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Sample records for 2d growth mode

  1. Band Engineering by Controlling vdW Epitaxy Growth Mode in 2D Gallium Chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui; Soignard, Emmanuel; Ataca, Can; Chen, Bin; Ko, Changhyun; Aoki, Toshihiro; Pant, Anupum; Meng, Xiuqing; Yang, Shengxue; Grossman, Jeffrey; Ogletree, Frank D; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-09-01

    Atomically thin quasi-2D GaSe flakes are synthesized via van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy on a polar Si (111) surface. The bandgap is continuously tuned from its commonly accepted value at 620 down to the 700 nm range, only attained previously by alloying Te into GaSe (GaSex Te1- x ). This is accomplished by manipulating various vdW epitaxy kinetic factors, which allows the choice bet ween screw-dislocation-driven and layer-bylayer growth, and the design of different morphologies with different material-substrate interaction (strain) energies. PMID:27271214

  2. New insights into the generalized Rutherford equation for nonlinear neoclassical tearing mode growth from 2D reduced MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhof, E.; de Blank, H. J.; Pratt, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two dimensional reduced MHD simulations of neoclassical tearing mode growth and suppression by ECCD are performed. The perturbation of the bootstrap current density and the EC drive current density perturbation are assumed to be functions of the perturbed flux surfaces. In the case of ECCD, this implies that the applied power is flux surface averaged to obtain the EC driven current density distribution. The results are consistent with predictions from the generalized Rutherford equation using common expressions for Δ \\text{bs}\\prime and Δ \\text{ECCD}\\prime . These expressions are commonly perceived to describe only the effect on the tearing mode growth of the helical component of the respective current perturbation acting through the modification of Ohm’s law. Our results show that they describe in addition the effect of the poloidally averaged current density perturbation which acts through modification of the tearing mode stability index. Except for modulated ECCD, the largest contribution to the mode growth comes from this poloidally averaged current density perturbation.

  3. Simulation of the flow and mass transfer for KDP crystals undergoing 2D translation during growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Li, Mingwei; Hu, Zhitao; Yin, Huawei; Wang, Bangguo; Cui, Qidong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel motion mode for crystals during growth, i.e., 2D translation, is proposed. Numerical simulations of flow and mass transfer are conducted for the growth of large-scale potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals subjected to the new motion mode. Surface supersaturation and shear stress are obtained as functions of the translational velocity, distance, size, orientation of crystals. The dependence of these two parameters on the flow fields around the crystals is also discussed. The thicknesses of the solute boundary layer varied with translational velocity are described. The characteristics of solution flow and surface supersaturation distribution are summarized, where it suggests that the morphological stability of a crystal surface can be enhanced if the proposed 2D translation is applied to crystal growth.

  4. Controlling cell growth with tailorable 2D nanoholes arrays.

    PubMed

    Fragal, Vanessa H; Cellet, Thelma Sley P; Fragal, Elizângela H; Pereira, Guilherme M; Garcia, Francielle P; Nakamura, Celso V; Asefa, Tewodros; Rubira, Adley F; Silva, Rafael

    2016-03-15

    A facile and reproducible route that can lead to two-dimensional arrays of nanopores in thin polymer films is demonstrated. The formation of the pores in the polymer films involves breath figure phenomenon and occurs during the film deposition by spin coating. The formation of nanoporous thin films takes only few seconds, and the method does not require complex equipment or expensive chemicals. This method also constitutes a straightforward approach to control the size of the pores formed in thin films. Besides allowing control over the average pore size of the porous films, the use of dynamic deposition with the breath figure phenomenon causes the reduction in the pore size to nanometer scale. The nanoporous arrays obtained by the breath figure are applied as substrates for cell growth, and the effect of their nanopore size on cell growth was evaluated. Notably, it is found that cell viability is related to pore size, where 2D nanoporous structure is more beneficial for cell culture than 2D microporous structures. The change in the average pore size of the polymer films from 1.22 μm to 346 nm results in a threefold increase in cell viability. PMID:26722796

  5. Ultrahigh-Q modes in anisotropic 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouleghlimat, Oussama; Hocini, Abdesselam

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we design a two-dimensional photonic crystal cavity made with a substrate of an anisotropic material. We consider triangular lattice photonic crystal made from air holes in tellurium. The cavity itself is then created by three missing holes in the centre. Using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation and optimization of the geometrical parameters and the symmetric displacement of the edge air holes on the quality factor, the cavity’s structural parameters yield an ultrahigh-Q mode cavity with quality factor Q = 2.95 × 1011 for a filling factor r/a = 0.45 and lateral displacement of 10 nm. This shows great enhancement compared with previous studies in which silicon material has been used. The designed structure can be helpful in a number of applications associated with photonic crystal cavities, including quantum information processing, filters, and nanoscale sensors.

  6. THz quantum cascade lasers operating on the radiative modes of a 2D photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Halioua, Y; Xu, G; Moumdji, S; Li, L H; Davies, A G; Linfield, E H; Colombelli, R

    2014-07-01

    Photonic-crystal lasers operating on Γ-point band-edge states of a photonic structure naturally exploit the so-called "nonradiative" modes. As the surface output coupling efficiency of these modes is low, they have relatively high Q factors, which favor lasing. We propose a new 2D photonic-crystal design that is capable of reversing this mode competition and achieving lasing on the radiative modes instead. Previously, this has only been shown in 1D structures, where the central idea is to introduce anisotropy into the system, both at unit-cell and resonator scales. By applying this concept to 2D photonic-crystal patterned terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers, surface-emitting devices with diffraction-limited beams are demonstrated, with 17 mW peak output power.

  7. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Jr., Carlos M.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  8. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M., Jr.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  9. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  10. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-09-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications.

  11. Fracture mode analysis and related surface deformation during dyke intrusion: Results from 2D experimental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M.; Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of surface deformation in response to approaching intrusion is important for assessing volcanic hazards. In this paper, we present results from 2D scaled models of magma intrusion, in which we discuss the propagation mode and related surface deformation during dyke growth. Our experiments consist in the injection of analogue magma (Golden syrup) into cohesive fine-grained silica powder, simulating the brittle upper crust. Using an optical image correlation technique (Particle Imaging Velocimetry), we were able to follow the surface deformation, the displacements within the country rock and to calculate strains induced by the magma emplacement. We identified two kinds of intrusion morphologies resulting from different interactions between the dyke and plastic deformations occurring in the country rock near the surface. In both morphologies, the dyke is vertical at depth. Our analysis demonstrates that both hydraulic tensile opening and shear-related propagation operate during this first stage of vertical growth. At the same time, the surface lifted up and formed a smooth symmetrical dome. Both types of morphologies differ in the upper part. During a second stage of evolution, the first type of intrusion inclined at a dip between 45 to 65°. This inclination is not caused by shear deformations and is attributed to stress rotation near the tip. Closer to the surface, the growth of the inclined sheet creates shear bands which conduct the fluid toward the surface. The surface uplift becomes asymmetric. The second type of intrusion does not rotate at depth and continues its vertical propagation by catching vertical tensile cracks. The intrusion of magma in these cracks creates horizontal stresses which are responsible for the closure of fractures and the formation of reverse faults. At the surface the dome remains symmetrical. For both intrusions, the surface uplift accelerates during the second stage and it is strongly influenced by the presence or the

  12. Spectroscopy and Thermometry of Drumhead Modes in a Mesoscopic 2D Coulomb Crystal of ^9Be^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Teale, Carson; Keith, Adam; Wang, Joseph; Freericks, James; Bollinger, John

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate spectroscopy and thermometry of individual motional modes in a mesoscopic 2D ion array using entanglement between ion valence electron spins and collective motion. Our system is a ˜400 μm-diameter planar crystal of several hundred ^9Be^+ ions exhibiting complex drumhead modes in the confining potential of a Penning trap. Exploiting precise control over the ^9Be^+ valence electron spins, we apply a homogeneous spin-dependent optical dipole force to excite arbitrary transverse modes with wavelengths ranging from the array diameter to the interparticle spacing of ˜20 μm. In addition to temperature measurements, this spin-motion entanglement induced by the spin-dependent optical dipole force allows for extremely sensitive detection of external forces (˜100 yN) acting on the ion crystal. Characterization of mode frequencies and temperatures is critical for quantum simulation experiments that make use of the ion spins.

  13. 2D modeling of the regeneration surface growth on crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. G.; Gavryushkin, P. N.; Fursenko, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    A physical model is proposed to describe the growth of regeneration surfaces (flat crystal surfaces that are not parallel to any possible faces). According to this model, the change in the growth rate of a regeneration surface during its evolution and the decrease in the number of subindividuals forming the growth front can be explained by the implementation of two types of geometric selection: within each subindividual (the absorption of rapidly growing faces by slowly growing ones) and between subindividuals (when subindividuals absorb each other). A numerical modeling of the growth of the regeneration surface (30.30.19) of potassium alum crystals showed quantitative agreement between the model proposed and the experimental data.

  14. Nonlinear propagating localized modes in a 2D hexagonal crystal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajars, Janis; Eilbeck, J. Chris; Leimkuhler, Benedict

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we consider a 2D hexagonal crystal lattice model first proposed by Marín, Eilbeck and Russell in 1998. We perform a detailed numerical study of nonlinear propagating localized modes, that is, propagating discrete breathers and kinks. The original model is extended to allow for arbitrary atomic interactions, and to allow atoms to travel out of the unit cell. A new on-site potential is considered with a periodic smooth function with hexagonal symmetry. We are able to confirm the existence of long-lived propagating discrete breathers. Our simulations show that, as they evolve, breathers appear to localize in frequency space, i.e. the energy moves from sidebands to a main frequency band. Our numerical findings shed light on the open question of whether exact moving breather solutions exist in 2D hexagonal layers in physical crystal lattices.

  15. List-mode likelihood: EM algorithm and image quality estimation demonstrated on 2-D PET.

    PubMed

    Parra, L; Barrett, H H

    1998-04-01

    Using a theory of list-mode maximum-likelihood (ML) source reconstruction presented recently by Barrett et al., this paper formulates a corresponding expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, as well as a method for estimating noise properties at the ML estimate. List-mode ML is of interest in cases where the dimensionality of the measurement space impedes a binning of the measurement data. It can be advantageous in cases where a better forward model can be obtained by including more measurement coordinates provided by a given detector. Different figures of merit for the detector performance can be computed from the Fisher information matrix (FIM). This paper uses the observed FIM, which requires a single data set, thus, avoiding costly ensemble statistics. The proposed techniques are demonstrated for an idealized two-dimensional (2-D) positron emission tomography (PET) [2-D PET] detector. We compute from simulation data the improved image quality obtained by including the time of flight of the coincident quanta.

  16. Growth of 2D black phosphorus film from chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua B; Hagaman, Daniel; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2016-05-27

    Phosphorene, a novel 2D material isolated from bulk black phosphorus (BP), is an intrinsic p-type material with a variable bandgap for a variety of applications. However, these applications are limited by the inability to isolate large films of phosphorene. Here we present an in situ chemical vapor deposition type approach that demonstrates progress towards growth of large area 2D BP with average areas >3 μm2 and thicknesses representing samples around four layers and thicker samples with average areas >100 μm2. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have confirmed successful growth of 2D BP from red phosphorus. PMID:27087456

  17. Growth of 2D black phosphorus film from chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joshua B.; Hagaman, Daniel; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorene, a novel 2D material isolated from bulk black phosphorus (BP), is an intrinsic p-type material with a variable bandgap for a variety of applications. However, these applications are limited by the inability to isolate large films of phosphorene. Here we present an in situ chemical vapor deposition type approach that demonstrates progress towards growth of large area 2D BP with average areas >3 μm2 and thicknesses representing samples around four layers and thicker samples with average areas >100 μm2. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have confirmed successful growth of 2D BP from red phosphorus.

  18. Modeling the Effect of Multiple Matrix Cracking Modes on Cyclic Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of multiple matrix cracking modes on cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existed in matrix cracking mode 3 and mode 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, are considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The effects of fiber volume content, peak stress, matrix crack spacing, interface properties, matrix cracking mode proportion and interface wear on interface slip and hysteresis loops have been analyzed. The cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite corresponding to different peak stresses have been predicted using the present analysis. It was found that the damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire cracking modes of the composite, increases with increasing peak stress.

  19. Comparison of Failure Modes in 2-D and 3-D Woven Carbon Phenolic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossman, Grant A.; Stackpoole, Mairead; Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Braun, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is developing Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) materials as a new class of heatshields for entry vehicles (Stackpoole). Currently, there are few options for ablative entry heatshield materials, none of which is ideally suited to the planetary probe missions currently of interest to NASA. While carbon phenolic was successfully used for the missions Pioneer Venus and Galileo (to Jupiter), the heritage constituents are no longer available. An alternate carbon phenolic would need to be qualified for probe missions, which is most efficient at heat fluxes greater than those currently of interest. Additional TPS materials such as Avcoat and PICA are not sufficiently robust for the heat fluxes required. As a result, there is a large TPS gap between the materials efficient at very high conditions (carbon phenolic) and those that are effective at low-moderate conditions (all others). Development of 3D Woven TPS is intended to fill this gap, targeting mid-density weaves that could with withstand mid-range heat fluxes between 1100 W/sq cm and 8000 W/sq cm (Venkatapathy (2012). Preliminary experimental studies have been performed to show the feasibility of WTPS as a future mid-range TPS material. One study performed in the mARC Jet Facility at NASA Ames Research Center characterized the performance of a 3D Woven TPS sample and compared it to 2D carbon phenolic samples at ply angles of 0deg, 23.5deg, and 90deg. Each sample contained similar compositions of phenolic and carbon fiber volume fractions for experimental consistency. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of the TPS materials by evaluating resulting recession and failure modes. After exposing both samples to similar heat flux and pressure conditions, the 2D carbon phenolic laminate was shown to experience significant delamination between layers and further pocketing underneath separated layers. The 3D Woven TPS sample did not experience the delamination or pocketing

  20. Plasma as a tool for growth of 1D and 2D nanomaterials and their conversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvelbar, Uros

    2015-09-01

    The growth of 1D and 2D nanostructures in low pressure oxygen plasma is presented with the special stress on metal-oxide nanowires and their deterministic growth mechanisms. Since the resulting nanostructures not always have required properties for applications their modifications are required. Therefore their conversions into different oxides or sulphites/nitrides are required with either molecules, atoms, electrons or photons.

  1. Digital transfer growth of patterned 2D metal chalcogenides by confined nanoparticle evaporation.

    PubMed

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M; Puretzky, Alexander A; McGuire, Michael A; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B

    2014-11-25

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor-phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a method to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (∼100 μm lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.

  2. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B.

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.

  3. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system.

  4. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    PubMed

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system. PMID:26718101

  5. The ideal tearing mode: 2D MHD simulations in the linear and nonlinear regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Simone; Del Zanna, Luca; Pucci, Fulvia; Velli, Marco; Papini, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    We present compressible, resistive MHD numerical simulations of the linear and nonlinear evolution of the tearing instability, for both Harris sheet and force-free initial equilibrium configurations. We analyze the behavior of a current sheet with aspect ratio S1/3, where S is the Lundquist number. This scaling has been recently recognized to be the threshold for fast reconnection occurring on the ideal Alfvenic timescale, with a maximum growth rate that becomes asymptotically independent on S. Our simulations clearly confirm that the tearing instability maximum growth rate and the full dispersion relation are exactly those predicted by the linear theory, at least for the values of S explored here. In the nonlinear stage, we notice the rapid onset and subsequent coalescence of plasmoids, as observed in previous simulations of the Sweet-Parker reconnection scenario. These findings strongly support the idea that in a fully dynamic regime, as soon as current sheets develop and reach the critical threshold in their aspect ratio of S1/3 (occurring well before the Sweet-Parker configuration is able to form), the tearing mode is able to trigger fast reconnection and plasmoids formation on Alfvenic timescales, as required to explain the violent flare activity often observed in solar and astrophysical plasmas.

  6. Seeded growth of robust SERS-active 2D Au@Ag nanoparticulate films

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Gary A; Dai, Sheng; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Zhu, Haoguo; Bao, Lili

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate herein a novel and versatile solution-based methodology for fabricating self-organized two-dimensional (2D) Au nanoparticle arrays on glass using in situ nucleation at an aminosilane monolayer followed by seeded, electroless growth; subsequent deposition of Ag produced Au{at}Ag core-shell nanoparticulate films which proved highly promising as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platforms.

  7. Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation

    DOE PAGES

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Wang, Kai; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Xiao, Kai; Eres, Gyula; et al

    2014-10-19

    Developing methods for the facile synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) metal chalcogenides and other layered materials is crucial for emerging applications in functional devices. Controlling the stoichiometry, number of the layers, crystallite size, growth location, and areal uniformity is challenging in conventional vapor phase synthesis. Here, we demonstrate a new route to control these parameters in the growth of metal chalcogenide (GaSe) and dichalcogenide (MoSe2) 2D crystals by precisely defining the mass and location of the source materials in a confined transfer growth system. A uniform and precise amount of stoichiometric nanoparticles are first synthesized and deposited onto a substrate bymore » pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature. This source substrate is then covered with a receiver substrate to form a confined vapor transport growth (VTG) system. By simply heating the source substrate in an inert background gas, a natural temperature gradient is formed that evaporates the confined nanoparticles to grow large, crystalline 2D nanosheets on the cooler receiver substrate, the temperature of which is controlled by the background gas pressure. Large monolayer crystalline domains (~ 100 m lateral sizes) of GaSe and MoSe2 are demonstrated, as well as continuous monolayer films through the deposition of additional precursor materials. This novel PLD-VTG synthesis and processing method offers a unique approach for the controlled growth of large-area, metal chalcogenides with a controlled number of layers in patterned growth locations for optoelectronics and energy related applications.« less

  8. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  9. J-integral evaluation for 2D mixed-mode crack problems employing a meshfree stabilized conforming nodal integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoyuki; Suzuki, Hirotaka; Sadamoto, Shota; Sannomaru, Shogo; Yu, Tiantang; Bui, Tinh Quoc

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) in-plane mixed-mode fracture mechanics problems are analyzed employing an efficient meshfree Galerkin method based on stabilized conforming nodal integration (SCNI). In this setting, the reproducing kernel function as meshfree interpolant is taken, while employing the SCNI for numerical integration of stiffness matrix in the Galerkin formulation. The strain components are smoothed and stabilized employing Gauss divergence theorem. The path-independent integral ( J-integral) is solved based on the nodal integration by summing the smoothed physical quantities and the segments of the contour integrals. In addition, mixed-mode stress intensity factors (SIFs) are extracted from the J-integral by decomposing the displacement and stress fields into symmetric and antisymmetric parts. The advantages and features of the present formulation and discretization in evaluation of the J-integral of in-plane 2D fracture problems are demonstrated through several representative numerical examples. The mixed-mode SIFs are evaluated and compared with reference solutions. The obtained results reveal high accuracy and good performance of the proposed meshfree method in the analysis of 2D fracture problems.

  10. Dispersion relations of externally and thermally excited dust lattice modes in 2D complex plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xuefeng; Cui Jian; Zhang Yuan; Liu Yue

    2012-07-15

    The dispersion relations of the externally and thermally (naturally) excited dust lattice modes (both longitudinal and transverse) in two-dimensional Debye-Yukawa complex plasma crystals are investigated. The dispersion relations are calculated numerically by taking the neutral gas damping effects into account and the numerical results are in agreement with the experimental data given by Nunomura et al.[Phys. Rev. E 65, 066402 (2002)]. It is found that for the mode excited by an external disturbance with a real frequency, the dispersion properties are changed at a critical frequency near where the group velocity of the mode goes to zero. Therefore, the high frequency branch with negative dispersion cannot be reached. In contrast, for the thermally excited mode, the dispersion curve can extend all the way to the negative dispersion region, while a 'cut-off' wave number exists at the long wavelength end of the dispersion in the transverse mode.

  11. Finite-size limitations on Quality factor of guided resonance modes in 2D photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Grepstad, Jon Olav; Greve, Martin M; Holst, Bodil; Johansen, Ib-Rune; Solgaard, Olav; Sudbø, Aasmund

    2013-10-01

    High-Q guided resonance modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals, enable high field intensity in small volumes that can be exploited to realize high performance sensors. We show through simulations and experiments how the Q-factor of guided resonance modes varies with the size of the photonic crystal, and that this variation is due to loss caused by scattering of in-plane propagating modes at the lattice boundary and coupling of incident light to fully guided modes that exist in the homogeneous slab outside the lattice boundary. A photonic crystal with reflecting boundaries, realized by Bragg mirrors with a band gap for in-plane propagating modes, has been designed to suppress these edge effects. The new design represents a way around the fundamental limitation on Q-factors for guided resonances in finite photonic crystals. Results are presented for both simulated and fabricated structures.

  12. Neurite outgrowth at the interface of 2D and 3D growth environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofron, Celinda M.; Fong, Vivian J.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2009-02-01

    Growing neurons navigate complex environments, but in vitro systems for studying neuronal growth typically limit the cues to flat surfaces or a single type of cue, thereby limiting the resulting growth. Here we examined the growth of neurons presented with two-dimensional (2D) substrate-bound cues when these cues were presented in conjunction with a more complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants were cultured at the interface between a collagen I matrix and a glass coverslip. Laminin (LN) or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) were uniformly coated on the surface of the glass coverslip or patterned in 50 µm tracks by microcontact printing. Quantitative analysis of neurite outgrowth with a novel grid system at multiple depths in the gel revealed several interesting trends. Most of the neurites extended at the surface of the gel when LN was presented whereas more neurites extended into the gel when CSPG was presented. Patterning of cues did not affect neurite density or depth of growth. However, neurite outgrowth near the surface of the gel aligned with LN patterns, and these extensions were significantly longer than neurites extended in other cultures. In interface cultures, DRG growth patterns varied with the type of cue where neurite density was higher in cultures presenting LN than in cultures presenting CSPG. These results represent an important step toward understanding how neurons integrate local structural and chemical cues to make net growth decisions.

  13. Simulation of growth normal fault sandbox tests using the 2D discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Sheng-Shin; Lin, Ming-Lang; Huang, Wen-Chao; Nien, Wei-Tung; Liu, Huan-Chi; Chan, Pei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    A fault slip can cause the deformation of shallow soil layers and destroy infrastructures. The Shanchiao Fault on the west side of the Taipei Basin is one such fault. The activities of the Shanchiao Fault have caused the quaternary sediment beneath the Taipei Basin to become deformed, damaging structures, traffic construction, and utility lines in the area. Data on geological drilling and dating have been used to determine that a growth fault exists in the Shanchiao Fault. In an experiment, a sandbox model was built using noncohesive sandy soil to simulate the existence of a growth fault in the Shanchiao Fault and forecast the effect of the growth fault on shear-band development and ground differential deformation. The experimental results indicated that when a normal fault contains a growth fault at the offset of the base rock, the shear band develops upward beside the weak side of the shear band of the original-topped soil layer, and surfaces considerably faster than that of the single-topped layer. The offset ratio required is approximately one-third that of the single-cover soil layer. In this study, a numerical simulation of the sandbox experiment was conducted using a discrete element method program, PFC2D, to simulate the upper-covering sand layer shear-band development pace and the scope of a growth normal fault slip. The simulation results indicated an outcome similar to that of the sandbox experiment, which can be applied to the design of construction projects near fault zones.

  14. Elucidating the origin of spurious modes in aluminum nitride microresonators using a 2-D finite-element model.

    PubMed

    Branch, Darren W; Wojciechowski, Kenneth E; Olsson, Roy H

    2014-05-01

    In this work, an approach has been developed to predict the location of large spurious modes in the resonant response of aluminum nitride (AlN) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators over a wide range of desired operating frequencies. This addresses significant challenges in the design of more complex AlN devices, namely the prediction and elimination of spurious modes in the resonance response. Using the finite element method (FEM), the dispersion curves at wavelengths ranging from 8 to 20 μm were computed. It was determined that the velocities of symmetric Lamb (S0) and high-order antisymmetric (A) modes overlap at specific wavelengths. A 2-D FEM analysis showed that both the S0 and higher order A modes are mutually excited at a common operating wavelength. From this analysis, the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters were extracted and used to compute the P-matrix and S-parameters using a 6-port transmission matrix. The P-matrix simulation was able to predict the electrical response of the S0 and nearby spurious modes. This work identified specific wavelength regions where COM has limited accuracy because of mode conversion. In these regions, the reflection (κ(p)) and transduction (ζ(p)) parameters change rapidly.

  15. Super-radiant plasmon mode is more efficient for SERS than the sub-radiant mode in highly packed 2D gold nanocube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud A.

    2015-08-21

    The field coupling in highly packed plasmonic nanoparticle arrays is not localized due to the energy transport via the sub-radiant plasmon modes, which is formed in addition to the regular super-radiant plasmon mode. Unlike the sub-radiant mode, the plasmon field of the super-radiant mode cannot extend over long distances since it decays radiatively with a shorter lifetime. The coupling of the plasmon fields of gold nanocubes (AuNCs) when organized into highly packed 2D arrays was examined experimentally. Multiple plasmon resonance optical peaks are observed for the AuNC arrays and are compared to those calculated using the discrete dipole approximation. The calculated electromagnetic plasmon fields of the arrays displayed high field intensity for the nanocubes located in the center of the arrays for the lower energy super-radiant mode, while the higher energy sub-radiant plasmon mode displayed high field intensity at the edges of the arrays. The Raman signal enhancement by the super-radiant plasmon mode was found to be one hundred fold greater than that by sub-radiant plasmon mode because the super-radiant mode has higher scattering and stronger plasmon field intensity relative to the sub-radiant mode.

  16. Super-radiant plasmon mode is more efficient for SERS than the sub-radiant mode in highly packed 2D gold nanocube arrays.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud A

    2015-08-21

    The field coupling in highly packed plasmonic nanoparticle arrays is not localized due to the energy transport via the sub-radiant plasmon modes, which is formed in addition to the regular super-radiant plasmon mode. Unlike the sub-radiant mode, the plasmon field of the super-radiant mode cannot extend over long distances since it decays radiatively with a shorter lifetime. The coupling of the plasmon fields of gold nanocubes (AuNCs) when organized into highly packed 2D arrays was examined experimentally. Multiple plasmon resonance optical peaks are observed for the AuNC arrays and are compared to those calculated using the discrete dipole approximation. The calculated electromagnetic plasmon fields of the arrays displayed high field intensity for the nanocubes located in the center of the arrays for the lower energy super-radiant mode, while the higher energy sub-radiant plasmon mode displayed high field intensity at the edges of the arrays. The Raman signal enhancement by the super-radiant plasmon mode was found to be one hundred fold greater than that by sub-radiant plasmon mode because the super-radiant mode has higher scattering and stronger plasmon field intensity relative to the sub-radiant mode.

  17. Ga adsorption on si(111) analysed by in situ ellipsometry: 2D and 3D growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, S.; d'Avitaya, F. Arnaud; Pfister, J. C.

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, Ga adsorption on Si(111) is analysed by in situ ellipsometry. Three regimes of adsorption and two orders of desorption are distinguished. The results are interpreted as amorphous growth at room temperature, Stranski-Krastanov growth in the substrate temperature range 400-600°C, and Volmer-Weber growth at higher temperatures. The difference in ellipsometric response between both growth modes allows an estimation of the critical coverage at which three-dimensional nucleation takes place. A phase diagram is thus proposed, taking into account the 3 × 3 superstructures occurring between 0 and 1/3 ML on Si(111). These results are compared to those obtained on Si(100), and show marked similarities.

  18. Communication: Effect of accidental mode degeneracy on Raman intensity in 2D materials: Hybrid functional study of bilayer phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-07-14

    Bulk black phosphorus has two optical phonon modes labeled as Ag (2) and B2u, respectively, that are nearly degenerate in frequency. However, density functional theory calculations using local or semi-local functionals cannot reproduce this degeneracy. Here, we propose a hybrid functional approach aided by van der Waals (vdW) force fields, which can accurately describe the lattice dynamic and electronic properties of both bulk and few-layer black phosphorus (phosphorene). Using this approach we show that in bilayer phosphorene, the two Raman modes derived from the B2u and Ag (2) modes could exhibit strong resonance as a result of the accidental degeneracy so that both modes could be observed in Raman experiment. Without the mode degeneracy, however, the Raman intensity of the B2u-derived mode would be too weak to be observed. We further show that the accidental degeneracy is correlated to the applied strain, which enables Raman spectroscopy to be a powerful tool for characterizing built-in strains in 2D materials, e.g., due to the interaction with substrates, which has emerged as an important issue in vdW epitaxy. PMID:27421389

  19. Communication: Effect of accidental mode degeneracy on Raman intensity in 2D materials: Hybrid functional study of bilayer phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-07-01

    Bulk black phosphorus has two optical phonon modes labeled as Ag2 and B2u, respectively, that are nearly degenerate in frequency. However, density functional theory calculations using local or semi-local functionals cannot reproduce this degeneracy. Here, we propose a hybrid functional approach aided by van der Waals (vdW) force fields, which can accurately describe the lattice dynamic and electronic properties of both bulk and few-layer black phosphorus (phosphorene). Using this approach we show that in bilayer phosphorene, the two Raman modes derived from the B2u and Ag2 modes could exhibit strong resonance as a result of the accidental degeneracy so that both modes could be observed in Raman experiment. Without the mode degeneracy, however, the Raman intensity of the B2u-derived mode would be too weak to be observed. We further show that the accidental degeneracy is correlated to the applied strain, which enables Raman spectroscopy to be a powerful tool for characterizing built-in strains in 2D materials, e.g., due to the interaction with substrates, which has emerged as an important issue in vdW epitaxy.

  20. Communication: Effect of accidental mode degeneracy on Raman intensity in 2D materials: Hybrid functional study of bilayer phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-07-14

    Bulk black phosphorus has two optical phonon modes labeled as Ag (2) and B2u, respectively, that are nearly degenerate in frequency. However, density functional theory calculations using local or semi-local functionals cannot reproduce this degeneracy. Here, we propose a hybrid functional approach aided by van der Waals (vdW) force fields, which can accurately describe the lattice dynamic and electronic properties of both bulk and few-layer black phosphorus (phosphorene). Using this approach we show that in bilayer phosphorene, the two Raman modes derived from the B2u and Ag (2) modes could exhibit strong resonance as a result of the accidental degeneracy so that both modes could be observed in Raman experiment. Without the mode degeneracy, however, the Raman intensity of the B2u-derived mode would be too weak to be observed. We further show that the accidental degeneracy is correlated to the applied strain, which enables Raman spectroscopy to be a powerful tool for characterizing built-in strains in 2D materials, e.g., due to the interaction with substrates, which has emerged as an important issue in vdW epitaxy.

  1. Novel high-Q modes in thick 2D photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, J. R.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Engin, E.; Railton, C.; Rarity, J. G.; Cryan, M. J.

    2013-03-01

    The periodic nature of photonic crystals (PCs) (Yablonovitch 1987 Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 2059-62 John 1987 Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 2486-9) has been extensively exploited for the past quarter of a century using photonic bandgap (PBG) effects to manipulate photons in engineered electromagnetic structures. Structures such as photonic crystal nanocavities are widely considered to be key in realizing future nanoscale optoelectronic devices. These cavities are capable of creating resonant modes with high-quality factor (Q) and small mode volume, in other words a large Purcell factor (Purcell 1946 Phys. Rev. 69 681), and have been widely researched in the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (PCS) defect cavity configuration (Painter et al 1999 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16 275-85). Here, we demonstrate for the first time how three confinement mechanisms are thought to coincide to give rise to a high-Q resonance for a slab containing a modified L3 defect where the slab thickness is such that the guiding in the slab is no longer single moded (Tandaechanurat et al 2008 Opt. Express 16 448-55). This is in contrast to the conventional design approach, where the PCS thickness is chosen to be of the order of half a lattice constant to ensure that a PBG exists to confine cavity modes strongly within the slab (Painter et al 1999 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16 275-85 Johnson et al 1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 5751-8 Khankhoje et al 2010 Nanotechnology 21 065202). These newly identified high-Q modes can be important in terms of the fabrication of slabs and other devices such as vertical pillars since they allow high-Q factors in thicker and more fabrication tolerant geometries.

  2. 2D modeling of regeneration surface growth on a single-crystal sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. G.; Gavryushkin, P. N.; Fursenko, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of a sphere produced from a single crystal potassium alum in course of its regeneration, using numerical 2D-simulation in the kinematic model, which describes the growth of the regenerating surfaces.The modeling results demonstrate a qualitative agreement between the predictions of the kinematic model and real processes of sphere regeneration. It is shown that the face arising on the regenerating surface of a sphere may grow either more slowly or more rapidly than the surrounding surface. In the latter case, the face interacts with the regeneration surface and disappears from the sphere surface before intersecting in edges with neighboring faces. The influence of the input model parameters on the numerical modeling results is analyzed. It is established that the roughness parameters of the initial surface of a single-crystal sphere significantly affect the surface evolution during regeneration.

  3. A transputer-based list mode parallel system for digital radiography with 2D silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M.; Russo, P.; Scarlatella, A. . Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche and INFN); Del Guerra, A. . Dipt. di Fisica and INFN); Mazzeo, A.; Mazzocca, N.; Russo, S. . Dipt. di Informatica e Sistemistica)

    1993-08-01

    The authors believe that a dedicated parallel computer system can represent an effective and flexible approach to the problem of list mode acquisition and reconstruction of digital radiographic images obtained with a double-sided silicon microstrip detector. They present a Transputer-based implementation of a parallel system for the data acquisition and image reconstruction from a silicon crystal with 200[mu]m read-out pitch. They are currently developing a prototype of the system connected to a detector with a 10mm[sup 2] sensitive area.

  4. Electromagnetic induction by finite wavenumber source fields in 2-D lateral heterogeneities - The transverse electric mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction in a laterally homogeneous earth is analyzed in terms of a source field with finite dimensions. Attention is focused on a time-varying two-dimensional current source directed parallel to the strike of a two-dimensional anomalous structure within the earth, i.e., the E-parallel mode. The spatially harmonic source field is expressed as discontinuities in the magnetic (or electric) field of the current in the source. The model is applied to describing the magnetic gradients across megatectonic features, and may be used to predict the magnetic fields encountered by a satellite orbiting above the ionosphere.

  5. Coupled leaky mode theory for light absorption in 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiling; Cao, Linyou

    2012-06-18

    We present an intuitive, simple theoretical model, coupled leaky mode theory (CLMT), to analyze the light absorption of 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures. This model correlates the light absorption of nanostructures to the optical coupling between incident light and leaky modes of the nanostructure. Unlike conventional methods such as Mie theory that requests specific physical features of nanostructures to evaluate the absorption, the CLMT model provides an unprecedented capability to analyze the absorption using eigen values of the leaky modes. Because the eigenvalue shows very mild dependence on the physical features of nanostructures, we can generally apply one set of eigenvalues calculated using a real, constant refractive index to calculations for the absorption of various nanostructures with different sizes, different materials, and wavelength-dependent complex refractive index. This CLMT model is general, simple, yet reasonably accurate, and offers new intuitive physical insights that the light absorption of nanostructures is governed by the coupling efficiency between incident light and leaky modes of the structure.

  6. Growth of Large and Highly Ordered 2D Crystals of a K+ Channel, Structural Role of Lipidic Environment

    PubMed Central

    De Zorzi, Rita; Nicholson, William V.; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Erne-Brand, Françoise; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    2D crystallography has proven to be an excellent technique to determine the 3D structure of membrane proteins. Compared to 3D crystallography, it has the advantage of visualizing the protein in an environment closer to the native one. However, producing good 2D crystals is still a challenge and little statistical knowledge can be gained from literature. Here, we present a thorough screening of 2D crystallization conditions for a prokaryotic inwardly rectifying potassium channel (>130 different conditions). Key parameters leading to very large and well-organized 2D crystals are discussed. In addition, the problem of formation of multilayers during the growth of 2D crystals is also addressed. An intermediate resolution projection map of KirBac3.1 at 6 Å is presented, which sheds (to our knowledge) new light on the structure of this channel in a lipid environment. PMID:23870261

  7. The Cultural Divide: Exponential Growth in Classical 2D and Metabolic Equilibrium in 3D Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Borkowski, Kamil; Schwämmle, Veit; Dai, Jie; Joensen, Kira Eyd; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Carvalho, Vasco Botelho; Fey, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found that they are dramatically different. Results Structurally, actin organization is changed, microtubules are increased and keratins 8 and 18 decreased. Metabolically, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism and the pentose phosphate shunt are increased while TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is unchanged. Enzymes involved in cholesterol and urea synthesis are increased consistent with the attainment of cholesterol and urea production rates seen in vivo. DNA repair enzymes are increased even though cells are predominantly in Go. Transport around the cell – along the microtubules, through the nuclear pore and in various types of vesicles has been prioritized. There are numerous coherent changes in transcription, splicing, translation, protein folding and degradation. The amount of individual proteins within complexes is shown to be highly coordinated. Typically subunits which initiate a particular function are present in increased amounts compared to other subunits of the same complex. Summary We have previously demonstrated that cells at dynamic equilibrium can match the physiological performance of cells in tissues in vivo. Here we describe the multitude of protein changes necessary to achieve this performance. PMID:25222612

  8. 2D HYDRA Calculations of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Growth and Feedthrough in Cylindrical Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Matthew; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Cylindrical liner implosions are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT), along with the azimuthal current-carrying modes (sausage, kink, etc). ``Feedthrough'' of these instabilities has a strong influence on the integrity of the liner/fuel interface in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept (MagLIF). The linearized ideal MHD equations can be solved to quantify these effects, including the presence of an effective gravity and an axial magnetic field. We investigate the potential of this field to mitigate feedthrough, due to MRT growth from various initial surface finishes (seeded, rough), throughout the implosion using our analytic results and the LLNL code, HYDRA. We will present both low and high convergence cases. Lastly, we illustrate the effect shock compression can have on feedthrough in seeded liners for various fill gases (cold and pre-heated) and magnetic field configurations. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories.

  9. A hybrid wave-mode formulation for the vibro-acoustic analysis of 2D periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz, C.; Zhou, C.; Ichchou, M. N.; Lainé, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of vibrational analysis of 2D periodic waveguides, Floquet-Bloch theorem is widely applied for the determination of wave dispersion characteristics. In this context, the Wave Finite Element Method (WFEM) combines Periodic Structure Theory (PST) with standard FE packages, enabling wave dispersion analysis of waveguides involving structurally realistic unit-cells. For such applications, the computational efficiency of the WFEM depends on the choice of the formulation and can lead to numerical issues, worsen by extensive computational cost. This paper presents a coupled wave-mode approach for the determination of wave dispersion characteristics in structurally advanced periodic structures. It combines two scales of model order reduction. At the unit-cell's scale, Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) provides the displacement field associated with local resonances of the periodic structure, while the free wave propagation is considered using a spectral problem projection on a reduced set of shape functions associated with propagating waves, thus providing considerable reduction of the computational cost. An application is provided for a bi-directionally stiffened panel and the influence of reduction parameters is discussed, as well as the robustness of the numerical results.

  10. Growth mode of polyethylene single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Toda, A.; Tanzawa, Y.; Nakagawa, Y.

    1995-12-01

    The growth kinetics and morphology of polyethylene single crystals of narrow molecular weight fractions is reviewed. Single crystals grown from the melt show two types of morphology in the lateral habits; a lenticular shape elongated in the direction of the b-axis (type A) and a truncated lozenge with curved edges of the (100) growth faces (type B). The change in the lateral habits occurs in the vicinity of a transition in the supercooling dependence of growth rate along the b-axis direction. This talk will discuss the mechanism of the change in morphology and growth mode.

  11. Transverse Strains in Muscle Fascicles during Voluntary Contraction: A 2D Frequency Decomposition of B-Mode Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibres shorten, they must increase in their transverse dimensions in order to maintain a constant volume. In pennate muscle, this transverse expansion results in the fibres rotating to greater pennation angle, with a consequent reduction in their contractile velocity in a process known as gearing. Understanding the nature and extent of this transverse expansion is necessary to understand the mechanisms driving the changes in internal geometry of whole muscles during contraction. Current methodologies allow the fascicle lengths, orientations, and curvatures to be quantified, but not the transverse expansion. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate techniques for quantifying transverse strain in skeletal muscle fascicles during contraction from B-mode ultrasound images. Images were acquired from the medial and lateral gastrocnemii during cyclic contractions, enhanced using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering and the spatial frequencies resolved using 2D discrete Fourier transforms. The frequency information was resolved into the fascicle orientations that were validated against manually digitized values. The transverse fascicle strains were calculated from their wavelengths within the images. These methods showed that the transverse strain increases while the longitudinal fascicle length decreases; however, the extent of these strains was smaller than expected. PMID:25328509

  12. The 2-D growth of gold on single-layer graphene/Ru(0001): Enhancement of CO adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Zhou, Zihao; Guo, Qinlin; Yan, Zhen; Yao, Yunxi; Goodman, D. Wayne

    2011-09-01

    The growth and morphology of two-dimensional (2-D) gold islands on a single-layer graphene supported on Ru(0001) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Our findings show that gold exhibits 2-D structures up to a gold dosage of 0.75 equivalent monolayers, and that these 2-D gold islands are thermally stable at room temperature. Parallel polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic (PM-IRAS) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopic (HREELS) studies indicate that carbon monoxide (CO) adsorbs on these 2-D gold islands at 85 K, showing a characteristic CO stretching feature at 2095 cm-1 for a saturation coverage of CO. The red shift of the CO stretching frequency compared to that on charge neutral gold is consistent with electron transfer from graphene to gold, i.e., an electron-rich gold overlayer. Preliminary data obtained by dosing molecular oxygen onto this CO pre-covered surface suggest that the 2-D gold islands catalyze the oxidation of CO.

  13. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Chitcholtan, Kenny; Asselin, Eric; Parent, Sophie; Sykes, Peter H.; Evans, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  14. Insights into the growth of bismuth nanoparticles on 2D structured BiOCl photocatalysts: an in situ TEM investigation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Shuangbao; Qi, Qi; Gondal, Mohammed A; Rashid, Siddique G; Gao, Si; Yang, Deyuan; Shen, Kai; Xu, Qingyu; Wang, Peng

    2015-09-28

    The synthetic techniques for novel photocatalytic crystals had evolved by a trial-and-error process that spanned more than two decades, and an insight into the photocatalytic crystal growth process is a challenging area and prerequisite for achieving an excellent photoactivity. Bismuth nanoparticle based hybrids, such as Bi/BiOCl composites, have recently been investigated as highly efficient photocatalytic systems because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of nanostructured bismuth. In this work, the observation towards the formation and growth of bismuth nanoparticles onto 2D structured BiOCl photocatalysts has been performed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) directly in real time. The growth of bismuth nanoparticles on BiOCl nanosheets can be emulated and speeded up driven by the electron beam (e(-) beam) in TEM. The crystallinity, growth and the elemental evolution during the formation of bismuth nanoparticles have also been probed in this work.

