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Sample records for 2d honeycomb lattice

  1. Self-Assembly of Cubes into 2D Hexagonal and Honeycomb Lattices by Hexapolar Capillary Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soligno, Giuseppe; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-06-01

    Particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface induce capillary deformations that determine their orientations and generate mutual capillary interactions which drive them to assemble into 2D ordered structures. We numerically calculate, by energy minimization, the capillary deformations induced by adsorbed cubes for various Young's contact angles. First, we show that capillarity is crucial not only for quantitative, but also for qualitative predictions of equilibrium configurations of a single cube. For a Young's contact angle close to 90°, we show that a single-adsorbed cube generates a hexapolar interface deformation with three rises and three depressions. Thanks to the threefold symmetry of this hexapole, strongly directional capillary interactions drive the cubes to self-assemble into hexagonal or graphenelike honeycomb lattices. By a simple free-energy model, we predict a density-temperature phase diagram in which both the honeycomb and hexagonal lattice phases are present as stable states.

  2. Self-Assembly of Cubes into 2D Hexagonal and Honeycomb Lattices by Hexapolar Capillary Interactions.

    PubMed

    Soligno, Giuseppe; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-06-24

    Particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface induce capillary deformations that determine their orientations and generate mutual capillary interactions which drive them to assemble into 2D ordered structures. We numerically calculate, by energy minimization, the capillary deformations induced by adsorbed cubes for various Young's contact angles. First, we show that capillarity is crucial not only for quantitative, but also for qualitative predictions of equilibrium configurations of a single cube. For a Young's contact angle close to 90°, we show that a single-adsorbed cube generates a hexapolar interface deformation with three rises and three depressions. Thanks to the threefold symmetry of this hexapole, strongly directional capillary interactions drive the cubes to self-assemble into hexagonal or graphenelike honeycomb lattices. By a simple free-energy model, we predict a density-temperature phase diagram in which both the honeycomb and hexagonal lattice phases are present as stable states. PMID:27391753

  3. Electronic and geometrical properties of monoatomic and diatomic 2D honeycomb lattices. A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Ángela; Rey, Rafael; Fonseca, Karen; Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica Team

    Since the discovery of graphene by Geim and Novoselov at 2004, several analogous systems have been theoretically and experimentally studied, due to their technological interest. Both monoatomic lattices, such as silicine and germanene, and diatomic lattices (h-GaAs and h-GaN) have been studied. Using Density Functional Theory we obtain and confirm the chemical stability of these hexagonal 2D systems through the total energy curves as a function of interatomic distance. Unlike graphene, silicine and germanene, gapless materials, h-GaAs and h-GaN exhibit electronic gaps, different from that of the bulk, which could be interesting for the industry. On the other hand, the ab initio band structure calculations for graphene, silicene and germanene show a non-circular cross section around K points, at variance with the prediction of usual Tight-binding models. In fact, we have found that Dirac cones display a dihedral group symmetry. This implies that Fermi speed can change up to 30 % due to the orientation of the wave vector, for both electrons and holes. Traditional analytic studies use the Dirac equation for the electron dynamics at low energies. However, this equation assumes an isotropic, homogeneous and uniform space. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia. A. M. Rojas-Cuervo would also like to thank the Colciencias, Colombia.

  4. Klein tunneling in deformed honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Bahat-Treidel, Omri; Peleg, Or; Grobman, Mark; Shapira, Nadav; Segev, Mordechai; Pereg-Barnea, T

    2010-02-12

    We study the scattering of waves off a potential step in deformed honeycomb lattices. For deformations below a critical value, perfect Klein tunneling is obtained; i.e., a potential step transmits waves at normal incidence with nonresonant unit-transmission probability. Beyond the critical deformation a gap forms in the spectrum, and a potential step perpendicular to the deformation direction reflects all normally incident waves, exhibiting a dramatic transition form unit transmission to total reflection. These phenomena are generic to honeycomb lattices and apply to electromagnetic waves in photonic lattices, quasiparticles in graphene, and cold atoms in optical lattices. PMID:20366822

  5. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorecka, Agnieszka; Gremaud, Benoit; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  6. Edge states in polariton honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milićević, M.; Ozawa, T.; Andreakou, P.; Carusotto, I.; Jacqmin, T.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Le Gratiet, L.; Sagnes, I.; Bloch, J.; Amo, A.

    2015-09-01

    The experimental study of edge states in atomically thin layered materials remains a challenge due to the difficult control of the geometry of the sample terminations, the stability of dangling bonds, and the need to measure local properties. In the case of graphene, localized edge modes have been predicted in zigzag and bearded edges, characterized by flat dispersions connecting the Dirac points. Polaritons in semiconductor microcavities have recently emerged as an extraordinary photonic platform to emulate 1D and 2D Hamiltonians, allowing the direct visualization of the wavefunctions in both real- and momentum-space as well as of the energy dispersion of eigenstates via photoluminescence experiments. Here we report on the observation of edge states in a honeycomb lattice of coupled micropillars. The lowest two bands of this structure arise from the coupling of the lowest energy modes of the micropillars, and emulate the π and π* bands of graphene. We show the momentum-space dispersion of the edge states associated with the zigzag and bearded edges, holding unidimensional quasi-flat bands. Additionally, we evaluate polarization effects characteristic of polaritons on the properties of these states.

  7. Featureless quantum insulator on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Panjin; Lee, Hyunyong; Jiang, Shenghan; Ware, Brayden; Jian, Chao-Ming; Zaletel, Michael; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    2016-08-01

    We show how to construct fully symmetric states without topological order on a honeycomb lattice for S =1/2 spins using the language of projected entangled pair states. An explicit example is given for the virtual bond dimension D =4 . Four distinct classes differing by lattice quantum numbers are found by applying the systematic classification scheme introduced by two of the authors [S. Jiang and Y. Ran, Phys. Rev. B 92, 104414 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.104414]. Lack of topological degeneracy or other conventional forms of symmetry breaking in the proposed wave functions are checked by numerical calculations of the entanglement entropy and various correlation functions. Exponential decay of all correlation functions measured are strongly indicative of the energy gap for the putative parent Hamiltonian of the state. Our work provides the first explicit realization of a featureless quantum state for spin-1/2 particles on a honeycomb lattice.

  8. Topological hardcore bosons on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a connection between the topological properties of hardcore bosons and that of magnons in quantum spin magnets. We utilize the Haldane-like hardcore bosons on the honeycomb lattice as an example. We show that this system maps to a spin-$1/2$ quantum XY model with a next-nearest-neighbour Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. We obtain the magnon excitations of the quantum spin model and compute the edge states, Berry curvature, thermal and spin Nernst conductivities. Due to the mapping from spin variables to bosons, the hardcore bosons possess the same nontrivial topological properties as those in quantum spin system. These results are important in the study of magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and they are also useful for understanding the control of ultracold bosonic quantum gases in honeycomb optical lattices, which is experimentally accessible.

  9. Nonlinear wave dynamics in honeycomb lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Bahat-Treidel, Omri; Segev, Mordechai

    2011-08-15

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of wave packets in honeycomb lattices and show that, in quasi-one-dimensional configurations, the waves propagating in the lattice can be separated into left-moving and right-moving waves, and any wave packet composed of only left (or only right) movers does not change its intensity structure in spite of the nonlinear evolution of its phase. We show that the propagation of a general wave packet can be described, within a good approximation, as a superposition of left- and right-moving self-similar (nonlinear) wave packets. Finally, we find that Klein tunneling is not suppressed by nonlinearity.

  10. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  11. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  12. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27541575

  13. Honeycomb optical lattices with harmonic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J. Kusk; Nygaard, N.

    2010-05-15

    We consider the fate of the Dirac points in the spectrum of a honeycomb optical lattice in the presence of a harmonic confining potential. By numerically solving the tight binding model, we calculate the density of states and find that the energy dependence can be understood from analytical arguments. In addition, we show that the density of states of the harmonically trapped lattice system can be understood by application of a local density approximation based on the density of states in the homogeneous lattice. The Dirac points are found to survive locally in the trap as evidenced by the local density of states. Furthermore, they give rise to a distinct spatial profile of a noninteracting Fermi gas.

  14. Interacting growth walk on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, S. L.; Sridhar, V.; Murthy, K. P. N.

    2003-03-01

    The interacting growth walk (IGW) is a kinetic algorithm proposed recently for generating long, lattice polymer configurations. The growth process in IGW is tuned by a parameter called the growth temperature TG=1/( kBβG). In this paper we consider IGW on a honeycomb lattice. We take the non-bonded nearest neighbour contact energy as ε=-1. We show that at βG=0, IGW algorithm generates a canonical ensemble of interacting self-avoiding walks at β= β̂(β G=0)= ln(2) . However for βG>0, IGW generates an ensemble of polymer configurations most of which are in equilibrium at β= β̂(β G) . The remaining ones are frozen in ‘non-equilibrium’ configurations.

  15. Dirac-like plasmons in Ag nanopillar honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Siying; Brenny, Benjamin; Hellstrom, Sondra; Coenen, Toon; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmons in honeycomb lattices of Ag nanoparticles exhibit Dirac-like band structures, similar to the electronic band structure of graphene. Full wave simulations for an infinite honeycomb lattice of silver nano-pillars reveal hybridization of localized plasmonic modes between two neighboring pillars and the consequent formation of bonding and anti-bonding modes that are energetically degenerate at Dirac points. Electromagnetic simulations reveal the existence of plasmonic edge states in finite width nanoribbons of the honeycomb nanoparticle lattice. Nanoscale architecture of the honeycomb lattice may provide a new way to control plasmon propagation by selective excitation of directional surface plasmon edge states without backscattering. Experimentally, we have utilized cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy to study angular emission patterns and construct band structures of the silver pillars in honeycomb lattices. In our initial CL measurement, silver pillars in honeycomb lattices, we have observed strong radiation patterns near the Brillouin zone edge, integrated over an interval of wavelength centered on the wavelength of the Dirac points.

  16. Topological states in multi-orbital HgTe honeycomb lattices

    PubMed Central

    Beugeling, W.; Kalesaki, E.; Delerue, C.; Niquet, Y.-M.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Smith, C. Morais

    2015-01-01

    Research on graphene has revealed remarkable phenomena arising in the honeycomb lattice. However, the quantum spin Hall effect predicted at the K point could not be observed in graphene and other honeycomb structures of light elements due to an insufficiently strong spin–orbit coupling. Here we show theoretically that 2D honeycomb lattices of HgTe can combine the effects of the honeycomb geometry and strong spin–orbit coupling. The conduction bands, experimentally accessible via doping, can be described by a tight-binding lattice model as in graphene, but including multi-orbital degrees of freedom and spin–orbit coupling. This results in very large topological gaps (up to 35 meV) and a flattened band detached from the others. Owing to this flat band and the sizable Coulomb interaction, honeycomb structures of HgTe constitute a promising platform for the observation of a fractional Chern insulator or a fractional quantum spin Hall phase. PMID:25754462

  17. Spin-orbital quantum liquid on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corboz, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    The symmetric Kugel-Khomskii can be seen as a minimal model describing the interactions between spin and orbital degrees of freedom in transition-metal oxides with orbital degeneracy, and it is equivalent to the SU(4) Heisenberg model of four-color fermionic atoms. We present simulation results for this model on various two-dimensional lattices obtained with infinite projected-entangled pair states (iPEPS), an efficient variational tensor-network ansatz for two dimensional wave functions in the thermodynamic limit. This approach can be seen as a two-dimensional generalization of matrix product states - the underlying ansatz of the density matrix renormalization group method. We find a rich variety of exotic phases: while on the square and checkerboard lattices the ground state exhibits dimer-Néel order and plaquette order, respectively, quantum fluctuations on the honeycomb lattice destroy any order, giving rise to a spin-orbital liquid. Our results are supported from flavor-wave theory and exact diagonalization. Furthermore, the properties of the spin-orbital liquid state on the honeycomb lattice are accurately accounted for by a projected variational wave-function based on the pi-flux state of fermions on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4-filling. In that state, correlations are algebraic because of the presence of a Dirac point at the Fermi level, suggesting that the ground state is an algebraic spin-orbital liquid. This model provides a good starting point to understand the recently discovered spin-orbital liquid behavior of Ba3CuSb2O9. The present results also suggest to choose optical lattices with honeycomb geometry in the search for quantum liquids in ultra-cold four-color fermionic atoms. We acknowledge the financial support from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  18. Geometric Frustration of Colloidal Dimers on a Honeycomb Magnetic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierno, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    We study the phase behavior and the collective dynamics of interacting paramagnetic colloids assembled above a honeycomb lattice of triangular shaped magnetic minima. A frustrated colloidal molecular crystal is realized when filling these potential minima with exactly two particles per pinning site. External in-plane rotating fields are used to anneal the system into different phases, including long range ordered stripes, random fully packed loops, labyrinth and disordered states. At a higher amplitude of the annealing field, the dimer lattice displays a two-step melting transition where the initially immobile dimers perform first localized rotations and later break up by exchanging particles across consecutive lattice minima.

  19. Programming Self-Assembly of DNA Origami Honeycomb Two-Dimensional Lattices and Plasmonic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Gaitanaros, Stavros; Lee, Seungwoo; Bathe, Mark; Shih, William M; Ke, Yonggang

    2016-06-22

    Scaffolded DNA origami has proven to be a versatile method for generating functional nanostructures with prescribed sub-100 nm shapes. Programming DNA-origami tiles to form large-scale 2D lattices that span hundreds of nanometers to the micrometer scale could provide an enabling platform for diverse applications ranging from metamaterials to surface-based biophysical assays. Toward this end, here we design a family of hexagonal DNA-origami tiles using computer-aided design and demonstrate successful self-assembly of micrometer-scale 2D honeycomb lattices and tubes by controlling their geometric and mechanical properties including their interconnecting strands. Our results offer insight into programmed self-assembly of low-defect supra-molecular DNA-origami 2D lattices and tubes. In addition, we demonstrate that these DNA-origami hexagon tiles and honeycomb lattices are versatile platforms for assembling optical metamaterials via programmable spatial arrangement of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into cluster and superlattice geometries. PMID:27224641

  20. Programming Self-Assembly of DNA Origami Honeycomb Two-Dimensional Lattices and Plasmonic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Gaitanaros, Stavros; Lee, Seungwoo; Bathe, Mark; Shih, William M; Ke, Yonggang

    2016-06-22

    Scaffolded DNA origami has proven to be a versatile method for generating functional nanostructures with prescribed sub-100 nm shapes. Programming DNA-origami tiles to form large-scale 2D lattices that span hundreds of nanometers to the micrometer scale could provide an enabling platform for diverse applications ranging from metamaterials to surface-based biophysical assays. Toward this end, here we design a family of hexagonal DNA-origami tiles using computer-aided design and demonstrate successful self-assembly of micrometer-scale 2D honeycomb lattices and tubes by controlling their geometric and mechanical properties including their interconnecting strands. Our results offer insight into programmed self-assembly of low-defect supra-molecular DNA-origami 2D lattices and tubes. In addition, we demonstrate that these DNA-origami hexagon tiles and honeycomb lattices are versatile platforms for assembling optical metamaterials via programmable spatial arrangement of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into cluster and superlattice geometries.

  1. 2D photonic crystals on the Archimedean lattices (tribute to Johannes Kepler (1571 1630))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajić, R.; class="cross-out">D. Jovanović,

    2008-03-01

    Results of our research on 2D Archemedean lattice photonic crystals are presented. This involves the calculations of the band structures, band-gap maps, equifrequency contours and FDTD simulations of electromagnetic propagation through the structures as well as an experimental verification of negative refraction at microwaves. The band-gap dependence on dielectric contrast is established both for dielectric rods in air and air-holes in dielectric materials. A special emphasis is placed on possibilities of negative refraction and left-handedness in these structures. Together with the familiar Archimedean lattices like square, triangular, honeycomb and Kagome' ones, we consider also, the less known, (3 2, 4, 3, 4) (ladybug) and (3, 4, 6, 4) (honeycomb-ring) structures.

  2. Topological phases and phase transitions on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan; Li, Xiaobing; Xing, Dingyu

    2016-10-01

    We investigate possible phase transitions among the different topological insulators in a honeycomb lattice under the combined influence of spin-orbit couplings and staggered magnetic flux. We observe a series of topological phase transitions when tuning the flux amplitude, and find topologically nontrivial phases with high Chern number or spin-Chern number. Through tuning the exchange field, we also find a new quantum state which exhibits the electronic properties of both the quantum spin Hall state and quantum anomalous Hall state. The topological characterization based on the Chern number and the spin-Chern number are in good agreement with the edge-state picture of various topological phases.

  3. Artificial honeycomb lattices for electrons, atoms and photons.

    PubMed

    Polini, Marco; Guinea, Francisco; Lewenstein, Maciej; Manoharan, Hari C; Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    Artificial honeycomb lattices offer a tunable platform for studying massless Dirac quasiparticles and their topological and correlated phases. Here we review recent progress in the design and fabrication of such synthetic structures focusing on nanopatterning of two-dimensional electron gases in semiconductors, molecule-by-molecule assembly by scanning probe methods and optical trapping of ultracold atoms in crystals of light. We also discuss photonic crystals with Dirac cone dispersion and topologically protected edge states. We emphasize how the interplay between single-particle band-structure engineering and cooperative effects leads to spectacular manifestations in tunnelling and optical spectroscopies.

  4. Hidden symmetry and protection of Dirac points on the honeycomb lattice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing-Min; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice possesses a novel energy band structure, which is characterized by two distinct Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, dominating most of the physical properties of the honeycomb structure materials. However, up till now, the origin of the Dirac points is unclear yet. Here, we discover a hidden symmetry on the honeycomb lattice and prove that the existence of Dirac points is exactly protected by such hidden symmetry. Furthermore, the moving and merging of the Dirac points and a quantum phase transition, which have been theoretically predicted and experimentally observed on the honeycomb lattice, can also be perfectly explained by the parameter dependent evolution of the hidden symmetry. PMID:26639178

  5. Chiral bosonic phases on the Haldane honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasić, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments in ultracold atoms and photonic analogs have reported the implementation of artificial gauge fields in lattice systems, facilitating the realization of topological phases. Motivated by such advances, we investigate the Haldane honeycomb lattice tight-binding model, for bosons with local interactions at the average filling of one boson per site. We analyze the ground-state phase diagram and uncover three distinct phases: a uniform superfluid (SF), a chiral superfluid (CSF), and a plaquette Mott insulator with local current loops (PMI). Nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor currents distinguish CSF from SF, and the phase transition between them is first order. We apply bosonic dynamical mean-field theory and exact diagonalization to obtain the phase diagram, complementing numerics with calculations of excitation spectra in strong and weak coupling perturbation theory. The characteristic density fluctuations, current correlation functions, and excitation spectra are measurable in ultracold atom experiments.

  6. Topological features of engineered arrays of adsorbates in honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Arraga, Luis A.; Lado, J. L.; Guinea, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen adatoms are one of the most the promising proposals for the functionalization of graphene. The adatoms induce narrow resonances near the Dirac energy, which lead to the formation of magnetic moments. Furthermore, they also create local lattice distortions which enhance the spin-orbit coupling. The combination of magnetism and spin-orbit coupling allows for a rich variety of phases, some of which have non-trivial topological features. We analyze the interplay between magnetism and spin-orbit coupling in ordered arrays of adsorbates on honeycomb lattice monolayers, and classify the different phases that may arise. We extend our model to consider arrays of adsorbates in graphene-like crystals with stronger intrinsic spin-orbit couplings. We also consider a regime away from half-filling in which the Fermi level is at the bottom of the conduction band, we find a Berry curvature distribution corresponding to a Valley-Hall effect.

  7. Coulomb correlations in the honeycomb lattice: Role of translation symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Ansgar; Wu, Wei

    2013-05-01

    The effect of Coulomb correlations in the half-filled Hubbard model of the honeycomb lattice is studied within the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) combined with exact diagonalization (ED) and continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), for unit cells consisting of six-site rings. The important difference between this approach and the previously employed cluster dynamical mean-field theory (CDMFT) is that DCA preserves the translation symmetry of the system, while CDMFT violates this symmetry. As the Dirac cones of the honeycomb lattice are the consequence of perfect long-range order, DCA yields semimetallic behavior at small on-site Coulomb interactions U, whereas CDMFT gives rise to a spurious excitation gap even for very small U. This basic difference between the two cluster approaches is found regardless of whether ED or QMC is used as the impurity solver. At larger values of U, the lack of translation symmetry becomes less important, so that the CDMFT reveals a Mott gap, in qualitative agreement with large-scale QMC calculations. In contrast, the semimetallic phase obtained in DCA persists even at U values where CDMFT and large-scale QMC consistently show Mott-insulating behavior.

  8. Topological insulator states in a honeycomb lattice of s-triazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aizhu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2014-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) graphitic carbon nitride materials have been drawing increasing attentions in energy conversion, environment protection and spintronic devices. Here, based on first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the already-synthesized honeycomb lattice of s-triazines with a chemical formula of C6N6 (g-C6N6) has topologically nontrivial electronic states characterized by px,y-orbital band structures with a topological invariant of Z2 = 1, and stronger spin-orbital coupling (SOC) than both graphene and silicene. The band gaps opened in the px,y-orbital bands due to SOC are 5.50 meV (K points) and 8.27 eV (Γ point), respectively, implying that the quantum spin Hall effect (QSHE) could be achieved in this 2D graphitic carbon nitride material at a temperature lower than 95 K. This offers a viable approach for searching for 2D Topological Insulators (TIs) in metal-free organic materials.Two-dimensional (2D) graphitic carbon nitride materials have been drawing increasing attentions in energy conversion, environment protection and spintronic devices. Here, based on first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the already-synthesized honeycomb lattice of s-triazines with a chemical formula of C6N6 (g-C6N6) has topologically nontrivial electronic states characterized by px,y-orbital band structures with a topological invariant of Z2 = 1, and stronger spin-orbital coupling (SOC) than both graphene and silicene. The band gaps opened in the px,y-orbital bands due to SOC are 5.50 meV (K points) and 8.27 eV (Γ point), respectively, implying that the quantum spin Hall effect (QSHE) could be achieved in this 2D graphitic carbon nitride material at a temperature lower than 95 K. This offers a viable approach for searching for 2D Topological Insulators (TIs) in metal-free organic materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A ruby model and the relevant tight-binding Hamiltonian, parity tables for the g-C6N6 lattice and the

  9. Quenched dynamics of superconducting Dirac fermions on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming; Xie, X. C.; X. C. Xie's group Team

    We study the BCS paring dynamics for the superconducting Dirac fermions on honeycomb lattice after a sudden quench of pairing strength. We observe two distinct phases, one is the synchronized phase with undamped oscillations of paring amplitude; the other phase has the paring amplitude oscillates from positive to negative. The exact phase transition point is given by investigating the integrability of the system. Different from the previous work on normal superconducting fermions, which has three distinct phases, our results shows the absence of the Landau damped phase and over damped phase. Moreover, we present a linear analysis in the weakly quenched regime, showing that in a rather long time scale, the dynamics can be approximated as the periodic oscillation with 2Δ∞ angular frequency along with the logarithmic decay of the pairing amplitude, in contrast of the t - 1 / 2 decay for the normal fermions, namely the Landau damped phase. The presenter's advisor.

  10. Discrete solitons and vortices in anisotropic hexagonal and honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoq, Q. E.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Bishop, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, we consider the self-focusing discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation on hexagonal and honeycomb lattice geometries. Our emphasis is on the study of the effects of anisotropy, motivated by the tunability afforded in recent optical and atomic physics experiments. We find that multi-soliton and discrete vortex states undergo destabilizing bifurcations as the relevant anisotropy control parameter is varied. We quantify these bifurcations by means of explicit analytical calculations of the solutions, as well as of their spectral linearization eigenvalues. Finally, we corroborate the relevant stability picture through direct numerical computations. In the latter, we observe the prototypical manifestation of these instabilities to be the spontaneous rearrangement of the solution, for larger values of the coupling, into localized waveforms typically centered over fewer sites than the original unstable structure. For weak coupling, the instability appears to result in a robust breathing of the relevant waveforms.

  11. Chiral Bosonic Phases on the Haldane Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasic, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter; Collaboration Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by its recent realization in an ultracold atom experiment, we investigate the honeycomb lattice tight-binding model introduced by Haldane, for bosons with local interactions at the average filling of one boson per site. We uncover in the ground state phase diagram three phases: a uniform superfluid (SF), a chiral superfluid (CSF) and a plaquette Mott insulator with local current loops (PMI). Nearest-neighbor and next-nearest neighbor currents distinguish CSF from SF, and the phase transition between them is first order. We apply bosonic dynamical mean field theory and exact diagonalization to obtain the zero temperature phase diagram, complementing numerics with calculations of excitation spectra in strong and weak coupling perturbation theory. Furthermore, we explore the possibility of chiral Mott insulating phases at the average filling of one boson every two sites. The characteristic density fluctuations, current correlation functions, and excitation spectra are measurable in ultracold atom experiments.

  12. Possible singlet and triplet superconductivity on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Long-Yun; Yu, Shun-Li; Wang, Wei; Yao, Zi-Jian; Li, Jian-Xin

    2016-07-01

    We study the possible superconducting pairing symmetry mediated by spin and charge fluctuations on the honeycomb lattice using the extended Hubbard model and the random-phase-approximation method. From 2% to 20% doping levels, a spin-singlet dx2-y2+idxy -wave is shown to be the leading superconducting pairing symmetry when only the on-site Coulomb interaction U is considered, with the gap function being a mixture of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor pairings. When the offset of the energy level between the two sublattices exceeds a critical value, the most favorable pairing is a spin-triplet f-wave which is mainly composed of the next-nearest-neighbor pairing. We show that the next-nearest-neighbor Coulomb interaction V is also in favor of the spin-triplet f-wave pairing.

  13. Classical Spin Liquid on the Maximally Frustrated Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, J.; Sen, Arnab; Damle, Kedar; Moessner, R.

    2016-10-01

    We show that the honeycomb Heisenberg antiferromagnet with J1/2 =J2=J3, where J1 , J2 , and J3 are first-, second-, and third-neighbor couplings, respectively, forms a classical spin liquid with pinch-point singularities in the structure factor at the Brillouin zone corners. Upon dilution with nonmagnetic ions, fractionalized degrees of freedom carrying 1 /3 of the free moment emerge. Their effective description in the limit of low temperature is that of spins randomly located on a triangular lattice, with a frustrated sublattice-sensitive interaction of long-ranged logarithmic form. The X Y version of this magnet exhibits nematic thermal order by disorder. This comes with a clear experimental diagnostic in neutron scattering, which turns out to apply also to the case of the celebrated planar order by disorder of the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

  14. Discrete solitons and vortices in anisotropic hexagonal and honeycomb lattices

    DOE PAGES

    Hoq, Q. E.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Bishop, A. R.

    2016-01-14

    We consider the self-focusing discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation on hexagonal and honeycomb lattice geometries. Our emphasis is on the study of the effects of anisotropy, motivated by the tunability afforded in recent optical and atomic physics experiments. We find that multi-soliton and discrete vortex states undergo destabilizing bifurcations as the relevant anisotropy control parameter is varied. Furthermore, we quantify these bifurcations by means of explicit analytical calculations of the solutions, as well as of their spectral linearization eigenvalues. Finally, we corroborate the relevant stability picture through direct numerical computations. In the latter, we observe the prototypical manifestation of these instabilitiesmore » to be the spontaneous rearrangement of the solution, for larger values of the coupling, into localized waveforms typically centered over fewer sites than the original unstable structure. In weak coupling, the instability appears to result in a robust breathing of the relevant waveforms.« less

  15. Monomer-dimer problem on random planar honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haizhen; Zhang, Fuji; Qian, Jianguo

    2014-02-15

    We consider the monomer-dimer (MD) problem on a random planar honeycomb lattice model, namely, the random multiple chain. This is a lattice system with non-periodic boundary condition, whose generating process is inspired by the growth of single walled zigzag carbon nanotubes. By applying algebraic and combinatorial techniques we establish a calculating expression of the MD partition function for bipartite graphs, which corresponds to the permanent of a matrix. Further, by using the transfer matrix argument we show that the computing problem of the permanent of high order matrix can be converted into some lower order matrices for this family of lattices, based on which we derive an explicit recurrence formula for evaluating the MD partition function of multiple chains and random multiple chains. Finally, we analyze the expectation of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements on a random multiple chain and the asymptotic behavior of the annealed MD entropy when the multiple chain becomes infinite in width and length, respectively.

  16. Antiferromagnetism and Kondo screening on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Hong-Shuai, Tao; Guo, Wen-Xiang; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic adatoms in the honeycomb lattice have received tremendous attention due to the interplay between Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction and Kondo coupling leading to very rich physics. Here we study the competition between the antiferromagnetism and Kondo screening of local moments by the conduction electrons on the honeycomb lattice using the determinant quantum Monte Carlo method. While changing the interband hybridization V, we systematically investigate the antiferromagnetic-order state and the Kondo singlet state transition, which is characterized by the behavior of the local moment, antiferromagnetic structure factor, and the short range spin-spin correlation. The evolution of the single particle spectrum are also calculated as a function of hybridization V, we find that the system presents a small gap in the antiferromagnetic-order region and a large gap in the Kondo singlet region in the Fermi level. We also find that the localized and itinerant electrons coupling leads to the midgap states in the conduction band in the Fermi level at very small V. Moreover, the formation of antiferromagnetic order and Kondo singlet are studied as on-site interaction U or temperature T increasing, we have derived the phase diagrams at on-site interaction U (or temperature T) and hybridization V plane. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 2011CB921502 and 2012CB821305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 61227902, 61378017, and 11434015), the State Key Laboratory for Quantum Optics and Quantum Optical Devices, China (Grant No. KF201403).

  17. Magnetic Properties of Restacked 2D Spin 1/2 honeycomb RuCl3 Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel; Schoop, Leslie M; Duppel, Viola; Lippmann, Judith M; Nuss, Jürgen; Lotsch, Bettina V

    2016-06-01

    Spin 1/2 honeycomb materials have gained substantial interest due to their exotic magnetism and possible application in quantum computing. However, in all current materials out-of-plane interactions are interfering with the in-plane order, hence a true 2D magnetic honeycomb system is still in demand. Here, we report the exfoliation of the magnetic semiconductor α-RuCl3 into the first halide monolayers and the magnetic characterization of the spin 1/2 honeycomb arrangement of turbostratically stacked RuCl3 monolayers. The exfoliation is based on a reductive lithiation/hydration approach, which gives rise to a loss of cooperative magnetism due to the disruption of the spin 1/2 state by electron injection into the layers. The restacked, macroscopic pellets of RuCl3 layers lack symmetry along the stacking direction. After an oxidative treatment, cooperative magnetism similar to the bulk is restored. The oxidized pellets of restacked single layers feature a magnetic transition at TN = 7 K if the field is aligned parallel to the ab-plane, while the magnetic properties differ from bulk α-RuCl3 if the field is aligned perpendicular to the ab-plane. The deliberate introduction of turbostratic disorder to manipulate the magnetic properties of RuCl3 is of interest for research in frustrated magnetism and complex magnetic order as predicted by the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. PMID:27176463

  18. Magnetic Properties of Restacked 2D Spin 1/2 honeycomb RuCl3 Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel; Schoop, Leslie M; Duppel, Viola; Lippmann, Judith M; Nuss, Jürgen; Lotsch, Bettina V

    2016-06-01

    Spin 1/2 honeycomb materials have gained substantial interest due to their exotic magnetism and possible application in quantum computing. However, in all current materials out-of-plane interactions are interfering with the in-plane order, hence a true 2D magnetic honeycomb system is still in demand. Here, we report the exfoliation of the magnetic semiconductor α-RuCl3 into the first halide monolayers and the magnetic characterization of the spin 1/2 honeycomb arrangement of turbostratically stacked RuCl3 monolayers. The exfoliation is based on a reductive lithiation/hydration approach, which gives rise to a loss of cooperative magnetism due to the disruption of the spin 1/2 state by electron injection into the layers. The restacked, macroscopic pellets of RuCl3 layers lack symmetry along the stacking direction. After an oxidative treatment, cooperative magnetism similar to the bulk is restored. The oxidized pellets of restacked single layers feature a magnetic transition at TN = 7 K if the field is aligned parallel to the ab-plane, while the magnetic properties differ from bulk α-RuCl3 if the field is aligned perpendicular to the ab-plane. The deliberate introduction of turbostratic disorder to manipulate the magnetic properties of RuCl3 is of interest for research in frustrated magnetism and complex magnetic order as predicted by the Kitaev-Heisenberg model.

  19. Magnetic Properties of Restacked 2D Spin 1/2 honeycomb RuCl3Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Daniel; Schoop, Leslie M.; Duppel, Viola; Lippmann, Judith M.; Nuss, Jürgen; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2016-06-01

    Spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ honeycomb materials have gained substantial interest due to their exotic magnetism and possible application in quantum computing. However, in all current materials out-of-plane interactions are interfering with the in-plane order, hence a true 2D magnetic honeycomb system is still of demand. Here, we report the exfoliation of the magnetic semiconductor $\\alpha$-RuCl$_3$ into the first halide monolayers and the magnetic characterization of the spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ honeycomb arrangement of turbostratically stacked RuCl$_3$ monolayers. The exfoliation is based on a reductive lithiation/hydration approach, which gives rise to a loss of cooperative magnetism due to the disruption of the spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ state by electron injection into the layers. After an oxidative treatment, cooperative magnetism similar to the bulk is restored. The oxidized pellets of restacked single layers feature a magnetic transition at T$_N$ = 7 K in the in-plane direction, while the magnetic properties in the out-of-plane direction vastly differ from bulk $\\alpha$-RuCl$_3$. The macroscopic pellets of RuCl$_3$ therefore behave like a stack of monolayers without any symmetry relation in the stacking direction. The deliberate introduction of turbostratic disorder to manipulate the spin structure of RuCl$_3$ is of interest for research in frustrated magnetism and complex magnetic order as predicted by the Kitaev-Heisenberg model.

  20. Short-Range Correlations and Cooling of Ultracold Fermions in the Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baoming; Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos

    2012-11-01

    We use determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations and numerical linked-cluster expansions to study thermodynamic properties and short-range spin correlations of fermions in the honeycomb lattice. We find that, at half filling and finite temperatures, nearest-neighbor spin correlations can be stronger in this lattice than in the square lattice, even in regimes where the ground state in the former is a semimetal or a spin liquid. The honeycomb lattice also exhibits a more pronounced anomalous region in the double occupancy that leads to stronger adiabatic cooling than in the square lattice. We discuss the implications of these findings for optical lattice experiments.

  1. Vacancy-Assisted Diffusion in a Honeycomb Lattice and in a Diamond Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yohichi; Kitahara, Kazuo; Fujitani, Youhei; Kinouchi, Sumie

    2002-12-01

    Vacancy-assisted diffusion in a crystalline solid can be modeled by means of many particles jumping stochastically to their respective nearest-neighbor lattice-sites with double occupancy forbidden. The diffusion coefficient of a tagged particle, defined in terms of its mean square displacement, depends not only on the transition rate but also on the particle concentration. Nakazato and Kitahara [Prog. Theor. Phys. 64 (1980) 2261] devised a projection operator method to calculate its approximate expression interpolating between the low- and high-concentration limits for a square lattice in any dimension. In this paper, we apply their method to a honeycomb lattice and a diamond lattice, in each of which a set of the nearest-neighbor vectors depends on a site from which they originate. Compared with simulation results, our explicit expression is found to give a good interpolation in each lattice unless the host particles migrate more slowly than the tagged particle.

  2. Majorana edge modes in Kitaev model on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakurathi, Manisha; Sengupta, Krishnendu; Sen, Diptiman

    2015-03-01

    We study the Majorana modes, both equilibrium and Floquet, which can appear at the edges of the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice. We first present the analytical solutions known for the equilibrium Majorana edge modes for both zigzag and armchair edges of a semi-infinite Kitaev model and chart the parameter regimes of the model in which they appear. We then examine how edge modes can be generated if the Kitaev coupling on the bonds perpendicular to the edge is varied periodically in time as periodic δ-function kicks. We derive a general condition for the appearance and disappearance of the Floquet edge modes as a function of the drive frequency for a generic d-dimensional integrable system. We confirm this general condition for the Kitaev model with a finite width by mapping it to a one-dimensional model. Our numerical and analytical study of this problem shows that Floquet Majorana modes can appear on some edges in the kicked system even when the corresponding equilibrium Hamiltonian has no Majorana mode solutions on those edges. We support our analytical studies by numerics for finite sized system which show that periodic kicks can generate modes at the edges and the corners of the lattice. We thank CSIR, India and DST, India for financial support.

  3. A continuum of compass spin models on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Quantum spin models with spatially dependent interactions, known as compass models, play an important role in the study of frustrated quantum magnetism. One example is the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice with spin-liquid (SL) ground states and anyonic excitations. Another example is the geometrically frustrated quantum 120° model on the same lattice whose ground state has not been unambiguously established. To generalize the Kitaev model beyond the exactly solvable limit and connect it with other compass models, we propose a new model, dubbed ‘the tripod model’, which contains a continuum of compass-type models. It smoothly interpolates the Ising model, the Kitaev model, and the quantum 120° model by tuning a single parameter {θ }\\prime , the angle between the three legs of a tripod in the spin space. Hence it not only unifies three paradigmatic spin models, but also enables the study of their quantum phase transitions. We obtain the phase diagram of the tripod model numerically by tensor networks in the thermodynamic limit. We show that the ground state of the quantum 120° model has long-range dimer order. Moreover, we find an extended spin-disordered (SL) phase between the dimer phase and an antiferromagnetic phase. The unification and solution of a continuum of frustrated spin models as outline here may be useful to exploring new domains of other quantum spin or orbital models.

  4. Generating and moving Dirac points in a two-dimensional deformed honeycomb lattice arrayed by coupled semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Juan Duan, Yifeng; Chen, PeiJian; Peng, Yan

    2015-03-15

    Analysis of the electronic properties of a two-dimensional (2D) deformed honeycomb structure arrayed by semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is conducted theoretically by using tight-binding method in the present paper. Through the compressive or tensile deformation of the honeycomb lattice, the variation of energy spectrum has been explored. We show that, the massless Dirac fermions are generated in this adjustable system and the positions of the Dirac cones as well as slope of the linear dispersions could be manipulated. Furthermore, a clear linear correspondence between the distance of movement d (the distance from the Dirac points to the Brillouin zone corners) and the tunable bond angle α of the lattice are found in this artificial planar QD structure. These results provide the theoretical basis for manipulating Dirac fermions and should be very helpful for the fabrication and application of high-mobility semiconductor QD devices.

  5. Competing pairing channels in the doped honeycomb lattice Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao Yan; Wessel, Stefan; Meng, Zi Yang

    2016-09-01

    Proposals for superconductivity emerging from correlated electrons in the doped Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice range from chiral d +i d singlet to p +i p triplet pairing, depending on the considered range of doping and interaction strength, as well as the approach used to analyze the pairing instabilities. Here, we consider these scenarios using large-scale dynamic cluster approximation (DCA) calculations to examine the evolution in the leading pairing symmetry from weak to intermediate coupling strength. These calculations focus on doping levels around the van Hove singularity (VHS) and are performed using DCA simulations with an interaction-expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo cluster solver. We calculated explicitly the temperature dependence of different uniform superconducting pairing susceptibilities and found a consistent picture emerging upon gradually increasing the cluster size: while at weak coupling the d +i d singlet pairing dominates close to the VHS filling, an enhanced tendency towards p -wave triplet pairing upon further increasing the interaction strength is observed. The relevance of these systematic results for existing proposals and ongoing pursuits of odd-parity topological superconductivity are also discussed.

  6. A continuum of compass spin models on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Quantum spin models with spatially dependent interactions, known as compass models, play an important role in the study of frustrated quantum magnetism. One example is the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice with spin-liquid ground states. Another example is the geometrically frustrated quantum 120° model whose ground state has not been unambiguously established. To generalize the Kitaev model beyond the exactly solvable limit and connect it with other models, we propose a new model, dubbed ``the tripod model,'' which contains a continuum of compass-type models. It not only unifies paradigmatic spin models, but also enables the study of their quantum phase transitions. We obtain the phase diagram of the tripod model numerically by tensor networks in the thermodynamic limit. We show that the ground state of the quantum 120° model has long-range dimer order. Moreover, we find an extended spin-disordered (spin-liquid) phase between the dimer phase and an antiferromagnetic phase. The unification and solution of a continuum of frustrated spin models as outline here may be useful to exploring new domains of other quantum spin or orbital models.

  7. Correlated Dirac particles and superconductivity on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Scherer, Michael M.; Honerkamp, Carsten; Le Hur, Karyn

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the properties of the nearest-neighbor singlet pairing and the emergence of d-wave superconductivity in the doped honeycomb lattice considering the limit of large interactions and the t-J1-J2 model. First, by applying a renormalized mean-field procedure as well as slave-boson theories which account for the proximity to the Mott-insulating state, we confirm the emergence of d-wave superconductivity, in agreement with earlier works. We show that a small but finite J2 spin coupling between next-nearest neighbors stabilizes d-wave symmetry compared to the extendeds-wave scenario. At small hole doping, to minimize the energy and to gap the whole Fermi surface or all the Dirac points, the superconducting ground state is characterized by a d+id singlet pairing assigned to one valley and a d-id singlet pairing to the other, which then preserves time-reversal symmetry. The slightly doped situation is distinct from the heavily doped case (around 3/8 and 5/8 filling) supporting a pure chiral d+id symmetry and breaking time-reversal symmetry. Then, we apply the functional renormalization group and study in more detail the competition between antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in the vicinity of half filling. We discuss possible applications to strongly correlated compounds with copper hexagonal planes such as In3Cu2VO9. Our findings are also relevant to the understanding of exotic superfluidity with cold atoms.

  8. Beam-Plasma Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrkos, S.; Kalman, G. J.; Rosenberg, M.

    2009-06-05

    We consider a 2D Yukawa lattice of grains, with a beam of other charged grains moving in the lattice plane. In contrast to Vlasov plasmas, where the electrostatic instability excited by the beam is only longitudinal, here both longitudinal and transverse instabilities of the lattice phonons can develop. We determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The growth rate spectrum in wave number space exhibits remarkable gaps where no instability can develop. Depending on the system parameters, the transverse instability can be selectively excited.

  9. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  10. High precision determination of the low-energy constants for the two-dimensional quantum Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The low-energy constants, namely the staggered magnetization density M˜ s per spin, the spin stiffness ρ s , and the spinwave velocity c of the two-dimensional (2-d) spin-1/2 Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice are calculated using first principles Monte Carlo method. The spinwave velocity c is determined first through the winding numbers squared. M˜ s and ρ s are then obtained by employing the relevant volume- and temperature-dependence predictions from magnon chiral perturbation theory. The periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) implemented in our simulations lead to a honeycomb lattice covering both a rectangular and a parallelogram-shaped region. Remarkably, by appropriately utilizing the predictions of magnon chiral perturbation theory, the numerical values of M˜ s , ρ s , and c we obtain for both the considered periodic honeycomb lattice of different geometries are consistent with each other quantitatively. The numerical accuracy reached here is greatly improved. Specifically, by simulating the 2-d quantum Heisenberg model on the periodic honeycomb lattice overlaying a rectangular area, we arrive at M˜ s = 0.26882(3), ρ s = 0.1012(2) J, and c = 1.2905(8) Ja. The results we obtain provide a useful lesson for some studies such as simulating fermion actions on hyperdiamond lattice and investigating second order phase transitions with twisted boundary conditions.

  11. Breaking inversion symmetry in a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: artificial graphene with tunable band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Staarmann, C.; Ölschläger, C.; Simonet, J.; Sengstock, K.

    2016-06-01

    Here, we present the application of a novel method for controlling the geometry of a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: the energy offset between the two sublattices of the honeycomb structure can be adjusted by rotating the atomic quantization axis. This enables us to continuously tune between a homogeneous graphene-like honeycomb lattice and a triangular lattice and to open an energy gap at the characteristic Dirac points. We probe the symmetry of the lattice with microwave spectroscopy techniques and investigate the behavior of atoms excited to the second energy band. We find a striking influence of the energy gap at the Dirac cones onto the lifetimes of bosonic atoms in the excited band.

  12. Emergent Honeycomb Lattice in LiZn2Mo3O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Rebecca; Lee, Patrick A.

    2013-11-01

    We introduce the idea of emergent lattices, where a simple lattice decouples into two weakly coupled lattices as a way to stabilize spin liquids. In LiZn2Mo3O8, the disappearance of 2/3 of the spins at low temperatures suggests that its triangular lattice decouples into an emergent honeycomb lattice weakly coupled to the remaining spins, and we suggest several ways to test this proposal. We show that these orphan spins act to stabilize the spin liquid in the J1-J2 honeycomb model and also discuss a possible 3D analogue, Ba2MoYO6 that may form a “depleted fcc lattice.”

  13. Existence of featureless paramagnets on the square and the honeycomb lattices in 2+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Chao-Ming; Zaletel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The peculiar features of quantum magnetism sometimes forbid the existence of gapped "featureless" paramagnets which are fully symmetric and unfractionalized. The Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem is an example of such a constraint, but it is not known what the most general restriction might be. We focus on the existence of featureless paramagnets on the spin-1 square lattice and the spin-1 and spin-1/2 honeycomb lattice with spin rotation and space group symmetries in 2+1 dimensions. Although featureless paramagnet phases are not ruled out by any existing theorem, field theoretic arguments disfavor their existence. Nevertheless, by generalizing the construction of Affleck, Kennedy, Lieb, and Tasaki to a class we call "slave-spin" states, we propose featureless wave functions for these models. The featurelessness of the spin-1 slave-spin states on the square and honeycomb lattice are verified both analytically and numerically, but the status of the spin-1/2 honeycomb state remains unclear.

  14. Bifurcations of edge states—topologically protected and non-protected—in continuous 2D honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, C. L.; Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Edge states are time-harmonic solutions to energy-conserving wave equations, which are propagating parallel to a line-defect or ‘edge’ and are localized transverse to it. This paper summarizes and extends the authors’ work on the bifurcation of topologically protected edge states in continuous two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures. We consider a family of Schrödinger Hamiltonians consisting of a bulk honeycomb potential and a perturbing edge potential. The edge potential interpolates between two different periodic structures via a domain wall. We begin by reviewing our recent bifurcation theory of edge states for continuous 2D honeycomb structures (http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06111). The topologically protected edge state bifurcation is seeded by the zero-energy eigenstate of a one-dimensional Dirac operator. We contrast these protected bifurcations with (more common) non-protected bifurcations from spectral band edges, which are induced by bound states of an effective Schrödinger operator. Numerical simulations for honeycomb structures of varying contrasts and ‘rational edges’ (zigzag, armchair and others), support the following scenario: (a) for low contrast, under a sign condition on a distinguished Fourier coefficient of the bulk honeycomb potential, there exist topologically protected edge states localized transverse to zigzag edges. Otherwise, and for general edges, we expect long lived edge quasi-modes which slowly leak energy into the bulk. (b) For an arbitrary rational edge, there is a threshold in the medium-contrast (depending on the choice of edge) above which there exist topologically protected edge states. In the special case of the armchair edge, there are two families of protected edge states; for each parallel quasimomentum (the quantum number associated with translation invariance) there are edge states which propagate in opposite directions along the armchair edge.

