model II, which possesses 8 x 10-deg horizontal resolution, for the cases of a 100-year control run and three different atmospheric composition scenarios in which trace gas growth is respectively a continuation of current exponential trends, a reduced linear growth, and a rapid curtailment of emissions due to which net climate forcing no longer increases after the year 2000. The experiments begin in 1958, run to the present, and encompass measured or estimated changes in CO2, CH4, N2O, chlorofluorocarbons, and stratospheric aerosols. It is shown that the greenhouse warming effect may be clearly identifiable in the 1990s.

  3. The Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpati, Gabriel; Martin, John; Steiner, Mark; Reinhardt, K.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Goddard has used its Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) to perform more than 150 mission concept studies. The IMDC performs rapid development of high-level, end-to-end mission concepts, typically in just 4 days. The approach to the studies varies, depending on whether the proposed mission is near-future using existing technology, mid-future using new technology being actively developed, or far-future using technology which may not yet be clearly defined. The emphasis and level of detail developed during any particular study depends on which timeframe (near-, mid-, or far-future) is involved and the specific needs of the study client. The most effective mission studies are those where mission capabilities required and emerging technology developments can synergistically work together; thus both enhancing mission capabilities and providing impetus for ongoing technology development.

  4. Future developments in planetary Fourier transform spectroscopy at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasunas, John C.

    2004-12-01

    Planetary Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) has a long history at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Rudy Hanel developed a series of such instruments for Earth, Mars and the two Voyager spacecraft. More recently as part of the Cassini mission, the CIRS (Composite Infrared Spectrometer) FTS was launched in 1997 for the 2000-2001 Jupiter flyby and the 2004-2008+ Saturn tour. At about 40 kg, CIRS is both too heavy and too light for future planetary missions. It is too heavy for future Discovery and New Frontier missions, where the emphasis is on low-mass, low-power instrumentation. On the other hand, CIRS could be heavier to take full advantage of future Prometheus missions such as JIMO. Here we discuss future development of CIRS-like FTS"s for both Discovery/New Frontier and for Prometheus flight opportunities. We also briefly discuss possible applications in the Moon/Mars exploration initiative.

  5. Upgrade of the Goddard Space Flight Center's Mass Properties Measuring Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brian P.; McLeod, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has a Mass Properties Measuring Facility (MPMF), which is used to measure weight, center of gravity, moment of inertia, and product of inertia of satellites and space flight hardware. The system was originally purchased more than 30 years ago. While the MPMF was still in good mechanical condition, the measurement and control subsystem had begun to experience more frequent component failures. Many of the outdated, discrete components in the system are no longer available for replacement. A decision was made to upgrade the measurement and control subsystem of the MPMF to improve its reliability and reduce the chance of component failures leading to extended facility outages. This paper will describe details of the upgraded subsystems and summarize the new performance capabilities of the system.

  6. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xian; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼ 50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter.

  7. Decreased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene 6 in cumulus cells of the cyclooxygenase-2 and EP2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Ochsner, Scott A; Russell, Darryl L; Day, Anthony J; Breyer, Richard M; Richards, Joanne S

    2003-03-01

    Ovulation, the release of fertilizable oocytes from mature follicles, involves tissue remodeling and increased prostaglandin (PG) signaling. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is the rate-limiting enzyme during PG synthesis. Female mice null for either COX-2 or the PGE(2) receptor EP2 are infertile, show decreased ovulation, and exhibit abnormal cumulus expansion. Cumulus expansion is the production of a complex extracellular matrix surrounding the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC). Matrix components consist of hyaluronan, proteoglycans, and proteins with hyaluronan binding domains. One such hyaluronan binding protein is TNFalpha-stimulated gene 6 (TSG-6). By various methods, we show induction of TSG-6 and hyaluronan synthase-2 mRNA in ovaries of mice treated with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin. By in situ hybridization, we show that both genes are expressed in periantral mural granulosa cells and cumulus cells of the mouse ovary. Notably, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization show that TSG-6 mRNA but not hyaluronan synthase-2 mRNA expression is selectively reduced in cumulus cells of COX-2 and EP2 null mice. Western analysis further confirms that TSG-6 protein is reduced in isolated COCs but remains covalently associated with inter alpha-trypsin inhibitor in COX-2 null mice. These observations identify TSG-6 as a target of PG action and show that its production in ovulatory follicles is associated with proper formation of the cumulus-derived extracellular matrix.