  15. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials--A general bond polarizability model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-01-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical z(xx)z configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials. PMID:26469313

  16. Co-nucleus 1D/2D Heterostructures with Bi2S3 Nanowire and MoS2 Monolayer: One-Step Growth and Defect-Induced Formation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Huang, Le; Li, Bo; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhou, Ziqi; Li, Jingbo; Wei, Zhongming

    2016-09-27

    Heterostructures constructed by low-dimensional (such as 0D, 1D, and 2D) materials have opened up opportunities for exploring interesting physical properties and versatile (opto)electronics. Recently, 2D/2D heterostructures, in particular, atomically thin graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides, including graphene/MoS2, WSe2/MoS2, and WS2/WSe2, were efficiently prepared (by transfer techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth, etc.) and systematically studied. In contrast, investigation of 1D/2D heterostructures was still very challenging and rarely reported, and the understanding of such heterostructures was also not well established. Herein, we demonstrate the one-step growth of a heterostructure on the basis of a 1D-Bi2S3 nanowire and a 2D-MoS2 monolayer through the CVD method. Multimeans were employed, and the results proved the separated growth of a Bi2S3 nanowire and a MoS2 sheet in the heterostructure rather than forming a BixMo1-xSy alloy due to their large lattice mismatch. Defect-induced co-nucleus growth, which was an important growth mode in 1D/2D heterostructures, was also experimentally confirmed and systematically investigated in our research. Such 1D/2D heterostructures were further fabricated and utilized in (opto)electronic devices, such as field-effect transistors and photodetectors, and revealed their potential for multifunctional design in electrical properties. The direct growth of such nanostructures will help us to gain a better comprehension of these specific configurations and allow device functionalities in potential applications.

  17. Use of 2D and 3D Imaging Techniques to Understand Fracture Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockner, D. A.

    2004-05-01

    The monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) is a valuable tool for studying the brittle fracture process in rock. With the improved characterization of transducer response, researchers are able to apply a broad spectrum of seismological techniques to AE catalogues collected in the laboratory; i.e., moment tensor analysis, Vp/Vs ratios, attenuation, event clustering statistics, Gutenberg-Richter b-value and aftershock analysis. Since AE occurs spontaneously as a result of unstable microcrack growth during rock deformation experiments, it provides a non-destructive method to observe damage accumulation. I will give examples of visualization techniques that have proven helpful in the analysis of fracture nucleation and growth based on 3D event locations in granite and sandstone samples. These techniques are useful in interpreting the development of complex fracture systems in lab samples. Complementary measurements of wave speed anisotropy and heterogeneity are used to infer both the development of damage zones and the rate of infiltration of water during fluid injection experiments. Finally, spatial clustering of AE events is evaluated in terms of the surface roughness of reactivated faults during triaxial deformation experiments.

  18. Facile synthesis of core-shell and Janus particles via 2-D dendritic growth of gold film.

    PubMed

    Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Se-Heon; Lee, Su Yeon; Jeong, Woong Chan; Yang, Seung-Man

    2010-10-15

    We report a facile method for the electroless deposition (ELD) of gold film via two-dimensional (2-D) dendritic growth. Our scheme employs protonated amine groups, which electrostatically attract both the negatively charged reducing agent and gold-precursor. This electrostatic interaction increases the local concentrations of gold-precursor and reducing agent near the silica surface to levels high enough for gold films with a 2-D fractal morphology to form directly on the surfaces of the amine-functionalized silica nanospheres by diffusion-limited aggregation. Our one-pot reaction avoids the need for seed attachment, which is typically employed for the growth of metallic shells on nanospheres. Therefore, the proposed method significantly reduces the number of processing steps required for the production of core-shell nanospheres. The gold morphologies were systematically investigated in terms of various synthesis variables, including solution pH, reducing agent concentration, and gold precursor injection speed. In addition, we synthesized gold-capped silica nanospheres via ELD of gold on a patterned array of silica nanospheres embedded in polystyrene (PS) film followed by dissolution of the PS matrix, thus demonstrating the potential utility of the proposed method in emerging fields of materials science such as patterning of noble metals and studies of nanometer-scale optics. PMID:20678776

  19. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-15

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model. PMID:21386517

  20. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose–response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  1. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose-response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  2. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-12-19

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose-response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  3. The Effect of Magnetic Field on 2-D Problem for a Mode-I Crack of a Fiber-Reinforced in Generalized Thermoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Kh.; Othman, Mohamed I. A.

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, the coupled theory, Lord-Şhulman theory, and Green-Lindsay theory are introduced to study the influence of a magnetic field on the 2-D problem of a fiber-reinforced thermoelastic. These theories are also applied to study the influence of reinforcement on the total deformation of an infinite space weakened by a finite linear opening Mode-I crack. The material is homogeneous and an isotropic elastic half-space. The crack is subjected to a prescribed temperature and stress distribution. Normal mode analysis is used to solve the problem of a Mode-I crack. Numerical results for the temperature, the displacement, and thermal stress components are given and illustrated graphically in the absence and the presence of the magnetic field. A comparison between the three theories is also made for different depths.

  4. Synthesis of silver nanostructures by simple redox under electrodeposited copper microcubes and the orient attachment growth of 2D silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoxing; Yang, Sanjun; Liu, Qiming

    2015-12-01

    Copper microcubes about 500 nm were electrodeposited on ITO glasses. Silver nanoparticles, netty consist of short nanorods or nanowires, nanosheets with thickness about 40 nm, were successfully obtained by immersing ITOs with different concentration of AgNO3 solution. XRD, SEM and TEM were applied to characterize the products. Silver ions were initially reduced on the surface of copper, and then gradually decomposed the copper. Cuprous oxide intermediate was found to participate in the redox reaction. Both agglomerates on the cubes and escaped reductant nanoparticles act as the positions for anisotropic growth. Based on the experimental results, the roles of three kinds of cubes are discussed in preparing the nanosheets before proposing the possible growth process. Oriented attachment influenced and controlled the final shapes, such as layered nanonets, nanoplates and nanosheets. Big nanoparticles were inclined to link as nanowires, netty and even 2D porous structure consisted of 'nanosnakes', small reductant nanoparticles with silver around absorbed on the edge of silver nanoplate and further accelerated the extension of nanoplate until worked out, holes on the nanoplate confirmed that the adsorbed matters could be reductant nanoparticles. Reductant nanoparticles can also be exhausted before silver nanoparticles and nanoflakes absorbed on the growth positions.

  5. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  6. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-04-20

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  7. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  8. An omics approach to rational feed: Enhancing growth in CHO cultures with NMR metabolomics and 2D-DIGE proteomics.

    PubMed

    Blondeel, Eric J M; Ho, Raymond; Schulze, Steffen; Sokolenko, Stanislav; Guillemette, Simon R; Slivac, Igor; Durocher, Yves; Guillemette, J Guy; McConkey, Brendan J; Chang, David; Aucoin, Marc G

    2016-09-20

    Expression of recombinant proteins exerts stress on cell culture systems, affecting the expression of endogenous proteins, and contributing to the depletion of nutrients and accumulation of waste metabolites. In this work, 2D-DIGE proteomics was employed to analyze differential expression of proteins following stable transfection of a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line to constitutively express a heavy-chain monoclonal antibody. Thirty-four proteins of significant differential expression were identified and cross-referenced with cellular functions and metabolic pathways to identify points of cell stress. Subsequently, 1D-(1)H NMR metabolomics experiments analyzed cultures to observe nutrient depletion and waste metabolite accumulations to further examine these cell stresses and pathways. From among fifty metabolites tracked in time-course, eight were observed to be completely depleted from the production media, including: glucose, glutamine, proline, serine, cystine, asparagine, choline, and hypoxanthine, while twenty-three excreted metabolites were also observed to accumulate. The differentially expressed proteins, as well as the nutrient depletion and accumulation of these metabolites corresponded with upregulated pathways and cell systems related to anaplerotic TCA-replenishment, NADH/NADPH replenishment, tetrahydrofolate cycle C1 cofactor conversions, limitations to lipid synthesis, and redox modulation. A nutrient cocktail was assembled to improve the growth medium and alleviate these cell stresses to achieve a ∼75% improvement to peak cell densities. PMID:27496566

  9. Shape regression machine and efficient segmentation of left ventricle endocardium from 2D B-mode echocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaohua Kevin

    2010-08-01

    We present a machine learning approach called shape regression machine (SRM) for efficient segmentation of an anatomic structure that exhibits a deformable shape in a medical image, e.g., left ventricle endocardial wall in an echocardiogram. The SRM achieves efficient segmentation via statistical learning of the interrelations among shape, appearance, and anatomy, which are exemplified by an annotated database. The SRM is a two-stage approach. In the first stage that estimates a rigid shape to solve an automatic initialization problem, it derives a regression solution to object detection that needs just one scan in principle and a sparse set of scans in practice, avoiding the exhaustive scanning required by the state-of-the-art classification-based detection approach while yielding comparable detection accuracy. In the second stage that estimates the nonrigid shape, it again learns a nonlinear regressor to directly associate nonrigid shape with image appearance. The underpinning of both stages is a novel image-based boosting ridge regression (IBRR) method that enables multivariate, nonlinear modeling and accommodates fast evaluation. We demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the SRM using experiments on segmenting the left ventricle endocardium from a B-mode echocardiogram of apical four chamber view. The proposed algorithm is able to automatically detect and accurately segment the LV endocardial border in about 120ms.

  10. 1,25(OH)2D3 Alters Growth Plate Maturation and Bone Architecture in Young Rats with Normal Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Idelevich, Anna; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Shahar, Ron; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat

    2011-01-01

    Whereas detrimental effects of vitamin D deficiency are known over century, the effects of vitamin D receptor activation by 1,25(OH)2D3, the principal hormonal form of vitamin D, on the growing bone and its growth plate are less clear. Currently, 1,25(OH)2D3 is used in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease and mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and is strongly associated with growth retardation. Here, we investigate the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment on bone development in normal young rats, unrelated to renal insufficiency. Young rats received daily i.p. injections of 1 µg/kg 1,25(OH)2D3 for one week, or intermittent 3 µg/kg 1,25(OH)2D3 for one month. Histological analysis revealed narrower tibial growth plates, predominantly in the hypertrophic zone of 1,25(OH)2D3-treated animals in both experimental protocols. This phenotype was supported by narrower distribution of aggrecan, collagens II and X mRNA, shown by in situ hybridization. Concomitant with altered chondrocyte maturation, 1,25(OH)2D3 increased chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis in terminal hypertrophic cells. In vitro treatment of the chondrocytic cell line ATDC5 with 1,25(OH)2D3 lowered differentiation and increased proliferation dose and time-dependently. Micro-CT analysis of femurs from 1-week 1,25(OH)2D3-treated group revealed reduced cortical thickness, elevated cortical porosity, and higher trabecular number and thickness. 1-month administration resulted in a similar cortical phenotype but without effect on trabecular bone. Evaluation of fluorochrome binding with confocal microscopy revealed inhibiting effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on intracortical bone formation. This study shows negative effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on growth plate and bone which may contribute to the exacerbation of MBD in the CKD pediatric patients. PMID:21695192

  11. AtHD2D Gene Plays a Role in Plant Growth, Development, and Response to Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhaofen; Yu, Huimin; Zhao, Zhong; Hunter, David; Luo, Xinjuan; Duan, Jun; Tian, Lining

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylases play important roles in the regulation of gene expression and the subsequent control of a number of important biological processes, including those involved in the response to environmental stress. A specific group of histone deacetylase genes, HD2, is present in plants. In Arabidopsis, HD2s include HD2A, HD2B, HD2C, and HD2D. Previous research showed that HD2A, HD2B, and HD2C are more related in terms of expression and function, but not HD2D. In this report, we studied different aspects of AtHD2D in Arabidopsis with respect to plant response to drought and other abiotic stresses. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that HD2D is distantly related to other HD2 genes. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and stable expression in Arabidopsis of AtHD2D fused with gfp showed that AtHD2D was expressed in the nucleus. Overexpression of AtHD2D resulted in developmental changes including fewer main roots, more lateral roots, and a higher root:shoot ratio. Seed germination and plant flowering time were delayed in transgenic plants expressing AtHD2D, but these plants exhibited higher degrees of tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, and cold stresses. Physiological studies indicated that the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was high in wild-type plants but in plants overexpressing HD2D the MDA level increased slowly in response to stress conditions of drought, cold, and salt stress. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage in leaf cells of wild type plants increased but remained stable in transgenic plants. Our results indicate that AtHD2D is unique among HD2 genes and it plays a role in plant growth and development regulation and these changes can modulate plant stress responses. PMID:27066015

  12. AtHD2D Gene Plays a Role in Plant Growth, Development, and Response to Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhaofen; Yu, Huimin; Zhao, Zhong; Hunter, David; Luo, Xinjuan; Duan, Jun; Tian, Lining

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylases play important roles in the regulation of gene expression and the subsequent control of a number of important biological processes, including those involved in the response to environmental stress. A specific group of histone deacetylase genes, HD2, is present in plants. In Arabidopsis, HD2s include HD2A, HD2B, HD2C, and HD2D. Previous research showed that HD2A, HD2B, and HD2C are more related in terms of expression and function, but not HD2D. In this report, we studied different aspects of AtHD2D in Arabidopsis with respect to plant response to drought and other abiotic stresses. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that HD2D is distantly related to other HD2 genes. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and stable expression in Arabidopsis of AtHD2D fused with gfp showed that AtHD2D was expressed in the nucleus. Overexpression of AtHD2D resulted in developmental changes including fewer main roots, more lateral roots, and a higher root:shoot ratio. Seed germination and plant flowering time were delayed in transgenic plants expressing AtHD2D, but these plants exhibited higher degrees of tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, and cold stresses. Physiological studies indicated that the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was high in wild-type plants but in plants overexpressing HD2D the MDA level increased slowly in response to stress conditions of drought, cold, and salt stress. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage in leaf cells of wild type plants increased but remained stable in transgenic plants. Our results indicate that AtHD2D is unique among HD2 genes and it plays a role in plant growth and development regulation and these changes can modulate plant stress responses.

  13. Growth Modes of Nd Deposited on Mo(110) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sadaharu; Gotoh, Yoshihiko

    1999-12-01

    We have studied the growth modes of Nd deposited on a Mo(110) surface by means of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nd grows on the Mo(110) surface in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode in the temperature range between 500°C and 750°C, in which a monolayer with a c(5×3) structure grows initially, followed by the growth of Nd islands. On the other hand, Nd grows on the Mo(110) surface in the pseudo Frank-van der Merwe growth mode in the temperature range between room temperature and 500°C. The results of RHEED specular beam intensity oscillations also support the above-mentioned growth modes.

  14. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    PubMed

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  15. Slow crack growth in glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetty, D. K.; Rosenfield, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    Slow crack growth in soda-lime glass under combined mode I and mode II loading was investigated in precracked disk specimens in which pure mode I, pure mode II, and various combinations of mode I and mode II were achieved by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to symmetric radial cracks. It is shown that slow crack growth under these conditions can be described by a simple exponential relationship with elastic strain energy release rate as the effective crack-driving force parameter. It is possible to interpret this equation in terms of theoretical models that treat subcritical crack growth as a thermally activated bond-rupture process with an activation energy dependent on the environment, and the elastic energy release rate as the crack-driving force parameter.

  16. Tuning the Growth Pattern in 2D Confinement Regime of Sm2O3 and the Emerging Room Temperature Unusual Superparamagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Guria, Amit K.; Dey, Koushik; Sarkar, Suresh; Patra, Biplab K.; Giri, Saurav; Pradhan, Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Programming the reaction chemistry for superseding the formation of Sm2O3 in a competitive process of formation and dissolution, the crystal growth patterns are varied and two different nanostructures of Sm2O3 in 2D confinement regime are designed. Among these, the regular and self-assembled square platelets nanostructures exhibit paramagnetic behavior analogous to the bulk Sm2O3. But, the other one, 2D flower like shaped nanostructure, formed by irregular crystal growth, shows superparamagnetism at room temperature which is unusual for bulk paramagnet. It has been noted that the variation in the crystal growth pattern is due to the difference in the binding ability of two organic ligands, oleylamine and oleic acid, used for the synthesis and the magnetic behavior of the nanostructures is related to the defects incorporated during the crystal growth. Herein, we inspect the formation chemistry and plausible origin of contrasting magnetism of these nanostructures of Sm2O3. PMID:25269458

  17. Step-Edge-Guided Nucleation and Growth of Aligned WSe2 on Sapphire via a Layer-over-Layer Growth Mode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Bilu; Ge, Mingyuan; Ma, Yuqiang; Abbas, Ahmad N; Zhou, Chongwu

    2015-08-25

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene have drawn a lot of attention recently. Among the large family of 2D materials, transitional metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), for example, molybdenum disulfides (MoS2) and tungsten diselenides (WSe2), have been demonstrated to be good candidates for advanced electronics, optoelectronics, and other applications. Growth of large single-crystalline domains and continuous films of monolayer TMDCs has been achieved recently. Usually, these TMDC flakes nucleate randomly on substrates, and their orientation cannot be controlled. Nucleation control and orientation control are important steps in 2D material growth, because randomly nucleated and orientated flakes will form grain boundaries when adjacent flakes merge together, and the formation of grain boundaries may degrade mechanical and electrical properties of as-grown materials. The use of single crystalline substrates enables the alignment of as-grown TMDC flakes via a substrate-flake epitaxial interaction, as demonstrated recently. Here we report a step-edge-guided nucleation and growth approach for the aligned growth of 2D WSe2 by a chemical vapor deposition method using C-plane sapphire as substrates. We found that at temperatures above 950 °C the growth is strongly guided by the atomic steps on the sapphire surface, which leads to the aligned growth of WSe2 along the step edges on the sapphire substrate. In addition, such atomic steps facilitate a layer-over-layer overlapping process to form few-layer WSe2 structures, which is different from the classical layer-by-layer mode for thin-film growth. This work introduces an efficient way to achieve oriented growth of 2D WSe2 and adds fresh knowledge on the growth mechanism of WSe2 and potentially other 2D materials. PMID:26221865

  18. Step-Edge-Guided Nucleation and Growth of Aligned WSe2 on Sapphire via a Layer-over-Layer Growth Mode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Bilu; Ge, Mingyuan; Ma, Yuqiang; Abbas, Ahmad N; Zhou, Chongwu

    2015-08-25

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene have drawn a lot of attention recently. Among the large family of 2D materials, transitional metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), for example, molybdenum disulfides (MoS2) and tungsten diselenides (WSe2), have been demonstrated to be good candidates for advanced electronics, optoelectronics, and other applications. Growth of large single-crystalline domains and continuous films of monolayer TMDCs has been achieved recently. Usually, these TMDC flakes nucleate randomly on substrates, and their orientation cannot be controlled. Nucleation control and orientation control are important steps in 2D material growth, because randomly nucleated and orientated flakes will form grain boundaries when adjacent flakes merge together, and the formation of grain boundaries may degrade mechanical and electrical properties of as-grown materials. The use of single crystalline substrates enables the alignment of as-grown TMDC flakes via a substrate-flake epitaxial interaction, as demonstrated recently. Here we report a step-edge-guided nucleation and growth approach for the aligned growth of 2D WSe2 by a chemical vapor deposition method using C-plane sapphire as substrates. We found that at temperatures above 950 °C the growth is strongly guided by the atomic steps on the sapphire surface, which leads to the aligned growth of WSe2 along the step edges on the sapphire substrate. In addition, such atomic steps facilitate a layer-over-layer overlapping process to form few-layer WSe2 structures, which is different from the classical layer-by-layer mode for thin-film growth. This work introduces an efficient way to achieve oriented growth of 2D WSe2 and adds fresh knowledge on the growth mechanism of WSe2 and potentially other 2D materials.

  19. Transport modes during crystal growth in a centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Carlson, Frederick; Chait, Arnon; Regel', Liia L.

    1992-01-01

    Flow modes arising under average acceleration in centrifugal crystal growth, the gradient of acceleration, and the Coriolis force are investigated using a fully nonlinear three-dimensional numerical model for a centrifugal crystal growth experiment. The analysis focuses on an examination of the quasi-steady state flow modes. The importance of the gradient acceleration is determined by the value of a new nondimensional number, Ad.

  20. Raman modes of MoS2 used as fingerprint of van der Waals interactions in 2-D crystal-based heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai-Ge; Withers, Freddie; Cao, Yang; Hu, Sheng; Yu, Geliang; Casiraghi, Cinzia

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we use Raman spectroscopy as a nondestructive and rapid technique for probing the van der Waals (vdW) forces acting between two atomically thin crystals, where one is a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC). In this work, MoS2 is used as a Raman probe: we show that its two Raman-active phonon modes can provide information on the interaction between the two crystals. In particular, the in-plane vibration (E2g(1)) provides information on the in-plane strain, while the out-of-plane mode (A1g) gives evidence for the quality of the interfacial contact. We show that a vdW contact with MoS2 is characterized by a blue shift of +2 cm(-1) of the A1g peak. In the case of a MoS2/graphene heterostructure, the vdW contact is also characterized by a shift of +14 cm(-1) of the 2D peak of graphene. Our approach offers a very simple, nondestructive, and fast method to characterize the quality of the interface of heterostructures containing atomically thick TMDC crystals.

  1. Nonlinear growth of strongly unstable tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1993-11-01

    Rutherford`s theory of the tearing instability is extended to cases where current nonlinearities are important, such as long wavelength modes in current slabs and the m = 1 instability in tokamaks with moderately large aspect-ratios. Of particular interest is the possibility that the associated magnetic islands, as a result of secondary instabilities, have a singular response to the Ohmic diffusion of the current. A family of islands is used to test this possibility; it is found that the response remains bounded.

  2. Critical Slowing of Density Fluctuations Approaching the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals: 2D IR Measurements and Mode Coupling Theory.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Kathleen P; Bailey, Heather E; Hoffman, David J; Andersen, Hans C; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) data are presented for a vibrational probe in three nematogens: 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl, and 4-(trans-4-amylcyclohexyl)-benzonitrile. The spectral diffusion time constants in all three liquids in the isotropic phase are proportional to [T*/(T - T*)](1/2), where T* is 0.5-1 K below the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TNI). Rescaling to a reduced temperature shows that the decays of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) for all three nematogens fall on the same curve, suggesting a universal dynamic behavior of nematogens above TNI. Spectral diffusion is complete before significant orientational relaxation in the liquid, as measured by optically heterodyne detected-optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) spectroscopy, and before any significant orientational randomization of the probe measured by polarization selective IR pump-probe experiments. To interpret the OHD-OKE and FFCF data, we constructed a mode coupling theory (MCT) schematic model for the relationships among three correlation functions: ϕ1, a correlator for large wave vector density fluctuations; ϕ2, the orientational correlation function whose time derivative is the observable in the OHD-OKE experiment; and ϕ3, the FFCF for the 2D IR experiment. The equations for ϕ1 and ϕ2 match those in the previous MCT schematic model for nematogens, and ϕ3 is coupled to the first two correlators in a straightforward manner. Resulting models fit the data very well. Across liquid crystals, the temperature dependences of the coupling constants show consistent, nonmonotonic behavior. A remarkable change in coupling occurs at ∼5 K above TNI, precisely where the rate of spectral diffusion in 5CB was observed to deviate from that of a similar nonmesogenic liquid.

  3. Critical Slowing of Density Fluctuations Approaching the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals: 2D IR Measurements and Mode Coupling Theory.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Kathleen P; Bailey, Heather E; Hoffman, David J; Andersen, Hans C; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) data are presented for a vibrational probe in three nematogens: 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl, and 4-(trans-4-amylcyclohexyl)-benzonitrile. The spectral diffusion time constants in all three liquids in the isotropic phase are proportional to [T*/(T - T*)](1/2), where T* is 0.5-1 K below the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TNI). Rescaling to a reduced temperature shows that the decays of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) for all three nematogens fall on the same curve, suggesting a universal dynamic behavior of nematogens above TNI. Spectral diffusion is complete before significant orientational relaxation in the liquid, as measured by optically heterodyne detected-optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) spectroscopy, and before any significant orientational randomization of the probe measured by polarization selective IR pump-probe experiments. To interpret the OHD-OKE and FFCF data, we constructed a mode coupling theory (MCT) schematic model for the relationships among three correlation functions: ϕ1, a correlator for large wave vector density fluctuations; ϕ2, the orientational correlation function whose time derivative is the observable in the OHD-OKE experiment; and ϕ3, the FFCF for the 2D IR experiment. The equations for ϕ1 and ϕ2 match those in the previous MCT schematic model for nematogens, and ϕ3 is coupled to the first two correlators in a straightforward manner. Resulting models fit the data very well. Across liquid crystals, the temperature dependences of the coupling constants show consistent, nonmonotonic behavior. A remarkable change in coupling occurs at ∼5 K above TNI, precisely where the rate of spectral diffusion in 5CB was observed to deviate from that of a similar nonmesogenic liquid. PMID:27363680

  4. Mode of dendrite growth in undercooled alloy melts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Yang, G.; Zhou, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The mode of dendrite growth in the undercooled Ni-50 at% Cu alloy was investigated. At lower undercoolings, the dendrite growth is mainly controlled by solute diffusion, and the formed dendritic morphologies are similar to those of the conventional as-cast equiaxed crystals, except that here the branches are much denser. At higher undercoolings, however, the severe solutal trapping that results from high dendrite growth velocity weakens the effect of solute diffusion on the dendrite growth. In this case, the dendrites branch in the bunching form. The dendrite spacings were measured, and the results were interpreted with the current dendrite growth theories.

  5. Centimeter Scale Patterned Growth of Vertically Stacked Few Layer Only 2D MoS2/WS2 van der Waals Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Nitin; Park, Juhong; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Chung, Hee-Suk; Dumas, Kenneth H.; Khondaker, Saiful I.; Choi, Wonbong; Jung, Yeonwoong

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waal (vdW) heterostructures composed of vertically-stacked multiple transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) are envisioned to present unprecedented materials properties unobtainable from any other material systems. Conventional fabrications of these hybrid materials have relied on the low-yield manual exfoliation and stacking of individual 2D TMD layers, which remain impractical for scaled-up applications. Attempts to chemically synthesize these materials have been recently pursued, which are presently limited to randomly and scarcely grown 2D layers with uncontrolled layer numbers on very small areas. Here, we report the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area (>2 cm2) patterned 2D vdW heterostructures composed of few layer, vertically-stacked MoS2 and WS2. Detailed structural characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution/scanning transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/STEM) directly evidence the structural integrity of two distinct 2D TMD layers with atomically sharp vdW heterointerfaces. Electrical transport measurements of these materials reveal diode-like behavior with clear current rectification, further confirming the formation of high-quality heterointerfaces. The intrinsic scalability and controllability of the CVD method presented in this study opens up a wide range of opportunities for emerging applications based on the unconventional functionalities of these uniquely structured materials.

  6. Centimeter Scale Patterned Growth of Vertically Stacked Few Layer Only 2D MoS2/WS2 van der Waals Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Nitin; Park, Juhong; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Chung, Hee-Suk; Dumas, Kenneth H; Khondaker, Saiful I; Choi, Wonbong; Jung, Yeonwoong

    2016-05-05

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waal (vdW) heterostructures composed of vertically-stacked multiple transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) are envisioned to present unprecedented materials properties unobtainable from any other material systems. Conventional fabrications of these hybrid materials have relied on the low-yield manual exfoliation and stacking of individual 2D TMD layers, which remain impractical for scaled-up applications. Attempts to chemically synthesize these materials have been recently pursued, which are presently limited to randomly and scarcely grown 2D layers with uncontrolled layer numbers on very small areas. Here, we report the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area (>2 cm(2)) patterned 2D vdW heterostructures composed of few layer, vertically-stacked MoS2 and WS2. Detailed structural characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution/scanning transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/STEM) directly evidence the structural integrity of two distinct 2D TMD layers with atomically sharp vdW heterointerfaces. Electrical transport measurements of these materials reveal diode-like behavior with clear current rectification, further confirming the formation of high-quality heterointerfaces. The intrinsic scalability and controllability of the CVD method presented in this study opens up a wide range of opportunities for emerging applications based on the unconventional functionalities of these uniquely structured materials.

  7. Centimeter Scale Patterned Growth of Vertically Stacked Few Layer Only 2D MoS2/WS2 van der Waals Heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Nitin; Park, Juhong; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Chung, Hee-Suk; Dumas, Kenneth H.; Khondaker, Saiful I.; Choi, Wonbong; Jung, Yeonwoong

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waal (vdW) heterostructures composed of vertically-stacked multiple transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) are envisioned to present unprecedented materials properties unobtainable from any other material systems. Conventional fabrications of these hybrid materials have relied on the low-yield manual exfoliation and stacking of individual 2D TMD layers, which remain impractical for scaled-up applications. Attempts to chemically synthesize these materials have been recently pursued, which are presently limited to randomly and scarcely grown 2D layers with uncontrolled layer numbers on very small areas. Here, we report the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area (>2 cm2) patterned 2D vdW heterostructures composed of few layer, vertically-stacked MoS2 and WS2. Detailed structural characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution/scanning transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/STEM) directly evidence the structural integrity of two distinct 2D TMD layers with atomically sharp vdW heterointerfaces. Electrical transport measurements of these materials reveal diode-like behavior with clear current rectification, further confirming the formation of high-quality heterointerfaces. The intrinsic scalability and controllability of the CVD method presented in this study opens up a wide range of opportunities for emerging applications based on the unconventional functionalities of these uniquely structured materials. PMID:27147503

  8. Numerical Modeling of Detachment Folding: a 2D Approach with Application to Incremental Coseismic Fold Growth in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Luther; Suppe, John; Graveleau, Fabien

    2010-05-01

    -Chi-like earthquakes with 8 m slip terminating in the fold and about 45 non-Chi-Chi events with 8 m slip passing through the fold. In order to understand the incremental, but not necessarily dynamical, development of the Tungshih and other similar anticlines we are developing 2D numerical models similar to this structure using both idealized initial states (flat layers, level ground surface, etc.) and deformed states derived from the natural prototype (seismic profiles, surface data, etc.). We are taking this two-pronged approach because while our main goal is to re-create the last 12 m increment of growth on the Cholan structure, having knowledge of the nature and extent of the strains (damage to the rockmass) required to get to this initial pre-Chi-Chi state will likely be important with regard to setting up the 'natural' example model. In other words-knowing where the rockmass is weakened or anisotropic due to prior deformation will aid in defining the character and distribution of material properties in our incremental model. We are using both continuum and discrete modeling methods and are examining the feasibility of developing a coupled continuous/discrete model in which deeper the levels of the structure is modeled as a continuum and the near surface is simulated using a bonded particle-based method. The particle nature of the discrete formulation lends itself particularly well to addressing the inherently discontinuous nature of shallow-level deformation. Both techniques rely on finite-difference formulations, which we believe have significant advantages over traditional finite-element modeling approaches. Results expected from this modeling work include, among others: 1) better understanding of the mechanical controls of the evolution of detachment folds in general; 2) knowledge of the slip-transfer mechanisms at core of the Tungshih anticline and mechanical conditions that allow us to re-create the surface deformation documented at Cholan; 3) an understanding of the

  9. High-pressure melt growth and transport properties of SiP, SiAs, GeP, and GeAs 2D layered semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreteau, C.; Michon, B.; Besnard, C.; Giannini, E.

    2016-06-01

    Silicon and Germanium monopnictides SiP, SiAs, GeP and GeAs form a family of 2D layered semiconductors. We have succeeded in growing bulk single crystals of these compounds by melt-growth under high pressure (0.5-1 GPa) in a cubic anvil hot press. Large (mm-size), shiny, micaceous crystals of GeP, GeAs and SiAs were obtained, and could be exfoliated into 2D flakes. Small and brittle crystals of SiP were yielded by this method. High-pressure sintered polycrystalline SiP and GeAs have also been successfully used as a precursor in the Chemical Vapor Transport growth of these crystals in the presence of I2 as a transport agent. All compounds are found to crystallize in the expected layered structure and do not undergo any structural transition at low temperature, as shown by Raman spectroscopy down to T=5 K. All materials exhibit a semiconducting behavior. The electrical resistivity of GeP, GeAs and SiAs is found to depend on temperature following a 2D-Variable Range Hopping conduction mechanism. The availability of bulk crystals of these compounds opens new perspectives in the field of 2D semiconducting materials for device applications.

  10. Inducible growth mode switches influence Valonia rhizoid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Elvira, Paul Rommel; Sekida, Satoko; Okuda, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    Cell differentiation and cell type commitment are an integral part of plant growth and development. Investigations on how environmental conditions affect the formation of shoots, roots, and rhizoids can help illustrate how plants determine cell fate and overall morphology. In this study, we evaluated the role of substratum and light on rhizoid differentiation in the coenocytic green alga, Valonia aegagropila. Elongating rhizoids displayed varying growth modes and cell shape upon exposure to different substrata and light conditions. It was found that soft substrata and dark incubation promoted rhizoid elongation via tip growth while subsequent exposure to light prevented tip growth and instead induced swelling in the apical region of rhizoids. Swelling was accompanied by the accumulation of protoplasm in the rhizoid tip through expansion of the cell wall and uninhibited cytoplasmic streaming. Subsequent diffuse growth led to the transformation from slender, rod-shaped rhizoids into spherical thallus-like structures that required photosynthesis. Further manipulation of light regimes caused vacillating cell growth redirections. An elongating V. aegagropila rhizoid cell thus appears capable of growth mode switching that is regulated by immediate environmental conditions thereby influencing ultimate cell shape and function. This is the first description of inducible, multiple growth mode shifts in a single intact plant cell that directly impact its differentiation.

  11. 25(OH)D Is Effective to Repress Human Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Growth through the Conversion of 25(OH)D to 1α,25(OH)2D3

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Yeh, Ta-Sen; S. Pang, Jong-Hwei; Hsu, Jun-Te; Chen, Li-Wei; Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Kittaka, Atsushi; Chen, Tai C.; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating disease without effective treatments. 1α,25(OH)2D3, the active form of Vitamin D, has emerged as a new anti-cancer regimen. However, the side effect of hypercalcemia impedes its systemic administration. 25(OH)D is biologically inert and needs hydroxylation by CYP27B1 to form 1α,25(OH)2D3, which is originally believed to only take place in kidneys. Recently, the extra-renal expression of CYP27B1 has been identified and in vitro conversion of 25(OH)D to 1α,25(OH)2D3 has been found in some cancer cells with CYP27B1 expression. In this study, CYP27B1 expression was demonstrated in CCA cells and human CCA specimens. 25(OH)D effectively represses SNU308 cells growth, which was strengthened or attenuated as CYP27B1 overexpression or knockdown. Lipocalcin-2 (LCN2) was also found to be repressed by 25(OH)D. After treatment with 800 ng/mL 25(OH)D, the intracellular 1α,25(OH)2D3 concentration was higher in SNU308 cells with CYP27B1 overexpression than wild type SNU308 cells. In a xenograft animal experiment, 25(OH)D, at a dose of 6 μg/kg or 20 μg/kg, significantly inhibited SNU308 cells’ growth without inducing obvious side effects. Collectively, our results indicated that SNU308 cells were able to convert 25(OH)D to 1α,25(OH)2D3 and 25(OH)D CYP27B1 gene therapy could be deemed as a promising therapeutic direction for CCA. PMID:27529229

  12. Growth of eccentric modes in disc-planet interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssandier, Jean; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-05-01

    We formulate a set of linear equations that describe the behaviour of small eccentricities in a protoplanetary system consisting of a gaseous disc and a planet. Eccentricity propagates through the disc by means of pressure and self-gravity, and is exchanged with the planet via secular interactions. Excitation and damping of eccentricity can occur through Lindblad and corotation resonances, as well as viscosity. We compute normal modes of the coupled disc-planet system in the case of short-period giant planets orbiting inside an inner cavity, possibly carved by the stellar magnetosphere. Three-dimensional effects allow for a mode to be trapped in the inner parts of the disc. This mode can easily grow within the disc's lifetime. An eccentric mode dominated by the planet can also grow, although less rapidly. We compute the structure and growth rates of these modes and their dependence on the assumed properties of the disc.

  13. Time resolved x-ray studies on growth mode changes induced by quantum electronic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hawoong; Basile, Leonardo; Peter, Czoschke; Tai-C., Chiang

    2004-03-01

    Growth of Pb thin films on Si(111)-(7x7) was studied by reflection surface x-ray diffraction in real time. During the deposition of Pb films at low temperatures, not only the reflectivity curves, but also all the rocking curves at every points on the reflectivity curves were continuously measured. In other words, two dimensional k-space mapping around specula reflectivity was obtained instead of conventional time-resolved reflectivity measurement at an anti-Bragg position. The abundance of information from real time 2-D k-space maps reveals very clear changes in the growth mode of ultra thin Pb films. In a temperature range where the quantum size effect is dominant, alternating layer and island growth was observed.[1] At the lower temperatures, layer-by-layer growth proceeds without a break. At the higher temperature, films grow rough. Kinetics leading to the growth mode changes will be discussed. [1] Hawoong Hong, C.-M.Wei, M.Y. Chou, Z.Wu, L. Basile, H. Chen, M. Holt, and T.-C. Chiang, Phys. Rev. Lett., 90, 076104 (2003)

  14. HIGH-MODE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR GROWTH IN NIF IGNITION CAPSULES

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, B A; Haan, S W; Clark, D; Edwards, M J; Langer, S H; Marinak, M; Patel, M; Salmonson, J; Scott, H A

    2009-08-04

    An assessment of short wavelength hydrodynamic stability is an essential component in the optimization of NIF ignition target designs. Using highly-resolved massively-parallel 2-D Hydra simulations, we routinely evaluate target designs up to mode numbers of 2000 ({lambda} {approx} 2 {micro}m). On the outer ablator surface, mode numbers up to {approx}300 ({lambda} {approx} 20 {micro}m) can have significant growth in CH capsule designs. At the internal fuel:ablator interface mode numbers up to {approx}2000 are important for both CH and Be designs. In addition, 'isolated features' on the capsule, such as the 'fill-tube' ({approx} 5 {micro}m scale-length) and defects, can seed short wavelength growth at the ablation front and the fuel:ablator interface, leading to the injection of {approx} 10's ng of ablator material into the central hot-spot. We are developing methods to measure high-mode mix on NIF implosion experiments. X-ray spectroscopic methods are appealing since mix into the hot-spot will result in x-ray emission from the high-Z dopant (Cu or Ge) in the ablator material (Be or CH).

  15. 2D Confined-Space Assisted Growth of Molecular-Level-Thick Polypyrrole Sheets with High Conductivity and Transparency.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Dong; Wu, Yongjin; Tian, Xiaorui; Qin, Haili; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Ting; Ni, Weihai; Jin, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Herein, the use of a 2D soft template system composed of hundred-nanometer-thick water/ethanol mixed layers sandwiched by lamellar bilayer membranes of a self-assembled amphiphilic molecule to produce ultrathin polyprrole (PPy) with a uniform thickness as thin as 3.8 nm and with large dimensions (>2 μm(2)) is presented. The obtained PPy nanosheets exhibit regioregularity with ordered chain alignment where the polymer chains in the nanosheets produced are well aligned with a clear interchain spacing as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering measurement. The molecular-level-thick PPy nanosheets exhibit extremely high conductivity up to 1330 S m(-1), thanks to the ordered alignment of polymer chains in the nanosheets, and a high transparency in both the visible region (transmittance >99%) and near-infrared region (transmittance >93%).

  16. Growth modes of ZnO nanostructures from laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarilio-Burshtein, I.; Tamir, S.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2010-03-01

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) and other nanostructures were grown by laser ablation of a ZnO containing target onto different substrates with and without the presence of an Au catalyst. The morphology and structure of the NWs were studied using high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopes [including imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS)]. The different growth modes obtainable could be tuned by varying the Zn concentration in the vapor phase keeping other growth parameters intact. Possible growth mechanisms of these nanowires are suggested and discussed.

  17. Characterization of Mode 1 and Mode 2 delamination growth and thresholds in graphite/peek composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Murri, Gretchen B.

    1988-01-01

    Composite materials often fail by delamination. The onset and growth of delamination in AS4/PEEK, a tough thermoplastic matrix composite, was characterized for mode 1 and mode 2 loadings, using the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) test specimens. Delamination growth per fatigue cycle, da/dN, was related to strain energy release rate, G, by means of a power law. However, the exponents of these power laws were too large for them to be adequately used as a life prediction tool. A small error in the estimated applied loads could lead to large errors in the delamination growth rates. Hence strain energy release rate thresholds, G sub th, below which no delamination would occur were also measured. Mode 1 and 2 threshold G values for no delamination growth were found by monitoring the number of cycles to delamination onset in the DCB and ENF specimens. The maximum applied G for which no delamination growth had occurred until at least 1,000,000 cycles was considered the threshold strain energy release rate. Comments are given on how testing effects, facial interference or delamination front damage, may invalidate the experimental determination of the constants in the expression.

  18. Characterization of Mode I and Mode II delamination growth and thresholds in AS4/PEEK composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Murri, Gretchen Bostaph

    1990-01-01

    Composite materials often fail by delamination. The onset and growth of delamination in AS4/PEEK, a tough thermoplastic matrix composite, was characterized for mode 1 and mode 2 loadings, using the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) test specimens. Delamination growth per fatigue cycle, da/dN, was related to strain energy release rate, G, by means of a power law. However, the exponents of these power laws were too large for them to be adequately used as a life prediction tool. A small error in the estimated applied loads could lead to large errors in the delamination growth rates. Hence strain energy release rate thresholds, G sub th, below which no delamination would occur were also measured. Mode 1 and 2 threshold G values for no delamination growth were found by monitoring the number of cycles to delamination onset in the DCB and ENF specimens. The maximum applied G for which no delamination growth had occurred until at least 1,000,000 cycles was considered the threshold strain energy release rate. Comments are given on how testing effects, facial interference or delamination front damage, may invalidate the experimental determination of the constants in the expression.