  15. Numerical calculations for Heisenberg ferromagnet on honeycomb lattice using Oguchi’s method

    SciTech Connect

    Mert, Gülistan; Mert, H. Şevki

    2015-03-10

    Magnetic properties such as the magnetization, internal energy and specific heat for Heisenberg ferromagnet with spin - 1/2 on honeycomb lattice are have been calculated using Oguchi’s method. We have found that the magnetic specific heat exhibits two peaks.

  16. β-Cu2V2O7 : A spin- (1)/(2) honeycomb lattice system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirlin, Alexander A.; Janson, Oleg; Rosner, Helge

    2010-10-01

    We report on band-structure calculations and a microscopic model of the low-dimensional magnet β-Cu2V2O7 . Magnetic properties of this compound can be described by a spin- (1)/(2) anisotropic honeycomb lattice model with the averaged coupling J¯1=60-66K . The low symmetry of the crystal structure leads to two inequivalent couplings J1 and J1' but this weak spatial anisotropy does not affect the essential physics of the honeycomb spin lattice. The structural realization of the honeycomb lattice is highly nontrivial: the leading interactions J1 and J1' run via double bridges of VO4 tetrahedra between spatially separated Cu atoms while the interactions between structural nearest neighbors are negligible. The non-negligible interplane coupling J⊥≃15K gives rise to the long-range magnetic ordering at TN≃26K . Our model simulations improve the fit of the magnetic susceptibility data, compared to the previously assumed spin-chain models. Additionally, the simulated ordering temperature of 27 K is in remarkable agreement with the experiment. Our study evaluates β-Cu2V2O7 as the best available experimental realization of the spin- (1)/(2) Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice. We also provide an instructive comparison of different band-structure codes and computational approaches to the evaluation of exchange couplings in magnetic insulators.

  17. An alternative order-parameter for non-equilibrium generalized spin models on honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Francisco; Henkel, Malte

    2016-04-01

    An alternative definition for the order-parameter is proposed, for a family of non-equilibrium spin models with up-down symmetry on honeycomb lattices, and which depends on two parameters. In contrast to the usual definition, our proposal takes into account that each site of the lattice can be associated with a local temperature which depends on the local environment of each site. Using the generalised voter motel as a test case, we analyse the phase diagram and the critical exponents in the stationary state and compare the results of the standard order-parameter with the ones following from our new proposal, on the honeycomb lattice. The stationary phase transition is in the Ising universality class. Finite-size corrections are also studied and the Wegner exponent is estimated as ω =1.06(9).

  18. Topological triple-vortex lattice stabilized by mixed frustration in expanded honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoyan; Dong, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    The expanded classical Kitaev-Heisenberg model on a honeycomb lattice is investigated with the next-nearest-neighboring Heisenberg interaction considered. The simulation shows a rich phase diagram with periodic behavior in a wide parameter range. Beside the double 120° ordered phase, an inhomogeneous phase is uncovered to exhibit a topological triple-vortex lattice, corresponding to the hexagonal domain structure of vector chirality, which is stabilized by the mixed frustration of two sources: the geometrical frustration arising from the lattice structure as well as the frustration from the Kitaev couplings. PMID:27229486

  19. Topological triple-vortex lattice stabilized by mixed frustration in expanded honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaoyan; Dong, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    The expanded classical Kitaev-Heisenberg model on a honeycomb lattice is investigated with the next-nearest-neighboring Heisenberg interaction considered. The simulation shows a rich phase diagram with periodic behavior in a wide parameter range. Beside the double 120° ordered phase, an inhomogeneous phase is uncovered to exhibit a topological triple-vortex lattice, corresponding to the hexagonal domain structure of vector chirality, which is stabilized by the mixed frustration of two sources: the geometrical frustration arising from the lattice structure as well as the frustration from the Kitaev couplings. PMID:27229486

  20. Nanostructured 2D Diporphyrin Honeycomb Film: Photoelectrochemistry, Photodegradation, and Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuewu; Shang, Qiuwei; Yu, Jiachao; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2015-06-10

    Surface patterns of well-defined nanostructures play important roles in fabrication of optoelectronic devices and applications in catalysis and biology. In this paper, the diporphyrin honeycomb film, composed of titanium dioxide, protoporphyrin IX, and hemin (TiO2/PPIX/Hem), was synthesized using a dewetting technique with the well-defined polystyrene (PS) monolayer as a template. The TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film exhibited a higher photoelectrochemical response than that of TiO2 or TiO2/PPIX, which implied a high photoelectric conversion efficiency and a synergistic effect between the two kinds of porphyrins. The TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film was also a good photosensitizer due to its ability to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) under irradiation by visible light. This led to the use of diporphyrin TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film for the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria. In addition, the photocatalytic activities of other metal-diporphyrin-based honeycomb films, such as TiO2/MnPPIX/Hem, TiO2/CoPPIX/Hem, TiO2/NiPPIX/Hem, TiO2/CuPPIX/Hem, and TiO2/ZnPPIX/Hem, were investigated. The result demonstrated that the photoelectric properties of diporphyrin-based film could be effectively enhanced by further coupling of porphyrin with metal ions. Such enhanced performance of diporphyrin compounds opened a new way for potential applications in various photoelectrochemical devices and medical fields. PMID:25992484

  1. Nanostructured 2D Diporphyrin Honeycomb Film: Photoelectrochemistry, Photodegradation, and Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuewu; Shang, Qiuwei; Yu, Jiachao; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2015-06-10

    Surface patterns of well-defined nanostructures play important roles in fabrication of optoelectronic devices and applications in catalysis and biology. In this paper, the diporphyrin honeycomb film, composed of titanium dioxide, protoporphyrin IX, and hemin (TiO2/PPIX/Hem), was synthesized using a dewetting technique with the well-defined polystyrene (PS) monolayer as a template. The TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film exhibited a higher photoelectrochemical response than that of TiO2 or TiO2/PPIX, which implied a high photoelectric conversion efficiency and a synergistic effect between the two kinds of porphyrins. The TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film was also a good photosensitizer due to its ability to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) under irradiation by visible light. This led to the use of diporphyrin TiO2/PPIX/Hem honeycomb film for the photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria. In addition, the photocatalytic activities of other metal-diporphyrin-based honeycomb films, such as TiO2/MnPPIX/Hem, TiO2/CoPPIX/Hem, TiO2/NiPPIX/Hem, TiO2/CuPPIX/Hem, and TiO2/ZnPPIX/Hem, were investigated. The result demonstrated that the photoelectric properties of diporphyrin-based film could be effectively enhanced by further coupling of porphyrin with metal ions. Such enhanced performance of diporphyrin compounds opened a new way for potential applications in various photoelectrochemical devices and medical fields.

  2. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal “artificial atoms” behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures.

  3. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal “artificial atoms” behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures. PMID:27076196

  4. On the equivalence of two vacancy models applied to the electronic spectrum of materials with honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrypnyk, Y. V.; Loktev, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of the tight-binding method, the Green's function for a material with honeycomb crystal lattice containing a vacancy was studied. Well-known and commonly used models for description of a single vacancy were considered, and their equivalence was analytically demonstrated. It was also shown that the contributions to the density of quasiparticle states from both sublattices of the honeycomb lattice are identical, except for zero energy, irrespective of which sublattice contains the vacancy.

  5. Bosons with Artificial Gauge Fields and Mott Physics on the Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidanovic, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2014-03-01

    We study bosons in the tight-binding model on the honeycomb lattice introduced by Haldane. We analyze the ground state topology and quasiparticle properties in the Mott phase by applying bosonic dynamical mean field theory, strong-coupling perturbation theory, exact diagonalization and numerical evaluations of sample Hall conductivity. The phase diagram also contains two different superfluid phases. The quasiparticle dynamics, number fluctuations, and local currents are measurable in cold atom experiments.

  6. Frustrated quantum antiferromagnet with third neighbor interactions and single ion anisotropy on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, A. S. T.

    2016-08-01

    I study the spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the two dimensional honeycomb lattice at zero temperature, with first J1, second J2 and third J3 neighbors exchange interactions and single ion easy plane anisotropy, using the SU(3) Schwinger boson formalism. The phase diagram is shown. The results show the existence of a region in the intermediate frustrated regime where the system does not have quantum magnetic order.

  7. Phononic band gap design in honeycomb lattice with combinations of auxetic and conventional core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushovan; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel design of a honeycomb lattice geometry that uses a seamless combination of conventional and auxetic cores, i.e. elements showing positive and negative Poisson’s ratio. The design is aimed at tuning and improving the band structure of periodic cellular structures. The proposed cellular configurations show a significantly wide band gap at much lower frequencies compared to their pure counterparts, while still retaining their major dynamic features. Different topologies involving both auxetic inclusions in a conventional lattice and conversely hexagonal cellular inclusions in auxetic butterfly lattices are presented. For all these cases the impact of the varying degree of auxeticity on the band structure is evaluated. The proposed cellular designs may offer significant advantages in tuning high-frequency bandgap behaviour, which is relevant to phononics applications. The configurations shown in this paper may be made iso-volumetric and iso-weight to a given regular hexagonal topology, making possible to adapt the hybrid lattices to existing sandwich structures with fixed dimensions and weights. This work also features a comparative study of the wave speeds corresponding to different configurations vis-a vis those of a regular honeycomb to highlight the superior behaviour of the combined hybrid lattice.

  8. Thermodynamics of the Hubbard model on stacked honeycomb and square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imriška, Jakub; Gull, Emanuel; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We present a numerical study of the Hubbard model on simply stacked honeycomb and square lattices, motivated by a recent experimental realization of such models with ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We perform simulations with different interlayer coupling and interaction strengths and obtain Néel transition temperatures and entropies. We provide data for the equation of state to enable comparisons of experiments and theory. We find an enhancement of the short-range correlations in the anisotropic lattices compared to the isotropic cubic lattice, in parameter regimes suitable for the interaction driven adiabatic cooling. Supplementary material in the form of one zip file available from the Jounal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70146-y

  9. Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki State on a Honeycomb Lattice from t(2g) Orbitals.

    PubMed

    Koch-Janusz, Maciej; Khomskii, D I; Sela, Eran

    2015-06-19

    The two-dimensional Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) model on a honeycomb lattice has been shown to be a universal resource for quantum computation. In this valence bond solid, however, the spin interactions involve higher powers of the Heisenberg coupling (S[over →](I)·S[over →](j))(n), making these states seemingly unrealistic on bipartite lattices, where one expects a simple antiferromagnetic order. We show that those interactions can be generated by orbital physics in multiorbital Mott insulators. We focus on t(2g) electrons on the honeycomb lattice and propose a physical realization of the spin-3/2 AKLT state. We find a phase transition from the AKLT to the Néel state on increasing Hund's rule coupling, which is confirmed by density matrix renormalization group simulations. An experimental signature of the AKLT state consists of protected, free S=1/2 spins on lattice vacancies, which may be detected in the spin susceptibility. PMID:26197004

  10. Intrinsic half-metallicity in fractal carbon nitride honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aizhu; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-14

    Fractals are natural phenomena that exhibit a repeating pattern "exactly the same at every scale or nearly the same at different scales". Defect-free molecular fractals were assembled successfully in a recent work [Shang et al., Nature Chem., 2015, 7, 389-393]. Here, we adopted the feature of a repeating pattern in searching two-dimensional (2D) materials with intrinsic half-metallicity and high stability that are desirable for spintronics applications. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the electronic properties of fractal frameworks of carbon nitrides have stable ferromagnetism accompanied by half-metallicity, which are highly dependent on the fractal structure. The ferromagnetism increases gradually with the increase of fractal order. The Curie temperature of these metal-free systems estimated from Monte Carlo simulations is considerably higher than room temperature. The stable ferromagnetism, intrinsic half-metallicity, and fractal characteristics of spin distribution in the carbon nitride frameworks open an avenue for the design of metal-free magnetic materials with exotic properties.

  11. Featureless and nonfractionalized Mott insulators on the honeycomb lattice at 1/2 site filling

    PubMed Central

    Kimchi, Itamar; Parameswaran, S. A.; Turner, Ari M.; Wang, Fa; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2013-01-01

    Within the Landau paradigm, phases of matter are distinguished by spontaneous symmetry breaking. Implicit here is the assumption that a completely symmetric state exists: a paramagnet. At zero temperature such quantum featureless insulators may be forbidden, triggering either conventional order or topological order with fractionalized excitations. Such is the case for interacting particles when the particle number per unit cell, f, is not an integer. However, can lattice symmetries forbid featureless insulators even at integer f? An especially relevant case is the honeycomb (graphene) lattice—where free spinless fermions at (the two sites per unit cell mean is half-filling per site) are always metallic. Here we present wave functions for bosons, and a related spin-singlet wave function for spinful electrons, on the honeycomb lattice and demonstrate via quantum to classical mappings that they do form featureless Mott insulators. The construction generalizes to symmorphic lattices at integer f in any dimension. Our results explicitly demonstrate that in this case, despite the absence of a noninteracting insulator at the same filling, lack of order at zero temperature does not imply fractionalization.

  12. Magnetic ordering of the buckled honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet Ba2NiTeO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Shinichiro; Soda, Minoru; Kasatani, Kazuhiro; Ono, Toshio; Avdeev, Maxim; Masuda, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic order of the buckled honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet Ba2NiTeO6 and its related antiferromagnet Ba3NiTa2O9 by neutron diffraction measurements. We observe magnetic Bragg peaks below the transition temperatures, and identify propagation vectors for these oxides. A combination of representation analysis and Rietveld refinement leads to a collinear magnetic order for Ba2NiTeO6 and a 120∘ structure for Ba3NiTa2O9 . We find that the spin model of the bilayer triangular lattice is equivalent to that of the two-dimensional buckled honeycomb lattice having magnetic frustration. We discuss the magnetic interactions and single-ion anisotropy of Ni+2 ions for Ba2NiTeO6 in order to clarify the origin of the collinear magnetic structures. Our calculation suggests that the collinear magnetic order of Ba2NiTeO6 is induced by the magnetic frustration and easy-axis anisotropy.

  13. Quantum phase diagram of a frustrated antiferromagnet on the bilayer honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Lamas, Carlos A.; Arlego, Marcelo; Brenig, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    We study the spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a bilayer honeycomb lattice including interlayer frustration. Using a set of complementary approaches, namely, Schwinger bosons, dimer series expansion, bond operators, and exact diagonalization, we map out the quantum phase diagram. Analyzing ground-state energies and elementary excitation spectra, we find four distinct phases, corresponding to three collinear magnetic long-range ordered states, and one quantum disordered interlayer dimer phase. We detail that the latter phase is adiabatically connected to an exact singlet product ground state of the bilayer, which exists along a line of maximum interlayer frustration. The order within the remaining three phases will be clarified.

  14. Tricritical behaviour of the frustrated Ising antiferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobák, A.; Lučivjanský, T.; Žukovič, M.; Borovský, M.; Balcerzak, T.

    2016-08-01

    We use the effective-field theory with correlations based on different cluster sizes to investigate phase diagrams of the frustrated Ising antiferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice with isotropic interactions of the strength J1 < 0 between nearest-neighbour pairs and J2 < 0 between next-nearest neighbour pairs of spins. We present results for the ground-state energy as a function of the frustration parameter R =J2 / |J1 |. We find that the cluster-size has a considerable effect on the existence and location of a tricritical point in the phase diagram at which the phase transition changes from the second order to the first one.

  15. Ferrimagnetism and single-particle excitations in a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiro; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Zhang, Qinfang; Li, Tao; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    By using the variationalcluster approximation and cluster perturbation theory, we investigate the magnetism and single-particle excitations of a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice as an effective model for the single-side hydrogenated graphene, namely, graphone. We calculate the magnetic moment as a function of U (Coulomb interaction on impurity sites) with showing that the ground state is ferrimagneticfor any U > 0. We then calculate the single-particle excitations and show that the single-particle excitations are gapless and exhibit quadratic dispersion relation near the Fermi energy.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Equation On a 2D Rectangular Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouzidi, MHamed; DHumieres, Dominique; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We construct a multi-relaxation lattice Boltzmann model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The model is partly inspired by a previous work of Koelman to construct a lattice BGK model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The linearized dispersion equation is analyzed to obtain the constraints on the isotropy of the transport coefficients and Galilean invariance for various wave propagations in the model. The linear stability of the model is also studied. The model is numerically tested for three cases: (a) a vortex moving with a constant velocity on a mesh periodic boundary conditions; (b) Poiseuille flow with an arbitrasy inclined angle with respect to the lattice orientation: and (c) a cylinder &symmetrically placed in a channel. The numerical results of these tests are compared with either analytic solutions or the results obtained by other methods. Satisfactory results are obtained for the numerical simulations.

  17. Interacting dimers on the honeycomb lattice: an exact solution of the five-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. Y.; Wu, F. Y.; Kunz, H.; Kim, D.

    1996-02-01

    The problem of close-packed dimers on the honeycomb lattice was solved by Kasteleyn in 1963. Here we extend the solution to include interactions between neighboring dimers in two spatial lattice directions. The solution is obtained by using the method of Bethe ansatz and by converting the dimer problem into a five-vertex problem. The complete phase diagram is obtained and it is found that a new frozen phase, in which the attracting dimers prevail, arises when the interaction is attractive. For repulsive dimer interactions a new first-order line separating two frozen phases occurs. The transitions are continuous and the critical behavior in the disorder regime is found to be the same as in the case of noninteracting dimers characterized by a specific heat exponent α = {1}/{2}.

  18. Elasticity of randomly diluted honeycomb and diamond lattices with bending forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Stenull, O.; Mao, Xiaoming; Lubensky, T. C.

    2016-04-01

    We use numerical simulations and an effective-medium theory to study the rigidity percolation transition of the honeycomb and diamond lattices when weak bond-bending forces are included. We use a rotationally invariant bond-bending potential, which, in contrast to the Keating potential, does not involve any stretching. As a result, the bulk modulus does not depend on the bending stiffness κ. We obtain scaling functions for the behavior of some elastic moduli in the limits of small Δ P=1-P , and small δ P=P-{{P}\\text{c}} , where P is an occupation probability of each bond, and {{P}\\text{c}} is the critical probability at which rigidity percolation occurs. We find good quantitative agreement between effective-medium theory and simulations for both lattices for P close to one.

  19. Strong-coupling approach to Mott transition of massless and massive Dirac fermions on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibi, Elaheh; Jafari, S. Akbar

    2016-02-01

    Phase transitions in the Hubbard model and ionic Hubbard model at half-filling on the honeycomb lattice are investigated in the strong-coupling perturbation theory which corresponds to an expansion in powers of the hopping t around the atomic limit. Within this formulation we find analytic expressions for the single-particle spectrum, whereby the calculation of the insulating gap is reduced to a simple root finding problem. This enables high-precision determination of the insulating gap that does not require any extrapolation procedure. The critical value of Mott transition on the honeycomb lattice is obtained to be Uc≈2.38 t . Studying the ionic Hubbard model at the lowest order, we find two insulating states, one with Mott character at large U and another with single-particle gap character at large ionic potential Δ . The present approach gives a critical gapless state at U =2 Δ at lowest order. By systematically improving on the perturbation expansion, the density of states around this critical gapless phase reduces.

  20. Cluster dynamic mean-field study on the superconductivity in doped honeycomb lattice Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao Yan; Dang, Hung T.; Wessel, Stefen; Meng, Zi Yang

    The issue of superconductivities emerging from doped honeycomb lattice Mott insulator remains inconclusive. Existing proposals, such as p+ip triplet pairing driven by ferromagnetic fluctuations, d+id singlet pairing driven by antiferromagnetic fluctuations or van Hove singularities in the band structure, are not compatible. This is mainly due to the limitation of various approximated techniques employed in addressing such question with inherent strongly correlated nature. Trying to clarify the situation, we perform large-scale cluster dynamic mean-field simulations to explore the superconductivity instabilities in the doped honeycomb lattice Hubbard model, from medium to strong coupling. To benchmark, we make use of both interaction- and hybridization-expansion continuous time quantum Monte Carlo methods to exactly solve the quantum cluster embedded in self-consistently determined mean-field bath. Temperature dependence of various superconducting susceptibilities are calculated, hence, we provide the least biased results of the competition of the superconductivity in different channels in the phase diagram spanned by doping and electronic interaction.

  1. Phase transitions of the ionic Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Liu, Hai-Di; Tao, Hong-Shuai; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Many-body problem on the honeycomb lattice systems have been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical interest. Here we investigate the phase transitions of the ionic Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice with an alternate ionic potential for the half filling and hole doping cases by means of cellular dynamical mean field theory combining with continue time quantum Monte Carlo as an impurity solver. At half filling, as the increase of the interaction at a fixed ionic potential, we find the single particle gap decreases firstly, reaches a minimum at a critical interaction Uc, then increases upturn. At Uc, there is a band insulator to Mott insulator transition accompanying with the presence of the antiferromagnetic order. Away from half filing, the system shows three phases for the different values of hole density and interaction, paramagnetic metal, antiferromagnetic metal and ferromagnetic metal. Further, we present the staggered particle number, the double occupancy, the staggered magnetization, the uniform magnetization and the single particle spectral properties, which exhibit characteristic features for those phases. PMID:25961417

  2. Phase transitions of the ionic Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Liu, Hai-Di; Tao, Hong-Shuai; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Many-body problem on the honeycomb lattice systems have been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical interest. Here we investigate the phase transitions of the ionic Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice with an alternate ionic potential for the half filling and hole doping cases by means of cellular dynamical mean field theory combining with continue time quantum Monte Carlo as an impurity solver. At half filling, as the increase of the interaction at a fixed ionic potential, we find the single particle gap decreases firstly, reaches a minimum at a critical interaction , then increases upturn. At , there is a band insulator to Mott insulator transition accompanying with the presence of the antiferromagnetic order. Away from half filing, the system shows three phases for the different values of hole density and interaction, paramagnetic metal, antiferromagnetic metal and ferromagnetic metal. Further, we present the staggered particle number, the double occupancy, the staggered magnetization, the uniform magnetization and the single particle spectral properties, which exhibit characteristic features for those phases.

  3. Simulations of Quantum Spin Models on 2D Frustrated Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melko, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Algorithmic advances in quantum Monte Carlo techniques have opened up the possibility of studying models in the general class of the S=1/2 XXZ model (equivalent to hard-core bosons) on frustrated lattices. With an antiferromagnetic diagonal interaction (Jz), these models can be solved exactly with QMC, albeit with some effort required to retain ergodicity in the near-degenerate manifold of states that exists for large Jz. The application of the quantum (ferromagnetic off-diagonal) interaction to this classically degenerate manifold produces a variety of intriguing physics, including an order-by-disorder supersolid phase, novel insulating states, and possible exotic quantum critical phenomena. We discuss numerical results for the triangular and kagome lattices with nearest and next-nearest neighbor exchange interactions, and focus on the relevance of the simulations to related areas of physics, such as experiments of cold trapped atomic gasses and the recent theory of deconfined quantum criticality.

  4. Lattice Formulation of 2D SQCD with exact supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sugino, Fumihiko

    2008-11-23

    We construct a lattice model for two-dimensional N = (2,2) supersymmetric QCD (SQCD), with the matter multiplets belonging to the fundamental or anti-fundamental representation of the gauge group U(N) or SU(N). The construction is based on the topological field theory (twisted supercharge) formulation and exactly preserves one supercharge. In order to avoid the species doublers of the matter multiplets, we introduce the Wilson terms and the model is defined for the case of the number of the fundamental matters (n{sub +}) equal to that of the anti-fundamental matters (n{sub -}). If some of the matter multiplets decouple from the theory by sending the corresponding anti-holomorphic twisted masses to the infinity, we can analyze the general n{sub +}{ne}n{sub -} case, although the lattice model is defined for n{sub +} = n{sub -}. By computing the anomaly of the U(1){sub A} R-symmetry in the lattice perturbation, we see that the decoupling is achieved and the anomaly for n{sub +}{ne}n{sub -} is correctly obtained.

  5. Thermal hydraulic design analysis of ternary carbide fueled square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Eric M.; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-22

    A computational analysis is conducted to determine the optimum thermal-hydraulic design parameters for a square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine core that will incorporate ternary carbide based uranium fuels. Recent studies at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of processing solid solution, ternary carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, (U, Zr, Ta)C, (U, Zr, Hf)C and (U, Zr, W)C. The square-lattice honeycomb design provides high strength and is amenable to the processing complexities of these ultrahigh temperature fuels. A parametric analysis is conducted to examine how core geometry, fuel thickness and the propellant flow area effect the thermal performance of the nuclear rocket engine. The principal variables include core size (length and diameter) and fuel element dimensions. The optimum core configuration requires a balance between high specific impulse and thrust level performance, and maintaining the temperature and strength limits of the fuel. A nuclear rocket engine simulation code is developed and used to examine the system performance as well as the performance of the main reactor core components. The system simulation code was originally developed for analysis of NERVA-Derivative and Pratt and Whitney XNR-2000 nuclear thermal rockets. The code is modified and adopted to the square-lattice geometry of the new fuel design. Thrust levels ranging from 44,500 to 222,400 N (10,000 to 50,000 lbf) are considered. The average hydrogen exit temperature is kept at 2800 K, which is well below the melting point of these fuels. For a nozzle area ratio of 300 and a thrust chamber pressure of 4.8 Mpa (700 psi), the specific impulse is 930 s. Hydrogen temperature and pressure distributions in the core and the fuel maximum temperatures are calculated.

  6. Dynamical polarizability of the 2D pseudospin-1 dice lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, John; Nicol, Elisabeth

    The two-dimensional dice lattice is composed of three triangular sublattices whose low-energy excitation spectrum consists of Dirac-Weyl fermions with pseudospin-1. The energy dispersion has two Dirac cones, like the pseudospin-1/2 two-triangular-sublattice graphene, with an additional third band exactly at zero energy. We present theoretical results for the electronic dynamical polarization function in the material. This is a fundamental entity in many-body physics, renormalizing the Coulomb interaction through the dielectric function. From the polarization function we also obtain the Lindhard function, the plasmon branch, and can discuss other screening effects. These are constrasted with those of graphene.

  7. Quantum spin Hall phase in 2D trigonal lattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z F; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase is an exotic phenomena in condensed-matter physics. Here we show that a minimal basis of three orbitals (s, px, py) is required to produce a QSH phase via nearest-neighbour hopping in a two-dimensional trigonal lattice. Tight-binding model analyses and calculations show that the QSH phase arises from a spin-orbit coupling (SOC)-induced s-p band inversion or p-p bandgap opening at Brillouin zone centre (Γ point), whose topological phase diagram is mapped out in the parameter space of orbital energy and SOC. Remarkably, based on first-principles calculations, this exact model of QSH phase is shown to be realizable in an experimental system of Au/GaAs(111) surface with an SOC gap of ∼73 meV, facilitating the possible room-temperature measurement. Our results will extend the search for substrate supported QSH materials to new lattice and orbital types. PMID:27599580

  8. Quantum spin Hall phase in 2D trigonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. F.; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Liu, Feng

    2016-09-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase is an exotic phenomena in condensed-matter physics. Here we show that a minimal basis of three orbitals (s, px, py) is required to produce a QSH phase via nearest-neighbour hopping in a two-dimensional trigonal lattice. Tight-binding model analyses and calculations show that the QSH phase arises from a spin-orbit coupling (SOC)-induced s-p band inversion or p-p bandgap opening at Brillouin zone centre (Γ point), whose topological phase diagram is mapped out in the parameter space of orbital energy and SOC. Remarkably, based on first-principles calculations, this exact model of QSH phase is shown to be realizable in an experimental system of Au/GaAs(111) surface with an SOC gap of ~73 meV, facilitating the possible room-temperature measurement. Our results will extend the search for substrate supported QSH materials to new lattice and orbital types.

  9. Quantum spin Hall phase in 2D trigonal lattice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. F.; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase is an exotic phenomena in condensed-matter physics. Here we show that a minimal basis of three orbitals (s, px, py) is required to produce a QSH phase via nearest-neighbour hopping in a two-dimensional trigonal lattice. Tight-binding model analyses and calculations show that the QSH phase arises from a spin–orbit coupling (SOC)-induced s–p band inversion or p–p bandgap opening at Brillouin zone centre (Γ point), whose topological phase diagram is mapped out in the parameter space of orbital energy and SOC. Remarkably, based on first-principles calculations, this exact model of QSH phase is shown to be realizable in an experimental system of Au/GaAs(111) surface with an SOC gap of ∼73 meV, facilitating the possible room-temperature measurement. Our results will extend the search for substrate supported QSH materials to new lattice and orbital types. PMID:27599580

  10. Phase Transition of Two-Dimensional Ising Models on the Honeycomb and Related Lattices with Striped Random Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Satoshi; Suzuki, Sei

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional Ising models on the honeycomb lattice and the square lattice with striped random impurities are studied to obtain their phase diagrams. Assuming bimodal distributions of the random impurities where all the non-zero couplings have the same magnitude, exact critical values for the fraction p of ferromagnetic bonds at the zero-temperature (T=0) are obtained. The critical lines in the p-T plane are drawn by numerically evaluating the Lyapunov exponent of random matrix products.

  11. CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    DOE PAGES

    McNally, D. E.; Simonson, J. W.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Smith, G. J.; Hassinger, J. E.; DeBeer-Schmidt, L.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Zaliznyak, I.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-05-22

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2:, which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a maximum excitation energy of ≈ 24 meV. These excitations are well described by spin waves in a Heisenberg model, including first and second neighbor exchange interactions, J1 and J2, in the Mn plane and also an exchange interaction between planes. The determined ratio J2/J1 ≈ 1/6 suggests that CaMn2Sb2: is the first example of a compound that lies very close to themore » mean field tricritical point, known for the classical Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, where the N´eel phase and two different spiral phases coexist. The magnitude of the determined exchange interactions reveal a mean field ordering temperature ≈ 4 times larger than the reported N´eel temperature TN = 85 K, suggesting significant frustration arising from proximity to the tricritical point.« less

  12. Field-induced dynamical properties of the XXZ model on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, Pavel; Chernyshev, Alexander

    We present a comprehensive 1 / S study of the field-induced dynamical properties of the nearest-neighbor XXZ antiferromagnet on a honeycomb lattice using the formalism of the nonlinear spin-wave theory developed for this model. External magnetic field controls spin frustration in the system and induces non-collinearity of the spin structure, which is essential for the two-magnon decay processes. Our results include an intriguing field-evolution of the regions of the Brillouin zone where decays of spin excitations are prominent, a thorough analysis of the singularities in the magnon spectra due to coupling to the two-magnon continuum, the asymptotic behavior of the decay rates near high-symmetry points, and inelastic neutron-scattering spin-spin structure factor obtained in the leading 1 / S order. Supported by DOE.

  13. Magnetic hysteresis, compensation behaviors, and phase diagrams of bilayer honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersin, Kantar

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic behaviors of the Ising system with bilayer honeycomb lattice (BHL) structure are studied by using the effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations. The effects of the interaction parameters on the magnetic properties of the system such as the hysteresis and compensation behaviors as well as phase diagrams are investigated. Moreover, when the hysteresis behaviors of the system are examined, single and double hysteresis loops are observed for various values of the interaction parameters. We obtain the L-, Q-, P-, and S-type compensation behaviors in the system. We also observe that the phase diagrams only exhibit the second-order phase transition. Hence, the system does not show the tricritical point (TCP).

  14. Plaquette order in the SU(6) Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, Pierre; Lajkó, Miklós; Corboz, Philippe; Läuchli, Andreas M.; Penc, Karlo; Mila, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the SU(6) Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, which has been predicted to be a chiral spin liquid by mean-field theory [G. Szirmai et al., Phys. Rev. A 84, 011611(R) (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.011611]. Using exact diagonalizations of finite clusters, infinite projected entangled pair state simulations, and variational Monte Carlo simulations based on Gutzwiller projected wave functions, we provide strong evidence that the model with one particle per site and nearest-neighbor exchange actually develops plaquette order. This is further confirmed by the investigation of the model with a ring-exchange term, which shows that there is a transition between the plaquette state and the chiral state at a finite value of the ring-exchange term.

  15. Spin conductivity of the two-dimensional anisotropic frustrated Heisenberg model in the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    We use the SU(3) Schwinger's boson theory to study the spin transport properties of the two-dimensional anisotropic frustrated Heisenberg model in a honeycomb lattice at T=0. We have investigated the behavior of the spin conductivity for this model which presents a single-ion anisotropy and J1 and J2 exchange interactions. We study the spin transport in the Bose-Einstein condensation regime where we have that the tz bosons are condensed and the following condition is valid: = < tz† > = t. Our results show a metallic spin transport for ω > 0 and a superconductor spin transport in the limit of DC conductivity, ω → 0, where σ(ω) tends to infinity in this limit of ω.

  16. Finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated fermions in the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baoming; Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos

    2013-09-01

    We study finite-temperature properties of strongly interacting fermions in the honeycomb lattice using numerical linked-cluster expansions and determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We analyze a number of thermodynamic quantities, including the entropy, the specific heat, uniform and staggered spin susceptibilities, short-range spin correlations, and the double occupancy at and away from half filling. We examine the viability of adiabatic cooling by increasing the interaction strength for homogeneous as well as for trapped systems. For the homogeneous case, this process is found to be more efficient at finite doping than at half filling. That, in turn, leads to an efficient adiabatic cooling in the presence of a trap, which, starting with even relatively high entropies, can drive the system to have a Mott insulating phase with substantial antiferromagnetic correlations.

  17. Absence of a Spin Liquid Phase in the Hubbard Model on the Honeycomb Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Sorella, Sandro; Yunoki, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    A spin liquid is a novel quantum state of matter with no conventional order parameter where a finite charge gap exists even though the band theory would predict metallic behavior. Finding a stable spin liquid in two or higher spatial dimensions is one of the most challenging and debated issues in condensed matter physics. Very recently, it has been reported that a model of graphene, i.e., the Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice, can show a spin liquid ground state in a wide region of the phase diagram, between a semi-metal (SM) and an antiferromagnetic insulator (AFMI). Here, by performing numerically exact quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we extend the previous study to much larger clusters (containing up to 2592 sites), and find, if any, a very weak evidence of this spin liquid region. Instead, our calculations strongly indicate a direct and continuous quantum phase transition between SM and AFMI. PMID:23251778

  18. Phase diagram of dipolar hard-core bosons on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakafuji, Takashi; Ito, Takeshi; Nagamori, Yuya; Ichinose, Ikuo

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study phase diagrams of dipolar hard-core boson gases on a honeycomb lattice. The system is described by the Haldane-Bose-Hubbard model with complex hopping amplitudes and nearest-neighbor repulsion. By using the slave-particle representation of the hard-core bosons and also the path-integral quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the system and show that the systems have a rich phase diagram. There are Mott, superfluid, chiral superfluid, and sublattice chiral superfluid phases as well as the density-wave phase. We also found a coexisting phase of superfluid and chiral superfluid. Critical behaviors of the phase transitions are also clarified.

  19. Competition between spin-orbit interaction and exchange coupling within a honeycomb lattice ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Son-Hsien; Hu, C. D.; Chang, Ching-Ray

    2016-01-01

    Spin density patterns of a pinned magnetic impurity that is embedded in a honeycomb lattice with zigzag edges are investigated by employing a mean-field assisted Landauer-Keldysh formalism. Both the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and the extrinsic localized magnetic moments are considered, and the effects of the pinning directions and the species of the sublattice on the electron spins are analyzed. A local time-reversal symmetry breaking cannot destroy the equilibrium edge-state spin accumulation that is induced by intrinsic spin-orbit coupling when the pinning field lies in the plane of the ribbon and the embedding position is the A-site at the edge. The induced local spin can be either parallel or antiparallel to the localized impurity moment, depending on the location of the pinned impurity, because itinerant electrons are found only at the B-site of the edge, but not at the A-site.

  20. Zigzag order and phase competition in expanded Kitaev-Heisenberg model on honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaoyan

    2015-07-01

    The Kitaev-Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice is investigated in two cases: (I) with the Kitaev interaction between the nearest neighbors, and (II) with the Kitaev interaction between the next nearest neighbors. In the full parameter range, the ground states are searched by Monte Carlo simulation and identified by evaluating the correlation functions. The energies of different phases are calculated and compared with the simulated result to show the phase competition. It is observed from both energy calculation and the density of states that the zigzag order shows a symmetric behavior to the stripy phase in the pure Kitaev-Heisenberg model. By considering more interactions in both cases, the energy of zigzag order can be reduced lower than the energies of other states. Thus the zigzag phase may be stabilized in more parameter region and even extended to the whole parameter range.

  1. Nature of the phases in the frustrated XY model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasquilla, Juan; Ciolo, Andrea Di; Becca, Federico; Galitski, Victor; Rigol, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    We study the phase diagram of the frustrated XY model on the honeycomb lattice by using accurate correlated wave functions and variational Monte Carlo simulations. Our results suggest that a spin-liquid state is energetically favorable in the region of intermediate frustration, intervening between two magnetically ordered phases. The latter ones are represented by classically ordered states supplemented with a long-range Jastrow factor, which includes relevant correlations and dramatically improves the description provided by the purely classical solution of the model. The construction of the spin-liquid state is based on a decomposition of the underlying bosonic particles in terms of spin-1/2 fermions (partons), with a Gutzwiller projection enforcing no single occupancy, as well as a long-range Jastrow factor.

  2. Asymmetric edge modes by staggered potential in honeycomb lattice: Spin splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Son-Hsien; Sun, Shih-Jye; Su, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Ching-Ray

    2015-05-07

    In honeycomb lattice with staggered potential such as silicene nanoribbon (SN) as used for illustrations here, we show that the lack of inversion symmetry due to buckled structure can lead to asymmetric edge modes where only one edge is utilized in transport, yielding no cross-walk (due to size effect) between edges. We also find asymmetric Hall accumulations formed because of the presence of staggered potential. Applying two opposite out-of-plane electric fields to two adjacent SNs appropriately, so that cross-walk occurs between two internal edge states, the bulk states serve as a spin-splitter that splits two specious of spins (spin-up and spin-down) into those two SNs. The spin-splitter proposed here does not require any magnetic field and thus manipulates spins in a full electric manner.

  3. Quantum oscillations of magnetization in tight-binding electrons on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigi, Keita; Hasegawa, Yasumasa

    2014-08-01

    We show that quantum oscillations of the magnetization can occur when the Fermi surface consists of points (massless Dirac points) or even when the chemical potential is in an energy gap by studying tight-binding electrons on a honeycomb lattice in a uniform magnetic field. The quantum oscillations of the magnetization as a function of the inverse magnetic field are known as de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillations and the frequency is proportional to the area of the Fermi surface. The dominant period of the oscillations shown in this paper corresponds to the area of the first Brillouin zone and its phase is zero. The origin of these quantum oscillations is the characteristic magnetic field dependence of the energy known as the Hofstadter butterfly and the Harper broadening of Landau levels. These oscillations are not caused by the crossing of the chemical potential and Landau levels, which is the case in dHvA oscillations. These oscillations can be observed experimentally in systems with a large supercell such as a graphene antidot lattice or ultracold atoms in an optical lattice at an external magnetic field of a few Tesla when the area of the supercell is 104 times larger than that of graphene.

  4. Design of Chern and Mott insulators in buckled 3 d oxide honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doennig, David; Baidya, Santu; Pickett, Warren E.; Pentcheva, Rossitza

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite (La X O3 )2/(LaAlO3)4(111) superlattices with X spanning the entire 3 d transition-metal series combine the strongly correlated, multiorbital nature of electrons in transition-metal oxides with a honeycomb lattice as a key feature. Based on density functional theory calculations including strong interaction effects, we establish trends in the evolution of electronic states as a function of several control parameters: band filling, interaction strength, spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and lattice instabilities. Competition between local pseudocubic and global trigonal symmetry as well as the additional flexibility provided by the magnetic and spin degrees of freedom of 3 d ions lead to a broad array of distinctive broken-symmetry ground states not accessible for the (001)-growth direction, offering a platform to design two-dimensional electronic functionalities. Constraining the symmetry between the two triangular sublattices causes X =Mn , Co, and Ti to emerge as Chern insulators driven by SOC. For X =Mn we illustrate how interaction strength and lattice distortions can tune these systems between a Dirac semimetal, a Chern and a trivial Mott insulator.

  5. Exotic disordered phases in the quantum J1-J2 model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Lamas, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    We study the ground-state phase diagram of the frustrated quantum J1-J2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice using a mean-field approach in terms of the Schwinger boson representation of the spin operators. We present results for the ground-state energy, local magnetization, energy gap, and spin-spin correlations. The system shows magnetic long-range order for 0⩽J2/J1≲0.2075 (Néel) and 0.398≲J2/J1⩽0.5 (spiral). In the intermediate region, we find two magnetically disordered phases: a gapped spin liquid phase, which shows short-range Néel correlations (0.2075≲J2/J1≲0.3732), and a lattice nematic phase (0.3732≲J2/J1≲0.398), which is magnetically disordered but breaks lattice rotational symmetry. The errors in the values of the phase boundaries, which are implicit in the number of significant figures quoted, correspond purely to the error in the extrapolation of our finite-size results to the thermodynamic limit.

  6. Enhanced detectability of small objects in correlated clutter using an improved 2-D adaptive lattice algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ffrench, P A; Zeidler, J H; Ku, W H

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) adaptive filtering is a technique that can be applied to many image processing applications. This paper will focus on the development of an improved 2-D adaptive lattice algorithm (2-D AL) and its application to the removal of correlated clutter to enhance the detectability of small objects in images. The two improvements proposed here are increased flexibility in the calculation of the reflection coefficients and a 2-D method to update the correlations used in the 2-D AL algorithm. The 2-D AL algorithm is shown to predict correlated clutter in image data and the resulting filter is compared with an ideal Wiener-Hopf filter. The results of the clutter removal will be compared to previously published ones for a 2-D least mean square (LMS) algorithm. 2-D AL is better able to predict spatially varying clutter than the 2-D LMS algorithm, since it converges faster to new image properties. Examples of these improvements are shown for a spatially varying 2-D sinusoid in white noise and simulated clouds. The 2-D LMS and 2-D AL algorithms are also shown to enhance a mammogram image for the detection of small microcalcifications and stellate lesions.

  7. Field-induced dynamical properties of the XXZ model on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, P. A.; Chernyshev, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive 1 /S study of the field-induced dynamical properties of the nearest-neighbor XXZ antiferromagnet on a honeycomb lattice using the formalism of nonlinear spin-wave theory developed for this model. The external magnetic field controls spin frustration in the system and induces noncollinearity of the spin structure, which is essential for the two-magnon decay processes. Our results include an intriguing field-evolution of the regions of the Brillouin zone wherein decays of spin excitations are prominent, a detailed classification of the decay channels involving magnons from both excitation branches, and a thorough analysis of the singularities in the magnon spectra due to coupling to the two-magnon continuum, all of which are illustrated for several field and anisotropy values. We highlight a number of features related to either the non-Bravais nature of the lattice or the existence of the Dirac-like points in the spectrum. In addition, the asymptotic behavior of the decay rates near high-symmetry points is analyzed in detail. The inelastic neutron-scattering spin-spin structure factor is obtained in the leading 1 /S order and is shown to exhibit qualitatively distinct fingerprints of the decay-induced magnon dynamics such as quasiparticle peaks broadened by decays and strong spectral weight redistribution.

  8. Asymptotic behavior for a version of directed percolation on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shu-Chiuan; Chen, Lung-Chi

    2015-10-01

    We consider a version of directed bond percolation on the honeycomb lattice as a brick lattice such that vertical edges are directed upward with probability y, and horizontal edges are directed rightward with probabilities x and one in alternate rows. Let τ(M , N) be the probability that there is at least one connected-directed path of occupied edges from (0 , 0) to (M , N) . For each x ∈(0 , 1 ] , y ∈(0 , 1 ] and aspect ratio α = M / N fixed, we show that there is a critical value αc =(1 - x + xy) (1 + x - xy) /(xy2) such that as N → ∞, τ(M , N) is 1, 0 and 1 / 2 for α >αc, α <αc and α =αc, respectively. We also investigate the rate of convergence of τ(M , N) and the asymptotic behavior of τ(MN- , N) and τ(MN+ , N) where MN- / N↑αc and MN+ / N↓αc as N↑∞.

  9. Quantum anomalous Hall states in the p-orbital honeycomb optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Machi; Hung Hsianghsuan; Wu Congjun; Zhang Chuanwei

    2011-02-15

    We study the quantum anomalous Hall states in the p-orbital bands of the honeycomb optical lattices loaded with single-component fermions. Such an effect has not yet been realized in both condensed-matter and cold-atom systems. By applying the available experimental techniques to rotate each lattice site around its own center, the band structures become topologically nontrivial. At a certain rotation angular velocity {Omega}, a flat band structure appears with localized eigenstates carrying chiral current moments. By imposing the soft confining potential, the density profile exhibits a wedding-cake-shaped distribution with insulating plateaus at commensurate fillings. Moreover, the inhomogeneous confining potential induces dissipationless circulation currents, the magnitudes and chiralities of which vary with the distance from the trap center. In the insulating regions, the Hall conductances are quantized, and in the metallic regions, the directions and magnitudes of chiral currents can not be described by the usual local-density approximation. The quantum anomalous Hall effects are robust at temperature scales that are small compared to band gaps, which increase the feasibility of experimental realizations.

  10. Bound states and Cooper pairs of molecules in 2D optical lattices bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Guardian, A.; Domínguez-Castro, G. A.; Paredes, R.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the formation of Cooper pairs, bound dimers and the dimer-dimer elastic scattering of ultra- cold dipolar Fermi molecules confined in a 2D optical lattice bilayer configuration. While the energy and their associated bound states are determined in a variational way, the correlated two-molecule pair is addressed as in the original Cooper formulation. We demonstrate that the 2D lattice confinement favors the formation of zero center mass momentum bound states. Regarding the Cooper pairs binding energy, this depends on the molecule populations in each layer. Maximum binding energies occur for non-zero (zero) pair momentum when the Fermi system is polarized (unpolarized). We find an analytic expression for the dimer-dimer effective interaction in the deep BEC regime. The present analysis represents a route for addressing the BCS-BEC crossover superfluidity in dipolar Fermi gases confined in 2D optical lattices within the current experimental panorama.

  11. Grid Cell Responses in 1D Environments Assessed as Slices through a 2D Lattice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, KiJung; Lewallen, Sam; Kinkhabwala, Amina A; Tank, David W; Fiete, Ila R

    2016-03-01

    Grid cells, defined by their striking periodic spatial responses in open 2D arenas, appear to respond differently on 1D tracks: the multiple response fields are not periodically arranged, peak amplitudes vary across fields, and the mean spacing between fields is larger than in 2D environments. We ask whether such 1D responses are consistent with the system's 2D dynamics. Combining analytical and numerical methods, we show that the 1D responses of grid cells with stable 1D fields are consistent with a linear slice through a 2D triangular lattice. Further, the 1D responses of comodular cells are well described by parallel slices, and the offsets in the starting points of the 1D slices can predict the measured 2D relative spatial phase between the cells. From these results, we conclude that the 2D dynamics of these cells is preserved in 1D, suggesting a common computation during both types of navigation behavior. PMID:26898777

  12. Strongly frustrated triangular spin lattice emerging from triplet dimer formation in honeycomb Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Satoshi; Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Yushankhai, Viktor; Stoll, Hermann; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Hozoi, Liviu; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Iridium oxides with a honeycomb lattice have been identified as platforms for the much anticipated Kitaev topological spin liquid: the spin-orbit entangled states of Ir4+ in principle generate precisely the required type of anisotropic exchange. However, other magnetic couplings can drive the system away from the spin-liquid phase. With this in mind, here we disentangle the different magnetic interactions in Li2IrO3, a honeycomb iridate with two crystallographically inequivalent sets of adjacent Ir sites. Our ab initio many-body calculations show that, while both Heisenberg and Kitaev nearest-neighbour couplings are present, on one set of Ir-Ir bonds the former dominates, resulting in the formation of spin-triplet dimers. The triplet dimers frame a strongly frustrated triangular lattice and by exact cluster diagonalization we show that they remain protected in a wide region of the phase diagram.