  8. Effects of coculture with cumulus-derived somatic cells on in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junchul David; Jeon, Yubyeol; Cai, Lian; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Kim, Eunhye; Lee, Eunsong; Kim, Dae Y; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2015-01-15

    In the process of IVM, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) separate from the follicular microenvironment, leading to the loss of endocrine interactions between follicular mural somatic cells and COCs. To restore the microenvironment, a coculture system was established using cumulus-derived somatic cells (CSCs) for IVM. The CSCs were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium for 48 hours with varying numbers of CSCs (0.0, 2.5 × 10(4), 5.0 × 10(4), and 10.0 × 10(4)) and then cultured in tissue culture medium 199 (TCM 199) for 4 hours before adding the oocytes. Cumulus-oocyte complexes from 3- to 6-mm follicles were matured in 500 μL of TCM 199 with eCG and hCG for 22 hours and then cultured in TCM 199 without hormones for 22 hours. After IVM, the group with 2.5 × 10(4) CSCs showed a significant increase in intracellular glutathione levels compared with the control group. In the evaluation of sperm penetration, efficient fertilization was increased in the groups with 2.5 × 10(4) and 5.0 × 10(4) CSCs compared with controls (44.9 and 46.5 vs. 32.1, respectively). The mRNA expression pattern analysis in matured COCs showed a significant upregulation of PCNA, COX-2, Has2, Ptx3, and Nrf2 in the 2.5 × 10(4) CSC group compared with controls. During COC maturation at 0, 11, 22, 33, and 44 hours, the 2.5 × 10(4) and 5.0 × 10(4) CSC groups showed a significantly altered mRNA expression of BMP15 and GDF9. The developmental competence of the matured oocytes in all groups was evaluated after IVF and parthenogenetic activation (PA). After IVF, the 2.5 × 10(4) CSC group showed significantly higher cleavage, blastocyst formation rate, and total cell numbers compared with controls (60.0%, 35.7%, and 127.3 vs. 43.2%, 21.1%, and 89.3, respectively). After PA, the 2.5 × 10(4) CSC group had significantly higher blastocyst formation rate and total cell number than the control group (52.0% and 120.4 vs. 35.4% and 90.9, respectively). In conclusion, these results suggest that

  9. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-04

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  10. Simulation of the Summer Monsoon Rainfall over East Asia using the NCEP GFS Cumulus Parameterization at Different Horizontal Resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Hong, Song You; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Han, Jongil

    2014-10-01

    The most recent version of Simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) cumulus scheme in National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecast System (GFS) (GFS SAS) has been implemented into the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model with a modification of triggering condition and convective mass flux to become depending on model’s horizontal grid spacing. East Asian Summer Monsoon of 2006 from June to August is selected to evaluate the performance of the modified GFS SAS scheme. Simulated monsoon rainfall with the modified GFS SAS scheme shows better agreement with observation compared to the original GFS SAS scheme. The original GFS SAS scheme simulates the similar ratio of subgrid-scale precipitation, which is calculated from a cumulus scheme, against total precipitation regardless of model’s horizontal grid spacing. This is counter-intuitive because the portion of resolved clouds in a grid box should be increased as the model grid spacing decreases. This counter-intuitive behavior of the original GFS SAS scheme is alleviated by the modified GFS SAS scheme. Further, three different cumulus schemes (Grell and Freitas, Kain and Fritsch, and Betts-Miller-Janjic) are chosen to investigate the role of a horizontal resolution on simulated monsoon rainfall. The performance of high-resolution modeling is not always enhanced as the spatial resolution becomes higher. Even though improvement of probability density function of rain rate and long wave fluxes by the higher-resolution simulation is robust regardless of a choice of cumulus parameterization scheme, the overall skill score of surface rainfall is not monotonically increasing with spatial resolution.

  11. The Effect of Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes and Atmospheric Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.; Evans, K. Franklin; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Cumulus clouds can become tilted or elongated in the presence of wind shear. Nevertheless, most studies of the interaction of cumulus clouds and radiation have assumed these clouds to be isotropic. This paper describes an investigation of the effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain-averaged solar fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of cloud scenes from a large eddy simulation. Progressively greater degrees of x-z plane tilting and horizontal stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes was produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. The mechanisms by which anisotropy interacts with solar fluxes were investigated by comparisons to independent pixel approximation and tilted independent pixel approximation computations for the same scenes. Cumulus anisotropy was found to most strongly impact solar radiative transfer by changing the effective cloud fraction, i.e., the cloud fraction when the field is projected on a surface perpendicular to the direction of the incident solar beam.