  19. DNT cell inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma via abnormal expressions of NKG2D and MICA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) and its ligands major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules A(MICA) in DNT cell killing pancreatic carcinoma. Antibodies adsorption was used to separate DNT cell from human peripheral blood. Human pancreatic tumor models were established via implanting BXPC-3 cells into nude mice. Then randomly divided mice into blank group, gemcitabine group and DNT group. Mice weights and mice tumor volumes were measured every 5 days. 50 days later mice were euthanized at cervical dislocation method. Tumor weights were measured. Relative tumor volume and tumor inhibition rate were calculated. Western blot and qPCR were used to detect the expressions of NKG2D and MICA in the transplanted tumors of the three groups. DNT cell significantly increased over time. The blank group tumor volume and weight were significantly larger than the other groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001), but there were no significantly difference between DNT group and gemcitabine group (p > 0.05). Gemcitabine and DNT cell tumor inhibition rate were 40.4% and 35.5%. Western blot and qPCR showed that MICA mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly higher than DNT group (p = 0.001, p = 0.003). NKG2D mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly lower than DNT cells group (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In conclusion DNT cell can significantly inhibit the growth of pancreatic carcinoma in vivo, and the mechanism may be involved in abnormal expressions of MICA and NKG2D. PMID:26616050

  20. DNT cell inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma via abnormal expressions of NKG2D and MICA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) and its ligands major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules A(MICA) in DNT cell killing pancreatic carcinoma. Antibodies adsorption was used to separate DNT cell from human peripheral blood. Human pancreatic tumor models were established via implanting BXPC-3 cells into nude mice. Then randomly divided mice into blank group, gemcitabine group and DNT group. Mice weights and mice tumor volumes were measured every 5 days. 50 days later mice were euthanized at cervical dislocation method. Tumor weights were measured. Relative tumor volume and tumor inhibition rate were calculated. Western blot and qPCR were used to detect the expressions of NKG2D and MICA in the transplanted tumors of the three groups. DNT cell significantly increased over time. The blank group tumor volume and weight were significantly larger than the other groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001), but there were no significantly difference between DNT group and gemcitabine group (p > 0.05). Gemcitabine and DNT cell tumor inhibition rate were 40.4% and 35.5%. Western blot and qPCR showed that MICA mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly higher than DNT group (p = 0.001, p = 0.003). NKG2D mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly lower than DNT cells group (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In conclusion DNT cell can significantly inhibit the growth of pancreatic carcinoma in vivo, and the mechanism may be involved in abnormal expressions of MICA and NKG2D.

  1. Growth mode evolution of hafnium oxide by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Xianglong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan; Xu, Kewei

    2014-01-15

    HfO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using tetrakis-ethylmethylamido hafnium and H{sub 2}O as precursors on silicon by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The morphology and microstructures at different ALD cycles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Based on the height–height correlation function and power spectral density function, quantitative analysis of surface morphologies was performed. Three characteristic dimensions (ξ{sub 1}, ξ{sub 2}, and ξ{sub 3}) corresponding to three surface structures, islands, local and global fluctuations, were identified. The evolution of ALD growth mode at range of the three critical scales was investigated, respectively. It suggests the transformation of growth mode from quasi two-dimensional layer-by-layer to three-dimensional island for global fluctuations.

  2. Volcano growth mechanisms and the role of sub-volcanic intrusions: Insights from 2D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Craig; Hunt-Stewart, Esther; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.

    2013-07-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in volcano morphology and internal architecture can determine eruption style and location. However, the relationship between the external and internal characteristics of volcanoes and sub-volcanic intrusions is often difficult to observe at outcrop or interpret uniquely from geophysical and geodetic data. We use high-quality 2D seismic reflection data from the Ceduna Sub-basin, offshore southern Australia, to quantitatively analyse 56, pristinely-preserved, Eocene-age volcanogenic mounds, and a genetically-related network of sub-volcanic sills and laccoliths. Detailed seismic mapping has allowed the 3D geometry of each mound to be reconstructed and distinct seismic facies within them to be recognised. Forty-six continental, basaltic shield volcanoes have been identified that have average flank dips of <12°, basal diameters of 1.94-18.89 km, central summits that are 0.02-1 km high and volumes that range from 0.06 to 57.21 km3. Parallel seismic reflections within the shield volcanoes are interpreted to represent interbedded volcanic and clastic material, suggesting that a series of temporally separate eruptions emanated from a central vent. The shield volcanoes typically overlie the lateral tips of sills and we suggest that the intermittent eruption phases correspond to the incremental emplacement of discrete magma pulses within the laterally extensive sill-complex. Eight volcanogenic hydrothermal vents, which are also associated with the lateral tips of sills, were also recognised, and these appear to have formed from the seepage of intrusion-related hydrothermal fluids onto the seafloor via emplacement-induced fractures. This work highlights that deformation patterns preceding volcanic eruptions may (i) be offset from the eruption site; (ii) attributed to intrusions with complex morphologies; and/or (iii) reflect magma movement along pre-existing fracture systems. These complexities should therefore be considered in eruption

  3. Computer simulation of topological evolution in 2-d grain growth using a continuum diffuse-interface field model

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Geng, C.; Chen, L.Q.

    1997-03-01

    The local kinetics and topological phenomena during normal grain growth were studied in two dimensions by computer simulations employing a continuum diffuse-interface field model. The relationships between topological class and individual grain growth kinetics were examined, and compared with results obtained previously from analytical theories, experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations. It was shown that both the grain-size and grain-shape (side) distributions are time-invariant and the linear relationship between the mean radii of individual grains and topological class n was reproduced. The moments of the shape distribution were determined, and the differences among the data from soap froth. Potts model and the present simulation were discussed. In the limit when the grain size goes to zero, the average number of grain edges per grain is shown to be between 4 and 5, implying the direct vanishing of 4- and 5-sided grains, which seems to be consistent with recent experimental observations on thin films. Based on the simulation results, the conditions for the applicability of the familiar Mullins-Von Neumann law and the Hillert`s equation were discussed.

  4. New ways to synthesize lead sulfide nanosheets-substituted alkanes direct the growth of 2D nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bielewicz, Thomas; Klein, Eugen; Klinke, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional colloidal nanosheets represent very attractive optoelectronic materials. They combine good lateral conductivity with solution-processability and geometry-tunable electronic properties. In the case of PbS nanosheets, so far synthesis has been driven by the addition of chloroalkanes as coligands. Here, we demonstrate how to synthesize two-dimensional lead sulfide nanostructures using other halogen alkanes and primary amines. Further, we show that at a reaction temperature of 170 °C a coligand is not even necessary and the only ligand, oleic acid, controls the anisotropic growth of the two-dimensional structures. Also, using thiourea as a sulfide source, nanosheets with lateral dimensions of over 10 μm are possible.

  5. New ways to synthesize lead sulfide nanosheets—substituted alkanes direct the growth of 2D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielewicz, Thomas; Klein, Eugen; Klinke, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional colloidal nanosheets represent very attractive optoelectronic materials. They combine good lateral conductivity with solution-processability and geometry-tunable electronic properties. In the case of PbS nanosheets, so far synthesis has been driven by the addition of chloroalkanes as coligands. Here, we demonstrate how to synthesize two-dimensional lead sulfide nanostructures using other halogen alkanes and primary amines. Further, we show that at a reaction temperature of 170 °C a coligand is not even necessary and the only ligand, oleic acid, controls the anisotropic growth of the two-dimensional structures. Also, using thiourea as a sulfide source, nanosheets with lateral dimensions of over 10 μm are possible.

  6. Sublimation growth of AlN crystals: Growth mode and structure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimova, R.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Yazdi, G. R.; Gueorguiev, G. K.; Syväjärvi, M.

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study has been to realize growth conditions suitable for seeded sublimation growth of AlN and to understand the relationship between external growth parameters and the initial stages of growth with respect to growth mode and structure evolution. Close space sublimation growth geometry has been used in a RF-heated furnace employing high-purity graphite coated by TaC with a possibility to change the growth environment from C- to Ta-rich. Influence of certain impurities on the initially formed crystallites with respect to their shape, size and population has been considered. It is shown that some impurity containing vapor molecules may act as transport agents and suppliers of nitrogen for the AlN growth. SiC seeds, both bare and with MOCVD AlN buffer, have been employed. By varying the process conditions we have grown crystals with different habits, e.g. from needles, columnar- and plate-like, to freestanding quasi-bulk material. The growth temperature ranged 1600-2000 °C whereas the optimal external nitrogen pressure varied from 200 to 700 mbar. There is a narrow parameter window in the relationship temperature-pressure for the evolution of different structural forms. Growth modes with respect to process conditions are discussed.

  7. Fatigue crack growth behavior of an 8090 Al-Li alloy under mixed mode 1--mode 3 loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.V.; Prasad, N.E.

    1993-11-15

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have evoked considerable interest in recent years because of their high specific strengths and stiffness. An additional advantage of these alloys is their superior fatigue crack growth resistance as compared to the conventional aluminium alloys. However, most of the fatigue crack growth investigations have dealt with crack propagation behavior under mode 1 and loading. A recent study on monotonic fracture behavior of 8090 Al-Li alloys has shown that these alloys possess lower fracture toughness under mode 3 loading as compared to mode 1 loading. The fracture resistance under mixed mode 1 - mode 3 loading was also found to be lower than that under pure mode 1 loading. However, no experimental data is available on the mixed mode 1--mode 3 fatigue crack growth behavior in Al-Li alloys. The objective of the present paper is to study the effect of combined mode 1--mode 3 loading on the fatigue crack growth behavior of an 8090 Al-Li alloy.

  8. Growth of porous anodized alumina on the sputtered aluminum films with 2D-3D morphology for high specific surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, M. W.; Chung, C. K.

    2014-08-01

    The porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with high-aspect-ratio pore channels is widely used as a template for fabricating nanowires or other one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. The high specific surface area of AAO can also be applied to the super capacitor and the supporting substrate for catalysis. The rough surface could be helpful to enhance specific surface area but it generally results in electrical field concentration even to ruin AAO. In this article, the aluminum (Al) films with the varied 2D-3D morphology on Si substrates were prepared using magnetron sputtering at a power of 50 W-185 W for 1 h at a working pressure of 2.5 × 10-1 Pa. Then, AAO was fabricated from the different Al films by means of one-step hybrid pulse anodizing (HPA) between the positive 40 V and the negative -2 V (1 s:1 s) for 3 min in 0.3 M oxalic acid at a room temperature. The microstructure and morphology of Al films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope, respectively. Some hillocks formed at the high target power could be attributed to the grain texture growth in the normal orientation of Al(1 1 1). The 3D porous AAO structure which is different from the conventional 2D planar one has been successfully demonstrated using HPA on the film with greatly rough hillock-surface formed at the highest power of 185 W. It offers a potential application of the new 3D AAO to high specific surface area devices.

  9. Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Assisted Growth of 2D Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets on Various 1D Carbons for Superior Li-Storage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qunting; Qian, Feng; Yang, Siming; Gao, Tian; Liu, Weijie; Shao, Jie; Zheng, Honghe

    2016-01-20

    Transitional metal sulfide/carbon hybrids with well-defined structures could not only maximize the functional properties of each constituent but engender some unique synergistic effects, holding great promise for applications in Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors and for catalysis. Herein, a facile and versatile approach is developed to controllably grow 2D ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with a large quantity of exposed edges onto various 1D carbons, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), electrospun carbon nanofibers, and Te-nanowire-templated carbon nanofibers. The typical approach involves the employment of layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled polyelectrolyte, which controls spatially the uniform growth and orientation of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets on these 1D carbons irrespective of their surface properties. Such unique structures of the as-prepared CNTs@MoS2 hybrid are significantly favorable for the fast diffusions of both Li-ions and electrons, satisfying the kinetic requirements of high-power lithium ion batteries. As a result, CNTs@MoS2 hybrids exhibit excellent electrochemical performances for lithium storage, including a high reversible capacity (1027 mAh g(-1)), high-rate capability (610 mAh g(-1) at 5 C), and excellent cycling stability (negligible capacity loss after 200 continuous cycles).

  10. Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Assisted Growth of 2D Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets on Various 1D Carbons for Superior Li-Storage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qunting; Qian, Feng; Yang, Siming; Gao, Tian; Liu, Weijie; Shao, Jie; Zheng, Honghe

    2016-01-20

    Transitional metal sulfide/carbon hybrids with well-defined structures could not only maximize the functional properties of each constituent but engender some unique synergistic effects, holding great promise for applications in Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors and for catalysis. Herein, a facile and versatile approach is developed to controllably grow 2D ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with a large quantity of exposed edges onto various 1D carbons, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), electrospun carbon nanofibers, and Te-nanowire-templated carbon nanofibers. The typical approach involves the employment of layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled polyelectrolyte, which controls spatially the uniform growth and orientation of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets on these 1D carbons irrespective of their surface properties. Such unique structures of the as-prepared CNTs@MoS2 hybrid are significantly favorable for the fast diffusions of both Li-ions and electrons, satisfying the kinetic requirements of high-power lithium ion batteries. As a result, CNTs@MoS2 hybrids exhibit excellent electrochemical performances for lithium storage, including a high reversible capacity (1027 mAh g(-1)), high-rate capability (610 mAh g(-1) at 5 C), and excellent cycling stability (negligible capacity loss after 200 continuous cycles). PMID:26709711

  11. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 {mu}m diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 {mu}m wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014 W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 μm diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 μm wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile.

  13. Synthesis, structural characterization and microbial activity of 2D Ag(I)-5-aminoisophthalate coordination polymer with a new coordination mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, Handan; Çolak, Alper Tolga; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Tunç, Tuncay; Çolak, Ferdağ

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel polynuclear Ag(I)-5-aminoisophthalate complex [Ag(μ4-Haip)]n (1) (H2aip = 5-aminoisophthalic acid) has been synthesized. The molecular structure of this complex has been determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction. The two-dimensional polynuclear complex is crystallized in the triclinic crystal system with space group P-1. The Ag(I) ion is four-coordinated by three carboxylate oxygen atoms of three different Haip ligands and one nitrogen atom in a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Furthermore, a novel coordination mode has shown by H2aip. This complex exhibits photoluminescence in the solid state at room temperature. Antimicrobial activity of complex was evaluated by the agar diffusion method. The complex showed antimicrobial activity against tested microorganism strains (Gram positive, gram negative bacteria, clinic isolate yeast and mold). Moreover this complex showed particularly high antifungal activity against yeast and mold.

  14. Growth mode and structures of magnetic Mn clusters on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2016-06-22

    We present a systematic study of Mn clusters on graphene by first-principles calculations. We show that the growth of Mn on graphene follows a three-dimensional (3D) mode. Both adsorption and attachment energies show that (Mn)3 and (Mn)6 on graphene are energetically favorable in the size range (Mn)1-7. Moreover, larger formation energy for Mn cluster on graphene implies the incoming Mn atoms are likely to nucleate and grow into bigger and bigger Mn clusters on graphene. The magnetic moments of (Mn)1,5,7 on graphene are enhanced by 11%, 186%, and 26% from their values at free-standing clusters, respectively. By contrast, the netmore » magnetic moment of (Mn)2,3,4,6 on graphene is reduced from that of the corresponding free-standing clusters. The origin of the magnetic moment changes can be attributed to the charge transfer within the Mn clusters and between the clusters and graphene upon adsorption.« less

  15. InAs nanowire growth modes on Si (111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, M. T.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    InAs nanowires (NWs) were grown on silicon substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using five different growth modes: (1) Au-assisted growth, (2) positioned (patterned) Au-assisted growth, (3) Au-free growth, (4) positioned Au-assisted growth using a patterned oxide mask, and (5) Au-free selective-area epitaxy (SAE) using a patterned oxide mask. Optimal growth conditions (temperature, V/III flux ratio) were identified for each growth mode for control of NW morphology and vertical NW yield. The highest yield (72%) was achieved with the SAE method at a growth temperature of 440 °C and a V/III flux ratio of 4. Growth mechanisms are discussed for each of the growth modes.

  16. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  17. Phase diagram of growth mode for the SiGe/Si heterostructure system with misfit dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Ujihara, Toru; Usami, Noritaka; Fujiwara, Kozo; Sazaki, Gen; Shishido, Toetsu

    2004-01-01

    The strain, surface and interface energies of the SiGe/Si (SiGe grown on Si) heterostructure system with and without misfit dislocations were calculated for the Frank-van der Merwe (FM), Stranski-Krastanov (SK) and Volmer-Weber (VW) growth modes essentially based on the three kinds of fundamental and simple structures. The free energies for each growth mode were derived from these energies, and it was determined as a function of the composition and layer thickness of SiGe on Si. By comparison of the free energies, the phase diagrams of the FM, SK and VW growth modes for the SiGe/Si system were determined. The (1 1 1) and (1 0 0) reconstructed surfaces were selected for this calculation. From the phase diagrams, it was found for the growth of SiGe on Si that the layer-by-layer growth such as the FM mode was easy to be obtained when the Ge composition is small, and the island growth on a wetting layer such as the SK mode was easy to be obtained when the Ge composition is large. The VW mode is energetically stable in the Ge-rich compositional range, but it is difficult for the VW mode to appear in the actual growth of SiGe on Si because the VW region is right above the SK region. The regions of the SK and VW modes for the (1 1 1) heterostructure are larger than those for the (1 0 0) one because the strain energy of the (1 1 1) face is larger than that of the (1 0 0) face. The regions of the SK and VW modes for the heterostructure with misfit dislocations are narrower than those for the one without misfit dislocations because the strain energy is much released by misfit dislocations. The phase diagrams roughly explain the behavior of the FM and SK growth modes of SiGe on Si.

  18. Influence of Mixed Mode I-Mode II Loading on Fatigue Delamination Growth Characteristics of a Graphite Epoxy Tape Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mode I-mode II interlaminar tests were conducted on IM7/8552 tape laminates using the mixed-mode bending test. Three mixed mode ratios, G(sub II)/G(sub T) = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8, were considered. Tests were performed at all three mixed-mode ratios under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions, where the former static tests were used to determine initial loading levels for the latter fatigue tests. Fatigue tests at each mixed-mode ratio were performed at four loading levels, Gmax, equal to 0.5G(sub c), 0.4G(sub c), 0.3G(sub c), and 0.2G(sub c), where G(sub c) is the interlaminar fracture toughness of the corresponding mixed-mode ratio at which a test was performed. All fatigue tests were performed using constant-amplitude load control and delamination growth was automatically documented using compliance solutions obtained from the corresponding quasi-static tests. Static fracture toughness data yielded a mixed-mode delamination criterion that exhibited monotonic increase in Gc with mixed-mode ratio, G(sub II)/G(sub T). Fatigue delamination onset parameters varied monotonically with G(sub II)/G(sub T), which was expected based on the fracture toughness data. Analysis of non-normalized data yielded a monotonic change in Paris law exponent with mode ratio. This was not the case when normalized data were analyzed. Fatigue data normalized by the static R-curve were most affected in specimens tested at G(sub II)/G(sub T)=0.2 (this process has little influence on the other data). In this case, the normalized data yielded a higher delamination growth rate compared to the raw data for a given loading level. Overall, fiber bridging appeared to be the dominant mechanism, affecting delamination growth rates in specimens tested at different load levels and differing mixed-mode ratios.

  19. The essential features and modes of bacterial polar growth.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Todd A; Zupan, John R; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Polar growth represents a surprising departure from the canonical dispersed cell growth model. However, we know relatively little of the underlying mechanisms governing polar growth or the requisite suite of factors that direct polar growth. Underscoring how classic doctrine can be turned on its head, the peptidoglycan layer of polar-growing bacteria features unusual crosslinks and in some species the quintessential cell division proteins FtsA and FtsZ are recruited to the growing poles. Remarkably, numerous medically important pathogens utilize polar growth, accentuating the need for intensive research in this area. Here we review models of polar growth in bacteria based on recent research in the Actinomycetales and Rhizobiales, with emphasis on Mycobacterium and Agrobacterium species.

  20. Heteroepitaxial growth modes with dislocations in a two-dimensional elastic lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuno, Hiroyasu; Uwaha, Makio; Saito, Yukio

    2008-11-01

    We study equilibrium shapes of adsorbate crystals by allowing a possibility of dislocations on an elastic substrate in a two-dimensional lattice model. The ground state energy is calculated numerically with the use of an elastic lattice Green's function. From the equilibrium shapes determined for various coverages, we infer the growth mode. As the misfit parameter increases, the growth mode changes from the Frank-van der Merwe (FM) to the Stranski-Krastanov (SK), further to the FM with dislocations for a parameter range of ordinary semiconductor materials. Conceivable growth modes such as the SK with dislocations appear in a parameter range between the SK and the FM with dislocations.

  1. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  2. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  3. Horizon instability of extremal Kerr black holes: Nonaxisymmetric modes and enhanced growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casals, Marc; Gralla, Samuel E.; Zimmerman, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We show that the horizon instability of the extremal Kerr black hole is associated with a singular branch point in the Green function at the superradiant bound frequency. We study generic initial data supported away from the horizon and find an enhanced growth rate due to nonaxisymmetric modes. The growth is controlled by the conformal weight h of each mode. We speculate on connections to near-extremal black holes and holographic duality.

  4. Experimental Investigation of m=1 Diocotron Mode Growth at Low Electron Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen F. Paul; Kyle Morrison; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-08-21

    Previous experiments on the Electron Diffusion Gauge showed that the diocotron mode damping increases with higher neutral gas filling pressure. Yet the energy dissipated from a rotating plasma by collisions with neutrals is predicted to excite the mode. To resolve this, experiments have been conducted to examine the coupling between expansion and the m=1 diocotron mode. Results from recent experiments have shown interesting phenomena: (1) The degree and sensitivity of mode growth is observed to be strongly dependent on filament conditions. Mode growth rates of nearly 20 sec{sup -1} have been observed even with negligible resistive drive. Specifically, at low filament bias voltages (and correspondingly low electron densities {approx}1-2 x 10{sup 7} electrons/cm), the mode growth is very sensitive to the heating voltage across the filament, even though changes in filament heating voltage barely affect the plasma expansion, the plasma density profile, the filament emission, or the resulting electron density. (2) At low neutral gas pressure (<10{sup -9} Torr), the diocotron mode growth rate increases with neutral pressure. However, the growth rate is several orders of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions.

  5. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  6. Antibiotic growth promoters in agriculture: history and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Dibner, J J; Richards, J D

    2005-04-01

    This report will review the history of antibiotic growth promoter (AGP) use in the animal industry, concerns about development of antimicrobial resistance, and response in the European Union and United States to these concerns. A brief description of the history of legislation regarding feed use of antimicrobials in Denmark and the experience of animal producers following the 1998 ban will serve to illustrate the consequences on animal performance and health of withdrawing the approval for this use. The biological basis for antibiotic effects on animal growth efficiency will consider effects on intestinal microbiota and effects on the host animal and will use the germ-free animal to illustrate effects of the conventional microflora. The probability that no single compound will replace all of the functions of antimicrobial growth promoters will be considered, and methods to consolidate and analyze the enlarging database will be discussed. PMID:15844822

  7. Growth Mode Transition in Complex Oxide Heteroepitaxy: Atomically Resolved Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Tselev, Alexander; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; Qiao, Liang; Meyer, Tricia L.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Biegalski, Michael D.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-04-04

    Here we performed investigations of the atomic-scale surface structure of epitaxial La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 thin films as a model system dependent on growth conditions in pulsed laser deposition with emphasis on film growth kinetics. Postdeposition in situ scanning tunneling microscopy was combined with in operando reflective high-energy electron diffraction to monitor the film growth and ex situ X-ray diffraction for structural analysis. We find a correlation between the out-of-plane lattice parameter and both adspecies mobility and height of the Ehrlich–Schwoebel barrier, with mobility of adatoms greater over the cationically stoichiometric terminations. We find that the data suggest that the out-of-plane lattice parametermore » is dependent on the mechanism of epitaxial strain relaxation, which is controlled by the oxidative power of the deposition environment.« less

  8. Control of growth mode of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Nguyen Hong; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2009-09-01

    We have conducted an experimental study to investigate the synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The synthesis of base and tip-type of CNTs was selectively controlled by changing the catalyst size, catalyst film thickness correlated with altering the NH3 pretreatment plasma current. These types of CNT showed distinctive properties in nanotube structure, growth rate and vertical alignment, which were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and in situ optical interference measurement. The vertically aligned behaviour of CNT was systematically studied by using a fine-patterned catalyst layer with diverse critical dimensions. Freestanding single CNT was successfully realized by optimum tip-type CNT growth, conventional photolithography and wet-etch process.

  9. The growth of the tearing mode - Boundary and scaling effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical model of resistive magnetic tearing is developed in order to verify and relate the results of the principal approximations used in analytic analyses and to investigate the solutions and their growth-rate scalings over a large range of primary parameters which include parametric values applicable to the solar atmosphere. The computations cover the linear behavior for a variety of boundary conditions, emphasizing effects which differentiate magnetic tearing in astrophysical situations from that in laboratory devices. Eigenfunction profiles for long and short wavelengths are computed and the applicability of the 'constant psi' approximation is investigated. The growth rate is computed for values of the magnetic Reynolds number up to a trillion and of the dimensionless wavelength parameter down to 0.001. The analysis predicts significant effects due to differing values of the magnetic Reynolds number.

  10. [Relationship between SO2 exposure mode and Chinese pine growth].

    PubMed

    Tang, Hong-shou; Aoki, Masatoshi; Totsuka, Tsumugu

    2005-01-01

    Chinese pine seedling, which age is 87 days, are exposed to SO2 in three treatments for 60 days from July 1, 2002 to August 29, 2002. In treatment 1 and treatment 2, the concentration of SO2 were 0.1 mg x m(-3) and 0.2 mg x m(-3), respectively. In treatment 3, the concentration of SO2 were 0.5 mg x m(-3) for 6 hours and 0.1 mg x m(-3) for 18 hours per day. In treatment 1, the abnormity of stomata guard cell and leaf colour are not observed. There are no significant difference of chlorophyll content, carotenoid content of leaf, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, relative growth rate, and dry weight per plant compare with control, but the sulfur content of leaf increased 17% compare with control, the amount of potassium ion leaching from leaf increased 22% compare with control. In treatment 2, the abnormity of stomata guard cell and leaf colour are not observed. There are no significant difference of chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate compare with control. But compare with control, the carotenoid content of leaf decreased 5%, and the sulfur content of leaf increased 92%, the amount of potassium ion leaching from leaf increased 67%, dry weight decreased 4.5% per plant, the relative growth rate decreased 0.6 mg x(gxd)-1. In treatment 3, the abnormity of stomata guard cell and leaf colour are observed. The chlorophyll content were similar with control, but compare with control, the carotenoid content of leaf decreased 21%, and the sulfur content of leaf increased 104%, the amount of potassium ion leaching from leaf increased 89%, photosynthetic rate decreased 5%, transpiration rate increased 8%, the dry weight decreased 7.6% per plant, the relative growth rate decreased 1.3mg x (gxd)-1.

  11. Single vesicle imaging indicates distinct modes of rapid membrane retrieval during nerve growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During nerve growth, cytoplasmic vesicles add new membrane preferentially to the growth cone located at the distal tip of extending axons. Growth cone membrane is also retrieved locally, and asymmetric retrieval facilitates membrane remodeling during growth cone repulsion by a chemorepellent gradient. Moreover, growth inhibitory factors can stimulate bulk membrane retrieval and induce growth cone collapse. Despite these functional insights, the processes mediating local membrane remodeling during axon extension remain poorly defined. Results To investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of membrane retrieval in actively extending growth cones, we have used a transient labeling and optical recording method that can resolve single vesicle events. Live-cell confocal imaging revealed rapid membrane retrieval by distinct endocytic modes based on spatial distribution in Xenopus spinal neuron growth cones. These modes include endocytic "hot-spots" triggered at the base of filopodia, at the lateral margins of lamellipodia, and along dorsal ridges of the growth cone. Additionally, waves of endocytosis were induced when individual filopodia detached from the substrate and fused with the growth cone dorsal surface or with other filopodia. Vesicle formation at sites of membrane remodeling by self-contact required F-actin polymerization. Moreover, bulk membrane retrieval by macroendocytosis correlated positively with the substrate-dependent rate of axon extension and required the function of Rho-family GTPases. Conclusions This study provides insight into the dynamic membrane remodeling processes essential for nerve growth by identifying several distinct modes of rapid membrane retrieval in the growth cone during axon extension. We found that endocytic membrane retrieval is intensified at specific subdomains and may drive the dynamic membrane ruffling and re-absorption of filopodia and lamellipodia in actively extending growth cones. The findings offer a platform

  12. Mixed mode fatigue crack growth in the commercial Al-Li alloys, 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, I.; Gregson, P.J. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1994-05-15

    Crystallographic fatigue crack propagation along planar slip bands has been recognized to occur over a particularly wide range of conditions in Al-Li alloys due to the presence of coherent, shearable [delta][prime] (Al[sub 3]Li) precipitates, in conjunction with the strong underlying crystallographic texture often developed in these materials during secondary processing. Such Stage 1 propagation typically produces a highly tortuous crack path during conventional mode 1 fatigue testing. While the net crack growth direction remains parallel to the nominal mode 1 direction, crack tortuosity has been generally recognized as beneficial to fatigue resistance, as both local mixed mode crack-tip loading conditions and roughness induced closure may significantly reduce the driving force for crack extension (i.e. crack shielding'' occurs). Recent investigations of commercial Al-Li plate in the damage tolerant condition have however shown that co-planar Stage 1 crack propagation along preferred [111]-plane orientations may give rise to sustained macroscopic crack deviation from the nominal mode 1 growth direction. Such crack growth raises a number of important questions with regard to conventional, nominally mode 1 based structure lifting and fatigue testing methods when applied to these materials. Work has therefore been carried out to characterized fatigue crack growth during sustained co-planar Stage 1 propagation in a commercial Al-Li alloy, with particular reference to mixed mode loading conditions.

  13. Designing of a Testing Machine for Shear-Mode Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaba, A.; Okazaki, S.; Endo, M.; Yanase, K.

    As recognized, flaking-type failure is one of the serious problems for railroad tracks and bearings. In essence, flaking-type failure is closely related to the growth of the shear-mode (Mode-II and Mode-III) fatigue crack. In our research group, it is demonstrated that a shear-mode fatigue crack can be reproduced for cylindrical specimens by applying the cyclic torsion in the presence of the static axial compressive stress. However, a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine is quite expensive to purchase and costly to maintain. The low testing speed (about 10Hz) of the testing machine further aggravates the situation. As a result, study on shear-mode fatigue crack growth is still in the nascent stage. To overcome the difficulties mentioned above, in this research activity, we developed a high-performance and cost-effective testing machine to reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack growth by improving the available resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine. The primary advantage of using the resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine is cost-efficiency. In addition, the testing speed effectively can be improved, in comparison with that of a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine. By utilizing the newly-designed testing machine, we have demonstrated that we can successfully reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack.

  14. Surface structures and growth modes of Ba deposited on Mo(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, S.; Gotoh, Y.

    2000-10-01

    The surface structures and growth modes of barium (Ba) on an Mo(110) surface have been investigated using a molecular beam epitaxy system equipped with a high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) apparatus. Three kinds of surface structures were observed, c(2×2), (1.6×2) and (1.5×1.8), in regions with low Ba coverage, and their phase diagram was obtained. All Ba atoms which form the c(2×2) structure coincide with Mo atoms, and the (1.6×2) and (1.5×1.8) structures with the regular triangle lattice have line coincidences with the atomic arrangement of the substrate along the [11¯0]Mo and [001]Mo directions, respectively. In the thickness range beyond 1 ML, the growth modes of the Ba-Mo(110) system were different due to the substrate temperature. The growth of the Ba-Mo(110) system is in accordance with the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode at room temperature and the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode at high temperatures.

  15. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  16. High-resistance GaN epilayers with low dislocation density via growth mode modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. Y.; Xu, F. J.; Wang, J. M.; Lu, L.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Shen, B.

    2016-09-01

    High-resistance GaN with low dislocation density adopting growth mode modification has been investigated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The sheet resistance of the order of 1016 Ω/sq has been achieved at room temperature by diminishing the oxygen impurity level close to the substrate with an AlN blocking layer. Attributed to this method which offers more freedom to tailor the growth mode, a three-dimensional (3D) growth process is introduced by adjusting the growth pressure and temperature at the initial stage of the GaN epitaxy to improve the crystalline quality. The large 3D GaN grains formed during this period roughen the surface, and the following coalescence of the GaN grains causes threading dislocations bending, which finally remarkably reduces the dislocation density.

  17. Two step formation of metal aggregates by surface X-ray radiolysis under Langmuir monolayers: 2D followed by 3D growth

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Smita; Fauré, Marie-Claude; Goldmann, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary In order to form a nanostructured metallic layer below a Langmuir monolayer, radiolysis synthesis was carried out in an adapted geometry that we call surface X-ray radiolysis. In this procedure, an X-ray beam produced by a synchrotron beamline intercepts the surface of an aqueous metal-ion solution covered by a Langmuir monolayer at an angle of incidence below the critical angle for total internal reflection. Underneath the organic layer, the X-ray beam induces the radiolytic synthesis of a nanostructured metal–organic layer whose ultrathin thickness is defined by the vertical X-ray penetration depth. We have shown that increasing the X-ray flux on the surface, which considerably enhances the kinetics of the silver layer formation, results in a second growth regime of silver nanocrystals. Here the formation of the oriented thin layer is followed by the appearance of a 3D powder of silver clusters. PMID:26734531

  18. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    In systems subjected to long-term loading, subcritical crack growth is the principal mechanism causing the time-dependent deformation and failure of rocks. Subcritical crack growth is environmentally-assisted crack growth, which can allow cracks to grow over a long period of time at stresses far smaller than their failure strength and at tectonic strain rates. The characteristics of subcritical crack growth can be described by a relationship between the stress intensity factor and the crack velocity. This study presents the results of studies conducted to validate the constant stress-rate test for determining subcritical crack growth parameters in Coconino sandstone, compared with the conventional testing method, the double torsion test. The results of the constant stress-rate test are in good agreement with the results of double torsion test. More importantly, the stress-rate tests can determine the parameter A with a much smaller standard deviation than the double torsion test. Thus the constant stress-rate test seems to be both a valid and preferred test method for determining the subcritical crack growth parameters in rocks. We investigated statistical aspects of the constant stress-rate test. The effects of the number of tests conducted on the subcritical crack growth parameters were examined and minimum specimen numbers were determined. The mean and standard deviation of the subcritical crack growth parameters were obtained by randomly selecting subsets from the original strength data. In addition, the distribution form of the subcritical crack growth parameters and the relation between the parameter n and A were determined. We extended the constant stress-rate test technique to modes II and III subcritical crack growth in rocks. The experimental results of the modes I, II and III tests show that the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters are similar to each other. The subcritical crack growth parameter n value for Coconino sandstone has the range

  19. Growth of Daphnia magna exposed to mixtures of chemicals with diverse modes of action

    SciTech Connect

    Deneer, J.W.; Seinen, W.; Hermens, J.L.

    1988-02-01

    Concentrations causing inhibition of growth of Daphnia magna after 16 days of exposure were determined for nine chemicals that presumably act through different modes of action. The joint toxic effect of a mixture of these chemicals is found to be nonadditive.

  20. Growth modes in two-dimensional heteroepitaxy on an elastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuno, Hiroyasu; Uemura, Hideaki; Uwaha, Makio; Saito, Yukio

    2005-02-01

    With the use of a two-dimensional harmonic elastic lattice model, in which spontaneous stress caused by the lack of neighboring atoms is incorporated, we determine ground state configuration of adsorbed atoms on a flat elastic substrate. Energy of the system is calculated by direct relaxation dynamics in the epitaxial layer and by using an elastic Green's function method in the substrate. Based on the ground state configurations determined for various coverages, we infer growth mode. As the lattice misfit and the strength of the spontaneous stress increase, the growth mode changes from Frank-van der Merwe (FM) to Stranski-Krastanov (SK) and finally to Volmer-Weber (VW) mode. In a parameter range between the SK and the VW with a large spontaneous stress, the equilibrium configuration changes from a layer to islands in unusual ways as the coverage increases.

  1. Computational comparison of mediated current generation capacity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in photosynthetic and respiratory growth modes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses many potential advantages to be exploited as a biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. In the present study, we performed computational studies based on flux balance analysis (FBA) to probe the maximum potential of C. reinhardtii for current output and identify the metabolic mechanisms supporting a high current generation in three different cultivation conditions, i.e., heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth. The results showed that flux balance limitations allow the highest current output for C. reinhardtii in the mixotrophic growth mode (2.368 A/gDW), followed by heterotrophic growth (1.141 A/gDW) and photoautotrophic growth the lowest (0.7035 A/gDW). The significantly higher mediated electron transfer (MET) rate in the mixotrophic mode is in complete contrast to previous findings for a photosynthetic cyanobacterium, and was attributed to the fact that for C. reinhardtii the photophosphorylation improved the efficiency of converting the acetate into biomass and NADH production. Overall, the cytosolic NADH-dependent current production was mainly associated with five reactions in both mixotrophic and photoautotrophic nutritional modes, whereas four reactions participated in the heterotrophic mode. The mixotrophic and photoautotrophic metabolisms were alike and shared the same set of reactions for maximizing current production, whereas in the heterotrophic mode, the current production was additionally contributed by the metabolic activities in the two organelles: glyoxysome and chloroplast. In conclusion, C. reinhardtii has a potential to be exploited in MFCs of MET mode to produce a high current output. PMID:24875305

  2. Abbreviated epitaxial growth mode (AGM) method for reducing cost and improving quality of LEDs and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Chan, Helen M; Vinci, Richard P; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Biser, Jeffrey

    2013-09-24

    The use of an abbreviated GaN growth mode on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire substrates, which utilizes a process of using 15 nm low temperature GaN buffer and bypassing etch-back and recovery processes during epitaxy, enables the growth of high-quality GaN template on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire. The GaN template grown on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire by employing abbreviated growth mode has two orders of magnitude lower threading dislocation density than that of conventional GaN template grown on planar sapphire. The use of abbreviated growth mode also leads to significant reduction in cost of the epitaxy. The growths and characteristics of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano-patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated at least a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown on conventional GaN templates.

  3. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  4. In situ investigation of growth modes during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of (0001) GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Speck, J. S.

    2007-10-15

    Real-time analysis of the growth modes during homoepitaxial (0001) GaN growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was performed using reflection high energy electron diffraction. A growth mode map was established as a function of Ga/N flux ratio and growth temperature, exhibiting distinct transitions between three-dimensional (3D), layer-by-layer, and step-flow growth modes. The layer-by-layer to step-flow growth transition under Ga-rich growth was surfactant mediated and related to a Ga adlayer coverage of one monolayer. Under N-rich conditions the transition from 3D to layer-by-layer growth was predominantly thermally activated, facilitating two-dimensional growth at temperatures of thermal decomposition.

  5. Growth of nucleation mode particles in the summertime Arctic: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Burkart, Julia; Thomas, Jennie L.; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter M.; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Schulz, Hannes; Herber, Andreas B.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2016-06-01

    The summertime Arctic lower troposphere is a relatively pristine background aerosol environment dominated by nucleation and Aitken mode particles. Understanding the mechanisms that control the formation and growth of aerosol is crucial for our ability to predict cloud properties and therefore radiative balance and climate. We present an analysis of an aerosol growth event observed in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago during summer as part of the NETCARE project. Under stable and clean atmospheric conditions, with low inversion heights, carbon monoxide less than 80 ppbv, and black carbon less than 5 ng m-3, we observe growth of small particles, < 20 nm in diameter, into sizes above 50 nm. Aerosol growth was correlated with the presence of organic species, trimethylamine, and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) in particles ˜ 80 nm and larger, where the organics are similar to those previously observed in marine settings. MSA-to-sulfate ratios as high as 0.15 were observed during aerosol growth, suggesting an important marine influence. The organic-rich aerosol contributes significantly to particles active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, supersaturation = 0.6 %), which are elevated in concentration during aerosol growth above background levels of ˜ 100 to ˜ 220 cm-3. Results from this case study highlight the potential importance of secondary organic aerosol formation and its role in growing nucleation mode aerosol into CCN-active sizes in this remote marine environment.

  6. Regularity in budding mode and resultant growth morphology of the azooxanthellate colonial scleractinian Tubastraea coccinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, A.; Ezaki, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scleractinia exhibit a variety of growth forms, whether zooxanthellate or azooxanthellate, according to factors that control asexual reproduction and ensuing coral growth. The azooxanthellate branching scleractinian Dendrophyllia arbuscula shows regular modes of budding in terms of the locations of budding sites, the orientations of directive septa, and the inclination angle of budding throughout colonial growth. This study reports that such regularities are also found in the apparently different growth form of the massive dendrophylliid Tubastraea coccinea, which shows the following growth features: (1) the offsets (lateral corallites) always occur near four primary septa, except the two directive primary septa, meaning that the lateral corallites do not appear in the sectors of the two directive septa; (2) the two directive septa in lateral corallites tend to be oriented subperpendicular to the growth direction of the parental corallites; (3) the lateral corallites grow approximately diagonally upwards; and (4) these regularities are seen in the axial and derived lateral corallites among all generations during colony growth. Large differences in growth form are found between the branching D. arbuscula and massive T. coccinea, irrespective of the presence of specific regularities. It is likely that subtle modifications of certain parameters (e.g., budding interval, branch length, corallite size, and inclination angle of lateral corallites) have a strong effect on the overall growth morphology. A precise understanding of such regularities, which occur regardless of generation or taxonomic position, would contribute to understanding the "shape-controlling mechanism" of corals, which are an archetypal modular organism.

  7. Strain-effect for controlled growth mode and well-ordered structure of quaterrylene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Ryoma; Turak, Ayse; Zhang, XueNa; Hiroshiba, Nobuya; Dosch, Helmut; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Wakayama, Yutaka

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the evolution of quaterrylene thin films on SiO2 and on an octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer (OTS-SAM) to examine the impact of film strains on the growth processes and evolving structure. Surface modification by SAMs allowed tailoring of the growth process from a Stranski-Krastanov (SK) mode (layer-plus-island) on the SiO2 surface to a Frank-van der Merwe mode (layer-by-layer) on the OTS surface. Detailed structural analysis by x-ray diffraction techniques confirmed that the SK mode was driven by lattice strain in the initial wetting layers on the SiO2 surface. On the other hand, strain-free wetting layers were already formed at the beginning of growth on the OTS surface, thereby suppressing three-dimensional island formation. Moreover, the films on the SiO2 surface were found to incorporate high microstrain induced by crystal defects such as dislocations and a mosaic structure. In contrast, few crystal defects were present in the films on OTS surface, demonstrating that OTS treatment enables marked improvement of the molecular alignment. These results clearly indicate that the lattice strain induced by the molecular-substrate interaction is essential for controlling the overall growth process.

  8. Characterization of Mode I fatigue crack growth in GFRP woven laminates at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Yasuhide . E-mail: shindo@material.tohoku.ac.jp; Inamoto, Akihiro; Narita, Fumio

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental and analytical study on the cryogenic fatigue behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer woven laminates under Mode I loading. Fatigue crack growth rate tests were performed using compact tension specimens at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and liquid helium temperature (4 K). The fracture surfaces were also examined by scanning electron microscopy to correlate with the fatigue properties. A finite element method coupled with fatigue damage was adopted for the extensional analysis. The effects of temperature and loading condition on the fatigue crack growth rates are examined.

  9. The propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams in earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokar, R. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, the propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams within earth's bow shock is investigated using a planar model for the bow shock and a model electron distribution function. Within the shock, the model electron distribution function possesses a field-aligned T greater than T beam that is directed toward the magnetosheath. Waves with frequencies between about 1 and 100 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via Landau and anomalous cyclotron resonances. However, because the growth rate is small and because the wave packets traverse the shock quickly, these waves do not attain large amplitudes. Waves with frequencies between about 30 and 150 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via the normal cyclotron resonance. The ray paths for most of these waves are directed toward the solar wind although some wave packets, due to plasma convection travel transverse to the shock normal. These wave packets grow to large amplitudes because they spend a long time in the growth region. The results suggest that whistler mode noise within the shock should increase in amplitude with increasing upstream theta sub Bn. The study provides an explanation for the origin of much of the whistler mode turbulence observed at the bow shock.