  13. Strongly frustrated triangular spin lattice emerging from triplet dimer formation in honeycomb Li2IrO3.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Satoshi; Katukuri, Vamshi M; Yushankhai, Viktor; Stoll, Hermann; Rößler, Ulrich K; Hozoi, Liviu; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Iridium oxides with a honeycomb lattice have been identified as platforms for the much anticipated Kitaev topological spin liquid: the spin-orbit entangled states of Ir(4+) in principle generate precisely the required type of anisotropic exchange. However, other magnetic couplings can drive the system away from the spin-liquid phase. With this in mind, here we disentangle the different magnetic interactions in Li2IrO3, a honeycomb iridate with two crystallographically inequivalent sets of adjacent Ir sites. Our ab initio many-body calculations show that, while both Heisenberg and Kitaev nearest-neighbour couplings are present, on one set of Ir-Ir bonds the former dominates, resulting in the formation of spin-triplet dimers. The triplet dimers frame a strongly frustrated triangular lattice and by exact cluster diagonalization we show that they remain protected in a wide region of the phase diagram. PMID:26776664

  14. Quantum phase diagrams and time-of-flight pictures of spin-1 Bose systems in honeycomb optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    By treating the hopping parameter as a perturbation, with the help of cumulant expansion and the re-summing technique, the one-particle Green’s function of a spin-1 Bose system in a honeycomb optical lattice is calculated analytically. By the use of the re-summed Green’s function, the quantum phase diagrams of the system in ferromagnetic cases as well as in antiferromagnetic cases are determined. It is found that in antiferromagnetic cases the Mott insulating states with even filling factor are more robust against the hopping parameter than that with odd filling factor, in agreement with results via other different approaches. Moreover, in order to illustrate the effectiveness of the re-summed Green’s function method in calculating time-of-flight pictures, the momentum distribution function of a honeycomb lattice spin-1 Bose system in the antiferromagnetic case is also calculated analytically and the corresponding time-of-flight absorption pictures are plotted.

  15. Strongly frustrated triangular spin lattice emerging from triplet dimer formation in honeycomb Li2IrO3

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Satoshi; Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Yushankhai, Viktor; Stoll, Hermann; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Hozoi, Liviu; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Iridium oxides with a honeycomb lattice have been identified as platforms for the much anticipated Kitaev topological spin liquid: the spin-orbit entangled states of Ir4+ in principle generate precisely the required type of anisotropic exchange. However, other magnetic couplings can drive the system away from the spin-liquid phase. With this in mind, here we disentangle the different magnetic interactions in Li2IrO3, a honeycomb iridate with two crystallographically inequivalent sets of adjacent Ir sites. Our ab initio many-body calculations show that, while both Heisenberg and Kitaev nearest-neighbour couplings are present, on one set of Ir–Ir bonds the former dominates, resulting in the formation of spin-triplet dimers. The triplet dimers frame a strongly frustrated triangular lattice and by exact cluster diagonalization we show that they remain protected in a wide region of the phase diagram. PMID:26776664

  16. Duality in topological superconductors and topological ferromagnetic insulators in a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shin-Ming; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Chung, Chung-Hou; Mou, Chung-Yu

    2016-02-01

    The ground state of the large Hubbard U limit of a honeycomb lattice near half filling is known to be a singlet d +i d -wave superconductor. It is also known that this d +i d superconductor exhibits a chiral p +i p pairing locally at the Dirac cone, characterized by a 2 Z topological invariant. By constructing a dual transformation, we demonstrate that this 2 Z topological superconductor is equivalent to a collection of two topological ferromagnetic insulators. As a result of the duality, the topology of the electronic structures for a d +i d superconductor is controllable via the change of the chemical potential by tuning the gate voltage. In particular, instead of always being a chiral superconductor, we find that the d +i d superconductor undergoes a topological phase transition from a chiral superconductor to a quasihelical superconductor as the gap amplitude or the chemical potential decreases. The quasihelical superconducting phase is found to be characterized by a topological invariant in the pseudospin charge sector with vanishing both the Chern number and the spin Chern number. We further elucidate the topological phase transition by analyzing the relationship between the topological invariant and the rotation symmetry. Due to the angular momentum carried by the gap function and spin-orbit interactions, we show that by placing d +i d superconductors in proximity to ferromagnets, varieties of chiral superconducting phases characterized by higher Chern numbers can be accessed, providing a platform for hosting large numbers of Majorana modes at edges.

  17. Strain-tunable topological quantum phase transition in buckled honeycomb lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jia-An Cruz, Mack A. Dela; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Yang, Li

    2015-05-04

    Low-buckled silicene is a prototypical quantum spin Hall insulator with the topological quantum phase transition controlled by an out-of-plane electric field. We show that this field-induced electronic transition can be further tuned by an in-plane biaxial strain ε, owing to the curvature-dependent spin-orbit coupling (SOC): There is a Z{sub 2} = 1 topological insulator phase for biaxial strain |ε| smaller than 0.07, and the band gap can be tuned from 0.7 meV for ε=+0.07 up to 3.0 meV for ε=−0.07. First-principles calculations also show that the critical field strength E{sub c} can be tuned by more than 113%, with the absolute values nearly 10 times stronger than the theoretical predictions based on a tight-binding model. The buckling structure of the honeycomb lattice thus enhances the tunability of both the quantum phase transition and the SOC-induced band gap, which are crucial for the design of topological field-effect transistors based on two-dimensional materials.

  18. Polarization beam splitter based on honeycomb-lattice photonic crystal ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaofu; Gu, Haifeng; Zheng, Yanmin; Wei, Maojin; Zheng, Dongmei; Xiao, Ronghui; Qiang, Zexuan

    2014-03-01

    A new polarization beam splitter is proposed based on a photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR) composed of honeycomb-lattice cylindrical silicon rods in air. By shrinking the width of the bus waveguide and adjusting the radii of two nearest-neighbor center rods of the PCRR, an unpolarized beam can be separated well into TE and TM polarization states, respectively, at the backward and forward output ports. Simulation results obtained by the two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain technique show that the insertion losses are 3.58 dB and 3.08 dB, and the polarization extinction ratios are 21.42 dB and 28.53 dB for TE and TM polarization, respectively, at a 1566.7 nm center wavelength. The excess loss is less than 0.34 dB and its dimensions are roughly 43.2 μm × 27.52 μm. These findings offer potential practical applications in high-density photonic integrated circuits.

  19. Electronic instabilities of the extended Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice from functional renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpez, Yanick; Scherer, Daniel D.; Scherer, Michael M.

    2016-10-01

    Interacting fermions on the half-filled honeycomb lattice with short-range repulsions have been suggested to host a variety of interesting many-body ground states, e.g., a topological Mott insulator. A number of recent studies of the spinless case in terms of exact diagonalization, the infinite density matrix renormalization group, and the functional renormalization group, however, indicate a suppression of the topological Mott insulating phase in the whole range of interaction parameters. Here, we complement the previous studies by investigating the quantum many-body instabilities of the physically relevant case of spin-1/2 fermions with onsite, nearest-neighbor, and second-nearest-neighbor repulsion. To this end, we employ the multipatch functional renormalization group for correlated fermions with refined momentum resolution observing the emergence of an antiferromagnetic spin-density wave and a charge-density wave for dominating onsite and nearest-neighbor repulsions, respectively. For dominating second-nearest neighbor interaction our results favor an ordering tendency towards a charge-modulated ground state over the topological Mott insulating state. The latter evades a stabilization as the leading instability by the additional onsite interaction.

  20. Dynamical polarization function, plasmons, and screening in silicene and other buckled honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabert, C. J.; Nicol, E. J.

    2014-05-01

    We explore the dielectric properties of graphene-like two-dimensional Kane-Mele topological insulators manifest in buckled honeycomb lattices (such as silicene and germanene). The effect of an on-site potential difference (Δz) between sublattices is given particular attention. We present the results for the real and imaginary parts of the dynamical polarization function. We show that these results display features of three regimes (topological insulator, valley-spin polarized metal, and trivial band insulator) and may be used to extract information on the strength of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. We study the inverse dielectric function and provide numerical results for the plasmon branch. We discuss the behavior of the plasmon as a function of sublattice potential difference and show that the behavior of the plasmon branch as Δz is varied is dependent on the location of the chemical potential with respect to the gaps. The static polarization is discussed and numerical results for the screening of a charged impurity are provided. We observe a beating phenomenon in the effective potential which is dependent on Δz.

  1. Phase diagram and Fermi liquid properties of the extended Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2014-05-01

    The Hubbard and extended Hubbard models on the honeycomb lattice can be seen as prototype models of a single-layer graphene placed in a high dielectric constant environment that screens the Coulomb interaction. Taking advantage of the absence of a sign problem at half-filling, we study this problem with clusters up to 96 sites with the determinant quantum Monte Carlo method as an impurity solver for the dynamical cluster approximation at finite temperatures. After determining the stability of the semimetallic phase to interaction-induced spin-density wave (SDW), charge-density wave (CDW), and Mott insulating phases, we study the single-particle dynamics of the Dirac fermions. We show that when spontaneous symmetry breaking is avoided, the semimetallic phase is a stable Fermi liquid in the presence of repulsive interactions and that Kondo screening dominates the low temperature regime, even though there is a ρ (ω)=|ω| type local density of states. We also investigate the impact of the correlation effects on the renormalization of the Fermi velocity vF. We find that vF is not renormalized when only on-site repulsion U is present, but that near-neighbor repulsion V does renormalize vF. This may explain the variations between different measurements of vF in graphene.

  2. Hierarchy of Floquet gaps and edge states for driven honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Piskunow, P. M.; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Usaj, Gonzalo

    2015-04-01

    Electromagnetic driving in a honeycomb lattice can induce gaps and topological edge states with a structure of increasing complexity as the frequency of the driving lowers. While the high-frequency case is the most simple to analyze we focus on the multiple photon processes allowed in the low-frequency regime to unveil the hierarchy of Floquet edge states. In the case of low intensities an analytical approach allows us to derive effective Hamiltonians and address the topological character of each gap in a constructive manner. At high intensities we obtain the net number of edge states, given by the winding number, with a numerical calculation of the Chern numbers of each Floquet band. Using these methods, we find a hierarchy that resembles that of a Russian nesting doll. This hierarchy classifies the gaps and the associated edge states in different orders according to the electron-photon coupling strength. For large driving intensities, we rely on the numerical calculation of the winding number, illustrated in a map of topological phase transitions. The hierarchy unveiled with the low-energy effective Hamiltonians, along with the map of topological phase transitions, discloses the complexity of the Floquet band structure in the low-frequency regime. The proposed method for obtaining the effective Hamiltonian can be easily adapted to other Dirac Hamiltonians of two-dimensional materials and even the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator.

  3. CaMn2Sb2: Spin Waves Near a Tricritical Point of the Antiferromagnetic Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Daniel; Simonson, Jack; Kistner-Morris, Jed; Smith, Greg; Hassinger, Julian; Debeer-Schmidt, Lisa; Kolesnikov, Alexander; Aronson, Meigan

    2015-03-01

    The classical Heisenberg model for a honeycomb lattice of spins predicts at least three tricritical points, where three different long range ordered magnetic phases co-exist, depending on the relative strength of the nearest and next-nearest exchange interactions J1,2. We performed inelastic neutron scattering at T = 5 K<honeycomb lattice. Spin wave excitations were observed up to E ~ 24 meV and these data were fit to the spin wave dispersion expected from the classical Heisenberg model to determine the individual exchange interactions SJ1 = 8.22 +/- 0.23 meV, SJ2 = 1.29 +/- 0.09 meV, SJc = -0.56 +/- 0.04 meV, where Jc is the exchange interaction between honeycomb planes. The quantum fluctuations resulting from proximity to the tricritical point at J2/J1 = 1/6 are responsible for the relatively low ordering temperature of CaMn2Sb2 , TN = 85 K, much reduced from the mean field ordering temperature TMFT = 2zJ1S(S+1)/3kB = 560 K. We acknowledge the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering for providing the NSSEFF funds that supported this research.

  4. Magnetic order in α -RuCl3 : A honeycomb-lattice quantum magnet with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, J. A.; Songvilay, M.; Plumb, K. W.; Clancy, J. P.; Qiu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Parshall, D.; Kim, Young-June

    2015-04-01

    We report magnetic and thermodynamic properties of single crystal α -RuCl3 , in which the Ru3+(4 d5) ion is in its low spin state and forms a honeycomb lattice. Two features are observed in both magnetic susceptibility and specific heat data; a sharp peak at 7 K and a broad hump near 10-15 K. In addition, we observe a metamagnetic transition between 5 and 10 T. Our neutron diffraction study of single crystal samples confirms that the low temperature peak in the specific heat is associated with a magnetic order with unit cell doubling along the honeycomb (100) direction, which is consistent with zigzag order, one of the types of magnetic order predicted within the framework of the Kitaev-Heisenberg model.

  5. Nonlinear propagating localized modes in a 2D hexagonal crystal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajars, Janis; Eilbeck, J. Chris; Leimkuhler, Benedict

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we consider a 2D hexagonal crystal lattice model first proposed by Marín, Eilbeck and Russell in 1998. We perform a detailed numerical study of nonlinear propagating localized modes, that is, propagating discrete breathers and kinks. The original model is extended to allow for arbitrary atomic interactions, and to allow atoms to travel out of the unit cell. A new on-site potential is considered with a periodic smooth function with hexagonal symmetry. We are able to confirm the existence of long-lived propagating discrete breathers. Our simulations show that, as they evolve, breathers appear to localize in frequency space, i.e. the energy moves from sidebands to a main frequency band. Our numerical findings shed light on the open question of whether exact moving breather solutions exist in 2D hexagonal layers in physical crystal lattices.

  6. A 2D DNA lattice as an ultrasensitive detector for beta radiations.

    PubMed

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Kim, Jang Ah; Kim, Byeonghoon; Joshirao, Pranav; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Vyas, Chirag; Kim, Taesung; Park, Sung Ha; Manchanda, Vijay

    2014-02-26

    There is growing demand for the development of efficient ultrasensitive radiation detectors to monitor the doses administered to individuals during therapeutic nuclear medicine which is often based on radiopharmaceuticals, especially those involving beta emitters. Recently biological materials are used in sensors in the nanobio disciplines due to their abilities to detect specific target materials or sites. Artificially designed two-dimensional (2D) DNA lattices grown on a substrate were analyzed after exposure to pure beta emitters, (90)Sr-(90)Y. We studied the Raman spectra and reflected intensities of DNA lattices at various distances from the source with different exposure times. Although beta particles have very low linear energy transfer values, the significant physical and chemical changes observed throughout the extremely thin, ∼0.6 nm, DNA lattices suggested the feasibility of using them to develop ultrasensitive detectors of beta radiations.

  7. Influence of lattice defects on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour of 2D magnonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Manzin, Alessandra; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Coïsson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies, from a modelling point of view, the influence of randomly distributed lattice defects (non-patterned areas and variable hole size) on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour and spin wave mode profiles of 2D magnonic crystals based on Ni80Fe20 antidot arrays with hexagonal lattice. A reference sample is first defined via the comparison of experimental and simulated hysteresis loops and magnetoresistive curves of patterned films, prepared by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Second, a parametric analysis of the dynamic response is performed, investigating how edge, quasi-uniform and localized modes are affected by alterations of the lattice geometry and bias field amplitude. Finally, some results about the possible use of magnetic antidot arrays in frequency-based sensors for magnetic bead detection are presented, highlighting the need for an accurate control of microstructural features. PMID:26911336

  8. Effect of delithiation on the dimer transition of the honeycomb-lattice ruthenate Li2 -xRuO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Segura, Marco-Polo; Ikeda, Atsutoshi; Kimber, Simon A. J.; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Yonezawa, Shingo; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2016-09-01

    The honeycomb-lattice ruthenate Li2RuO3 is made heavily Li deficient by chemical oxidation by iodine. The delithiation induces a different phase Li2 -xRuO3 , the "D phase," with superlattice. For the first time we disclose the magnetic and structural properties of the D phase in the dimer-solid state. The low-temperature magnetic susceptibility and the bond lengths indicate a bonding configuration consisting of both Ru4 +-Ru4 + and Ru5 +-Ru5 + dimers.

  9. Negative magnetization of Li2Ni2Mo3O12 including two spin subsystems, distorted honeycomb lattice and linear chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Masashi; Pomjakushin, Vladimir Yu; Sikolenko, Vadim; Keller, Lukas; Dönni, Andreas; Kitazawa, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    We studied magnetism of a spin-1 insulating substance Li2Ni2Mo3O12. The spin system consists of distorted honeycomb lattices and linear chains of Ni2+ spins. A magnetic phase transition occurs at Tc = 8.0 K in the zero magnetic field. In low magnetic fields, the magnetization increases rapidly below Tc, decreases below 7 K and becomes negative at low temperatures. We determined the magnetic structure using neutron powder diffraction data. The honeycomb lattices and linear chains show antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic long-range order, respectively. We discuss the origin of the negative magnetization.

  10. Identifying topological edge states in 2D optical lattices using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Nathan; Beugnon, Jérôme; Gerbier, Fabrice

    2013-02-01

    We recently proposed in a Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255303] a novel scheme to detect topological edge states in an optical lattice, based on a generalization of Bragg spectroscopy. The scope of the present article is to provide a more detailed and pedagogical description of the system - the Hofstadter optical lattice - and probing method. We first show the existence of topological edge states, in an ultra-cold gas trapped in a 2D optical lattice and subjected to a synthetic magnetic field. The remarkable robustness of the edge states is verified for a variety of external confining potentials. Then, we describe a specific laser probe, made from two lasers in Laguerre-Gaussian modes, which captures unambiguous signatures of these edge states. In particular, the resulting Bragg spectra provide the dispersion relation of the edge states, establishing their chiral nature. In order to make the Bragg signal experimentally detectable, we introduce a "shelving method", which simultaneously transfers angular momentum and changes the internal atomic state. This scheme allows to directly visualize the selected edge states on a dark background, offering an instructive view on topological insulating phases, not accessible in solid-state experiments.

  11. Electrical Control of Edge Magnetism in Two-Dimensional Buckled Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Liang-Jian

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically study indirect spin coupling strength between two magnetic impurities located on honeycomb Kane—Mele zigzag ribbon (KMZR) with periodic and open boundary (PB and OB). We show that spin interaction J in PB ribbons displays an AFM-FM oscillating behavior with increasing the staggered potential and electron density, and approaches to maximum at the edges. While the spin coupling in OB KMZR shows a trivial smooth AFM coupling with varying staggered potential. Such a novel J(Δ) behavior is the combining effect of finite size, topological edge states and inversion symmetry breaking induced by the staggered potential. We propose that one could control the edge magnetism electrically in two-dimensional buckled honeycomb materials, e.g., silicence, germanene and stanene.

  12. CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, D. E.; Simonson, J. W.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Smith, G. J.; Hassinger, J. E.; DeBeer-Schmidt, L.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Zaliznyak, I.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-05-22

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2:, which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a maximum excitation energy of ≈ 24 meV. These excitations are well described by spin waves in a Heisenberg model, including first and second neighbor exchange interactions, J1 and J2, in the Mn plane and also an exchange interaction between planes. The determined ratio J2/J1 ≈ 1/6 suggests that CaMn2Sb2: is the first example of a compound that lies very close to the mean field tricritical point, known for the classical Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, where the N´eel phase and two different spiral phases coexist. The magnitude of the determined exchange interactions reveal a mean field ordering temperature ≈ 4 times larger than the reported N´eel temperature TN = 85 K, suggesting significant frustration arising from proximity to the tricritical point.

  13. Neutron Diffraction on NaNi2 BiO6 : Complex Interactions on a Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheie, Allen; Ross, Kate; Seibel, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jose; Broholm, Collin; Cava, Robert; Institute for Quantum Matter Collaboration

    Magnetic crystals with a honeycomb lattice can have a very high degree of frustration when next-nearest neighbor interactions are strong. Such complex interactions can lead to Kitaev model physics, including a proposed spin liquid phase. Using neutron scattering, we studied the magnetic properties of a new spin-1/2 honeycomb compound, NaNi2BiO6, which was known to have heat capacity peaks indicative of a phase transition at 5 K. The magnetic order indicates beyond nearest-neighbor exchange as well as significant inter-plane interaction, which allows for a study of rich and complex structure. In this talk I report the magnetic structure of the compound as found with neutron powder diffraction, and discuss the exchanges necessary to lead to such a complex order. The work at IQM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material Sciences and Engineering, under Grant No. DEFG02-08ER46544.

  14. Robust singlet dimers with fragile ordering in two-dimensional honeycomb lattice of Li2RuO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junghwan; Tan, Teck-Yee; Adroja, D. T.; Daoud-Aladine, A.; Choi, Seongil; Cho, Deok-Yong; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jiyeon; Sim, Hasung; Morioka, T.; Nojiri, H.; Krishnamurthy, V. V.; Manuel, P.; Lees, M. R.; Streltsov, S. V.; Khomskii, D. I.; Park, Je-Geun

    2016-05-01

    When an electronic system has strong correlations and a large spin-orbit interaction, it often exhibits a plethora of mutually competing quantum phases. How a particular quantum ground state is selected out of several possibilities is a very interesting question. However, equally fascinating is how such a quantum entangled state breaks up due to perturbation. This important question has relevance in very diverse fields of science from strongly correlated electron physics to quantum information. Here we report that a quantum entangled dimerized state or valence bond crystal (VBC) phase of Li2RuO3 shows nontrivial doping dependence as we perturb the Ru honeycomb lattice by replacing Ru with Li. Through extensive experimental studies, we demonstrate that the VBC phase melts into a valence bond liquid phase of the RVB (resonating valence bond) type. This system offers an interesting playground where one can test and refine our current understanding of the quantum competing phases in a single compound.

  15. A study of the magnetic properties in the Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice by variational cluster approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic properties of the half-filled Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice, which is a simple model of graphene, are studied using the variational cluster approximation (VCA). We found that the critical interaction strength of a magnetic transition is slightly lower than that of the nonmagnetic metal-to-insulator transition and the magnetic order parameter is already nonnegligible at the latter transition point. Thus, a semi-metallic state becomes a magnetic insulator as the interaction strength increases, and a spin liquid state characterized by a Mott insulator without spontaneously broken spatial or spin symmetry, or a state very close to that is not realized in this system. Both the magnetic and nonmagnetic metal-to-insulator transitions are of the second-order. Our results agree with recent large scale quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations.

  16. Unconventional magnetism on a honeycomb lattice in α -RuCl3 studied by muon spin rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, F.; Baker, P. J.; Haghighirad, A. A.; Li, Y.; Prabhakaran, D.; Valentí, R.; Blundell, S. J.

    2016-07-01

    Muon spin rotation measurements have been performed on a powder sample of α -RuCl3 , a layered material in which Ru ions are arranged on a honeycomb lattice and which previously has been proposed to be close to a quantum spin liquid ground state. Our data reveal two distinct transitions at 11 and 14 K, which we interpret as originating from the onset of three-dimensional order and in-plane magnetic order, respectively. We identify, with the help of density functional theory calculations, likely muon stopping sites and combine these with dipolar field calculations to show that the two measured muon rotation frequencies are consistent with two inequivalent muon sites within a zigzag antiferromagnetic structure proposed previously.

  17. Robust singlet dimers with fragile ordering in two-dimensional honeycomb lattice of Li2RuO3

    PubMed Central

    Park, Junghwan; Tan, Teck-Yee; Adroja, D. T.; Daoud-Aladine, A.; Choi, Seongil; Cho, Deok-Yong; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jiyeon; Sim, Hasung; Morioka, T.; Nojiri, H.; Krishnamurthy, V. V.; Manuel, P.; Lees, M. R.; Streltsov, S. V.; Khomskii, D. I.; Park, Je-Geun

    2016-01-01

    When an electronic system has strong correlations and a large spin-orbit interaction, it often exhibits a plethora of mutually competing quantum phases. How a particular quantum ground state is selected out of several possibilities is a very interesting question. However, equally fascinating is how such a quantum entangled state breaks up due to perturbation. This important question has relevance in very diverse fields of science from strongly correlated electron physics to quantum information. Here we report that a quantum entangled dimerized state or valence bond crystal (VBC) phase of Li2RuO3 shows nontrivial doping dependence as we perturb the Ru honeycomb lattice by replacing Ru with Li. Through extensive experimental studies, we demonstrate that the VBC phase melts into a valence bond liquid phase of the RVB (resonating valence bond) type. This system offers an interesting playground where one can test and refine our current understanding of the quantum competing phases in a single compound. PMID:27143474

  18. Chiral spin density wave order on the frustrated honeycomb and bilayer triangle lattice hubbard model at half-filling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kun; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Sen; Wang, Ziqiang

    2015-05-29

    We study the Hubbard model on the frustrated honeycomb lattice with nearest-neighbor hopping t_{1} and second nearest-neighbor hopping t_{2}, which is isomorphic to the bilayer triangle lattice, using the SU(2)-invariant slave boson theory. We show that the Coulomb interaction U induces antiferromagnetic (AF) chiral spin density wave (χSDW) order in a wide range of κ=t_{2}/t_{1} where both the two-sublattice AF order at small κ and the decoupled three-sublattice 120° order at large κ are strongly frustrated, leading to three distinct phases with different anomalous Hall responses. We find a continuous transition from a χSDW semimetal with the anomalous Hall effect to a topological chiral Chern insulator exhibiting the quantum anomalous Hall effect, followed by a discontinuous transition to a χSDW insulator with a zero total Chern number but an anomalous ac Hall effect. The χSDW is likely a generic phase of strongly correlated and highly frustrated hexagonal lattice electrons. PMID:26066448

  19. Chiral spin density wave order on the frustrated honeycomb and bilayer triangle lattice hubbard model at half-filling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kun; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Sen; Wang, Ziqiang

    2015-05-29

    We study the Hubbard model on the frustrated honeycomb lattice with nearest-neighbor hopping t_{1} and second nearest-neighbor hopping t_{2}, which is isomorphic to the bilayer triangle lattice, using the SU(2)-invariant slave boson theory. We show that the Coulomb interaction U induces antiferromagnetic (AF) chiral spin density wave (χSDW) order in a wide range of κ=t_{2}/t_{1} where both the two-sublattice AF order at small κ and the decoupled three-sublattice 120° order at large κ are strongly frustrated, leading to three distinct phases with different anomalous Hall responses. We find a continuous transition from a χSDW semimetal with the anomalous Hall effect to a topological chiral Chern insulator exhibiting the quantum anomalous Hall effect, followed by a discontinuous transition to a χSDW insulator with a zero total Chern number but an anomalous ac Hall effect. The χSDW is likely a generic phase of strongly correlated and highly frustrated hexagonal lattice electrons.

  20. All optical active high decoder using integrated 2D square lattice photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper introduces a novel all optical active high 2 × 4 decoder based on 2D photonic crystals (PhC) of silicon rods with permittivity of ε = 10.1 × 10-11 farad/m. The main structure of optical decoder is designed using a combination of five nonlinear photonic crystal ring resonator, set of T-type waveguide, and line defect of Y and T branch splitters. The proposed structure has two logic input ports, four output ports, and one bias input port. The total size of the proposed 2 × 4 decoder is equal to 40 μm × 38 μm. The PhC structure has a square lattice of silicon rod with refractive index of 3.39 in air. The overall design and the results are discussed through the realization and the numerically simulation to confirm its operation and feasibility.

  1. A first theoretical realization of honeycomb topological magnon insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    It has been recently shown that in the Heisenberg (anti)ferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice, the magnons (spin wave quasipacticles) realize a massless two-dimensional (2D) Dirac-like Hamiltonian. It was shown that the Dirac magnon Hamiltonian preserves time-reversal symmetry defined with the sublattice pseudo spins and the Dirac points are robust against magnon–magnon interactions. The Dirac points also occur at nonzero energy. In this paper, we propose a simple realization of nontrivial topology (magnon edge states) in this system. We show that the Dirac points are gapped when the inversion symmetry of the lattice is broken by introducing a next-nearest neighbour Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM) interaction. Thus, the system realizes magnon edge states similar to the Haldane model for quantum anomalous Hall effect in electronic systems. However, in contrast to electronic spin current where dissipation can be very large due to Ohmic heating, noninteracting topological magnons can propagate for a long time without dissipation as magnons are uncharged particles. We observe the same magnon edge states for the XY model on the honeycomb lattice. Remarkably, in this case the model maps to interacting hardcore bosons on the honeycomb lattice. Quantum magnetic systems with nontrivial magnon edge states are called topological magnon insulators. They have been studied theoretically on the kagome lattice and recently observed experimentally on the kagome magnet Cu(1-3, bdc) with three magnon bulk bands. Our results for the honeycomb lattice suggests an experimental procedure to search for honeycomb topological magnon insulators within a class of 2D quantum magnets and ultracold atoms trapped in honeycomb optical lattices. In 3D lattices, Dirac and Weyl points were recently studied theoretically, however, the criteria that give rise to them were not well-understood. We argue that the low-energy Hamiltonian near the Weyl points should break time-reversal symmetry of the pseudo

  2. A first theoretical realization of honeycomb topological magnon insulator.

    PubMed

    Owerre, S A

    2016-09-28

    It has been recently shown that in the Heisenberg (anti)ferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice, the magnons (spin wave quasipacticles) realize a massless two-dimensional (2D) Dirac-like Hamiltonian. It was shown that the Dirac magnon Hamiltonian preserves time-reversal symmetry defined with the sublattice pseudo spins and the Dirac points are robust against magnon-magnon interactions. The Dirac points also occur at nonzero energy. In this paper, we propose a simple realization of nontrivial topology (magnon edge states) in this system. We show that the Dirac points are gapped when the inversion symmetry of the lattice is broken by introducing a next-nearest neighbour Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Thus, the system realizes magnon edge states similar to the Haldane model for quantum anomalous Hall effect in electronic systems. However, in contrast to electronic spin current where dissipation can be very large due to Ohmic heating, noninteracting topological magnons can propagate for a long time without dissipation as magnons are uncharged particles. We observe the same magnon edge states for the XY model on the honeycomb lattice. Remarkably, in this case the model maps to interacting hardcore bosons on the honeycomb lattice. Quantum magnetic systems with nontrivial magnon edge states are called topological magnon insulators. They have been studied theoretically on the kagome lattice and recently observed experimentally on the kagome magnet Cu(1-3, bdc) with three magnon bulk bands. Our results for the honeycomb lattice suggests an experimental procedure to search for honeycomb topological magnon insulators within a class of 2D quantum magnets and ultracold atoms trapped in honeycomb optical lattices. In 3D lattices, Dirac and Weyl points were recently studied theoretically, however, the criteria that give rise to them were not well-understood. We argue that the low-energy Hamiltonian near the Weyl points should break time-reversal symmetry of the pseudo spins

  3. A first theoretical realization of honeycomb topological magnon insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    It has been recently shown that in the Heisenberg (anti)ferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice, the magnons (spin wave quasipacticles) realize a massless two-dimensional (2D) Dirac-like Hamiltonian. It was shown that the Dirac magnon Hamiltonian preserves time-reversal symmetry defined with the sublattice pseudo spins and the Dirac points are robust against magnon-magnon interactions. The Dirac points also occur at nonzero energy. In this paper, we propose a simple realization of nontrivial topology (magnon edge states) in this system. We show that the Dirac points are gapped when the inversion symmetry of the lattice is broken by introducing a next-nearest neighbour Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Thus, the system realizes magnon edge states similar to the Haldane model for quantum anomalous Hall effect in electronic systems. However, in contrast to electronic spin current where dissipation can be very large due to Ohmic heating, noninteracting topological magnons can propagate for a long time without dissipation as magnons are uncharged particles. We observe the same magnon edge states for the XY model on the honeycomb lattice. Remarkably, in this case the model maps to interacting hardcore bosons on the honeycomb lattice. Quantum magnetic systems with nontrivial magnon edge states are called topological magnon insulators. They have been studied theoretically on the kagome lattice and recently observed experimentally on the kagome magnet Cu(1-3, bdc) with three magnon bulk bands. Our results for the honeycomb lattice suggests an experimental procedure to search for honeycomb topological magnon insulators within a class of 2D quantum magnets and ultracold atoms trapped in honeycomb optical lattices. In 3D lattices, Dirac and Weyl points were recently studied theoretically, however, the criteria that give rise to them were not well-understood. We argue that the low-energy Hamiltonian near the Weyl points should break time-reversal symmetry of the pseudo spins

  4. Honeycomb-like S = 5/2 Spin-Lattices in Manganese(II) Vanadates.

    PubMed

    Sanjeewa, Liurukara D; McGuire, Michael A; McMillen, Colin D; Willett, Daniel; Chumanov, George; Kolis, Joseph W

    2016-09-19

    New complex manganese vanadate materials were synthesized as high-quality single crystals in multi-millimeter lengths using a high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal method. One compound, Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4, was grown from Mn2O3 and V2O5 in 3 M CsOH at 580 °C and 1.5 kbar. Changing the mineralizer to 1 M CsOH/3MCsCl leads to the formation of another product, Mn6O(VO4)2(OH). Both compounds were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4: C2/m, Z = 2, a = 9.6568(9) Å, b = 9.5627(9) Å, c = 5.4139(6) Å, β = 98.529(8)°; Mn6O(VO4)2(OH): P21/m, Z = 2, a = 8.9363(12) Å, b = 6.4678(8) Å, c = 10.4478(13) Å, β = 99.798(3)°), revealing interesting low-dimensional transition-metal features. Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4 possesses complex honeycomb-type Mn-O layers, built from edge-sharing [MnO6] octahedra in the bc plane, with bridging vanadate groups connecting these layers along the a-axis. Mn6O(VO4)2(OH) presents a more complicated structure with both octahedral [MnO6] and trigonal bipyramidal [MnO5] units. A different pattern of planar honeycomb sheets are formed by edge-shared [MnO6] octahedra, and these sublattices are connected through edge-shared dimers of [MnO5] trigonal bipyramids to form corrugated sheets. Vanadate groups again condense the sheets into a three-dimensional framework. Infrared and Raman spectroscopies indicated the presence of OH groups and displayed characteristic Raman scattering due to vanadate groups. Temperature-dependent magnetic studies indicated Curie-Weiss behavior above 100 K with significant anti-ferromagnetic coupling for both compounds, with further complex magnetic behavior at lower temperatures. The data indicate canted anti-ferromagnetic order below 57 K in Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4 and below 45 K in Mn6O(VO4)2(OH). Members of another class of compounds, K2M3(VO4)2(OH)2 (M = Mn, Co), also containing a honeycomb-type sublattice, were also synthesized to allow a comparison of the structural features across all three

  5. Two-Dimensional Pnictogen Honeycomb Lattice: Structure, On-Site Spin-Orbit Coupling and Spin Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason; Tian, Wen-Chuan; Wang, Wei-Liang; Yao, Dao-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Because of its novel physical properties, two-dimensional materials have attracted great attention. From first-principle calculations and vibration frequencies analysis, we predict a new family of two-dimensional materials based on the idea of octet stability: honeycomb lattices of pnictogens (N, P, As, Sb, Bi). The buckled structures of materials come from the sp3 hybridization. These materials have indirect band gap ranging from 0.43 eV to 3.7 eV. From the analysis of projected density of states, we argue that the s and p orbitals together are sufficient to describe the electronic structure under tight-binding model, and the tight-binding parameters are obtained by fitting the band structures to first-principle results. Surprisingly large on-site spin-orbit coupling is found for all the pnictogen lattices except nitrogen. Investigation on the electronic structures of both zigzag and armchair nanoribbons reveals the possible existence of spin-polarized ferromagnetic edge states in some cases, which are rare in one-dimensional systems. These edge states and magnetism may exist under the condition of high vacuum and low temperature. This new family of materials would have promising applications in electronics, optics, sensors, and solar cells. PMID:26122870

  6. Ground-state phases of the spin-1 J1-J2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. H. Y.; Bishop, R. F.

    2016-06-01

    We study the zero-temperature quantum phase diagram of a spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice with both nearest-neighbor exchange coupling J1>0 and frustrating next-nearest-neighbor coupling J2≡κ J1>0 , using the coupled cluster method implemented to high orders of approximation, and based on model states with different forms of classical magnetic order. For each we calculate directly in the bulk thermodynamic limit both ground-state low-energy parameters (including the energy per spin, magnetic order parameter, spin stiffness coefficient, and zero-field uniform transverse magnetic susceptibility) and their generalized susceptibilities to various forms of valence-bond crystalline (VBC) order, as well as the energy gap to the lowest-lying spin-triplet excitation. In the range 0 <κ <1 we find evidence for four distinct phases. Two of these are quasiclassical phases with antiferromagnetic long-range order, one with two-sublattice Néel order for κ <κc1=0.250(5 ) , and another with four-sublattice Néel-II order for κ >κc 2=0.340 (5 ) . Two different paramagnetic phases are found to exist in the intermediate region. Over the range κc1<κ<κci=0.305 (5 ) we find a gapless phase with no discernible magnetic order, which is a strong candidate for being a quantum spin liquid, while over the range κci<κ <κc 2 we find a gapped phase, which is most likely a lattice nematic with staggered dimer VBC order that breaks the lattice rotational symmetry.

  7. Computational analysis of triangular and honeycomb lattice-structured tapered nanoholes for enhanced light trapping in thin-film Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Jolly; Becker, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    For an optimized light harvesting while using diverse periodic photonic light-trapping architectures in low cost thin film crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells, it is also of prime importance to tune the features of their lattice point basis structure. In view of this, tapered nanoholes would be of importance for envisaged better light in-coupling due to graded index effect and also from the point of fabrication feasibility. Using a 3D finite element method based computational simulator, we investigate the basis structural influence of triangular as well as honeycomb lattice-structured experimentally feasible tapered air nanoholes in ~400 nm thick c-Si absorber on a glass substrate. We present a detailed convergence analysis of volume absorption in Si absorber with cylindrical as well as tapered nanoholes. For a wavelength rage of 300 nm to 1100 nm, we present the computed results on light absorption of the engineered Si nanoholes for a lattice periodicity of 600nm. In particular, we study the influence of tapering angle of engineered nano air holes in Si thin film for the absorption enhancement in photonic triangular and honeycomb lattice structured tapered nanoholes. Further we make a comparative analysis of cylindrical and tapered nanoholes for a range of light incident angles from 0° to 60°. For the presented triangular as well as honeycomb lattice structured nanoholes, we observe that in comparison to the cylindrical nanoholes, the tapered nanoholes perform better in terms of light trapping for enhanced light absorption in textured Si thin films even when the effective volume fraction of Si is lower in the absorber layer with tapered nanoholes in comparison to that of cylindrical ones. From the maximum achievable short circuit current density estimation in the present study, the performance of c-Si absorbing layer engineered with triangular lattice structured tapered air holes harvests light efficiently owing to its higher lattice symmetry among periodic

  8. Enhancement of long-range correlations in a 2D vortex lattice by an incommensurate 1D disorder potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillamon, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Cordoba, R.; Sese, J.; de Teresa, J. M.; Ibarra, R.

    In two dimensional (2D) systems, theory has proposed that random disorder destroys long range correlations driving a transition to a glassy state. Here, I will discuss new insights into this issue obtained through the direct visualization of the critical behaviour of a 2D superconducting vortex lattice formed in a thin film with a smooth 1D thickness modulation. Using scanning tunneling microscopy at 0.1K, we have tracked the modification in the 2D vortex arrangements induced by the 1D thickness modulation while increasing the vortex density by three orders of magnitude. Upon increasing the field, we observed a two-step order-disorder transition in the 2D vortex lattice mediated by the appearance of dislocations and disclinations and accompanied by an increase in the local vortex density fluctuations. Through a detailed analysis of correlation functions, we find that the transition is driven by the incommensurate 1D thickness modulation. We calculate the critical points and exponents and find that they are well above theoretical expectation for random disorder. Our results show that long range 1D correlations in random potentials enhance the stability range of the ordered phase in a 2D vortex lattice. Work supported by Spanish MINECO, CIG Marie Curie Grant, Axa Research Fund and FBBVA.

  9. Fragile magnetic order in the honeycomb lattice Iridate Na2IrO3 revealed by magnetic impurity doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlawat, Kavita; Sharma, G.; Singh, Yogesh

    2015-10-01

    We report the structure, magnetic, and thermal property measurements on single-crystalline and polycrystalline samples of the Ru-substituted honeycomb lattice iridate Na2Ir1 -xRuxO3 (x =0 ,0.05 ,0.1 ,0.15 ,0.2 ,0.3 ,0.5 ) . The evolution of magnetism in Na2Ir1 -xRuxO3 has been studied using dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities and heat-capacity measurements. The parent compound Na2IrO3 is a spin-orbit-driven Mott insulator with magnetic order of reduced moments below TN=15 K . In the Ru-substituted samples the antiferromagnetic long-range state is replaced by a spin-glass-like state even for the smallest substitution suggesting that the magnetic order in Na2IrO3 is extremely fragile. We argue that these behaviors indicate the importance of nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange in the parent Na2IrO3 . Additionally, all samples show insulating electrical transport.

  10. Microsandwich honeycomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, T. Balakrishna; Wang, Taylor G.; Gibson, Lorna J.

    1989-01-01

    Microsandwich honeycombs are honeycombs in which the cell walls are themselves sandwich structures. This article develops the idea of microsandwich honeycombs, outlining their design principles, fabrication techniques and properties.

  11. Quantum fluctuations and Collective Oscillations of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a 2D Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Orso, G.; Stringari, S.; Menotti, C.

    2006-11-10

    We use Bogoliubov theory to calculate the beyond mean field correction to the equation of state of a weakly interacting Bose gas in the presence of a tight 2D optical lattice. We show that the lattice induces a characteristic 3D to 1D crossover in the behavior of quantum fluctuations. Using the hydrodynamic theory of superfluids, we calculate the corresponding shift of the collective frequencies of a harmonically trapped gas. We find that this correction can be of the order of a few percent and hence easily measurable in current experiments. The behavior of the quantum depletion of the condensate is also discussed.

  12. Crystal structures and magnetic properties of the honeycomb-lattice antiferromagnet M2(pymca)3(ClO4), (M = Fe, Co, Ni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Zentaro; Kodama, Takafumi; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Kida, Takanori; Okutani, Akira; Sakai, Masamichi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Kamata, Norihiko

    2016-09-01

    We report on the syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of a series of transition metal coordination polymers M2(pymca)3(ClO4), (pymca = pyrimidine-2-carboxylic acid, M = Fe (1), Co (2), and Ni (3)). These compounds are found to crystallize in a trigonal crystal system, space group P31m, with the lattice constants a = 9.727 Å and c = 5.996 Å for 1, a = 9.608 Å and c = 5.996 Å for 2, and a = 9.477 Å and c = 5.958 Å for 3 at room temperature. In these compounds, each pymca ligand connects to two M2+ ions, forming a honeycomb network in the ab plane. The temperature dependences of magnetic susceptibilities in these compounds show broad maxima, indicating antiferromagnetic interactions within two-dimensional honeycomb layers. We also observed an antiferromagnetic phase transition at low temperatures by magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. From the crystal structures and magnetic properties, we conclude that the compounds 1, 2, and 3 are good realizations of honeycomb-lattice antiferromagnets.

  13. Edge states in a honeycomb lattice: effects of anisotropic hopping and mixed edges

    SciTech Connect

    Dahal, Hari P; Balatsky, Alexander V; Sinistsyn, N A; Hu, Zi - Xiang; Yang, Kun

    2008-01-01

    We study the edge states in graphene in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the lattice. Most of the work done so far discusses the edge states in either zigzag or armchair edge graphene considering an isotropic electron hopping. In practice, graphene can have a mixture of armchair and zigzag edges and the electron hopping can be anisotropic, which is the subject of this article. We predict that the mixed edges smear the enhanced local density of states (LDOS) at E=0 of the zigzag edge and, on the other hand, the anisotropic hopping gives rise to the enhanced LDOS at E=0 in the armchair edge. The behavior of the LDOS can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments. We suggest that care must be taken while interpreting the STM data, because the clear distinction between the zigzag edge (enhanced LDOS at E=0) and armchair edge (suppressed LDOS at E=0) can be lost if the hopping is not isotropic and if the edges are mixed.

  14. Metastable States of a Gas of Dipolar Bosons in a 2D Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Menotti, C.; Trefzger, C.; Lewenstein, M.

    2007-06-08

    We investigate the physics of dipolar bosons in a two-dimensional optical lattice. It is known that due to the long-range character of dipole-dipole interaction, the ground state phase diagram of a gas of dipolar bosons in an optical lattice presents novel quantum phases, like checkerboard and supersolid phases. In this Letter, we consider the properties of the system beyond its ground state, finding that it is characterized by a multitude of almost degenerate metastable states, often competing with the ground state. This makes dipolar bosons in a lattice similar to a disordered system and opens possibilities of using them as quantum memories.

  15. Chiral Spin-Density Wave, Spin-Charge-Chern Liquid, and d +id Superconductivity in 1/4-Doped Correlated Electronic Systems on the Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shenghan; Mesaros, Andrej; Ran, Ying

    2014-07-01

    Recently, two interesting candidate quantum phases—the chiral spin-density wave state featuring anomalous quantum Hall effect and the d+id superconductor—were proposed for the Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4 doping. Using a combination of exact diagonalization, density matrix renormalization group, the variational Monte Carlo method, and quantum field theories, we study the quantum phase diagrams of both the Hubbard model and the t-J model on the honeycomb lattice at 1/4 doping. The main advantage of our approach is the use of symmetry quantum numbers of ground-state wave functions on finite-size systems (up to 32 sites) to sharply distinguish different quantum phases. Our results show that for 1≲U/t<40 in the Hubbard model and for 0.1honeycomb lattice.

  16. Interferometric approach to measuring band topology in 2D optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Abanin, Dmitry A; Kitagawa, Takuya; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2013-04-19

    Recently, optical lattices with nonzero Berry's phases of Bloch bands have been realized. New approaches for measuring Berry's phases and topological properties of bands with experimental tools appropriate for ultracold atoms need to be developed. In this Letter, we propose an interferometric method for measuring Berry's phases of two-dimensional Bloch bands. The key idea is to use a combination of Ramsey interference and Bloch oscillations to measure Zak phases, i.e., Berry's phases for closed trajectories corresponding to reciprocal lattice vectors. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to measure the Berry curvature of Bloch bands, the π Berry's phase of Dirac points, and the first Chern number of topological bands. We discuss several experimentally feasible realizations of this technique, which make it robust against low-frequency magnetic noise.