  12. Tropical Cumulus Convection and Upward Propagating Waves in Middle Atmospheric GCMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horinouchi, T.; Pawson, S.; Shibata, K.; Langematz, U.; Manzini, E.; Giorgetta, M. A.; Sassi, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Hamilton, K. P.; deGranpre, J.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is recognized that the resolved tropical wave spectrum can vary considerably between general circulation models (GCMs) and that these differences can have an important impact on the simulated climate. A comprehensive comparison of the waves is presented for the December-January-February period using high-frequency (three-hourly) data archives from eight GCMs and one simple model participating in the GCM Reality Intercomparison Project for SPARC (GRIPS). Quantitative measures of the structure and causes of the wavenumber-frequency structure of resolved waves and their impacts on the climate are given. Space-time spectral analysis reveals that the wave spectrum throughout the middle atmosphere is linked to variability of convective precipitation, which is determined by the parameterized convection. The variability of the precipitation spectrum differs by more than an order of magnitude between the models, with additional changes in the spectral distribution (especially the frequency). These differences can be explained primarily by the choice of different, cumulus par amet erizations: quasi-equilibrium mass-flux schemes tend to produce small variability, while the moist-convective adjustment scheme is most active. Comparison with observational estimates of precipitation variability suggests that the model values are scattered around the truth. This result indicates that a significant portion of the forcing of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is provided by waves with scales that are not resolved in present-day GCMs, since only the moist convective adjustment scheme (which has the largest transient variability) can force a QBO in models that have no parameterization of non-stationary gravity waves. Parameterized cumulus convection also impacts the nonmigrating tides in the equatorial region. In most of the models, momentum transport by diurnal nonmigrating tides in the mesosphere is larger than that by Kelvin waves, being more significant than has

  13. Competence Classification of Cumulus and Granulosa Cell Transcriptome in Embryos Matched by Morphology and Female Age

    PubMed Central

    Thuesen, Lea Langhoff; Andersen, Claus Yding; Nyboe-Andersen, Anders; Ziebe, Søren; Winther, Ole; Grøndahl, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objective By focussing on differences in the mural granulosa cell (MGC) and cumulus cell (CC) transcriptomes from follicles resulting in competent (live birth) and non-competent (no pregnancy) oocytes the study aims on defining a competence classifier expression profile in the two cellular compartments. Design: A case-control study. Setting: University based facilities for clinical services and research. Patients: MGC and CC samples from 60 women undergoing IVF treatment following the long GnRH-agonist protocol were collected. Samples from 16 oocytes where live birth was achieved and 16 age- and embryo morphology matched incompetent oocytes were included in the study. Methods MGC and CC were isolated immediately after oocyte retrieval. From the 16 competent and non-competent follicles, mRNA was extracted and expression profile generated on the Human Gene 1.0 ST Affymetrix array. Live birth prediction analysis using machine learning algorithms (support vector machines) with performance estimation by leave-one-out cross validation and independent validation on an external data set. Results We defined a signature of 30 genes expressed in CC predictive of live birth. This live birth prediction model had an accuracy of 81%, a sensitivity of 0.83, a specificity of 0.80, a positive predictive value of 0.77, and a negative predictive value of 0.86. Receiver operating characteristic analysis found an area under the curve of 0.86, significantly greater than random chance. When applied on 3 external data sets with the end-point outcome measure of blastocyst formation, the signature resulted in 62%, 75% and 88% accuracy, respectively. The genes in the classifier are primarily connected to apoptosis and involvement in formation of extracellular matrix. We were not able to define a robust MGC classifier signature that could classify live birth with accuracy above random chance level. Conclusion We have developed a cumulus cell classifier, which showed a promising performance on

  14. Autologous embryo-cumulus cells co-culture and blastocyst transfer in repeated implantation failures: a collaborative prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Benkhalifa, M; Demirol, A; Sari, T; Balashova, E; Tsouroupaki, M; Giakoumakis, Y; Gurgan, T

    2012-05-01

    In repeated implantation failure, the co-culture of human embryos with somatic cells has been reported to promote the improvement of embryos quality, implantation and pregnancy rate. It was reported that feeder cells can be more beneficial to the oocyte and embryo by detoxifying the culture medium and supporting embryo development via different pathways. In this study, 432 patients, each with a minimum of three repeated implantation failures, were accepted for a prospective randomized study with or without autologous cumulus cell embryo co-culture and transfer at day 3 or day 5-6. We also investigated the expression of leukaemia inhibitor factor (LIF) and platelet activating factor receptor (PAF-R) on day 3 confluent cumulus cells. The statistic analysis of the data showed significant difference of implantation and clinical pregnancy rates between classical culture and day 3 compared with co-culture and day 5-6 transfer. The molecular analysis showed that cumulus cells express the LIF and the PAF-R genes and confirmed the possible positive role of growth factors and cytokines in early embryo development. Embryo co-culture systems with autologous cells can be beneficial in routine in vitro fertilization for embryo selection and implantation improvement. More molecular investigations need to be done to improve elucidation of the complex dialogue between the embryo and feeder cells prior to implantation and to understand the involved biological function and molecular process during embryo development.