  10. Effect of adherend thickness and mixed mode loading on debond growth in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Symmetric and unsymmetric double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were tested and analyzed to assess the effect of: (1) adherend thickness, and (2) a predominantly mode I mixed mode loading on cyclic debond growth and static fracture toughness. The specimens were made of unidirectional composite (T300/5208) adherends bonded together with EC3445 structural adhesive. The thickness was 8, 16, or 24 plies. The experimental results indicated that the static fracture toughness increases and the cyclic debond growth rate decreases with increasing adherend thickness. This behavior was related to the length of the plastic zone ahead of the debond tip. For the symmetric DCB specimens, it was further found that displacement control tests resulted in higher debond growth rates than did load control tests. While the symmetric DCB tests always resulted in cohesive failures in the bondline, the unsymmetric DCB tests resulted in the debond growing into the thinner adherend and the damage progressing as delamination in that adherend. This behavior resulted in much lower fracture toughness and damage growth rates than found in the symmetric DCB tests.

  11. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  12. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  13. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  14. Continuous monitoring of bacterial biofilm growth using uncoated Thickness-Shear Mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, P.; Resa, P.; Durán, C.; Maestre, J. R.; Mateo, M.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) were used to nondestructively monitor in real time the microbial growth of the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) in a liquid broth. QCM, sometimes referred to as Thickness-Shear Mode (TSM) resonators, are highly sensitive sensors not only able to measure very small mass, but also non-gravimetric contributions of viscoelastic media. These devices can be used as biosensors for bacterial detection and are employed in many applications including their use in the food industry, water and environment monitoring, pharmaceutical sciences and clinical diagnosis. In this work, three strains of S. epidermidis (which differ in the ability to produce biofilm) have been continuously monitored using an array of piezoelectric TSM resonators, at 37 °C in a selective culturing media. Microbial growth was followed by measuring the changes in the crystal resonant frequency and bandwidth at several harmonics. It was shown that microbial growth can be monitored in real time using multichannel and multiparametric QCM sensors.

  15. Growth modes of thin films of ligand-free metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dollinger, A.; Strobel, C. H.; Bleuel, H.; Marsteller, A.; Gantefoer, G.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Tang, Xin; Bowen, K. H.; Kim, Young Dok

    2015-05-21

    Size-selected Mo{sub n}{sup −}, W{sub n}{sup −}, and Fe{sub n}{sup −} cluster anions are deposited on a weakly interacting substrate (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) and studied ex-situ using atomic force microscopy. Depending on size, three growth modes can be distinguished. Very small clusters consisting of less than 10–30 atoms behave similar to atoms and coalesce into 3-dimensional bulk-like islands. Medium sized clusters consisting of hundreds of atoms do not coalesce and follow a Stanski-Krastanov growth pattern. At low coverage, an almost perfect monolayer is formed. This is a new finding different from all previous studies on deposited metal clusters. For clusters with several thousands of atoms, the growth pattern again changes. At low coverage, the substrate is dotted with individual clusters, while at high coverage, the surface becomes extremely rough.

  16. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mode II Static Delamination Propagation and Fatigue Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for static delamination propagation and cyclic delamination onset and growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of an End-Notched Flexure (ENF) specimen. The example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation, onset and growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, static benchmark examples were created for the specimen. Second, based on the static results, benchmark examples for cyclic delamination growth were created. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Fourth, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the automated analysis and compared to the benchmark examples. Again, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Selecting the appropriate input parameters, however, was not straightforward and often required an iterative procedure. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required.

  17. Surface Structure and Growth Mode of Pd Deposited on Mo(110) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, Y.; Kawanowa, H.; Gotoh, Y.

    The surface structure and growth mode of Pd/Mo(110) have been studied using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The surface diagram of Pd on the Mo(110) substrate for deposition thickness versus substrate temperature was obtained. Four kinds of surface structures, namely α1, α2, β and γ, were observed. At less than 1 ML, α2 appeared in temperatures ranging from 400 to 1050°C and α1 appeared from RT to 400°C. α2 has a structure intermediate between those of Pd(111) and Mo(110), in which the dense direction of the layer is parallel to the [111]Mo orientation and their atomic row distances are coincident, resulting in formation of a long-period structure with a Mo surface, namely a coincident site lattice. The α1 structure is similar to the 1 × 1 structure. At more than 1.0 ML, β and γ structures appeared simultaneously in the temperature region from 500 to 950°C. However, at a high temperature region from 950 to 1050°C, the α2 structure was observed. β shows a one-dimensional ordered structure, in which Pd atoms line along [111]Mo. γ exhibits a 3 × 1 structure with the same atomic arrangement as the Mo(110) plane rotated at 70.5°. At greater than 2.0 ML, the Pd film grows in the Frank van der Merwe growth mode at a low temperature with accumulation of a Pd(111) layer, and in the Stranski Krastanov growth mode at a high temperature with two-dimensional growth of the γ structure followed by formation of flat crystallites.

  18. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  19. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  20. 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of SATURN imploding Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Springer, P.T.

    1995-11-06

    Z-pinch implosions driven by the SATURN device at Sandia National Laboratory are modeled with a 2D radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, showing strong growth of magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instability. Modeling of the linear and nonlinear development of MRT modes predicts growth of bubble-spike structures that increase the time span of stagnation and the resulting x-ray pulse width. Radiation is important in the pinch dynamics keeping the sheath relatively cool during the run-in and releasing most of the stagnation energy. The calculations give x-ray pulse widths and magnitudes in reasonable agreement with experiments, but predict a radiating region that is too dense and radially localized at stagnation. We also consider peaked initial density profiles with constant imploding sheath velocity that should reduce MRT instability and improve performance. 2D krypton simulations show an output x-ray power > 80 TW for the peaked profile.

  1. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-15

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam.

  2. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Watt, R.G.; Gobby, P.L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5{times}10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4{percent}{endash}7{percent} over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90{percent} intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with {ital ORCHID} simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-μm-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-μm and 60-μm wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-μm-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-μm perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-μm case when compared to targets without foam.

  4. Controlled Growth of one-dimensional zinc oxide nanostructures in the pulsed electrodeposition mode

    SciTech Connect

    Klochko, N. P. Khrypunov, G. S.; Myagchenko, Yu. O.; Melnychuk, E. E.; Kopach, V. R.; Klepikova, E. S.; Lyubov, V. M.; Kopach, A. V.

    2012-06-15

    Zinc oxide nanostructures are objects of study in the field of optoelectronics, solar power engineering, nanosensorics, and catalysis. For the purpose of the controlled growth of one-dimensional submicrometer zinc oxide structures in the pulsed electrodeposition mode, the effect of the pulse electrolysis parameters on the morphology of ZnO layers, their optical properties, and structural and substructural characteristics is determined using X-ray diffraction, optical spectrophotometry, and atomic-force microscopy. The possibility of fabricating arrays of ZnO nanowires with different geometrical shapes, perpendicular to the substrate surface, by varying the frequency of cathode-substrate potential pulses is shown.

  5. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  6. Growth mode and structures of silicene on the Ag(1 1 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Guo-Wei; Chen, Han-De; Lin, Deng-Sung

    2015-11-01

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been utilized to explore the growth processes and atomic structure of silicene on the Ag(1 1 1) surface. STM images reveal an etching growth mode in the sub-monolayer range. The results confirm the existence of various overlayer structures reported previously and that the lattice parameters of several overlayer structures at sub-monolayer coverages are close to the corresponding substrate supercells. However, detailed analysis of domain boundaries and Moiré-like superstructure in the STM images strongly suggest that the overlayer structures and the substrate lattices have no coincident relationships. Preliminary results of DFT calculations show that the changes in total energy upon translational displacement of the (3 × 3)Si silicene supercells with respect to the Ag(1 1 1) lattice is within a few tens of meV/Si atom.

  7. Characterization of debond growth mechanism in adhesively bonded composites under mode II static and fatigue loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the debond growth mechanism under mode II static and fatigue loadings. For this purpose, end-notched flexure specimens of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive were tested. In all specimen tested, the fatigue failure occurred in the form of cyclic debonding. The present study confirmed the result of previous studies that total strain-energy-release rate is the driving parameter for cyclic debonding. Further, the debond growth resistance under cyclic loading with full shear reversal (i.e., stress ratio, R = -1) is drastically reduced in comparison to the case when subjected to cyclic shear loading with no shear reversal (i.e., R = 0.1).

  8. In situ growth and activity and modes of penetration of Escherichia coli in unconsolidated porous materials.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P K; McInerney, M J; Knapp, R M

    1993-01-01

    Statistically reliable data on the in situ rates of growth, substrate consumption, and product formation are required to test the validity of the mathematical models developed for microbially enhanced oil recovery and in situ bioremediation processes. A simple, replicable porous-core system that could be aseptically divided into sections at various times was developed to follow the kinetics of microbial growth and metabolism in situ. This core system was used to study the kinetics of growth and the mode of penetration of strains of Escherichia coli through anaerobic, nutrient-saturated, fine Ottawa sand (permeability of 7.0 microns2 and porosity of 37%) under static conditions. The in situ rate of growth of a wild-type, motile, chemotactic strain, RW262, was two times slower inside cores than it was in liquid cultures. The mode of metabolism of galactose by strain RW262 was not altered inside cores, as acetate was the only product detected either inside the cores or in liquid cultures. Without applied advective force, strain RW262 grew exponentially and moved through cores at a rate of about 0.1 m/day. The cell population moved through cores in a band-like fashion, as the front of the moving cells consisted of high cell concentrations (greater than 10(5) cells per ml). Until the breakthrough of the cells occurred, galactose consumption and acetate production were observed only in the proximal sections of the core, showing that the cell propagation preceded the complete depletion of the substrate or the accumulation of large amounts of products.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8285677

  9. Effects of experimental conditions on the morphologies, structures and growth modes of pulsed laser-deposited CdS nanoneedles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    CdS nanoneedles with different morphologies, structures, and growth modes have been grown on Ni-coated Si(100) surface under different experimental conditions by pulsed laser deposition method. The effects of catalyst layer, substrate temperature, and laser pulse energy on the growth of the CdS nanoneedles were studied in detail. It was confirmed that the formation of the molten catalyst spheres is the key to the nucleation of the CdS nanoneedles by observing the morphologies of the Ni catalyst thin films annealed at different substrate temperatures. Both the substrate temperature and laser pulse energy strongly affected the growth modes of the CdS nanoneedles. The secondary growth of the smaller nanoneedles on the top of the main nanoneedles was found at appropriate conditions. A group of more completed pictures of the growth modes of the CdS nanoneedles were presented. PMID:24559455

  10. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  11. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  12. Onset of nonlinear saturation for Rayleigh-Taylor growth in the presence of a full spectrum of modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, Steven W.

    1989-06-01

    It is generally recognized that a single Rayleigh-Taylor unstable mode grows exponentially, proportional to the initial amplitude, until the amplitude is about (1/10 to (1/5 of the wavelength. The growth then becomes nonlinear, and the mode evolves into spikes and bubbles. This paper considers how this picture of the transition to nonlinearity changes when, instead of there being a single mode, there is a full spectrum of modes. We argue that nonlinear behavior begins whenever the sum of modes over a specified small region of k space becomes comparable to the wavelength. In the case of a single mode, this reduces to the usual comparison of the mode's amplitude with its wavelength λ. But if the modal amplitudes are smooth functions of k, the modes begin to saturate when their amplitude is comparable to λ2/R times a dimensionless scale factor; here, R is the radius in spherical geometry, or the length of the surface in planar geometry. Given this new notion of the amplitude at which nonlinear saturation begins, we construct a simple model to estimate the net perturbation resulting from a broadband initial spectrum. We assume that modes grow exponentially until saturation occurs, and then the growth of the individual modes becomes linear in time. The model predictions in two and three dimensions are compared with Read and Young's experiments [Atomic Weapons Research Establishment Report No. 011/83, Aldermasten, 1983 (unpublished)], and to Youngs's calculations [Physica 12D, 32 (1984)]. The experimental results are used to set the single parameter characterizing the onset of nonlinearity. The model provides a complete description of a weak dependence on initial amplitude. The model can be easily extended to any situation for which one can estimate single-mode growths; results are presented regarding effects on multimode growth of spherical geometry, ablation stabilization, and interface coupling.

  13. Epitaxial growth of highly-crystalline spinel ferrite thin films on perovskite substrates for all-oxide devices

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Jarrett A.; Gao, Ran; Schiffer, Peter; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-01-01

    The potential growth modes for epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on SrTiO3 (001) are investigated through control of the energetics of the pulsed-laser deposition growth process (via substrate temperature and laser fluence). We find that Fe3O4 grows epitaxially in three distinct growth modes: 2D-like, island, and 3D-to-2D, the last of which is characterized by films that begin growth in an island growth mode before progressing to a 2D growth mode. Films grown in the 2D-like and 3D-to-2D growth modes are atomically flat and partially strained, while films grown in the island growth mode are terminated in islands and fully relaxed. We find that the optimal structural, transport, and magnetic properties are obtained for films grown on the 2D-like/3D-to-2D growth regime boundary. The viability for including such thin films in perovskite-based all-oxide devices is demonstrated by growing a Fe3O4/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 spin valve epitaxially on SrTiO3. PMID:26030835

  14. Anisotropic 2D Materials for Tunable Hyperbolic Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Nemilentsau, Andrei; Low, Tony; Hanson, George

    2016-02-12

    Motivated by the recent emergence of a new class of anisotropic 2D materials, we examine their electromagnetic modes and demonstrate that a broad class of the materials can host highly directional hyperbolic plasmons. Their propagation direction can be manipulated on the spot by gate doping, enabling hyperbolic beam reflection, refraction, and bending. The realization of these natural 2D hyperbolic media opens up a new avenue in dynamic control of hyperbolic plasmons not possible in the 3D version.

  15. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  16. On the abrupt growth dynamics of nonlinear resistive tearing mode and the viscosity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2014-05-15

    The nonlinear evolution of the resistive tearing mode exhibits an abrupt growth after an X-point collapse once the magnetic island exceeds a certain critical width Δ′w{sub c} for large instability parameter Δ′, leading to a current sheet formation [N. F. Loureiro et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 235003 (2005)]. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of the X-point collapse as well as the current sheet formation including the viscosity effects, based on a secondary instability analysis. The secondary instability is excited due to the quasilinear current modification by the zonal current. In particular, it is identified that the current peaking effect is plausibly responsible for the onset of the X-point collapse and the current sheet formation, leading to the explosive growth of reconnected flux. In the presence of finite viscosity, the Δ′w{sub c} scaling with the resistivity gets modified. A transition behavior is revealed at P{sub r}≈1 for the viscosity dependence of Δ′w{sub c} and the linear tearing instability. However, the explosive growth seems to be independent of the viscosity in the magnetic Prandtl number P{sub r}<1 regime, while large viscosity plays a strong dissipation role.

  17. Use of the 'Precessions' process for prepolishing and correcting 2D & 2(1/2)D form.

    PubMed

    Walker, David D; Freeman, Richard; Morton, Roger; McCavana, Gerry; Beaucamp, Anthony

    2006-11-27

    The Precessions process polishes complex surfaces from the ground state preserving the ground-in form, and subsequently rectifies measured form errors. Our first paper introduced the technology and focused on the novel tooling. In this paper we describe the unique CNC machine tools and how they operate in polishing and correcting form. Experimental results demonstrate both the '2D' and '2(1/2)D' form-correction modes, as applied to aspheres with rotationally-symmetric target-form.

  18. Extending non-fatigue Mode I subcritical crack growth data to subcritical fatigue crack growth: Demonstration of the equivalence of the Charles' law and Paris law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell; Eppes, Martha-Cary

    2016-04-01

    Paris's law connects fatigue-induced subcritical crack growth and fatigue loading. Environmentally-driven subcritical crack growth, while a random process, can be decomposed into a spectrum of cyclic processes, where each spectral component is governed by Paris's law. Unfortunately, almost no data exists concerning the Paris law exponent, m; rather, the great majority of existing sub-critical crack growth measurements on rock have been carried out via Mode I tensile tests, where corresponding data are generally correlated using Charles' law, and where the latter, similar to Paris's law, exposes a power law relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity. In this study, a statistical argument is used to derive a simple, rigorous relationship between the all-important Paris law and Charles law exponents, m and n. This result has a significant practical implication: subcritical fatigue crack growth in rock, driven by various random environmental weathering processes can now be predicted using available Mode I stress corrosion indices, n.

  19. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  20. Mixed-mode fatigue-crack growth thresholds in Ti-6Al-4V at high frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-10-22

    Multiaxial loading conditions exist at fatigue-critical locations within turbine engine components, particularly in association with fretting fatigue in the blade dovetail/disk contact section. For fatigue-crack growth in such situations, the resultant crack-driving force is a combination of the influence of a mode I (tensile opening) stress-intensity range, {Delta}K{sub I}, as well as mode II (in-plane shear) and/or mode III (anti-plane shear) stress-intensity ranges, {Delta}K{sub II} and {Delta}K{sub III}, respectively. For the case of the high-cycle fatigue of turbine-engine alloys, it is critical to quantify such behavior, as the extremely high cyclic loading frequencies ({approximately}1--2 kHz) and correspondingly short times to failure may necessitate a design approached based on the fatigue-crack growth threshold. Moreover, knowledge of such thresholds is required for accurate prediction of fretting fatigue failures. Accordingly, this paper presents the mixed-mode fatigue crack growth thresholds for mode I + II loading (phase angles from 0{degree} to 82{degree}) in a Ti-6Al-4V blade alloy. These results indicate that when fatigue-crack growth in this alloy is characterized in terms of the crack-driving force {Delta}G, which incorporates both the applied tensile and shear loading, the mode 1 fatigue-crack growth threshold is a lower bound (worst case) with respect to mixed-mode (I + II) crack-growth behavior.

  1. The growth modes of vapor-deposited Bi on Cu(2 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, B.; Ascolani, H.

    2001-06-01

    This work presents growth modes of vapor-deposited Bi on clean and C contaminated Cu(2 1 0) surfaces, characterized with low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and work-function shifts ( Δeφ). Up to θBi=0.5 ML (monolayer, ML) fractional Bi coverage (equivalent to 0.686×10 15 at. cm -2) a p(1×1) structure is observed, associated with a gradual LEED pattern symmetry change from one mirror plane for clean Cu(2 1 0) to two, for θBi=0.5 ML. The higher symmetry phase is stable up to 723 K, and no appreciable binding-energy shifts are detected by XPS in the Bi (4f 7/2) and Cu (2p 3/2) core lines. Additional Bi results in Stranski-Krastanov growth of a compact Cu(2 1 0)-(6×1)-Bi structure with eight Bi atoms per unit cell, stable up to 628 K. Impurity levels of both either pre or coadsorbed C lower the stability temperature of the (6×1)-Bi phase. However, C does not have any appreciable influence on the p(1×1)-Bi phase. The presence of as little as θC=0.1 ML of preadsorbed C produces Frank-Van der Merwe (layer by layer) growth of the p(1×1) c2mm structure, up till completion of the third layer, and as much as 30% variation in Δeφ values with respect to C-free samples. Carbon appears to have no effect on the growth, at 723 K, of Cu(2 1 0)-p(1×1)-Bi facets from the Cu(1 0 0)-c(2×2)-Bi phase when sufficient defects (vacancies) are present in the selvedge.

  2. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes

    PubMed Central

    Randich, Amelia M.; Brun, Yves V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery. PMID:26106381

  3. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Biofilm Formation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris Growth under Two Metabolic Modes

    PubMed Central

    Kernan, Chase; Chow, Philicia P.; Christianson, Rebecca J.; Huang, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We examined biofilms formed by the metabolically versatile bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown via different metabolic modes. R. palustris was grown in flow cell chambers with identical medium conditions either in the presence or absence of light and oxygen. In the absence of oxygen and the presence of light, R. palustris grew and formed biofilms photoheterotrophically, and in the presence of oxygen and the absence of light, R. palustris grew and formed biofilms heterotrophically. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis software to quantitatively analyze and compare R. palustris biofilm formation over time in these two metabolic modes. We describe quantifiable differences in structure between the biofilms formed by the bacterium grown heterotrophically and those grown photoheterotrophically. We developed a computational model to explore ways in which biotic and abiotic parameters could drive the observed biofilm architectures, as well as a random-forest machine-learning algorithm based on structural differences that was able to identify growth conditions from the confocal imaging of the biofilms with 87% accuracy. Insight into the structure of phototrophic biofilms and conditions that influence biofilm formation is relevant for understanding the generation of biofilm structures with different properties, and for optimizing applications with phototrophic bacteria growing in the biofilm state. PMID:26087200

  4. [Methods for extraction of exopolymeric complex in plankton and biofilm growth mode of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia 22M].

    PubMed

    Boretskaia, M A; Suslova, O S

    2013-01-01

    The optimal methods for the extraction of exopolymeric complex (EPS) of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia 22M was determined. That EPS was synthesized in plankton and biofilm growth mode on the mild steel surface. It is desirable to use different physical and chemical methods for studying the EPS composition (carbohydrates and proteins) depending on the bacteria growth mode. In this way the interaction with ion exchange resin was the most effective for plankton growth mode to determine the maximum amount of carbohydrates (9.5 microg/ml), and the impact of heating to determine protein (3.9 microg/ml). For EPS biofilm in order to obtain maximum amount of carbohydrate it is desirable to use heating (30 microg/ml) and centrifugation (35 microg/ml). It is recommended to determine protein in the biofilm EPS after treatment with heating (3.75 microg/ml) and centrifugation (3.75 microg/ml).

  5. Magnetorotational Instability: Nonmodal Growth and the Relationship of Global Modes to the Shearing Box

    SciTech Connect

    J Squire, A Bhattacharjee

    2014-07-01

    We study the magnetorotational instability (MRI) (Balbus & Hawley 1998) using non-modal stability techniques.Despite the spectral instability of many forms of the MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very diff erent to the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely di fferent region of space. These ideas lead – for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes – to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary diff erential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using non-modal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite time-scales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that non-modal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence (Squire & Bhattacharjee 2014).

  6. Mode of growth of bacterial pathogens in chronic polymicrobial human osteomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, T J; Costerton, J W

    1985-01-01

    Direct examination of material from two cases of persistent (2 and 60 years) osteomyelitis by morphological and culture techniques showed that the pathogens comprised several bacterial species whose cells grew predominantly in discrete exopolysaccharide-enclosed microcolonies made up of a single bacterial morphotype. Bacterial microcolonies were seen between tissue elements in infected connective tissue, and the microcolonies adherent to bone surfaces coalesced to form extensive biofilms that occluded the surfaces of dead bone in sequestrae. Decalcification techniques were required to examine the interior of infected bone, but recognizable remnants were associated with very large amounts of fibrous, ruthenium red-stained material. All bacterial growth in these persistent infections occurred within an intercellular matrix, and some elements of this matrix, which was fibrous in transmission electron microscopy and amorphous in scanning electron microscopy, were associated with the surfaces of bacterial cells in a manner that suggested their production by these organisms. All of the implications of this microcolony mode of bacterial growth in osteomyelitis, and in other chronic bacterial diseases, have yet to be determined. Images PMID:4066923

  7. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  8. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  9. Growth and smolting in lower-mode Atlantic Salmon stocked into the Penobscot River, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; O'Malley, Andrew; Cox, Oliver; Ruksznis, Peter; Trial, Joan G.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar in Maine has relied on hatchery-produced fry and smolts for critical stocking strategies. Stocking fry minimizes domestication selection, but these fish have poor survival. Conversely, stocked smolts have little freshwater experience but provide higher adult returns. Lower-mode (LM) fish, those not growing fast enough to ensure smolting by the time of stocking, are a by-product of the smolt program and are an intermediate hatchery product. From 2002 to 2009, between 70,000 and 170,000 marked LM Atlantic Salmon were stocked into the Pleasant River (a tributary in the Penobscot River drainage, Maine) in late September to early October. These fish were recaptured as actively migrating smolts (screw trapping), as nonmigrants (electrofishing), and as returning adults to the Penobscot River (Veazie Dam trap). Fork length (FL) was measured and a scale sample was taken to retrospectively estimate FL at winter annulus one (FW1) using the intercept-corrected direct proportion model. The LM fish were observed to migrate as age-1, age-2, and infrequently as age-3 smolts. Those migrating as age-1 smolts had a distinctly larger estimated FL at FW1 (>112 mm) than those that remained in the river for at least one additional year. At the time of migration, age-2 and age-3 smolts were substantially larger than age-1 smolts. Returning adult Atlantic Salmon of LM origin had estimated FLs at FW1 that corresponded to smolt age (greater FL for age 1 than age 2). The LM product produces both age-1 and age-2 smolts that have greater freshwater experience than hatchery smolts and may have growth and fitness advantages. The data from this study will allow managers to better assess the probability of smolting age and manipulate hatchery growth rates to produce a targeted-size LM product.

  10. Mode of utilization of amino acids as growth substrates by Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pradip

    2005-12-01

    The study was undertaken to analyze the rate of uptake and utilization of various amino acids by Azospirillum brasilense Sp81 (RG) in a basal mineral salts solution under non-nitrogen fixing condition. These amino acids including other nitrogenous compounds were tested for both N- and C-sources. The kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) of uptake of some amino acids (e.g. lysine, arginine, proline, glutamine and glutamic acid) were exploited using a Hanes-Woolf plot, and discussed in the context of nitrogen starvation or both carbon and nitrogen starvation. To summarize all the kinetic data for these amino acids strongly suggested that the mode of these amino acids utilization in this bacterium followed the same general pattern, although the quantitative differences were there. A single amino acid was able to satisfy the nitrogen needs of this bacterium in basal mineral salts solution, and this possibility could be considered for the cost-effective growth medium for this bacterium in the biotechnological industry.

  11. Improved health and growth of fish fed mannan oligosaccharides: potential mode of action.

    PubMed

    Torrecillas, Silvia; Montero, Daniel; Izquierdo, Marisol

    2014-02-01

    Nowadays, aquaculture industry still confronts several disease-related problems mainly caused by viruses, bacteria and parasites. In the last decade, the use of mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) in fish production has received increased attention due to its beneficial effects on fish performance and disease resistance. This review shows the MOS use in aquaculture with a specific emphasis on the effectiveness of the several MOS forms available in the market related to disease resistance, fish nutrition and the possible mechanisms involved. Among the main beneficial effects attributed to MOS dietary supplementation, enhanced fish performance, feed efficiency and pathogen protection by potentiation of the systemic and local immune system and the reinforcement of the epithelial barrier structure and functionality are some of the most commonly demonstrated benefits. These combined effects suggest that the reinforcement of the intestinal integrity and functionality, together with the stimulation of the innate immune system, are the primary mode of action of MOS in fish. However, the supplementation strategy related to the structure of the MOS added, the correct dose and duration, as well as fish species, size and culture conditions are determinant factors to achieve improvements in health status and growth performance.

  12. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  13. A Novel Method for Characterizing Fatigue Delamination Growth Under Mode I Using the Double Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carvalho, Nelson; Murri, G.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to obtain Mode I delamination growth rate from a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen. In the proposed method, Unidirectional (UD) DCB specimens are tested in fatigue at different initial maximum energy release rates levels. The growth rate data obtained in the first increments of crack growth at each maximum energy release rate level are used to generate a Paris Law equation, which characterizes delamination growth rate without fiber-bridging, and can also be used to determine a delamination onset curve. The remaining delamination growth rate data from each test are used to determine a modified Paris law, which characterizes the delamination growth rate in a DCB specimen, explicitly accounting for fiber-bridging. The proposed expression captures well the scatter in experimental data obtained using the DCB specimens, suggesting its adequacy. The Paris Law characterizing delamination growth rate without fiber-bridging predicts higher delamination growth rates for the same maximum energy release rate applied, leading to a conservative estimate for delamination growth. This is particularly relevant, since in generic ply interfaces, fiber-bridging is less predominant than in UD DCB specimens. Failing to account for fiber-bridging in UD DCB specimens may underestimate the delamination growth rate, yielding non-conservative predictions.

  14. Influence of modes of metal transfer on grain structure and direction of grain growth in low nickel austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Manidipto; Saha, Saptarshi; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Kanjilal, Prasanta

    2015-04-15

    The present study elaborately discussed the effect of different modes of metal transfer (i.e., short circuit mode, spray mode and pulse mode) on grain structure and direction of grain growth in low nickel austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis was used to study the grain growth direction and grain structure in weld metals. The changes in grain structure and grain growth direction were found to be essentially varied with the weld pool shape and acting forces induced by modes of metal transfer at a constant welding speed. Short circuit mode of metal transfer owing to higher Marangoni force (M{sub a}) and low electromagnetic force (R{sub m}) promotes the lower weld pool volume (Γ) and higher weld pool maximum radius (r{sub m}). Short circuit mode also shows curved and tapered columnar grain structures and the grain growth preferentially occurred in <001> direction. In contrast, spray mode of metal transfer increases the Γ and reduces the r{sub m} values due to very high R{sub m} and typically reveals straight and broad columnar grain structures with preferential growth direction in <111>. In the pulse mode of metal transfer relatively high M{sub a} and R{sub m} simultaneously increase the weld pool width and the primary penetration which might encourage relatively complex grain growth directions in the weld pool and cause a shift of major intensity from <001> to <111> direction. It can also be concluded that the fusion zone grain structure and direction of grain growth are solely dependent on modes of metal transfer and remain constant for a particular mode of metal transfer irrespective of filler wire used. - Highlights: • Welded joints of LNiASS were prepared by varying modes of metal transfer. • Weld pool shape, grain structure and grain growth direction were studied. • Short circuit mode shows curved and tapered grain growth in <001> direction. • Spray mode shows straight and broad columnar grain growth

  15. Mode growth and competition in the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator start-up from noise.

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, R. R.; Kim, K.-J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-07-01

    We describe the radiation properties of an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator, beginning with its start-up from noise through saturation. We first decompose the initially chaotic undulator radiation into the growing longitudinal modes of the composite system consisting of the electron beam, the undulator, and the Bragg mirror resonator cavity. Because the radiation initially comprises several modes whose growth rates are comparable, we find that only after many oscillator passes is the output pulse dominantly characterized by the lowest-order Gaussian mode. We verify our analytic results with a novel, reduced one-dimensional FEL code (derived in the text), and with two-dimensional FEL simulations. Understanding the full longitudinal structure during the initial amplification will be critical in assessing the tolerances on the electron beam, undulator, and optical cavity required for robust operation.

  16. Mode growth and competition in the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator start-up from noise.

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, R. R.; Kim, K.-J. )

    2009-07-02

    We describe the radiation properties of an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator, beginning with its start-up from noise through saturation. We first decompose the initially chaotic undulator radiation into the growing longitudinal modes of the composite system consisting of the electron beam, the undulator, and the Bragg mirror resonator cavity. Because the radiation initially comprises several modes whose growth rates are comparable, we find that only after many oscillator passes is the output pulse dominantly characterized by the lowest-order Gaussian mode. We verify our analytic results with a novel, reduced one-dimensional FEL code (derived in the text), and with two-dimensional FEL simulations. Understanding the full longitudinal structure during the initial amplification will be critical in assessing the tolerances on the electron beam, undulator, and optical cavity required for robust operation.

  17. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  18. Controlling cell growth on titanium by surface functionalization of heptylamine using a novel combined plasma polymerization mode.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing H; Michalski, Wojtek P; Williams, Catherine; Li, Li; Xu, Hong-Sheng; Lamb, Peter R; Jones, Scott; Zhou, Yan M; Dai, Xiujuan J

    2011-05-01

    A novel bio-interface, produced by a combined plasma polymerization mode on a titanium (Ti) surface, was shown to enhance osteoblast growth and reduce fibroblast cell growth. This new method can securely attach a tailored interface to difficult materials such as Ti or ceramics. Here a more stable and higher density of NH₂ functional groups is able to withstand sterilization in ethanol. The biocompatibility, in terms of cell attachment and actin cytoskeleton development, was markedly improved in vitro, compared with untreated Ti surfaces and samples treated by other plasma modes. It gave a boosted (approximately six times higher) cellular response of osteoblasts in their initial adhesion stage. These factors should increase the formation of new bone around implants (reducing healing time), promoting osseointegration and thereby increasing implantation success rates. PMID:21370442

  19. Focusing surface wave imaging with flexible 2D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Fu, Junqiang; Li, Zhe; Xu, Chunguang; Xiao, Dingguo; Wang, Shaohan

    2016-04-01

    Curved surface is widely exist in key parts of energy and power equipment, such as, turbine blade cylinder block and so on. Cycling loading and harsh working condition of enable fatigue cracks appear on the surface. The crack should be found in time to avoid catastrophic damage to the equipment. A flexible 2D array transducer was developed. 2D Phased Array focusing method (2DPA), Mode-Spatial Double Phased focusing method (MSDPF) and the imaging method using the flexible 2D array probe are studied. Experiments using these focusing and imaging method are carried out. Surface crack image is obtained with both 2DPA and MSDPF focusing method. It have been proved that MSDPF can be more adaptable for curved surface and more calculate efficient than 2DPA.

  20. Factors influencing the temporal growth rate of the high order TM0n modes in the Ka-band overmoded Cherenkov oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dapeng; Shu, Ting; Ju, Jinchuan

    2015-06-01

    When the wavelength of overmoded Cherenkov oscillator goes into Ka-band, power handling capacity becomes an essential issue. Using the TM02 mode or higher order TM0n modes as the operating mode is a potential solution. This paper is aimed to find some proper parameters to make the temporal growth rate of the TM02 mode higher in our previously studied Gigawatt (GW)-class Ka band oscillator. An accurate and fast calculation method of the "hot" dispersion equation is derived for rectangular corrugated SWSs, which are widely used in the high frequency Cherenkov devices. Then, factors that affect the temporal growth rate of the high order TM0n modes are analyzed, including the depth of corrugation, the radius of drift tube, and the diode voltage. Results show that, when parameters are chosen properly, the temporal growth rate of the TM02 mode can be as high as 0.3 ns-1.

  1. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  2. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  3. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  4. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  5. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  6. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  7. Interfacial wave theory of dendrite growth - Global mode solution and quantum condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1990-01-01

    The signal feedback process at the edge of the dendrite tip is investigated, and the global instability mechanism of the system is derived. A mechanism is developed to describe a discrete set of unstable global modes for the system. Called WEASR, the method considers the wave emission at the turning point and signal reflections between the turning point and the front edge of the tip. It is shown that the method can obtain the asymptotic solutions for the unstable global modes and the quantum condition for the corresponding eigenvalues. A turning point called the pattern formation condition is shown to be crucial in the formation of dendritic structure and the choice of the final tip velocity. The wave emission process is outlined, and the importance of a signal feedback process at the edge of the dendrite tip is demonstrated. Parameters such as stability and surface tension can be analyzed in terms of their effects on WEASR modes.

  8. [Effects of different water-saving irrigation modes on chestnut growth and fruiting in drought hilly land].

    PubMed

    Tian, Shou-Le; Shen, Guang-Ning; Xu, Lin; Sun, Xiao-Li

    2012-03-01

    Taking the chestnut trees in a semi-arid and semi-humid hilly orchard of Tai' an, Shandong Province of East China as test objects, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different water-saving irrigation modes (pottery jar storing water, small hole storing water, and border irrigation with covering) on the soil moisture characteristics and the growth, fruiting, and development of chestnut roots. Comparing with the control (border irrigation), all the three water-saving irrigation modes could prolong the period of soil keeping moist, and the best effect came from pottery, jar treatment, with the soil keeping moist for 32 days, 13 days longer than the control. Under water-saving irrigations, the bearing branches length and number, leaf area and mass, and shoot mixed buds all increased obviously. Both pottery jar storing water and small hole storing water could irrigate deeper roots and induce root growth in deeper soil layers, and thus, relieve the drought stress on superficial roots. The three water-saving irrigation modes could increase chestnut yield markedly, with an increment of 18.8%, 16.5%, and 14.2%, respectively, as compared with the control.

  9. Measurements of sideband mode-coupling effects and linear MHD growth rates associated with the ponderomotive force

    SciTech Connect

    Meassick, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the interactions of rf waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with flute interchange modes are presented. Interactions between the applied l = +1 rf wave and an m = {minus}1 flute mode give rise to sidebands above and below the rf frequency with mode numbers of l = 0 and l = +2 respectively. The contribution of the sideband terms to perturbed energy are shown to cancel 40% of the direct ponderomotive contribution for w/w{sub ci} = 1.25. This is less then the 90% predicted by self-consistent theories of the ponderomotive force for an applied l = +1 rf wave above the ion cyclotron frequency with a large separation between the plasma and the vacuum vessel. Measurements of the linear growth and decay rate of the flute instability in the presence of rf are presented. These measurements allow a determination of the net stabilizing force on the plasma. The measured growth rate is in good agreement with that calculated by considering only the curvature driven instability and the ponderomotive force.

  10. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  11. Tuning the growth mode of nanowires via the interaction among seeds, substrates and beam fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannier, Valentina; Grillo, Vincenzo; Martelli, Faustino; Plaisier, Jasper Rikkert; Lausi, Andrea; Rubini, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    The growth mechanism of semiconductor nanowires is still an argument of high interest, and it is becoming clearer, investigation after investigation, that simple pictures fail to describe the complex behaviors observed under different growth conditions. We report here on the growth of semiconductor nanowires, maintaining control over the chemical composition and the physical state of the metallic seeds, and tuning the growth mechanism by varying the growth conditions. We focused on Au-assisted ZnSe nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(111)B substrates. We show that at sufficiently high temperatures, the Au seed is strongly affected by the interaction with the substrate and that nanowire growth can occur through two different mechanisms, which have a strong impact on the nanowire's morphology and crystal quality. In particular, ZnSe NWs may exhibit either a uniformly oriented, straight morphology when the nanoparticle seed is liquid, or a kinked, worm-like shape when the nanoparticle seed is switched to a solid phase. This switch, which tunes the nanowire growth mechanism, is achieved by controlling the Zn-to-Se beam pressure ratio at the Au-seed surface. Our results allow a deeper understanding of particle-assisted nanowire growth, and an accurate control of nanowire morphology via the control of the growth mechanism.The growth mechanism of semiconductor nanowires is still an argument of high interest, and it is becoming clearer, investigation after investigation, that simple pictures fail to describe the complex behaviors observed under different growth conditions. We report here on the growth of semiconductor nanowires, maintaining control over the chemical composition and the physical state of the metallic seeds, and tuning the growth mechanism by varying the growth conditions. We focused on Au-assisted ZnSe nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(111)B substrates. We show that at sufficiently high temperatures, the Au seed is strongly

  12. Mouse tumor vasculature expresses NKG2D ligands and can be targeted by chimeric NKG2D-modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L

    2013-03-01

    Tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in the development of solid tumors, and targeting the tumor vasculature has emerged as a strategy to prevent growth and progression of solid tumors. In this study, we show that murine tumor vasculature expresses Rae1, a ligand for a stimulatory NK receptor NKG2D. By genetic modification of T cells with an NKG2D-based chimeric Ag receptor, referred to as chNKG2D in which the NKG2D receptor is fused to the signaling domain of CD3ζ-chain, T cells were capable of targeting tumor vasculature leading to reduced tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This occurred even in tumors where the tumor cells themselves did not express NKG2D ligands. H5V, an endothelial cell line, expresses Rae1 and was lysed by chNKG2D-bearing T cells in a perforin-dependent manner. In vitro capillary tube formation was inhibited by chNKG2D T cells through IFN-γ and cell-cell contact mechanisms. The in vivo antiangiogenesis effects mediated by chNKG2D-bearing T cells at the tumor site were dependent on IFN-γ and perforin. These results provide a novel mechanism for NKG2D-based targeting of solid tumors.

  13. Construction and Validation of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 DNA Microarray: Transcriptome Flexibility at Diverse Growth Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Christopher T.; Sram, Jakub; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Ivanov, Pavel S.; Mackenzie, Christopher; Choudhary, Madhusudan; Land, Miriam L; Larimer, Frank W; Kaplan, Samuel; Gomelsky, Mark

    2004-07-01

    A high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarray, a genechip, representing the 4.6-Mb genome of the facultative phototrophic proteobacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, was custom-designed and manufactured by Affymetrix, Santa Clara, Calif. The genechip contains probe sets for 4,292 open reading frames (ORFs), 47 rRNA and tRNA genes, and 394 intergenic regions. The probe set sequences were derived from the genome annotation generated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory after extensive revision, which was based primarily upon codon usage characteristic of this GC-rich bacterium. As a result of the revision, numerous missing ORFs were uncovered, nonexistent ORFs were deleted, and misidentified start codons were corrected. To evaluate R. sphaeroides transcriptome flexibility, expression profiles for three diverse growth modes-aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration in the dark, and anaerobic photosynthesis-were generated. Expression levels of one-fifth to one-third of the R. sphaeroides ORFs were significantly different in cells under any two growth modes. Pathways involved in energy generation and redox balance maintenance under three growth modes were reconstructed. Expression patterns of genes involved in these pathways mirrored known functional changes, suggesting that massive changes in gene expression are the major means used by R. sphaeroides in adaptation to diverse conditions. Differential expression was observed for genes encoding putative new participants in these pathways (additional photosystem genes, duplicate NADH dehydrogenase, ATP synthases), whose functionality has yet to be investigated. The DNA microarray data correlated well with data derived from quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, as well as with data from the literature, thus validating the R. sphaeroides genechip as a powerful and reliable tool for studying unprecedented metabolic versatility of this bacterium.

  14. The lack of synchronization between iron uptake and cell growth leads to iron overload in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during post-exponential growth modes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A

    2013-12-31

    Fermenting cells growing exponentially on rich (YPAD) medium underwent a transition to a slow-growing state as glucose levels declined and their metabolism shifted to respiration. During exponential growth, Fe import and cell-growth rates were matched, affording an approximately invariant cellular Fe concentration. During the transition period, the high-affinity Fe import rate declined slower than the cell-growth rate declined, causing Fe to accumulate, initially as Fe(III) oxyhydroxide nanoparticles but eventually as mitochondrial and vacuolar Fe. Once the cells had reached slow-growth mode, Fe import and cell-growth rates were again matched, and the cellular Fe concentration was again approximately invariant. Fermenting cells grown on minimal medium (MM) grew more slowly during the exponential phase and underwent a transition to a true stationary state as glucose levels declined. The Fe concentration of MM cells that just entered the stationary state was similar to that of YPAD cells, but MM cells continued to accumulate Fe in the stationary state. Fe initially accumulated as nanoparticles and high-spin Fe(II) species, but vacuolar Fe(III) also eventually accumulated. Surprisingly, Fe-packed 5-day-old MM cells suffered no more reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage than younger cells, suggesting that the Fe concentration alone does not accurately predict the extent of ROS damage. The mode and rate of growth at the time of harvesting dramatically affected cellular Fe content. A mathematical model of Fe metabolism in a growing cell was developed. The model included the import of Fe via a regulated high-affinity pathway and an unregulated low-affinity pathway. The import of Fe from the cytosol to vacuoles and mitochondria and nanoparticle formation were also included. The model captured essential trafficking behavior, demonstrating that cells regulate Fe import in accordance with their overall growth rate and that they misregulate Fe import when nanoparticles

  15. Mode of Filamentous Growth of Leucothrix mucor in Pure Culture and in Nature, as Studied by Tritiated Thymidine Autoradiography

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Thomas D.