  17. Spin frustration in 2D kagomé lattices: a problem for inorganic synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Daniel G; Bartlett, Bart M; Grohol, Daniel; Papoutsakis, Dimitris; Shores, Matthew P

    2004-08-20

    A kagomé antiferromagnet presents an ideal construct for studying the unusual physics that result from the placement of magnetically frustrated spins on a low-dimensional lattice. Jarosites are the prototype for a spin-frustrated magnetic structure, because these materials are composed exclusively of kagomé layers. Notwithstanding, jarosite-type materials have escaped precise magnetic characterization over the past three decades, because they are notoriously difficult to prepare in pure and single-crystal forms. These hurdles have been overcome with the development of redox-based hydrothermal methods. Armed with pure and crystalline materials, several perplexing issues surrounding the magnetic properties of the jarosites have been resolved, yielding a detailed and comprehensive picture of the ground-state physics of this kagomé lattice.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann methods for some 2-D nonlinear diffusion equations:Computational results

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, B.H.; Rodrigue, G.H. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Levermore, C.D. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we examine two lattice Boltzmann methods (that are a derivative of lattice gas methods) for computing solutions to two two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations of the form {partial derivative}/{partial derivative}t u = v ({partial derivative}/{partial derivative}x D(u){partial derivative}/{partial derivative}x u + {partial derivative}/{partial derivative}y D(u){partial derivative}/{partial derivative}y u), where u = u({rvec x},t), {rvec x} {element of} R{sup 2}, v is a constant, and D(u) is a nonlinear term that arises from a Chapman-Enskog asymptotic expansion. In particular, we provide computational evidence supporting recent results showing that the methods are second order convergent (in the L{sub 1}-norm), conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Solutions computed via the lattice Boltzmann methods are compared with those computed by other explicit, second order, conservative, monotone finite difference methods. Results are reported for both the L{sub 1}- and L{sub {infinity}}-norms.

  19. Metal-dielectric photonic crystal superlattice: 1D and 2D models and empty lattice approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichin, G.; Weiss, T.; Gao, H.; Henzie, J.; Odom, T. W.; Tikhodeev, S. G.; Giessen, H.

    2012-10-01

    Periodic nanostructures are one of the main building blocks in modern nanooptics. They are used for constructing photonic crystals and metamaterials and provide optical properties that can be changed by adjusting the geometrical parameters of the structures. In this paper the optical properties of a photonic crystal slab with a 2D superlattice are discussed. The structure consists of a gold layer with a finite periodic pattern of air holes that is itself repeated periodically with a larger superperiod. We propose simplified 1D and 2D models to understand the physical nature of Wood's anomalies in the optical spectra of the investigated structure. The latter are attributed to the Rayleigh anomalies, surface plasmon Bragg resonances and the hole-localized plasmons.

  20. Dispersion relations of externally and thermally excited dust lattice modes in 2D complex plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xuefeng; Cui Jian; Zhang Yuan; Liu Yue

    2012-07-15

    The dispersion relations of the externally and thermally (naturally) excited dust lattice modes (both longitudinal and transverse) in two-dimensional Debye-Yukawa complex plasma crystals are investigated. The dispersion relations are calculated numerically by taking the neutral gas damping effects into account and the numerical results are in agreement with the experimental data given by Nunomura et al.[Phys. Rev. E 65, 066402 (2002)]. It is found that for the mode excited by an external disturbance with a real frequency, the dispersion properties are changed at a critical frequency near where the group velocity of the mode goes to zero. Therefore, the high frequency branch with negative dispersion cannot be reached. In contrast, for the thermally excited mode, the dispersion curve can extend all the way to the negative dispersion region, while a 'cut-off' wave number exists at the long wavelength end of the dispersion in the transverse mode.

  1. Kondo lattice on the edge of a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejko, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Much attention has been devoted recently to the experimental and theoretical study of the effect of magnetic impurities on the stability of the gapless boundary modes of topological insulators. When the quantum dynamics of the impurities is considered, those boundary modes constitute novel types of fermionic baths which may affect the nature of possible impurity phases and phase transitions. We study a regular one-dimensional array of quantum magnetic impurities interacting with the helical edge liquid of a two-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulator. Exact solutions at the special Toulouse and Luther-Emery points as well as a renormalization group analysis àla Anderson-Yuval allow us to construct a phase diagram in the space of Kondo coupling, electron-electron interaction strength, and electron density. We point out similarities and differences with the Kondo lattice in a ordinary one-dimensional electron gas.

  2. Fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane and classical Casimir-Polder force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-05-01

    We start with the well-known expression for the vacuum polarization and suitably modify it for 2+1-dimensional spin-orbit coupled (SOC) fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane described by the low-energy Liu-Yao-Feng-Ezawa (LYFE) model Hamiltonian involving the Dirac matrices in the chiral representation obeying the Clifford algebra. The silicene and germanene fit this description suitably. They have the Dirac cones similar to those of graphene and SOC is much stronger. The system could be normal or ferromagnetic in nature. The silicene turns into the latter type if there is exchange field arising due to the proximity coupling to a ferromagnet (FM) such as depositing Fe atoms to the silicene surface. For the silicene, we find that the many-body effects considerably change the bare Coulomb potential by way of the dependence of the Coulomb propagator on the real-spin, iso-spin and the potential due to an electric field applied perpendicular to the silicene plane. The computation aspect of the Casimir-Polder force (CPF) needs to be investigated in this paper. An important quantity in this process is the dielectric response function (DRF) of the material. The plasmon branch was obtained by finding the zeros of DRF in the long-wavelength limit. This leads to the plasmon frequencies. We find that the collective charge excitations at zero doping, i.e., intrinsic plasmons, in this system, are absent in the Dirac limit. The valley-spin-split intrinsic plasmons, however, come into being in the case of the massive Dirac particles with characteristic frequency close to 10 THz. Our scheme to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction (CPI) of a micro-particle with a sheet involves replacing the dielectric constant of the sample in the CPI expression obtained on the basis of the Lifshitz theory by the static DRF obtained using the expressions for the polarization function we started with. Though the approach replaces a macroscopic constant by a microscopic

  3. A hydrodynamically-consistent MRT lattice Boltzmann model on a 2D rectangular grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Min, Haoda; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2016-12-01

    A multiple-relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model on a D2Q9 rectangular grid is designed theoretically and validated numerically in the present work. By introducing stress components into the equilibrium moments, this MRT-LB model restores the isotropy of diffusive momentum transport at the macroscopic level (or in the continuum limit), leading to moment equations that are fully consistent with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model is derived by an inverse design process which is described in detail. Except one moment associated with the energy square, all other eight equilibrium moments can be theoretically and uniquely determined. The model is then carefully validated using both the two-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green vortex flow and lid-driven cavity flow, with different grid aspect ratios. The corresponding results from an earlier model (Bouzidi et al. (2001) [28]) are also presented for comparison. The results of Bouzidi et al.'s model show problems associated with anisotropy of viscosity coefficients, while the present model exhibits full isotropy and is accurate and stable.

  4. Adiabatic and Hamiltonian computing on a 2D lattice with simple two-qubit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Terhal, Barbara M.

    2016-02-01

    We show how to perform universal Hamiltonian and adiabatic computing using a time-independent Hamiltonian on a 2D grid describing a system of hopping particles which string together and interact to perform the computation. In this construction, the movement of one particle is controlled by the presence or absence of other particles, an effective quantum field effect transistor that allows the construction of controlled-NOT and controlled-rotation gates. The construction translates into a model for universal quantum computation with time-independent two-qubit ZZ and XX+YY interactions on an (almost) planar grid. The effective Hamiltonian is arrived at by a single use of first-order perturbation theory avoiding the use of perturbation gadgets. The dynamics and spectral properties of the effective Hamiltonian can be fully determined as it corresponds to a particular realization of a mapping between a quantum circuit and a Hamiltonian called the space-time circuit-to-Hamiltonian construction. Because of the simple interactions required, and because no higher-order perturbation gadgets are employed, our construction is potentially realizable using superconducting or other solid-state qubits.

  5. A hierarchical lattice spring model to simulate the mechanics of 2-D materials-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brely, Lucas; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    In the field of engineering materials, strength and toughness are typically two mutually exclusive properties. Structural biological materials such as bone, tendon or dentin have resolved this conflict and show unprecedented damage tolerance, toughness and strength levels. The common feature of these materials is their hierarchical heterogeneous structure, which contributes to increased energy dissipation before failure occurring at different scale levels. These structural properties are the key to exceptional bioinspired material mechanical properties, in particular for nanocomposites. Here, we develop a numerical model in order to simulate the mechanisms involved in damage progression and energy dissipation at different size scales in nano- and macro-composites, which depend both on the heterogeneity of the material and on the type of hierarchical structure. Both these aspects have been incorporated into a 2-dimensional model based on a Lattice Spring Model, accounting for geometrical nonlinearities and including statistically-based fracture phenomena. The model has been validated by comparing numerical results to continuum and fracture mechanics results as well as finite elements simulations, and then employed to study how structural aspects impact on hierarchical composite material properties. Results obtained with the numerical code highlight the dependence of stress distributions on matrix properties and reinforcement dispersion, geometry and properties, and how failure of sacrificial elements is directly involved in the damage tolerance of the material. Thanks to the rapidly developing field of nanocomposite manufacture, it is already possible to artificially create materials with multi-scale hierarchical reinforcements. The developed code could be a valuable support in the design and optimization of these advanced materials, drawing inspiration and going beyond biological materials with exceptional mechanical properties.

  6. Monte Carlo study of the honeycomb structure of anthraquinone molecules on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangmoo; Einstein, T. L.

    2011-06-01

    Using Monte Carlo calculations of the two-dimensional (2D) triangular lattice gas model, we demonstrate a mechanism for the spontaneous formation of honeycomb structure of anthraquinone (AQ) molecules on a Cu(111) plane. In our model long-range attractions play an important role, in addition to the long-range repulsions and short-range attractions proposed by Pawin, Wong, Kwon, and Bartels [ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1129309 313, 961 (2006)]. We provide a global account of the possible combinations of long-range attractive coupling constants which lead to a honeycomb superstructure. We also provide the critical temperature of disruption of the honeycomb structure and compare the critical local coverage rate of AQ’s where the honeycomb structure starts to form with the experimental observations.

  7. Large-s expansions for the low-energy parameters of the honeycomb-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet with spin quantum number s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. F.; Li, P. H. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The coupled cluster method (CCM) is employed to very high orders of approximation to study the ground-state (GS) properties of the spin-s Heisenberg antiferromagnet (with isotropic interactions, all of equal strength, between nearest-neighbour pairs only) on the honeycomb lattice. We calculate with high accuracy the complete set of GS parameters that fully describes the low-energy behaviour of the system, in terms of an effective magnon field theory, viz., the energy per spin, the magnetic order parameter (i.e., the sublattice magnetization), the spin stiffness and the zero-field (uniform, transverse) magnetic susceptibility, for all values of the spin quantum numbers in the range 1/2 ≤ s ≤ 9/2. The CCM data points are used to calculate the leading quantum corrections to the classical (s → ∞) values of these low-energy parameters, considered as large-s asymptotic expansions.

  8. Self-assembled honeycomb lattice in the monolayer of cyclic thiazyl diradical BDTDA (= 4,4′-bis(1,2,3,5-dithiadiazolyl)) on Cu(111) with a zero-bias tunneling spectra anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masayuki; Suizu, Rie; Dutta, Sudipta; Mishra, Puneet; Nakayama, Tomonobu; Sakamoto, Kazuyuki; Wakabayashi, Katsunori; Uchihashi, Takashi; Awaga, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation reveals that a cyclic thiazyl diradical, BDTDA (= 4,4′-bis(1,2,3,5-dithiadiazolyl)), forms a well-ordered monolayer honeycomb lattice consisting of paramagnetic corners with unpaired electrons on a clean Cu(111) surface. This BDTDA lattice is commensurate with the triangular lattice of Cu(111), with the former being 3 × 3 larger than the latter. The formation of the BDTDA monolayer structure, which is significantly different from its bulk form, is attributed to an interaction with the metal surface as well as the intermolecular assembling forces. STM spectroscopy measurements on the BDTDA molecules indicate the presence of a characteristic zero-bias anomaly centered at the Fermi energy. The origin of this zero-bias anomaly is discussed in terms of the Dirac cones inherent to the honeycomb structure. PMID:26678594

  9. Topological honeycomb magnon Hall effect: A calculation of thermal Hall conductivity of magnetic spin excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Quite recently, the magnon Hall effect of spin excitations has been observed experimentally on the kagome and pyrochlore lattices. The thermal Hall conductivity κxy changes sign as a function of magnetic field or temperature on the kagome lattice, and κxy changes sign upon reversing the sign of the magnetic field on the pyrochlore lattice. Motivated by these recent exciting experimental observations, we theoretically propose a simple realization of the magnon Hall effect in a two-band model on the honeycomb lattice. The magnon Hall effect of spin excitations arises in the usual way via the breaking of inversion symmetry of the lattice, however, by a next-nearest-neighbour Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. We find that κxy has a fixed sign for all parameter regimes considered. These results are in contrast to the Lieb, kagome, and pyrochlore lattices. We further show that the low-temperature dependence on the magnon Hall conductivity follows a T2 law, as opposed to the kagome and pyrochlore lattices. These results suggest an experimental procedure to measure thermal Hall conductivity within a class of 2D honeycomb quantum magnets and ultracold atoms trapped in a honeycomb optical lattice.

  10. Infrared probe of spin-phonon coupling in antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice compound Li2MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Seungjae; Lee, Sanghyun; Jeon, Seyoung; Park, Je-Geun; Moon, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated temperature-dependent infrared-active phonon modes of honeycomb Li2MnO3 which shows an antiferromagnetic transition at T N  =  36 K. In the far-infrared frequency region, we observed fourteen phonon modes. We obtained the temperature dependence of each phonon mode from the analysis of optical conductivity spectra by using the Lorentz and the Fano-type oscillator models. We found that the resonance frequencies of nine phonon modes showed an anomalous behavior near T N that should be attributed to the spin-phonon coupling. We calculated the magnitude of the spin-phonon coupling constant from the shift in the resonance frequencies of the phonon modes below T N. Our results suggest that Li2MnO3 is weakly frustrated and that spin-phonon coupling plays a role in antiferromagnetic ordering.

  11. An exact and efficient first passage time algorithm for reaction-diffusion processes on a 2D-lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzola, Andri; Bales, Benjamin B.; Alkire, Richard C.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an exact and efficient algorithm for reaction-diffusion-nucleation processes on a 2D-lattice. The algorithm makes use of first passage time (FPT) to replace the computationally intensive simulation of diffusion hops in KMC by larger jumps when particles are far away from step-edges or other particles. Our approach computes exact probability distributions of jump times and target locations in a closed-form formula, based on the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the corresponding 1D transition matrix, maintaining atomic-scale resolution of resulting shapes of deposit islands. We have applied our method to three different test cases of electrodeposition: pure diffusional aggregation for large ranges of diffusivity rates and for simulation domain sizes of up to 4096×4096 sites, the effect of diffusivity on island shapes and sizes in combination with a KMC edge diffusion, and the calculation of an exclusion zone in front of a step-edge, confirming statistical equivalence to standard KMC simulations. The algorithm achieves significant speedup compared to standard KMC for cases where particles diffuse over long distances before nucleating with other particles or being captured by larger islands.

  12. An exact and efficient first passage time algorithm for reaction–diffusion processes on a 2D-lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Bezzola, Andri; Bales, Benjamin B.; Alkire, Richard C.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an exact and efficient algorithm for reaction–diffusion–nucleation processes on a 2D-lattice. The algorithm makes use of first passage time (FPT) to replace the computationally intensive simulation of diffusion hops in KMC by larger jumps when particles are far away from step-edges or other particles. Our approach computes exact probability distributions of jump times and target locations in a closed-form formula, based on the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the corresponding 1D transition matrix, maintaining atomic-scale resolution of resulting shapes of deposit islands. We have applied our method to three different test cases of electrodeposition: pure diffusional aggregation for large ranges of diffusivity rates and for simulation domain sizes of up to 4096×4096 sites, the effect of diffusivity on island shapes and sizes in combination with a KMC edge diffusion, and the calculation of an exclusion zone in front of a step-edge, confirming statistical equivalence to standard KMC simulations. The algorithm achieves significant speedup compared to standard KMC for cases where particles diffuse over long distances before nucleating with other particles or being captured by larger islands.

  13. Design of single-mode waveguides for enhanced light-sound interaction in honeycomb-lattice silicon slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Escalante, Jose M. Martínez, Alejandro; Laude, Vincent

    2014-02-14

    We present the design of two waveguides (ladder and slot-ladder waveguides) implemented in a silicon honeycomb photonic-phononic crystal slab, which can support slow electromagnetic and elastic guided modes simultaneously. Interestingly, the photonic bandgap extends along the first Brillouin zone; so with an appropriate design, we can suppress propagation losses that arise coupling to radiative modes. From the phononic point of view, we explain the slow elastic wave effect by considering the waveguide as a chain of coupled acoustic resonators (coupled resonant acoustic waveguide), which provides the mechanism for slow elastic wave propagation. The ladder waveguide moreover supports guided phononic modes outside the phononic bandgap, similar to photonic slab modes, resulting in highly confined phononic modes propagating with low losses. Such waveguides could find important applications to the observation of optomechanical and electrostriction effects, as well as to enhanced stimulated Brillouin scattering and other opto-acoustical effects in nanoscale silicon structures. We also suggest that they can be the basis for a “perfect” photonic-phononic cavity in which damping by coupling to the surroundings is completely forbidden.

  14. Quantum phase transition, universality, and scaling behaviors in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg model with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic competing interactions on a honeycomb lattice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Zhen; Xi, Bin; Chen, Xi; Li, Wei; Wang, Zheng-Chuan; Su, Gang

    2016-06-01

    The quantum phase transition, scaling behaviors, and thermodynamics in the spin-1/2 quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic coupling J>0 in the armchair direction and ferromagnetic interaction J^{'}<0 in the zigzag direction on a honeycomb lattice are systematically studied using the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. By calculating the Binder ratio Q_{2} and spin stiffness ρ in two directions for various coupling ratios α=J^{'}/J under different lattice sizes, we found that a quantum phase transition from the dimerized phase to the stripe phase occurs at the quantum critical point α_{c}=-0.93. Through the finite-size scaling analysis on Q_{2}, ρ_{x}, and ρ_{y}, we determined the critical exponent related to the correlation length ν to be 0.7212(8), implying that this transition falls into a classical Heisenberg O(3) universality. A zero magnetization plateau is observed in the dimerized phase, whose width decreases with increasing α. A phase diagram in the coupling ratio α-magnetic field h plane is obtained, where four phases, including dimerized, stripe, canted stripe, and polarized, are identified. It is also unveiled that the temperature dependence of the specific heat C(T) for different α's intersects precisely at one point, similar to that of liquid ^{3}He under different pressures and several magnetic compounds under various magnetic fields. The scaling behaviors of Q_{2}, ρ, and C(T) are carefully analyzed. The susceptibility is compared with the experimental data to give the magnetic parameters of both compounds. PMID:27415211

  15. Quantum phase transition, universality, and scaling behaviors in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg model with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic competing interactions on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Zhen; Xi, Bin; Chen, Xi; Li, Wei; Wang, Zheng-Chuan; Su, Gang

    2016-06-01

    The quantum phase transition, scaling behaviors, and thermodynamics in the spin-1/2 quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic coupling J >0 in the armchair direction and ferromagnetic interaction J'<0 in the zigzag direction on a honeycomb lattice are systematically studied using the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. By calculating the Binder ratio Q2 and spin stiffness ρ in two directions for various coupling ratios α =J'/J under different lattice sizes, we found that a quantum phase transition from the dimerized phase to the stripe phase occurs at the quantum critical point αc=-0.93 . Through the finite-size scaling analysis on Q2, ρx, and ρy, we determined the critical exponent related to the correlation length ν to be 0.7212(8), implying that this transition falls into a classical Heisenberg O(3) universality. A zero magnetization plateau is observed in the dimerized phase, whose width decreases with increasing α . A phase diagram in the coupling ratio α -magnetic field h plane is obtained, where four phases, including dimerized, stripe, canted stripe, and polarized, are identified. It is also unveiled that the temperature dependence of the specific heat C (T ) for different α 's intersects precisely at one point, similar to that of liquid 3He under different pressures and several magnetic compounds under various magnetic fields. The scaling behaviors of Q2, ρ , and C (T ) are carefully analyzed. The susceptibility is compared with the experimental data to give the magnetic parameters of both compounds.

  16. Pure spin current and perfect valley filter by designed separation of the chiral states in two-dimensional honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da-Ping; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Yu-Liang

    2016-10-01

    We propose a realization of pure spin currents and perfect valley filters based on a quantum anomalous Hall insulator, around which edge states with up spin and down spin circulate. By applying staggered sublattice potential on the strips along the edges of sample, the edge states with down spin can be pushed into the inner boundaries of the strips while the other edge states with up spin remain on the outer boundaries, resulting in spatially separated chiral states with perfect spin polarization. Moreover, a valley filter, which is immune to both long-range and short-range scatterers, can be engineered by additionally applying boundary potentials on the outmost lattices of the sample. We also find that the boundary potential can be used to control the size effect induced oscillation of the inner chiral states. The connection of the boundary potential to size effect is revealed.

  17. Theoretical Predictions of Freestanding Honeycomb Sheets of Cadmium Chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kent, Paul R; Xie, Yu; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Smith, Sean C

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanocrystals of CdX (X = S, Se, Te) typically grown by colloidal synthesis are coated with organic ligands. Recent experimental work on ZnSe showed that the organic ligands can be removed at elevated temperature, giving a freestanding 2D sheet of ZnSe. In this theoretical work, freestanding single- to few-layer sheets of CdX, each possessing a pseudo honeycomb lattice, are considered by cutting along all possible lattice planes of the bulk zinc blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) phases. Using density functional theory, we have systematically studied their geometric structures, energetics, and electronic properties. A strong surface distortion is found to occur for all of the layered sheets, and yet all of the pseudo honeycomb lattices are preserved, giving unique types of surface corrugations and different electronic properties. The energetics, in combination with phonon mode calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, indicate that the syntheses of these freestanding 2D sheets could be selective, with the single- to few-layer WZ110, WZ100, and ZB110 sheets being favored. Through the GW approximation, it is found that all single-layer sheets have large band gaps falling into the ultraviolet range, while thicker sheets in general have reduced band gaps in the visible and ultraviolet range. On the basis of the present work and the experimental studies on freestanding double-layer sheets of ZnSe, we envision that the freestanding 2D layered sheets of CdX predicted herein are potential synthesis targets, which may offer tunable band gaps depending on their structural features including surface corrugations, stacking motifs, and number of layers.

  18. Antiferromagnetism in 2D arrays of superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidović, D.; Kumar, S.; Reich, D. H.; Siegel, J.; Field, S. B.; Tiberio, R. C.; Hey, R.; Ploog, K.

    1996-03-01

    An array of isolated superconducting rings at Φ_0/2 applied flux is equivalent to a 2D random field Ising antiferromagnet. The quantized magnetic moments of the rings play the role of Ising spins, and small variations in the rings' areas lead to a Gaussian random field. Using SQUID magnetometry and scanning Hall probe microscopy, we studied the dynamics and antiferromagnetic correlations of arrays of micron-size Al rings, arranged on square, honeycomb, triangular, and kagomé lattices. All the arrays exhibit short range antiferromagnetic order. Spin freezing at low temperatures and the random field prevent the development of long range correlations on bipartite lattices. Effects of geometrical frustration on the triangular and kagomé lattices were also observed.

  19. 2D Lattice Boltzmann Simulation Of Chemical Reactions Within Rayleigh-Bénard And Poiseuille-Bénard Convection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya-Ventura, Gilberto; Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with the computational simulation of the reaction-diffusion-advection phenomena emerging in Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) and Poiseuille-Bénard reactive convection systems. We use the Boussinesq's approximation for buoyancy forces and the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The first kinetic mesoscopic model proposed here is based on the discrete Boltzmann equation needed to solve the momentum balance coupled with buoyancy forces. Then, a second lattice Boltzmann algorithm is applied to solve the reaction-diffusion-advection equation to calculate the evolution of the chemical species concentration. We use a reactive system composed by nitrous oxide (so call laughing gas) in air as an example; its spatio-temporal decomposition is calculated. Two cases are considered, a rectangular enclosed cavity and an open channel. The simulations are performed at low Reynolds numbers and in a steady state between the first and second thermo-hydrodynamic instabilities. The results presented here, for the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior, are in good agreement with experimental data; while our| chemical kinetics simulation yields expected results. Some applications of our approach are related to chemical reactors and atmospheric phenomena, among others.

  20. Programmable hierarchical three-component 2D assembly at a liquid-solid interface: recognition, selection, and transformation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shengbin; Surin, Mathieu; Tahara, Kazukuni; Adisoejoso, Jinne; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Tobe, Yoshito; De Feyter, Steven

    2008-08-01

    Recognition and selection are of fundamental importance for the hierarchical assembly of supramolecular systems. Coronene induces the formation of a hydrogen-bonded isophthalic acid supramolecular macrocycle, and this well-defined heterocluster forces, in its turn, DBA1 to form a van der Waals stabilized honeycomb lattice, leading to a three-component 2D crystal containing nine molecules in the unit cell. The recognition and selection events enable efficient error correction and healing in redundant mixtures.

  1. Effect of random structure on permeability and heat transfer characteristics for flow in 2D porous medium based on MRT lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, PeiPei; Wen, Zhi; Dou, RuiFeng; Liu, Xunliang

    2016-08-01

    Flow and heat transfer through a 2D random porous medium are studied by using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). For the random porous medium, the influence of disordered cylinder arrangement on permeability and Nusselt number are investigated. Results indicate that the permeability and Nusselt number for different cylinder locations are unequal even with the same number and size of cylinders. New correlations for the permeability and coefficient b‧Den of the Forchheimer equation are proposed for random porous medium composed of Gaussian distributed circular cylinders. Furthermore, a general set of heat transfer correlations is proposed and compared with existing experimental data and empirical correlations. Our results show that the Nu number increases with the increase of the porosity, hence heat transfer is found to be accurate considering the effect of porosity.

  2. Optical filter based on contra-directional waveguide coupling in a 2D photonic crystal with square lattice of dielectric rods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Wang, Jiangang; He, Qingsheng; Cao, Liangcai; Su, Ping; Jin, Guofan

    2005-07-25

    A coupler-type optical filter in 2D photonic crystal (PhC) with square lattice of dielectric rods in air is presented. The reduced-index and increased-index waveguides of filter have dispersion curves with opposite slopes to realize contra-directional coupling, and the point of anti-crossing is designed below the light line to avoid vertical radiation. The filter has a broad operable bandwidth due to the absence of mini stop bands. The transmission properties are analyzed using coupled modes theory (CMT) and simulated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results show that a filtering bandwidth of 4 nm can be achieved in the range of 1500~1600 nm, and over 83% drop coefficient is obtained.

  3. Two-Dimensional Iron Tungstate: A Ternary Oxide Layer With Honeycomb Geometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The exceptional physical properties of graphene have sparked tremendous interests toward two-dimensional (2D) materials with honeycomb structure. We report here the successful fabrication of 2D iron tungstate (FeWOx) layers with honeycomb geometry on a Pt(111) surface, using the solid-state reaction of (WO3)3 clusters with a FeO(111) monolayer on Pt(111). The formation process and the atomic structure of two commensurate FeWOx phases, with (2 × 2) and (6 × 6) periodicities, have been characterized experimentally by combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and understood theoretically by density functional theory (DFT) modeling. The thermodynamically most stable (2 × 2) phase has a formal FeWO3 stoichiometry and corresponds to a buckled Fe2+/W4+ layer arranged in a honeycomb lattice, terminated by oxygen atoms in Fe–W bridging positions. This 2D FeWO3 layer has a novel structure and stoichiometry and has no analogues to known bulk iron tungstate phases. It is theoretically predicted to exhibit a ferromagnetic electronic ground state with a Curie temperature of 95 K, as opposed to the antiferromagnetic behavior of bulk FeWO4 materials. PMID:27110319

  4. Strain induced topological phase transitions in monolayer honeycomb structures of group-V binary compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yaozhuang; Rahman, Mavlanjan; Wang, Daowei; Wang, Can; Guo, Guanghua

    2015-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of electronic structures of a class of two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures of group-V binary compounds. Our results show these new 2D materials are stable semiconductors with direct or indirect band gaps. The band gap can be tuned by applying lattice strain. During their stretchable regime, they all exhibit metal-indirect gap semiconductor-direct gap semiconductor-topological insulator (TI) transitions with increasing strain from negative (compressive) to positive (tensile) values. The topological phase transition results from the band inversion at the Γ point which is due to the evolution of bonding and anti-bonding states under lattice strain. PMID:26656257

  5. Two-dimensional topological crystalline insulator phase in Sb/Bi planar honeycomb with tunable Dirac gap

    DOE PAGES

    Hsu, Chia -Hsiu; Huang, Zhi -Quan; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yao, Liang -Zi; Chuang, Feng -Chuan; Liu, Yu -Tzu; Wang, Baokai; Hsu, Chuang -Han; Lee, Chi -Cheng; Lin, Hsin; et al

    2016-01-14

    We predict planar Sb/Bi honeycomb to harbor a two-dimensional (2D) topological crystalline insulator (TCI) phase based on first-principles computations. Although buckled Sb and Bi honeycombs support 2D topological insulator (TI) phases, their structure becomes planar under tensile strain. The planar Sb/Bi honeycomb structure restores the mirror symmetry, and is shown to exhibit non-zero mirror Chern numbers, indicating that the system can host topologically protected edge states. Our computations show that the electronic spectrum of a planar Sb/Bi nanoribbon with armchair or zigzag edges contains two Dirac cones within the band gap and an even number of edge bands crossing themore » Fermi level. Lattice constant of the planar Sb honeycomb is found to nearly match that of hexagonal-BN. As a result, the Sb nanoribbon on hexagonal-BN exhibits gapped edge states, which we show to be tunable by an out-of the-plane electric field, providing controllable gating of edge state important for device applications.« less

  6. Two-dimensional Topological Crystalline Insulator Phase in Sb/Bi Planar Honeycomb with Tunable Dirac Gap

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yao, Liang-Zi; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Liu, Yu-Tzu; Wang, Baokai; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2016-01-01

    We predict planar Sb/Bi honeycomb to harbor a two-dimensional (2D) topological crystalline insulator (TCI) phase based on first-principles computations. Although buckled Sb and Bi honeycombs support 2D topological insulator (TI) phases, their structure becomes planar under tensile strain. The planar Sb/Bi honeycomb structure restores the mirror symmetry, and is shown to exhibit non-zero mirror Chern numbers, indicating that the system can host topologically protected edge states. Our computations show that the electronic spectrum of a planar Sb/Bi nanoribbon with armchair or zigzag edges contains two Dirac cones within the band gap and an even number of edge bands crossing the Fermi level. Lattice constant of the planar Sb honeycomb is found to nearly match that of hexagonal-BN. The Sb nanoribbon on hexagonal-BN exhibits gapped edge states, which we show to be tunable by an out-of-the-plane electric field, providing controllable gating of edge state important for device applications. PMID:26764118

  7. Two-dimensional Topological Crystalline Insulator Phase in Sb/Bi Planar Honeycomb with Tunable Dirac Gap.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Crisostomo, Christian P; Yao, Liang-Zi; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Liu, Yu-Tzu; Wang, Baokai; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2016-01-01

    We predict planar Sb/Bi honeycomb to harbor a two-dimensional (2D) topological crystalline insulator (TCI) phase based on first-principles computations. Although buckled Sb and Bi honeycombs support 2D topological insulator (TI) phases, their structure becomes planar under tensile strain. The planar Sb/Bi honeycomb structure restores the mirror symmetry, and is shown to exhibit non-zero mirror Chern numbers, indicating that the system can host topologically protected edge states. Our computations show that the electronic spectrum of a planar Sb/Bi nanoribbon with armchair or zigzag edges contains two Dirac cones within the band gap and an even number of edge bands crossing the Fermi level. Lattice constant of the planar Sb honeycomb is found to nearly match that of hexagonal-BN. The Sb nanoribbon on hexagonal-BN exhibits gapped edge states, which we show to be tunable by an out-of-the-plane electric field, providing controllable gating of edge state important for device applications. PMID:26764118

  8. Honeycomb superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ping; Dong, Lifang Yang, Jing; Gao, Yenan; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Ben

    2015-02-15

    We report on a honeycomb superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air for the first time. It consists of hexagon lattice and honeycomb framework and bifurcates from a hexagon pattern as the applied voltage increases. A phase diagram of the pattern as a function of the gas component and gas pressure is presented. The instantaneous images show that the hexagon lattice and honeycomb framework are ignited in turn in each half voltage cycle. The honeycomb framework is composed of filaments ignited randomly. The spatiotemporal dynamics of honeycomb superlattice pattern is discussed by wall charges.

  9. Superdiffusion in a honeycomb billiard.

    PubMed

    Schmiedeberg, Michael; Stark, Holger

    2006-03-01

    We investigate particle transport in the honeycomb billiard which consists of connected channels placed on the edges of a honeycomb structure. The spreading of particles is superdiffusive due to the existence of ballistic trajectories which we term perfect paths. Simulations give a time exponent of 1.72 for the mean-square displacement and a starlike, i.e., anisotropic, particle distribution. We present an analytical treatment based on the formalism of continuous-time random walks and explain the anisotropic distribution under the assumption that the perfect paths follow the directions of the six lattice axes. Furthermore, we derive a relation between the time exponent and the exponent of the distribution function for trajectories close to a perfect path. In billiards with randomly distributed channels, conventional diffusion is always observed in the long-time limit, although for small disorder transient superdiffusional behavior exists. Our simulation results are again supported by an analytical analysis. PMID:16605506

  10. Designing artificial two dimensional electron lattice on metal surface: a Kagome-like lattice as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Qiu, Wen-Xuan; Gao, Jin-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a new kind of artificial two dimensional (2D) electron lattice on the nanoscale, i.e. molecular graphene, has drawn a lot of interest, where the metal surface electrons are transformed into a honeycomb lattice via absorbing a molecular lattice on the metal surface [Gomes et al., Nature, 2012, 438, 306; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 196803]. In this work, we theoretically demonstrate that this technique can be readily used to build other complex 2D electron lattices on a metal surface, which are of high interest in the field of condensed matter physics. The main challenge to build a complex 2D electron lattice is that this is a quantum antidot system, where the absorbed molecule normally exerts a repulsive potential on the surface electrons. Thus, there is no straightforward corresponding relation between the molecular lattice pattern and the desired 2D lattice of surface electrons. Here, we give an interesting example about the Kagome lattice, which has exotic correlated electronic states. We design a special molecular pattern and show that this molecular lattice can transform the surface electrons into a Kagome-like lattice. The numerical simulation is conducted using a Cu(111) surface and CO molecules. We first estimate the effective parameters of the Cu/CO system by fitting experimental data of the molecular graphene. Then, we calculate the corresponding energy bands and LDOS of the surface electrons in the presence of the proposed molecular lattice. Finally, we interpret the numerical results by the tight binding model of the Kagome lattice. We hope that our work can stimulate further theoretical and experimental interest in this novel artificial 2D electron lattice system.

  11. Designing artificial two dimensional electron lattice on metal surface: a Kagome-like lattice as an example.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Qiu, Wen-Xuan; Gao, Jin-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a new kind of artificial two dimensional (2D) electron lattice on the nanoscale, i.e. molecular graphene, has drawn a lot of interest, where the metal surface electrons are transformed into a honeycomb lattice via absorbing a molecular lattice on the metal surface [Gomes et al., Nature, 2012, 438, 306; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 196803]. In this work, we theoretically demonstrate that this technique can be readily used to build other complex 2D electron lattices on a metal surface, which are of high interest in the field of condensed matter physics. The main challenge to build a complex 2D electron lattice is that this is a quantum antidot system, where the absorbed molecule normally exerts a repulsive potential on the surface electrons. Thus, there is no straightforward corresponding relation between the molecular lattice pattern and the desired 2D lattice of surface electrons. Here, we give an interesting example about the Kagome lattice, which has exotic correlated electronic states. We design a special molecular pattern and show that this molecular lattice can transform the surface electrons into a Kagome-like lattice. The numerical simulation is conducted using a Cu(111) surface and CO molecules. We first estimate the effective parameters of the Cu/CO system by fitting experimental data of the molecular graphene. Then, we calculate the corresponding energy bands and LDOS of the surface electrons in the presence of the proposed molecular lattice. Finally, we interpret the numerical results by the tight binding model of the Kagome lattice. We hope that our work can stimulate further theoretical and experimental interest in this novel artificial 2D electron lattice system. PMID:27279292

  12. HP-Lattice QSAR for dynein proteins: experimental proteomics (2D-electrophoresis, mass spectrometry) and theoretic study of a Leishmania infantum sequence.

    PubMed

    Dea-Ayuela, María Auxiliadora; Pérez-Castillo, Yunierkis; Meneses-Marcel, Alfredo; Ubeira, Florencio M; Bolas-Fernández, Francisco; Chou, Kuo-Chen; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2008-08-15

    The toxicity and inefficacy of actual organic drugs against Leishmaniosis justify research projects to find new molecular targets in Leishmania species including Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) and Leishmaniamajor (L. major), both important pathogens. In this sense, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods, which are very useful in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry to discover small-sized drugs, may help to identify not only new drugs but also new drug targets, if we apply them to proteins. Dyneins are important proteins of these parasites governing fundamental processes such as cilia and flagella motion, nuclear migration, organization of the mitotic splinde, and chromosome separation during mitosis. However, despite the interest for them as potential drug targets, so far there has been no report whatsoever on dyneins with QSAR techniques. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first QSAR for dynein proteins. We used as input the Spectral Moments of a Markov matrix associated to the HP-Lattice Network of the protein sequence. The data contain 411 protein sequences of different species selected by ClustalX to develop a QSAR that correctly discriminates on average between 92.75% and 92.51% of dyneins and other proteins in four different train and cross-validation datasets. We also report a combined experimental and theoretic study of a new dynein sequence in order to illustrate the utility of the model to search for potential drug targets with a practical example. First, we carried out a 2D-electrophoresis analysis of L. infantum biological samples. Next, we excised from 2D-E gels one spot of interest belonging to an unknown protein or protein fragment in the region M<20,200 and pI<4. We used MASCOT search engine to find proteins in the L. major data base with the highest similarity score to the MS of the protein isolated from L. infantum. We used the QSAR model to predict the new sequence as dynein with probability of 99.99% without

  13. Nano-spatial parameters from 3D to 2D lattice dimensionality by organic variant in [ZnCl4]- [R]+ hybrid materials: Structure, architecture-lattice dimensionality, microscopy, optical Eg and PL correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajit; Verma, Sanjay K.; Alvi, P. A.; Jasrotia, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    The nanospatial morphological features of [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ hybrid derivative depicts 28 nm granular size and 3D spreader shape packing pattern as analyzed by FESEM and single crystal XRD structural studies. The organic moiety connect the inorganic components through N-H+…Cl- hydrogen bond to form a hybrid composite, the replacement of organic derivatives from 2-methylpyridine to 2-Amino-5-choloropyridine results the increase in granular size from 28nm to 60nm and unit cell packing pattern from 3D-2D lattice dimensionality along ac plane. The change in optical energy direct band gap value from 3.01eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ (HM1) to 3.42eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H5ClN2]+ (HM2) indicates the role of organic moiety in optical properties of hybrid materials. The photoluminescence emission spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 370 to 600 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.66a.u. at 438 nm for (HM1) and 370 to 600 nm with max peak intensity of 9.91 a.u. at 442 nm for (HM2), indicating that the emission spectra lies in visible range. PL excitation spectra depicts the maximum excitation intensity [9.8] at 245.5 nm for (HM1) and its value of 9.9 a.u. at 294 nm, specify the excitation spectra lies in UV range. Photoluminescence excitation spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 280 to 350 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.4 a.u. at 285.5 nm and 9.9 a.u. at 294 and 297 nm, indicating excitation in the UV spectrum. Single crystal growth process and detailed physiochemical characterization such as XRD, FESEM image analysis photoluminescence property reveals the structure stability with non-covalent interactions, lattice dimensionality (3D-2D) correlations interweaving into the design of inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

  14. Structural Physics of Bee Honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-03-01

    Honeybee combs have aroused interest in the ability of honeybees to form regular hexagonal geometric constructs since ancient times. Here we use a real space technique based on the pair distribution function (PDF) and radial distribution function (RDF), and a reciprocal space method utilizing the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) to quantify the order for a range of honeycombs made by Apis mellifera. The PDFs and RDFs are fit with a series of Gaussian curves. We characterize the order in the honeycomb using a real space order parameter, OP3, to describe the order in the combs and a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller order parameter, u, is derived. Both OP3 and u take values from [0, 1] where the value one represents perfect order. The analyzed combs have values of OP3 from 0.33 to 0.60 and values of u from 0.83 to 0.98. RDF fits of honeycomb histograms show that naturally made comb can be crystalline in a 2D ordered structural sense, yet is more `liquid-like' than cells made on `foundation' wax. We show that with the assistance of man-made foundation wax, honeybees can manufacture highly ordered arrays of hexagonal cells.

  15. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  16. Construction of 2D atomic crystals on transition metal surfaces: graphene, silicene, and hafnene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Zhang, Lizhi; Huang, Li; Li, Linfei; Meng, Lei; Gao, Min; Huan, Qing; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2014-06-12

    The synthesis and structures of graphene on Ru(0001) and Pt(111), silicene on Ag(111) and Ir(111) and the honeycomb hafnium lattice on Ir(111) are reviewed. Epitaxy on a transition metal (TM) substrate is a pro-mising method to produce a variety of two dimensional (2D) atomic crystals which potentially can be used in next generation electronic devices. This method is particularly valuable in the case of producing 2D materials that do not exist in 3D forms, for instance, silicene. Based on the intensive investigations of epitaxial graphene on TM in recent years, it is known that the quality of graphene is affected by many factors, including the interaction between the 2D material overlayer and the substrate, the lattice mismatch, the nucleation density at the early stage of growth. It is found that these factors also apply to many other epitaxial 2D crystals on TM. The knowledge from the reviewed systems will shine light on the design and synthesis of new 2D crystals with novel properties.

  17. Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring frame/stringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin veil- efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels was made -hick incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining their strength. The majority of the designs were centered around the concept of creating areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced/recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  18. Honeycombs in honeycombs: complex liquid crystal alumina composite mesostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruibin; Zeng, Xianbing; Prehm, Marko; Liu, Feng; Grimm, Silko; Geuss, Markus; Steinhart, Martin; Tschierske, Carsten; Ungar, Goran

    2014-05-27

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study orientation patterns of two polyphilic liquid crystals (LC) confined to cylindrical pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO). The hierarchical hybrid systems had the LC honeycomb (lattice parameter 3.5-4 nm) inside the pores of the AAO honeycomb (diameters 60 and 400 nm). By conducting complete reciprocal space mapping using SAXS, we conclude that the columns of both compounds align in planes normal to the AAO pore axis, with a specific crystallographic direction of the LC lattice aligning strictly parallel to the pore axis. AFM of LC-containing AAO fracture surfaces further revealed that the columns of the planar anchoring LC (compound 1) formed concentric circles in the plane normal to the pore axis near the AAO wall. Toward the pore center, the circles become anisometric "racetrack" loops consisting of two straight segments and two semicircles. This mode compensates for slight ellipticity of the pore cross section. Indications are, however, that for perfectly circular pores, circular shape is maintained right to the center of the pore, the radius coming down to the size of a molecule. For the homeotropically anchoring compound 2, the columns are to the most part straight and parallel to each other, arranged in layers normal to the AAO pore axis, like logs in an ordered pile. Only near the pore wall the columns splay somewhat. In both cases, columns are confined to layers strictly perpendicular to the AAO pore axis, and there is no sign of escape to the third dimension or of axial orientation, the latter having been reported previously for some discotic LCs. The main cause of the two new LC configurations, the "racetrack" and the "logpile", and of their difference from those of confined nematic LC, is the very high splay energy and low bend energy of columnar phases.

  19. Identical band gaps in structurally re-entrant honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu-Wei; Deng, Zi-Chen

    2016-08-01

    Structurally re-entrant honeycomb is a sort of artificial lattice material, characterized by star-like unit cells with re-entrant topology, as well as a high connectivity that the number of folded sheets jointing at each vertex is at least six. In-plane elastic wave propagation in this highly connected honeycomb is investigated through the application of the finite element method in conjunction with the Bloch's theorem. Attention is devoted to exploring the band characteristics of two lattice configurations with different star-like unit cells, defined as structurally square re-entrant honeycomb (SSRH) and structurally hexagonal re-entrant honeycomb (SHRH), respectively. Identical band gaps involving their locations and widths, interestingly, are present in the two considered configurations, attributed to the resonance of the sketch folded sheets, the basic component elements for SSRH and SHRH. In addition, the concept of heuristic models is implemented to elucidate the underlying physics of the identical gaps. The phenomenon of the identical bandgaps is not only beneficial for people to further explore the band characteristics of lattice materials, but also provides the structurally re-entrant honeycombs as potential host structures for the design of lattice-based metamaterials of interest for elastic wave control. PMID:27586722

  20. Prediction of Near-Room-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect on Honeycomb Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binghai; Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun

    2015-03-01

    Recently, this long-sought quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in the magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (~ 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, which are found to be 2D topological insulators, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV, respectively. The ferromagnetic order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and consequently an ferromagnetic insulator with large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions. We thank the helpful discussions with C. Felser, S. Kanugo, C.-X. Liu, Z. Wang, Y. Xu, K. Wu, and Y. Zhou.

  1. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  2. Extruded ceramic honeycomb and method

    DOEpatents

    Day, J. Paul

    1995-04-04

    Extruded low-expansion ceramic honeycombs comprising beta-spodumene solid solution as the principal crystal phase and with less than 7 weight percent of included mullite are produced by compounding an extrusion batch comprising a lithium aluminosilicate glass powder and a clay additive, extruding a green honeycomb body from the batch, and drying and firing the green extruded cellular honeycomb to crystallize the glass and clay into a low-expansion spodumene ceramic honeycomb body.

  3. Wax Reinforces Honeycomb During Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towell, Timothy W.; Fahringer, David T.; Vasquez, Peter; Scheidegger, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    Method of machining on conventional metal lathe devised for precise cutting of axisymmetric contours on honeycomb cores made of composite (matrix/fiber) materials. Wax filling reinforces honeycomb walls against bending and tearing while honeycomb being contoured on lathe. Innovative method of machining on lathe involves preparation in which honeycomb is placed in appropriate fixture and the fixture is then filled with molten water-soluble wax. Number of different commercial waxes have been tried.

  4. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-28

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ∼1000 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.