  15. MicroRNA-224 is involved in the regulation of mouse cumulus expansion by targeting Ptx3.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guidong; Liang, Meng; Liang, Ning; Yin, Mianmian; Lü, Mingrong; Lian, Jie; Wang, Yong; Sun, Fei

    2014-01-25

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are indicated to regulate ovarian development in a cell- or stage-specific manner. Our previous study showed that miR-224 is involved in TGF-β1-mediated follicular granulosa cell (GC) growth and estradiol (E2) production during the transition from the preantral to early antral stage by targeting Smad4. In this study, miR-224 was found to target pentraxin 3 (Ptx3), a gene critical for cumulus expansion during ovulation. In addition, PTX3 was up-regulated in mouse mural GCs and cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) by TGF-β1 treatment, which was partially mediated by miR-224. The effect of miR-224 during ovulation was further examined in vitro and in vivo by construction of an adenovirus-mediated expression vector for miR-224 (Ad-miR-224). In vitro studies demonstrated that miR-224 could perturb cumulus expansion in EGF-stimulated COCs by decreasing PTX3 secretion. In vivo studies also showed that injection of Ad-miR-224 into ovarian bursa decreased PTX3 expression and disrupted ovulation, which led to a decreased number of implantation sites and offspring being born. These results indicate that miR-224 may affect ovulation and subsequent embryo development by targeting Ptx3, suggesting potential roles for miRNAs in offering new treatments for ovulation disorder-associated infertility, or, conversely, designing new contraceptives.

  16. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  17. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  18. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  20. NKG2D Receptor and Its Ligands in Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells, and subsets of CD4(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells (iNKT), and γδ T cells. In humans, NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit, and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least eight genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and posttranslation. In general, healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyperproliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves as a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone "stress." Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system, and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

  1. 2-D Versus 3-D Magnetotelluric Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, the number of publications dealing with the mathematical and physical 3-D aspects of the magnetotelluric method has increased drastically. However, field experiments on a grid are often impractical and surveys are frequently restricted to single or widely separated profiles. So, in many cases we find ourselves with the following question: is the applicability of the 2-D hypothesis valid to extract geoelectric and geological information from real 3-D environments? The aim of this paper is to explore a few instructive but general situations to understand the basics of a 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data and to determine which data subset (TE-mode or TM-mode) is best for obtaining the electrical conductivity distribution of the subsurface using 2-D techniques. A review of the mathematical and physical fundamentals of the electromagnetic fields generated by a simple 3-D structure allows us to prioritise the choice of modes in a 2-D interpretation of responses influenced by 3-D structures. This analysis is corroborated by numerical results from synthetic models and by real data acquired by other authors. One important result of this analysis is that the mode most unaffected by 3-D effects depends on the position of the 3-D structure with respect to the regional 2-D strike direction. When the 3-D body is normal to the regional strike, the TE-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, while the TM-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects. In this case, a 2-D interpretation of the TM-mode is prone to error. When the 3-D body is parallel to the regional 2-D strike the TE-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects and the TM-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, making it more suitable for 2-D interpretation. In general, a wise 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data can be a guide to a reasonable geological interpretation.

  2. The goddard and saturn genes are essential for Drosophila male fertility and may have arisen de novo.

    PubMed

    Gubala, Anna M; Schmitz, Jonathan F; Kearns, Michael J; Vinh, Tery T; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Wolfner, Mariana F; Findlay, Geoffrey D

    2017-01-19

    New genes arise through a variety of mechanisms, including the duplication of existing genes and the de novo birth of genes from non-coding DNA sequences. While there are numerous examples of duplicated genes with important functional roles, the functions of de novo genes remain largely unexplored. Many newly evolved genes are expressed in the male reproductive tract, suggesting that these evolutionary innovations may provide advantages to males experiencing sexual selection. Using testis-specific RNA interference, we screened 11 putative de novo genes in Drosophila melanogaster for effects on male fertility and identified two, goddard and saturn, that are essential for spermatogenesis and sperm function. Goddard knockdown males fail to produce mature sperm, while saturn knockdown males produce fewer sperm that function inefficiently once transferred to females. Consistent with a de novo origin, both genes are identifiable only in Drosophila and are predicted to encode proteins with no sequence similarity to any annotated protein. However, since high levels of divergence prevented the unambiguous identification of the non-coding sequences from which each gene arose, we consider goddard and saturn to be putative de novo genes. Within Drosophila, both genes have been lost in certain lineages, but show conserved, male-specific patterns of expression in the species in which they are found. Goddard is consistently found in single-copy and evolves under purifying selection. In contrast, saturn has diversified through gene duplication and positive selection. These data suggest that de novo genes can evolve essential roles in male reproduction.