    1967-01-01

    Mode of growth of Leucothrix mucor filaments was measured by autoradiography with tritiated thymidine. Studies were performed on L. mucor in pure cultures in free suspension, as an epiphyte of pure cultures of the red alga Antithamnion sarniense, and as an epiphyte of red algae in the sea. Statistical analyses of the distribution of growing cells was done by use of the nonparametric One-Sample Runs Test and a Cluster analysis adapted from quadrat analyses of plant ecologists. No evidence of preferential growth at base or tip of L. mucor filaments was obtained in any of these studies. However, in nature, but not in the laboratory, there were regions of L. mucor filaments which were nongrowing or dormant. Such nongrowing regions could incorporate tritiated glucose. Images PMID:6025435

  16. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  17. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  18. Effect of density gradients in confined supersonic shear layers. Part 2: 3-D modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peroomian, Oshin; Kelly, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of basic flow density gradients on the supersonic wall modes were investigated in Part 1 of this analysis. In that investigation only the 2-D modes were studied. Tam and Hu investigated the 3-D modes in a confined vortex sheet and reported that the first 2-D Class A mode (A01) had the highest growth rate compared to all other 2-D and 3-D modes present in the vortex sheet for that particular set of flow patterns. They also showed that this result also held true for finite thickness shear layers with delta(sub w) less than 0.125. For free shear layers, Sandham and Reynolds showed that the 3-D K-H mode became the dominant mode for M(sub c) greater than 0.6. Jackson and Grosch investigated the effect of crossflow and obliqueness on the slow and fast odes present in a M(sub c) greater than 1 environment and showed that for certain combination of crossflow and wave angles the growth rates could be increased by up to a factor of 2 with respect to the 2-D case. The case studied here is a confined shear layer shown in Part 1. All solution procedures and basic low profiles are the same as in Part 1. The effect of density gradients on the 3-D modes present in the density ratios considered in Part 1 are investigated.

  19. Highly-resolved 2D HYDRA simulations of Double-Shell Ignition Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Milovich, J L; Amendt, P; Hamza, A; Marinak, M; Robey, H

    2006-06-30

    Double-shell (DS) targets (Amendt, P. A. et al., 2002) offer a complementary approach to the cryogenic baseline design (Lindl, J. et al., 2004) for achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Among the expected benefits are the ease of room temperature preparation and fielding, the potential for lower laser backscatter and the reduced need for careful shock timing. These benefits are offset, however, by demanding fabrication tolerances, e.g., shell concentricity and shell surface smoothness. In particular, the latter is of paramount importance since DS targets are susceptible to the growth of interface perturbations from impulsive and time-dependent accelerations. Previous work (Milovich, J. L. et al., 2004) has indicated that the growth of perturbations on the outer surface of the inner shell is potentially disruptive. To control this instability new designs have been proposed requiring bimetallic inner shells and material-matching mid-Z nanoporous foam. The challenges in manufacturing such exotic foams have led to a further evaluation of the densities and pore sizes needed to reduce the seeding of perturbations on the outer surface of the inner shell, thereby guiding the ongoing material science research efforts. Highly-resolved 2D simulations of porous foams have been performed to establish an upper limit on the allowable pore sizes for instability growth. Simulations indicate that foams with higher densities than previously thought are now possible. Moreover, while at the present time we are only able to simulate foams with average pore sizes larger than 1 micron (due to computational limitations), we can conclude that these pore sizes are potentially problematic. Furthermore, the effect of low-order hohlraum radiation asymmetries on the growth of intrinsic surface perturbations is also addressed. Highly-resolved 2D simulations indicate that the transverse flows that are set up by these low-order mode features (which can excite Kelvin

  20. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  1. Evaluation of Delamination Growth Characterization Methods Under Mode I Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable delamination characterization data for laminated composites are needed for input to analytical models of structures to predict delamination. The double-cantilevered beam (DCB) specimen is used with laminated composites to measure fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), delamination onset strain energy release rate, and growth rate data under cyclic loading. In the current study, DCB specimens of IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy supplied by two different manufacturers were tested in static and fatigue to compare the measured characterization data from the two sources, and to evaluate a proposed ASTM standard for generating Paris Law equations. Static results were used to generate compliance calibration constants for the fatigue data, and a delamination resistance curve, G(sub IR), which was used to determine the effects of fiber-bridging on delamination growth. Specimens were tested in fatigue at a cyclic G(sub Imax) level equal to 50, 40 or 30% of G(sub Ic), to determine a delamination onset curve and delamination growth rate. The delamination onset curve equations had similar exponents and the same trends. Delamination growth rate was calculated by fitting a Paris Law to the da/dN versus G(sub Imax) data. Both a 2-point and a 7-point data reduction method were used and the Paris Law equations were compared. To determine the effects of fiber-bridging, growth rate results were normalized by the delamination resistance curve for each material and compared to the non-normalized results. Paris Law exponents were found to decrease by 31% to 37% due to normalizing the growth data. Normalizing the data also greatly reduced the amount of scatter between the different specimens. Visual data records from the fatigue testing were used to calculate individual compliance calibration constants from the fatigue data for some of the specimens. The resulting da/dN versus G(sub Imax) plots showed much improved repeatability between specimens. Gretchen

  2. Flow transitions in a 2D directional solidification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larroude, Philippe; Ouazzani, Jalil; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1992-01-01

    Flow transitions in a Two Dimensional (2D) model of crystal growth were examined using the Bridgman-Stockbarger me thod. Using a pseudo-spectral Chebyshev collocation method, the governing equations yield solutions which exhibit a symmetry breaking flow tansition and oscillatory behavior indicative of a Hopf bifurcation at higher values of Ra. The results are discussed from fluid dynamic viewpoint, and broader implications for process models are also addressed.

  3. Multi-stacked InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown with different growth modes for quantum dot solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeongho; Ban, Keun-Yong Honsberg, Christiana B.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the material properties and device performance of InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) made using three different QD growth modes: Stranski-Krastanov (S-K), quasi-monolayer (QML), and sub-monolayer (SML) growth modes. All QDSCs show an extended external quantum efficiency (EQE) at near infrared wavelengths of 950–1070 nm from the QD absorption. Compared to the S-K and SML QDSCs, the QML QDSC with a higher strain exhibits a poor EQE response in the wavelength region of 300–880 nm due to increased non-radiative recombination. The conversion efficiency of the S-K and SML QDSCs exceeds that of the reference cell (13.4%) without QDs due to an enhanced photocurrent (>16% increase) produced by the silicon doped QD stacks. However, as expected from the EQE of the QML QDSC, the increase of strain-induced crystalline defects greatly degrades the photocurrent and open-circuit voltage, leading to the lowest conversion efficiency (8.9%)

  4. Evaluation of Delamination Onset and Growth Characterization Methods under Mode I Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2013-01-01

    Double-cantilevered beam specimens of IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy from two different manufacturers were tested in static and fatigue to compare the material characterization data and to evaluate a proposed ASTM standard for generating Paris Law equations for delamination growth. Static results were used to generate compliance calibration constants for reducing the fatigue data, and a delamination resistance curve, GIR, for each material. Specimens were tested in fatigue at different initial cyclic GImax levels to determine a delamination onset curve and the delamination growth rate. The delamination onset curve equations were similar for the two sources. Delamination growth rate was calculated by plotting da/dN versus GImax on a log-log scale and fitting a Paris Law. Two different data reduction methods were used to calculate da/dN. To determine the effects of fiber-bridging, growth results were normalized by the delamination resistance curves. Paris Law exponents decreased by 31% to 37% after normalizing the data. Visual data records from the fatigue tests were used to calculate individual compliance constants from the fatigue data. The resulting da/dN versus GImax plots showed improved repeatability for each source, compared to using averaged static data. The Paris Law expressions for the two sources showed the closest agreement using the individually fit compliance data.

  5. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  6. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  7. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  8. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  9. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  10. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  11. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  12. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  13. Beam-Plasma Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrkos, S.; Kalman, G. J.; Rosenberg, M.

    2009-06-05

    We consider a 2D Yukawa lattice of grains, with a beam of other charged grains moving in the lattice plane. In contrast to Vlasov plasmas, where the electrostatic instability excited by the beam is only longitudinal, here both longitudinal and transverse instabilities of the lattice phonons can develop. We determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The growth rate spectrum in wave number space exhibits remarkable gaps where no instability can develop. Depending on the system parameters, the transverse instability can be selectively excited.

  14. Observations of vortex merger and growth reduction in a dual-mode, supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Willow; Malamud, Guy; Shimony, Assaf; Trantham, Matt; Klein, Sallee; Shvarts, Dov; Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) generates vortical structures and turbulence at an interface with shear flow. This instability is ubiquitous in natural and engineering systems including astrophysical environments and laboratory plasmas. Detailed measurements of modulation amplitude growth reduction and vortex merger evolving from well-defined initial conditions can benchmark hydrodynamic models and theories. This experiment provides the first measurements of the vortex merger rate of well-characterized seed perturbations evolving under the influence of the KHI in a supersonic flow. These data were obtained by utilizing a sustained laser pulse to drive a steady shockwave into low-density carbon foam, introducing shear along a precision-machined plastic interface. The evolution and merger of the modulations was measured with x-ray radiography and reproduced with 2D hydrodynamic simulations. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0002032, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  15. 2D-patterning of self-assembled silver nanoisland films.

    PubMed

    Chervinskii, Semen; Reduto, Igor; Kamenskii, Alexander; Mukhin, Ivan S; Lipovskii, Andrey A

    2016-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the recently developed by the authors technique of silver nanoisland growth, allowing self-arrangement of 2D-patterns of nanoislands. The technique employs silver out-diffusion from ion-exchanged glass in the course of annealing in hydrogen. To modify the silver ion distribution in the exchanged soda-lime glass we included the thermal poling of the ion-exchanged glass with a profiled electrode as an intermediate stage of the process. The resulting consequence consists of three steps: (i) during the ion exchange of the glass in the AgxNa1-xNO3 (x = 0.01-0.15) melt we enrich the subsurface layer of the glass with silver ions; (ii) under the thermal poling, the electric field displaces these ions deeper into the glass under the 2D profiled anodic electrode, the displacement is smaller under the hollows in the electrode where the intensity of the field is minimal; (iii) annealing in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen results in silver out-diffusion only in the regions corresponding to the electrode hollows, as a result silver forms nanoislands following the shape of the electrode. Varying the electrode and mode of processing allows governing the nanoisland size distribution and self-arrangement of the isolated single nanoislands, pairs, triples or groups of several nanoislands-so-called plasmonic molecules. PMID:26765367

  16. Nonlinear Spring Finite Elements for Predicting Mode I-Dominated Delamination Growth in Laminated Structure with Through-Thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Krueger, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    One particular concern of polymer matrix composite laminates is the relatively low resistance to delamination cracking, in particular when the dominant type of failure is mode I opening. One method proposed for alleviating this problem involves the insertion pultruded carbon pins through the laminate thickness. The pins, known as z-pins, are inserted into the prepreg laminate using an ultrasonic hammer prior to the curing process, resulting in a field of pins embedded normal to the laminate plane as illustrated in Figure. 1. Pin diameters range between 0.28-mm to 0.5-mm and standard areal densities range from 0.5% to 4%. The z-pins are provided by the manufacturer, Aztex(Registered TradeMark) , in a low-density foam preform, which acts to stabilize orientation of the pins during the insertion process [1-3]. Typical pin materials include boron and carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix. A number of methods have been developed for predicting delamination growth in laminates reinforced with z-pins. During a study on the effect of z-pin reinforcement on mode I delamination resistance, finite element analyses of z-pin reinforced double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were performed by Cartie and Partridge [4]. The z-pin bridging stresses were modeled by applying equivalent forces at the pin locations. Single z-pin pull-out tests were performed to characterize the traction law of the pins under mode I loading conditions. Analytical solutions for delamination growth in z-pin reinforced DCB specimens were independently derived by Robinson and Das [5] and Ratcliffe and O'Brien [6]. In the former case, pin bridging stresses were modeled using a distributed load and in the latter example the bridging stresses were discretely modeled by way of grounded springs. Additionally, Robinson and Das developed a data reduction strategy for calculating mode I fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), from a z-pin reinforced DCB specimen test [5]. In both cases a traction law similar to that

  17. The Mode of Cell Wall Growth in Selected Archaea Is Similar to the General Mode of Cell Wall Growth in Bacteria as Revealed by Fluorescent Dye Analysis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Reinhard; Bellack, Annett; Bertl, Markus; Bilek, Yvonne; Heimerl, Thomas; Herzog, Bastian; Leisner, Madeleine; Probst, Alexander; Rachel, Reinhard; Sarbu, Christina; Schopf, Simone; Wanner, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The surfaces of 8 bacterial and 23 archaeal species, including many hyperthermophilic Archaea, could be stained using succinimidyl esters of fluorescent dyes. This allowed us for the first time to analyze the mode of cell wall growth in Archaea by subculturing stained cells. The data obtained show that incorporation of new cell wall material in Archaea follows the pattern observed for Bacteria: in the coccoid species Pyrococcus furiosus incorporation was in the region of septum formation while for the rod-shaped species Methanopyrus kandleri and Methanothermus sociabilis, a diffuse incorporation of cell wall material over the cell length was observed. Cell surface appendages like fimbriae/pili, fibers, or flagella were detectable by fluorescence staining only in a very few cases although their presence was proven by electron microscopy. Our data in addition prove that Alexa Fluor dyes can be used for in situ analyses at temperatures up to 100°C. PMID:21169435

  18. Accelerated fatigue crack growth behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal alloy and its dependence on the deformation mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal nickel base superalloy was conducted. Typical Paris region behavior was observed above a delta K of 8 MPa sq rt of m. However, below that stress intensity range, the alloy exhibited highly unusual behavior. This behavior consisted of a region where the crack growth rate became essentially independent of the applied stress intensity. The transition in the FCG behavior was related to a change in the observed crack growth mechanisms. In the Paris region, fatigue failure occurred along (111) facets; however, at the lower stress intensities, (001) fatigue failure was observed. A mechanism was proposed, based on barriers to dislocation motion, to explain the changes in the observed FCG behavior. The FCG data were also evaluated in terms of a recently proposed stress intensity parameter, K sub rss. This parameter, based on the resolved shear stresses on the slip planes, quantified the crack driving force as well as the mode I delta K, and at the same time was also able to predict the microscopic crack path under different stress states.

  19. Electromagnetic absorption of semiconductor 2D Majorana nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Daniel; Osca, Javier; Serra, Llorenç

    2015-04-01

    We calculate the cross section for the electromagnetic absorption of planar 2D Majorana nanowires. The electromagnetic field is described in the dipole approximation. We discuss the signatures on the cross section of a near-zero-energy mode. A low energy peak for transverse polarization, absent in the longitudinal one, reveals the presence of the Majorana-like state. This peak is relatively robust against the thermal smearing of the level occupations. We consider the influence of optical masks hiding parts of the nanowire from the radiation.

  20. Development of a numerical procedure for mixed mode K-solutions and fatigue crack growth in FCC single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Srikant

    2005-11-01

    Fatigue-induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades and vanes are a pervasive problem. Turbine blades and vanes represent perhaps the most demanding structural applications due to the combination of high operating temperature, corrosive environment, high monotonic and cyclic stresses, long expected component lifetimes and the enormous consequence of structural failure. Single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. These materials have orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. Computation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the ability to model fatigue crack growth rate at single crystal cracks subject to mixed-mode loading conditions are important parts of developing a mechanistically based life prediction for these complex alloys. A general numerical procedure has been developed to calculate SIFs for a crack in a general anisotropic linear elastic material subject to mixed-mode loading conditions, using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). The procedure does not require an a priori assumption of plane stress or plane strain conditions. The SIFs KI, KII, and KIII are shown to be a complex function of the coupled 3D crack tip displacement field. A comprehensive study of variation of SIFs as a function of crystallographic orientation, crack length, and mode-mixity ratios is presented, based on the 3D elastic orthotropic finite element modeling of tensile and Brazilian Disc (BD) specimens in specific crystal orientations. Variation of SIF through the thickness of the specimens is also analyzed. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient or effective SIF, Krss, can be computed as a function of crack tip SIFs and the

  1. Magnetorotational instability: nonmodal growth and the relationship of global modes to the shearing box

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-12-10

    We study magnetorotational instability (MRI) using nonmodal stability techniques. Despite the spectral instability of many forms of MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very different from the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely different region of space. These ideas lead—for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes—to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using nonmodal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite timescales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that nonmodal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence.

  2. Magnetorotational Instability: Nonmodal Growth and the Relationship of Global Modes to the Shearing Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study magnetorotational instability (MRI) using nonmodal stability techniques. Despite the spectral instability of many forms of MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very different from the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely different region of space. These ideas lead—for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes—to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using nonmodal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite timescales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that nonmodal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence.

  3. Global 2-D intercomparison of sectional and modal aerosol modules

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenstein, D K; Penner, J E; Herzog, M; Liu, Xiaohong

    2007-05-08

    We present an intercomparison of two aerosol modules, one sectional, one modal, in a global 2-D model in order to differentiate their behavior for tropospheric and stratospheric applications. We model only binary sulfuric acid-water aerosols in this study. Two versions of the sec-tional model and three versions of the modal model are used to test the sensitivity of background aerosol mass and size distribution to the number of bins or modes and to the pre-scribed width of the largest mode. We find modest sensitivity to the number of bins (40 vs 150) used in the sectional model. Aerosol mass is found to be reduced in a modal model if care is not taken in selecting the width of the largest lognormal mode, reflecting differences in sedimentation in the middle stratosphere. The size distributions calculated by the sec-tional model can be better matched by a modal model with four modes rather than three modes in most but not all sit-uations. A simulation of aerosol decay following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo shows that the representation of the size distribution can have a signflcant impact on model-calculated aerosol decay rates in the stratosphere. Between 1991 and 1995, aerosol mass and surface area density calcu-lated by two versions of the modal model adequately match results from the sectional model. Calculated effective radius for the same time period shows more intermodel variability.

  4. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  5. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  6. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  7. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  8. Use of anomolous thermal imaging effects for multi-mode systems control during crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargo, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Real time image processing techniques, combined with multitasking computational capabilities are used to establish thermal imaging as a multimode sensor for systems control during crystal growth. Whereas certain regions of the high temperature scene are presently unusable for quantitative determination of temperature, the anomalous information thus obtained is found to serve as a potentially low noise source of other important systems control output. Using this approach, the light emission/reflection characteristics of the crystal, meniscus and melt system are used to infer the crystal diameter and a linear regression algorithm is employed to determine the local diameter trend. This data is utilized as input for closed loop control of crystal shape. No performance penalty in thermal imaging speed is paid for this added functionality. Approach to secondary (diameter) sensor design and systems control structure is discussed. Preliminary experimental results are presented.

  9. Synthesis, growth and characterization of ZnO microtubes using a traveling-wave mode microwave system

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Naser, Qusay A.H.; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Han; Liu, Guizhen; Wang, Lin

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • ZnO microtubes were successfully synthesized within 15 min. • Introducing a design of a traveling-wave mode microwave system. • Growth temperature of ZnO microtubes becomes predominant between 1350 °C and 1400 °C. • ZnO microtube showed a strong ultraviolet and a weak and broad green emission. • ZnO microtube is composed only of ZnO with high crystallinity. - Abstract: Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) investigation reveals that zinc oxide (ZnO) microtubes have been successfully synthesized via a traveling-wave mode microwave system. These products are hexagonal tubular crystals with an average diameter of 60 μm and 250 μm in length, having a well faceted end and side surfaces. The wall thickness of the ZnO tubes is about 3–5 μm. The influence of reaction temperature on the formation of crystalline ZnO hexagonal tubes is studied. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra have also been examined to explore the optical property which exhibits strong ultraviolet emission at 377.422 nm and a weak and broad green emission band at 587.548 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) show that the product is composed only of ZnO with high crystallinity. The presented synthesis method possesses several advantages, which would be significant to the deeper study and wide applications of ZnO tubes in the future.

  10. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid tellurite (TeO32–) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO32– further increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO32–. P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/plac-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO32– exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to TeO32–. Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. PMID:25992876

  11. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

    PubMed

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

  12. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  13. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  14. Non-canonical signaling mode of the epidermal growth factor receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heng-Huan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its family members are key players in both physiological and pathological settings for which they are well recognized as models for investigating the functions and regulations of other membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and serve as therapeutic targets critical to clinical need and fundamental research. The canonical view of the pivotal functions in the EGFR family has been well documented as being an initiator of signaling amplification cascades from the plasma membrane to different subcellular compartments via receptor endocytic trafficking, intermolecular interaction, and kinase-substrate reaction in a temporalspatial manner. However, several lines of evidence have identified non-canonical roles of the EGFR family, acting as a transcriptional factor and a chromatin regulator in the nucleus to regulate gene expression, DNA replication, and DNA damage repair. Moreover, the EGFR family can even exert its impact outside the host cell through exosomal vesicle secretion. The emerging concept of the non-canonical roles of the EGFR family reveals an astonishing and elaborate scheme on the molecular functions of membrane RTKs, offering new insights into the receptor biology as well as the development of comprehensive therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26693051

  15. Raman 2D-band splitting in graphene: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Frank, Otakar; Mohr, Marcel; Maultzsch, Janina; Thomsen, Christian; Riaz, Ibtsam; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S; Tsoukleri, Georgia; Parthenios, John; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Kavan, Ladislav; Galiotis, Costas

    2011-03-22

    We present a systematic experimental and theoretical study of the two-phonon (2D) Raman scattering in graphene under uniaxial tension. The external perturbation unveils that the 2D mode excited with 785 nm has a complex line-shape mainly due to the contribution of two distinct double resonance scattering processes (inner and outer) in the Raman signal. The splitting depends on the direction of the applied strain and the polarization of the incident light. The results give new insight into the nature of the 2D band and have significant implications for the use of graphene as reinforcement in composites since the 2D mode is crucial to assess how effectively graphene uptakes an applied stress or strain.

  16. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  17. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  18. 2D OR NOT 2D: THE EFFECT OF DIMENSIONALITY ON THE DYNAMICS OF FINGERING CONVECTION AT LOW PRANDTL NUMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Garaud, Pascale; Brummell, Nicholas

    2015-12-10

    Fingering convection (otherwise known as thermohaline convection) is an instability that occurs in stellar radiative interiors in the presence of unstable compositional gradients. Numerical simulations have been used in order to estimate the efficiency of mixing induced by this instability. However, fully three-dimensional (3D) computations in the parameter regime appropriate for stellar astrophysics (i.e., low Prandtl number) are prohibitively expensive. This raises the question of whether two-dimensional (2D) simulations could be used instead to achieve the same goals. In this work, we address this issue by comparing the outcome of 2D and 3D simulations of fingering convection at low Prandtl number. We find that 2D simulations are never appropriate. However, we also find that the required 3D computational domain does not have to be very wide: the third dimension only needs to contain a minimum of two wavelengths of the fastest-growing linearly unstable mode to capture the essentially 3D dynamics of small-scale fingering. Narrow domains, however, should still be used with caution since they could limit the subsequent development of any large-scale dynamics typically associated with fingering convection.

  19. 2D or Not 2D: The Effect of Dimensionality on the Dynamics of Fingering Convection at Low Prandtl Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, Pascale; Brummell, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Fingering convection (otherwise known as thermohaline convection) is an instability that occurs in stellar radiative interiors in the presence of unstable compositional gradients. Numerical simulations have been used in order to estimate the efficiency of mixing induced by this instability. However, fully three-dimensional (3D) computations in the parameter regime appropriate for stellar astrophysics (i.e., low Prandtl number) are prohibitively expensive. This raises the question of whether two-dimensional (2D) simulations could be used instead to achieve the same goals. In this work, we address this issue by comparing the outcome of 2D and 3D simulations of fingering convection at low Prandtl number. We find that 2D simulations are never appropriate. However, we also find that the required 3D computational domain does not have to be very wide: the third dimension only needs to contain a minimum of two wavelengths of the fastest-growing linearly unstable mode to capture the essentially 3D dynamics of small-scale fingering. Narrow domains, however, should still be used with caution since they could limit the subsequent development of any large-scale dynamics typically associated with fingering convection.

  20. Arrayed van der Waals Vertical Heterostructures Based on 2D GaSe Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiang; Tang, Lei; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Yanwen; Wang, Weiyi; Zou, Yichao; Liu, Cong; Guo, Nan; Zou, Jin; Zhou, Peng; Hu, Weida; Xiu, Faxian

    2015-05-13

    Vertically stacking two-dimensional (2D) materials can enable the design of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices and realize complex functionality. However, the fabrication of such artificial heterostructures on a wafer scale with an atomically sharp interface poses an unprecedented challenge. Here, we demonstrate a convenient and controllable approach for the production of wafer-scale 2D GaSe thin films by molecular beam epitaxy. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction oscillations and Raman spectroscopy reveal a layer-by-layer van der Waals epitaxial growth mode. Highly efficient photodetector arrays were fabricated, based on few-layer GaSe on Si. These photodiodes show steady rectifying characteristics and a high external quantum efficiency of 23.6%. The resultant photoresponse is super-fast and robust, with a response time of 60 μs. Importantly, the device shows no sign of degradation after 1 million cycles of operation. We also carried out numerical simulations to understand the underlying device working principles. Our study establishes a new approach to produce controllable, robust, and large-area 2D heterostructures and presents a crucial step for further practical applications.

  1. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  2. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  3. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; de Vries, P. C.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.; García-Muñoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  4. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  5. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  6. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  7. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  8. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  9. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  10. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  11. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  12. Analysis of the Numerical and Geometrical Parameters Influencing the Simulation of Mode I and Mode II Delamination Growth in Unidirectional and Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, S.; De Baere, I.; Van Paepegem, W.

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of composite structures depends, among other damage mechanisms, on their ability to withstand delaminations. In order to have a better understanding of the cohesive zone method technique for delamination simulations, a complete analysis of the multiple parameters influencing the results is necessary. In this paper the work is concentrated on the cohesive zone method using cohesive elements. First a summary of the theory of the cohesive zone method is given. A numerical investigation on the multiple parameters influencing the numerical simulation of the mode I and mode II delamination tests has been performed. The parameters such as the stabilization method, the output frequency, the friction and the computational efficiency have been taken into account. The results will be compared to an analytical solution obtained by linear elastic fracture mechanics. Additionally the numerical simulation results will be compared to the experimental results of a glass-fibre reinforced composite material for the mode I Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and to a carbon fibre 5-harness satin weave reinforced polyphenylene sulphide composite for the mode I DCB and mode II End Notched Flexure (ENF).

  13. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  14. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  16. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X-L

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout. PMID:27464908

  17. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X-L

    2016-07-28

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  18. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  19. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout. PMID:27464908

  20. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  1. Repression of multiple CYP2D genes in mouse primary hepatocytes with a single siRNA construct.

    PubMed

    Elraghy, Omaima; Baldwin, William S

    2015-01-01

    The Cyp2d subfamily is the second most abun-dant subfamily of hepatic drug-metabolizing CYPs. In mice, there are nine Cyp2d members that are believed to have redundant catalytic activity. We are testing and optimizing the ability of one short interfering RNA (siRNA) construct to knockdown the expression of multiple mouse Cyp2ds in primary hepatocytes. Expression of Cyp2d10, Cyp2d11, Cyp2d22, and Cyp2d26 was observed in the primary male mouse hepatocytes. Cyp2d9, which is male-specific and growth hormone-dependent, was not expressed in male primary hepatocytes, potentially because of its dependence on pulsatile growth hormone release from the anterior pituitary. Several different siRNAs at different concentrations and with different reagents were used to knockdown Cyp2d expression. siRNA constructs designed to repress only one construct often mildly repressed several Cyp2d isoforms. A construct designed to knockdown every Cyp2d isoform provided the best results, especially when incubated with transfection reagents designed specifically for primary cell culture. Interestingly, a construct designed to knockdown all Cyp2d isoforms, except Cyp2d10, caused a 2.5× increase in Cyp2d10 expression, presumably because of a compensatory response. However, while RNA expression is repressed 24 h after siRNA treatment, associated changes in Cyp2d-mediated metabolism are tenuous. Overall, this study provides data on the expression of murine Cyp2ds in primary cell lines, valuable information on designing siRNAs for silencing multiple murine CYPs, and potential pros and cons of using siRNA as a tool for repressing Cyp2d and estimating Cyp2d's role in murine xenobiotic metabolism. PMID:25124873

  2. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  3. 2D to 3D conversion implemented in different hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Huitron, Victor; Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Hernandez-Fragoso, Araceli

    2015-02-01

    Conversion of available 2D data for release in 3D content is a hot topic for providers and for success of the 3D applications, in general. It naturally completely relies on virtual view synthesis of a second view given by original 2D video. Disparity map (DM) estimation is a central task in 3D generation but still follows a very difficult problem for rendering novel images precisely. There exist different approaches in DM reconstruction, among them manually and semiautomatic methods that can produce high quality DMs but they demonstrate hard time consuming and are computationally expensive. In this paper, several hardware implementations of designed frameworks for an automatic 3D color video generation based on 2D real video sequence are proposed. The novel framework includes simultaneous processing of stereo pairs using the following blocks: CIE L*a*b* color space conversions, stereo matching via pyramidal scheme, color segmentation by k-means on an a*b* color plane, and adaptive post-filtering, DM estimation using stereo matching between left and right images (or neighboring frames in a video), adaptive post-filtering, and finally, the anaglyph 3D scene generation. Novel technique has been implemented on DSP TMS320DM648, Matlab's Simulink module over a PC with Windows 7, and using graphic card (NVIDIA Quadro K2000) demonstrating that the proposed approach can be applied in real-time processing mode. The time values needed, mean Similarity Structural Index Measure (SSIM) and Bad Matching Pixels (B) values for different hardware implementations (GPU, Single CPU, and DSP) are exposed in this paper.

  4. Growth mode and self-organization of LuPc2 on Si(001)-2×1 vicinal surfaces: An optical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudet, S.; Bidermane, I.; Lacaze, E.; Gallas, B.; Bouvet, M.; Brunet, J.; Pauly, A.; Borensztein, Y.; Witkowski, N.

    2012-09-01

    We report an investigation of the initial growth and of the self-organization of lutetium biphthalocyanine LuPc2 on Si(001)-2×1 vicinal surfaces. Using surface-sensitive optical spectroscopies, namely, surface-difference-reflectance spectroscopy (SDRS) and reflectance-anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS), together with local-probe microscopies, we are able to propose a scenario for the growth mode up to about 20 nm. We demonstrate that the growth mode initially proceeds through the formation of a wetting layer, followed by the formation of clusters whose sizes increase while keeping a constant shape in which the molecules are inclined. Moreover, the LuPc2 molecules are self-organized along the step edges, and we are able to estimate that about 30% to 100% of the molecules are aligned when considering that the molecules are tilted by 45∘ to 63∘ with respect to the surface normal.

  5. Observation of growth mode dependence on over-potential values: a combination of in-situ optical monitoring and ex-situ atomic force microscopy characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, M. K.; Gray, J.; Moffat, T.; Orme, C.; Schwarzacher, W.; Zhu, X. D.

    2005-03-01

    We study the over-potential electrodeposition of Pb on Cu(100) using a combination of an in-situ oblique-incidence reflectivity difference technique and ex-situ atomic force microscopy. We identified two distinctly different over-potential growth modes that depend on the values of the overpotential. We have characterized the morphology corresponding to the two growth modes using AFM. At a high over-potential there is even growth of small clusters across the monolayer thick under-potential deposited (UPD) Pb covered Cu(100) surface. At lower over-potentials (a fraction of a volt from the value for UPD), we observed much larger 3-D clusters, more than 400 nm in height and separated by an averaged distance of one micron.

  6. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  7. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  8. 2-D soft x-ray arrays in the EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaiyun; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Duan, Yanmin; Li, Xueqin; Yuan, Yi; Mao, Songtao; Sheng, Xiuli; Zhao, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray (SXR) imaging diagnostic has been installed in EAST for the study of magnetohydrodynamics activities and core high-Z impurity transport. Up to 122 lines of sight view the poloidal plasma from three directions (two up-down symmetrical horizontal arrays and one vertical array), which renders the diagnostic able to provide detailed tomographic reconstructions under various conditions. Fourier-Bessel method based on flux coordinates was employed for 2-D SXR tomographic reconstruction. Examples of several events measured by SXR diagnostic in EAST are shown, namely the crash patterns of sawtooth, periodical burst of edge localized modes, and the transport of high-Z intrinsic impurities.

  9. A full 2D IDCT with extreme low complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Antonio; Silva, Antonio; Reznik, Yuriy

    2007-09-01

    In the context of a Call for Proposal for integer IDCTs issued by MPEG in July 2005, a full 2D integer IDCT based on a previous Feig and Winograd's work has been proposed. It achieves a high precision by meeting all IEEE1180 conditions and is suitable of implementation on hardware since it can be performed only with shifts and additions. Furthermore, it can be useful in high video resolution scenarios like in 720p/1080i/p due to its feedforward operation mode without any loop as usual in row-column implementations. The proposed transformation can be implemented without changing other functional blocks either at the encoder or at the decoder or alternatively as a scaled version incorporating the scaling factors into the dequantization stage. Our algorithm uses only 1328 operations for 8x8 blocks, including scaling factors.

  10. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  11. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  12. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  13. Pistillate flower development and pollen tube growth mode during the delayed fertilization stage in Corylus heterophylla Fisch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Huidi; Cheng, Yunqing; Kafkas, Salih; Güney, Murat

    2014-09-01

    Unlike most angiosperms, in which fertilization occurs within several days after pollination, fertilization in hazel (Corylus Spp.) is delayed by two to three and a half months. However, the female inflorescences or young fruits are too hard or lignified to be dissected according to regular paraffin sectioning technique. So, what the nature of development during the extended progamic phases of hazel remains unknown. The female inflorescence development and pollen tube growth mode during the delayed fertilization stage in hazel were investigated by improved paraffin sectioning and aniline blue staining of pollen tubes. The results showed ovaries and ovules of hazel were invisible at the time of blooming. Early ovary and ovule primordium began to form from 15 to 20 days after blooming, respectively. Integument and mature embryo sacs differentiated from the nucellus on 40th and 55th day after blooming, respectively. Pollen tubes were retarded in the bottom of the style or the pollen tube cavity (PTC, a specifical lignified cavity structure at the bottom of style for pollen tube to rest during progamic phase) for about 26 days. Then, the pollen tubes were observed to leave the PTC and began to enter the ovary. After that, a single pollen tube passed through the vicinity of the micropyle. Finally, pollen tubes turned a corner and penetrated the embryo sac through the tissue of the chalaza instead of micropyle on 52 and 55 days after blooming, respectively. The results of more in-depth information will be beneficial to better understanding of the delayed fertilization process in hazel.

  14. Effects of misfit dislocations and AlN buffer layer on the GaInN/GaN phase diagram of the growth mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Ujihara, Toru; Miyashita, Satoru; Sazaki, Gen

    2001-01-01

    The thickness-composition phase diagrams of the growth modes were determined for the GaInN-on-GaN (GaInN/GaN) and the GaInN-on-AlN-on-GaN (GaInN/AlN/GaN) structures. For this determination, the strain energy was calculated by considering the stress relaxation due to introduction of misfit dislocations, the surface energy was estimated from bonding enthalpy of the nearest-neighbor bonds on the surface, and the interface energy was estimated by considering both effects of the dangling bonds due to lattice misfit and the abrupt transition of bonding species at the heterointerface. From these phase diagrams, it was found that the layer-by-layer growth such as the Frank-van der Merwe mode was very difficult to obtain for the epitaxial growth of GaInN on GaN when the InN fraction is large. The Volmer-Weber mode is dominant in the phase diagram of the GaInN/GaN structures. The influence of an AlN buffer layer with a larger surface energy was studied by introducing an AlN layer between the GaInN layer and the GaN substrate. It was known that the layer-by-layer growth could be more easily obtained if misfit dislocations were introduced and an AlN layer was used as a buffer.

  15. One-step growth of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} stem-branch featured nanostructures: Morphology control by VS and VLS mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiushi; Gao Wei; Shan Lianchen; Zhang Jian; Jin Yunxia; Cong Ridong; Cui Qiliang

    2011-09-15

    We report here one-step synthesis of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanodendrites by selectively applying a vapor-solid (VS) and vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) strategy via direct current arc discharge method. The resultant nanodendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The spine-shaped nanodendrites were generated by a noncatalytic growth following a VS mode. The uniform secondary nanowire branches were epitaxial grown from two side surfaces of the nanowire stems. The pine-shaped nanodendrites were obtained through a catalytic growth in a VLS process. These branch nanowires were unsystematically grown from the nanocone-like stems. The photoluminescence spectra of the nanodendrites show a strong white light emission around 400-750 nm, suggesting their potential applications in light and electron emission devices. - Graphical abstract: Spine-shaped and pine-shaped Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures were synthesized by VS and VLS mode with plasma-assisted dc arc discharge method. Highlights: > Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} stem-branch featured nanostructures have been prepared. > Spine-shaped nanodendrites were generated by a noncatalytic growth following a VS mode. > Pine-shaped nanodendrites were obtained through a catalytic growth in a VLS process.

  16. Squeezing in a 2-D generalized oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castanos, Octavio; Lopez-Pena, Ramon; Manko, Vladimir I.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional generalized oscillator with time-dependent parameters is considered to study the two-mode squeezing phenomena. Specific choices of the parameters are used to determine the dispersion matrix and analytic expressions, in terms of standard hermite polynomials, of the wavefunctions and photon distributions.

  17. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  18. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  19. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  20. CYP2D6*36 gene arrangements within the cyp2d6 locus: association of CYP2D6*36 with poor metabolizer status.

    PubMed

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Bradford, L Dianne; Alander, Sarah W; Leeder, J Steven

    2006-04-01

    Unexplained cases of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype discordance continue to be discovered. In previous studies, several African Americans with a poor metabolizer phenotype carried the reduced function CYP2D6*10 allele in combination with a nonfunctional allele. We pursued the possibility that these alleles harbor either a known sequence variation (i.e., CYP2D6*36 carrying a gene conversion in exon 9 along the CYP2D6*10-defining 100C>T single-nucleotide polymorphism) or novel sequences variation(s). Discordant cases were evaluated by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to test for gene rearrangement events, and a 6.6-kilobase pair PCR product encompassing the CYP2D6 gene was cloned and entirely sequenced. Thereafter, allele frequencies were determined in different study populations comprising whites, African Americans, and Asians. Analyses covering the CYP2D7 to 2D6 gene region established that CYP2D6*36 did not only exist as a gene duplication (CYP2D6*36x2) or in tandem with *10 (CYP2D6*36+*10), as previously reported, but also by itself. This "single" CYP2D6*36 allele was found in nine African Americans and one Asian, but was absent in the whites tested. Ultimately, the presence of CYP2D6*36 resolved genotype/phenotype discordance in three cases. We also discovered an exon 9 conversion-positive CYP2D6*4 gene in a duplication arrangement (CYP2D6*4Nx2) and a CYP2D6*4 allele lacking 100C>T (CYP2D6*4M) in two white subjects. The discovery of an allele that carries only one CYP2D6*36 gene copy provides unequivocal evidence that both CYP2D6*36 and *36x2 are associated with a poor metabolizer phenotype. Given a combined frequency of between 0.5 and 3% in African Americans and Asians, genotyping for CYP2D6*36 should improve the accuracy of genotype-based phenotype prediction in these populations.

  1. Immunological Visibility: Posttranscriptional Regulation of Human NKG2D Ligands by the EGF Receptor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vantourout, Pierre; Willcox, Carrie; Turner, Andrea; Swanson, Chad; Haque, Yasmin; Sobolev, Olga; Grigoriadis, Anita; Tutt, Andrew; Hayday, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Human cytolytic T lymphocytes and NK cells can limit tumor growth and are being increasingly harnessed for tumor immunotherapy. One way cytolytic lymphocytes recognize tumor cells is by engagement of their activating receptor, NKG2D, by stress-antigens of the MICA/B and ULBP families. This study shows that surface upregulation of NKG2D ligands by human epithelial cells in response to ultraviolet irradiation, osmotic shock, oxidative stress, and growth factor provision, is attributable to activation of the EGF-receptor (EGFR). EGFR activation causes intracellular re-localisation of AUF1 proteins that ordinarily destabilise NKG2D ligand mRNAs by targeting an AU-rich element conserved within the 3′ ends of most human but not murine NKG2D ligand genes. Consistent with these findings, NKG2D ligand expression by primary human carcinomas positively correlated with EGFR expression that is commonly hyper-activated in such tumours, and was reduced by clinical EGFR inhibitors. Thus, stress-induced activation of EGFR not only regulates cell growth but concomitantly regulates the cells’ immunological visibility. Thus, therapeutics designed to limit cancer cell growth should also be considered in terms of their impact on immunosurveillance. PMID:24718859

  2. 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Vázquez-Cabo, José; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Martín-Gil, Jesús; Navas-Gracia, Luis M.; Dante, Roberto C.

    2014-11-15

    The transition from a prevalent turbostratic arrangement with low planar interactions (2D) to an array of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets with stronger interplanar interactions (3D), occurring for samples treated above 650 °C, was detected by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The simulated 3D material made of stacks of shifted quasi planar sheets composed of zigzagged polymer ribbons, delivered a XRD simulated pattern in relatively good agreement with the experimental one. The 2D to 3D transition was also supported by the simulation of THz-TDS spectra obtained from quantum chemistry calculations, in which the same broad bands around 2 THz and 1.5 THz were found for 2D and 3D arrays, respectively. This transition was also in accordance with the tightening of the interplanar distance probably due to an interplanar π bond contribution, as evidenced also by a broad absorption around 2.6 eV in the UV–vis spectrum, which appeared in the sample treated at 650 °C, and increased in the sample treated at 700 °C. The band gap was calculated for 1D and 2D cases. The value of 3.374 eV for the 2D case is, within the model accuracy and precision, in a relative good agreement with the value of 3.055 eV obtained from the experimental results. - Graphical abstract: 2D lattice mode vibrations and structural changes correlated with the so called “2D to 3D transition”. - Highlights: • A 2D to 3D transition has been detected for polymeric carbon nitride. • THz-TDS allowed us to discover and detect the 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride. • We propose a structure for polymeric carbon nitride confirming it with THz-TDS.