  5. Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides with a hexagonal lattice: Room-temperature quantum spin Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yandong; Kou, Liangzhi; Li, Xiao; Dai, Ying; Heine, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    So far, several transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC)-based two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) have been discovered, all of them based on a tetragonal lattice. However, in 2D crystals, the hexagonal rather than the tetragonal symmetry is the most common motif. Here, based on first principles calculations, we propose a class of stable 2D TMDCs of composition MX2(M =Mo ,W ;X =S ,Se ,Te ) with a hexagonal lattice. They are all in the same stability range as other 2D TMDC allotropes that have been demonstrated experimentally, and they are identified to be practical 2D TIs with large band gaps ranging from 41 to 198 meV, making them suitable for applications at room temperature. Besides, in contrast to tetragonal 2D TMDCs, their hexagonal lattice will greatly facilitate the integration of theses novel TI state van der Waals crystals with other hexagonal or honeycomb materials and thus provide a route for 2D material-based devices for wider nanoelectronic and spintronic applications. The nontrivial band gaps of both WS e2 and WT e2 2D crystals are 198 meV, which are larger than that in any previously reported TMDC-based TIs. These large band gaps entirely stem from the strong spin orbit coupling strength within the d orbitals of Mo/W atoms near the Fermi level. Our findings broaden the scientific and technological impact of both 2D TIs and TMDCs.

  6. Geometric phases generated by the non-trivial spatial topology of static vector fields linearly coupled to a neutral spin-endowed particle: application to 171Yb atoms trapped in a 2D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Marie-Anne; Bouchiat, Claude

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed the geometric phases emerging from the non-trivial topology of a space-dependent magnetic field B(r), interacting with the spin magnetic moment of a neutral particle. Our basic tool, adapted from a previous work on Berry’s phases, is the space-dependent unitary transformation {U}({\\mathbf {r}}), which leads to the identity, {U}({\\mathbf {r}})^{\\dag }\\, {\\mathbf {S}}\\,{\\bm \\cdot}\\, {\\mathbf {B}}({\\mathbf {r}}) \\, {U}({\\mathbf {r}}) = \\vert {\\mathbf {B}}({\\mathbf {r}}) \\vert \\, S_z, at each point r. In the ‘rotated’ Hamiltonian \\widehat{ H}, \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}} is replaced by the non-Abelian covariant derivative \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}}- \\frac{i}{\\hbar } {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) where {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) = i \\hbar \\, {U}^{\\dag }\\,{\\bm\\cdot}\\, \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}} {U} can be written as A1(r)Sx + A2(r)Sy + A3(r)Sz. The Abelian differentials Ak(r)·dr are given in terms of the Euler angles defining the orientation of B(r). The non-Abelian field {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) transforms as a Yang-Mills field; however, its vanishing ‘curvature’ reveals its purely geometric character. We have defined a perturbation scheme based upon the assumption that in \\widehat{ H} the longitudinal field A3(r) dominates the transverse field A1, 2(r) contributions, evaluated to second order. The geometry embedded in both the vector field A3(r) and the geometric magnetic field \\mathbf { B}_3 ({\\mathbf {r}}) = \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}}\\wedge {{\\mathbf {A}}}_3({\\mathbf {r}}) is described by their associated Aharonov-Bohm phase. As an illustration we study the physics of cold 171Yb atoms dressed by overlaying two circularly polarized stationary waves with orthogonal directions, which form a 2D square optical lattice. The frequency is tuned midway between the two hyperfine levels of the (6s6p)3P1 states to protect the optical B(r) field generated by the

  7. Pretransitional Clusters in Multicolor Liquid Crystalline Honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, Goran; Zeng, Xiangbing; Liu, Feng; Kieffer, Robert; Nürnberger, Constance; Tschierske, Carsten; Gehring, Gillian

    2012-02-01

    X-shaped tetraphilic molecules consisting of a rod-like core with two hydrogen-bonding terminal groups and two mutually incompatible side-chains A and B form a range of honeycomb-like structures in which the rods act as bricks in the walls of polygonal cylinder cells containing the fluid side-chains. Some of these systems exhibit a 2nd-order transition from the high-temperature mixed (``1-color'') phase to a low-temperature phase in which the side-chains are separated in A and B cells (``2-color''). This is the situation with triangular, rectangular and square honeycombs. Strong pre-transitional 2-color domains formation is observed above the transition temperature. Particularly interesting is the case of the hexagonal honeycomb, where no fully phase-separated ground state can exist. Here the 2-color ``ordered'' phase consists of [A] cells and [A(1/4)B(3/4)] cells. The situation is similar to frustrated ferro- and antiferromagnets on a kagome lattice. Instead of the spins flipping, it is the molecules that undergo 180 degree rotations about the axis of their rod-like cores [Science 331, 1302 (2011)].

  8. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  9. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  10. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  11. Room temperature quantum spin Hall insulators with a buckled square lattice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Xiang, Hongjun

    2015-05-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs), also known as quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators, are excellent candidates for coherent spin transport related applications because the edge states of 2D TIs are robust against nonmagnetic impurities since the only available backscattering channel is forbidden. Currently, most known 2D TIs are based on a hexagonal (specifically, honeycomb) lattice. Here, we propose that there exists the quantum spin Hall effect (QSHE) in a buckled square lattice. Through performing global structure optimization, we predict a new three-layer quasi-2D (Q2D) structure, which has the lowest energy among all structures with the thickness less than 6.0 Å for the BiF system. It is identified to be a Q2D TI with a large band gap (0.69 eV). The electronic states of the Q2D BiF system near the Fermi level are mainly contributed by the middle Bi square lattice, which are sandwiched by two inert BiF2 layers. This is beneficial since the interaction between a substrate and the Q2D material may not change the topological properties of the system, as we demonstrate in the case of the NaF substrate. Finally, we come up with a new tight-binding model for a two-orbital system with the buckled square lattice to explain the low-energy physics of the Q2D BiF material. Our study not only predicts a QSH insulator for realistic room temperature applications but also provides a new lattice system for engineering topological states such as quantum anomalous Hall effect.

  12. Development of Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring framelstringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin very efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels were made which incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining its strength. The majority of the desi gns were centered around the concept of creatin g areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced./recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  13. Complete band gaps and deaf bands of triangular and honeycomb water-steel phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Fu-Li; Khelif, Abdelkrim; Moubchir, Hanane; Choujaa, Abdelkrim; Chen, Chii-Chang; Laude, Vincent

    2007-02-01

    Phononic crystals with triangular and honeycomb lattices are investigated experimentally and theoretically. They are composed of arrays of steel cylinders immersed in water. The measured transmission spectra reveal the existence of complete band gaps but also of deaf bands. Band gaps and deaf bands are identified by comparing band structure computations, obtained by a periodic-boundary finite element method, with transmission simulations, obtained using the finite difference time domain method. The appearance of flat bands and the polarization of the associated eigenmodes is also discussed. Triangular and honeycomb phononic crystals with equal cylinder diameter and smallest spacing are compared. As previously obtained with air-solid phononic crystals, it is found that the first complete band gap opens for the honeycomb lattice but not for the triangular lattice, thanks to symmetry reduction.

  14. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  15. Method of fabricating a honeycomb structure

    DOEpatents

    Holleran, L.M.; Lipp, G.D.

    1999-08-03

    A method of fabricating a monolithic honeycomb structure product involves shaping a first mixture of raw materials and a binder into a green honeycomb, extruding a second mixture of raw materials and a binder into one or more green members that each define an opening extending longitudinally therethrough. The raw materials of the second mixture are compatible with the raw materials of the first mixture. The green honeycomb and member(s) are dried. The binders of the green honeycomb and member(s) are softened at the surfaces that are to be bonded. The green member(s) is inserted into the honeycomb and bonded to the honeycomb to form an assembly thereof, which is then dried and fired to form a unified monolithic honeycomb structure. The insertion is best carried out by mounting a member in the shape of a tube on a mandrel, and inserting the mandrel into the honeycomb opening to bond the tube to the honeycomb. 7 figs.

  16. Method of fabricating a honeycomb structure

    DOEpatents

    Holleran, Louis M.; Lipp, G. Daniel

    1999-01-01

    A method of fabricating a monolithic honeycomb structure product involves shaping a first mixture of raw materials and a binder into a green honeycomb, extruding a second mixture of raw materials and a binder into one or more green members that each define an opening extending longitudinally therethrough. The raw materials of the second mixture are compatible with the raw materials of the first mixture. The green honeycomb and member(s) are dried. The binders of the green honeycomb and member(s) are softened at the surfaces that are to be bonded. The green member(s) is inserted into the honeycomb and bonded to the honeycomb to form an assembly thereof, which is then dried and fired to form a unified monolithic honeycomb structure. The insertion is best carried out by mounting a member in the shape of a tube on a mandrel, and inserting the mandrel into the honeycomb opening to bond the tube to the honeycomb.

  17. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-01

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ~1000 cm2 V-1 s-1 even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor

  18. Honeycomb and triangular domain wall networks in heteroepitaxial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, K. R.; Chen, Z.; Elder, K. L. M.; Hirvonen, P.; Mkhonta, S. K.; Ying, S.-C.; Granato, E.; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive study is presented for the influence of misfit strain, adhesion strength, and lattice symmetry on the complex Moiré patterns that form in ultrathin films of honeycomb symmetry adsorbed on compact triangular or honeycomb substrates. The method used is based on a complex Ginzburg-Landau model of the film that incorporates elastic strain energy and dislocations. The results indicate that different symmetries of the heteroepitaxial systems lead to distinct types of domain wall networks and phase transitions among various surface Moiré patterns and superstructures. More specifically, the results show a dramatic difference between the phase diagrams that emerge when a honeycomb film is adsorbed on substrates of honeycomb versus triangular symmetry. It is also shown that in the small deformation limit, the complex Ginzburg-Landau model reduces to a two-dimensional sine-Gordon free energy form. This free energy can be solved exactly for one dimensional patterns and reveals the role of domains walls and their crossings in determining the nature of the phase diagrams.

  19. Hierarchical honeycomb auxetic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Mousanezhad, Davood; Babaee, Sahab; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Ghosh, Ranajay; Hamouda, Abdelmagid Salem; Bertoldi, Katia; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2015-12-16

    Most conventional materials expand in transverse directions when they are compressed uniaxially resulting in the familiar positive Poisson's ratio. Here we develop a new class of two dimensional (2D) metamaterials with negative Poisson's ratio that contract in transverse directions under uniaxial compressive loads leading to auxeticity. This is achieved through mechanical instabilities (i.e., buckling) introduced by structural hierarchy and retained over a wide range of applied compression. This unusual behavior is demonstrated experimentally and analyzed computationally. The work provides new insights into the role of structural organization and hierarchy in designing 2D auxetic metamaterials, and new opportunities for developing energy absorbing materials, tunable membrane filters, and acoustic dampeners.

  20. Honeycomb mirrors of borosilicate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Hill, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication of different types of honeycomb mirrors with various kinds of borosilicate glass is discussed. Borosilicate glass is much less expensive to make than zero expansion glass, and can be used for ground-based applications. A mirror 60 cm in diameter made with a slotted strut or egg-crate honeycomb of 6 mm polished Pyrex plate is shown. The faceplates are 12 mm thick, laminated from the same 6 mm sheet. The result of an interferometric test is shown, with residual errors of about wavelength/8 RMS. An alternative fabrication technique for very large mirrors which require high quality bonds between separate sheets of thick Pyrex is described. The result of a recent test casting of a 60 cm honeycomb structure made in a mold with towers 14 cm square and 6 mm gaps between is shown, and methods to cast an entire mirror in one operation are discussed.

  1. Mechanical and electrical strain response of a piezoelectric auxetic PZT lattice structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, Tobias; Eichhorn, Franziska; Han, Guifang; Ebert, Kathrin; Wegener, Moritz; Roosen, Andreas; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi; Greil, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional auxetic lattice structure was fabricated from a PZT piezoceramic. Tape casted and sintered sheets with a thickness of 530 μm were laser cut into inverted honeycomb lattice structure with re-entrant cell geometry (θ = -25°) and poling direction oriented perpendicular to the lattice plane. The in-plane strain response upon applying an uniaxial compression load as well as an electric field perpendicular to the lattice plane were analyzed by a 2D image data detection analysis. The auxetic lattice structure exhibits orthotropic deformation behavior with a negative in-plane Poisson’s ratio of -2.05. Compared to PZT bulk material the piezoelectric auxetic lattice revealed a strain amplification by a factor of 30-70. Effective transversal coupling coefficients {{d}al}31 of the PZT lattice exceeding 4 × 103 pm V-1 were determined which result in an effective hydrostatic coefficient {{d}al}h 66 times larger than that of bulk PZT.

  2. Hierarchical honeycomb auxetic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousanezhad, Davood; Babaee, Sahab; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Ghosh, Ranajay; Hamouda, Abdelmagid Salem; Bertoldi, Katia; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2015-12-01

    Most conventional materials expand in transverse directions when they are compressed uniaxially resulting in the familiar positive Poisson’s ratio. Here we develop a new class of two dimensional (2D) metamaterials with negative Poisson’s ratio that contract in transverse directions under uniaxial compressive loads leading to auxeticity. This is achieved through mechanical instabilities (i.e., buckling) introduced by structural hierarchy and retained over a wide range of applied compression. This unusual behavior is demonstrated experimentally and analyzed computationally. The work provides new insights into the role of structural organization and hierarchy in designing 2D auxetic metamaterials, and new opportunities for developing energy absorbing materials, tunable membrane filters, and acoustic dampeners.

  3. Hierarchical honeycomb auxetic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Mousanezhad, Davood; Babaee, Sahab; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Ghosh, Ranajay; Hamouda, Abdelmagid Salem; Bertoldi, Katia; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2015-01-01

    Most conventional materials expand in transverse directions when they are compressed uniaxially resulting in the familiar positive Poisson’s ratio. Here we develop a new class of two dimensional (2D) metamaterials with negative Poisson’s ratio that contract in transverse directions under uniaxial compressive loads leading to auxeticity. This is achieved through mechanical instabilities (i.e., buckling) introduced by structural hierarchy and retained over a wide range of applied compression. This unusual behavior is demonstrated experimentally and analyzed computationally. The work provides new insights into the role of structural organization and hierarchy in designing 2D auxetic metamaterials, and new opportunities for developing energy absorbing materials, tunable membrane filters, and acoustic dampeners. PMID:26670417

  4. Symmetry analysis of translational symmetry broken density waves: Application to hexagonal lattices in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venderbos, J. W. F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we introduce a symmetry classification for electronic density waves which break translational symmetry due to commensurate wave-vector modulations. The symmetry classification builds on the concept of extended point groups: symmetry groups which contain, in addition to the lattice point group, translations that do not map the enlarged unit cell of the density wave to itself, and become "nonsymmorphic"-like elements. Multidimensional representations of the extended point group are associated with degenerate wave vectors. Electronic properties such as (nodal) band degeneracies and topological character can be straightforwardly addressed, and often follow directly. To further flesh out the idea of symmetry, the classification is constructed so as to manifestly distinguish time-reversal invariant charge (i.e., site and bond) order, and time-reversal breaking flux order. For the purpose of this work, we particularize to spin-rotation invariant density waves. As a first example of the application of the classification we consider the density waves of a simple single- and two-orbital square lattice model. The main objective, however, is to apply the classification to two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal lattices, specifically the triangular and the honeycomb lattices. The multicomponent density waves corresponding to the commensurate M -point ordering vectors are worked out in detail. To show that our results generally apply to 2 D hexagonal lattices, we develop a general low-energy SU(3 ) theory of (spinless) saddle-point electrons.

  5. Preelectroplating Treatment Of Titanium Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael L.; Harvey, James S.

    1992-01-01

    New technique used to treat titanium honeycomb core electrochemically by applying conversion coat to keep honeycomb active and receptive to electroplating with solution of sodium bichromate and hydrofluoric acid. Maskant permits electroplating of controlled amount of filler metal on edge of honeycomb. Eliminates excess copper filler.

  6. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  7. Three-dimensional quantum spin liquids in models of harmonic-honeycomb iridates and phase diagram in an infinite-D approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimchi, Itamar; Analytis, James G.; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2014-11-01

    Motivated by the recent synthesis of two insulating Li2IrO3 polymorphs, where Ir4 + Seff=1 /2 moments form 3D ("harmonic") honeycomb structures with threefold coordination, we study magnetic Hamiltonians on the resulting β -Li2IrO3 hyperhoneycomb lattice and γ -Li2IrO3 stripyhoneycomb lattice. Experimentally measured magnetic susceptibilities suggest that Kitaev interactions, predicted for the ideal 90∘ Ir-O-Ir bonds, are sizable in these materials. We first consider pure Kitaev interactions, which lead to an exactly soluble 3D quantum spin liquid (QSL) with emergent Majorana fermions and Z2 flux loops. Unlike 2D QSLs, the 3D QSL is stable to finite temperature, with Tc≈|K | /100 . On including Heisenberg couplings, exact solubility is lost. However, by noting that the shortest closed loop ℓ is relatively large in these structures, we construct an ℓ →∞ approximation by defining the model on the Bethe lattice. The phase diagram of the Kitaev-Heisenberg model on this lattice is obtained directly in the thermodynamic limit, using tensor network states and the infinite-system time-evolving-block-decimation (iTEBD) algorithm. Both magnetically ordered and gapped QSL phases are found, the latter being identified by an entanglement fingerprint.

  8. Artificial Staggered Magnetic Field for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais Smith, Cristiane

    2011-03-01

    Uniform magnetic fields are ubiquitous in nature, but this is not the case for staggered magnetic fields. In this talk, I will discuss an experimental set-up for cold atoms recently proposed by us, which allows for the realization of a ``staggered gauge field'' in a 2D square optical lattice. If the lattice is loaded with bosons, it may be described by an effective Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, with complex and anisotropic hopping coefficients. A very rich phase diagram emerges: besides the usual Mott-insulator and zero-momentum condensate, a new phase with a finite momentum condensate becomes the ground-state at strong gauge fields. By using the technique of Feshbach resonance, the dynamics of a coherent superposition of a vortex-carrying atomic condensate and a conventional zero-momentum molecular condensate can also be studied within the same scheme. On the other hand, if the lattice is loaded with fermions, a highly tunable, graphene-like band structure can be realized, without requiring the honeycomb lattice symmetry. When the system is loaded with a mixture of bosons and two-species fermions, several features of the high-Tc phase diagram can be reproduced. A dome-shaped unconventional superconducting region arises, surrounded by a non-Fermi liquid and a Fermi liquid at low and high doping, respectively. We acknowledge financial support from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  9. Origin of the Giant Honeycomb Network of Quinones on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Kim, Kwangmoo; Wyrick, Jon; Cheng, Zhihai; Bartels, Ludwig; Berland, Kristian; Hyldgaard, Per

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the factors that lead to the amazing regular giant honeycomb network formed by quinones on Cu(111). Using a related lattice gas model with many characteristic energies, we can reproduce many experimental features. These models require a long-range attraction, which can be attributed to indirect interactions mediated by the Shockley surface state of Cu(111). However, Wyrick's preceding talk gave evidence that the network self-selects for the size of the pore rather than for the periodicity of the superstructure, suggesting that confined states are the key ingredient. We discuss this phenomenon in terms of the magic numbers of 2D quantum dots. We also report calculations of the effects of anthraquinones (AQ) in modifying the surface states by considering a superlattice of AQ chains with various separations. We discuss implications of these results for tuning the electronic states and, thence, superstructures. Supported by (TLE) NSF CHE 07-50334 & UMD MRSEC DMR 05-20471, (JW & LB) NSF CHE NSF CHE 07-49949, (KB & PH) Swedish Vetenskapsrådet VR 621-2008-4346.

  10. Mechanical properties of additively manufactured octagonal honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-12-01

    Honeycomb structures have found numerous applications as structural and biomedical materials due to their favourable properties such as low weight, high stiffness, and porosity. Application of additive manufacturing and 3D printing techniques allows for manufacturing of honeycombs with arbitrary shape and wall thickness, opening the way for optimizing the mechanical and physical properties for specific applications. In this study, the mechanical properties of honeycomb structures with a new geometry, called octagonal honeycomb, were investigated using analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches. An additive manufacturing technique, namely fused deposition modelling, was used to fabricate the honeycomb from polylactic acid (PLA). The honeycombs structures were then mechanically tested under compression and the mechanical properties of the structures were determined. In addition, the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories were used for deriving analytical relationships for elastic modulus, yield stress, Poisson's ratio, and buckling stress of this new design of honeycomb structures. Finite element models were also created to analyse the mechanical behaviour of the honeycombs computationally. The analytical solutions obtained using Timoshenko beam theory were close to computational results in terms of elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and yield stress, especially for relative densities smaller than 25%. The analytical solutions based on the Timoshenko analytical solution and the computational results were in good agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the elastic properties of the proposed honeycomb structure were compared to those of other honeycomb structures such as square, triangular, hexagonal, mixed, diamond, and Kagome. The octagonal honeycomb showed yield stress and elastic modulus values very close to those of regular hexagonal honeycombs and lower than the other considered honeycombs. PMID:27612831

  11. Mechanical properties of additively manufactured octagonal honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-12-01

    Honeycomb structures have found numerous applications as structural and biomedical materials due to their favourable properties such as low weight, high stiffness, and porosity. Application of additive manufacturing and 3D printing techniques allows for manufacturing of honeycombs with arbitrary shape and wall thickness, opening the way for optimizing the mechanical and physical properties for specific applications. In this study, the mechanical properties of honeycomb structures with a new geometry, called octagonal honeycomb, were investigated using analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches. An additive manufacturing technique, namely fused deposition modelling, was used to fabricate the honeycomb from polylactic acid (PLA). The honeycombs structures were then mechanically tested under compression and the mechanical properties of the structures were determined. In addition, the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories were used for deriving analytical relationships for elastic modulus, yield stress, Poisson's ratio, and buckling stress of this new design of honeycomb structures. Finite element models were also created to analyse the mechanical behaviour of the honeycombs computationally. The analytical solutions obtained using Timoshenko beam theory were close to computational results in terms of elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and yield stress, especially for relative densities smaller than 25%. The analytical solutions based on the Timoshenko analytical solution and the computational results were in good agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the elastic properties of the proposed honeycomb structure were compared to those of other honeycomb structures such as square, triangular, hexagonal, mixed, diamond, and Kagome. The octagonal honeycomb showed yield stress and elastic modulus values very close to those of regular hexagonal honeycombs and lower than the other considered honeycombs.

  12. Giant topological insulator gap and Rashba splitting in honeycomb Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haiyan; Hu, Jun; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu's Group Team

    2014-03-01

    It was predicted that graphene can be a topological insulator (TI) due to its special Dirac states and spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, the SOC gap of pure graphene is too small for experimental observation. It was found that heavier group IV elements, such as Si and Ge, can also produce the TI state in the tow-dimensional honeycomb lattice, with their SOC gaps a few orders larger than that of graphene. In the present work, we find that the honeycomb Pb is also a TI, with a SOC gap as large as 250 meV. We demonstrate the feasibility of making a honeycomb Pb monolayer on the Al2O3(0001) substrate. Moreover, Pb/Al2O3(0001) has a giant Rashba splitting of 270 meV, useful for spintronics and topotronics applications. This work was supported by DOE-BES(Grant No: DE-FG02-05ER46237) and by NERSC for computing time.

  13. Quantum phase diagram of distorted J 1 - J 2 Heisenberg S  =  1/2 antiferromagnet in honeycomb lattice: a modified spin wave study.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Elaheh; Shahbazi, Farhad; Mosadeq, Hamid

    2016-10-12

    Using the modified spin wave method, we study the [Formula: see text] Heisenberg model with first and second neighbor antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. For a symmetric S  =  1/2 model, with the same couplings for all the equivalent neighbors, we find three phases in terms of the frustration parameter [Formula: see text]: (1) a commensurate collinear ordering with staggered magnetization (Néel.I state) for [Formula: see text], (2) a magnetically gapped disordered state for [Formula: see text], preserving all the symmetries of the Hamiltonian and lattice, which by definition is a quantum spin liquid (QSL) state and (3) a commensurate collinear ordering in which two out of the three nearest neighbor magnetizations are antiparallel and the remaining pair are parallel (Néel.II state), for [Formula: see text]. We also explore the phase diagram of a distorted [Formula: see text] model with S  =  1/2. Distortion is introduced as an inequality of one nearest neighbor coupling with the other two. This yields a richer phase diagram by the appearance of a new gapped QSL, a gapless QSL and also a valence bond crystal phase in addition to the previous three phases found for the undistorted model. PMID:27518832

  14. Quantum phase diagram of distorted J 1 - J 2 Heisenberg S  =  1/2 antiferromagnet in honeycomb lattice: a modified spin wave study.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Elaheh; Shahbazi, Farhad; Mosadeq, Hamid

    2016-10-12

    Using the modified spin wave method, we study the [Formula: see text] Heisenberg model with first and second neighbor antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. For a symmetric S  =  1/2 model, with the same couplings for all the equivalent neighbors, we find three phases in terms of the frustration parameter [Formula: see text]: (1) a commensurate collinear ordering with staggered magnetization (Néel.I state) for [Formula: see text], (2) a magnetically gapped disordered state for [Formula: see text], preserving all the symmetries of the Hamiltonian and lattice, which by definition is a quantum spin liquid (QSL) state and (3) a commensurate collinear ordering in which two out of the three nearest neighbor magnetizations are antiparallel and the remaining pair are parallel (Néel.II state), for [Formula: see text]. We also explore the phase diagram of a distorted [Formula: see text] model with S  =  1/2. Distortion is introduced as an inequality of one nearest neighbor coupling with the other two. This yields a richer phase diagram by the appearance of a new gapped QSL, a gapless QSL and also a valence bond crystal phase in addition to the previous three phases found for the undistorted model.

  15. Quantum phase diagram of distorted J 1 - J 2 Heisenberg S  =  1/2 antiferromagnet in honeycomb lattice: a modified spin wave study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Elaheh; Shahbazi, Farhad; Mosadeq, Hamid

    2016-10-01

    Using the modified spin wave method, we study the {{J}1}-{{J}2} Heisenberg model with first and second neighbor antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. For a symmetric S  =  1/2 model, with the same couplings for all the equivalent neighbors, we find three phases in terms of the frustration parameter \\barα={{J}2}/{{J}1} : (1) a commensurate collinear ordering with staggered magnetization (Néel.I state) for 0≤slant \\barα≲ 0.207 , (2) a magnetically gapped disordered state for 0.207≲ \\barα≲ 0.369 , preserving all the symmetries of the Hamiltonian and lattice, which by definition is a quantum spin liquid (QSL) state and (3) a commensurate collinear ordering in which two out of the three nearest neighbor magnetizations are antiparallel and the remaining pair are parallel (Néel.II state), for 0.396≲ \\barα≤slant 1 . We also explore the phase diagram of a distorted {{J}1}-{{J}2} model with S  =  1/2. Distortion is introduced as an inequality of one nearest neighbor coupling with the other two. This yields a richer phase diagram by the appearance of a new gapped QSL, a gapless QSL and also a valence bond crystal phase in addition to the previous three phases found for the undistorted model.

  16. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Avadh B; Bishop, Alan R; Law, K J H; Kevrekidis, P G

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  17. Processing and characterization of honeycomb composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Jahan Emir

    Honeycomb composite structures are widely used in the aerospace and sporting goods industries because of the superior performance and weight saving advantages they offer over traditional metal structures. However, in order to maximize the mechanical and chemical properties of honeycomb composites, the structures must be specially designed to take advantage of their inherent anisotropic, viscoelastic and heterogeneous qualities. In the open literature little work has been done to understand these relationships. Most research efforts have been focused towards studying and modeling the effects of environmental exposure, impact damage and energy absorption. The objectives of this work was to use a systemic engineering approach to explore the fundamental material relationships of honeycomb composites with an emphasis towards the industrial manufacturing, design and performance characteristics of these materials. To reach this goal, a methodology was created to develop model honeycomb systems that were characteristically similar to their commercial counterparts. From the model systems, some of the important chemical and mechanical properties that controlled the behavior of honeycomb core were identified. With the knowledge gained from the model system, studies were carried out to correlate the compressive properties of honeycomb rings to honeycomb core. This type of correlation gives paper, resin, and adhesive manufactures the ability to develop new honeycomb materials without requiring specific honeycomb manufacturers to divulge their trade secrets. After characterizing the honeycomb core, efforts were made to understand the manufacturing and in-service responses of honeycomb materials. Using three Design of Experiments, investigations were performed to measure the mechanisms of composite structures to propagate damage and water over a fourteen month service period. Collectively, this research represents a fundamental starting point for understanding the processing

  18. PREFACE: Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geber, Thomas; Oshima, Chuhei

    2012-08-01

    Since ancient times, pure carbon materials have been familiar in human society—not only diamonds in jewellery and graphite in pencils, but also charcoal and coal which have been used for centuries as fuel for living and industry. Carbon fibers are stronger, tougher and lighter than steel and increase material efficiency because of their lower weight. Today, carbon fibers and related composite materials are used to make the frames of bicycles, cars and even airplane parts. The two-dimensional allotrope, now called graphene, is just a single layer of carbon atoms, locked together in a strongly bonded honeycomb lattice. In plane, graphene is stiffer than diamond, but out-of-plane it is soft, like rubber. It is virtually invisible, may conduct electricity (heat) better than copper and weighs next to nothing. Carbon compounds with two carbon atoms as a base, such as graphene, graphite or diamond, have isoelectronic sister compounds made of boron-nitrogen pairs: hexagonal and cubic boron nitride, with almost the same lattice constant. Although the two 2D sisters, graphene and h-BN, have the same number of valence electrons, their electronic properties are very different: freestanding h-BN is an insulator, while charge carriers in graphene are highly mobile. The past ten years have seen a great expansion in studies of single-layer and few-layer graphene. This activity has been concerned with the π electron transport in graphene, in electric and magnetic fields. More than 30 years ago, however, single-layer graphene and h-BN on solid surfaces were widely investigated. It was noted that they drastically changed the chemical reactivity of surfaces, and they were known to 'poison' heterogeneous catalysts, to passivate surfaces, to prevent oxidation of surfaces and to act as surfactants. Also, it was realized that the controlled growth of h-BN and graphene on substrates yields the formation of mismatch driven superstructures with peculiar template functionality on the

  19. PREFACE: Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geber, Thomas; Oshima, Chuhei

    2012-08-01

    Since ancient times, pure carbon materials have been familiar in human society—not only diamonds in jewellery and graphite in pencils, but also charcoal and coal which have been used for centuries as fuel for living and industry. Carbon fibers are stronger, tougher and lighter than steel and increase material efficiency because of their lower weight. Today, carbon fibers and related composite materials are used to make the frames of bicycles, cars and even airplane parts. The two-dimensional allotrope, now called graphene, is just a single layer of carbon atoms, locked together in a strongly bonded honeycomb lattice. In plane, graphene is stiffer than diamond, but out-of-plane it is soft, like rubber. It is virtually invisible, may conduct electricity (heat) better than copper and weighs next to nothing. Carbon compounds with two carbon atoms as a base, such as graphene, graphite or diamond, have isoelectronic sister compounds made of boron-nitrogen pairs: hexagonal and cubic boron nitride, with almost the same lattice constant. Although the two 2D sisters, graphene and h-BN, have the same number of valence electrons, their electronic properties are very different: freestanding h-BN is an insulator, while charge carriers in graphene are highly mobile. The past ten years have seen a great expansion in studies of single-layer and few-layer graphene. This activity has been concerned with the π electron transport in graphene, in electric and magnetic fields. More than 30 years ago, however, single-layer graphene and h-BN on solid surfaces were widely investigated. It was noted that they drastically changed the chemical reactivity of surfaces, and they were known to 'poison' heterogeneous catalysts, to passivate surfaces, to prevent oxidation of surfaces and to act as surfactants. Also, it was realized that the controlled growth of h-BN and graphene on substrates yields the formation of mismatch driven superstructures with peculiar template functionality on the

  20. Order parameters from image analysis: a honeycomb example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest H.; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-11-01

    Honeybee combs have aroused interest in the ability of honeybees to form regular hexagonal geometric constructs since ancient times. Here we use a real space technique based on the pair distribution function (PDF) and radial distribution function (RDF), and a reciprocal space method utilizing the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) to quantify the order for a range of honeycombs made by Apis mellifera ligustica. The PDFs and RDFs are fit with a series of Gaussian curves. We characterize the order in the honeycomb using a real space order parameter, OP 3 , to describe the order in the combs and a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller order parameter, u, is derived. Both OP 3 and u take values from [0, 1] where the value one represents perfect order. The analyzed combs have values of OP 3 from 0.33 to 0.60 and values of u from 0.59 to 0.69. RDF fits of honeycomb histograms show that naturally made comb can be crystalline in a 2D ordered structural sense, yet is more ‘liquid-like’ than cells made on ‘foundation’ wax. We show that with the assistance of man-made foundation wax, honeybees can manufacture highly ordered arrays of hexagonal cells. This is the first description of honeycomb utilizing the Debye-Waller Factor, and provides a complete analysis of the order in comb from a real-space order parameter and a reciprocal space order parameter. It is noted that the techniques used are general in nature and could be applied to any digital photograph of an ordered array.

  1. Honeycomb-Fin Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1989-01-01

    Improved finned heat sink for electronic components more lightweight, inexpensive, and efficient. Designed for use with forced air, easily scaled up to dissipate power up to few hundred watts. Fins are internal walls of aluminum honeycomb structure. Cell structure gives strength to thin aluminum foil. Length of channels chosen for thermodynamic efficency; columns of cells combined in any reasonable number because flowing air distributed to all. Heat sink cools nearly as effectively at ends as near its center, no matter how many columns of cells combined.

  2. Aluminum Honeycomb Characteristics in Dynamic Crush Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Vesta I.; Swanson, Lloyd H.

    1999-07-01

    Fifteen aluminum honeycomb cubes (3 in.) have been crushed in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory's drop table testing machines. This report summarizes shock experiments with honeycomb densities of 22.1 pcf and 38.0 pcf and with crush weights of 45 lb, 168 lb, and 268 lb. The honeycomb samples were crushed in all three orientations, W, L, and T. Most of the experiments were conducted at an impact velocity of {approx}40 fps, but higher velocities of up to 90 fps were used for selected experiments. Where possible, multiple experiments were conducted for a specific orientation and density of the honeycomb samples. All results are for Hexcel honeycomb except for one experiment with Alcore honeycomb and have been evaluated for validity. This report contains the raw acceleration data measured on the top of the drop table carriage, pictures of the crushed samples, and normalized force-displacement curves for all fifteen experiments. These data are not strictly valid for material characteristics in L and T orientations because the cross-sectional area of the honeycomb changed (split) during the crush. However, these are the best data available at this time. These dynamic crush data do suggest a significant increase in crush strength to 8000 psi ({approximately} 25-30% increase) over quasi-static values of {approximately}6000 psi for the 38.0 pcf Hexcel Honeycomb in the T-orientation. An uncertainty analysis is included and estimates the error in these data.

  3. Technique for anchoring fasteners to honeycomb panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. J.; Spagnuolo, A. C.; Stonebraker, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Two-piece fastener bushing provides mounting surface for components on a three-inch thick honeycomb structure. Specially constructed starter drill and sheet metal drill permit drilling without misalignment. Tapered knife-edge cutting tool removes honeycomb core material without tearing the adjacent material.

  4. Seal Leakages for Honeycomb or Smooth Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh M.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    Three dimensional-CFD simulations were attempted to analyze the flow field in a honeycomb flat plate tester. This discussion reviews some of the numerical difficulties and relations, including those relating the honeycombs to labyrinth throttles and the consistency of selected seal and tester data sets.

  5. Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Williams, R A; Pillet, J D; Al-Assam, S; Fletcher, B; Shotter, M; Foot, C J

    2008-10-13

    We demonstrate a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a 2D optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Ultracold atoms in such a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, allowing investigation of phenomena such as the fractional quantum Hall effect. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of a 2D optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D accordion lattice.

  6. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  7. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  8. Extension theorems for homogenization on lattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    When applying homogenization techniques to problems involving lattice structures, it is necessary to extend certain functions defined on a perforated domain to a simply connected domain. This paper provides general extension operators which preserve bounds on derivatives of order l. Only the special case of honeycomb structures is considered.

  9. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  10. A novel isolation curtain to reduce turbine ingress heating and an advanced model for honeycomb labyrinth seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dong Chun

    A combination of 3-D and 2-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling as well as experimental testing of the labyrinth seal with hexagonal honeycomb cells on the stator wall was performed. For the 3-D and 2-D CFD models, the hexagonal honeycomb structure was modeled using the concept of the baffle (zero-thickness wall) and the simplified 2-D fin, respectively. The 3-D model showed that even a small axial change of the tooth (or honeycomb wall) location, or a small circumferential change of the honeycomb wall location significantly affected the flow patterns and leakage characteristics especially for small tooth tip clearance. Also, the local details of the flow field were investigated. The seven basic procedural steps to develop a 2-D axisymmetric honeycomb labyrinth seal leakage model were shown. Clearly demonstrated for varying test conditions was the 2-D model capability to predict the 3-D honeycomb labyrinth flow that had been measured at different operating conditions from that used in developing the 2-D model. Specifically, the 2-D model showed very close agreement with measurements. In addition, the 2-D model greatly reduced the computer resource requirement needed to obtain a solution of the 3-D honeycomb labyrinth seal leakage. The novel and advanced strategy to reduce the turbine ingress heating, and thus the coolant requirement, by injecting a "coolant isolation curtain" was developed numerically using a 3-D CFD model. The coolant isolation curtain was applied under the nozzle guide vane platform for the forward cavity of a turbine stage. Specifically, the isolation curtain serves to isolate the hot mainstream gas from the turbine outer region. The effect of the geometry change, the outer cavity axial gap clearance, the circumferential location of the injection curtain slot and the injection fluid angle on the ingress heating was investigated. Adding the chamfer to the baseline design gave a similar or higher maximum temperature T*max than did the

  11. JeffDescription of the Honeycomb Mott Insulatorα‑RuCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koitzsch, A.; Habenicht, C.; Müller, E.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Kandpal, H. C.; van den Brink, J.; Nowak, D.; Isaeva, A.; Doert, Th.

    2016-09-01

    Novel ground states might be realized in honeycomb lattices with strong spin-orbit coupling. Here we study the electronic structure of {\\alpha}-RuCl_3, in which the Ru ions are in a d5 configuration and form a honeycomb lattice, by angle-resolved photoemission, x-ray photoemission and electron energy loss spectroscopy supported by density functional theory and multiplet calculations. We find that {\\alpha}-RuCl_3 is a Mott insulator with significant spin-orbit coupling, whose low energy electronic structure is naturally mapped onto Jeff states. This makes {\\alpha}-RuCl_3 a promising candidate for the realization of Kitaev physics. Relevant electronic parameters such as the Hubbard energy U, the crystal field splitting 10Dq and the charge transfer energy are evaluated. Furthermore, we observe significant Cl photodesorption with time, which must be taken into account when interpreting photoemission and other surface sensitive experiments.

  12. The Soudan 2 honeycomb calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, C.

    1990-12-01

    Soudan 2 is an 1100-ton honeycomb tracking calorimeter which is being constructed to search for nucleon decay. The detector consists of finely segmented iron instrumented with long drift tubes, and records three spatial coordinates and dE/dx for every gas crossing. Excellent event reconstruction capability, particle identification and muon sign and direction determination give superior rejection of the neutrino background to nucleon decay in many modes. The first 620 tons of Soudan 2 are now in steady operation, with completion planned for 1992. Detector performance has been studied using cosmic ray tracks and a charged test beam calibration. Results on detector performance and detector response are described in this paper. 2 refs. , 11 figs.

  13. Non-Colliding Paths in the Honeycomb Dimer Model and the Dyson Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutillier, Cédric

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we describe a natural family of random non-intersecting discrete paths in the dimer model on the honeycomb lattice. We show that when the dimer model is going to freeze, this family of paths, after a proper rescaling, converges to the extended sine process, obtained traditionally as the limit of the Dyson model when the number of particles goes to infinity.

  14. Incommensurate counterrotating magnetic order stabilized by Kitaev interactions in the layered honeycomb α -Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. Â. C.; Johnson, R. Â. D.; Freund, F.; Choi, Sungkyun; Jesche, A.; Kimchi, I.; Manni, S.; Bombardi, A.; Manuel, P.; Gegenwart, P.; Coldea, R.

    2016-05-01

    The layered honeycomb magnet α -Li2IrO3 has been theoretically proposed as a candidate to display unconventional magnetic behaviour associated with Kitaev interactions between spin-orbit entangled jeff=1 /2 magnetic moments on a honeycomb lattice. Here we report single crystal magnetic resonant x-ray diffraction combined with powder magnetic neutron diffraction to reveal an incommensurate magnetic order in the honeycomb layers with Ir magnetic moments counterrotating on nearest-neighbor sites. This unexpected type of magnetic structure for a honeycomb magnet cannot be explained by a spin Hamiltonian with dominant isotropic (Heisenberg) couplings. The magnetic structure shares many key features with the magnetic order in the structural polytypes β - and γ -Li2IrO3 , understood theoretically to be stabilized by dominant Kitaev interactions between Ir moments located on the vertices of three-dimensional hyperhoneycomb and stripyhoneycomb lattices, respectively. Based on this analogy and a theoretical soft-spin analysis of magnetic ground states for candidate spin Hamiltonians, we propose that Kitaev interactions also dominate in α -Li2IrO3 , indicative of universal Kitaev physics across all three members of the harmonic honeycomb family of Li2IrO3 polytypes.

  15. Properties of honeycomb polyester knitted fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The properties of honeycomb polyester weft-knitted fabrics were studied to understand their advantages. Seven honeycomb polyester weft-knitted fabrics and one common polyester weft-knitted fabric were selected for testing. Their bursting strengths, fuzzing and pilling, air permeability, abrasion resistance and moisture absorption and perspiration were studied. The results show that the honeycomb polyester weft-knitted fabrics have excellent moisture absorption and liberation. The smaller their thicknesses and area densities are, the better their moisture absorption and liberation will be. Their anti-fuzzing and anti-pilling is good, whereas their bursting strengths and abrasion resistance are poorer compared with common polyester fabric's. In order to improve the hygroscopic properties of the fabrics, the proportion of the honeycomb microporous structure modified polyester in the fabrics should not be less than 40%.

  16. Acoustic performance of reiterated hierarchical honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainar, Naveen

    Sandwich panels constructed from honeycomb structures have been found to reduce sound transmission and improve vibration isolation. In this work, reiterated hierarchical honeycomb structures have been modeled for the core in sandwich panels and studied for sound transmission properties using finite element analysis. Several honeycomb unit cell geometries are considered, including, regular hexagonal, auxetic with properties of negative Poisson's ratio, and different reiterated hierarchical structures. Previous studies have shown that auxetic honeycomb structures exhibit improved sound transmission loss compared to regular honeycomb sandwich panels. Two different orientations of the honeycomb unit cell geometry have been studied, namely, the zigzag and armchair configurations, which are, rotated 90 degrees. Both regular and auxetic honeycombs have been used in both these configurations. The finite element model of the panels are used to extract natural frequencies and mode shapes and to perform steady state frequency response dynamic analysis up to 1000 Hz. The transmitted sound pressure levels on the surface of each structure is extracted and compared to study the influence of the reiterated hierarchy on sound transmission characteristics. The influence of corner reinforcement constructed by subtracting interior high-level hierarchical structure except at the vertices of the underlying lower-level honeycomb unit cell was also studied. Furthermore, a study was conducted to quantify the effect of changing the ratio of cell-wall thickness between various levels of hierarchy. Special focus on the limiting case of level-1 hierarchy with zero level-0 thickness is also studied. In all cases, the total mass was kept constant in order to isolate only stiffness and mass distribution effects. The results show that introduction of reiterated hierarchy in level-1 structures reduced the sound transmission of honeycomb sandwich panels compared to parent level-0 geometry. Results

  17. Adaptive reorganization of 2D molecular nanoporous network induced by coadsorbed guest molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Na; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Yu-Wu; Liu, Xuan-He; Chen, Ting; Yan, Hui-Juan; Wang, Dong; Yao, Jian-Nian; Wan, Li-Jun

    2014-03-25

    The ordered array of nanovoids in nanoporous networks, such as honeycomb, Kagome, and square, provides a molecular template for the accommodation of "guest molecules". Compared with the commonly studied guest molecules featuring high symmetry evenly incorporated into the template, guest molecules featuring lower symmetry are rare to report. Herein, we report the formation of a distinct patterned superlattice of guest molecules by selective trapping of guest molecules into the honeycomb network of trimesic acid (TMA). Two distinct surface patterns have been achieved by the guest inclusion induced adaptive reconstruction of a 2D molecular nanoporous network. The honeycomb networks can synergetically tune the arrangement upon inclusion of the guest molecules with different core size but similar peripherals groups, resulting in a trihexagonal Kagome or triangular patterns.

  18. Phosphorenes with Non-Honeycomb Structures: A Much Extended Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Menghao; Fu, Huahua; Zhou, Ling; Yao, Kailun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Huazhong University of Science; Technology Team; University of Nebraska-Lincoln Team

    We predict a new class of monolayer phosphorous allotropes, namely, ɛ-P, ζ-P, η-P and θ-P. Distinctly different from the monolayer α-P (black) and previously predicted β-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 176802 (2014)), γ-P and δ-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 046804 (2014)) with buckled honeycomb lattice, the new allotropes are composed of P4 square or P5 pentagon units that favor tricoordination for P atoms. The new four phases, together with 5 hybrid phases, are confirmed stable by first-principles calculations. In particularly, the θ-P is shown to be equally stable as the α-P (black) and more stable than all previously reported phosphorene allotropes. Prediction of nonvolatile ferroelastic switching and structural transformation among different phases under strains points out their potential applications via strain engineering. MHW was supported by start-up fund from Huazhong University of Science and Technology.

  19. Making the Cut: Lattice Kirigami Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Toen; Cho, Yigil; Gong, Xingting; Jung, Euiyeon; Sussman, Daniel M.; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.

    2014-12-01

    In this Letter we explore and develop a simple set of rules that apply to cutting, pasting, and folding honeycomb lattices. We consider origami-like structures that are extrinsically flat away from zero-dimensional sources of Gaussian curvature and one-dimensional sources of mean curvature, and our cutting and pasting rules maintain the intrinsic bond lengths on both the lattice and its dual lattice. We find that a small set of rules is allowed providing a framework for exploring and building kirigami—folding, cutting, and pasting the edges of paper.

  20. 2D hexagonal quaternion Fourier transform in color image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel concept of the quaternion discrete Fourier transform on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, which we call the two-dimensional hexagonal quaternion discrete Fourier transform (2-D HQDFT). The concept of the right-side 2D HQDFT is described and the left-side 2-D HQDFT is similarly considered. To calculate the transform, the image on the hexagonal lattice is described in the tensor representation when the image is presented by a set of 1-D signals, or splitting-signals which can be separately processed in the frequency domain. The 2-D HQDFT can be calculated by a set of 1-D quaternion discrete Fourier transforms (QDFT) of the splitting-signals.

  1. The dynamic shear properties of structural honeycomb materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.; Maheri, M. R.

    A technique is described for measuring the dynamic modulus and damping of honeycomb materials. Results of tests on both aluminium and Nomex honeycombs are presented and compared with those reported in the literature.