  3. Using microsoft excel applications in the graduate intern program at Goddard Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, Lisa

    1992-01-01

    An outline of the Project Operations Branch at Goddard Space Flight Center is presented that describes the management of the division and each subgroup's responsibility. The paper further describes the development of software tools for the Macintosh personal computer, and their impending implementation. A detailed step by step procedure is given for using these software tools.

  4. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  5. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  6. SeaWiFS ocean color products and services at the NASA Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Kartan, Ravi; Li, Angela W.; Simmon, Robert B.

    1997-02-01

    SeaWiFS ocean color data will be archived at the Goddard DAAC in early 1997. The Goddard DAAC has been designated the primary archive for all SeaWiFS data. Almost all authorized SeaWiFS users will access SeaWiFS data via the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data and Resources web page. New interfaces and services are being developed by the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data Support Team on the Ocean Color website to support the SeaWiFS community following launch: A new SeaWiFS WWW Browser will allow users to browse and order SeaWiFS data via the Web. This Browser will incorporate all necessary elements for SeaWiFS data ordering, including password controls, subsetting, coincident search and visual browse. Users will also find SeaWiFS ancillary data, software routines, SeaWiFS data products specification, an order form for the SeaWIFS Technical Memoranda, as well as direct links to the 'Dear Colleague' letter and other documents and software on the SeaWiFS Project homepage. Other ocean color products available at he Goddard DAAC Ocean Color website include the following: New HDF versions of CZCS data files, including browse images and collection of regridded global composites designed for interdisciplinary study. New CZCS read and visualization software are available. A bibliography of ocean color research papers, several previously rare hardcopy documents, and a periodic ocean color newsletter are also available via the Web. The website also contains a collection of several new educational resources for ocean color educators and students. Being the main source of SeaWiFS data and consolidating ocean color data, documents, software, and points of contact form several other sources all at one convenient location, the Goddard DAAC hopes to become an important nexus for the entire global ocean color community. The Ocean Color Data and Resources webpage can be found at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov under 'ocean color'. Contact the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data Support Team about

  7. Integrated cumulus ensemble and turbulence (ICET): An integrated parameterization system for general circulation models (GCMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.L.; Frank, W.M.; Young, G.S.

    1996-04-01

    Successful simulations of the global circulation and climate require accurate representation of the properties of shallow and deep convective clouds, stable-layer clouds, and the interactions between various cloud types, the boundary layer, and the radiative fluxes. Each of these phenomena play an important role in the global energy balance, and each must be parameterized in a global climate model. These processes are highly interactive. One major problem limiting the accuracy of parameterizations of clouds and other processes in general circulation models (GCMs) is that most of the parameterization packages are not linked with a common physical basis. Further, these schemes have not, in general, been rigorously verified against observations adequate to the task of resolving subgrid-scale effects. To address these problems, we are designing a new Integrated Cumulus Ensemble and Turbulence (ICET) parameterization scheme, installing it in a climate model (CCM2), and evaluating the performance of the new scheme using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites.

  8. Stratocumulus to Cumulus Transition Capped by a Light-Absorbing Smoke Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Feingold, G.; Kazil, J.; McComiskey, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning aerosol emitted from Africa seasonally advects over the eastern Atlantic and forms a layer of light-absorbing smoke above stratocumulus clouds, which influences heating profiles, dynamics, and cloud microphysics. In this study, large-eddy simulation is used to investigate the effect of the absorbing smoke layer on the stratocumulus to cumulus transition (SCT). A prognostic absorbing smoke model incorporates humidity effects on optical properties, and is coupled with a two-moment bulk microphysics scheme and an interactive radiation code. Smoke both absorbs shortwave radiation and acts as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Simulations are of three day duration. The simulations assess sensitivity of the SCT to distance of the smoke layer from the cloud top, aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo, and precipitation. Our simulations show that 1) As a shortwave absorber, the smoke stabilizes the free atmosphere and strengthens the temperature jump at the boundary layer top, which limits entrainment; 2) Smoke helps evaporate cloud during daytime, which amplifies the diurnal cycle of cloud cover; 3) As a source of CCN, the entrained smoke suppresses rain formation, which inhibits precipitation-generated cloud breakup. The net effect of smoke is modification of heating profiles to limit the deepening of the planetary boundary layer, and suppression of precipitation. This leads to enhancement of the diurnal cycle of cloudiness but a delay in the SCT.