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  4. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  5. Continental Margin of Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia: the Mode and Nature of Crustal Growth in the Accretionary Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinovskaya, E. A.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2001-12-01

    Tectonic accretion of island arc terranes is the process widely developed in Pacific Rim in the present and in the past. The mode and nature of crustal growth of continental margins during arc accretion are various and essentially determined by deformation of the margin. The Cenozoic Kamchatka orogen formed by the accretion of two island arc terranes: Achaivayam-Valaginskaya arc (A-V, Eocene) (2) and Kronotskaya arc (terminal Miocene) to the continental margin of Asia. During the Early Eocene, the southern segment of the A-V arc collided with the Sredinny metamorphic massif, which was the frontal part of the Asian continental margin (3). New results from SHRIMP dating of zircons (1) from metamorphic rocks of Sredinny massif (Kolpakovskaya series) show that the massif contains an abundance of Archean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic detrital zircon cores, and ubiquitous 77 Ma rims. The youngest ages are from four 47-53 Ma unzoned zircon cores, with dull cathodoluminescence, and irregular morphology. We regard the 47-53 Ma episode of zircon growth in the Sredinny massif as evidence for superimposed metamorphism induced by continental margin subduction at the beginning of its collision with the A-V arc in the early Eocene. Physical modeling experiments of arc-continent collision suggest that deformation at continental margin is controlled by strength of the subducting crust. Failure, accretion and erosion-activated extrusion/exhumation of the subducted crust occur in the continental margin in the case when the margin is weakened by pre-existing faulting, extension, or heating. At the beginning of the continental margin subduction, crust of the margin fails along the continent-vergent thrust. The subducted crustal slice is, then, completely scraped from the mantle base and accreted to the fore-arc block. Subsequent thrusting and thickening of the subducting crust within the continental margin lead to formation of the accretionary orogen composed of crustal slices in front

  6. The Herschel view of the dominant mode of galaxy growth from z = 4 to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, C.; Pannella, M.; Elbaz, D.; Béthermin, M.; Inami, H.; Dickinson, M.; Magnelli, B.; Wang, T.; Aussel, H.; Daddi, E.; Juneau, S.; Shu, X.; Sargent, M. T.; Buat, V.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giavalisco, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Magdis, G.; Morrison, G. E.; Papovich, C.; Santini, P.; Scott, D.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the deepest Herschel images in four major extragalactic fields GOODS-North, GOODS-South, UDS, and COSMOS obtained within the GOODS-Herschel and CANDELS-Herschel key programs. The star formation picture provided by a total of 10 497 individual far-infrared detections is supplemented by the stacking analysis of a mass complete sample of 62 361 star-forming galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) H band-selected catalogs of the CANDELS survey and from two deep ground-based Ks band-selected catalogs in the GOODS-North and the COSMOS-wide field to obtain one of the most accurate and unbiased understanding to date of the stellar mass growth over the cosmic history. We show, for the first time, that stacking also provides a powerful tool to determine the dispersion of a physical correlation and describe our method called "scatter stacking", which may be easily generalized to other experiments. The combination of direct UV and far-infrared UV-reprocessed light provides a complete census on the star formation rates (SFRs), allowing us to demonstrate that galaxies at z = 4 to 0 of all stellar masses (M∗) follow a universal scaling law, the so-called main sequence of star-forming galaxies. We find a universal close-to-linear slope of the log 10(SFR)-log 10(M∗) relation, with evidence for a flattening of the main sequence at high masses (log 10(M∗/M⊙) > 10.5) that becomesless prominent with increasing redshift and almost vanishes by z ≃ 2. This flattening may be due to the parallel stellar growth of quiescent bulges in star-forming galaxies, which mostly happens over the same redshift range. Within the main sequence, we measure a nonvarying SFR dispersion of 0.3 dex: at a fixed redshift and stellar mass, about 68% of star-forming galaxies form stars at a universal rate within a factor 2. The specific SFR (sSFR = SFR/M∗) of star-forming galaxies is found to continuously increase from z = 0 to 4. Finally we discuss the implications of

  7. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  8. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  9. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  10. Resistive MHD and kinetic simulations of 2D magnetotail equilibria leading to reconnection onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Sitnov, M. I.; Lyon, J.; Cassak, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent progress in theory and fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of 2D magnetotail-like configurations has revealed an important class of equilibria, which can be unstable to ion tearing instability and eventually result in explosive dissipation of energy, fast plasma sheet flows, dipolarizations and changes in initial magnetic topology (reconnection). Such configurations are characterized by an increase of magnetic flux at the tailward end of the equilibrium state. While the instability and subsequent reconfiguration of the initial state exhibit kinetic signatures, the question remains, which parts of the process can be reproduced using reduced plasma models, e.g., resistive and Hall MHD. In this presentation we explore the stability of the new class of magnetotail equilibria to the resistive tearing mode and investigate its properties as a function of equilibrium parameters, e.g., the current sheet thickness and the amount of flux accumulation at the tailward end of the equilibrium, as well as other system parameters, e.g., resistivity and Lundquist number. We discuss comparative aspects of the system behavior in kinetic and resistive MHD simulations, in particular, what, if any, parameters of the MHD system lead to similar growth rates of the instability. Since the theoretical onset condition of the kinetic tearing mode can be expressed fully in MHD terms, we also investigate the effects of including this criterion as an additional constraint on the tearing onset in our resistive MHD simulations. This work is a first step toward inclusion of a kinetically-motivated description of reconnection onset in global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere.

  11. Image quality of up-converted 2D video from frame-compatible 3D video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, Filippo; Tam, Wa James; Vázquez, Carlos; Renaud, Ronald; Blanchfield, Phil

    2011-03-01

    In the stereoscopic frame-compatible format, the separate high-definition left and high-definition right views are reduced in resolution and packed to fit within the same video frame as a conventional two-dimensional high-definition signal. This format has been suggested for 3DTV since it does not require additional transmission bandwidth and entails only small changes to the existing broadcasting infrastructure. In some instances, the frame-compatible format might be used to deliver both 2D and 3D services, e.g., for over-the-air television services. In those cases, the video quality of the 2D service is bound to decrease since the 2D signal will have to be generated by up-converting one of the two views. In this study, we investigated such loss by measuring the perceptual image quality of 1080i and 720p up-converted video as compared to that of full resolution original 2D video. The video was encoded with either a MPEG-2 or a H.264/AVC codec at different bit rates and presented for viewing with either no polarized glasses (2D viewing mode) or with polarized glasses (3D viewing mode). The results confirmed a loss of video quality of the 2D video up-converted material. The loss due to the sampling processes inherent to the frame-compatible format was rather small for both 1080i and 720p video formats; the loss became more substantial with encoding, particularly for MPEG-2 encoding. The 3D viewing mode provided higher quality ratings, possibly because the visibility of the degradations was reduced.

  12. Low 2D:4D Values Are Associated with Video Game Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Zenses, Eva-Maria; Lenz, Bernd; Stoessel, Christina; Bouna-Pyrrou, Polyxeni; Rehbein, Florian; Kliem, Sören; Mößle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Androgen-dependent signaling regulates the growth of the fingers on the human hand during embryogenesis. A higher androgen load results in lower 2D:4D (second digit to fourth digit) ratio values. Prenatal androgen exposure also impacts brain development. 2D:4D values are usually lower in males and are viewed as a proxy of male brain organization. Here, we quantified video gaming behavior in young males. We found lower mean 2D:4D values in subjects who were classified according to the CSAS-II as having at-risk/addicted behavior (n = 27) compared with individuals with unproblematic video gaming behavior (n = 27). Thus, prenatal androgen exposure and a hyper-male brain organization, as represented by low 2D:4D values, are associated with problematic video gaming behavior. These results may be used to improve the diagnosis, prediction, and prevention of video game addiction. PMID:24236143

  13. Low 2D:4D values are associated with video game addiction.

    PubMed

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Zenses, Eva-Maria; Lenz, Bernd; Stoessel, Christina; Bouna-Pyrrou, Polyxeni; Rehbein, Florian; Kliem, Sören; Mößle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Androgen-dependent signaling regulates the growth of the fingers on the human hand during embryogenesis. A higher androgen load results in lower 2D:4D (second digit to fourth digit) ratio values. Prenatal androgen exposure also impacts brain development. 2D:4D values are usually lower in males and are viewed as a proxy of male brain organization. Here, we quantified video gaming behavior in young males. We found lower mean 2D:4D values in subjects who were classified according to the CSAS-II as having at-risk/addicted behavior (n = 27) compared with individuals with unproblematic video gaming behavior (n = 27). Thus, prenatal androgen exposure and a hyper-male brain organization, as represented by low 2D:4D values, are associated with problematic video gaming behavior. These results may be used to improve the diagnosis, prediction, and prevention of video game addiction.

  14. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye: primary flight display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolillo, Paul W.; Saxena, Ragini; Garruba, Jonathan; Tripathi, Sanjay; Blanchard, Randy

    2006-05-01

    This paper is a response to the challenge of providing a large area avionics display for the E-2D AHE aircraft. The resulting display design provides a pilot with high-resolution visual information content covering an image area of almost three square feet (Active Area of Samsung display = 33.792cm x 27.0336 cm = 13.304" x 10.643" = 141.596 square inches = 0.983 sq. ft x 3 = 2.95 sq. ft). The avionics display application, design and performance being described is the Primary Flight Display for the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft. This cockpit display has a screen diagonal size of 17 inches. Three displays, with minimum bezel width, just fit within the available instrument panel area. The significant design constraints of supporting an upgrade installation have been addressed. These constraints include a display image size that is larger than the mounting opening in the instrument panel. This, therefore, requires that the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) window, LCD panel and backlight all fit within the limited available bezel depth. High brightness and a wide dimming range are supported with a dual mode Cold Cathode Fluorescent Tube (CCFT) and LED backlight. Packaging constraints dictated the use of multiple U shaped fluorescent lamps in a direct view backlight design for a maximum display brightness of 300 foot-Lamberts. The low intensity backlight levels are provided by remote LEDs coupled through a fiber optic mesh. This architecture generates luminous uniformity within a minimum backlight depth. Cross-cockpit viewing is supported with ultra-wide field-of-view performance including contrast and the color stability of an advanced LCD cell design supports. Display system design tradeoffs directed a priority to high optical efficiency for minimum power and weight.

  15. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  16. Quantitative analysis of tissue deformation dynamics reveals three characteristic growth modes and globally aligned anisotropic tissue deformation during chick limb development

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-level characterization of deformation dynamics is crucial for understanding organ morphogenetic mechanisms, especially the interhierarchical links among molecular activities, cellular behaviors and tissue/organ morphogenetic processes. Limb development is a well-studied topic in vertebrate organogenesis. Nevertheless, there is still little understanding of tissue-level deformation relative to molecular and cellular dynamics. This is mainly because live recording of detailed cell behaviors in whole tissues is technically difficult. To overcome this limitation, by applying a recently developed Bayesian approach, we here constructed tissue deformation maps for chick limb development with high precision, based on snapshot lineage tracing using dye injection. The precision of the constructed maps was validated with a clear statistical criterion. From the geometrical analysis of the map, we identified three characteristic tissue growth modes in the limb and showed that they are consistent with local growth factor activity and cell cycle length. In particular, we report that SHH signaling activity changes dynamically with developmental stage and strongly correlates with the dynamic shift in the tissue growth mode. We also found anisotropic tissue deformation along the proximal-distal axis. Morphogenetic simulation and experimental studies suggested that this directional tissue elongation, and not local growth, has the greatest impact on limb shaping. This result was supported by the novel finding that anisotropic tissue elongation along the proximal-distal axis occurs independently of cell proliferation. Our study marks a pivotal point for multi-scale system understanding in vertebrate development. PMID:25858459

  17. Destabilization of 2D magnetic current sheets by resonance with bouncing electron - a new theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Gabriel; Louarn, Philippe; Tur, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons. The geometry is clearly 2D and uses Harris sheet profile. Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasi neutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. The present talk will focus on the main results of this theory. The electrostatic version of the model may be applied to the near-Earth environment (8-12 R_{E}) where beta is rather low. It is showed that inclusion of bouncing electron motion may enhance strongly the growth rate of the classical drift wave instability. This model could thus explain the generation of strong parallel electric fields in the ionosphere and the formation of aurora beads with wavelength of a few hundreds of km. In the electromagnetic version, it is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (B_{z} > 0.1 B _{lobes}) undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in B_{z}/B _{lobes}, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few

  18. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H; Kooij, E Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-21

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma. PMID:26203037

  19. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-01

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma.

  20. Room temperature weak ferromagnetism in Sn1-xMnxSe2 2D films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Sining; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Xiang; Kanzyuba, Vasily; Yoo, Taehee; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili G.; Jena, Debdeep; Dobrowolska, Margaret; Furdyna, Jacek K.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss growth and magnetic properties of high-quality two dimensional (2D) Sn1-xMnxSe2 films. Thin films of this 2D ternary alloy with a wide range of Mn concentrations were successfully grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Mn concentrations up to x ≈ 0.60 were achieved without destroying the crystal structure of the parent SnSe2 2D system. Most important, the specimens show clear weak ferromagnetic behavior above room temperature, which should be of interest for 2D spintronic applications.

  1. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  2. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  3. Determination of growth modes of Cu on O/Ni( 1 0 0 ) and NiO( 1 0 0 ) surfaces by SIMS and secondary electron emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, M. A.

    2002-10-01

    The growth modes of Cu overlayers deposited on oxygen-predosed Ni(1 0 0) surfaces in the Cu coverage range 0-8 monolayers (ML) have been studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and ion-induced secondary electron emission measurements. On a c(2×2)-O/Ni(1 0 0) surface prepared by 40 L O 2 exposure of Ni(1 0 0), Cu grows according to the Frank-van der Merwe (FVDM, or layer-by-layer) mode up to at least 2 ML Cu coverage. In contrast, Cu grows by the Volmer-Weber mode on a NiO(1 0 0) surface prepared by 400 L O 2 exposure of Ni(1 0 0) up to at least 8 ML Cu coverage; three-dimensional growth of Cu clusters commences at about 0.2 ML Cu coverage. The characterisation of Cu overlayer growth modes from the measurement of SIMS intensity variations hinges largely on the behaviour of the Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ cluster ions which mainly originate from the surface layer of the sample. For example, the deposition of 1 ML Cu on c(2×2)-O/Ni(1 0 0) completely quenches Ni 2+ emission, whereas on NiO(1 0 0) this process is not complete even after deposition of 8 ML Cu. This behaviour can be formally described with a simple analytical model. On the basis of comparisons between the secondary ion and secondary electron emission properties of O/Cu/Ni(1 0 0) and Cu/O/Ni(1 0 0) surfaces, it is concluded that the Cu layers deposited on the c(2×2)-O/Ni(1 0 0) substrate are covered by an adsorbed layer of oxygen.

  4. Cooperative dynamics in ultrasoft 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprakel, Joris; van der Meer, Berend; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-03-01

    The creation, annihilation, and diffusion of defects in crystal lattices play an important role during crystal melting and deformation. Although it is well understood how defects form and react when crystals are subjected to external stresses, it remains unclear how crystals cope with internal stresses. We report a study in which we create a highly localized internal stress, by means of optical tweezing, in a crystal formed from micrometer-sized colloidal spheres and directly observe how the solid reacts using microscopy. We find that, even though the excitation is highly localized, a collective dance of colloidal particles results; these collective modes take the form of closed rings or open-ended strings, depending on the sequence of events which nucleate the rearrangements. Surprisingly, we find from Brownian Dynamics simulations that these cooperative dynamics are thermally-activated modes inherent to the crystal, and can even occur through a single, sufficiently large thermal fluctuation, resulting in the irreversible displacement of 100s of particles from their lattice sites.

  5. High-resolution simulations and modeling of reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. I. Comparison to experimental data and to amplitude growth model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Latini, M; Schilling, O; Don, W

    2006-05-15

    The reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is simulated in two spatial dimensions using the fifth- and ninth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory shock-capturing method with uniform spatial resolution of 256 points per initial perturbation wavelength. The initial conditions and computational domain are modeled after the single-mode, Mach 1.21 air(acetone)/SF{sub 6} shock tube experiment of Collins and Jacobs [J. Fluid Mech. 464, 113 (2002)]. The simulation densities are shown to be in very good agreement with the corrected experimental planar laser-induced fluorescence images at selected times before reshock of the evolving interface. Analytical, semianalytical and phenomenological linear and nonlinear, impulsive, perturbation and potential flow models for single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable perturbation growth are summarized. The simulation amplitudes are shown to be in very good agreement with the experimental data and with the predictions of linear amplitude growth models for small times and with those of nonlinear amplitude growth models at later times up to the time at which the driver-based expansion in the experiment (but not present in the simulations or models) expands the layer before reshock. The qualitative and quantitative differences between the fifth- and ninth-order simulation results are discussed. Using a local and global quantitative metric, the prediction of the Zhang and Sohn [Phys. Fluids 9, 1106 (1997)] nonlinear Pade model is shown to be in best overall agreement with the simulation amplitudes before reshock. The sensitivity of the amplitude growth model predictions to the initial growth rate from linear instability theory, the post-shock Atwood number and amplitude, and the velocity jump due to the passage of the shock through the interface is also investigated numerically. In Part II [Phys. Fluids (2006)], a comprehensive investigation of mixing induced by the reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is

  6. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  7. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  8. Position control using 2D-to-2D feature correspondences in vision guided cell micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanliang; Han, Mingli; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2007-01-01

    Conventional camera calibration that utilizes the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the camera and the objects has certain limitations for micro-level cell operations due to the presence of hardware deviations and external disturbances during the experimental process, thereby invalidating the extrinsic parameters. This invalidation is often neglected in macro-world visual servoing and affects the visual image processing quality, causing deviation from the desired position in micro-level cell operations. To increase the success rate of vision guided biological micromanipulations, a novel algorithm monitoring the changing image pattern of the manipulators including the injection micropipette and cell holder is designed and implemented based on 2 dimensional (2D)-to 2D feature correspondences and can adjust the manipulator and perform position control simultaneously. When any deviation is found, the manipulator is retracted to the initial focusing plane before continuing the operation.

  9. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics. PMID:26846617

  10. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-02-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics.

  11. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  12. 'Brukin2D': a 2D visualization and comparison tool for LC-MS data

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Zerefos, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Vlahou, Antonia; Baumann, Marc; Kossida, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) is a commonly used technique to resolve complex protein mixtures. Visualization of large data sets produced from LC-MS, namely the chromatogram and the mass spectra that correspond to its compounds is the focus of this work. Results The in-house developed 'Brukin2D' software, built in Matlab 7.4, which is presented here, uses the compound data that are exported from the Bruker 'DataAnalysis' program, and depicts the mean mass spectra of all the chromatogram compounds from one LC-MS run, in one 2D contour/density plot. Two contour plots from different chromatograph runs can then be viewed in the same window and automatically compared, in order to find their similarities and differences. The results of the comparison can be examined through detailed mass quantification tables, while chromatogram compound statistics are also calculated during the procedure. Conclusion 'Brukin2D' provides a user-friendly platform for quick, easy and integrated view of complex LC-MS data. The software is available at . PMID:19534737

  13. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) by methadone.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D; Otton, S V; Sproule, B A; Busto, U; Inaba, T; Kalow, W; Sellers, E M

    1993-01-01

    1. In microsomes prepared from three human livers, methadone competitively inhibited the O-demethylation of dextromethorphan, a marker substrate for CYP2D6. The apparent Ki value of methadone ranged from 2.5 to 5 microM. 2. Two hundred and fifty-two (252) white Caucasians, including 210 unrelated healthy volunteers and 42 opiate abusers undergoing treatment with methadone were phenotyped using dextromethorphan as the marker drug. Although the frequency of poor metabolizers was similar in both groups, the extensive metabolizers among the opiate abusers tended to have higher O-demethylation metabolic ratios and to excrete less of the dose as dextromethorphan metabolites than control extensive metabolizer subjects. These data suggest inhibition of CYP2D6 by methadone in vivo as well. 3. Because methadone is widely used in the treatment of opiate abuse, inhibition of CYP2D6 activity in these patients might contribute to exaggerated response or unexpected toxicity from drugs that are substrates of this enzyme. PMID:8448065

  14. Overexpression of the Tomato Pollen Receptor Kinase LePRK1 Rewires Pollen Tube Growth to a Blebbing Mode[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Cai-Ping; Dong, Xin; Liu, Hai-Kuan; Huang, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shu-Jie; Barberini, María Laura; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Muschietti, Jorge; McCormick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    The tubular growth of a pollen tube cell is crucial for the sexual reproduction of flowering plants. LePRK1 is a pollen-specific and plasma membrane–localized receptor-like kinase from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). LePRK1 interacts with another receptor, LePRK2, and with KINASE PARTNER PROTEIN (KPP), a Rop guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Here, we show that pollen tubes overexpressing LePRK1 or a truncated LePRK1 lacking its extracellular domain (LePRK1ΔECD) have enlarged tips but also extend their leading edges by producing “blebs.” Coexpression of LePRK1 and tomato PLIM2a, an actin bundling protein that interacts with KPP in a Ca2+-responsive manner, suppressed these LePRK1 overexpression phenotypes, whereas pollen tubes coexpressing KPP, LePRK1, and PLIM2a resumed the blebbing growth mode. We conclude that overexpression of LePRK1 or LePRK1ΔECD rewires pollen tube growth to a blebbing mode, through KPP- and PLIM2a-mediated bundling of actin filaments from tip plasma membranes. Arabidopsis thaliana pollen tubes expressing LePRK1ΔECD also grew by blebbing. Our results exposed a hidden capability of the pollen tube cell: upon overexpression of a single membrane-localized molecule, LePRK1 or LePRK1ΔECD, it can switch to an alternative mechanism for extension of the leading edge that is analogous to the blebbing growth mode reported for Dictyostelium and for Drosophila melanogaster stem cells. PMID:25194029

  15. Rapid loss of the plasma sheet energetic electrons associated with the growth of whistler mode waves inside the bursty bulk flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Yu, J.; Cao, J. B.

    During the interval 07:45:36- 07:54:24 UT on 24 August 2005, Cluster satellites (C1 and C3) observed an obvious loss of energetic electrons (3.2- 95keV) associated with the growth of whistler mode waves inside some bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the midtail plasma sheet (X _{GSM}= -17.25 R _{E}). However, the fluxes of the higher-energy electrons (>128keV) and energetic ions (10- 160 keV) were relatively stable in the BBF-impacted regions. The energy-dependent electron loss inside the BBFs is mainly due to the energy-selective pitch angle scatterings by whistler mode waves within the time scales from several seconds to several minutes, and the electron scatterings in different pitch angle distributions are different in the wave growth regions. The plasma sheet energetic electrons have mainly a quasi-perpendicular pitch angle distribution (30(°) growth regions inside the BBFs. Unlike the energetic electrons, the low-energy electrons (0.073- 2.1keV) have initially a field-aligned pitch angle distribution (0(°) mode waves, and their loss in field-aligned directions is accompanied by their increase in quasi-perpendicular directions in the wave growth regions, but the loss of the low-energy electrons inside the BBFs is not obvious in the presence of their large background fluxes. These observations indicate that the resonant electrons in an anisotropic pitch angle distribution mainly undergo the rapid pitch angle scattering loss during the wave-particle resonances.

  16. Comparison of the spiral growth modes of silicon-face and carbon-face silicon carbide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiss, M.; Ouisse, T.; Chaussende, D.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the dependence of the terrace width of growth spirals on local supersaturation during the growth of on-axis silicon carbide (SiC) crystals. Local supersaturation is adjusted by changing the residual argon gas pressure inside the sublimation growth chamber. Whereas Si-face crystals seem to partly verify the model of Burton, Cabrera and Frank, we found that on C-face crystals, the terrace width is independent of supersaturation. In contrast to previously reported data obtained from KDP crystals, we cannot ascribe our result to hollow-core dislocations or micropipes, as the observed growth spirals arose from independent and closed, unit or double-unit screw dislocations. Besides, we checked that neither the finite growth area nor the influence of the stress field of the dislocation can explain our data.

  17. Label-free Growth Receptor-2 Detection and Dissociation Constant Assessment in Diluted Human Serum Using a Longitudinal Extension Mode of a Piezoelectric Microcantilever Sensor.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Joseph A; Shih, Wan Y; Adams, Gregory P; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2011-12-15

    We have investigated real-time, label-free, in-situ detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) in diluted serum using the first longitudinal extension mode of a lead zirconate-lead titanate (PZT)/glass piezoelectric microcantilever sensor (PEMS) with H3 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) immobilized on the 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) insulation layer of the PEMS surface. We showed that with the longitudinal extension mode, the PZT/glass PEMS consisting of a 1 mm long and 127 μm thick PZT layer bonded with a 75 μm thick glass layer with a 1.8 mm long glass tip could detect Her2 at a concentration of 6-60 ng/ml (or 0.06-0.6 nM) in diluted human serum, about 100 times lower than the concentration limit obtained using the lower-frequency flexural mode of a similar PZT/glass PEMS. We further showed that with the longitudinal mode, the PZT/glass PEMS determined the equilibrium H3-Her2 dissociation constant K(d) to be 3.3±0.3 × 10(-8) M consistent with the value, 3.2±0.28 ×10(-8) M deduced by the surface plasmon resonance method (BIAcore).

  18. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  19. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  20. Low frequency 2D Raman-THz spectroscopy of ionic solution: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhijun; Wu, Tianmin; Jin, Tan; Liu, Yong; Nagata, Yuki; Zhang, Ruiting; Zhuang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    The 2D Raman-THz spectrum of the MgCl2 solution was simulated using the molecular dynamics simulation and the stability matrix method and compared with that of the pure water. The 2D Raman-THz signal provides more information on the ion effects on the collective water motion than the conventional 1D signal. The presence of MgCl2 suppresses the cross peak of water between the hydrogen bond bending and the other intermolecular vibrational mode, which clearly illustrates that the water hydrogen bending motion is affected by the confining effect of the ions. Our theoretical work thus demonstrates that the 2D Raman-THz technique can become a valuable nonlinear vibrational probe for the molecular dynamics in the ionic solutions.

  1. Ratios between acute aquatic toxicity and effects on population growth rates in relation to toxicant mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Roex, E.W.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Wezel, A.P. Van; Straalen, N.M. Van

    2000-03-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is mostly based on the results of standardized toxicity tests. To obtain environmental quality criteria, extrapolation factors are used that depend on the amount and quality of available data. These extrapolation factors do not, however, take into account the mode of action of the compound tested or the life history of the test organism. In this study, the authors analyzed the variability in acute-to-chronic ratios (ACRs) for various chemicals in relation to their mode of action. Chemicals were classified as nonpolar narcotics, polar narcotics, specifically acting compounds, and heavy metals. As an acute endpoint, the LC50 was used; as a chronic endpoint, the lowest test concentration at which the natural rate of population increase (r) is affected, or LOEC(r), was used. Data were derived from the on-line literature. Nonpolar narcotic chemicals demonstrate the smallest variation in ACRs, and acute tests can be used to derive chronic endpoints for this class. For the other classes, the variation in ACRs is larger. Fish species especially show a relatively large ACR. For heavy metals, differences in the mode of action may play an important role in explaining differences in ACRs. For the other three classes, however, it is less reliable to predict chronic toxicity using the results of acute tests. In general, differences in species sensitivity rather than in mode of action for the chemical seem to determine differences in ACRs.

  2. α-amylase crystal growth investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astier, J. P.; Bokern, D.; Lapena, L.; Veesler, S.

    2001-06-01

    The growth behavior of porcine pancreatic α-amylase at defined supersaturation has been investigated by means of temperature controlled in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The step velocities measured by AFM were in overall agreement with the normal growth rates of an individual face measured by optical microscopy. In addition, highly local growth dynamics could be visualized. Imaging in tapping mode revealed crystalline amylase aggregates attached to the basal face and their subsequent incorporation into growing terraces producing a macrodefect. At high supersaturation ( β=1.6) 2-D nucleation was found to be the dominating growth mechanism, whereas at lower supersaturation ( β=1.3) the growth process appears to be defect controlled (spiral growth). The analysis of step heights on 2-D nucleation islands (monomolecular protein layers) and growth steps (two molecules in height) in combination with results from light scattering experiments suggest that a single protein molecule is the basic growth unit.

  3. Designing 2D arrays for SHM of planar structures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring structural integrity of large planar structures that aims at detecting and localizing impact or damage at any point of the structure requires normally a relatively dense network of uniformly distributed ultrasonic sensors. 2-D ultrasonic phased arrays, due to their beam-steering capability and all azimuth angle coverage are a very promising tool for structural health monitoring (SHM) of plate-like structures using Lamb waves (LW). Linear phased arrays that have been proposed for that purpose, produce mirrored image characterized by azimuth dependent resolution, which prevents unequivocal damage localization. 2D arrays do not have this drawback and they are even capable of mode selectivity when generating and receiving LWs. Performance of 2D arrays depends on their topology as well as the number of elements (transducers) used and their spacing in terms of wavelength. In this paper we propose a consistent methodology for three-step: theoretical, numerical and experimental investigation of a diversity of 2D array topologies in SHM applications. In the first step, the theoretical evaluation is performed using frequency-dependent structure transfer function (STF). STF that defines linear propagation of different LWs modes through the dispersive medium enables theoretical investigation of the particular array performance for a predefined tone-burst excitation signal. A dedicated software tool has been developed for the numerical evaluation of 2D array directional characteristics (beampattern) in a specific structure. The simulations are performed using local interaction simulation approach (LISA), implemented using NVIDIA CUDA graphical computation unit (GPU), which enables time-efficient 3D simulations of LWs propagation. Beampatterns of a 2D array can be to some extend evaluated analytically and using numerical simulations; in most cases, however, they require experimental verification. Using scanning laser vibrometer is proposed for that purpose, in a setup

  4. Monolithic integration of a single quantum well laser diode and a mode-size convertor using shadow-masked metalorganic vapour phase epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeire, G.; Vermaerke, F.; Moerman, I.; Haes, J.; Baets, R.; Van Daele, P.; Demeester, P.; Gustafsson, A.; Samuelson, L.

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we propose the monolithic integration of quantum well InGaAs/GaAs 0.98 μm lasers with passive mode-size convertors using the shadow-masked growth technique. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the far-field in the transverse direction could be reduced from 47° to 30° without a significant increase of Ith and even a slight increase of ν d. Values down to 21° could be reached although a small penalty in threshold current had to be paid. Along the tapered sections, a bandgap increase up to 130 meV has been measured providing transparent windows near the laser facets. Adjusting the nominal layer structure of the laser should allow the realization of reliable 0.98 μm pump lasers for erbium-doped fibre amplifiers showing an improved coupling efficiency in single mode fibres and an enhanced reliability.

  5. 2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2014-02-12

    The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

  6. Glutamate dependent NMDA receptor 2D is a novel angiogenic tumour endothelial marker in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Stephen; Heath, Victoria L.; Ismail, Tariq; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Current vascular-targeted therapies in colorectal cancer (CRC) have shown limited benefit. The lack of novel, specific treatment in CRC has been hampered by a dearth of specific endothelial markers. Microarray comparison of endothelial gene expression in patient-matched CRC and normal colon identified a panel of putative colorectal tumour endothelial markers. Of these the glutamate dependent NMDA receptor GRIN2D emerged as the most interesting target. GRIN2D expression was shown to be specific to colorectal cancer vessels by RTqPCR and IHC analysis. Its expression was additionally shown be predictive of improved survival in CRC. Targeted knockdown studies in vitro demonstrated a role for GRIN2D in endothelial function and angiogenesis. This effect was also shown in vivo as vaccination against the extracellular region of GRIN2D resulted in reduced vascularisation in the subcutaneous sponge angiogenesis assay. The utility of immunologically targeting GRIN2D in CRC was demonstrated by the vaccination approach inhibiting murine CRC tumour growth and vascularisation. GRIN2D represents a promising target for the future treatment of CRC. PMID:26943033

  7. Effects of dietary fructooligosaccharide levels and feeding modes on growth, immune responses, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Nuan; Li, Xiang-Fei; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Tian, Hong-Yan; Li, Jun-Yi; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) levels and its feeding modes on growth, immune response, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala). Fish (12.5 ± 0.5 g) were subjected to three FOS levels (0, 0.4% and 0.8%) and two feeding modes (supplementing FOS continuously and supplementing FOS two days interval 5 days) according to a 3 × 2 factorial design. At the end of 8-week feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila with concentration of 1 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1) and mortality was recorded for the next 96 h. Fish fed 0.4% FOS continuously (D2) and fish fed the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days (D5) showed admirable growth performance. The highest plasma lysozyme, acid phosphatase and myeloperoxidase activities as well as complement component 3, total protein and immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels were all observed in fish fed D5. They were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the control group and/or fish fed 0.8% FOS continuously, but exhibited no statistical difference (P > 0.05) with that of fish fed D2. A similar trend was also observed in antioxidant capability as well as the expression of Leap-I and Leap-Ⅱ. Mortality showed an opposite trend with the immune response with the lowest rate observed in fish fed D5. The results indicated that diet supplementing FOS in appropriate levels and feeding modes could improve the growth, immune response and antioxidant capability of fish, as might consequently lead to enhanced disease resistance. It can be speculated that the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days was most suitable for blunt snout bream.

  8. Atomic Resolution in Situ Imaging of a Double-Bilayer Multistep Growth Mode in Gallium Nitride Nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Gamalski, A. D.; Tersoff, J.; Stach, E. A.

    2016-04-13

    We study the growth of GaN nanowires from liquid Au–Ga catalysts using environmental transmission electron microscopy. GaN wires grow in either (11¯20) or (11¯00) directions, by the addition of {11¯00} double bilayers via step flow with multiple steps. Step-train growth is not typically seen with liquid catalysts, and we suggest that it results from low step mobility related to the unusual double-height step structure. Finally, the results here illustrate the surprising dynamics of catalytic GaN wire growth at the nanoscale and highlight striking differences between the growth of GaN and other III–V semiconductor nanowires.

  9. Atomic Resolution in Situ Imaging of a Double-Bilayer Multistep Growth Mode in Gallium Nitride Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gamalski, A D; Tersoff, J; Stach, E A

    2016-04-13

    We study the growth of GaN nanowires from liquid Au-Ga catalysts using environmental transmission electron microscopy. GaN wires grow in either ⟨112̅0⟩ or ⟨11̅00⟩ directions, by the addition of {11̅00} double bilayers via step flow with multiple steps. Step-train growth is not typically seen with liquid catalysts, and we suggest that it results from low step mobility related to the unusual double-height step structure. The results here illustrate the surprising dynamics of catalytic GaN wire growth at the nanoscale and highlight striking differences between the growth of GaN and other III-V semiconductor nanowires. PMID:26990711

  10. Reconstructing skeletal fiber arrangement and growth mode in the coral Porites lutea (Cnidaria, Scleractinia): a confocal Raman microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, M.; Nehrke, G.

    2012-11-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) mapping was used to investigate the microstructural arrangement and organic matrix distribution within the skeleton of the coral Porites lutea. Relative changes in the crystallographic orientation of crystals within the fibrous fan-system could be mapped, without the need to prepare thin sections, as required if this information is obtained by polarized light microscopy. Simultaneously, incremental growth lines can be visualized without the necessity of etching and hence alteration of sample surface. Using these methods two types of growth lines could be identified: one corresponds to the well-known incremental growth layers, whereas the second type of growth lines resemble denticle finger-like structures (most likely traces of former spines or skeletal surfaces). We hypothesize that these lines represent the outer skeletal surface before another growth cycle of elongation, infilling and thickening of skeletal areas continues. We show that CRM mapping with high spatial resolution can significantly improve our understanding of the micro-structural arrangement and growth patterns in coral skeletons.

  11. SPA-LEED study of the morphology and nucleation of a novel growth mode and the "devil's staircase" on lead/silicon(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wang-Chi Vincent

    In this thesis we describe two intriguing and unexpected discoveries we made in the Pb/Si(111). A novel growth mode was discovered on Pb thin film grown on Si(111)-7 x 7 reconstructed surface: nano-scale islands of uniform 7-layer height with steep edges and flat tops can form below room temperature. This growth mode is different from the three common modes: Frank-van der Merwe, Volmer-Weber, and Stranski-Krastanov modes. The three common modes could be explained by thermodynamic considerations on the surface free energy and do not lead to the type of self-organization we have discovered. This novel mode is explained by quantum size effects (QSE), which states that the confinement of electrons inside a well requires that the dimensions of the well meet the requirements of energy quantization: the electron wavefunctions have to form standing waves within the confining well. Further study showed that different stable heights that differ by two-layer difference could be selected by changing deposition temperature, total coverage, annealing temperature, or initial interface. Oxygen covered structures are found to retain their selected height up to almost room temperature. In addition, a novel "devil's staircase" was discovered in Pb/Si(111) between coverage 6/5 ML and 4/3 ML. Experimentally it has been an outstanding challenge to show a "devil's staircase" since physical phenomena are not expected to be described by non-differentiable functions, i.e., the stability curve Deltamu vs. theta of a "devil's staircase". This novel staircase differs from conventional ones in the difference between their two generating phases: their [11¯0] dimensions differ by two lattice constants instead of one. It was found unexpectedly that such a staircase can form with macroscopic spatial extent (˜0.5 mm) even at low temperature (T ˜ 120K) where atoms are not expected to mobile! This unusual result suggests that a high degree of self-organization is possible in the system of Pb/Si(111).

  12. Imaging Meso-Scale Structures in TEXTOR with 2D-ECE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Spakman, G. W.; van der Pol, M. J.; Domier, C. W.; Donne, A. J. H.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Westerhof, E.; Jakubowski, M. W.; TEXTOR Team

    The detection and control of instabilities in a tokamak is one of the exciting challenges in fusion research on the way to a reactor. Thanks to a combination of an innovative 2D temperature imaging technique (ECEI), a versatile ECRH/ECCD system and a unique possibility to externally induce tearing modes in the plasma, TEXTOR is able to make pioneering contributions in this field. This paper focuses on two meso-scale phenomena in tokamaks: m = 2 tearing modes and magnetic structures in the stochastic boundary. In these cases the 2D-ECEI diagnostic can resolve features not attainable before. In addition the possibility to use the diagnostic for fluctuation measurements is addressed.

  13. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  14. The infrared spectrum of the Ne-C2D2 complex.

    PubMed

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N; McKellar, A R W; Fernández, Berta; Farrelly, David

    2015-11-28

    Infrared spectra of Ne-C2D2 are observed in the region of the ν3 fundamental band (asymmetric C-D stretch, ≈2440 cm(-1)) using a tunable optical parametric oscillator to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion from a cooled nozzle. Like helium-acetylene, this system lies close to the free rotor limit, making analysis tricky because stronger transitions tend to pile up close to monomer (C2D2) rotation-vibration transitions. Assignments are aided by predicted rotational energies calculated from a published ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface. The analysis extends up to the j = 3←2 band, where j labels C2D2 rotation within the dimer, and is much more complete than the limited infrared assignments previously reported for Ne-C2H2 and Ne-C2HD. Two previous microwave transitions within the j = 1 state of Ne-C2D2 are reassigned. Coriolis model fits to the theoretical levels and to the spectrum are compared. Since the variations observed as a function of C2D2 vibrational excitation are comparable to those noted between theory and experiment, it is evident that more detailed testing of theory will require vibrational averaging over the acetylene intramolecular modes.

  15. [Effects of different fertilization modes on vegetable growth, fertilizer nitrogen utilization, and nitrogen loss from vegetable field].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-feng; Wang, Guo; Li, Wei-hua; Qiu, Xiao-xuan

    2009-03-01

    A field experiment with Chinese cabbage, water spinach, and three-colored amaranth cropped three times in one year was conducted to study the effects of seven fertilization modes, i.e., none fertilization, basal application of chemical fertilizers, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers, basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure, and basal application of organic manure, on the plant height, yield, nitrogen accumulation, and fertilizer nitrogen utilization of the vegetables, and the loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N from vegetable field under natural rainfall condition. The results showed that comparing with none fertilization, the fertilization modes '1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure' and 'basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide' improved the agronomic properties of test vegetables, increased their yields by 103%-219% and 93%-226%, and nitrogen accumulation by 153% -216% and 231%-320%, respectively, and enhanced fertilizer nitrogen utilization rate. They also decreased the surface runoff loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N by 48.1% and 46.5%, respectively, compared with the mode 'basal application of chemical fertilizers', and hence, reduced the risk of agricultural non-point pollution. Therefore, these two fertilization modes could be popularized in vegetable production.

  16. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an array's aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays' elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  17. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  18. Real-time monitoring of hypertrophy in HL-1 cardiomyocytes by impedance measurements reveals different modes of growth.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Laura; Ndongson-Dongmo, Bernadin; Kusch, Angelika; Dragun, Duska; Heller, Regine; Huber, Otmar

    2016-10-01

    Hypertrophic growth is a response of the heart to increased mechanical load or physiological stress. Thereby, cardiomyocytes grow in length and/or width to maintain cardiac pump function. Major signaling pathways involved in cardiomyocyte growth and remodeling have been identified during recent years including calcineurin-NFAT and PI3K-Akt signaling. Modulation of these pathways is of certain interest for therapeutic treatment of cardiac hypertrophy. However, quantification and characterization of hypertrophy in response to different stimuli or modulators is difficult. This study aims to test different read-out systems for detection and quantification of differences in hypertrophic growth in response to prohypertrophic stimuli. Real-time impedance measurements allowed the detection of distinct differences in hypertrophic growth in response to endothelin, norepinephrine, phenylephrine or BIO, which were not observable by other methods such as flow cytometry. Endothelin treatment induced a rapid and strong peak in the impedance signal concomitant with a massive reorientation of the actin cytoskeleton. Changes in expression of hypertrophy-associated genes were detected and stabilization of β-catenin was identified as a common response to all hypertrophic stimuli used in this study. Hypertrophic growth was blocked by the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PI-103.

  19. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  20. Potentiostatic controlled nucleation and growth modes of electrodeposited cobalt thin films on n-Si(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechehoud, Fayçal; Khelil, Abdelbacet; Eddine Hakiki, Nour; Bubendorff, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    The nucleation and growth of Co electrodeposits on n-Si(1 1 1) substrate have been investigated as a function of the applied potential in a large potential range using electrochemical techniques (voltammetry and chrono-amperometry) and surface imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface preparation of the sample is crucial and we achieve a controlled n-Si(1 1 1) surface with mono-atomic steps and flat terraces. Using Scharifker-Hills models for fitting the current-time transients, we show that a transition from an instantaneous nucleation process to a progressive one occurs when the overpotential increases. A good agreement between the nucleation and growth parameters extracted from the models and the AFM data's is observed. The growth is of the Volmer-Weber type with a roughness and a spatial extension in the substrate plane of the deposited islands that increase with thickness.