  2. Thermodynamic Study of 3D ``Harmonic'' Honeycomb Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Alejandro; Helm, Toni; Breznay, Nicholas; Lopez, Gilbert; Analytis, James

    2015-03-01

    Honeycomb iridates have been the focus of substantial interest due to the strong magnetic frustration that arises from their edge-shared bonding environment, which favors a strongly anisotropic Ising-like exchange between bonds. In materials with edge-shared IrO6 octahedra, spin-anisotropy of the exchange between neighboring effective spin-1/2 states is enhanced by the interference of the two exchange paths across the planar Ir-O2-Ir bond. In the honeycomb lattice, such an interaction couples different orthogonal spin components for the three nearest neighbors; no single exchange direction can be simultaneously satisfied, leading to strong frustration which can be described by the Kitaev-model. We have recently synthesized a new structure that retains the same bonding environment as the honeycomb lattice, and extends this physics to three-dimensions. Previous RMXD experiments on our orthorhombic  < 1 > -Li2IrO3 samples revealed an incommensurate, non-coplanar magnetic structure with counter-rotating moments, suggesting that Kitaev exchange is the dominant spin interaction in this system. In this work, we study the thermal properties of our single crystals as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field. Berkeley Chancellor's Fellowship & NSF-GRFP.

  3. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  4. Method and apparatus for extruding large honeycombs

    DOEpatents

    Kragle, Harry A.; Lambert, David W.; Lipp, G. Daniel

    1996-09-03

    Extrusion die apparatus and an extrusion method for extruding large-cross-section honeycomb structures from plasticized ceramic batch materials are described, the apparatus comprising a die having a support rod connected to its central portion, the support rod being anchored to support means upstream of the die. The support rod and support means act to limit die distortion during extrusion, reducing die strain and stress to levels permitting large honeycomb extrusion without die failure. Dies of optimal thickness are disclosed which reduce the maximum stresses exerted on the die during extrusion.

  5. Proposal of honeycomb-based deployable breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Okabe, S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes development of a smart breakwater or river bank using honeycomb-like structure to be adaptive to change of water level. A designed cell is deformed using a tensile test machine, and the results show that the honeycomb cell can deploy up to double of is original height without plastic deformation and the deformation is reproducible. It is stacked up to twelve layers and similar performance can be found. In addition, a six-layer and double-row deployable model is prepared and it became clear that the model can change its height in proportion to the water height in the experimental range and successfully block the water.

  6. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  7. Breath Figure Method for Construction of Honeycomb Films

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Yingying; Jin, Mingliang; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Honeycomb films with various building units, showing potential applications in biological, medical, physicochemical, photoelectric, and many other areas, could be prepared by the breath figure method. The ordered hexagonal structures formed by the breath figure process are related to the building units, solvents, substrates, temperature, humidity, air flow, and other factors. Therefore, by adjusting these factors, the honeycomb structures could be tuned properly. In this review, we summarized the development of the breath figure method of fabricating honeycomb films and the factors of adjusting honeycomb structures. The organic-inorganic hybrid was taken as the example building unit to discuss the preparation, mechanism, properties, and applications of the honeycomb films. PMID:26343734

  8. Two-dimensional TiO2 honeycomb structure for enhanced light extraction from polymer light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Lee, Hang Ken; Im, Sang Hyuk; Park, O Ok

    2014-11-01

    We have demonstrated the preparation of an ordered hole pattern via a simple colloidal assembly technique and a sol-gel process without the use of any special equipment to enhance light extraction from polymer light-emitting diodes (LEDs). From two-dimensional (2D) polystyrene (PS) colloidal crystals, 2D TiO2 honeycomb structures were easily obtained after depositing TiO(x) sol solution onto the colloidal crystals by a doctor blade technique and removing the PS colloidal particles. In order to optimize the thickness of the deposited TiO(x) materials for fabricating 2D TiO2 honeycomb structures, the concentration of the TiO(x) sol solution was controlled. By applying the 2D TiO2 honeycomb structure on the backside of the glass substrate, the efficiency of a polymer LED, compared to the device without the structure, was increased without a significant change in the electroluminescence spectrum. This enhancement is attributed to the improved light extraction, which is due to the suppression of total internal reflection at the interface between the glass substrate and the air.

  9. Honeycomb architecture of carbon quantum dots: a new efficient substrate to support gold for stronger SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yueqiong; Cheng, Huhu; Zhou, Ce; Xie, Xuejun; Liu, Yong; Dai, Liming; Zhang, Jing; Qu, Liangti

    2012-02-01

    The rational assembly of quantum dots (QDs) in a geometrically well-defined fashion opens up the possibility of accessing the full potential of the material and allows new functions of the assembled QDs to be achieved. In this work, well-confined two-dimensional (2D) and 3D carbon quantum dot (CQD) honeycomb structures have been assembled by electrodeposition of oxygen-rich functional CQDs within the interstitial voids of assemblies of SiO2 nanospheres, followed by extraction of the SiO2 cores with HF treatment. Although made from quantum sized carbon dots, the CQD assemblies present a solid porous framework, which can be further used as a sacrificial template for the fabrication of new nanostructures made from other functional materials. Based on the unique honeycomb architecture of the CQDs, which allows the more efficient adsorption of molecules, the formed Au nanoparticles on the CQD honeycomb exhibit 8-11 times stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect than the widely used Au nanoparticle SERS substrate for the highly sensitive detection of target molecules. This work provides a new approach for the design and fabrication of ultrasensitive SERS platforms for various applications.The rational assembly of quantum dots (QDs) in a geometrically well-defined fashion opens up the possibility of accessing the full potential of the material and allows new functions of the assembled QDs to be achieved. In this work, well-confined two-dimensional (2D) and 3D carbon quantum dot (CQD) honeycomb structures have been assembled by electrodeposition of oxygen-rich functional CQDs within the interstitial voids of assemblies of SiO2 nanospheres, followed by extraction of the SiO2 cores with HF treatment. Although made from quantum sized carbon dots, the CQD assemblies present a solid porous framework, which can be further used as a sacrificial template for the fabrication of new nanostructures made from other functional materials. Based on the unique honeycomb

  10. Honeycomb Geometry: Applied Mathematics in Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William J.

    1984-01-01

    Study and exploration of the hexagonal shapes found in honeycombs is suggested as an interesting topic for geometry classes. Students learn that the hexagonal pattern maximizes the enclosed region and minimizes the wax needed for construction, while satisfying the bees' cell-size constraint. (MNS)

  11. Fiberglass honeycomb elements formed quickly and cheaply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    Cookie cutter device initiates production of identical, double-contoured fiber glass elements used as shock absorbers. Three-bladed edges convert triangular honeycomb elements into hexagonal shapes which are then stamped to desired length by concave and convex dies. Sandpaper smoothing completes the process.

  12. Evolution of the Hofstadter butterfly in a tunable optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, F.; Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ã.-.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in realizing artificial gauge fields on optical lattices promise experimental detection of topologically nontrivial energy spectra. Self-similar fractal energy structures generally known as Hofstadter butterflies depend sensitively on the geometry of the underlying lattice, as well as the applied magnetic field. The recent demonstration of an adjustable lattice geometry [L. Tarruell, D. Greif, T. Uehlinger, G. Jotzu, and T. Esslinger, Nature (London) 483, 302 (2012), 10.1038/nature10871] presents a unique opportunity to study this dependence. In this paper, we calculate the Hofstadter butterflies that can be obtained in such an adjustable lattice and find three qualitatively different regimes. We show that the existence of Dirac points at zero magnetic field does not imply the topological equivalence of spectra at finite field. As the real-space structure evolves from the checkerboard lattice to the honeycomb lattice, two square-lattice Hofstadter butterflies merge to form a honeycomb lattice butterfly. This merging is topologically nontrivial, as it is accomplished by sequential closings of gaps. Ensuing Chern number transfer between the bands can be probed with the adjustable lattice experiments. We also calculate the Chern numbers of the gaps for qualitatively different spectra and discuss the evolution of topological properties with underlying lattice geometry.

  13. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  14. Tunable spin wave spectra in two-dimensional Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} antidot lattices with varying lattice symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, R.; Barman, S.; Saha, S.; Barman, A.; Otani, Y.

    2015-08-07

    Ferromagnetic antidot lattices are important systems for magnetic data storage and magnonic devices, and understanding their magnetization dynamics by varying their structural parameters is an important problems in magnetism. Here, we investigate the variation in spin wave spectrum in two-dimensional nanoscale Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} antidot lattices with lattice symmetry. By varying the bias magnetic field values in a broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectrometer, we observed a stark variation in the spin wave spectrum with the variation of lattice symmetry. The simulated mode profiles showed further difference in the spatial nature of the modes between different lattices. While for square and rectangular lattices extended modes are observed in addition to standing spin wave modes, all modes in the hexagonal, honeycomb, and octagonal lattices are either localized or standing waves. In addition, the honeycomb and octagonal lattices showed two different types of modes confined within the honeycomb (octagonal) units and between two such consecutive units. Simulated internal magnetic fields confirm the origin of such a wide variation in the frequency and spatial nature of the spin wave modes. The tunability of spin waves with the variation of lattice symmetry is important for the design of future magnetic data storage and magnonic devices.

  15. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  16. Thermal inspection of composite honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-05-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Honeycomb Impact Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Nohyu

    To participate in Student Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) competitions, it is necessary to build an impact attenuator that would give an average deceleration not to exceed 20g when it runs into a rigid wall. Students can use numerical simulations or experimental test data to show that their car satisfies this safety requirement. A student group to study formula cars at the Korea University of Technology and Education has designed a vehicle to take part in a SAE competition, and a honeycomb structure was adopted as the impact attenuator. In this paper, finite element calculations were carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of the honeycomb attenuator. Deceleration and deformation behaviors were studied. Effect of the yield strength was checked by comparing the numerical results. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code was used.

  18. Thermal Inspection of Composite Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  19. Development of graphite/polyimide honeycomb core materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Honeycomb panel constructions consisting entirely of graphite/polyimide composites were developed and evaluated. Graphite/polyimide composites, were used in the honeycomb core webs and in pre-cured sandwich skins. Polyimide adhesives were also developed and evaluated for use in skin-core bonding. The purpose of this program was to develop light weight sandwich constructions for high temperature applications which could provide comparable shear strength and stiffness to metallic honeycomb constructions.

  20. Evolution of magnetism in the Na3-δ(Na1-xMgx)Ir2O6 series of honeycomb iridates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, David C.; Brown, Craig M.; McQueen, Tyrel M.

    2015-04-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of a new series of iridium-based honeycomb lattices with the formula Na3-δ(Na1-xMgx)Ir2O6(0 ≤ x ≤ 1) are reported. As x and δ are increased, the honeycomb lattice contracts and the strength of the antiferromagnetic interactions decreases systematically due to a reduction in Ir-O-Ir bond angles. Samples with imperfect stoichiometry exhibit disordered magnetic freezing at temperatures Tf between 3.4 K and 5 K. This glassy magnetism likely arises due to the presence of non-magnetic Ir3+, which are distributed randomly throughout the lattice, with a possible additional contribution from stacking faults. Together, these results demonstrate that chemical defects and non-stoichiometry have a significant effect on the magnetism of compounds in the A2IrO3 materials family.

  1. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  2. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  3. Advanced radiator concepts utilizing honeycomb panel heat pipes (stainless steel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Tanzer, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing moderate temperature range heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for highly efficient radiator fins for the NASA space station was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts were evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. Concepts evaluated include: type of material, material and panel thicknesses, wick type and manufacturability, liquid and vapor communication among honeycomb cells, and liquid flow return from condenser to evaporator facesheet areas. In addition, the overall performance of the honeycomb panel heat pipe was evaluated analytically.

  4. Exact results for a random frustrated Ising model on the Kagome lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomini, H.J.; Riera, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    The authors perform a slight modification of the decoration-decimation transformation which allows us to map the homogeneous Ising model on the honeycomb lattice on an inhomogeneous Ising model on the Kagome lattice. Then, we obtain exact results for a class of random bond Ising model on the Kagome lattice with competing interactions and show that the different types of frustration make the critical point of the pure model disappear.

  5. Proximate Kitaev quantum spin liquid behaviour in a honeycomb magnet

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, A.; Bridges, C. A.; Yan, J. -Q.; Aczel, A. A.; Li, L.; Stone, M. B.; Granroth, G. E.; Lumsden, M. D.; Yiu, Y.; Knolle, J.; et al

    2016-04-04

    Quantum spin liquids (QSLs) are topological states of matter exhibiting remarkable properties such as the capacity to protect quantum information from decoherence. While their featureless ground states have precluded their straightforward experimental identification, excited states are more revealing and particularly interesting due to the emergence of fundamentally new excitations such as Majorana Fermions. Ideal probes of these excitations are inelastic neutron scattering experiments. We report these here for a ruthenium-based material α-RuCl3, continuing a major search (so far concentrated on iridium materials inimical to neutron probes) for realizations of the celebrated Kitaev honeycomb topological QSL. Our measurements confirm the requisitemore » strong spin-orbit coupling and low-temperature magnetic order matching predictions proximate to the QSL. We find stacking faults, inherent to the highly 2D nature of the material, resolve an outstanding puzzle. Crucially, dynamical response measurements above interlayer energy scales are naturally accounted for in terms of deconfinement physics expected for QSLs. Comparing these with recent dynamical calculations involving gauge flux excitations and Majorana fermions of the pure Kitaev model, we propose the excitation spectrum of α-RuCl3 as prime candidate for realization of fractionalized Kitaev physics.« less

  6. Mechanics and applications of pressure adaptive honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Roelof

    A novel adaptive aerostructure is presented that relies on certified aerospace materials and can therefore be applied in conventional passenger aircraft. This structure consists of a honeycomb material which' cells extend over a significant length perpendicular to the plane of the cells. Each of the cells contains an inelastic pouch (or bladder) that forms a circular tube when the cell forms a perfect hexagon. By changing the cell differential pressure (CDP) the stiffness of the honeycomb can be altered. Using an external force or the elastic force within the honeycomb material, the honeycomb can be deformed such that the cells deviate from their perfect-hexagonal shape. It can be shown that by increasing the CDP, the structure eventually returns to a perfect hexagon. By doing so, a fully embedded pneumatic actuator is created that can perform work and substitute conventional low-bandwidth flight control actuators. It is shown that two approaches can be taken to regulate the stiffness of this embedded actuator: (1) The first approach relies on the pouches having a fixed amount of air in them and stiffness is altered by a change in ambient pressure. Coupled to the ambient pressure-altitude cycle that aircraft encounter during each flight, this approach yields a true adaptive aerostructure that operates independently of pilot input and is controlled solely by the altitude the aircraft is flying at. (2) The second approach relies on a controlled constant CDP. This CDP could be supplied from one of the compressor stages of the engine as a form of bleed air. Because of the air-tight pouches there would essentially be no mass flow, meaning engine efficiency would not be significantly affected due to this application. By means of a valve system the pilot could have direct control over the pressure and, consequently, the stiffness of the structure. This allows for much higher CDPs (on the order of 1MPa) than could physically be achieved by relying on the ambient pressure

  7. Raman spectroscopic signature of fractionalized excitations in the harmonic-honeycomb iridates β- and γ-Li2IrO3.

    PubMed

    Glamazda, A; Lemmens, P; Do, S-H; Choi, Y S; Choi, K-Y

    2016-01-01

    The fractionalization of elementary excitations in quantum spin systems is a central theme in current condensed matter physics. The Kitaev honeycomb spin model provides a prominent example of exotic fractionalized quasiparticles, composed of itinerant Majorana fermions and gapped gauge fluxes. However, identification of the Majorana fermions in a three-dimensional honeycomb lattice remains elusive. Here we report spectroscopic signatures of fractional excitations in the harmonic-honeycomb iridates β- and γ-Li2IrO3. Using polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopy, we find that the dynamical Raman response of β- and γ-Li2IrO3 features a broad scattering continuum with distinct polarization and composition dependence. The temperature dependence of the Raman spectral weight is dominated by the thermal damping of fermionic excitations. These results suggest the emergence of Majorana fermions from spin fractionalization in a three-dimensional Kitaev-Heisenberg system. PMID:27457278

  8. Raman spectroscopic signature of fractionalized excitations in the harmonic-honeycomb iridates β- and γ-Li2IrO3

    PubMed Central

    Glamazda, A.; Lemmens, P.; Do, S. -H.; Choi, Y. S.; Choi, K. -Y.

    2016-01-01

    The fractionalization of elementary excitations in quantum spin systems is a central theme in current condensed matter physics. The Kitaev honeycomb spin model provides a prominent example of exotic fractionalized quasiparticles, composed of itinerant Majorana fermions and gapped gauge fluxes. However, identification of the Majorana fermions in a three-dimensional honeycomb lattice remains elusive. Here we report spectroscopic signatures of fractional excitations in the harmonic-honeycomb iridates β- and γ-Li2IrO3. Using polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopy, we find that the dynamical Raman response of β- and γ-Li2IrO3 features a broad scattering continuum with distinct polarization and composition dependence. The temperature dependence of the Raman spectral weight is dominated by the thermal damping of fermionic excitations. These results suggest the emergence of Majorana fermions from spin fractionalization in a three-dimensional Kitaev–Heisenberg system. PMID:27457278

  9. Room-temperature quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe honeycomb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais Smith, Cristiane; Beugeling, Wouter; Kalesaki, Efterpi; Niquet, Y.-M.; Delerue, Christophe; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The recent experimental realization of self-assembled honeycomb superlattices of truncated semiconducting nanocrystals has opened a new path to engineer graphene-like structures. Atomistic band-structure calculations for honeycomb lattices of PbSe and CdSe have shown a rich band structure, with Dirac cones at the s- as well as at the p-bands, in addition to a flat p-band. By controlling the chemical composition of the nanocrystals, lattices with strong spin-orbit coupling can be artificially designed. We show that for HgTe a huge non-trivial gap, of order of 50 meV, opens at the K-points. We calculate the edge states using both, an atomistic calculation that takes into account 106 atomic orbitals per unit cell, as well as an effective 16-bands tight-binding model, and find that the quantum spin Hall effect should be observable in this material at temperatures of the order of room temperature. Financial support from ANR, NWO and FOM is acknowledged.

  10. Dirac topological insulator in the dz2 manifold of a honeycomb oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, J. L.; Pardo, V.

    2016-09-01

    We show by means of ab initio calculations and tight-binding modeling that an oxide system based on a honeycomb lattice can sustain topologically nontrivial states if a single orbital dominates the spectrum close to the Fermi level. In such a situation, the low-energy spectrum is described by two Dirac equations that become nontrivially gapped when spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is switched on. We provide one specific example but the recipe is general. We discuss a realization of this starting from a conventional spin-1/2 honeycomb antiferromagnet whose states close to the Fermi energy are dz2 orbitals. Switching off magnetism by atomic substitution and ensuring that the electronic structure becomes two-dimensional is sufficient for topologicality to arise in such a system. By deriving a tight-binding Wannier Hamiltonian, we find that the gap in such a model scales linearly with SOC, opposed to other oxide-based topological insulators, where smaller gaps tend to appear by construction of the lattice. We show that the quantum spin Hall state in this system survives in the presence of off-plane magnetism and the orbital magnetic field and we discuss its Landau level spectra, showing that our recipe provides a dz2 realization of the Kane-Mele model.

  11. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  12. Algorithmic lattice kirigami: A route to pluripotent materials

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Daniel M.; Cho, Yigil; Castle, Toen; Gong, Xingting; Jung, Euiyeon; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.

    2015-01-01

    We use a regular arrangement of kirigami elements to demonstrate an inverse design paradigm for folding a flat surface into complex target configurations. We first present a scheme using arrays of disclination defect pairs on the dual to the honeycomb lattice; by arranging these defect pairs properly with respect to each other and choosing an appropriate fold pattern a target stepped surface can be designed. We then present a more general method that specifies a fixed lattice of kirigami cuts to be performed on a flat sheet. This single pluripotent lattice of cuts permits a wide variety of target surfaces to be programmed into the sheet by varying the folding directions. PMID:26015582

  13. Clean Electrical-Discharge Machining Of Delicate Honeycomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Clarence S.

    1993-01-01

    Precise recesses in fragile metal honeycomb blocks formed in special electrical-discharge machining process. Special tooling used, and recesses bored with workpiece in nonstandard alignment. Cutting electrode advances into workpiece along x axis to form pocket of rectangular cross section. Deionized water flows from fitting, along honeycomb tubes of workpiece, to electrode/workpiece interface.

  14. Formation and Dynamics of Antiferromagnetic Correlations in Tunable Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greif, Daniel; Jotzu, Gregor; Messer, Michael; Desbuquois, Rémi; Esslinger, Tilman

    2015-12-01

    We report on the observation of antiferromagnetic correlations of ultracold fermions in a variety of optical lattice geometries that are well described by the Hubbard model, including dimers, 1D chains, ladders, isolated and coupled honeycomb planes, as well as square and cubic lattices. The dependence of the strength of spin correlations on the specific geometry is experimentally studied by measuring the correlations along different lattice tunneling links, where a redistribution of correlations between the different lattice links is observed. By measuring the correlations in a crossover between distinct geometries, we demonstrate an effective reduction of the dimensionality for our atom numbers and temperatures. We also investigate the formation and redistribution time of spin correlations by dynamically changing the lattice geometry and studying the time evolution of the system. Time scales ranging from a sudden quench of the lattice geometry to an adiabatic evolution are probed.

  15. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  16. Millimeter Wave Holographical Inspection of Honeycomb Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, J. T.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Stefes, G.; Hepburn, Frank L.; Hepburn, Frank L.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-layered composite structures manufactured with honeycomb, foam or balsa wood cores are finding increasing utility in a variety of aerospace, transportation, and infrastructure applications. Due to the low conductivity and inhomogeneity associated with these composites standard nondestructive testing (NDT) methods are not always capable of inspecting their interior for various defects caused during the manufacturing process or as a result of in-service loading. On the contrary, microwave and millimeter wave NDT methods are well-suited for inspecting these structures since signals at these frequencies readily penetrate through these structures and reflect from different interior boundaries revealing the presence of a wide range of defects such as disbond, delamination, moisture and oil intrusion, impact damage, etc. Millimeter wave frequency spectrum spans 30 GHz - 300 GHz with corresponding wavelengths of 10 - 1 mm. Due to the inherent short wavelengths at these frequencies, one can produce high spatial resolution images of these composites either using real-antenna focused or synthetic-aperture focused methods. In addition, incorporation of swept-frequency in the latter method (i.e., holography) results in high-resolution three-dimensional images. This paper presents the basic steps behind producing such images at millimeter wave frequencies and the results of two honeycomb composite panels are demonstrated at Q-band (33-50 GHz). In addition, these results are compared to previous results using X-ray computed tomography.

  17. Emergent Power-Law Phase in the 2D Heisenberg Windmill Antiferromagnet: A Computational Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-10-01

    In an extensive computational experiment, we test Polyakov's conjecture that under certain circumstances an isotropic Heisenberg model can develop algebraic spin correlations. We demonstrate the emergence of a multispin U(1) order parameter in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The correlations of this relative phase angle are observed to decay algebraically at intermediate temperatures in an extended critical phase. Using finite-size scaling we show that both phase transitions are of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type, and at lower temperatures we find long-range Z6 order.

  18. Emergent Power-Law Phase in the 2D Heisenberg Windmill Antiferromagnet: A Computational Experiment.

    PubMed

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Orth, Peter P

    2015-10-23

    In an extensive computational experiment, we test Polyakov's conjecture that under certain circumstances an isotropic Heisenberg model can develop algebraic spin correlations. We demonstrate the emergence of a multispin U(1) order parameter in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The correlations of this relative phase angle are observed to decay algebraically at intermediate temperatures in an extended critical phase. Using finite-size scaling we show that both phase transitions are of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type, and at lower temperatures we find long-range Z(6) order.

  19. Molecular geometry directed Kagomé and honeycomb networks: toward two-dimensional crystal engineering.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shuhei; Uji-i, Hiroshi; Tahara, Kazukuni; Ichikawa, Tomoyuki; Sonoda, Motohiro; De Schryver, Frans C; Tobe, Yoshito; De Feyter, Steven

    2006-03-22

    We present here the formation of a molecular Kagomé network within a two-dimensional (2D) crystal on a surface. This system provides a clear example of how, by design, molecular geometry can be expressed at the level of the 2D crystal lattice, leading to the formation of open networks. Key elements to control molecular network formation are core symmetry, location and orientation of interacting and connecting substituents, as well as symmetry matching between the networks and the surface.

  20. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-08

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  1. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  2. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  3. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  4. Topological Properties of Atomic Lead Film with Honeycomb Structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y H; Zhou, D; Wang, T; Yang, Shengyuan A; Jiang, J Z

    2016-02-25

    Large bandgap is desired for the fundamental research as well as applications of topological insulators. Based on first-principles calculations, here we predict a new family of two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators in functionalized atomic lead films Pb-X (X = H, F, Cl, Br, I and SiH3). All of them have large bandgaps with the largest one above 1 eV, far beyond the recorded gap values and large enough for practical applications even at room temperature. Besides chemical functionalization, external strain can also effectively tune the bandgap while keeping the topological phase. Thus, the topological properties of these materials are quite robust, and as a result there exist 1D topological edge channels against backscattering. We further show that the 2D Pb structure can be encapsulated by SiO2 with very small lattice mismatch and still maintains its topological character. All these features make the 2D atomic Pb films a promising platform for fabricating novel topological electronic devices.

  5. Topological Properties of Atomic Lead Film with Honeycomb Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. H.; Zhou, D.; Wang, T.; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Large bandgap is desired for the fundamental research as well as applications of topological insulators. Based on first-principles calculations, here we predict a new family of two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators in functionalized atomic lead films Pb-X (X = H, F, Cl, Br, I and SiH3). All of them have large bandgaps with the largest one above 1 eV, far beyond the recorded gap values and large enough for practical applications even at room temperature. Besides chemical functionalization, external strain can also effectively tune the bandgap while keeping the topological phase. Thus, the topological properties of these materials are quite robust, and as a result there exist 1D topological edge channels against backscattering. We further show that the 2D Pb structure can be encapsulated by SiO2 with very small lattice mismatch and still maintains its topological character. All these features make the 2D atomic Pb films a promising platform for fabricating novel topological electronic devices. PMID:26912024

  6. Superradiance Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Ren-Bao; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the timed Dicke states of a collection of three-level atoms can form a tight-binding lattice in momentum space. This lattice, coined the superradiance lattice (SL), can be constructed based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). For a one-dimensional SL, we need the coupling field of the EIT system to be a standing wave. The detuning between the two components of the standing wave introduces an effective uniform force in momentum space. The quantum lattice dynamics, such as Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch band collapsing, and dynamic localization can be observed in the SL. The two-dimensional SL provides a flexible platform for Dirac physics in graphene. The SL can be extended to three and higher dimensions where no analogous real space lattices exist with new physics waiting to be explored.

  7. Damping capacity in shape memory alloy honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, M.-A.; Smith, C. W.; Scarpa, F.; Miller, W.; Hassan, M. R.

    2010-04-01

    SMA honeycombs have been recently developed by several Authors [1, 2] as innovative cellular structures with selfhealing capability following mechanical indentation, unusual deformation (negative Poisson's ratio [3]), and possible enhanced damping capacity due to the natural vibration dissipation characteristics of SMAs under pseudoelastic and superelastic regime. In this work we describe the nonlinear damping effects of novel shape memory alloy honeycomb assemblies subjected to combine mechanical sinusoidal and thermal loading. The SMA honeycomb structures made with Ni48Ti46Cu6 are designed with single and two-phase polymeric components (epoxy), to enhance the damping characteristics of the base SMA for broadband frequency vibration.

  8. Crystallography of rare galactic honeycomb structure near supernova 1987a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Near supernova 1987a, the rare honeycomb structure of 20-30 galactic bubbles measures 30 x 90 light years. Its remarkable regularity in bubble size suggests a single-event origin which may correlate with the nearby supernova. To test the honeycomb's regularity in shape and size, the formalism of statistical crystallography is developed here for bubble sideness. The standard size-shape relations (Lewis's law, Desch's law, and Aboav-Weaire's law) govern area, perimeter and nearest neighbor shapes. Taken together, they predict a highly non-equilibrium structure for the galactic honeycomb which evolves as a bimodal shape distribution without dominant bubble perimeter energy.

  9. Three-dimensional honeycomb-like networks of birnessite manganese oxide assembled by ultrathin two-dimensional nanosheets with enhanced Li-ion battery performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liyun; Wei, Chengzhen; Ma, Haifeng; Lu, Qingyi; Gao, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) honeycomb-like birnessite networks composed of ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets were firstly synthesized through a facile and low-cost synthetic route. By using carbon microspheres as a template instead of graphene, hierarchical birnessite structures assembled by ultrathin nanosheets including york-shell and hollow structures were obtained besides the ultrathin birnessite nanosheets with a thickness of about 0.7 nm. By assembling carbon spheres into an ordered 3D array, novel 3D honeycomb-like birnessite structures assembled by ultrathin nanosheets were firstly prepared. When evaluated as an anode material for Li-ion batteries, the 3D honeycomb-like networks show enhanced electrochemical performances with high capacities, excellent cycling stability and good rate capability, which can be ascribed to the novel 3D honeycomb-like macroporous structure with a 3D inverse opal structure, well-ordered macropores, interconnected walls and a regular periodicity.Three-dimensional (3D) honeycomb-like birnessite networks composed of ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets were firstly synthesized through a facile and low-cost synthetic route. By using carbon microspheres as a template instead of graphene, hierarchical birnessite structures assembled by ultrathin nanosheets including york-shell and hollow structures were obtained besides the ultrathin birnessite nanosheets with a thickness of about 0.7 nm. By assembling carbon spheres into an ordered 3D array, novel 3D honeycomb-like birnessite structures assembled by ultrathin nanosheets were firstly prepared. When evaluated as an anode material for Li-ion batteries, the 3D honeycomb-like networks show enhanced electrochemical performances with high capacities, excellent cycling stability and good rate capability, which can be ascribed to the novel 3D honeycomb-like macroporous structure with a 3D inverse opal structure, well-ordered macropores, interconnected walls and a regular periodicity

  10. Stripe states in photonic honeycomb ribbon

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sul-Ah; Son, Young-Woo; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2015-01-01

    We reveal new stripe states in deformed hexagonal array of photonic wave guides when the array is terminated to have a ribbon-shaped geometry. Unlike the well-known zero energy edge modes of honeycomb ribbon, the new one-dimensional states are shown to originate from high-energy saddle-shaped photonic bands of the ribbon's two-dimensional counterpart. We find that the strain field deforming the ribbon generates pseudo-electric fields in contrast to pseudo-magnetic fields in other hexagonal crystals. Thus, the stripe states experience Bloch oscillation without any actual electric field so that the spatial distributions of stripes have a singular dependence on the strength of the field. The resulting stripe states are located inside the bulk and their positions depend on their energies. PMID:27547090

  11. Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

  12. Simulation of the honeycomb construction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanzhang, Zhang

    2010-06-01

    The construction process of the honeycomb by bees is an astonishing process. The original structure which the bees built is nothing more than a lot of rough cylinders. But keeping the beeswax semi-flow for a certain time, those rough structures become perfect hexahedral columns. A modified, simplified particle method was used here to simulate the semi-flow state of the material. Although the parameters used here were still rather subjective, the simulation still could demonstrate some behavior of that sort of material like beeswax. And the method that the bees used to build their honey comb, could be an efficient method to imitate when we are trying to manufacture cellular materials.

  13. Quantum spin Hall insulators with interactions and lattice anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Rachel, Stephan; Liu, Wu-Ming; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the interplay between spin-orbit coupling and electron-electron interactions on the honeycomb lattice, combining the cellular dynamical mean-field theory and its real-space extension with analytical approaches. We provide a thorough analysis of the phase diagram and temperature effects at weak spin-orbit coupling. We systematically discuss the stability of the quantum spin Hall phase toward interactions and lattice anisotropy, resulting in the plaquette-honeycomb model. We also show the evolution of the helical edge states characteristic of quantum spin Hall insulators as a function of Hubbard interaction and anisotropy. At very weak spin-orbit coupling and intermediate electron-electron interactions, we substantiate the existence of a quantum spin liquid phase.

  14. Fibonacci Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kevin; Geiger, Zachary; Senaratne, Ruwan; Rajagopal, Shankari; Fujiwara, Kurt; Weld, David; Weld Group Team

    2015-05-01

    Quasiperiodicity is intimately involved in quantum phenomena from localization to the quantum Hall effect. Recent experimental investigation of quasiperiodic quantum effects in photonic and electronic systems have revealed intriguing connections to topological phenomena. However, such experiments have been limited by the absence of techniques for creating tunable quasiperiodic structures. We propose a new type of quasiperiodic optical lattice, constructed by intersecting a Gaussian beam with a 2D square lattice at an angle with an irrational tangent. The resulting potential, a generalization of the Fibonacci lattice, is a physical realization of the mathematical ``cut-and-project'' construction which underlies all quasiperiodic structures. Calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of atoms loaded into the proposed quasiperiodic lattice demonstrate a fractal energy spectrum and the existence of edge states. We acknowledge support from the ONR (award N00014-14-1-0805), the ARO and the PECASE program (award W911NF-14-1-0154), the AFOSR (award FA9550-12-1-0305), and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation (grant BR2013-110).

  15. Characterization of Aluminum Honeycomb and Experimentation for Model Development and Validation, Volume I: Discovery and Characterization Experiments for High-Density Aluminum Honeycomb

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Korellis, John S.; Lee, Kenneth L.; Scheffel, Simon; Hinnerichs, Terry Dean; Neilsen, Michael K.; Scherzinger, William Mark

    2006-08-01

    Honeycomb is a structure that consists of two-dimensional regular arrays of open cells. High-density aluminum honeycomb has been used in weapon assemblies to mitigate shock and protect payload because of its excellent crush properties. In order to use honeycomb efficiently and to certify the payload is protected by the honeycomb under various loading conditions, a validated honeycomb crush model is required and the mechanical properties of the honeycombs need to be fully characterized. Volume I of this report documents an experimental study of the crush behavior of high-density honeycombs. Two sets of honeycombs were included in this investigation: commercial grade for initial exploratory experiments, and weapon grade, which satisfied B61 specifications. This investigation also includes developing proper experimental methods for crush characterization, conducting discovery experiments to explore crush behaviors for model improvement, and identifying experimental and material uncertainties.

  16. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  17. Lattice Green's functions in all dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.

    2010-07-01

    We give a systematic treatment of lattice Green's functions (LGF) on the d-dimensional diamond, simple cubic, body-centred cubic and face-centred cubic lattices for arbitrary dimensionality d >= 2 for the first three lattices, and for 2 <= d <= 5 for the hyper-fcc lattice. We show that there is a close connection between the LGF of the d-dimensional hyper-cubic lattice and that of the (d - 1)-dimensional diamond lattice. We give constant-term formulations of LGFs for each of these lattices in all dimensions. Through a still under-developed connection with Mahler measures, we point out an unexpected connection between the coefficients of the sc, bcc and diamond LGFs and some Ramanujan-type formulae for 1/π.

  18. Elastic wave propagation in adaptive honeycomb-based materials with high connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi-Wei; Deng, Zi-Chen

    2016-08-01

    Beam-type periodic materials with high connectivity have displayed unique band gap behaviors analogous to locally resonant band gaps in acoustic metamaterials. In this study, structurally square re-entrant honeycomb, one highly connected lattice configuration featuring eight folded beams connected at each joint, is introduced to be the host structure of a smart material to tailor the elastic wave propagation. Finite length piezoelectric patches connected with negative capacitance shunting circuits are arranged on the beam surfaces, providing active adjustment via altering the parameters of shunting circuits. The characteristics of band structure of this smart structured material are investigated through the application of finite element method in conjunction with the Bloch theorem. Results demonstrate that the variation of internally resonant band gaps induced by the alteration of the piezoelectric patches to those positions and mechanical properties, can be precisely estimated by simple heuristic models proposed according to deformation characteristics of standing wave modes. This founding could promote the practical implementation of the highly connected honeycombs in the adaptive control to elastic wave.

  19. Moving vortex phases, dynamical symmetry breaking, and jamming for vortices in honeycomb pinning arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    We show using numerical simulations that vortices in honeycomb pinning arrays can exhibit a remarkable variety of dynamical phases that are distinct from those found for triangular and square pinning arrays. In the honeycomb arrays, it is possible for the interstitial vortices to form dimer or higher n-mer states which have an additional orientational degree of freedom that can lead to the formation of vortex molecular crystals. For filling fractions where dimer states appear, a dynamical symmetry breaking can occur when the dimers flow in one of two possible alignment directions. This leads to transport in the direction transverse to the applied drive. We show that dimerization produces distinct types of moving phases which depend on the direction of the driving force with respect to the pinning lattice symmetry. When the dimers are driven along certain directions, a reorientation of the dimers can produce a jamming phenomenon which results in a strong enhancement in the critical depinning force. The jamming can also cause unusual effects such as an increase in the critical depinning force when the size of the pinning sites is reduced.

  20. Engineering interaction-induced topological insulators in a √{3 }×√{3 } substrate-induced honeycomb superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venderbos, Jörn W. F.; Manzardo, Marco; Efremov, Dmitry V.; van den Brink, Jeroen; Ortix, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    We consider a system of spinless fermions on the honeycomb lattice with substrate-induced modulated electrostatic potentials tripling the unit cell. The resulting non-Abelian S U (2 ) gauge fields act cooperatively to realize a quadratic band crossing point (QBCP). Using a combination of mean-field theory and renormalization group techniques, we show that in the QBCP regime, arbitrarily weak repulsive electronic interactions drive the system into the quantum anomalous Hall state. This proves that substrate-induced local voltages are an effective knob to induce the spontaneous formation of a topological quantum phase.

  1. Double-Lap Shear Test For Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Hodge, Andrew J.

    1992-01-01

    Double-lap test measures shear strength of panel made of honeycomb core with 8-ply carbon-fiber/epoxy face sheets. Developed to overcome three principal disadvantages of prior standard single-lap shear test: specimen had to be more than 17 in. long; metal face sheets had to be used; and test introduced torque, with consequent bending and peeling of face sheets and spurious tensile or compressive loading of honeycomb.

  2. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  3. Low voltage reversible electrowetting exploiting lubricated polymer honeycomb substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Pogreb, Roman; Bormashenko, Yelena; Grynyov, Roman; Gendelman, Oleg

    2014-04-01

    Low-voltage electrowetting-on-dielectric scheme realized with lubricated honeycomb polymer surfaces is reported. Polycarbonate honeycomb reliefs manufactured with the breath-figures self-assembly were impregnated with silicone and castor oils. The onset of the reversible electrowetting for silicone oil impregnated substrates occurred at 35 V, whereas for castor oil impregnated ones it took place at 80 V. The semi-quantitative analysis of electrowetting of impregnated surfaces is proposed.

  4. New-Type Phase Transition of Li2RuO3 with Honeycomb Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoko; Yasui, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi; Igawa, Naoki; Kakurai, Kazuhisa

    2007-03-01

    A new-type structural transition has been found in Li2RuO3 with a honeycomb lattice of edge-sharing RuO6 octahedra. With decreasing temperature T, the electrical resistivity exhibits an anomalous increase at T=Tc ˜ 540 K, suggesting the (metal-to-insulator)-like transition, and the magnetic susceptibility also shows a sharp decrease. Detailed structure analyses have revealed that the high-temperature space group C2/m changes to P21/m at Tc. The most striking fact is that a significant reduction of the bond lengths is found between two of the six Ru-Ru pairs of the hexagon in the low-temperature phase, indicating a new-type phase transition driven by the formation of the molecular orbits of these Ru-Ru pairs.

  5. Nine new phosphorene polymorphs with non-honeycomb structures: a much extended family.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menghao; Fu, Huahua; Zhou, Ling; Yao, Kailun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-05-13

    We predict a new class of monolayer phosphorus allotropes, namely, ε-P, ζ-P, η-P, and θ-P. Distinctly different from the monolayer α-P (black) and previously predicted β-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 176802), γ-P, and δ-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 113, 046804) with buckled honeycomb lattice, the new allotropes are composed of P4 square or P5 pentagon units that favor tricoordination for P atoms. The new four polymorphs, together with five additional hybrid polymorphs, greatly enrich the phosphorene structures, and their stabilities are confirmed by first-principles calculations. In particular, the θ-P is shown to be equally stable as the α-P (black) and more stable than all previously reported phosphorene polymorphs. Prediction of nonvolatile ferroelastic switching and structural transformation among different polymorphs under strains points out their potential applications via strain engineering.

  6. Magnon Hall effect in AB-stacked bilayer honeycomb quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that many bilayer quantum magnets occur in nature, we generalize the study of thermal Hall transports of spin excitations to bilayer magnetic systems. It is shown that bilayer magnetic systems can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically. We study both scenarios on the honeycomb lattice and show that the system realizes topologically nontrivial magnon bands induced by alternating next-nearest-neighbor Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. As a result, the bilayer system realizes both magnon Hall effect and magnon spin Nernst effect. We show that antiferromagnetically coupled layers differ from ferromagnetically coupled layers by a sign change in the conductivities as the magnetic field is reversed. Furthermore, Chern number protected magnon edge states are observed and propagate in the same direction on the top and bottom layers in ferromagnetically coupled layers, whereas the magnon edge states propagate in opposite directions for antiferromagnetically coupled layers.

  7. Nine new phosphorene polymorphs with non-honeycomb structures: a much extended family.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menghao; Fu, Huahua; Zhou, Ling; Yao, Kailun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-05-13

    We predict a new class of monolayer phosphorus allotropes, namely, ε-P, ζ-P, η-P, and θ-P. Distinctly different from the monolayer α-P (black) and previously predicted β-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 176802), γ-P, and δ-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 113, 046804) with buckled honeycomb lattice, the new allotropes are composed of P4 square or P5 pentagon units that favor tricoordination for P atoms. The new four polymorphs, together with five additional hybrid polymorphs, greatly enrich the phosphorene structures, and their stabilities are confirmed by first-principles calculations. In particular, the θ-P is shown to be equally stable as the α-P (black) and more stable than all previously reported phosphorene polymorphs. Prediction of nonvolatile ferroelastic switching and structural transformation among different polymorphs under strains points out their potential applications via strain engineering. PMID:25844524

  8. Evidence of silicene in honeycomb structures of silicon on Ag(111).

    PubMed

    Feng, Baojie; Ding, Zijing; Meng, Sheng; Yao, Yugui; He, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2012-07-11

    In the search for evidence of silicene, a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice of silicon, it is important to obtain a complete picture for the evolution of Si structures on Ag(111), which is believed to be the most suitable substrate for growth of silicene so far. In this work we report the finding and evolution of several monolayer superstructures of silicon on Ag(111), depending on the coverage and temperature. Combined with first-principles calculations, the detailed structures of these phases have been illuminated. These structures were found to share common building blocks of silicon rings, and they evolve from a fragment of silicene to a complete monolayer silicene and multilayer silicene. Our results elucidate how silicene forms on Ag(111) surface and provides methods to synthesize high-quality and large-scale silicene.

  9. Continuum Nonsimple Loops and 2D Critical Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camia, Federico; Newman, Charles M.

    2004-08-01

    Substantial progress has been made in recent years on the 2D critical percolation scaling limit and its conformal invariance properties. In particular, chordal SLE 6(the Stochastic Loewner Evolution with parameter κ=6) was, in the work of Schramm and of Smirnov, identified as the scaling limit of the critical percolation "exploration process." In this paper we use that and other results to construct what we argue is the fullscaling limit of the collection of allclosed contours surrounding the critical percolation clusters on the 2D triangular lattice. This random process or gas of continuum nonsimple loops in Bbb R2is constructed inductively by repeated use of chordal SLE 6. These loops do not cross but do touch each other—indeed, any two loops are connected by a finite "path" of touching loops.

  10. Subwavelength Lattice Optics by Evolutionary Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials—lattice opto-materials—that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  11. Kitaev's honeycomb model on a buckyball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Paula; Petrova, Olga; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    We study the effect of disclinations in the Kitaev's honeycomb model by examining the effective tight binding hamiltonian of Majorana fermions on Buckminsterfullerene. Disclinations are realized by the 12 pentagons which shape the buckyball. We found that the ground state of the system with isotropic nearest neighbor coupling t1, corresponds to a uniform flux sector of the Z2 gauge field, where hexagons are flux free and pentagons have the same fluxes. Inclusion of second neighbor couplings t2, preserve the projective symmetries of the truncated icosahedron as long as fluxes through all plaquettes (triangles, pentagons, and hexagons) related by symmetries are the same. For t1 /t2 smaller than 1 / 2 , the local density of states reorganizes suggesting that the zero energy Majorana modes localize at the disclinations. The robustness of this quantum state against noise is examined. This work was supported in part by Fondecyt under Grant No. 79112004 and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Grant No. DEFG02-08ER46544.

  12. Method of fabricating lightweight honeycomb structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S. (Inventor); Pickering, Michael (Inventor); Taylor, Raymond L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for fabricating lightweight honeycomb type structures out of material such as silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon (S). The lightweight structure consists of a core to define the shape and size of the structure. The core is coated with an appropriate deposit such as SiC or Si to give the lightweight structure strength and stiffness and for bonding the lightweight structure to another surface. The core is fabricated from extremely thin ribs of appropriately stiff and strong material such as graphite. First, a graphite core consisting of an outer hexagonal cell with six inner triangular cells is constructed from the graphite ribs. The graphite core may be placed on the back-up side of a SiC faceplate and then coated with SiC to produce a monolithic structure without the use of any bonding agent. Cores and methods for the fabrication thereof in which the six inner triangular cells are further divided into a plurality of cells are also disclosed.

  13. Experimental Analysis and Modeling of the Crushing of Honeycomb Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminanda, Y.; Castanié, B.; Barrau, J.-J.; Thevenet, P.

    2005-05-01

    In the aeronautical field, sandwich structures are widely used for secondary structures like flaps or landing gear doors. The modeling of low velocity/low energy impact, which can lead to a decrease of the structure strength by 50%, remains a designer’s main problem. Since this type of impact has the same effect as quasi-static indentation, the study focuses on the behavior of honeycomb cores under compression. The crushing phenomenon has been well identified for years but its mechanism is not described explicitly and the model proposed may not satisfy industrial purposes. To understand the crushing mechanism, honeycomb test specimens made of Nomex™, aluminum alloy and paper were tested. During the crushing, a CCD camera showed that the cell walls buckled very quickly. The peak load recorded during tests corresponded to the buckling of the common edge of three honeycomb cells. Further tests on corner structures to simulate only one vertical edge of a honeycomb cell show a similar behavior. The different specimens exhibited similar load/displacement curves and the differences observed were only due to the behavior of the different materials. As a conclusion of this phenomenological study, the hypothesis that loads are mainly taken by the vertical edge can be made. So, a honeycomb core subjected to compression can be modeled by a grid of nonlinear springs. A simple analytical model was then developed and validated by tests on Nomex™ honeycomb core indented by different sized spherical indenters. A good correlation between theory and experiment was found. This result can be used to satisfactorily model using finite elements the indentation on a sandwich structure with a metallic or composite skin and honeycomb core.

  14. Interfacing graphene and related 2D materials with the 3D world.

    PubMed

    Tománek, David

    2015-04-10

    An important prerequisite to translating the exceptional intrinsic performance of 2D materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides into useful devices precludes their successful integration within the current 3D technology. This review provides theoretical insight into nontrivial issues arising from interfacing 2D materials with 3D systems including epitaxy and ways to accommodate lattice mismatch, the key role of contact resistance and the effect of defects in electrical and thermal transport.