  9. From large-eddy simulation to multi-UAVs sampling of shallow cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamraoui, Fayçal; Roberts, Greg; Burnet, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    In-situ sampling of clouds that can provide simultaneous measurements at satisfying spatio-temporal resolutions to capture 3D small scale physical processes continues to present challenges. This project (SKYSCANNER) aims at bringing together cloud sampling strategies using a swarm of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) based on Large-eddy simulation (LES). The multi-UAV-based field campaigns with a personalized sampling strategy for individual clouds and cloud fields will significantly improve the understanding of the unresolved cloud physical processes. An extensive set of LES experiments for case studies from ARM-SGP site have been performed using MesoNH model at high resolutions down to 10 m. The carried out simulations led to establishing a macroscopic model that quantifies the interrelationship between micro- and macrophysical properties of shallow convective clouds. Both the geometry and evolution of individual clouds are critical to multi-UAV cloud sampling and path planning. The preliminary findings of the current project reveal several linear relationships that associate many cloud geometric parameters to cloud related meteorological variables. In addition, the horizontal wind speed indicates a proportional impact on cloud number concentration as well as triggering and prolonging the occurrence of cumulus clouds. In the framework of the joint collaboration that involves a Multidisciplinary Team (including institutes specializing in aviation, robotics and atmospheric science), this model will be a reference point for multi-UAVs sampling strategies and path planning.

  10. Do Shallow Cumulus Clouds have the Potential to Trigger Secondary Circulations Via Shading?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronemeier, Tobias; Kanani-Sühring, Farah; Raasch, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    The effects on the convective boundary layer (CBL) of shading due to shallow cumulus clouds are investigated. The main question is to see whether clouds are able to produce secondary circulations by shading of the surface (dynamic heterogeneities) and how these dynamic heterogeneities interact with static heterogeneities in terms of the production of secondary circulations. Also the effects of cloud shadows on cloud-field characteristics are analyzed. The effects are studied using large-eddy simulations of a cloud-topped CBL with an idealized surface. Over a homogeneous surface, shadows trigger secondary circulations with different strengths depending on the solar zenith angle θ, with large θ favouring the development of secondary circulations. Over a static heterogeneous surface with a simple striped pattern, the strength of secondary circulations is effectively reduced by dynamic heterogeneities at small θ. At large θ, however, the effect on secondary circulations depends on the orientation of the striped static heterogeneities to the shadow-casting direction of the clouds. The influence of shadows is only small if they are cast perpendicular to the striped heterogeneity, but if stripes and the shadow-casting direction are parallel, secondary circulations are reduced in strength also for large θ. Shadow effects on the cloud-field characteristics vary with θ as well. The results show that small θ favours the development of small clouds with a reduced lifetime while large θ promotes the development of larger clouds with an extended lifetime compared to non-shading clouds.

  11. A stochastic shallow cumulus ensemble model as a scale-aware parameterization of convective fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakradzija, Mirjana; Seifert, Axel; Heus, Thijs; Dipankar, Anurag

    Numerical models are approaching the high-resolution limit where some aspects of deep convection and mesoscale convective systems can be explicitly modeled, while shallow cumuli are still a subgrid process that requires a parameterization. The classical assumption of a sufficiently large cloud sample within a model grid column breaks down in this regime, so it is crucial to develop scale-aware parameterizations. Therefore, we propose an approach to represent the variability of subgrid shallow cumuli about the ensemble average convective response. The shallow clouds are studied using Large Eddy Simulation (LES), where the original cloud field modeled on the grid of 25 m resolution is coarse-grained to mimic resolutions from 1 to 50 km. A canonical statistical ensemble is developed based on theoretical and LES findings and fluctuations of shallow convection are modeled by random subsampling of microstates from the convective ensemble distribution. The resulting distribution of subgrid convective states is scale-aware, and it represents stochastic fluctuations that increase with grid resolution and become substantial on the kilometre-scale grids. We find that the local cloud memory plays an important role in defining the convective ensemble statistics in a steady cumulus regime. Hans Ertel Centre for Weather Research.

  12. Long-term Statistics of Continental Cumuli: Does Aerosol Trigger Cumulus Variability?

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Turner, David D.

    2009-02-01

    Atmospheric aerosols may control the formation, maintenance, and dissipation of cumuli by changing their microphysics. Recent observational and modeling results exist both in support and against strong potential impacts of aerosol [1-3]. Typically, the aerosol impact on water clouds has been investigated for regions with high aerosol loading and/or large atmospheric moisture [4]. Can we provide observational evidence of the aerosol-cloud relationship for a relatively dry continental region with low/moderate aerosol burden? To address this question, we revisit the aerosol-cloud relationship at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. In comparison with highly polluted regions, the SGP site is characterized by relatively small-to-moderate aerosol loading. Also, moisture content is small-to-moderate (compared to marine and coastal regions) for the SGP site. Because cumulus clouds have important impacts on climate forcing estimations [5] and are susceptible to aerosol effects [6], we focus on fair-weather cumuli (FWC) and their association with aerosol concentration and other potentially important factors. This association is investigated using a new 8-year aerosol and cloud climatology (2000-2007) developed with collocated and coincident surface and satellite observations.