  1. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  2. Haloxyfop mode of action in liquid cultures of proso millet: An analysis of haloxyfop sensitivity changes during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Irzyk, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Haloxyfop is a grass-selective herbicide that inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase in species that are not tolerant to the herbicide. Liquid cultures of proso millet (Panicum miliaceum) cells treated with haloxyfop at different phases of growth exhibited different levels of sensitivity to the herbicide. Treatment of 1-d cultures with 1 {mu}M haloxyfop completely inhibited growth within 48 h. In contrast, 1 mM haloxyfop was required to elicit a similar response in 4-, 7-, or 10-d cultures. Calculated IC{sub 50} values indicated a 300-fold decrease in haloxyfop sensitivity during the period from 1 to 4 d. This period of growth coincided with the greatest increase in cell number during culture growth and suggested that dividing cells are most sensitive to haloxyfop. Uptake and metabolism of {sup 14}C-haloxyfop in 1-d and 4-d cultures were compared. In both cultures, amounts of radiolabel uptake were similar. Almost all radioactivity extracted from 1- and 4-d cells was present as the parent compound. These results suggested that the sensitivity change was related to other factors. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity of proso millet cells, measured in vitro by the acetyl-CoA-dependent incorporation of {sup 14} C-bicarbonate into an acid-stable product, was essentially constant during culture growth. Micromolar concentrations of haloxyfop significantly inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity from both sensitive and insensitive cultures. Thus, the change in the sensitivity of cultures to haloxyfop was not correlated with changes in acetyl-CoA carboxylase abundance, activity, or sensitivity to haloxyfop during culture growth. In vivo incorporation of {sup 14}C-acetate into lipids was decreased by 1 {mu}M haloxyfop in both 1-d and 4-d cultures at the earliest sampling times but the amount of inhibition was significantly greater in the sensitive cultures.

  3. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) (2dFGRS Team, 1998-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, M.; Dalton, G.; Maddox, S.; Sutherland, W.; Norberg, P.; Cole, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bridges, T.; Cannon, R.; Collins, C.; Couch, W.; Cross, N.; Deeley, K.; de Propris, R.; Driver, S. P.; Efstathiou, G.; Ellis, R. S.; Frenk, C. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Jackson, C.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, I.; Lumsden, S.; Madgwick, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Price, I.; Seaborne, M.; Taylor, K.

    2007-11-01

    The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is a major spectroscopic survey taking full advantage of the unique capabilities of the 2dF facility built by the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The 2dFGRS is integrated with the 2dF QSO survey (2QZ, Cat. VII/241). The 2dFGRS obtained spectra for 245591 objects, mainly galaxies, brighter than a nominal extinction-corrected magnitude limit of bJ=19.45. Reliable (quality>=3) redshifts were obtained for 221414 galaxies. The galaxies cover an area of approximately 1500 square degrees selected from the extended APM Galaxy Survey in three regions: a North Galactic Pole (NGP) strip, a South Galactic Pole (SGP) strip, and random fields scattered around the SGP strip. Redshifts are measured from spectra covering 3600-8000 Angstroms at a two-pixel resolution of 9.0 Angstrom and a median S/N of 13 per pixel. All redshift identifications are visually checked and assigned a quality parameter Q in the range 1-5; Q>=3 redshifts are 98.4% reliable and have an rms uncertainty of 85 km/s. The overall redshift completeness for Q>=3 redshifts is 91.8% but this varies with magnitude from 99% for the brightest galaxies to 90% for objects at the survey limit. The 2dFGRS data base is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/. (6 data files).

  5. Overexpression of the tomato pollen receptor kinase LePRK1 rewires pollen tube growth to a blebbling mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tubular growth of a pollen tube cell is crucial for the sexual reproduction of flowering plants. LePRK1 is a pollen-specific and plasma membrane–localized receptor-like kinase from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). LePRK1 interacts with another receptor, LePRK2, and with KINASE PARTNER PROTEIN (KPP...

  6. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  7. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-01

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs. PMID:27537619

  8. CVMAC 2D Program: A method of converting 3D to 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Lown, J.

    1990-06-20

    This paper presents the user with a method of converting a three- dimensional wire frame model into a technical illustration, detail, or assembly drawing. By using the 2D Program, entities can be mapped from three-dimensional model space into two-dimensional model space, as if they are being traced. Selected entities to be mapped can include circles, arcs, lines, and points. This program prompts the user to digitize the view to be mapped, specify the layers in which the new two-dimensional entities will reside, and select the entities, either by digitizing or windowing. The new two-dimensional entities are displayed in a small view which the program creates in the lower left corner of the drawing. 9 figs.

  9. Evaluation of Comprehensive 2-D Gas Chromatography-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for 209 Chlorinated Biphenyl Congeners in Two Chromatographic Runs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research evaluates a recently developed comprehensive 2-D GC coupled with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer for the potential separation of 209 PCB congeners, using a sequence of 1-D and 2-D chromatographic modes. In two consecutive chromatographic runs, using a 40 m,...

  10. Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic Geological Evolution of Mongolia: Constraints on Modes of "Crustal Growth" in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, F. A.; Bold, U.; Smith, E.; Olin, P. H.; Crowley, J. L.; Schmitz, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is widely considered the largest area of Phanerozoic juvenile crustal growth on Earth. However, the timing and nature of the orogenic events in the core of the CAOB in Mongolia has remained poorly constrained due to a dearth of detailed geological and geochronological studies. To bridge this gap and test models of crustal growth, here we refine the sequencing of geological events by focusing on the formation and destruction of Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic tectonic basins. Mongolia's basins record a complete Neoproterozoic to Cambrian Wilson cycle with rifting of the Mongolian continent at ca. 700 Ma, the development of a Cryogenian to Ediacaran thermally subsiding passive margin, an arc-continent collision at ca. 520 Ma, and a continent-arc-continent collision at ca. 500 Ma. During this collisional orogeny, that is the Cambrian Altaids, crustal growth occurred largely through the obduction of ophiolites. Rifting of the southern margin occurred during the Ordovician Period, with the development of a Silurian passive margin. Oblique northwest-dipping subduction was initiated during the Devonian and resulted in a transpressional accretionary orogen. The CAOB culminated with a continent-arc-continent collision and the accretion of the North China and Tarim Blocks in the latest Permian. The Devonian to early Permian accretionary orogen is associated not only with voluminous plutonism, but also, major translational structures oblique to the margin resulting in the appearance of many accreted terranes. These data are consistent with existing coarse Hf and Nd isotopic data, but also provide a framework for future detailed studies. Although our geological constraints suggest distinct periods of apparent crustal growth through either collisional or accretionary orogenies, net crustal growth after accounting for recycling is equivocal.

  11. Experimental measurements of the m = 1 unstable diocotron mode in hollow electron columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Mitchell, T. B.

    2006-10-18

    Trapped electron columns with hollow density profiles exhibit an exponential m = 1 diocotron instability which can not be accounted for in standard 2D fluid theory. End effects are believed responsible for the discrepancy. We present measurements of the instability for initial conditions where the hollowness and the end curvature were systematically varied. Mode eigenfunctions, eigenfrequencies and growth rate scalings are compared with existing theory and experiments. The agreement is fairly good although a few discrepancies remain.

  12. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  13. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  14. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  15. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  16. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2D in-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  17. Implicit adaptive mesh refinement for 2D reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Chacón, Luis; Pernice, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An implicit structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) solver for 2D reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described. The time-implicit discretization is able to step over fast normal modes, while the spatial adaptivity resolves thin, dynamically evolving features. A Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method is used for the nonlinear solver engine. For preconditioning, we have extended the optimal "physics-based" approach developed in [L. Chacón, D.A. Knoll, J.M. Finn, An implicit, nonlinear reduced resistive MHD solver, J. Comput. Phys. 178 (2002) 15-36] (which employed multigrid solver technology in the preconditioner for scalability) to SAMR grids using the well-known Fast Adaptive Composite grid (FAC) method [S. McCormick, Multilevel Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations, SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 1989]. A grid convergence study demonstrates that the solver performance is independent of the number of grid levels and only depends on the finest resolution considered, and that it scales well with grid refinement. The study of error generation and propagation in our SAMR implementation demonstrates that high-order (cubic) interpolation during regridding, combined with a robustly damping second-order temporal scheme such as BDF2, is required to minimize impact of grid errors at coarse-fine interfaces on the overall error of the computation for this MHD application. We also demonstrate that our implementation features the desired property that the overall numerical error is dependent only on the finest resolution level considered, and not on the base-grid resolution or on the number of refinement levels present during the simulation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool on several challenging problems.

  18. 2D DEM model of sand transport with wind interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oger, L.; Valance, A.

    2013-06-01

    The advance of the dunes in the desert is a threat to the life of the local people. The dunes invade houses, agricultural land and perturb the circulation on the roads. It is therefore very important to understand the mechanism of sand transport in order to fight against desertification. Saltation in which sand grains are propelled by the wind along the surface in short hops, is the primary mode of blown sand movement [1]. The saltating grains are very energetic and when impact a sand surface, they rebound and consequently eject other particles from the sand bed. The ejected grains, called reptating grains, contribute to the augmentation of the sand flux. Some of them can be promoted to the saltation motion. We use a mechanical model based on the Discrete Element Method to study successive collisions of incident energetic beads with granular packing in the context of Aeolian saltation transport. We investigate the collision process for the case where the incident bead and those from the packing have identical mechanical properties. We analyze the features of the consecutive collision processes made by the transport of the saltating disks by a wind in which its profile is obtained from the counter-interaction between air flow and grain flows. We used a molecular dynamics method known as DEM (soft Discrete Element Method) with a initial static packing of 20000 2D particles. The dilation of the upper surface due to the consecutive collisions is responsible for maintaining the flow at a given energy input due to the wind.

  19. Modes of Action and Functions of ERECTA-family Receptor-like Kinases in Plant Organ Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    TORII, Keiko U.

    2012-05-01

    Higher plants constitute the central resource for renewable lignocellulose biomass that can supplement for the world's depleting stores of fossil fuels. As such, understanding the molecular and genetic mechanisms of plant organ growth will provide key knowledge and genetic resources that enables manipulation of plant biomass feedstock for better growth and productivity. The goal of this proposal is to understand how cell proliferation and growth are coordinated during aboveground organ morphogenesis, and how cell-cell signaling mediated by a family of receptor kinases coordinates plant organogenesis. The well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used for our research to facilitate rapid progress. Specifically, we focus on how ERECTA-family leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RLKs) interact in a synergistic manner to promote organogenesis and pattern formation in Arabidopsis. This project was highly successful, resulted in fourteen publications including nine peer-reviewed original research articles. One provisional US patent has been filed through this DOE funding. We have addressed the critical roles for a family of receptor kinases in coordinating proliferation and differentiation of plants, and we successfully elucidated the downstream targets of this signaling pathway in specifying stomatal patterning.

  20. Characterization and optimization of 2-step MOVPE growth for single-mode DFB or DBR laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, F.; Mogilatenko, A.; Zeimer, U.; Brox, O.; Neumann, W.; Erbert, G.; Weyers, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the MOVPE regrowth of AlGaAs over a grating for GaAs-based laser diodes with an internal wavelength stabilisation. Growth temperature and aluminium concentration in the regrown layers considerably affect the oxygen incorporation. Structural characterisation by transmission electron microscopy of the grating after regrowth shows the formation of quaternary InGaAsP regions due to the diffusion of indium atoms from the top InGaP layer and As-P exchange processes during the heating-up procedure. Additionally, the growth over such gratings with different facets leads to self-organisation of the aluminium content in the regrown AlGaAs layer, resulting in an additional AlGaAs grating, which has to be taken into account for the estimation of the coupling coefficient. With optimized growth conditions complete distributed feedback laser structures have been grown for different emission wavelengths. At 1062 nm a very high single-frequency output power of nearly 400 mW with a slope efficiency of 0.95 W/A for a 4 μm ridge-waveguide was obtained.

  1. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  2. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  3. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  4. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  5. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  6. Construction of 2D atomic crystals on transition metal surfaces: graphene, silicene, and hafnene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Zhang, Lizhi; Huang, Li; Li, Linfei; Meng, Lei; Gao, Min; Huan, Qing; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2014-06-12

    The synthesis and structures of graphene on Ru(0001) and Pt(111), silicene on Ag(111) and Ir(111) and the honeycomb hafnium lattice on Ir(111) are reviewed. Epitaxy on a transition metal (TM) substrate is a pro-mising method to produce a variety of two dimensional (2D) atomic crystals which potentially can be used in next generation electronic devices. This method is particularly valuable in the case of producing 2D materials that do not exist in 3D forms, for instance, silicene. Based on the intensive investigations of epitaxial graphene on TM in recent years, it is known that the quality of graphene is affected by many factors, including the interaction between the 2D material overlayer and the substrate, the lattice mismatch, the nucleation density at the early stage of growth. It is found that these factors also apply to many other epitaxial 2D crystals on TM. The knowledge from the reviewed systems will shine light on the design and synthesis of new 2D crystals with novel properties.

  7. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  8. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  9. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter. PMID:25943116

  10. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  11. Critical role of the NKG2D receptor for NK cell-mediated control and immune escape of B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Belting, Lena; Hömberg, Nadine; Przewoznik, Margarethe; Brenner, Christoph; Riedel, Tanja; Flatley, Andrew; Polić, Bojan; Busch, Dirk H; Röcken, Martin; Mocikat, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    Little is known on the control of lymphomas by NK cells. Here, we study the role of the NK group 2D (NKG2D) receptor for the immunosurveillance of lymphoma. By using transplantable tumors as well as a λ-myc-transgenic model of endogenously arising lymphoma and NKG2D-deficient mice, we show that NK cells eliminate tumor cells in vivo after receiving two signals. One step involved the activation of NK cells giving rise to IFN-γ expression, which was effected by MHCI(low) tumor cells or DCs. However, this was necessary but not sufficient to mediate cytotoxicity. Triggering cytotoxicity additionally required a second step, which could be mediated by engagement of the NKG2D receptor. Thus, NKG2D-deficient NK cells could become activated in vivo, but they were not able to reject transplanted lymphomas or to degranulate in animals bearing autochthonous lymphomas. Tumor growth in NKG2D-deficient λ-myc-transgenic mice was significantly accelerated compared to NKG2D-competent animals. Whereas the latter developed tumors that lost expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) in late disease stages, this did not occur in NKG2D-deficient mice. This indicates that NK cells and the NKG2D receptor play a role for control of lymphomas and that selection for NKG2D-L loss mutants provides a mechanism of tumor escape. PMID:26151313

  12. Critical role of the NKG2D receptor for NK cell-mediated control and immune escape of B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Belting, Lena; Hömberg, Nadine; Przewoznik, Margarethe; Brenner, Christoph; Riedel, Tanja; Flatley, Andrew; Polić, Bojan; Busch, Dirk H; Röcken, Martin; Mocikat, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    Little is known on the control of lymphomas by NK cells. Here, we study the role of the NK group 2D (NKG2D) receptor for the immunosurveillance of lymphoma. By using transplantable tumors as well as a λ-myc-transgenic model of endogenously arising lymphoma and NKG2D-deficient mice, we show that NK cells eliminate tumor cells in vivo after receiving two signals. One step involved the activation of NK cells giving rise to IFN-γ expression, which was effected by MHCI(low) tumor cells or DCs. However, this was necessary but not sufficient to mediate cytotoxicity. Triggering cytotoxicity additionally required a second step, which could be mediated by engagement of the NKG2D receptor. Thus, NKG2D-deficient NK cells could become activated in vivo, but they were not able to reject transplanted lymphomas or to degranulate in animals bearing autochthonous lymphomas. Tumor growth in NKG2D-deficient λ-myc-transgenic mice was significantly accelerated compared to NKG2D-competent animals. Whereas the latter developed tumors that lost expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) in late disease stages, this did not occur in NKG2D-deficient mice. This indicates that NK cells and the NKG2D receptor play a role for control of lymphomas and that selection for NKG2D-L loss mutants provides a mechanism of tumor escape.

  13. Quantum (in)stability of 2D charged dilaton black holes and 3D rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    1999-02-01

    The quantum properties of charged black holes (BHs) in two-dimensional (2D) dilaton-Maxwell gravity (spontaneously compactified from heterotic string) with N dilaton coupled scalars are studied. We first investigate 2D BHs found by McGuigan, Nappi, and Yost. Kaluza-Klein reduction of 3D gravity with minimal scalars leads also to 2D dilaton-Maxwell gravity with dilaton coupled scalars and the rotating BH solution found by Bañados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli, which can be also described by 2D charged dilatonic BHs. Evaluating the one-loop effective action for dilaton coupled scalars in large N (and the s-wave approximation for the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli case), we show that quantum-corrected BHs may evaporate or else antievaporate similarly to 4D Nariai BHs as is observed by Bousso and Hawking. Higher modes may cause the disintegration of BHs in accordance with recent observation by Bousso.

  14. 2D Doppler backscattering using synthetic aperture microwave imaging of MAST edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. A.; Brunner, K. J.; Freethy, S. J.; Huang, B. K.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is already established as a powerful diagnostic; its extension to 2D enables imaging of turbulence characteristics from an extended region of the cut-off surface. The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D DBS experiments of MAST edge plasma. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (±40° vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-34.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24° FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial observations of phenomena previously measured by conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch angle to be made; preliminary results are presented. Capabilities gained through steering a beam using a phased array and the limitations of this technique are discussed.

  15. Transient 2D IR spectroscopy of charge injection in dye-sensitized nanocrystalline thin films.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E; Paoprasert, Peerasak; Franking, Ryan A; Hamers, Robert J; Gopalan, Padma; Zanni, Martin T

    2009-12-23

    We use nonlinear 2D IR spectroscopy to study TiO(2) nanocrystalline thin films sensitized with a Re dye. We find that the free electron signal, which often obscures the vibrational features in the transient absorption spectrum, is not observed in the 2D IR spectra. Its absence allows the vibrational features of the dye to be much better resolved than with the typical IR absorption probe. We observe multiple absorption bands but no cross peaks in the 2D IR spectra, which indicates that the dyes have at least three conformations. Furthermore, by using a pulse sequence in which we initiate electron transfer in the middle of the infrared pulse train, we are able to assign the excited state features by correlating them to the ground state vibrational modes and determine that the three conformations have different time scales and cross sections for electron injection. 2D IR spectroscopy is proving to be very useful in disentangling overlapping structural distributions in biological and chemical physics processes. These experiments demonstrate that nonlinear infrared probes are also a powerful new tool for studying charge transfer at interfaces.

  16. A comment on the rank correlation merit function for 2D/3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Bloch, Christoph; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2010-02-01

    Lots of procedures in computer assisted interventions register pre-interventionally generated 3D data sets to the intraoperative situation using fast and simply generated 2D images, e.g. from a C-Arm, a B-mode Ultrasound, etc. Registration is typically done by generating a 2D image out of the 3D data set, comparison to the original 2D image using a planar similarity measure and subsequent optimisation. As these two images can be very different, a lot of different comparison functions are in use. In a recent article Stochastic Rank Correlation, a merit function based on Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was presented. By comparing randomly chosen subsets of the images, the authors wanted to avoid the computational expense of sorting all the points in the image. In the current paper we show that, because of the limited grey level range in medical images, full image rank correlation can be computed almost as fast as Pearson's correlation coefficient. A run time estimation is illustrated with numerical results using a 2D Shepp-Logan phantom at different sizes, and a sample data set of a pig.

  17. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Global Analysis of the Bending Vibrations of Acetylene 12C2D2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian J.; Pearson, John C.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Lattanzi, Valerio; Walters, Adam

    2009-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty-one 12C2D2 transitions have been measured in the 0.2-1.6 THz region of its ν5-ν4 difference band and 202 of them were observed for the first time. The accuracy of these measurements is estimated to be ranging from 50 kHz to 100 kHz. The 12C2D2 molecules were generated under room temperature by passing 120-150 mTorr D2O vapor through calcium carbide (CaC2) powder. A multistate analysis was carried out for the bending vibrational modes ν4 and ν5 of 12C2D2, which includes the lines observed in this work and prior microwave, far-infrared and infrared data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for 12C2D2 by adding the new measurements to the old data set, which had only 10 lines with microwave measurement precision. New frequency and intensity predictions have been made based on the obtained molecular parameters. The more precise measurements and new predictions reported here will support the analyses of astronomical observations by the future high-resolution spectroscopy telescopes such as Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA, which will work in the terahertz spectral region.

  18. Global synthetic seismograms using a 2-D finite-difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dunzhu; Helmberger, Don; Clayton, Robert W.; Sun, Daoyuan

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference (FD) synthetics, which fill the gap between fast 1-D analytic synthetics and time-consuming full 3-D synthetics in our ability to model seismograms, have been used in many studies. We address several issues involving 2-D FD methods in generating global synthetic seismograms. These include: (1) interfacing point source excitation for earthquakes with 2-D FD methods; (2) out-of-plane spreading corrections and (3) reducing the spherical Earth to the flattened models. The first issue is tackled using two methods, a `transparent source box' approach and a moment tensor excitation approach, where each has its own advantages. Moreover, our `source box' excitation does not have the late-time drift problem that occurred in previous studies. The out-of-plane geometric spreading correction is accounted for by estimating the ray parameter and applying a post-simulation filter to 2-D synthetics. Finally, parameters of the Earth-flattening transformation are discussed and validated. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated by comparing our synthetics with frequency-wavenumber summation, normal-mode and 3-D spectral-element synthetics.

  19. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    SciTech Connect

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-18

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  20. Roton Excitations and the Fluid-Solid Phase Transition in Superfluid 2D Yukawa Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinelli, S.; Galli, D. E.; Reatto, L.; Motta, M.

    2016-10-01

    We compute several ground-state properties and the dynamical structure factor of a zero-temperature system of Bosons interacting with the 2D screened Coulomb (2D-SC) potential. We resort to the exact shadow path integral ground state (SPIGS) quantum Monte Carlo method to compute the imaginary-time correlation function of the model, and to the genetic algorithm via falsification of theories (GIFT) to retrieve the dynamical structure factor. We provide a detailed comparison of ground-state properties and collective excitations of 2D-SC and ^4He atoms. The roton energy of the 2D-SC system is an increasing function of density, and not a decreasing one as in ^4He. This result is in contrast with the view that the roton is the soft mode of the fluid-solid transition. We uncover a remarkable quasi-universality of backflow and of other properties when expressed in terms of the amount of short-range order as quantified by the height of the first peak of the static structure factor.

  1. Roton Excitations and the Fluid-Solid Phase Transition in Superfluid 2D Yukawa Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinelli, S.; Galli, D. E.; Reatto, L.; Motta, M.

    2016-05-01

    We compute several ground-state properties and the dynamical structure factor of a zero-temperature system of Bosons interacting with the 2D screened Coulomb (2D-SC) potential. We resort to the exact shadow path integral ground state (SPIGS) quantum Monte Carlo method to compute the imaginary-time correlation function of the model, and to the genetic algorithm via falsification of theories (GIFT) to retrieve the dynamical structure factor. We provide a detailed comparison of ground-state properties and collective excitations of 2D-SC and ^4 He atoms. The roton energy of the 2D-SC system is an increasing function of density, and not a decreasing one as in ^4 He. This result is in contrast with the view that the roton is the soft mode of the fluid-solid transition. We uncover a remarkable quasi-universality of backflow and of other properties when expressed in terms of the amount of short-range order as quantified by the height of the first peak of the static structure factor.

  2. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Hamed, Ali M.; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of the developing and developed flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching flume. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The flow was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40000, based on the bulk velocity and the flume half height. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels, particularly for which shows about 30% reduction. The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and the rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D wall. POD analysis was also performed to further understand distinctive features of the flow structures due to surface topography.

  3. Overtone spectroscopy of H2D+ and D2H+ using laser induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvany, Oskar; Hugo, Edouard; Müller, Frank; Kühnemann, Frank; Schiller, Stephan; Tennyson, Jonathan; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2007-10-01

    The method of laser induced reaction is used to obtain high-resolution IR spectra of H2D+ and D2H+ in collision with n-H2 at a nominal temperature of 17K. For this purpose three cw-laser systems have been coupled to a 22-pole ion trap apparatus, two commercial diode laser systems in the ranges of 6100-6600cm-1 and 6760-7300cm-1, respectively, and a high-power optical parametric oscillator tunable in the range of 2600-3200cm-1. In total, 27 new overtone and combination transitions have been detected for H2D + and D2H+, as well as a weak line in the ν1 vibrational band of H2D+ (220←101) at 3164.118cm-1. The line positions are compared to high accuracy ab initio calculations, showing small but mode-dependent differences, being largest for three vibrational quanta in the ν2 symmetric bending of H2D+. Within the experimental accuracy, the relative values of the ab initio predicted Einstein B coefficients are confirmed.

  4. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  5. Practical Algorithm For Computing The 2-D Arithmetic Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Choi, Y. Y.; Yu, Xiaoli

    1989-05-01

    Recently, Tufts and Sadasiv [10] exposed a method for computing the coefficients of a Fourier series of a periodic function using the Mobius inversion of series. They called this method of analysis the Arithmetic Fourier Transform(AFT). The advantage of the AFT over the FN 1' is that this method of Fourier analysis needs only addition operations except for multiplications by scale factors at one stage of the computation. The disadvantage of the AFT as they expressed it originally is that it could be used effectively only to compute finite Fourier coefficients of a real even function. To remedy this the AFT developed in [10] is extended in [11] to compute the Fourier coefficients of both the even and odd components of a periodic function. In this paper, the improved AFT [11] is extended to a two-dimensional(2-D) Arithmetic Fourier Transform for calculating the Fourier Transform of two-dimensional discrete signals. This new algorithm is based on both the number-theoretic method of Mobius inversion of double series and the complex conjugate property of Fourier coefficients. The advantage of this algorithm over the conventional 2-D FFT is that the corner-turning problem needed in a conventional 2-D Discrete Fourier Transform(DFT) can be avoided. Therefore, this new 2-D algorithm is readily suitable for VLSI implementation as a parallel architecture. Comparing the operations of 2-D AFT of a MxM 2-D data array with the conventional 2-D FFT, the number of multiplications is significantly reduced from (2log2M)M2 to (9/4)M2. Hence, this new algorithm is faster than the FFT algorithm. Finally, two simulation results of this new 2-D AFT algorithm for 2-D artificial and real images are given in this paper.

  6. Transition from planar to island growth mode in SiGe structures fabricated on SiGe/Si(001) strain-relaxed buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaleev, M. V.; Novikov, A. V.; Yurasov, D. V.; Hartmann, J. M.; Kuznetsov, O. A.; Lobanov, D. N.; Krasilnik, Z. F.

    2012-10-01

    The specifics of the two-to-three dimensional growth mode transition of pure Ge on SiGe/Si(001) strain-relaxed buffers (SRBs) were investigated. It was shown that the critical thickness for elastic relaxation is influenced not only by the lattice mismatch between the substrate and the film but also by Ge segregation and surface roughness dependent on parameters of strained layers. Critical thickness was found to be smaller for Ge grown on SiGe strain-relaxed buffers than on pure Si(001) substrates, in spite of the lesser lattice mismatch. Insertion of thin tensile-strained Si layers between Ge and SiGe strain-relaxed buffers increased the critical thickness.

  7. Nanostructured oxide-based powders: investigation of the growth mode of the CeO2 clusters on the YSZ surface.

    PubMed

    Natile, Marta M; Glisenti, Antonella

    2006-02-16

    CeO(2)/YSZ nanocomposite powders, characterized by increasing Ce/Zr atomic ratio, were obtained by depositing, by wet impregnation, different amounts of CeO(2) on the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) surface. These powders were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Experimental results allow us to obtain interesting information concerning the growth mode, the morphology, and the dimensions of the CeO(2) clusters on the YSZ supporting surface. A 3-D growing mechanism was observed for the CeO(2) nanoparticles. With increasing Ce/Zr atomic ratio the CeO(2) clusters become more and more spherical. Moreover, XPS data also show the presence of Ce(III) and Ce(IV) ions at the interface supported/supporting oxides.

  8. Quantum stabilities and growth modes of thin metal films: Unsupported and NiAl-supported Ag(1 1 0) and Ag(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong; Evans, J. W.; Liu, Da-Jiang

    2008-07-01

    We present density functional theory (DFT) analyses of the stability of Ag thin films versus film thicknesses for various surface orientations. We include benchmark results for freestanding films, but consider in detail Ag(1 1 0) films supported on a NiAl(1 1 0) substrate, and Ag(1 0 0) films supported on a NiAl(1 0 0) substrate. The supported films exhibit an almost perfect lattice-match between film and substrate surface unit cells, so one can assess film stability in the absence of significant lateral mismatch strain. We also provide a characterization of film growth modes for these NiAl-supported Ag films based on DFT results for the relevant energetics.

  9. Modeling of 2D photonic bandgap structures using a triangular mesh finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2001-10-01

    A numerical model is presented for computing the out-of- plane losses of a general class of row-defect waveguides formed by the superposition of a 2D photonic crystal onto a slab confinement structure. The usefulness of this model is demonstrated here by calculating the propagation loss of a single-row-defect waveguide composed of hexagonal air holes etched into two different slab structures. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple coupled-mode-theory picture in which loss is due to coupling by the waveguide corrugation between the fundamental and certain radiative slab modes. These calculations show that low-loss photonic crystal waveguides should be possible by carefully engineering the radiation modes of the slab waveguide.

  10. Effective Temperature of 2D Dusty Plasma Liquids at the Discrete Level

    SciTech Connect

    Io, C.-W.; Chan, C.-L.; I Lin

    2007-07-13

    Fluctuation-dissipation theory has been used to measure the effective temperature of non-equilibrium system. In this work, using a 2D dusty plasma liquid formed by the negatively charged fine particles suspending in weakly ionized discharges and sheared by two CW counter parallel laser beams, we measure the micro-transport at the kinetic level. The effective temperatures Teff at different time scales are obtained through the Stokes-Einstein relation which relates the diffusion coefficient (D) and the viscosity ({eta}). The external energy is cascaded from the slow hopping modes to the fast caging modes through mutual coupling, which leads to the higher effective temperature of the slow hopping modes.

  11. Weak-localization approach to a 2D electron gas with a spectral node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, K.; Sinner, A.

    2015-07-01

    We study a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and a spectral node within the weak-localization approach and compare its results with those of Gaussian fluctuations around the self-consistent Born approximation. The appearance of diffusive modes depends on the type of disorder. In particular, we find for a random gap a diffusive mode only from ladder contributions, whereas for a random scalar potential the diffusive mode is created by ladder and by maximally crossed contributions. The ladder (maximally crossed) contributions correspond to fermionic (bosonic) Gaussian fluctuations. We calculate the conductivity corrections from the density-density Kubo formula and find a good agreement with the experimentally observed V-shape conductivity of graphene.

  12. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  13. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  14. The unified ballooning theory with weak up-down asymmetric mode structure and the numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, T.; Qin, H.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Mahajan, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    A unified ballooning theory, constructed on the basis of two special theories [Zhang et al., Phys. Fluids B 4, 2729 (1992); Y. Z. Zhang and T. Xie, Nucl. Fusion Plasma Phys. 33, 193 (2013)], shows that a weak up-down asymmetric mode structure is normally formed in an up-down symmetric equilibrium; the weak up-down asymmetry in mode structure is the manifestation of non-trivial higher order effects beyond the standard ballooning equation. It is shown that the asymmetric mode may have even higher growth rate than symmetric modes. The salient features of the theory are illustrated by investigating a fluid model for the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode. The two dimensional (2D) analytical form of the ITG mode, solved in ballooning representation, is then converted into the radial-poloidal space to provide the natural boundary condition for solving the 2D mathematical local eigenmode problem. We find that the analytical expression of the mode structure is in a good agreement with finite difference solution. This sets a reliable framework for quasi-linear computation.

  15. Pokemon and MEF2D co-operationally promote invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Hong, Xing-Yu; Li, Tao; He, Cheng-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human malignancy, and frequent invasion and metastasis is closely associated with its poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion is still not completely elucidated. Pokemon is a well-established oncogene for HCC growth, but its contribution to HCC invasion has not been studied yet. In this paper, Pokemon was found to be overexpressed in MHCC-97H HCC cell line, which possesses higher invasiveness. Downregulation of Pokemon abolished the invasion of MHCC-97H HCC cell lines. Pokemon overexpression was able to enhance the invasion of MHCC-97L cells with lower invasiveness. MEF2D, an oncogene promoting the invasion of HCC cells, was further detected to be upregulated and downregulated when Pokemon was overexpressed and silenced, respectively. Online database analysis indicated that one Pokemon recognition site was located within the promoter of MEF2D. Chromatin co-precipitation, luciferase, and qPCR assays all proved that Pokemon can promote the expression of MEF2D in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D expression can prevent the impaired invasion of HCC cells with Pokemon silencing, while suppression of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon overexpression on HCC invasion. More interestingly, MEF2D was also found to increase the transcription of Pokemon by binding myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) sites within its promoter region, implying an auto-regulatory circuit consisting of these two oncogenes that can promote HCC invasion. Our findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion, and provided evidence that targeting this molecular loop may be a promising strategy for anti-invasion therapy. PMID:26164003

  16. Pokemon and MEF2D co-operationally promote invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Hong, Xing-Yu; Li, Tao; He, Cheng-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human malignancy, and frequent invasion and metastasis is closely associated with its poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion is still not completely elucidated. Pokemon is a well-established oncogene for HCC growth, but its contribution to HCC invasion has not been studied yet. In this paper, Pokemon was found to be overexpressed in MHCC-97H HCC cell line, which possesses higher invasiveness. Downregulation of Pokemon abolished the invasion of MHCC-97H HCC cell lines. Pokemon overexpression was able to enhance the invasion of MHCC-97L cells with lower invasiveness. MEF2D, an oncogene promoting the invasion of HCC cells, was further detected to be upregulated and downregulated when Pokemon was overexpressed and silenced, respectively. Online database analysis indicated that one Pokemon recognition site was located within the promoter of MEF2D. Chromatin co-precipitation, luciferase, and qPCR assays all proved that Pokemon can promote the expression of MEF2D in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D expression can prevent the impaired invasion of HCC cells with Pokemon silencing, while suppression of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon overexpression on HCC invasion. More interestingly, MEF2D was also found to increase the transcription of Pokemon by binding myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) sites within its promoter region, implying an auto-regulatory circuit consisting of these two oncogenes that can promote HCC invasion. Our findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion, and provided evidence that targeting this molecular loop may be a promising strategy for anti-invasion therapy.

  17. De-Li-DAQ-2D - a new data acquisition system for position-sensitive neutron detectors with delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchanovskiy, F. V.; Murashkevich, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Software for a data acquisition system of modern one- and two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors with delay-line readout, which includes a software interface to a new electronic module De-Li-DAQ-2D with a USB interface, is presented. The new system after successful tests on the stand and on several spectrometers of the IBR-2 reactor has been integrated into the software complex SONIX+ [1]. The De-Li- DAQ-2D module [2] contains an 8-channel time-code converter (TDC-GPX) with a time resolution of 80 ps, field programmable gate array (FPGA), 1 Gbyte histogram memory and high-speed interface with a fiber-optic communication line. A real count rate is no less than 106 events/s. The De-Li-DAQ-2D module is implemented in the NIM standard. The De-Li-DAQ-2D module can operate in two modes: histogram mode and list mode.

  18. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  19. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  20. 2D hexagonal quaternion Fourier transform in color image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel concept of the quaternion discrete Fourier transform on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, which we call the two-dimensional hexagonal quaternion discrete Fourier transform (2-D HQDFT). The concept of the right-side 2D HQDFT is described and the left-side 2-D HQDFT is similarly considered. To calculate the transform, the image on the hexagonal lattice is described in the tensor representation when the image is presented by a set of 1-D signals, or splitting-signals which can be separately processed in the frequency domain. The 2-D HQDFT can be calculated by a set of 1-D quaternion discrete Fourier transforms (QDFT) of the splitting-signals.

  1. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  2. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  3. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices. PMID:26839956

  4. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  5. Nanohole-array-based device for 2D snapshot multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) snapshot multispectral imager that utilizes the optical transmission characteristics of nanohole arrays (NHAs) in a gold film to resolve a mixture of input colors into multiple spectral bands. The multispectral device consists of blocks of NHAs, wherein each NHA has a unique periodicity that results in transmission resonances and minima in the visible and near-infrared regions. The multispectral device was illuminated over a wide spectral range, and the transmission was spectrally unmixed using a least-squares estimation algorithm. A NHA-based multispectral imaging system was built and tested in both reflection and transmission modes. The NHA-based multispectral imager was capable of extracting 2D multispectral images representative of four independent bands within the spectral range of 662 nm to 832 nm for a variety of targets. The multispectral device can potentially be integrated into a variety of imaging sensor systems. PMID:24005065

  6. 2D and 3D simulations of damage in 5-grain copper gas gun samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Davis L; Cerreta, Ellen K; Dennis - Koller, Darcie; Escobedo - Diaz, Juan P; Trujillo, Carl P; Luo, Shengian; Bingert, John F

    2010-12-16

    2D and 3D Hydrocode simulations were done of a gas gun damage experiment involving a 5 grain sample with a polycrystalline flyer with a velocity of about 140 m/s. The simulations were done with the Flag hydrocode and involved explicit meshing of the 5 grains with a single crystal plasticity model and a pressure based damage model. The calculated fields were compared with two cross sections from the recovered sample. The sample exhibited grain boundary cracks at high angle and tilt grain boundaries in the sample but not at a sigma 3 twin boundary. However, the calculation showed large gradients in stress and strain at only the twin boundary, contrary to expectation. This indicates that the twin boundary is quite strong to resist the predicted high gradients and that the calculation needs the addition of a grain boundary fracture mode. The 2D and 3D simulations were compared.

  7. Molecular insights into the klotho-dependent, endocrine mode of action of fibroblast growth factor 19 subfamily members.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Regina; Beenken, Andrew; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Kalinina, Juliya; Olsen, Shaun K; Eliseenkova, Anna V; Xu, ChongFeng; Neubert, Thomas A; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Yu, Xijie; White, Kenneth E; Inagaki, Takeshi; Kliewer, Steven A; Yamamoto, Masaya; Kurosu, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Yasushi; Kuro-o, Makoto; Lanske, Beate; Razzaque, Mohammed S; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2007-05-01

    Unique among fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), FGF19, -21, and -23 act in an endocrine fashion to regulate energy, bile acid, glucose, lipid, phosphate, and vitamin D homeostasis. These FGFs require the presence of Klotho/betaKlotho in their target tissues. Here, we present the crystal structures of FGF19 alone and FGF23 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a disaccharide chemically related to heparin. The conformation of the heparin-binding region between beta strands 10 and 12 in FGF19 and FGF23 diverges completely from the common conformation adopted by paracrine-acting FGFs. A cleft between this region and the beta1-beta2 loop, the other heparin-binding region, precludes direct interaction between heparin/heparan sulfate and backbone atoms of FGF19/23. This reduces the heparin-binding affinity of these ligands and confers endocrine function. Klotho/betaKlotho have evolved as a compensatory mechanism for the poor ability of heparin/heparan sulfate to promote binding of FGF19, -21, and -23 to their cognate receptors. PMID:17339340

  8. Alternative Binding Modes Identified for Growth and Differentiation Factor-associated Serum Protein (GASP) Family Antagonism of Myostatin*

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ryan G.; Angerman, Elizabeth B.; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. PMID:25657005

  9. Alternative binding modes identified for growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein (GASP) family antagonism of myostatin.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ryan G; Angerman, Elizabeth B; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B

    2015-03-20

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. PMID:25657005

  10. Molecular Insights into the Klotho-Dependent, Endocrine Mode of Action of Fibroblast Growth Factor 19 Subfamily Members

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz,R.; Beenken, A.; Ibrahimi, O.; Kalinina, J.; Olsen, S.; Eliseenkova, A.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; Zhang, F.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Unique among fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), FGF19, -21, and -23 act in an endocrine fashion to regulate energy, bile acid, glucose, lipid, phosphate, and vitamin D homeostasis. These FGFs require the presence of Klotho/{beta}Klotho in their target tissues. Here, we present the crystal structures of FGF19 alone and FGF23 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a disaccharide chemically related to heparin. The conformation of the heparin-binding region between {beta} strands 10 and 12 in FGF19 and FGF23 diverges completely from the common conformation adopted by paracrine-acting FGFs. A cleft between this region and the {beta}1-{beta}2 loop, the other heparin-binding region, precludes direct interaction between heparin/heparan sulfate and backbone atoms of FGF19/23. This reduces the heparin-binding affinity of these ligands and confers endocrine function. Klotho/{beta}Klotho have evolved as a compensatory mechanism for the poor ability of heparin/heparan sulfate to promote binding of FGF19, -21, and -23 to their cognate receptors.

  11. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  12. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  13. A simultaneous 2D/3D autostereo workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Dennis; McGinnis, Bradley; Talandis, Jonas; Leigh, Jason; Peterka, Tom; Knoll, Aaron; Sumer, Aslihan; Papka, Michael; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel immersive workstation environment that scientists can use for 3D data exploration and as their everyday 2D computer monitor. Our implementation is based on an autostereoscopic dynamic parallax barrier 2D/3D display, interactive input devices, and a software infrastructure that allows client/server software modules to couple the workstation to scientists' visualization applications. This paper describes the hardware construction and calibration, software components, and a demonstration of our system in nanoscale materials science exploration.

  14. QUENCH2D. Two-Dimensional IHCP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, A.; Beck, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    QUENCH2D* is developed for the solution of general, non-linear, two-dimensional inverse heat transfer problems. This program provides estimates for the surface heat flux distribution and/or heat transfer coefficient as a function of time and space by using transient temperature measurements at appropriate interior points inside the quenched body. Two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric geometries such as turnbine disks and blades, clutch packs, and many other problems can be analyzed using QUENCH2D*.

  15. LBQ2D, Extending the Line Broadened Quasilinear Model to TAE-EP Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2012-10-01

    The line broadened quasilinear model was proposed and tested on the one dimensional electrostatic case of the bump on tailfootnotetextH.L Berk, B. Breizman and J. Fitzpatrick, Nucl. Fusion, 35:1661, 1995 to study the wave particle interaction. In conventional quasilinear theory, the sea of overlapping modes evolve with time as the particle distribution function self consistently undergo diffusion in phase space. The line broadened quasilinear model is an extension to the conventional theory in a way that allows treatment of isolated modes as well as overlapping modes by broadening the resonant line in phase space. This makes it possible to treat the evolution of modes self consistently from onset to saturation in either case. We describe here the model denoted by LBQ2D which is an extension of the proposed one dimensional line broadened quasilinear model to the case of TAEs interacting with energetic particles in two dimensional phase space, energy as well as canonical angular momentum. We study the saturation of isolated modes in various regimes and present the analytical derivation and numerical results. Finally, we present, using ITER parameters, the case where multiple modes overlap and describe the techniques used for the numerical treatment.

  16. Growth modes and epitaxy of FeAl thin films on a-cut sapphire prepared by pulsed laser and ion beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Xiang; Trautvetter, Moritz; Ziemann, Paul; Wiedwald, Ulf

    2014-01-14

    FeAl films around equiatomic composition are grown on a-cut (112{sup ¯}0) sapphire substrates by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at ambient temperature. Subsequent successive annealing is used to establish chemical order and crystallographic orientation of the films with respect to the substrate. We find a strongly [110]-textured growth for both deposition techniques. Pole figures prove the successful preparation of high quality epitaxial films by PLD with a single in-plane orientation. IBAD-grown films, however, exhibit three in-plane orientations, all of them with broad angular distributions. The difference of the two growth modes is attributed to the existence of a metastable intermediate crystalline orientation as concluded from nonassisted sputter depositions at different substrate temperatures. The formation of the chemically ordered crystalline B2 phase is accompanied by the expected transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic behavior of the films. In accordance with the different thermally induced structural recovery, we find a step-like magnetic transition to paramagnetic behavior after annealing for 1 h at T{sub A} = 300 °C for IBAD deposition, while PLD-grown films show a gradual decrease of ferromagnetic signals with rising annealing temperatures.