  15. Robust Large Gap Two-Dimensional Topological Insulators in Hydrogenated III-V Buckled Honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Crisostomo, Christian P; Yao, Liang-Zi; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Albao, Marvin A; Bansil, Arun

    2015-10-14

    A large gap two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator (TI), also known as a quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator, is highly desirable for low-power-consuming electronic devices owing to its spin-polarized backscattering-free edge conducting channels. Although many freestanding films have been predicted to harbor the QSH phase, band topology of a film can be modified substantially when it is placed or grown on a substrate, making the materials realization of a 2D TI challenging. Here we report a first-principles study of possible QSH phases in 75 binary combinations of group III (B, Al, Ga, In, and Tl) and group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements in the 2D buckled honeycomb structure, including hydrogenation on one or both sides of the films to simulate substrate effects. A total of six compounds (GaBi, InBi, TlBi, TlAs, TlSb, and TlN) are identified to be nontrivial in unhydrogenated case; whereas for hydrogenated case, only four (GaBi, InBi, TlBi, and TlSb) remains nontrivial. The band gap is found to be as large as 855 meV for the hydrogenated TlBi film, making this class of III-V materials suitable for room temperature applications. TlBi remains topologically nontrivial with a large band gap at various hydrogen coverages, indicating the robustness of its band topology against bonding effects of substrates.

  16. Optimal Design of Honeycomb Material Used to Mitigate Head Impact

    PubMed Central

    Caccese, Vincent; Ferguson, James R.; Edgecomb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the impact resistance of honeycomb structure with the purpose to mitigate impact forces. The objective is to aid in the choice of optimal parameters to minimize the thickness of the honeycomb structure while providing adequate protection to prevent injury due to head impact. Studies are presented using explicit finite element analysis representing the case of an unprotected drop of a rigid impactor onto a simulated floor consisting of vinyl composition tile and concrete. Analysis of honeycomb material to reduce resulting accelerations is also presented where parameters such as honeycomb material modulus, wall thickness, cell geometry and structure depth are compared to the unprotected case. A simplified analysis technique using a genetic algorithm is presented to demonstrate the use of this method to select a minimum honeycomb depth to achieve a desired acceleration level at a given level of input energy. It is important to select a minimum material depth in that smaller dimensions lead toward more aesthetic design that increase the likelihood of that the device is used. PMID:23976812

  17. Manufacture of large glass honeycomb mirrors. [for astronomical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Hill, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of making very large glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes is examined, and the advantages of honeycomb mirrors made of borosilicate glass are discussed. Thermal gradients in the glass that degrade the figure of thick borosilicate mirrors during use can be largely eliminated in a honeycomb structure by internal ventilation (in air) or careful control of the radiation environment (in space). It is expected that ground-based telescopes with honeycomb mirrors will give better images than those with solid mirrors. Materials, techniques, and the experience that has been gained making trial mirrors and test castings as part of a program to develop 8-10-m-diameter lightweight mirrors are discussed.

  18. Honeycomb Structures of Transition Metal-Group 6A Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataca, Can; Sahin, Hasan; Akturk, Ethem; Ciraci, Salim

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the structural, electronic, magnetic properties and stability of MoS2 like honeycomb structures, namely MX2 where M is a transition metal atom (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Nb, Mo, W) and two group (X) 6A elements (O, S, Se, Te) in a unit cell, using first-principles density functional theory. The structure consists of three layers, two for group 6A elements and one for the transition metal atom. The stabilities of various new structures are further testified by phonon dispersion analysis. Unlike graphene, some of the new honeycomb structures resulted in magnetic ground states. It is also noted that metallic honeycomb structures also exist.

  19. High capacity demonstration of honeycomb panel heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.; Cerza, M. R., Jr.; Hall, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    High capacity honeycomb panel heat pipes were investigated as heat rejection radiators on future space platforms. Starting with a remnant section of honeycomb panel measuring 3.05-m long by 0.127-m wide that was originally designed and built for high-efficiency radiator fins, features were added to increase thermal transport capacity and thus permit test evaluation as an integral heat transport and rejection radiator. A series of subscale panels were fabricated and reworked to isolate individual enhancement features. Key to the enhancement was the addition of a liquid sideflow that utilizes pressure priming. A prediction model was developed and correlated with measured data, and then used to project performance to large, space-station size radiators. Results show that a honeycomb panel with 5.08-cm sideflow spacing and core modification will meet the design load of a 50 kW space heat rejection system.

  20. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    Bismaleimide resins are prime candidates for nonflammable aircraft interior panels. Three resin types with different structures and processing characteristics were formulated. Resin M 751 was used to fabricate 100 kg of glass fabric prepregs which were used for the preparation of face sheets for honeycomb sandwich panels. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication are provided. In order to advance beyond the current solvent resin technology for fibre and fabric impregnation, a hot melt solvent-less resin system was prepared and characterized. Preliminary tests were performed to develop a wet bonding process for the fabrication of advanced sandwich honeycomb panels by use of polybismaleimide glass fabric face sheets and polybismaleimide Nomex honeycomb core. B-stage material was used for both the core and the face sheet, providing flatwise tensile properties equivalent to those obtained by the state-of-the-art 3-step process which includes an epoxy adhesive resin.

  1. Honeycomb vs. Foam: Evaluating Potential Upgrades to ISS Module Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon J.; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of honeycomb cells in a dual-wall structure is advantageous for mechanical performance and low weight in spacecraft primary structures but detrimental for shielding against impact of micrometeoroid and orbital debris particles (MMOD). The presence of honeycomb cell walls acts to restrict the expansion of projectile and bumper fragments, resulting in the impact of a more concentrated (and thus lethal) fragment cloud upon the shield rear wall. The Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) is a Russian research module scheduled for launch and ISS assembly in 2011 (currently under review). Baseline shielding of the MLM is expected to be predominantly similar to that of the existing Functional Energy Block (FGB), utilizing a baseline triple wall configuration with honeycomb sandwich panels for the dual bumpers and a thick monolithic aluminum pressure wall. The MLM module is to be docked to the nadir port of the Zvezda service module and, as such, is subject to higher debris flux than the FGB module (which is aligned along the ISS flight vector). Without upgrades to inherited shielding, the MLM penetration risk is expected to be significantly higher than that of the FGB module. Open-cell foam represents a promising alternative to honeycomb as a sandwich panel core material in spacecraft primary structures as it provides comparable mechanical performance with a minimal increase in weight while avoiding structural features (i.e. channeling cells) detrimental to MMOD shielding performance. In this study, the effect of replacing honeycomb sandwich panel structures with metallic open-cell foam structures on MMOD shielding performance is assessed for an MLM-representative configuration. A number of hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on both the baseline honeycomb configuration and upgraded foam configuration, and differences in target damage, failure limits, and derived ballistic limit equations are discussed.

  2. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  3. Carbon Honeycomb High Capacity Storage for Gaseous and Liquid Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainyukova, Nina V.; Zubarev, Evgeniy N.

    2016-02-01

    We report an exceptionally stable honeycomb carbon allotrope obtained by deposition of vacuum-sublimated graphite. The allotrope structures are derived from our low temperature electron diffraction and electron microscopy data. These structures can be both periodic and random and are built exclusively from s p2 -bonded carbon atoms, and may be considered as three-dimensional graphene. They demonstrate high levels of physical absorption of various gases unattainable in other carbon forms such as fullerites or nanotubes. These honeycomb structures can be used not only for storage of various gases and liquids but also as a matrix for new composites.

  4. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  5. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  6. Photonic crystal based 2D integrating cell for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohrmann, Lena Simone; Petrov, Alexander Y.; Sommer, Gerrit; Krauss, Thomas; Eich, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    We present a concept of a silicon slab based 2D integrating cell where photonic crystal (PhC) reflectors are used in order to confine light in a two-dimensional area to acquire a long propagation length. The evanescent field of the guided wave can be used for sensing applications. We use FDTD simulations to investigate the dependence of the reflectivity of photonic crystal mirrors with a hexagonal lattice. The reflectivity in ΓM direction demonstrates reduced vertical losses compared to the ΓK direction and can be further improved by adiabatically tapering the hole radii of the photonic crystal. A small hexagonal 2D integrating cell was studied with PhC boundaries oriented in ΓM and ΓK direction. It is shown that average reflectivities of 99% can be obtained in a rectangular 2D cell with optimized reflector design, limited only by residual vertical scattering losses at the PhC boundary. This reflectivity is already comparable to the best metallic reflectors.

  7. Coherent transfer by adiabatic passage in two-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-09-15

    Coherent tunneling by adiabatic passage (CTAP) is a well-established technique for robust spatial transport of quantum particles in linear chains. Here we introduce two exactly-solvable models where the CTAP protocol can be extended to two-dimensional lattice geometries. Such bi-dimensional lattice models are synthesized from time-dependent second-quantization Hamiltonians, in which the bosonic field operators evolve adiabatically like in an ordinary three-level CTAP scheme thus ensuring adiabatic passage in Fock space. - Highlights: • New ways of coherent transport by adiabatic passage (CTAP) in 2D lattices. • Synthesis of exactly-solvable 2D lattices from a simple three-well model. • CTAP in 2D lattices can be exploited for quantum state transfer.

  8. Understanding the interaction between energetic ions and freestanding graphene towards practical 2D perforation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchheim, Jakob; Wyss, Roman M.; Shorubalko, Ivan; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2016-04-01

    We report experimentally and theoretically the behavior of freestanding graphene subjected to bombardment of energetic ions, investigating the capability of large-scale patterning of freestanding graphene with nanometer sized features by focused ion beam technology. A precise control over the He+ and Ga+ irradiation offered by focused ion beam techniques enables investigating the interaction of the energetic particles and graphene suspended with no support and allows determining sputter yields of the 2D lattice. We found a strong dependency of the 2D sputter yield on the species and kinetic energy of the incident ion beams. Freestanding graphene shows material semi-transparency to He+ at high energies (10-30 keV) allowing the passage of >97% He+ particles without creating destructive lattice vacancy. Large Ga+ ions (5-30 keV), in contrast, collide far more often with the graphene lattice to impart a significantly higher sputter yield of ~50%. Binary collision theory applied to monolayer and few-layer graphene can successfully elucidate this collision mechanism, in great agreement with experiments. Raman spectroscopy analysis corroborates the passage of a large fraction of He+ ions across graphene without much damaging the lattice whereas several colliding ions create single vacancy defects. Physical understanding of the interaction between energetic particles and suspended graphene can practically lead to reproducible and efficient pattern generation of unprecedentedly small features on 2D materials by design, manifested by our perforation of sub-5 nm pore arrays. This capability of nanometer-scale precision patterning of freestanding 2D lattices shows the practical applicability of focused ion beam technology to 2D material processing for device fabrication and integration.We report experimentally and theoretically the behavior of freestanding graphene subjected to bombardment of energetic ions, investigating the capability of large-scale patterning of

  9. Mirror effects and optical meta-surfaces in 2d atomic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Wild, Dominik; Lukin, Mikhail; Yelin, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Strong optical response of natural and artificial (meta-) materials typically relies on the fact that the lattice constant that separates their constituent particles (atoms or electromagnetic resonators, respectively) is much smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we consider a single layer of a 2d atom array with a lattice constant on the order of an optical wavelength, which can be thought of as a highly dilute 2d metamaterial (meta-surface). Our theoretical analysis shows how strong scattering of resonant incoming light off the array can be controlled by choosing its lattice constant, e.g. allowing the array to operate as a perfect mirror or a retro-reflector for most incident angles of the incoming light. We discuss the prospects for quantum metasurfaces, i.e. the ability to shape the output quantum state of light by controlling the atomic states, and the possible generality of our results as a universal wave phenomena.

  10. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  11. Some considerations of the performance of two honeycomb gas path seal material systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Shiembob, L. T.

    1980-01-01

    A standard Hastelloy-X honeycomb material and a pack aluminide coated honeycomb material were evaluated as to their performance as labyrinth seal materials for aircraft gas turbine engines. Consideration from published literature was given to the fluid sealing characteristics of two honeycomb materials in labyrinth seal applications, and their rub characteristics, erosion resistance, and oxidation resistance were evaluated. The increased temperature potential of the coated honeycomb material compared to the uncoated standard could be achieved without compromising the honeycomb material's rub tolerance, although there was some penalty in terms of reduced erosion resistance.

  12. Understanding the interaction between energetic ions and freestanding graphene towards practical 2D perforation.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Jakob; Wyss, Roman M; Shorubalko, Ivan; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2016-04-21

    We report experimentally and theoretically the behavior of freestanding graphene subjected to bombardment of energetic ions, investigating the capability of large-scale patterning of freestanding graphene with nanometer sized features by focused ion beam technology. A precise control over the He(+) and Ga(+) irradiation offered by focused ion beam techniques enables investigating the interaction of the energetic particles and graphene suspended with no support and allows determining sputter yields of the 2D lattice. We found a strong dependency of the 2D sputter yield on the species and kinetic energy of the incident ion beams. Freestanding graphene shows material semi-transparency to He(+) at high energies (10-30 keV) allowing the passage of >97% He(+) particles without creating destructive lattice vacancy. Large Ga(+) ions (5-30 keV), in contrast, collide far more often with the graphene lattice to impart a significantly higher sputter yield of ∼50%. Binary collision theory applied to monolayer and few-layer graphene can successfully elucidate this collision mechanism, in great agreement with experiments. Raman spectroscopy analysis corroborates the passage of a large fraction of He(+) ions across graphene without much damaging the lattice whereas several colliding ions create single vacancy defects. Physical understanding of the interaction between energetic particles and suspended graphene can practically lead to reproducible and efficient pattern generation of unprecedentedly small features on 2D materials by design, manifested by our perforation of sub-5 nm pore arrays. This capability of nanometer-scale precision patterning of freestanding 2D lattices shows the practical applicability of focused ion beam technology to 2D material processing for device fabrication and integration.

  13. Assessment of a novel neutron tomography instrument and other nondestructive technologies for the characterization of degradation in honeycomb composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungler, P. C.

    The feasibility of developing a nondestructive evaluation technique (NDE) or combination of techniques capable of characterizing degradation in honeycomb composites was investigated. To enable the determination of the exact location of water ingress inside a honeycomb composite structure, a novel neutron tomography instrument (NTI) was designed and developed at RMC. The system represents the only NTI available in Canada and allows a range of objects to be investigated including honeycomb coupons and complete CF 188 rudders. In order to produce 3D volumetric reconstructions of sufficient quality to assess the location of water, the system was optimized in terms of optics, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). An imaging test object was designed to enable the quantitative measurement of the spatial resolution in 2D images and 3D reconstructions, filling a gap in the current neutron imaging standards. Several noise reduction filters were applied to 2D and 3D images produced by the NTI, which improved the spatial resolution and SNR. Appropriate coupons that were purposely degraded to represent honeycomb composites subjected to water ingress were designed, constructed and tested. To produce coupons with different degrees of degradation in the skin to core bond, varying numbers of freeze-thaw cycles were used. Destructive flat-wise tension tests were then performed to evaluate the coupons and the results showed a strong first-order linear decay relationship between the number of freeze-thaw cycles and the filet bond strength. The method developed to reliably degrade the filet bond, provides a more appropriate degradation mechanism compared to other available methods for producing degraded coupons. The degraded coupons were subsequently inspected using several adapted NDE techniques: neutron tomography, infrared thermography, through-transmission ultrasonics and acoustic bond testing. Neutron tomography was capable of detailing the exact location of water in

  14. Repair of honeycomb panels with welded breakaway studs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, D. F.

    1969-01-01

    Damaged metallic honeycomb panels can be repaired by drilling holes and welding breakaway studs to both facing sheets. Minimal heat required for welding reduces distortion of highly stressed panels. Repairs can be made without the use of doublers and with greater strength when doublers are used.

  15. Detection of entrapped moisture in honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallmark, W. B.

    1967-01-01

    Thermal neutron moisture detection system detects entrapped moisture in intercellular areas of bonded honeycomb sandwich structures. A radium/beryllium fast neutron source bombards a specimen. The emitted thermal neutrons from the target nucleus are detected and counted by a boron trifluoride thermal neutron detector.

  16. Ultrasonic quality inspection of bonded honeycomb assemblies is automated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, C. C.

    1966-01-01

    Inspection system for bonded honeycomb assemblies is accurate, fast, and automated. The ultrasonic system consists of inner and outer transducer positioning assemblies with suitable motor controls, a centerless turntable assembly, water squirter assemblies, and an inspection program completely encoded on tape suitable for use on a high speed computer.

  17. Hollow needle used to cut metal honeycomb structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, E. A.

    1966-01-01

    Hollow needle tool cuts metal honeycomb structures without damaging adjacent material. The hollow needle combines an electrostatic discharge and a stream of oxygen at a common point to effect rapid, accurate metal cutting. The tool design can be varied to use the hollow needle principle for cutting a variety of shapes.

  18. Experimental study of acoustical characteristics of honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Portia Renee

    Loss factor measurements were performed on sandwich panels to determine the effects of different skin and core materials on the acoustical properties. Results revealed inserting a viscoelastic material in the core's mid-plane resulted in the highest loss factor. Panels constructed with carbon-fiber skins exhibited larger loss factors than glass-fiber skins. Panels designed to achieve subsonic wave speed did not show a significant increase in loss factor above the coincidence frequency. The para-aramid core had a larger loss factor value than the meta-aramid core. Acoustic absorption coefficients were measured for honeycomb sandwiches designed to incorporate multiple sound-absorbing devices, including Helmholtz resonators and porous absorbers. The structures consisted of conventional honeycomb cores filled with closed-cell polyurethane foams of various densities and covered with perforated composite facesheets. Honeycomb cores filled with higher density foam resulted in higher absorption coefficients over the frequency range of 50 -- 1250 Hz. However, this trend was not observed at frequencies greater than 1250 Hz, where the honeycomb filled with the highest density foam yielded the lowest absorption coefficient among samples with foam-filled cores. The energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression method (ERSA) was employed to determine the relationship between vibration suppression and acoustic damping for a honeycomb sandwich panel. Results indicated the ERSA method simultaneously reduced the sound transmitted through the panel and the panel vibration. The largest reduction in sound transmitted through the panel was 14.3% when the vibrations of the panel were reduced by 7.3%. The influence of different design parameters, such as core density, core material, and cell size on wave speeds of honeycomb sandwich structures was experimentally analyzed. Bending and shear wave speeds were measured and related to the transmission loss performance for various material

  19. Quantification of Honeycomb Number-Type Stacking Faults: Application to Na3Ni2BiO6 Cathodes for Na-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jue; Yin, Liang; Wu, Lijun; Bai, Jianming; Bak, Seong-Min; Yu, Xiqian; Zhu, Yimei; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Khalifah, Peter G

    2016-09-01

    Ordered and disordered samples of honeycomb-lattice Na3Ni2BiO6 were investigated as cathodes for Na-ion batteries, and it was determined that the ordered sample exhibits better electrochemical performance, with a specific capacity of 104 mA h/g delivered at plateaus of 3.5 and 3.2 V (vs Na(+)/Na) with minimal capacity fade during extended cycling. Advanced imaging and diffraction investigations showed that the primary difference between the ordered and disordered samples is the amount of number-type stacking faults associated with the three possible centering choices for each honeycomb layer. A labeling scheme for assigning the number position of honeycomb layers is described, and it is shown that the translational shift vectors between layers provide the simplest method for classifying different repeat patterns. It is demonstrated that the number position of honeycomb layers can be directly determined in high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM-HAADF) imaging studies. By the use of fault models derived from STEM studies, it is shown that both the sharp, symmetric subcell peaks and the broad, asymmetric superstructure peaks in powder diffraction patterns can be quantitatively modeled. About 20% of the layers in the ordered monoclinic sample are faulted in a nonrandom manner, while the disordered sample stacking is not fully random but instead contains about 4% monoclinic order. Furthermore, it is shown that the ordered sample has a series of higher-order superstructure peaks associated with 6-, 9-, 12-, and 15-layer periods whose existence is transiently driven by the presence of long-range strain that is an inherent consequence of the synthesis mechanism revealed through the present diffraction and imaging studies. This strain is closely associated with a monoclinic shear that can be directly calculated from cell lattice parameters and is strongly correlated with the degree of ordering in the samples. The present results are

  20. Finite element analysis of an accordion-like honeycomb scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jean, Aurélie; Engelmayr, George C

    2010-11-16

    Optimizing the function of tissue engineered cardiac muscle is becoming more feasible with the development of microfabricated scaffolds amenable to mathematical modeling. In the current study, the elastic behavior of a recently developed poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) accordion-like honeycomb (ALH) scaffold [Engelmayr et al., 2008. Nature Materials 7 (12), 1003-1010] was analyzed. Specifically, 2D finite element (FE) models of the ALH unit cell (periodic boundary conditions) and tessellations (kinematic uniform boundary conditions) were utilized to determine a representative volume element (RVE) and to retrospectively predict the elastic effective stiffnesses. An RVE of 90 ALH unit cells (≃3.18×4.03mm) was found, indicating that previous experimental uni-axial test samples were mechanically representative. For ALH scaffolds microfabricated from PGS cured 7.5h at 160°C, FE predicted effective stiffnesses in the two orthogonal material directions (0.081±0.012 and 0.033±0.005MPa) matched published experimental data (0.083±0.004 and 0.031±0.002MPa) within 2.4% and 6.4%. Of potential use as a design criterion, model predicted global strain amplifications were lower in ALH (0.54 and 0.34) versus rectangular honeycomb (1.19 and 0.74) scaffolds, appearing to be inversely correlated with previously measured strains-to-failure. Important in matching the anisotropic mechanical properties of native cardiac muscle, FE predicted ALH scaffolds with 50μm wide PGS struts to be maximally anisotropic. The FE model will thus be useful in designing future variants of the ALH pore geometry that simultaneously provide proper cardiac anisotropy and reduced stiffness to enhance heart cell-mediated contractility.

  1. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  2. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  3. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics. PMID:26846617

  4. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-02-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics.

  5. Topological spin liquids in the ruby lattice with anisotropic Kitaev interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, Saeed S.; Kargarian, Mehdi; Masoudi, S. Farhad; Langari, Abdollah

    2016-09-01

    The ruby lattice is a four-valent lattice interpolating between honeycomb and triangular lattices. In this work we investigate the topological spin-liquid phases of a spin Hamiltonian with Kitaev interactions on the ruby lattice using exact diagonalization and perturbative methods. The latter interactions combined with the structure of the lattice yield a model with Z2×Z2 gauge symmetry. We mapped out the phase diagram of the model and found gapped and gapless spin-liquid phases. While the low-energy sector of the gapped phase corresponds to the well-known topological color code model on a honeycomb lattice, the low-energy sector of the gapless phases is described by an effective spin model with three-body interactions on a triangular lattice. A gap is opened in the spectrum in small magnetic fields, where we showed that the ground state has a finite topological entanglement entropy. We argue that the gapped phases could be possibly described by exotic excitations, and their corresponding spectrum is richer than the Ising phase of the Kitaev model.

  6. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  7. Realising Haldane's vision for a Chern insulator in buckled lattices.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    The Chern insulator displays a quantum Hall effect with no net magnetic field. Proposed by Haldane over 20 years ago, it laid the foundation for the fields of topological order, unconventional quantum Hall effects, and topological insulators. Despite enormous impact over two decades, Haldane's original vision of a staggered magnetic field within a crystal lattice has been prohibitively difficult to realise. In fact, in the original paper Haldane stresses his idea is probably merely a toy model. I show that buckled lattices with only simple hopping terms, within in-plane magnetic fields, can realise these models, requiring no exotic interactions or experimental parameters. As a concrete example of this very broad, and remarkably simple principle, I consider silicene, a honeycomb lattice with out-of-plane sublattice anisotropy, in an in-plane magnetic field, and show that it is a Chern insulator, even at negligibly small magnetic fields, which is analogous to Haldane's original model. PMID:24061332

  8. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  9. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  10. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  11. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  12. Demonstration of Minimally Machined Honeycomb Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, William

    2012-01-01

    Honeycomb silicon carbide composite mirrors are made from a carbon fiber preform that is molded into a honeycomb shape using a rigid mold. The carbon fiber honeycomb is densified by using polymer infiltration pyrolysis, or through a reaction with liquid silicon. A chemical vapor deposit, or chemical vapor composite (CVC), process is used to deposit a polishable silicon or silicon carbide cladding on the honeycomb structure. Alternatively, the cladding may be replaced by a freestanding, replicated CVC SiC facesheet that is bonded to the honeycomb. The resulting carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide honeycomb structure is a ceramic matrix composite material with high stiffness and mechanical strength, high thermal conductivity, and low CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). This innovation enables rapid, inexpensive manufacturing. The web thickness of the new material is less than 1 millimeter, and core geometries tailored. These parameters are based on precursor carbon-carbon honeycomb material made and patented by Ultracor. It is estimated at the time of this reporting that the HoneySiC(Trademark) will have a net production cost on the order of $38,000 per square meter. This includes an Ultracor raw material cost of about $97,000 per square meter, and a Trex silicon carbide deposition cost of $27,000 per square meter. Even at double this price, HoneySiC would beat NASA's goal of $100,000 per square meter. Cost savings are estimated to be 40 to 100 times that of current mirror technologies. The organic, rich prepreg material has a density of 56 kilograms per cubic meter. A charred carbon-carbon panel (volatile organics burnt off) has a density of 270 kilograms per cubic meter. Therefore, it is estimated that a HoneySiC panel would have a density of no more than 900 kilograms per cubic meter, which is about half that of beryllium and about onethird the density of bulk silicon carbide. It is also estimated that larger mirrors could be produced in a matter of weeks

  13. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  14. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  15. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  16. From lattice Hamiltonians to tunable band structures by lithographic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadjine, Athmane; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Recently, new materials exhibiting exotic band structures characterized by Dirac cones, nontrivial flat bands, and band crossing points have been proposed on the basis of effective two-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians. Here, we show using atomistic tight-binding calculations that these theoretical predictions could be experimentally realized in the conduction band of superlattices nanolithographed in III-V and II-VI semiconductor ultrathin films. The lithographed patterns consist of periodic lattices of etched cylindrical holes that form potential barriers for the electrons in the quantum well. In the case of honeycomb lattices, the conduction minibands of the resulting artificial graphene host several Dirac cones and nontrivial flat bands. Similar features, but organized in different ways, in energy or in k -space are found in kagome, distorted honeycomb, and Lieb superlattices. Dirac cones extending over tens of meV could be obtained in superlattices with reasonable sizes of the lithographic patterns, for instance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures. Bilayer artificial graphene could be also realized by lithography of a double quantum-well heterostructure. These new materials should be interesting for the experimental exploration of Dirac-based quantum systems, for both fundamental and applied physics.

  17. Effect of isoelectronic doping on the honeycomb-lattice iridate A2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manni, S.; Choi, Sungkyun; Mazin, I. I.; Coldea, R.; Altmeyer, Michaela; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser; Gegenwart, P.

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated, experimentally and theoretically, the series (Na1-xLix)2IrO3. Contrary to what has been believed so far, only for x ≤0.25 does the system form uniform solid solutions where Li preferentially goes to the Ir2Na planes, as observed in our density functional theory calculations and consistent with x-ray diffraction analysis. For larger Li content, as evidenced by powder x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and density functional theory calculations, the system shows a miscibility gap and a phase separation into an ordered Na3LiIr2O6 phase with alternating Na3 and LiIr2O6 planes, and a Li-rich phase close to pure Li2IrO3. For x ≤0.25 we observe (1) an increase of c /a with Li doping up to x =0.25, despite the fact that c /a in pure Li2IrO3 is smaller than in Na2IrO3, and (2) a gradual reduction of the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature TN and ordered moment. In view of our results showing clear evidence for phase separation for 0.25≤x≤0.6, more detailed studies are needed to confirm the presence or absence of phase separation at the higher doping x ˜0.7, where a continuum quantum phase transition has been proposed previously.

  18. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  19. Mechanical-Acoustic Multi-Objective Optimization of Honeycomb Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wang-Ying; Yang, Xiong-Wei; Li, Yue-Ming

    At present, optimal design against noise caused by vibrating structures is often formulated with the objective of minimizing sound power or sound pressure. In this paper, a mechanical and acoustic multi-objective optimization method is proposed aimed at minimizing static, dynamic and acoustic response of a honeycomb sandwich panel under given mass constraint. The multi-objective is defined as a weighted sum of static deflection, vibration response and sound power from the norm method. The static and dynamic responses are calculated using FEM and sound power radiated by structures is calculated using discrete Rayleigh integral. The sensitivities of static, dynamic and acoustic response are formulated to improve efficiency by the adjoint method. Numerical examples on the honeycomb plate are considered, which indicate that the proposed method can improve acoustical property without weakening mechanical property.

  20. Characterization of Thermal and Mechanical Impact on Aluminum Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Christen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study supports NASA Kennedy Space Center's research in the area of intelligent thermal management systems and multifunctional thermal systems. This project addresses the evaluation of the mechanical and thermal properties of metallic cellular solid (MCS) materials; those that are lightweight; high strength, tunable, multifunctional and affordable. A portion of the work includes understanding the mechanical properties of honeycomb structured cellular solids upon impact testing under ambient, water-immersed, liquid nitrogen-cooled, and liquid nitrogen-immersed conditions. Additionally, this study will address characterization techniques of the aluminum honeycomb's ability to resist multiple high-rate loadings or impacts in varying environmental conditions, using various techniques for the quantitative and qualitative determination for commercial applicability.

  1. Nanoscale Superconducting Honeycomb Charge Order in IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo Sung; Kim, Sooran; Kim, Kyoo; Min, Byung Il; Cho, Yong-Heum; Wang, Lihai; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Yeom, Han Woong

    2016-07-01

    Entanglement of charge orderings and other electronic orders such as superconductivity is in the core of challenging physics issues of complex materials including high temperature superconductivity. Here, we report on the observation of a unique nanometer scale honeycomb charge ordering of the cleaved IrTe2 surface, which hosts a superconducting state. IrTe2 was recently established to exhibit an intriguing cascade of stripe charge orders. The stripe phases coexist with a hexagonal phase, which is formed locally and falls into a superconducting state below 3 K. The atomic and electronic structures of the honeycomb and hexagon pattern of this phase are consistent with the charge order nature but the superconductivity does not survive on neighboring stripe charge order domains. The present work provides an intriguing physics issue and a new direction of functionalization for two dimensional materials.

  2. The Honeycomb illusion: Uniform textures not perceived as such

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michael H.; Bruno, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of patterns, in which texture is perceived differently at fixation in comparison to the periphery, such that a physically uniform stimulus yields a nonuniform percept. We call this the Honeycomb illusion, and we discuss it in relation to the similar Extinction illusion (Ninio & Stevens, 2000). The effect remains strong despite multiple fixations, dynamic changes, and manipulations of the size of texture elements. We discuss the phenomenon in relation to how vision achieves a detailed and stable representation of the environment despite changes in retinal spatial resolution and dramatic changes across saccades. The Honeycomb illusion complements previous related observations in suggesting that this representation is not necessarily based on multiple fixations (i.e., memory) or on extrapolation from information available to central vision. PMID:27698980

  3. The Honeycomb illusion: Uniform textures not perceived as such

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michael H.; Bruno, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of patterns, in which texture is perceived differently at fixation in comparison to the periphery, such that a physically uniform stimulus yields a nonuniform percept. We call this the Honeycomb illusion, and we discuss it in relation to the similar Extinction illusion (Ninio & Stevens, 2000). The effect remains strong despite multiple fixations, dynamic changes, and manipulations of the size of texture elements. We discuss the phenomenon in relation to how vision achieves a detailed and stable representation of the environment despite changes in retinal spatial resolution and dramatic changes across saccades. The Honeycomb illusion complements previous related observations in suggesting that this representation is not necessarily based on multiple fixations (i.e., memory) or on extrapolation from information available to central vision.

  4. Ultrasonic waveguide transducer for high temperature testing of ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; An, C. P.; Nickerson, S. T.; Gunasekaran, N.; Shi, Z.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a practical ultrasonic waveguide transducer designed for in situ material property characterization of ceramic honeycomb at high temperatures (>1200°C) and under fast thermal cycles (>1000°C/min). The low thermal conductivity MACOR waveguide allows the use of conventional transducer (max temp. 50°C) at one end and guides ultrasonic waves into the high temperature region where the characterization is carried out. The impact of time, temperature, and heating/cooling rates on the material behavior was studied. It was demonstrated that the same transducer could also be used for in-situ crack detection during the thermal shock testing of ceramic honeycomb.

  5. Nanoscale Superconducting Honeycomb Charge Order in IrTe2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Sung; Kim, Sooran; Kim, Kyoo; Min, Byung Il; Cho, Yong-Heum; Wang, Lihai; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Yeom, Han Woong

    2016-07-13

    Entanglement of charge orderings and other electronic orders such as superconductivity is in the core of challenging physics issues of complex materials including high temperature superconductivity. Here, we report on the observation of a unique nanometer scale honeycomb charge ordering of the cleaved IrTe2 surface, which hosts a superconducting state. IrTe2 was recently established to exhibit an intriguing cascade of stripe charge orders. The stripe phases coexist with a hexagonal phase, which is formed locally and falls into a superconducting state below 3 K. The atomic and electronic structures of the honeycomb and hexagon pattern of this phase are consistent with the charge order nature, but the superconductivity does not survive on neighboring stripe charge order domains. The present work provides an intriguing physics issue and a new direction of functionalization for two-dimensional materials. PMID:27221583

  6. Development of Pyrrone structural forms for honeycomb filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The development of techniques for the preparation of Pyrrone structural foams for use as honeycomb filler is described. The feasibility of preparing foams from polymers formed by the condensation of 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB), or 3,3',4,4'-tetraaminobenzophenone (TABP), with 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) was investigated. Initially, most of the effort was devoted to preparing Pyrrone prepolymers with improved and more reproducible foaming properties for making chemically blown foams. When it became apparent that very high curing shrinkages would not allow the use of unfilled Pyrrone prepolymers in a foam-in-place process, emphasis was shifted from chemically blown foams to syntactic foams. Syntactic foam formulations containing hollow carbon microspheres were developed. Syntactic foams made from selected formulations were found to have very low coefficients of thermal expansion. A technique was developed for the emplacement of Pyrrone syntactic foam formulations in honeycomb core structures.

  7. Fatigue and impact properties of metal honeycomb sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Guang ping; Lu, Jie; Liang, Jun; Chang, Zhong liang

    2008-11-01

    Honeycomb sandwich structures are significant to be used as applied to thermal protection system on reusable launch vehicle. In this paper the fatigue and impact properties of a novel metallic thermal protection material have been investigated and predicted at room temperature. A series of strength tests are carried out to obtain parameters firstly for further experiments. A set of tension-tension stress fatigue tests and impact tests based on split-Hopkinson pressure bar are carried out. Different high strain rate impact experiments are accomplished. The curves of dynamical stress, strain and strain rate are obtained. Also the cell units images after impact are presented. The results show the fatigue properties of honeycomb sandwich panels are comparatively better. And it has the advantages of anti-impact resistance and high, energy absorption capability.

  8. Simulations of two-particle interactions with 2D quantum walks in time

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.; Laiho, K.; Silberhorn, C.; Rohde, P. P.; Štefaňak, M.; Potoček, V.; Hamilton, C.; Jex, I.

    2014-12-04

    We present the experimental implementation of a quantum walk on a two-dimensional lattice and show how to employ the optical system to simulate the quantum propagation of two interacting particles. Our quantum walk in time transfers the spatial spread of a quantum walk into the time domain, which guarantees a high stability and scalability of the setup. We present with our device quantum walks over 12 steps on a 2D lattice. By changing the properties of the driving quantum coin, we investigate different kinds of two-particle interactions and reveal their impact on the occurring quantum propagation.

  9. A 2-D Model to Predict Time Development of Scour below Pipelines with Spoiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. S.; Cheng, Liang

    2010-05-01

    A lattice Boltzmann 2-D scour model is developed in order to predict time development of scour around offshore pipelines with spoiler. The fluid flow is captured employing Lattice Boltzmann method and the scour model is designed with the combination of multi-particle Cellular Automata technique and threshold of sediment entrainment technique available in literature. It is revealed that the proposed hybrid model is robust enough to predict evolution of bed profiles for flow and scour underneath offshore pipelines considering various orientation and length of spoiler attached.

  10. Classical ground states of Heisenberg and X Y antiferromagnets on the windmill lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Orth, Peter P.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the classical Heisenberg and planar (X Y ) spin models on the windmill lattice. The windmill lattice is formed out of two widely occurring lattice geometries: a triangular lattice is coupled to its dual honeycomb lattice. Using a combination of iterative minimization, heat-bath Monte Carlo simulations, and analytical calculations, we determine the complete ground-state phase diagram of both models and find the exact energies of the phases. The phase diagram shows a rich phenomenology due to competing interactions and hosts, in addition to collinear and various coplanar phases, also intricate noncoplanar phases. We briefly outline different paths to an experimental realization of these spin models. Our extensive study provides a starting point for the investigation of quantum and thermal fluctuation effects.

  11. Pressurized honeycombs as soft-actuators: a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Lorenzo; Fratzl, Peter; Bréchet, Yves J. M.; Dunlop, John W. C.

    2014-01-01

    The seed capsule of Delosperma nakurense is a remarkable example of a natural hygromorph, which unfolds its protecting valves upon wetting to expose its seeds. The beautiful mechanism responsible for this motion is generated by a specialized organ based on an anisotropic cellular tissue filled with a highly swelling material. Inspired by this system, we study the mechanics of a diamond honeycomb internally pressurized by a fluid phase. Numerical homogenization by means of iterative finite-element (FE) simulations is adapted to the case of cellular materials filled with a variable pressure fluid phase. Like its biological counterpart, it is shown that the material architecture controls and guides the otherwise unspecific isotropic expansion of the fluid. Deformations up to twice the original dimensions can be achieved by simply setting the value of input pressure. In turn, these deformations cause a marked change of the honeycomb geometry and hence promote a stiffening of the material along the weak direction. To understand the mechanism further, we also developed a micromechanical model based on the Born model for crystal elasticity to find an explicit relation between honeycomb geometry, swelling eigenstrains and elastic properties. The micromechanical model is in good qualitative agreement with the FE simulations. Moreover, we also provide the force-stroke characteristics of a soft actuator based on the pressurized anisotropic honeycomb and show how the internal pressure has a nonlinear effect which can result in negative values of the in-plane Poisson's ratio. As nature shows in the case of the D. nakurense seed capsule, cellular materials can be used not only as low-weight structural materials, but also as simple but convenient actuating materials. PMID:24966238

  12. Fabrication of prepackaged superalloy honeycomb Thermal Protection System (TPS) panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, W.; Meaney, J. E.; Rosenthal, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature materials were surveyed, and Inconel 617 and titanium were selected for application to a honeycomb TPS configuration designed to withstand 2000 F. The configuration was analyzed both thermally and structurally. Component and full-sized panels were fabricated and tested to obtain data for comparison with analysis. Results verified the panel design. Twenty five panels were delivered to NASA Langley Research Center for additional evaluation.

  13. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 3; 8-ply Out-of-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10 m diameter barrel section of the heavy lift launch vehicle, were manufactured under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: inautoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800B/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of the 3- by 5-ft panels. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panel composed of 8-ply, T40-800B/5320-1 facesheets (referred to as Panel C). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear, two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D), models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was predicted correctly that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength.

  14. Heat Shielding Characteristics and Thermostructural Performance of a Superalloy Honeycomb Sandwich Thermal Protection System (TPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2004-01-01

    Heat-transfer, thermal bending, and mechanical buckling analyses have been performed on a superalloy "honeycomb" thermal protection system (TPS) for future hypersonic flight vehicles. The studies focus on the effect of honeycomb cell geometry on the TPS heat-shielding performance, honeycomb cell wall buckling characteristics, and the effect of boundary conditions on the TPS thermal bending behavior. The results of the study show that the heat-shielding performance of a TPS panel is very sensitive to change in honeycomb core depth, but insensitive to change in honeycomb cell cross-sectional shape. The thermal deformations and thermal stresses in the TPS panel are found to be very sensitive to the edge support conditions. Slight corrugation of the honeycomb cell walls can greatly increase their buckling strength.

  15. A honeycomb composite of mollusca shell matrix and calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    You, Hua-jian; Li, Jin; Zhou, Chan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2016-03-01

    A honeycomb composite is useful to carry cells for application in bone, cartilage, skin, and soft tissue regenerative therapies. To fabricate a composite, and expand the application of mollusca shells as well as improve preparing methods of calcium alginate in tissue engineering research, Anodonta woodiana shell powder was mixed with sodium alginate at varying mass ratios to obtain a gel mixture. The mixture was frozen and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid to generate a shell matrix/calcium alginate composite. Calcium carbonate served as the control. The composite was transplanted subcutaneously into rats. At 7, 14, 42, and 70 days after transplantation, frozen sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, followed by DAPI, β-actin, and collagen type-I immunofluorescence staining, and observed using laser confocal microscopy. The composite featured a honeycomb structure. The control and composite samples displayed significantly different mechanical properties. The water absorption rate of the composite and control group were respectively 205-496% and 417-586%. The composite (mass ratio of 5:5) showed good biological safety over a 70-day period; the subcutaneous structure of the samples was maintained and the degradation rate was lower than that of the control samples. Freezing the gel mixture afforded control over chemical reaction rates. Given these results, the composite is a promising honeycomb scaffold for tissue engineering. PMID:26700239

  16. Heat Transfer in Adhesively Bonded Honeycomb Core Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The Swann and Pittman semi-empirical relationship has been used as a standard in aerospace industry to predict the effective thermal conductivity of honeycomb core panels. Recent measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of an adhesively bonded titanium honeycomb core panel using three different techniques, two steady-state and one transient radiant step heating method, at four laboratories varied significantly from each other and from the Swann and Pittman predictions. Average differences between the measurements and the predictions varied between 17 and 61% in the temperature range of 300 to 500 K. In order to determine the correct values of the effective thermal conductivity and determine which set of the measurements or predictions were most accurate, the combined radiation and conduction heat transfer in the honeycomb core panel was modeled using a finite volume numerical formulation. The transient radiant step heating measurements provided the best agreement with the numerical results. It was found that a modification of the Swann and Pittman semi-empirical relationship which incorporated the facesheets and adhesive layers in the thermal model provided satisfactory results. Finally, a parametric study was conducted to investigate the influence of adhesive thickness and thermal conductivity on the overall heat transfer through the panel.

  17. Characterizing Facesheet/Core Disbonding in Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Martin; Ratcliffe, James G.; Adams, Daniel O.; Krueger, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation into facesheet core disbonding in carbon fiber reinforced plastic/Nomex honeycomb sandwich structures using a Single Cantilever Beam test. Specimens with three, six and twelve-ply facesheets were tested. Specimens with different honeycomb cores consisting of four different cell sizes were also tested, in addition to specimens with three different widths. Three different data reduction methods were employed for computing apparent fracture toughness values from the test data, namely an area method, a compliance calibration technique and a modified beam theory method. The compliance calibration and modified beam theory approaches yielded comparable apparent fracture toughness values, which were generally lower than those computed using the area method. Disbonding in the three-ply facesheet specimens took place at the facesheet/core interface and yielded the lowest apparent fracture toughness values. Disbonding in the six and twelve-ply facesheet specimens took place within the core, near to the facesheet/core interface. Specimen width was not found to have a significant effect on apparent fracture toughness. The amount of scatter in the apparent fracture toughness data was found to increase with honeycomb core cell size.

  18. Advanced radiator concepts utilizing honeycomb panel heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Peck, S. J.; Tanzer, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing moderate temperature range vapor chamber type heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb panel configuration for highly efficient radiator fins for potential use on the space station was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts were evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. Concepts evaluated include type of material, material and panel thickness, wick type and manufacturability, liquid and vapor communication among honeycomb cells, and liquid flow return from condenser to evaporator facesheet areas. A thin-wall all-welded stainless steel design with methanol as the working fluid was the initial prototype unit. It was found that an aluminum panel could not be fabricated in the same manner as a stainless steel panel due to diffusion bonding and resistance welding considerations. Therefore, a formed and welded design was developed. The prototype consists of ten panels welded together into a large panel 122 by 24 by 0.15 in., with a heat rejection capability of 1000 watts and a fin efficiency of essentially 1.0.

  19. A honeycomb composite of mollusca shell matrix and calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    You, Hua-jian; Li, Jin; Zhou, Chan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2016-03-01

    A honeycomb composite is useful to carry cells for application in bone, cartilage, skin, and soft tissue regenerative therapies. To fabricate a composite, and expand the application of mollusca shells as well as improve preparing methods of calcium alginate in tissue engineering research, Anodonta woodiana shell powder was mixed with sodium alginate at varying mass ratios to obtain a gel mixture. The mixture was frozen and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid to generate a shell matrix/calcium alginate composite. Calcium carbonate served as the control. The composite was transplanted subcutaneously into rats. At 7, 14, 42, and 70 days after transplantation, frozen sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, followed by DAPI, β-actin, and collagen type-I immunofluorescence staining, and observed using laser confocal microscopy. The composite featured a honeycomb structure. The control and composite samples displayed significantly different mechanical properties. The water absorption rate of the composite and control group were respectively 205-496% and 417-586%. The composite (mass ratio of 5:5) showed good biological safety over a 70-day period; the subcutaneous structure of the samples was maintained and the degradation rate was lower than that of the control samples. Freezing the gel mixture afforded control over chemical reaction rates. Given these results, the composite is a promising honeycomb scaffold for tissue engineering.

  20. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  1. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  2. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  3. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  4. Tunable Lattice-Induced Opacity for Matter Wave Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Greene, Chris H.

    2014-03-01

    We describe the novel phenomena of lattice-induced opacity in the process of matter wave scattering from a two dimensional atomic lattice. As an analogue to the confinement-induced resonance, the two dimensional atomic lattice can be tuned to complete opacity to a normally incident low energy matter wave, by changing the s-wave scattering length between the matter wave and the atoms in the lattice. A scheme for a matter wave transistor is proposed based on the transmission-reflection properties of the matter wave through the atomic lattice. We also propose a matter wave cavity, constructed by two parallel 2D atomic lattices that are both opaque to the matter wave. In higher kinetic energy regimes of the matter wave, the two dimensional atomic lattice is shown to be a matter wave beam splitter and wave plate, with tunable peak intensity into different directions.