  13. Identification of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Specific Genes in Cumulus and Mural Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Aydos, Alp; Gurel, Aykut; Oztemur Islakoglu, Yasemin; Noyan, Senem; Gokce, Bagdagul; Ecemis, Tolga; Kaya, Cemil; Aksu, Arif Tarik; Gur Dedeoglu, Bala

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic and endocrine disorder which affects women of reproductive age with prevalence of 8-18%. The oocyte within the follicle is surrounded by cumulus cells (CCs), which connect with mural granulosa cells (MGCs) that are responsible for secreting steroid hormones. The main aim of this study is comparing gene expression profiles of MGCs and CCs in PCOS and control samples to identify PCOS-specific differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In this study, two microarray databases were searched for mRNA expression microarray studies performed with CCs and MGCs obtained from PCOS patients and control samples. Three independent studies were selected to be integrated with naive meta-analysis since raw meta-data from these studies were found to be highly correlated. DEGs in these somatic cells were identified for PCOS and control groups. This study enabled us to reveal dysregulation in MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase), insulin and Wnt signaling pathways between CCs and MGCs in PCOS. The meta-analysis results together with qRT-PCR validations provide evidence that molecular signaling is dysregulated through MGCs and CCs in PCOS, which is important for follicle and oocyte maturation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

  14. Optimizing the Betts-Miller-Janjic cumulus parameterization with Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Melin; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.-L.

    2015-10-01

    The schemes of cumulus parameterization are responsible for the sub-grid-scale effects of convective and/or shallow clouds, and intended to represent vertical fluxes due to unresolved updrafts and downdrafts and compensating motion outside the clouds. Some schemes additionally provide cloud and precipitation field tendencies in the convective column, and momentum tendencies due to convective transport of momentum. The schemes all provide the convective component of surface rainfall. Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) is one scheme to fulfill such purposes in the weather research and forecast (WRF) model. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) has tried to optimize the BMJ scheme for operational application. As there are no interactions among horizontal grid points, this scheme is very suitable for parallel computation. With the advantage of Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture, efficient parallelization and vectorization essentials, it allows us to optimize the BMJ scheme. If compared to the original code respectively running on one CPU socket (eight cores) and on one CPU core with Intel Xeon E5-2670, the MIC-based optimization of this scheme running on Xeon Phi coprocessor 7120P improves the performance by 2.4x and 17.0x, respectively.

  15. Effects of cumulus convection on the simulated monsoon circulation in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guang Jun )

    1994-09-01

    The effect of cumulus convection on the Asian summer monsoon circulation is investigated, using a general circulation model. Two simulations for the summer months (June, July, and August) are performed, one parameterizing convection using a mass flux scheme and the other without convective parameterization. The results show that convection has significant effects on the monsoon circulation and its associated precipitation. In the simulation with the mass flux convective parameterization, precipitation in the western Pacific is decreased, together with a decrease in surface evaporation and wind speed. In the indian monsoon region it is almost the opposite. Comparison with a simulation using moist convective adjustment to parameterize convection shows that the monsoon circulation and precipitation distribution in the no-convection simulation are very similar to those in the simulation with moist convective adjustment. The difference in the large-scale circulation with and without convective parameterization is interpreted in terms of convective stabilization of the atmosphere by convection, using dry and moist static energy budgets. It is shown that weakening of the low-level convergence in the western Pacific in the simulation with convection is closely associated with the stabilization of the atmosphere by convection, mostly through drying of the lower troposphere; changes in low-level convergence lead to changes in precipitation. The precipitation increase in the Indian monsoon can be explained similarly. 29 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Lightning Optical Pulse Statistics from Storm Overflights During the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2004-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect time resolved optical pulse data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We divided our data into two amplitude groups based on prior NASA U2 aircraft optical data and our pulse characteristics. The group of large pulses with radiance greater than 2.1 mW /sq m sr had mean and median 10 - 10% optical pulse widths of 765 and 735 microns respectively, the 50-50% pulse widths of 396 and 355 microns respectively, and 10-90% rise times of 290 and 260 microns. These values are very similar to the previous U2 based optical results The other group of pulses consisting of slightly more than a quarter of the total pulses observed had radiances less than the minimum values detected in the U2 study. The small pulses were narrower than the large pulses with 5040% mean and median values of 198 and 160 ps respectively. Only 12 % of the flashes contained only small pulses, minimizing the impact of this data on the estimates of detection efficiencies of the orbital instruments, the Lightning Imaging Sensor and Optical Transient Detector.