  17. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  18. Narrow growth window for stoichiometric, layer-by-layer growth of LaAlO3 thin films using pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golalikhani, M.; Lei, Q. Y.; Wolak, M. A.; Davidson, B. A.; Xi, X. X.

    2016-06-01

    We study the structure and surface morphology of the 100 nm homoepitaxial LaAlO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition in a broad range of growth parameters. We show that there is a narrow window of growth conditions in which the stoichiometric, bulk-like structure is obtained while maintaining a 2-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth mode. In our system, these optimum growth conditions are 100 mTorr background pressure with laser energy density 1.5-2 J/cm2. The sensitivity to growth conditions of the stoichiometry and structure of LaAlO3 films can have a crucial role in the 2-D electron gas formed at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

  19. Miga Aero Actuator and 2D Machined Mechanical Binary Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators provide the highest force-to-weight ratio of any known actuator. They can be designed for a wide variety of form factors from flat, thin packages, to form-matching packages for existing actuators. SMA actuators can be operated many thousands of times, so that ground testing is possible. Actuation speed can be accurately controlled from milliseconds to position and hold, and even electronic velocity-profile control is possible. SMA actuators provide a high degree of operational flexibility, and are truly smart actuators capable of being accurately controlled by onboard microprocessors across a wide range of voltages. The Miga Aero actuator is a SMA actuator designed specifically for spaceflight applications. Providing 13 mm of stroke with either 20- or 40-N output force in two different models, the Aero actuator is made from low-outgassing PEEK (polyether ether ketone) plastic, stainless steel, and nickel-titanium SMA wires. The modular actuator weighs less than 28 grams. The dorsal output attachment allows the Aero to be used in either PUSH or PULL modes by inverting the mounting orientation. The SPA1 actuator utilizes commercially available SMA actuator wire to provide 3/8-in. (approx. =.1 cm) of stroke at a force of over 28 lb (approx. = .125 N). The force is provided by a unique packaging of the single SMA wire that provides the output force of four SMA wires mechanically in parallel. The output load is shared by allowing the SMA wire to slip around the output attachment end to adjust or balance the load, preventing any individual wire segment from experiencing high loads during actuation. A built-in end limit switch prevents overheating of the SMA element following actuation when used in conjunction with the Miga Analog Driver [a simple MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) switching circuit]. A simple 2D machined mechanical binary latch has been developed to complement the capabilities of SMA wire

  20. Empowering a mesophilic inoculum for thermophilic nitrification: Growth mode and temperature pattern as critical proliferation factors for archaeal ammonia oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Vandekerckhove, Tom; Prat, Delphine; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Meerbergen, Ken; Lievens, Bart; Boon, Nico; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E

    2016-04-01

    Cost-efficient biological treatment of warm nitrogenous wastewaters requires the development of thermophilic nitrogen removal processes. Only one thermophilic nitrifying bioreactor was described so far, achieving 200 mg N L(-1) d(-1) after more than 300 days of enrichment from compost samples. From the practical point of view in which existing plants would be upgraded, however, a more time-efficient development strategy based on mesophilic nitrifying sludge is preferred. This study evaluated the adaptive capacities of mesophilic nitrifying sludge for two linear temperature increase patterns (non-oscillating vs. oscillating), two different slopes (0.25 vs. 0.08 °C d(-1)) and two different reactor types (floc vs. biofilm growth). The oscillating temperature pattern (0.25 °C d(-1)) and the moving bed biofilm reactor (0.08 °C d(-1)) could not reach nitrification at temperatures higher than 46 °C. However, nitrification rates up to 800 mg N L(-1) d(-1) and 150 mg N g(-1) volatile suspended solids d(-1) were achieved at a temperature as high as 49 °C by imposing the slowest linear temperature increase to floccular sludge. Microbial community analysis revealed that this successful transition was related with a shift in ammonium oxidizing archaea dominating ammonia oxidizing bacteria, while for nitrite oxidation Nitrospira spp. was constantly more abundant than Nitrobacter spp.. This observation was accompanied with an increase in observed sludge yield and a shift in maximal optimum temperature, determined with ex-situ temperature sensitivity measurements, predicting an upcoming reactor failure at higher temperature. Overall, this study achieved nitrification at 49 °C within 150 days by gradual adaptation of mesophilic sludge, and showed that ex-situ temperature sensitivity screening can be used to monitor and steer the transition process. PMID:26841233

  1. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth

    PubMed Central

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; de Paoli, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type-specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P < 0.01) and exhibited a group difference from Ecc (P < 0.05), which did not increase. Myonuclei content in type I fibers increased in all groups (P < 0.01), while a specific accretion of myonuclei in type II fibers was observed in the Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and Placebo-Ecc (P < 0.01) groups. Similarly, whereas type I fiber CSA increased independently of intervention (P < 0.001), type II fiber CSA increased exclusively with Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and type II fiber hypertrophy correlated with whole muscle hypertrophy exclusively following Conc training (P < 0.01). In conclusion, isolated concentric knee extensor resistance training appears to constitute a stronger driver of SC content than eccentric resistance training while type II fiber hypertrophy was accentuated when combining concentric resistance training with whey protein supplementation. PMID:25103976

  2. Empowering a mesophilic inoculum for thermophilic nitrification: Growth mode and temperature pattern as critical proliferation factors for archaeal ammonia oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Vandekerckhove, Tom; Prat, Delphine; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Meerbergen, Ken; Lievens, Bart; Boon, Nico; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E

    2016-04-01

    Cost-efficient biological treatment of warm nitrogenous wastewaters requires the development of thermophilic nitrogen removal processes. Only one thermophilic nitrifying bioreactor was described so far, achieving 200 mg N L(-1) d(-1) after more than 300 days of enrichment from compost samples. From the practical point of view in which existing plants would be upgraded, however, a more time-efficient development strategy based on mesophilic nitrifying sludge is preferred. This study evaluated the adaptive capacities of mesophilic nitrifying sludge for two linear temperature increase patterns (non-oscillating vs. oscillating), two different slopes (0.25 vs. 0.08 °C d(-1)) and two different reactor types (floc vs. biofilm growth). The oscillating temperature pattern (0.25 °C d(-1)) and the moving bed biofilm reactor (0.08 °C d(-1)) could not reach nitrification at temperatures higher than 46 °C. However, nitrification rates up to 800 mg N L(-1) d(-1) and 150 mg N g(-1) volatile suspended solids d(-1) were achieved at a temperature as high as 49 °C by imposing the slowest linear temperature increase to floccular sludge. Microbial community analysis revealed that this successful transition was related with a shift in ammonium oxidizing archaea dominating ammonia oxidizing bacteria, while for nitrite oxidation Nitrospira spp. was constantly more abundant than Nitrobacter spp.. This observation was accompanied with an increase in observed sludge yield and a shift in maximal optimum temperature, determined with ex-situ temperature sensitivity measurements, predicting an upcoming reactor failure at higher temperature. Overall, this study achieved nitrification at 49 °C within 150 days by gradual adaptation of mesophilic sludge, and showed that ex-situ temperature sensitivity screening can be used to monitor and steer the transition process.

  3. Investigations on Substrate Temperature-Induced Growth Modes of Organic Semiconductors at Dielectric/semiconductor Interface and Their Correlation with Threshold Voltage Stability in Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Padma, Narayanan; Maheshwari, Priya; Bhattacharya, Debarati; Tokas, Raj B; Sen, Shashwati; Honda, Yoshihide; Basu, Saibal; Pujari, Pradeep Kumar; Rao, T V Chandrasekhar

    2016-02-10

    Influence of substrate temperature on growth modes of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films at the dielectric/semiconductor interface in organic field effect transistors (OFETs) is investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging at the interface reveals a change from 'layer+island' to "island" growth mode with increasing substrate temperatures, further confirmed by probing the buried interfaces using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and positron annihilation spectroscopic (PAS) techniques. PAS depth profiling provides insight into the details of molecular ordering while positron lifetime measurements reveal the difference in packing modes of CuPc molecules at the interface. XRR measurements show systematic increase in interface width and electron density correlating well with the change from layer + island to coalesced huge 3D islands at higher substrate temperatures. Study demonstrates the usefulness of XRR and PAS techniques to study growth modes at buried interfaces and reveals the influence of growth modes of semiconductor at the interface on hole and electron trap concentrations individually, thereby affecting hysteresis and threshold voltage stability. Minimum hole trapping is correlated to near layer by layer formation close to the interface at 100 °C and maximum to the island formation with large voids between the grains at 225 °C.

  4. Investigations on Substrate Temperature-Induced Growth Modes of Organic Semiconductors at Dielectric/semiconductor Interface and Their Correlation with Threshold Voltage Stability in Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Padma, Narayanan; Maheshwari, Priya; Bhattacharya, Debarati; Tokas, Raj B; Sen, Shashwati; Honda, Yoshihide; Basu, Saibal; Pujari, Pradeep Kumar; Rao, T V Chandrasekhar

    2016-02-10

    Influence of substrate temperature on growth modes of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films at the dielectric/semiconductor interface in organic field effect transistors (OFETs) is investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging at the interface reveals a change from 'layer+island' to "island" growth mode with increasing substrate temperatures, further confirmed by probing the buried interfaces using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and positron annihilation spectroscopic (PAS) techniques. PAS depth profiling provides insight into the details of molecular ordering while positron lifetime measurements reveal the difference in packing modes of CuPc molecules at the interface. XRR measurements show systematic increase in interface width and electron density correlating well with the change from layer + island to coalesced huge 3D islands at higher substrate temperatures. Study demonstrates the usefulness of XRR and PAS techniques to study growth modes at buried interfaces and reveals the influence of growth modes of semiconductor at the interface on hole and electron trap concentrations individually, thereby affecting hysteresis and threshold voltage stability. Minimum hole trapping is correlated to near layer by layer formation close to the interface at 100 °C and maximum to the island formation with large voids between the grains at 225 °C. PMID:26761590

  5. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  6. 2 D patterns of soil gas diffusivity , soil respiration, and methane oxidation in a soil profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    The apparent gas diffusion coefficient in soil (DS) is an important parameter describing soil aeration, which makes it a key parameter for root growth and gas production and consumption. Horizontal homogeneity in soil profiles is assumed in most studies for soil properties - including DS. This assumption, however, is not valid, even in apparently homogeneous soils, as we know from studies using destructive sampling methods. Using destructive methods may allow catching a glimpse, but a large uncertainty remains, since locations between the sampling positions cannot be analyzed, and measurements cannot be repeated. We developed a new method to determine in situ the apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient in order to examine 2 D pattern of DS and methane oxidation in a soil profile. Different tracer gases (SF6, CF4, C2H6) were injected continuously into the subsoil and measured at several locations in the soil profile. These data allow for modelling inversely the 2 D patterns of DS using Finite Element Modeling. The 2D DS patterns were then combined with naturally occurring CH4 and CO2 concentrations sampled at the same locations to derive the 2D pattern of soil respiration and methane oxidation in the soil profile. We show that methane oxidation and soil respiration zones shift within the soil profile while the gas fluxes at the surface remain rather stable during a the 3 week campaign.

  7. Suramin blocks interaction between human FGF1 and FGFR2 D2 domain and reduces downstream signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zong-Sian; Liu, Che Fu; Fu, Brian; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-09-01

    The extracellular portion of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor2 D2 domain (FGFR2 D2) interacts with human fibroblast growth factor 1 (hFGF1) to activate a downstream signaling cascade that ultimately affects mitosis and differentiation. Suramin is an antiparasiticdrug and a potent inhibitor of FGF-induced angiogenesis. Suramin has been shown to bind to hFGF1, and might block the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. Here, we titrated hFGF1 with FGFR2 D2 and suramin to elucidate their interactions using the detection of NMR. The docking results of both hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 domain and hFGF1-suramin complex were superimposed. The results indicate that suramin blocks the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. We used the PyMOL software to show the hydrophobic interaction of hFGF1-suramin. In addition, we used a Water-soluble Tetrazolium salts assay (WST1) to assess hFGF1 bioactivity. The results will be useful for the development of new antimitogenic activity drugs.

  8. Mixing and reaction in the subsonic 2-D turbulent free shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieler, Clifford Eugene

    Several aspects of mixing and reaction in a turbulent two-dimensional shear layer have been studied. Experiments have been performed with reacting H2, F2, and NO in inert diluent gases. Sensing the heat release by these reactions, several aspects of the mixing process can be examined without the usual resolution limitations. For example, in contrast with direct measurements of composition, the amount of mixed fluid can be conservatively estimated with the results of the "flip" experiments. These have been performed over a range of density ratios, Reynolds numbers and heat release.The effects of initial conditions are of primary importance when comparisons to other studies are undertaken. Aspects as fundamental as growth rate of the turbulent region, or as obscure as the mixed fluid flux ratio depend strongly on the boundary conditions of this flow. These effects are examined in conjunction with those of Reynolds number and density ratio. For most cases studied here, tripping of the high speed boundary layer led to growth rate decreases. An exception was found for the case of high density ratio where the opposite effect was observed. This anomalous result occurred at conditions under which a new mode of instability has been shown to exist. Parallels exist between this unusual result and those of Batt in the uniform density case.An extensive study of the effects of density ratio on the mixing and reaction in the 2-D shear layer has been performed. Results indicate that several aspects of the mixing process are remarkably similar. Profiles of mixed fluid change little as the density ratio varies by a factor of 30. The integral amount of mixed fluid varies less than 6% for all density ratios examined. This insensitivity contrasts with that of the profiles of mixed fluid composition. While having very similar shapes the profiles are offset by an amount which depends very strongly upon the density ratio. The entrainment into the mixing layer has also been examined. Power

  9. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    PubMed

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-μL), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown

  10. The separation of overlapping transitions in β-carotene with broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, Tessa R.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Graham, Matthew W.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy is applied to β-carotene, revealing new insight into the excited state dynamics of carotenoids by exploring the full energetic range encompassing the S0→S2 and S1→S1n transitions at 77 K. Multiple signals are observed in the regime associated with the proposed S∗ state and isolated through separate analysis of rephasing and nonrephasing contributions. Peaks in rephasing pathways display dynamic lineshapes characteristic of coupling to high energy vibrational modes, and simulation with a simple model supports their assignment to impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. A signal persisting beyond 10 ps in the nonrephasing spectra is still under investigation.

  11. Two 2D silver(I) coordination polymers derived from mixed ligands: Syntheses, structures, photoluminescent and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Jing; Sun, Di; Li, Yun-Hua; Hao, Hong-Jun; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2011-07-01

    Two isomers of the aminobenzonitrile were reacted with Ag 2O and phthalic acid under ultrasonic condition, yielding two coordination polymers (CPs) of the formula [Ag 2( o-abn)(pa)] n ( 1) and [Ag 4( m-abn)(pa) 2] n ( 2). They have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectrum and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both complexes 1 and 2 are 2D sheet structures which contain two different Ag(I) aggregates, 1D silver helical chain and 2D silver sheet for 1 and 2, respectively. The o-abn in 1 adopts a rare tridentate μ 3- N, N' N' mode to bridge the neighboring 1D silver chains to form a 2D coordination network, while the m-abn ligand just acts as a monodentate N-donor in 2 and does not contribute to the extension of the 2D silver sheet to the higher dimensionality. As the change of the relative position of amino and cyano groups of the aminobenzonitrile ligand, the dimensionality of the Ag(I) aggregates in 1 and 2 increases from 1D to 2D, which indicates that the relative positions of amino and cyano groups of aminobenzonitrile play an important role in the formation of the diverse Ag(I) aggregates, as a consequence, different 2D coordination networks are produced. Additionally, results about emissive behaviors and thermal stabilities of them are discussed.

  12. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future.

  13. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  14. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  15. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  16. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future. PMID:27506268

  17. Development and Evaluation of 2-D and 3-D Exocentric Synthetic Vision Navigation Display Concepts for Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, J. J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Sweeters, Jason L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies with practical applications that will help to eliminate low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. The paper describes experimental evaluation of a multi-mode 3-D exocentric synthetic vision navigation display concept for commercial aircraft. Experimental results evinced the situation awareness benefits of 2-D and 3-D exocentric synthetic vision displays over traditional 2-D co-planar navigation and vertical situation displays. Conclusions and future research directions are discussed.

  18. Development and evaluation of 2D and 3D exocentric synthetic vision navigation display concepts for commercial aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Sweeters, Jason L.

    2005-05-01

    NASA's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies with practical applications that will help to eliminate low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. The paper describes experimental evaluation of a multi-mode 3-D exocentric synthetic vision navigation display concept for commercial aircraft. Experimental results evinced the situation awareness benefits of 2-D and 3-D exocentric synthetic vision displays over traditional 2-D co-planar navigation and vertical situation displays. Conclusions and future research directions are discussed.

  19. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben

    2013-01-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability. PMID:24307756

  20. Adiabatic Amplification of Plasmons and Demons in 2D Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically investigate charged collective modes in a two-dimensional conductor with hot electrons where the instantaneous mode frequencies gradually increase or decrease with time. We show that the loss compensation or even amplification of the modes may occur. We apply our theory to two types of collective modes in graphene, the plasmons and the energy waves, which can be probed in optical pump-probe experiments.

  1. Adiabatic Amplification of Plasmons and Demons in 2D Systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Basov, D N; Fogler, M M

    2016-08-12

    We theoretically investigate charged collective modes in a two-dimensional conductor with hot electrons where the instantaneous mode frequencies gradually increase or decrease with time. We show that the loss compensation or even amplification of the modes may occur. We apply our theory to two types of collective modes in graphene, the plasmons and the energy waves, which can be probed in optical pump-probe experiments. PMID:27563987

  2. Dynamics of the Direct Vortex Cascade in 2D Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary; Forrester, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The growth and decay of the direct vortex cascade in 2D quantum turbulence is studied for different rates of injection of vortex pairs of a given separation (the stirring scale), with the system in contact with a heat bath at low temperature. At low injection rates the vortices have no effect on the superfluidity, and the distribution of pair separations spreads out until reaching the steady-state distribution of the direct cascade, where pairs annihilate at the same rate they are injected. This cascade has a k- 3 energy spectrum, the same spectrum as the direct enstrophy cascade in 2D classical turbulence. On switching off the injection, the pair distribution first decays starting from the initial stirring scale, with the total vortex density decreasing linearly in time. As pairs at smaller scales decay, the vortex density then falls off as a power law, the same power law found in recent exact solutions of quenched 2D superfluids. At high injection rates the large density of vortices drives the superfluid density to zero at long length scales, and the growth and decay of the cascade is found to be much slower for this case. Work supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Grant DMR 0906467.

  3. Graphene based 2D-materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniselvam, Thangavelu; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-09-01

    Ever-increasing energy demands and the depletion of fossil fuels are compelling humanity toward the development of suitable electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices to attain a more sustainable society with adequate renewable energy and zero environmental pollution. In this regard, supercapacitors are being contemplated as potential energy storage devices to afford cleaner, environmentally friendly energy. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, including 2D graphene and its inorganic analogues (transition metal double layer hydroxides, chalcogenides, etc), as potential electrodes for the development of supercapacitors with high electrochemical performance. This review provides an overview of the recent progress in using these graphene-based 2D materials as potential electrodes for supercapacitors. In addition, future research trends including notable challenges and opportunities are also discussed.

  4. Perception-based reversible watermarking for 2D vector maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Chaoguang; Cao, Liujuan; Li, Xiang

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an effective and reversible watermarking approach for digital copyright protection of 2D-vector maps. To ensure that the embedded watermark is insensitive for human perception, we only select the noise non-sensitive regions for watermark embedding by estimating vertex density within each polyline. To ensure the exact recovery of original 2D-vector map after watermark extraction, we introduce a new reversible watermarking scheme based on reversible high-frequency wavelet coefficients modification. Within the former-selected non-sensitive regions, our watermarking operates on the lower-order vertex coordinate decimals with integer wavelet transform. Such operation further reduces the visual distortion caused by watermark embedding. We have validated the effectiveness of our scheme on our real-world city river/building 2D-vector maps. We give extensive experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art methods, including embedding capability, invisibility, and robustness over watermark attacking.

  5. Secretory pathways generating immunosuppressive NKG2D ligands

    PubMed Central

    Baragaño Raneros, Aroa; Suarez-Álvarez, Beatriz; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural Killer Group 2 member D (NKG2D) activating receptor, present on the surface of various immune cells, plays an important role in activating the anticancer immune response by their interaction with stress-inducible NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) on transformed cells. However, cancer cells have developed numerous mechanisms to evade the immune system via the downregulation of NKG2DL from the cell surface, including the release of NKG2DL from the cell surface in a soluble form. Here, we review the mechanisms involved in the production of soluble NKG2DL (sNKG2DL) and the potential therapeutic strategies aiming to block the release of these immunosuppressive ligands. Therapeutically enabling the NKG2D-NKG2DL interaction would promote immunorecognition of malignant cells, thus abrogating disease progression. PMID:25050215

  6. 2D bifurcations and Newtonian properties of memristive Chua's circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalek, W.; Podhaisky, H.

    2016-01-01

    Two interesting properties of Chua's circuits are presented. First, two-parameter bifurcation diagrams of Chua's oscillatory circuits with memristors are presented. To obtain various 2D bifurcation images a substantial numerical effort, possibly with parallel computations, is needed. The numerical algorithm is described first and its numerical code for 2D bifurcation image creation is available for free downloading. Several color 2D images and the corresponding 1D greyscale bifurcation diagrams are included. Secondly, Chua's circuits are linked to Newton's law φ ''= F(t,φ,φ')/m with φ=\\text{flux} , constant m > 0, and the force term F(t,φ,φ') containing memory terms. Finally, the jounce scalar equations for Chua's circuits are also discussed.

  7. The TRPC channel blocker SKF 96365 inhibits glioblastoma cell growth by enhancing reverse mode of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and increasing intracellular Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Song, M; Chen, D; Yu, S P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE SKF 96365 is well known for its suppressing effect on human glioblastoma growth by inhibiting pre-activated transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels and Ca2+ influx. The effect of SKF 96363 on glioblastoma cells, however, may be multifaceted and this possibility has been largely ignored. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of SKF 96365 on cell cycle and cell viability of cultured human glioblastoma cells were characterized. Western blot, Ca2+ imaging and patch clamp recordings were used to delineate cell death mechanisms. siRNA gene knockdown provided additional evidence. KEY RESULTS SKF 96365 repressed glioblastoma cell growth via increasing intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) irrespective of whether TRPC channels were blocked or not. The effect of SKF 96365 primarily resulted from enhanced reverse operation of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) with an EC50 of 9.79 μM. SKF 96365 arrested the glioblastoma cells in the S and G2 phases and activated p38-MAPK and JNK, which were all prevented by the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM or EGTA. The expression of NCX in glioblastoma cells was significantly higher than in normal human astrocytes. Knockdown of the NCX1 isoforms diminished the effect of SKF 96365 on glioblastoma cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS At the same concentration, SKF 96365 blocks TRPC channels and enhances the reverse mode of the NCX causing [Ca2+]i accumulation and cytotoxicity. This finding suggests an alternative pharmacological mechanism of SKF 96365. It also indicates that modulation of the NCX is an effective method to disrupt Ca2+ homeostasis and suppress human glioblastoma cells. PMID:24641279

  8. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego A R

    2015-06-01

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials. PMID:25965703

  9. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  10. On 2D bisection method for double eigenvalue problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, X.

    1996-06-01

    The two-dimensional bisection method presented in (SIAM J. Matrix Anal. Appl. 13(4), 1085 (1992)) is efficient for solving a class of double eigenvalue problems. This paper further extends the 2D bisection method of full matrix cases and analyses its stability. As in a single parameter case, the 2D bisection method is very stable for the tridiagonal matrix triples satisfying the symmetric-definite condition. Since the double eigenvalue problems arise from two-parameter boundary value problems, an estimate of the discretization error in eigenpairs is also given. Some numerical examples are included. 42 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.; Vronsky, Tomas; Gaudern, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils.

  12. Laboratory Experiments On Continually Forced 2d Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. G.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Van Heijst, G. J. F.

    There has been much recent interest in the advection of tracers by 2D turbulence in geophysical flows. While there is a large body of literature on decaying 2D turbulence or forced 2D turbulence in unbounded domains, there have been very few studies of forced turbulence in bounded domains. In this study we present new experimental results from a continuously forced quasi 2D turbulent field. The experiments are performed in a square Perspex tank filled with water. The flow is made quasi 2D by a steady background rotation. The rotation rate of the tank has a small (<8 %) sinusoidal perturbation which leads to the periodic formation of eddies in the corners of the tank. When the oscillation period of the perturbation is greater than an eddy roll-up time-scale, dipole structures are observed to form. The dipoles can migrate away from the walls, and the interior of the tank is continually filled with vortexs. From experimental visualizations the length scale of the vortexs appears to be largely controlled by the initial formation mechanism and large scale structures are not observed to form at large times. Thus the experiments provide a simple way of cre- ating a continuously forced 2D turbulent field. The resulting structures are in contrast with most previous laboratory experiments on 2D turbulence which have investigated decaying turbulence and have observed the formations of large scale structure. In these experiments, decaying turbulence had been produced by a variety of methods such as the decaying turbulence in the wake of a comb of rods (Massen et al 1999), organiza- tion of vortices in thin conducting liquids (Cardoso et al 1994) or in rotating systems where there are sudden changes in angular rotation rate (Konijnenberg et al 1998). Results of dye visualizations, particle tracking experiments and a direct numerical simulation will be presented and discussed in terms of their oceanographic application. Bibliography Cardoso,O. Marteau, D. &Tabeling, P

  13. EM 2dV1.0.F

    2012-01-05

    Code is for a layered electric medium with 2d structure. Includes air-earth interface at node z=2.. The electric ex and ez fields are calculated on edges of elemental grid and magnetic field hy is calculated on the face of the elemental grid. The code allows for a layered earth with 2d structures. Solutions of coupled first order Maxwell's equations are solved in the two dimensional environment using a finite- difference scheme on a staggered spationamore » and temporal grid.« less

  14. Noninvasive deep Raman detection with 2D correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Min; Park, Hyo Sun; Cho, Youngho; Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Kang Taek; Jung, Young Mee; Suh, Yung Doug

    2014-07-01

    The detection of poisonous chemicals enclosed in daily necessaries is prerequisite essential for homeland security with the increasing threat of terrorism. For the detection of toxic chemicals, we combined a sensitive deep Raman spectroscopic method with 2D correlation analysis. We obtained the Raman spectra from concealed chemicals employing spatially offset Raman spectroscopy in which incident line-shaped light experiences multiple scatterings before being delivered to inner component and yielding deep Raman signal. Furthermore, we restored the pure Raman spectrum of each component using 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis with chemical inspection. Using this method, we could elucidate subsurface component under thick powder and packed contents in a bottle.

  15. Self-dual strings and 2D SYM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosomichi, Kazuo; Lee, Sungjay

    2015-01-01

    We study the system of M2-branes suspended between parallel M5-branes using ABJM model with a natural half-BPS boundary condition. For small separation between M5-branes, the worldvolume theory is shown to reduce to a 2D super Yang-Mills theory with some similarity to q-deformed Yang-Mills theory. The gauge coupling is related to the position of the branes in an interesting manner. The theory is considerably different from the 2D theory proposed for multiple "M-strings". We make a detailed comparison of elliptic genus of the two descriptions and find only a partial agreement.

  16. Finite temperature corrections in 2d integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Hasenbusch, M.

    2002-09-01

    We study the finite size corrections for the magnetization and the internal energy of the 2d Ising model in a magnetic field by using transfer matrix techniques. We compare these corrections with the functional form recently proposed by Delfino and LeClair-Mussardo for the finite temperature behaviour of one-point functions in integrable 2d quantum field theories. We find a perfect agreement between theoretical expectations and numerical results. Assuming the proposed functional form as an input in our analysis we obtain a relevant improvement in the precision of the continuum limit estimates of both quantities.

  17. 2dF grows up: Echidna for the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Andrew; Barden, Sam; Miziarski, Stan; Rambold, William; Smith, Greg

    2008-07-01

    We present the concept design of a new fibre positioner and spectrograph system for the Anglo-Australian Telescope, as a proposed enhancement to the Anglo-Australian Observatory's well-known 2dF facility. A four-fold multiplex enhancement is accomplished by replacing the 400-fibre 2dF fibre positioning robot with a 1600-fibre Echidna unit, feeding three clones of the AAOmega optical spectrograph. Such a facility has the capability of a redshift 1 survey of a large fraction of the southern sky, collecting five to ten thousand spectra per night for a million-galaxy survey.

  18. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  19. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  20. Spreading dynamics of 2D dipolar Langmuir monolayer phases.

    PubMed

    Heinig, P; Wurlitzer, S; Fischer, Th M

    2004-07-01

    We study the spreading of a liquid 2D dipolar droplet in a Langmuir monolayer. Interfacial tensions (line tensions) and microscopic contact angles depend on the scale on which they are probed and obey a scaling law. Assuming rapid equilibration of the microscopic contact angle and ideal slippage of the 2D solid/liquid and solid/gas boundary, the driving force of spreading is merely expressed by the shape-dependent long-range interaction integrals. We obtain good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations using this theory. PMID:15278693

  1. Evaluation of 2D ceramic matrix composites in aeroconvective environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R.; Love, Wendell L.; Balter-Peterson, Aliza

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of a novel ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) material system for use in the aeroconvective-heating environments encountered by the nose caps and wing leading edges of such aerospace vehicles as the Space Shuttle, during orbit-insertion and reentry from LEO. These CMCs are composed of an SiC matrix that is reinforced with Nicalon, Nextel, or carbon refractory fibers in a 2D architecture. The test program conducted for the 2D CMCs gave attention to their subsurface oxidation.

  2. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  3. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Fearn, Jamie M; Brownson, Dale A C; Smith, Graham C; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E

    2016-08-21

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm(-2) modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR. PMID:27448174

  4. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion-relaxation data--2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition.

    PubMed

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T; Engelsen, Søren B

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T(2)-D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T(2)-D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T(2)-D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D=3 x 10(-12) m(2) s(-1) and T(2)=180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D=10(-9) m(2) s(-1), T(2)=10 ms and D=3 x 10(-13) m(2) s(-1), T(2)=13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  5. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Fearn, Jamie M; Brownson, Dale A C; Smith, Graham C; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E

    2016-08-21

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm(-2) modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR.

  6. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion relaxation data—2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T2- D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T2- D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T2- D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D = 3 × 10 -12 m 2 s -1 and T2 = 180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D = 10 -9 m 2 s -1, T2 = 10 ms and D = 3 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1, T2 = 13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  7. Ultrafast state detection and 2D ion crystals in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Michael; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2016-05-01

    Projective readout of quantum information stored in atomic qubits typically uses state-dependent CW laser-induced fluorescence. This method requires an often sophisticated imaging system to spatially filter out the background CW laser light. We present an alternative approach that instead uses simple pulse sequences from a mode-locked laser to affect the same state-dependent excitations in less than 1 ns. The resulting atomic fluorescence occurs in the dark, allowing the placement of non-imaging detectors right next to the atom to improve the qubit state detection efficiency and speed. We also study 2D Coulomb crystals of atomic ions in an oblate Paul trap. We find that crystals with hundreds of ions can be held in the trap, potentially offering an alternative to the use of Penning traps for the quantum simulation of 2D lattice spin models. We discuss the classical physics of these crystals and the metastable states that are supported in 2D. This work is supported by the US Army Research Office.

  8. Two dimensional spectroscopy of Liquids in THz-domain: THz analogue of 2D Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, K.; Tanimura, Y.

    1998-03-01

    After the initial proposal(Y. Tanimura and S. Mukamel, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 9496 (1993)), the two dimensional Raman spectroscopy in the liquid phase has been received a considerable attention. Both experimental and theoretical activity of this field has been quite high. Since we have two controllable delay times, we can obtain more information than the lower-order experiments such as OKE. The new information includes that on heterogeneous distribution in liquids. Recently, it is found that the coupling between the modes in liquids can be investigated by the technique, both experimentally and theoretically(A. Tokmakoff, M.J. Lang, D.S. Larsen, G.R. Fleming, V. Chernyak, and S. Mukamel, Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press))^,(K. Okumura and Y. Tanimura, Chem. Phys. Lett. 278, 175 (1997)) In this talk, we will emphasize that we can perform the THz analogue of the 2D Raman spectroscopy if the THz short-pulse laser becomes available, which may not be in the far future. Theoretically, we can formulate this novel THz spectroscopy on the same footing as the 2D Raman spectroscopy. We will clarify new aspects of this technique comparing with the 2D Raman spectroscopy--- the reason it worth trying the tough experiment. See

  9. Nonlinear 2D-IR spectroscopy as a tool to study peptide dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The structure of bio-macromolecules (peptides, proteins, enzymes and DNA) crucially defines their function and it is the enormous progress in structure-sensitive methods (NMR, x-ray) which has lead to an extremely detailed microscopic understanding of reactions in biological systems. Our knowledge on the dynamics of these structures, which presumably is as important for the function as the structure itself, is essentially based on computer simulations with essentially no or very indirect experimental feedback. Nonlinear 2D vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) on the amide I mode of small globular peptides has been demonstrated recently and a detailed relationship between the static 3D structure and the strength of cross peaks has been established (in analogy to COSY in 2D-NMR spectroscopy). An extension of this technique allows to observe equilibrium fluctuations of model helices by incorporating an additional population period (i.e. 'mixing time'), giving rise to spectral diffusion of the diagonal peaks and incoherent population transfer between excitonic states (the latter being equivalent to the nuclear Overhauser effect, NOESY). In contrast to spin transitions, however, the processes are not in the 'motional narrowing limit' (i. e. τ_c>=T_2) so that the timescales of protein fluctuation can be measured directly on a picosecond timescale and in a site specific manner.

  10. Birefringence-Directed Raman Selection Rules in 2D Black Phosphorus Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mao, Nannan; Wu, Juanxia; Han, Bowen; Lin, Jingjing; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    The incident and scattered light engaged in the Raman scattering process of low symmetry crystals always suffer from the birefringence-induced depolarization. Therefore, for anisotropic crystals, the classical Raman selection rules should be corrected by taking the birefringence effect into consideration. The appearance of the 2D anisotropic materials provides an excellent platform to explore the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules, due to its controllable thickness at the nanoscale that greatly simplifies the situation comparing with bulk materials. Herein, a theoretical and experimental investigation on the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules in the anisotropic black phosphorus (BP) crystals is presented. The abnormal angle-dependent polarized Raman scattering of the Ag modes in thin BP crystal, which deviates from the normal Raman selection rules, is successfully interpreted by the theoretical model based on birefringence. It is further confirmed by the examination of different Raman modes using different laser lines and BP samples of different thicknesses. PMID:27030911

  11. Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Charles; Cahoon, James F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

    2007-12-11

    Many properties of chemical reactions are determined by the transition state connecting reactant and product, yet it is difficult to directly obtain any information about these short-lived structures in liquids. We show that two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy can provide direct information about transition states by tracking the transformation of vibrational modes as a molecule crossed a transition state. We successfully monitored a simple chemical reaction, the fluxional rearrangement of Fe(CO)5, in which the exchange of axial and equatorial CO ligands causes an exchange of vibrational energy between the normal modes of the molecule. This energy transfer provides direct evidence regarding the time scale, transition state, and mechanism of the reaction.

  12. Birefringence-Directed Raman Selection Rules in 2D Black Phosphorus Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mao, Nannan; Wu, Juanxia; Han, Bowen; Lin, Jingjing; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    The incident and scattered light engaged in the Raman scattering process of low symmetry crystals always suffer from the birefringence-induced depolarization. Therefore, for anisotropic crystals, the classical Raman selection rules should be corrected by taking the birefringence effect into consideration. The appearance of the 2D anisotropic materials provides an excellent platform to explore the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules, due to its controllable thickness at the nanoscale that greatly simplifies the situation comparing with bulk materials. Herein, a theoretical and experimental investigation on the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules in the anisotropic black phosphorus (BP) crystals is presented. The abnormal angle-dependent polarized Raman scattering of the Ag modes in thin BP crystal, which deviates from the normal Raman selection rules, is successfully interpreted by the theoretical model based on birefringence. It is further confirmed by the examination of different Raman modes using different laser lines and BP samples of different thicknesses.

  13. High contrast 2D visualization of edge plasma instabilities by ECE imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, G. S.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    High contrast high resolution 2D images of edge MHD instabilities have been obtained for the KSTAR H-mode plasmas in 2010 using an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging system. A fast structural evolution of the edge instabilities has been identified where the validity of the observed structures, i.e., the local measurement is ensured by the high contrast. On the other hand, the exact interpretation of the ECE intensity (Trad) is not straightforward due to the marginal optical depth ( ~ 1) in the plasma edge region. The effect of the electron temperature (Te) and density (ne) profiles in the edge region on the ECE localization and intensity have been evaluated for typical KSTAR H-mode discharges.

  14. Influence of lattice defects on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour of 2D magnonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Manzin, Alessandra; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Coïsson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies, from a modelling point of view, the influence of randomly distributed lattice defects (non-patterned areas and variable hole size) on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour and spin wave mode profiles of 2D magnonic crystals based on Ni80Fe20 antidot arrays with hexagonal lattice. A reference sample is first defined via the comparison of experimental and simulated hysteresis loops and magnetoresistive curves of patterned films, prepared by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Second, a parametric analysis of the dynamic response is performed, investigating how edge, quasi-uniform and localized modes are affected by alterations of the lattice geometry and bias field amplitude. Finally, some results about the possible use of magnetic antidot arrays in frequency-based sensors for magnetic bead detection are presented, highlighting the need for an accurate control of microstructural features. PMID:26911336

  15. Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectra of Diborane(6): B2H6 and B2D6.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu-Chain; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Lo, Jen-Iu; Lin, Meng-Yeh; Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Ogilvie, J F

    2016-07-21

    We recorded absorption spectra of diborane(6), B2H6 and B2D6, dispersed in solid neon near 4 K in both mid-infrared and ultraviolet regions. For gaseous B2H6 from 105 to 300 nm, we report quantitative absolute cross sections; for solid B2H6 and for B2H6 dispersed in solid neon, we measured ultraviolet absorbance with relative intensities over a wide range. To assign the mid-infrared spectra to specific isotopic variants, we applied the abundance of (11)B and (10)B in natural proportions; we undertook quantum-chemical calculations of wavenumbers associated with anharmonic vibrational modes and the intensities of the harmonic vibrational modes. To aid an interpretation of the ultraviolet spectra, we calculated the energies of electronically excited singlet and triplet states and oscillator strengths for electronic transitions from the electronic ground state. PMID:27351464

  16. The Sobolev Stability Threshold for 2D Shear Flows Near Couette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedrossian, Jacob; Vicol, Vlad; Wang, Fei

    2016-08-01

    We consider the 2D Navier-Stokes equation on T × R , with initial datum that is ɛ -close in H^N to a shear flow (U(y), 0), where Vert U(y) - yVert _{H^{N+4}} ≪ 1 and N>1 . We prove that if ɛ ≪ ν ^{1/2} , where ν denotes the inverse Reynolds number, then the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation remains ɛ -close in H^1 to (e^{t ν partial _{yy}}U(y),0) for all t>0 . Moreover, the solution converges to a decaying shear flow for times t ≫ ν ^{-1/3} by a mixing-enhanced dissipation effect, and experiences a transient growth of gradients. In particular, this shows that the stability threshold in finite regularity scales no worse than ν ^{1/2} for 2D shear flows close to the Couette flow.

  17. Transient-mode liquid phase epitaxial growth of GaAs on GaAs-coated Si substrates prepared by migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Shuji; Sakai, Shiro; Chang, Shi S.; Ramaswamy, Ramu V.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Liu, John K.; Katz, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Planar oxide-maskless growth of GaAs was demonstrated by transient-mode liquid phase epitaxy (TMLPE) on GaAs-coated Si substrates that were prepared by migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy (MEMBE). In TMLPE, the cool substrate was brought into contact with hot melts for a short time. A GaAs layer as thick as 30 microns was grown in 10 sec. The etch pits observed in TMLPE-grown layers became longer in one direction and decreased in density with increasing the TMLPE epilayer thickness. The density of etch pits in a 20 micron-thick layer was approximately 5 x 10 the 6th/sq cm. Strong bandgap emission elliptically polarized with a major axis perpendicular to the surface was observed at about 910 nm, while deep-level emission from the TMLPE/MEMBE GaAs interface was detected at 980 nm. The photoluminescence intensity divided by the carrier concentration of the TMLPE-grown layer was about 270 times larger than that of the MEMBE-grown layer used as a substrate.

  18. 2D aperture synthesis for Lamb wave imaging using co-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2014-03-01

    2D ultrasonic arrays in Lamb wave based SHM systems can operate in the phased array (PA) or synthetic focusing (SF) mode. In the real-time PA approach, multiple electronically delayed signals excite transmitting elements to form the desired wave-front, whereas receiving elements are used to sense scattered waves. Due to that, the PA mode requires multi channeled hardware and multiple excitations at numerous azimuths to scan the inspected region of interest. To the contrary, the SF mode, assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing of the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the SF technique, a single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Performance of a 2D imaging array depends on many parameters, such as, its topology, number of its transducers and their spacing in terms of wavelength as well as the type of weighting function (apodization). Moreover, it is possible to use sparse arrays, which means that not all array elements are used for transmitting and/ or receiving. In this paper the co-array concept is applied to facilitate the synthesis process of an array's aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum co-array is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual elements' locations in the sub-arrays used for imaging. The coarray framework will be presented here using two different array topologies, aID uniform linear array and a cross-shaped array that will result in a square coarray. The approach will be discussed in terms of array patterns and beam patterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both, theoretical and experimental results will be given.

  19. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  20. THz devices based on 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Huili Grace; Yan, Rusen; Song, Bo; Encomendero, Jimy; Jena, Debdeep

    2015-05-01

    In two-dimensional electron systems with mobility on the order of 1,000 - 10,000 cm2/Vs, the electron scattering time is about 1 ps. For the THz window of 0.3 - 3 THz, the THz photon energy is in the neighborhood of 1 meV, substantially smaller than the optical phonon energy of solids where these 2D electron systems resides. These properties make the 2D electron systems interesting as a platform to realize THz devices. In this paper, I will review 3 approaches investigated in the past few years in my group toward THz devices. The first approach is the conventional high electron mobility transistor based on GaN toward THz amplifiers. The second approach is to employ the tunable intraband absorption in 2D electron systems to realize THz modulators, where I will use graphene as a model material system. The third approach is to exploit plasma wave in these 2D electron systems that can be coupled with a negative differential conductance element for THz amplifiers/sources/detectors.