  17. A Comparison of Cumulus Parameterizations in Idealized Sea-Breeze Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Charles; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Four cumulus parameterizations in the Penn State-NCAR model MM5 are compared in idealized sea-breeze simulations, with the aim of discovering why they work as they do. The most realistic results appear to be those using the Kain-Fritsch scheme. Rainfall is significantly delayed with the Betts-Miller-Janjic scheme, due to the method of computing the reference sounding. This method can be corrected, but downdrafts should be added in a physically realistic manner. Even without downdrafts, a corrected version of the BMJ scheme produces nearly the same timing and location of deep convection as the KF scheme, despite the very different physics. In order to simulate the correct timing of the rainfall, a minimum amount of mass is required in the layer that is the source of a parameterized updraft. The Grell parameterization, in the present simulation, always derives the updraft from the top of the mixed layer, where vertical advection predominates over horizontal advection in increasing the moist static energy. This makes the application of the quasi-equilibrium closure more correct than it would be if the updrafts were always derived from the most unstable layer, but it evades the question of whether or not horizontal advection generates instability. Using different physics, the parameterizations produce significantly different cloud-top heights.

  18. Identification of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Specific Genes in Cumulus and Mural Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aydos, Alp; Gurel, Aykut; Oztemur Islakoglu, Yasemin; Noyan, Senem; Gokce, Bagdagul; Ecemis, Tolga; Kaya, Cemil; Aksu, Arif Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic and endocrine disorder which affects women of reproductive age with prevalence of 8–18%. The oocyte within the follicle is surrounded by cumulus cells (CCs), which connect with mural granulosa cells (MGCs) that are responsible for secreting steroid hormones. The main aim of this study is comparing gene expression profiles of MGCs and CCs in PCOS and control samples to identify PCOS-specific differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In this study, two microarray databases were searched for mRNA expression microarray studies performed with CCs and MGCs obtained from PCOS patients and control samples. Three independent studies were selected to be integrated with naive meta-analysis since raw meta-data from these studies were found to be highly correlated. DEGs in these somatic cells were identified for PCOS and control groups. This study enabled us to reveal dysregulation in MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase), insulin and Wnt signaling pathways between CCs and MGCs in PCOS. The meta-analysis results together with qRT-PCR validations provide evidence that molecular signaling is dysregulated through MGCs and CCs in PCOS, which is important for follicle and oocyte maturation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the syndrome. PMID:27997581

  19. Sensitivity of diurnal variation in simulated precipitation during East Asian summer monsoon to cumulus parameterization schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, In-Jin; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Han, Ji-Young; Kim, So-Young; Kwon, Young

    2015-12-01

    The capability to simulate the diurnal variation of precipitation over East Asia region during the summertime of 2011 is investigated using five different cumulus parameterization schemes with the Weather Research and Forecasting model. A semidiurnal cycle with a 12 h interval over land and a diurnal cycle with a 24 h interval over ocean are commonly found in all simulations, consistent with the observed diurnal cycle. Two observed dominant peaks in the early morning and afternoon are reproduced in all simulations. With overestimated precipitation rate, however, the simulated afternoon peaks occur earlier than the observed peaks by 2 h for the Kain-Fritsch (KF) and Simplified Arakawa-Schubert schemes, and by 3 h for the Betts-Miller-Janjić and Tiedtke schemes. The overestimation of simulated precipitation frequency leads to amplitude and phase errors in the precipitation rate, and the early peak time of simulated precipitation intensity intensifies the phase error in the simulation over land. The KF scheme with alternative trigger function (KFtr) based on moisture advection provides slightly better results in terms of alleviating the overestimated precipitation rate and frequency and delaying the afternoon peaks. Additional sensitivity simulations based on the change of temperature perturbation in the trigger function of the KF and KFtr schemes demonstrate the afternoon peak tends to be delayed as temperature perturbation decreases, implying the significant role of convective initiation frequency in determining diurnal peaks of precipitation. Modulation of temperature perturbation alleviates the precipitation frequency bias, while it could not resolve the precipitation intensity bias.

  20. Airborne observations of electric fields around growing and decaying cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, K. L.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne electric field data were gathered in an atmospheric electrification study near Cape Canaveral, FL. A Learjet 36A was instrumented with eight electric field meters (mills) and five different particle probes. The local electric field enhancements at each field mill site were determined under lab conditions and verified using in-flight data. The overdetermined system of eight equations (one for each field mill) was solved using a weighted least squares algorithm to compute the magnitude and direction of the ambient electric field. The signal processing system allowed the measured data to be expressed in terms of earth coordinates, regardless of the attitude of the aircraft. Thus, it was possible to take maximum advantage of the Learjet's speed and maneuverability in studying the electric field structure in the vicinity of the clouds. Data gathered while circling just outside the boundary of a growing cumulus cloud show a nonsymmetric pattern of electric field strength. Field intensity grew rapidly over a period of less than 10 minutes. The observed direction of the ambient electric field vector can be explained by an ascending motion of the charge centers of a classic tripole model of a thunderstorm.