  5. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  6. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  7. A nonlinear mechanics model of bio-inspired hierarchical lattice materials consisting of horseshoe microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiang; Cheng, Huanyu; Jang, Kyung-In; Luan, Haiwen; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yihui

    2016-05-01

    Development of advanced synthetic materials that can mimic the mechanical properties of non-mineralized soft biological materials has important implications in a wide range of technologies. Hierarchical lattice materials constructed with horseshoe microstructures belong to this class of bio-inspired synthetic materials, where the mechanical responses can be tailored to match the nonlinear J-shaped stress-strain curves of human skins. The underlying relations between the J-shaped stress-strain curves and their microstructure geometry are essential in designing such systems for targeted applications. Here, a theoretical model of this type of hierarchical lattice material is developed by combining a finite deformation constitutive relation of the building block (i.e., horseshoe microstructure), with the analyses of equilibrium and deformation compatibility in the periodical lattices. The nonlinear J-shaped stress-strain curves and Poisson ratios predicted by this model agree very well with results of finite element analyses (FEA) and experiment. Based on this model, analytic solutions were obtained for some key mechanical quantities, e.g., elastic modulus, Poisson ratio, peak modulus, and critical strain around which the tangent modulus increases rapidly. A negative Poisson effect is revealed in the hierarchical lattice with triangular topology, as opposed to a positive Poisson effect in hierarchical lattices with Kagome and honeycomb topologies. The lattice topology is also found to have a strong influence on the stress-strain curve. For the three isotropic lattice topologies (triangular, Kagome and honeycomb), the hierarchical triangular lattice material renders the sharpest transition in the stress-strain curve and relative high stretchability, given the same porosity and arc angle of horseshoe microstructure. Furthermore, a demonstrative example illustrates the utility of the developed model in the rapid optimization of hierarchical lattice materials for

  8. Spin correlation and Majorana spectrum in chiral spin liquids in a decorated-honeycomb Kitaev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, Joji; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-02-01

    Temperature evolution of the spin correlation and excitation spectrum is investigated for the Kitaev model defined on a decorated honeycomb lattice by using the quantum Monte Carlo simulation in the Majorana fermion representation. The ground state of this quantum spin model is given by two kinds of chiral spin liquids: one is topologically trivial with Abelian anyon excitations, and the other is topologically nontrivial with non-Abelian anyon excitations. While lowering temperature, the model exhibits several crossovers in the paramagnetic state, which originate from the fractionalization of quantum spins into Majorana fermions, in addition to a phase transition associated with time reversal symmetry breaking. We show that the spin correlation develops around the crossover temperatures, whereas it shows a slight change at the critical temperature, as in other Kitaev-type models. We also calculate the excitation spectrum in terms of Majorana fermions, and find that the excitation gap in the non-Abelian phase is fragile against thermal fluctuations of the Z2 fluxes, while that in the Abelian phase remains open.

  9. Rings sliding on a honeycomb network: Adsorption contours, interactions, and assembly of benzene on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berland, K.; Einstein, T. L.; Hyldgaard, P.

    2009-10-01

    Using a van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)], we perform ab initio calculations for the adsorption energy of benzene (Bz) on Cu(111) as a function of lateral position and height. We find that the vdW-DF inclusion of nonlocal correlations (responsible for dispersive interactions) changes the relative stability of eight binding-position options and increases the binding energy by over an order of magnitude, achieving good agreement with experiment. The admolecules can move almost freely along a honeycomb web of “corridors” passing between fcc and hcp hollow sites via bridge sites. Our diffusion barriers (for dilute and two condensed adsorbate phases) are consistent with experimental observations. Further vdW-DF calculations suggest that the more compact (hexagonal) Bz-overlayer phase, with lattice constant a=6.74Å , is due to direct Bz-Bz vdW attraction, which extends to ˜8Å . We attribute the second, sparser hexagonal Bz phase, with a=10.24Å , to indirect electronic interactions mediated by the metallic surface state on Cu(111). To support this claim, we use a formal Harris-functional approach to evaluate nonperturbationally the asymptotic form of this indirect interaction. Thus, we can account well for benzene self-organization on Cu(111).

  10. Phase diagram and quantum order by disorder in the Kitaev K1-K2 honeycomb magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny; Rachel, Stephan; Perkins, Natalia

    We show that the topological Kitaev spin liquid on the honeycomb lattice is extremely fragile against the second neighbor Kitaev coupling K2, which has been recently identified as the dominant perturbation away from the nearest neighbor model in iridate Na2IrO3, and may also play a role in α-RuCl3. This coupling explains naturally the zig-zag ordering and the special entanglement between real and spin space observed recently in Na2IrO3. The minimal K1-K2 model that we present here holds in addition the unique property that the classical and quantum phase diagrams and their respective order-by-disorder mechanisms are qualitatively different due to their fundamentally different symmetry structure. Nsf DMR-1511768; Freie Univ. Berlin Excellence Initiative of German Research Foundation; European Research Council, ERC-StG-336012; DFG-SFB 1170; DFG-SFB 1143, DFG-SPP 1666, and Helmholtz association VI-521.

  11. Free-standing silicene obtained by cooling from 2D liquid Si: structure and thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoang, Vo; Thi Cam Mi, Huynh

    2014-12-01

    The structure and various thermodynamic properties of free-standing silicene have been studied by computer simulation. Models are obtained by cooling from buckling two-dimensional (2D) liquid Si via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential. The temperature dependence of total energy, heat capacity, mean ring size and mean coordination number shows that silicenization of 2D liquid Si exhibits a first-order-like behavior. The evolution of radial distribution function upon cooling from the melt also shows that solidification occurs in the system. The final configuration of silicene is analyzed via coordination, bond-angle, interatomic distance and ring distributions or distribution of buckling in the system. 2D visualization of atomic configurations clearly demonstrated that silicene obtained ‘naturally’ by cooling from the melt exhibits various structural previously unreported behaviors. We find the formation of polycrystalline silicene with clear grain boundaries containing various defects including various vacancies, Stone-Wales defects or skew rings and multimembered rings unlike those proposed in the literature. However, atoms in the obtained silicene are mostly involved in six-fold rings, forming a buckling honeycomb structure like that found in practice. We find that buckling is not unique for all atoms in the models although the majority of atoms reveal buckling of the most stable low-buckling silicene found in the literature. The buckling distribution is broad and symmetric. Our comprehensive MD simulation of a relatively large silicene model containing 104 atoms and obtained ‘naturally’ by cooling from the melt provides original insights into the structure and thermodynamics of this important 2D material.

  12. Emergent Criticality and Ricci Flow in a 2D Frustrated Heisenberg Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Peter P.

    2014-03-01

    In most systems that exhibit order at low temperatures, the order occurs in the elementary degrees of freedom such as spin or charge. Prominent examples are magnetic or superconducting states of matter. In contrast, emergent order describes the phenomenon where composite objects exhibit longer range correlations. Such emergent order has been suspected to occur in a range of correlated materials. One specific example are spin systems with competing interactions, where long-range discrete order in the relative orientation of spins may occur. Interestingly, this order parameter may induce other phase transitions as is the case for the nematic transition in the iron pnictides. In this talk, we introduce and discuss a system with emergent Z6 symmetry, a two-dimensional frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the windmill lattice consisting of interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The multiple spin stiffnesses can be captured in terms of a four-dimensional metric tensor, and the renormalization group flow of the stiffnesses is described by the Ricci flow of the metric tensor. The key result is a decoupling of an emergent collective degree of freedom given by the relative phase of spins on different sublattices. In particular, our results reveal a sequence of two Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transitions that bracket a critical phase.

  13. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  14. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  15. Guided wave propagation in a honeycomb composite sandwich structure in presence of a high density core.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Shirsendu; Banerjee, Sauvik

    2016-09-01

    A coordinated theoretical, numerical and experimental study is carried out in an effort to interpret the characteristics of propagating guided Lamb wave modes in presence of a high-density (HD) core region in a honeycomb composite sandwich structure (HCSS). Initially, a two-dimensional (2D) semi-analytical model based on the global matrix method is used to study the response and dispersion characteristics of the HCSS with a soft core. Due to the complex structural characteristics, the study of guided wave (GW) propagation in HCSS with HD-core region inherently poses many challenges. Therefore, a numerical simulation of GW propagation in the HCSS with and without the HD-core region is carried out, using surface-bonded piezoelectric wafer transducer (PWT) network. From the numerical results, it is observed that the presence of HD-core significantly decreases both the group velocity and the amplitude of the received GW signal. Laboratory experiments are then conducted in order to verify the theoretical and numerical results. A good agreement between the theoretical, numerical and experimental results is observed in all the cases studied. An extensive parametric study is also carried out for a range of HD-core sizes and densities in order to study the effect due to the change in size and density of the HD zone on the characteristics of propagating GW modes. It is found that the amplitudes and group velocities of the GW modes decrease with the increase in HD-core width and density.

  16. Guided wave propagation in a honeycomb composite sandwich structure in presence of a high density core.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Shirsendu; Banerjee, Sauvik

    2016-09-01

    A coordinated theoretical, numerical and experimental study is carried out in an effort to interpret the characteristics of propagating guided Lamb wave modes in presence of a high-density (HD) core region in a honeycomb composite sandwich structure (HCSS). Initially, a two-dimensional (2D) semi-analytical model based on the global matrix method is used to study the response and dispersion characteristics of the HCSS with a soft core. Due to the complex structural characteristics, the study of guided wave (GW) propagation in HCSS with HD-core region inherently poses many challenges. Therefore, a numerical simulation of GW propagation in the HCSS with and without the HD-core region is carried out, using surface-bonded piezoelectric wafer transducer (PWT) network. From the numerical results, it is observed that the presence of HD-core significantly decreases both the group velocity and the amplitude of the received GW signal. Laboratory experiments are then conducted in order to verify the theoretical and numerical results. A good agreement between the theoretical, numerical and experimental results is observed in all the cases studied. An extensive parametric study is also carried out for a range of HD-core sizes and densities in order to study the effect due to the change in size and density of the HD zone on the characteristics of propagating GW modes. It is found that the amplitudes and group velocities of the GW modes decrease with the increase in HD-core width and density. PMID:27290650

  17. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  18. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  19. Self-Assembled Si(111) Surface States: 2D Dirac Material for THz Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z F; Liu, Feng

    2015-07-10

    Graphene, the first discovered 2D Dirac material, has had a profound impact on science and technology. In the last decade, we have witnessed huge advances in graphene related fundamental and applied research. Here, based on first-principles calculations, we propose a new 2D Dirac band on the Si(111) surface with 1/3 monolayer halogen coverage. The sp(3) dangling bonds form a honeycomb superstructure on the Si(111) surface that results in an anisotropic Dirac band with a group velocity (∼10(6)  m/s) comparable to that in graphene. Most remarkably, the Si-based surface Dirac band can be used to excite a tunable THz plasmon through electron-hole doping. Our results demonstrate a new way to design Dirac states on a traditional semiconductor surface, so as to make them directly compatible with Si technology. We envision this new type of Dirac material to be generalized to other semiconductor surfaces with broad applications.

  20. 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Vázquez-Cabo, José; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Martín-Gil, Jesús; Navas-Gracia, Luis M.; Dante, Roberto C.

    2014-11-15

    The transition from a prevalent turbostratic arrangement with low planar interactions (2D) to an array of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets with stronger interplanar interactions (3D), occurring for samples treated above 650 °C, was detected by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The simulated 3D material made of stacks of shifted quasi planar sheets composed of zigzagged polymer ribbons, delivered a XRD simulated pattern in relatively good agreement with the experimental one. The 2D to 3D transition was also supported by the simulation of THz-TDS spectra obtained from quantum chemistry calculations, in which the same broad bands around 2 THz and 1.5 THz were found for 2D and 3D arrays, respectively. This transition was also in accordance with the tightening of the interplanar distance probably due to an interplanar π bond contribution, as evidenced also by a broad absorption around 2.6 eV in the UV–vis spectrum, which appeared in the sample treated at 650 °C, and increased in the sample treated at 700 °C. The band gap was calculated for 1D and 2D cases. The value of 3.374 eV for the 2D case is, within the model accuracy and precision, in a relative good agreement with the value of 3.055 eV obtained from the experimental results. - Graphical abstract: 2D lattice mode vibrations and structural changes correlated with the so called “2D to 3D transition”. - Highlights: • A 2D to 3D transition has been detected for polymeric carbon nitride. • THz-TDS allowed us to discover and detect the 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride. • We propose a structure for polymeric carbon nitride confirming it with THz-TDS.

  1. Fermionic quantum criticality in honeycomb and π -flux Hubbard models: Finite-size scaling of renormalization-group-invariant observables from quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Hohenadler, Martin; Assaad, Fakher F.; Herbut, Igor F.

    2015-04-01

    We numerically investigate the critical behavior of the Hubbard model on the honeycomb and the π -flux lattice, which exhibits a direct transition from a Dirac semimetal to an antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulator. We use projective auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations and a careful finite-size scaling analysis that exploits approximately improved renormalization-group-invariant observables. This approach, which is successfully verified for the three-dimensional XY transition of the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model, allows us to extract estimates for the critical couplings and the critical exponents. The results confirm that the critical behavior for the semimetal to Mott insulator transition in the Hubbard model belongs to the Gross-Neveu-Heisenberg universality class on both lattices.

  2. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    PubMed

    Lasala, R; Coudray, N; Abdine, A; Zhang, Z; Lopez-Redondo, M; Kirshenbaum, R; Alexopoulos, J; Zolnai, Z; Stokes, D L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I

    2015-02-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization.

  3. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Lasala, R.; Coudray, N.; Abdine, A.; Zhang, Z.; Lopez-Redondo, M.; Kirshenbaum, R.; Alexopoulos, J.; Zolnai, Z.; Stokes, D.L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1,300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization. PMID:25478971

  4. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    PubMed

    Lasala, R; Coudray, N; Abdine, A; Zhang, Z; Lopez-Redondo, M; Kirshenbaum, R; Alexopoulos, J; Zolnai, Z; Stokes, D L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I

    2015-02-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization. PMID:25478971

  5. Highly resolved measurements of atmospheric turbulence with the new 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeromin, A.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; Puczylowski, J.; Peinke, J.; Hölling, M.

    2014-12-01

    For the investigation of atmospheric turbulent flows on small scales a new anemometer was developed, the so-called 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-ALCA). It performs highly resolved measurements with a spatial resolution in millimeter range and temporal resolution in kHz range, thus detecting very small turbulent structures. The anemometer is a redesign of the successfully operating 2d-LCA for laboratory application. The new device was designed to withstand hostile operating environments (rain and saline, humid air). In February 2012, the 2d-ALCA was used for the first time in a test field. The device was mounted in about 53 m above ground level on a lattice tower near the German North Sea coast. Wind speed was measured by the 2d-ALCA at 10 kHz sampling rate and by cup anemometers at 1 Hz. The instantaneous wind speed ranged from 8 m/s to 19 m/s at an average turbulence level of about 7 %. Wind field characteristics were analyzed based on cup anemometer as well as 2d-ALCA. The combination of both devices allowed the study of atmospheric turbulence over several magnitudes in turbulent scales.

  6. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  7. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  8. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  9. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  10. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  11. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  12. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  13. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  14. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  15. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  16. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  17. Strain-displacement relations for strain engineering in single-layer 2d materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midtvedt, Daniel; Lewenkopf, Caio H.; Croy, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the electromechanical coupling in single-layer 2d materials. For non-Bravais lattices, we find important corrections to the standard macroscopic strain-microscopic atomic-displacement theory. We put forward a general and systematic approach to calculate strain-displacement relations for several classes of 2d materials. We apply our findings to graphene as a study case, by combining a tight binding and a valence force-field model to calculate electronic and mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons under strain. The results show good agreement with the predictions of the Dirac equation coupled to continuum mechanics. For this long wave-limit effective theory, we find that the strain-displacement relations lead to a renormalization correction to the strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields. A similar renormalization is found for the strain-induced band-gap of black phosphorous. Implications for nanomechanical properties and electromechanical coupling in 2d materials are discussed.

  18. Quantum Diffusion on Molecular Tubes: Universal Scaling of the 1D to 2D Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chern; Lee, Chee Kong; Moix, Jeremy M.; Knoester, Jasper; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-01

    The transport properties of disordered systems are known to depend critically on dimensionality. We study the diffusion coefficient of a quantum particle confined to a lattice on the surface of a tube, where it scales between the 1D and 2D limits. It is found that the scaling relation is universal and independent of the temperature, disorder, and noise parameters, and the essential order parameter is the ratio between the localization length in 2D and the circumference of the tube. Phenomenological and quantitative expressions for transport properties as functions of disorder and noise are obtained and applied to real systems: In the natural chlorosomes found in light-harvesting bacteria the exciton transfer dynamics is predicted to be in the 2D limit, whereas a family of synthetic molecular aggregates is found to be in the homogeneous limit and is independent of dimensionality.

  19. Quantum Diffusion on Molecular Tubes: Universal Scaling of the 1D to 2D Transition.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chern; Lee, Chee Kong; Moix, Jeremy M; Knoester, Jasper; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-13

    The transport properties of disordered systems are known to depend critically on dimensionality. We study the diffusion coefficient of a quantum particle confined to a lattice on the surface of a tube, where it scales between the 1D and 2D limits. It is found that the scaling relation is universal and independent of the temperature, disorder, and noise parameters, and the essential order parameter is the ratio between the localization length in 2D and the circumference of the tube. Phenomenological and quantitative expressions for transport properties as functions of disorder and noise are obtained and applied to real systems: In the natural chlorosomes found in light-harvesting bacteria the exciton transfer dynamics is predicted to be in the 2D limit, whereas a family of synthetic molecular aggregates is found to be in the homogeneous limit and is independent of dimensionality. PMID:27232033

  20. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  1. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  3. Electron and phonon properties and gas storage in carbon honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Chen, Yuanping; Zhong, Chengyong; Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Yuee; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-06-01

    A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotrope, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks has been constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are studied by various theoretical approaches. All networks are porous metals with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channel originates from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channel is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ~106 m s-1. Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by at least a factor of 15. Our calculations further indicate that these porous carbon networks possess high storage capacity for gaseous atoms and molecules in agreement with the experiments.A new kind of three-dimensional carbon allotrope, termed carbon honeycomb (CHC), has recently been synthesized [PRL 116, 055501 (2016)]. Based on the experimental results, a family of graphene networks has been constructed, and their electronic and phonon properties are studied by various theoretical approaches. All networks are porous metals with two types of electron transport channels along the honeycomb axis and they are isolated from each other: one type of channel originates from the orbital interactions of the carbon zigzag chains and is topologically protected, while the other type of channel is from the straight lines of the carbon atoms that link the zigzag chains and is topologically trivial. The velocity of the electrons can reach ~106 m s-1. Phonon transport in these allotropes is strongly anisotropic, and the thermal conductivities can be very low when compared with graphite by

  4. Emission of an intense electron beam from a ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Myers, M.; Hegeler, F.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Sethian, J. D.; Ludeking, L.

    2003-01-01

    Inserting a slab of honeycomb ceramic in front of the emitting surface of a large-area cathode improves the electron beam emission uniformity, decreases the beam current rise and fall times, and maintains a more constant diode impedance. Moreover, changing the cathode material from velvet to carbon fiber achieved a more robust cathode that starts to emit at a higher electric field without a degradation in beam uniformity. In addition, an 80% reduction in the postshot diode pressure was also observed when gamma alumina was deposited on the ceramic. A possible explanation is that reabsorption and recycling of adsorbed gases takes place.

  5. Design data for brazed Rene 41 honeycomb sandwich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Arnquist, J.; Koetje, E. L.; Esposito, J. J.; Lindsay, V. E. J.; Swegle, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Strength data, creep data and residual strength data after cyclic thermal exposure were obtained at temperatures from 78 K to 1144 K (-320 F to 1600 F). The influences of face thickness, core depth, core gage, cell size and thermal/stress exposure conditions on the mechanical design properties were investigated. A braze alloy and process was developed that is adequate to fully develop the strength of the honeycomb core while simultaneously solution treating and aging the Rene 41 fact sheets. New test procedures and test specimen configurations were developed to avoid excessive thermal stresses during cyclic thermal exposure.

  6. [Degradation of nitrobenzene in aqueous solution by modified ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Zhong; Zhao, Lei; Ma, Jun

    2005-11-01

    Comparative experiments of modified ceramic honeycomb, ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation and ozonation alone were conducted with nitrobenzene as the model organic pollutant. It was found that the processes of modified ceramic honeycomb and ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation could increase the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene by 38.35% and 15.46%, respectively, compared with that achieved by ozonation alone. Under the conditions of this experiment, the degradation rate of modified ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation increased by 30.55% with the increase of amount of catalyst to 5 blocks. The degradation rate of three process all increased greatly with the increase of temperature and value of pH in the solution. But when raising the pH value of the solution to 10.00, the advantage of modified ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation processes lost. The experimental results indicate that in modified ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation, nitrobenzene is primarily oxidized by *OH free radical in aqueous solution. The adsorption of nitrobenzene is too limited to have any influence on the degradation efficiency of nitrobenzene. With the same total dosage of applied ozone, the multiple steps addition of ozone showed a much higher removal efficiency than that obtained by one step in three processes. Modified ceramic honeycomb had a relative longer lifetime.

  7. [Catalytic ozonation by ceramic honeycomb for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Sun, Zhi-Zhong; Ma, Jun

    2007-11-01

    Comparative experiments for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution were carried out in the three processes of ozonation alone, ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation and ceramic honeycomb adsorption. The results show that the degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation, ozonation alone and ceramic honeycomb adsorption systems are 37.6%, 2.2% and 0.4%, and the presence of ceramic honeycomb catalyst significantly improves the degradation rate of oxalic acid compared to the results from non-catalytic ozonation and adsorption. With the addition of tert-butanol, the degradation rates of oxalic acid in catalytic ozonation system decrease by 24.1%, 29.0% and 30.1%, respectively, at the concentration of 5, 10 and 15 mg x L(-1). This phenomenon indicates that ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution follows the mechanism of *OH oxidation, namely the heterogeneous surface of catalyst enhances the initiation of *OH. The results of TOC analysis demonstrate that the process of ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation can achieve the complete mineralization level without the formation of intermediary degradation products. The experimental results suggest that the reaction temperature has positive relationship with the degradation rate of oxalic acid. The degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation system are 16.4%, 37.6%, 61.3% and 68.2%, at the respective reaction temperature of 10, 20, 30 and 40 degrees C.

  8. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  9. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  10. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  11. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  12. 49 CFR 587.15 - Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. 587.15 Section 587.15 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL... Deformable Barrier § 587.15 Verification of aluminum honeycomb crush strength. The following procedure...

  13. Finite Element Development of Honeycomb Panel Configurations with Improved Transmission Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob; Castle, William D.

    2006-01-01

    The higher stiffness-to-mass ratio of a honeycomb panel compared to a homogeneous panel results in a lower acoustic critical frequency. Above the critical frequency the panel flexural wave speed is acoustically fast and the structure becomes a more efficient radiator with associated lower sound transmission loss. Finite element models of honeycomb sandwich structures are presented featuring areas where the core is removed from the radiating face sheet disrupting the supersonic flexural and shear wave speeds that exist in the baseline honeycomb panel. These modified honeycomb panel structures exhibit improved transmission loss for a pre-defined diffuse field sound excitation. The models were validated by the sound transmission loss of honeycomb panels measured in the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. A honeycomb core panel configuration is presented exhibiting a transmission loss improvement of 3-11 dB compared to a honeycomb baseline panel over a frequency range from 170 Hz to 1000 Hz. The improved transmission loss panel configuration had a 5.1% increase in mass over the baseline honeycomb panel, and approximately twice the deflection when excited by a static force.

  14. Simulated effect on the compressive and shear mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates.

    PubMed

    He, Chenglin; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Zu, Qiao; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Honeycomb plates can be applied in many fields, including furniture manufacturing, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, transportation and aerospace. In the present study, we discuss the simulated effect on the mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates by investigating the compressive and shear failure modes and the mechanical properties of trabeculae reinforced by long or short fibers. The results indicate that the simulated effect represents approximately 80% and 70% of the compressive and shear strengths, respectively. Compared with existing bionic samples, the mass-specific strength was significantly improved. Therefore, this integrated honeycomb technology remains the most effective method for the trial manufacturing of bionic integrated honeycomb plates. The simulated effect of the compressive rigidity is approximately 85%. The short-fiber trabeculae have an advantage over the long-fiber trabeculae in terms of shear rigidity, which provides new evidence for the application of integrated bionic honeycomb plates.

  15. Simulated effect on the compressive and shear mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates.

    PubMed

    He, Chenglin; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Zu, Qiao; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Honeycomb plates can be applied in many fields, including furniture manufacturing, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, transportation and aerospace. In the present study, we discuss the simulated effect on the mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates by investigating the compressive and shear failure modes and the mechanical properties of trabeculae reinforced by long or short fibers. The results indicate that the simulated effect represents approximately 80% and 70% of the compressive and shear strengths, respectively. Compared with existing bionic samples, the mass-specific strength was significantly improved. Therefore, this integrated honeycomb technology remains the most effective method for the trial manufacturing of bionic integrated honeycomb plates. The simulated effect of the compressive rigidity is approximately 85%. The short-fiber trabeculae have an advantage over the long-fiber trabeculae in terms of shear rigidity, which provides new evidence for the application of integrated bionic honeycomb plates. PMID:25746272

  16. Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients; comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.; Elrod, David; Hale, Keith

    1989-01-01

    Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals show the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluid entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

  17. Annular honeycomb seals: Test results for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients - Comparisons to labyrinth and smooth configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D.; Elrod, D.; Hale, K.

    1989-01-01

    Test results are presented for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients for seven honeycomb seals. All seals have the same radius, length, and clearance; however, the cell depths and diameters are varied. Rotordynamic data, which are presented, consist of the direct and cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and the direct damping coefficients. The rotordynamic-coefficient data show a considerable sensitivity to changes in cell dimensions; however, no clear trends are identifiable. Comparisons of test data for the honeycomb seals with labyrinth and smooth annular seals shows the honeycomb seal had the best sealing (minimum leakage) performance, followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth seals. For prerotated fluids entering the seal, in the direction of shaft rotation, the honeycomb seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the labyrinth and smooth. For no prerotation, or fluid prerotation against shaft rotation, the labyrinth seal has the best rotordynamic stability followed in order by the smooth and honeycomb seals.

  18. Tensor network algorithm by coarse-graining tensor renormalization on finite periodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui-Hai; Xie, Zhi-Yuan; Xiang, Tao; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    We develop coarse-graining tensor renormalization group algorithms to compute physical properties of two-dimensional lattice models on finite periodic lattices. Two different coarse-graining strategies, one based on the tensor renormalization group and the other based on the higher-order tensor renormalization group, are introduced. In order to optimize the tensor network model globally, a sweeping scheme is proposed to account for the renormalization effect from the environment tensors under the framework of second renormalization group. We demonstrate the algorithms by the classical Ising model on the square lattice and the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice, and show that the finite-size algorithms achieve substantially more accurate results than the corresponding infinite-size ones.

  19. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  20. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  1. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  2. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  3. Vibroacoustic Model Validation for a Curved Honeycomb Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Robinson, Jay H.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2001-01-01

    Finite element and boundary element models are developed to investigate the vibroacoustic response of a curved honeycomb composite sidewall panel. Results from vibroacoustic tests conducted in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission facility are used to validate the numerical predictions. The sidewall panel is constructed from a flexible honeycomb core sandwiched between carbon fiber reinforced composite laminate face sheets. This type of construction is being used in the development of an all-composite aircraft fuselage. In contrast to conventional rib-stiffened aircraft fuselage structures, the composite panel has nominally uniform thickness resulting in a uniform distribution of mass and stiffness. Due to differences in the mass and stiffness distribution, the noise transmission mechanisms for the composite panel are expected to be substantially different from those of a conventional rib-stiffened structure. The development of accurate vibroacoustic models will aide in the understanding of the dominant noise transmission mechanisms and enable optimization studies to be performed that will determine the most beneficial noise control treatments. Finite element and boundary element models of the sidewall panel are described. Vibroacoustic response predictions are presented for forced vibration input and the results are compared with experimental data.

  4. The Hamiltonian Laceability of some Generalized Honeycomb Tori

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu Liyen; Lin Tungyi; Kao Shinshin

    2008-11-06

    Assume that m, n and s are integers with m{>=}2, n{>=}4, 0{<=}s{<=}n and s is of the same parity of m. The generalized honeycomb torus GHT (m,n,s) is recognized as another attractive alternative to existing torus interconnection networks in parallel and distributed applications. It is known that any GHT (m,n,s) is 3-regular, hamiltonian, bipartite graph. We are interested in two special types of the generalized honeycomb torus, GHT (m,n,(n/2)) and GHT (m,n,0). Let G = GHT(m,n,s), where s(set-membership sign){l_brace}(n/2),0{r_brace}. We prove that any G is hamiltonian laceable. More precisely, given a pair of vertices P = {l_brace}u,v|u(set-membership sign)B,v(set-membership sign)W{r_brace} where B and W are the bipartition of V(G), there exists a path Q between u and v such that Q contains all vertices of G.

  5. Crushing Strength of Aluminum Honeycomb with Thinning Cell Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Nagahisa; Chiba, Norimasa; Kobayashi, Eiji; Kikuchi, Yuji

    To evaluate the crash safety of automobiles, various collision tests are performed by the auto industry. In the offset frontal collision test and the side collision test, the target is an aluminum honeycomb material which has thinning cell walls. In this study, based on the analyses of the shock absorption mechanism, a new crushing strength formula is proposed. First, load-displacement curves obtained from compression tests in quasi-static condition showed an almost linear relation between a thinning rate of cell walls and a crushing strength. Second, based on Wierzbicki's theory, a new formula was proposed, which can estimate a crushing strength of a honeycomb material with thinning wall. In addition, a correcting equation which considered an elastic deformation was also proposed. Third, parametric analyses were carried out with a FE model which can simulate a delamination between cell walls. The results obtained from the theory and FEM almost corresponded to each other for a wide range of the thinning rate. Fourth, impact tests were carried out, in which the weight was dropped freely at the speed used for the automobile tests. Those results almost agreed well with the sum of the theoretical crush strength and the inside air pressure.

  6. Quantum Simulation with 2D Arrays of Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richerme, Philip

    2016-05-01

    The computational difficulty of solving fully quantum many-body spin problems is a significant obstacle to understanding the behavior of strongly correlated quantum matter. This work proposes the design and construction of a 2D quantum spin simulator to investigate the physics of frustrated materials, highly entangled states, mechanisms potentially underpinning high-temperature superconductivity, and other topics inaccessible to current 1D systems. The effective quantum spins will be encoded within the well-isolated electronic levels of trapped ions, confined in a two-dimensional planar geometry, and made to interact using phonon-mediated optical dipole forces. The system will be scalable to 100+ quantum particles, far beyond the realm of classical intractability, while maintaining individual-ion control, long quantum coherence times, and site-resolved projective spin measurements. Once constructed, the two-dimensional quantum simulator will implement a broad range of spin models on a variety of reconfigurable lattices and characterize their behavior through measurements of spin-spin correlations and entanglement. This versatile tool will serve as an important experimental resource for exploring difficult quantum many-body problems in a regime where classical methods fail.

  7. Duality Between Spin Networks and the 2D Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Costantino, Francesco; Livine, Etera R.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to exhibit a deep relation between the partition function of the Ising model on a planar trivalent graph and the generating series of the spin network evaluations on the same graph. We provide respectively a fermionic and a bosonic Gaussian integral formulation for each of these functions and we show that they are the inverse of each other (up to some explicit constants) by exhibiting a supersymmetry relating the two formulations. We investigate three aspects and applications of this duality. First, we propose higher order supersymmetric theories that couple the geometry of the spin networks to the Ising model and for which supersymmetric localization still holds. Secondly, after interpreting the generating function of spin network evaluations as the projection of a coherent state of loop quantum gravity onto the flat connection state, we find the probability distribution induced by that coherent state on the edge spins and study its stationary phase approximation. It is found that the stationary points correspond to the critical values of the couplings of the 2D Ising model, at least for isoradial graphs. Third, we analyze the mapping of the correlations of the Ising model to spin network observables, and describe the phase transition on those observables on the hexagonal lattice. This opens the door to many new possibilities, especially for the study of the coarse-graining and continuum limit of spin networks in the context of quantum gravity.

  8. Cooperative dynamics in ultrasoft 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprakel, Joris; van der Meer, Berend; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-03-01

    The creation, annihilation, and diffusion of defects in crystal lattices play an important role during crystal melting and deformation. Although it is well understood how defects form and react when crystals are subjected to external stresses, it remains unclear how crystals cope with internal stresses. We report a study in which we create a highly localized internal stress, by means of optical tweezing, in a crystal formed from micrometer-sized colloidal spheres and directly observe how the solid reacts using microscopy. We find that, even though the excitation is highly localized, a collective dance of colloidal particles results; these collective modes take the form of closed rings or open-ended strings, depending on the sequence of events which nucleate the rearrangements. Surprisingly, we find from Brownian Dynamics simulations that these cooperative dynamics are thermally-activated modes inherent to the crystal, and can even occur through a single, sufficiently large thermal fluctuation, resulting in the irreversible displacement of 100s of particles from their lattice sites.

  9. Superfluid density through 2D superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Shih, Chih-Kang

    As S. Qin et al. reported, two monolayer (2 ML) lead film on a silicon (111) substrate has one of two different atomic structures on the silicon substrate: the unstrained 1x1 and the psedumorphically strained √3x √3 (i.e. the same lattice constant as the Si √3x √3 lattice). Most interestingly, although these two different regions show the same quantum well state features, they have different Tc's (5 K and 4 K). These two different regions of 2 ML film naturally form superconductor-superconductor (SS or SS') junctions along silicon step edges. Physical connection of the junction is only 1 ML thickness because of the step height difference of substrate. We will present this study of SS (or SS') junction system using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and in-situ double-coil mutual inductance measurement. The transition of superconducting gaps across either SS or SS' junctions should show how to locally affect each other. Double coil measurement show a global Tc close to the lower Tc region with sizable superfluid density. We will discuss the phase rigidity and its relationship to the superfluid density in this ultra-thin Pb film that is only 2 ML thick.

  10. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  11. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  12. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  13. Perspectives in Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramashi, Yoshinobu

    2007-12-01

    Preface -- Fixed point actions, symmetries and symmetry transformations on the lattice / P. Hasenfratz -- Algorithms for dynamical fennions / A. D. Kennedy -- Applications of chiral perturbation theory to lattice QCD / Stephen R. Sharpe -- Lattice QCD with a chiral twist / S. Sint -- Non-perturbative QCD: renormalization, O(A) - Improvement and matching to Heavy Quark effective theory / Rainer Sommer.

  14. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  15. Robust Room-Temperature Quantum Spin Hall Effect in Methyl-functionalized InBi honeycomb film.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-shi; Ji, Wei-Xiao; Zhang, Chang-wen; Hu, Shu-jun; Li, Ping; Wang, Pei-ji; Zhang, Bao-min; Cao, Chong-long

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) group-III-V honeycomb films have attracted significant interest for their potential application in fields of quantum computing and nanoelectronics. Searching for 2D III-V films with high structural stability and large-gap are crucial for the realizations of dissipationless transport edge states using quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect. Based on first-principles calculations, we predict that the methyl-functionalized InBi monolayer (InBiCH3) has no dynamic instability, and hosts QSH state with a band gap as large as 0.29 eV, exhibiting an interesting electronic behavior viable for room-temperature applications. The topological characteristic is confirmed by s-pxy band inversion, topological invariant Z2 number, and the time-reversal symmetry protected helical edge states. Noticeably, the QSH states are tunable and robust against the mechanical strain, electric field and different levels of methyl coverages. We also find that InBiCH3 supported on h-BN substrate maintains a nontrivial QSH state, which harbors the edge states lying within the band gap of substrate. These findings demonstrate that the methyl-functionalized III-V films may be a good QSH platform for device design and fabrication in spintronics. PMID:26997163

  16. Robust Room-Temperature Quantum Spin Hall Effect in Methyl-functionalized InBi honeycomb film

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng-shi; Ji, Wei-xiao; Zhang, Chang-wen; Hu, Shu-jun; Li, Ping; Wang, Pei-ji; Zhang, Bao-min; Cao, Chong-long

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) group-III-V honeycomb films have attracted significant interest for their potential application in fields of quantum computing and nanoelectronics. Searching for 2D III-V films with high structural stability and large-gap are crucial for the realizations of dissipationless transport edge states using quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect. Based on first-principles calculations, we predict that the methyl-functionalized InBi monolayer (InBiCH3) has no dynamic instability, and hosts QSH state with a band gap as large as 0.29 eV, exhibiting an interesting electronic behavior viable for room-temperature applications. The topological characteristic is confirmed by s-pxy band inversion, topological invariant Z2 number, and the time-reversal symmetry protected helical edge states. Noticeably, the QSH states are tunable and robust against the mechanical strain, electric field and different levels of methyl coverages. We also find that InBiCH3 supported on h-BN substrate maintains a nontrivial QSH state, which harbors the edge states lying within the band gap of substrate. These findings demonstrate that the methyl-functionalized III-V films may be a good QSH platform for device design and fabrication in spintronics. PMID:26997163

  17. The Morphology and Functions of Articular Chondrocytes on a Honeycomb-Patterned Surface

    PubMed Central

    Eniwumide, Joshua O.; Tanaka, Masaru; Nagai, Nobuhiro; Morita, Yuka; de Bruijn, Joost; Yamamoto, Sadaaki; Onodera, Shin; Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential of a novel micropatterned substrate for neocartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes were cultured on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) materials whose surfaces were either flat or honeycomb-patterned. The latter was prepared using a novel self-organization technique, while the former, was prepared by spin-coating. The chondrocytes attached and proliferated on both surfaces. On the honeycomb films, chondrocytes were found at the top surface and encased within the 10 μm pores. Meanwhile, chondrocytes on the spin-coated surface flattened out. Accumulation of DNA and keratin sulphate was comparatively higher on the honeycomb films within the first 7 days. At their respective peaks, DNA concentration increased on the honeycomb and flat surfaces by approximately 210% and 400% of their day 1 values, respectively. However, cultures on the flat surface took longer to peak. Extracellular Matrix (ECM) concentrations peaked at 900% and 320% increases for the honeycomb and flat cultures. Type II collagen was upregulated on the honeycomb and flat surfaces by as much as 28% and 25% of their day 1 values, while aggrecan was downregulated with time, by 3.4% and 7.4%. These initial results demonstrate the potential usefulness of honeycomb-based scaffolds during early cultures neocartilage and soft tissue engineering. PMID:24804237

  18. Directed Self-Assembly of Large Scaffold-free Multicellular Honeycomb Structures

    PubMed Central

    Tejavibulya, Nalin; Youssef, Jacquelyn; Bao, Brian; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Morgan, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    A significant challenge to the field of biofabrication is the rapid construction of large three dimensional (3D) living tissues and organs. Multi-cellular spheroids have been used as building blocks. In this paper, we create large multi-cellular honeycomb building blocks using directed self-assembly, whereby cell-to-cell adhesion, in the context of the shape and obstacles of a micromold, drives the formation of a 3D structure. Computer aided design, rapid prototyping and replica molding were used to fabricate honeycomb-shaped micro-molds. Nonadhesive hydrogels cast from these micro-molds were equilibrated in cell culture medium and seeded with two types of mammalian cells. The cells settled into the honeycomb recess, were unable to attach to the nonadhesive hydrogel and so cell-to-cell adhesion drove the self-assembly of a large multicellular honeycomb within 24 hours. Distinct morphological changes occurred to the honeycomb and its cells indicating the presence of significant cell-mediated tension. Unlike the spheroid, whose size is constrained by a critical diffusion distance needed to maintain cell viability, the overall size of the honeycomb is not limited. The rapid production of the honeycomb building unit, with its multiple rings of high density cells and open lumen spaces, offers interesting new possibilities for biofabrication strategies. PMID:21828905

  19. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  20. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  1. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  2. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  3. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  4. Some properties of correlations of quantum lattice systems in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Fröhlich, Jürg; Ueltschi, Daniel

    2015-05-15

    Simple proofs of uniqueness of the thermodynamic limit of KMS states and of the decay of equilibrium correlations are presented for a large class of quantum lattice systems at high temperatures. New quantum correlation inequalities for general Heisenberg models are described. Finally, a simplified derivation of a general result on power-law decay of correlations in 2D quantum lattice systems with continuous symmetries is given, extending results of McBryan and Spencer for the 2D classical XY model.

  5. CYP2D6*36 gene arrangements within the cyp2d6 locus: association of CYP2D6*36 with poor metabolizer status.

    PubMed

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Bradford, L Dianne; Alander, Sarah W; Leeder, J Steven

    2006-04-01

    Unexplained cases of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype discordance continue to be discovered. In previous studies, several African Americans with a poor metabolizer phenotype carried the reduced function CYP2D6*10 allele in combination with a nonfunctional allele. We pursued the possibility that these alleles harbor either a known sequence variation (i.e., CYP2D6*36 carrying a gene conversion in exon 9 along the CYP2D6*10-defining 100C>T single-nucleotide polymorphism) or novel sequences variation(s). Discordant cases were evaluated by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to test for gene rearrangement events, and a 6.6-kilobase pair PCR product encompassing the CYP2D6 gene was cloned and entirely sequenced. Thereafter, allele frequencies were determined in different study populations comprising whites, African Americans, and Asians. Analyses covering the CYP2D7 to 2D6 gene region established that CYP2D6*36 did not only exist as a gene duplication (CYP2D6*36x2) or in tandem with *10 (CYP2D6*36+*10), as previously reported, but also by itself. This "single" CYP2D6*36 allele was found in nine African Americans and one Asian, but was absent in the whites tested. Ultimately, the presence of CYP2D6*36 resolved genotype/phenotype discordance in three cases. We also discovered an exon 9 conversion-positive CYP2D6*4 gene in a duplication arrangement (CYP2D6*4Nx2) and a CYP2D6*4 allele lacking 100C>T (CYP2D6*4M) in two white subjects. The discovery of an allele that carries only one CYP2D6*36 gene copy provides unequivocal evidence that both CYP2D6*36 and *36x2 are associated with a poor metabolizer phenotype. Given a combined frequency of between 0.5 and 3% in African Americans and Asians, genotyping for CYP2D6*36 should improve the accuracy of genotype-based phenotype prediction in these populations.

  6. Sound Transmission Through a Curved Honeycomb Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Robinson, Jay H.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2003-01-01

    Composite structures are often used in aircraft because of the advantages offered by a high strength to weight ratio. However, the acoustical properties of these light and stiff structures can often be less than desirable resulting in high aircraft interior noise levels. In this paper, measurements and predictions of the transmission loss of a curved honeycomb composite panel are presented. The transmission loss predictions are validated by comparisons to measurements. An assessment of the behavior of the panel is made from the dispersion characteristics of transverse waves propagating in the panel. The speed of transverse waves propagating in the panel is found to be sonic or supersonic over the frequency range from 100 to 5000 Hz. The acoustical benefit of reducing the wave speed for transverse vibration is demonstrated.

  7. Projective symmetry of partons in Kitaev's honeycomb model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Paula

    2015-03-01

    Low-energy states of quantum spin liquids are thought to involve partons living in a gauge-field background. We study the spectrum of Majorana fermions of Kitaev's honeycomb model on spherical clusters. The gauge field endows the partons with half-integer orbital angular momenta. As a consequence, the multiplicities reflect not the point-group symmetries of the cluster, but rather its projective symmetries, operations combining physical and gauge transformations. The projective symmetry group of the ground state is the double cover of the point group. We acknowledge Fondecyt under Grant No. 11121397, Conicyt under Grant No. 79112004, and the Simons Foundation (P.M.); the Max Planck Society and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (O.P.); and the US DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER46544 (O.T.).

  8. Friction-factor characteristics for narrow channels with honeycomb surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, T. W.; Morrison, G. L.; Childs, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental determination of friction-factors for the flow of air in a narrow channel lined with various honeycomb geometries has been carried out. Test results show that, generally, the friction-factor is nearly constant or slightly decreases as the Reynolds number increases, a characteristic common to turbulent flow in pipes. However, in some test geometries this trend is remarkably different. The friction factor dramatically drops and then rises as the Reynolds number increases. This phenomenon can be characterized as a 'friction-factor jump'. Further investigations of the acoustic spectrum and friction-factor measurements for a broad range of Reynolds numbers indicate that the 'friction-factor jump' phenomenon is accompanied by an onset of a normal mode resonance excited coherent flow fluctuation structure, which occurs at Reynolds number of the order of 10,000. The purpose of this paper is to explain the friction-factor-jump phenomenon and friction-factor characteristics.

  9. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  10. Incommensurate lattice modulations in Potassium Vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Banerjee, Arnab; Mark, Lumsden; Cao, Huibo; Kim, Jong-Woo; Hoffman, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping

    Potassium Vanadate (K2V3O8) is an S = 1/2 2D square lattice antiferromagnet that shows spin reorientation indicating a strong coupling between the magnetism and its dielectric properties with a promise of rich physics that promises multiferroicity. These tangible physical properties are strongly tied through a spin-lattice coupling to the underlying lattice and superlattice behavior. It has a superlattice (SL) onsetting below Tc = 115 K with an approximate [3 x 3 x 2] modulation. Here we present our recent experiments at TOPAZ beamline at SNS which for the first time proves conclusively that the lattice modulations are incommensurate, with an in-plane Q of 0.315. We will also show our attempts to refine the data using JANA which requires a redefinition of the lattice, as well as the temperature and Q dependence of the superlattice modulation measured using neutrons at HFIR and synchrotron x-rays at APS. Our results are not only relevant for the ongoing search of multifunctional behavior in K2V3O8 but also generally for the superlattice modulations observed in a large family of fresnoites. Work performed at ORNL and ANL is supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of User Facilities Division.

  11. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  12. A lattice-Boltzmann scheme of the Navier-Stokes equations on a 3D cuboid lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Haoda; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    The standard lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow simulation is based on a square (in 2D) or cubic (in 3D) lattice grids. Recently, two new lattice Boltzmann schemes have been developed on a 2D rectangular grid using the MRT (multiple-relaxation-time) collision model, by adding a free parameter in the definition of moments or by extending the equilibrium moments. Here we developed a lattice Boltzmann model on 3D cuboid lattice, namely, a lattice grid with different grid lengths in different spatial directions. We designed our MRT-LBM model by matching the moment equations from the Chapman-Enskog expansion with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model guarantees correct hydrodynamics. A second-order term is added to the equilibrium moments in order to restore the isotropy of viscosity on a cuboid lattice. The form and the coefficients of the extended equilibrium moments are determined through an inverse design process. An additional benefit of the model is that the viscosity can be adjusted independent of the stress-moment relaxation parameter, thus improving the numerical stability of the model. The resulting cuboid MRT-LBM model is then validated through benchmark simulations using laminar channel flow, turbulent channel flow, and the 3D Taylor-Green vortex flow.

  13. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  14. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  15. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  16. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  17. Holographic method for site-resolved detection of a 2D array of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Daniel Kai; Deissler, Benjamin; Limmer, Wolfgang; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel approach to site-resolved detection of a 2D gas of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A near-resonant laser beam is coherently scattered by the atomic array, and after passing a lens its interference pattern is holographically recorded by superimposing it with a reference laser beam on a CCD chip. Fourier transformation of the recorded intensity pattern reconstructs the atomic distribution in the lattice with single-site resolution. The holographic detection method requires only about two hundred scattered photons per atom in order to achieve a high reconstruction fidelity of 99.9 %. Therefore, additional cooling during detection might not be necessary even for light atomic elements such as lithium. Furthermore, first investigations suggest that small aberrations of the lens can be post-corrected in imaging processing.

  18. Load-dependent Optimization of Honeycombs for Sandwich Components - New Possibilities by Using Additive Layer Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riss, Fabian; Schilp, Johannes; Reinhart, Gunther

    Due to their feasible geometric complexity, additive layer manufacturing (ALM) processes show a highpotential for the production of lightweight components.Therefore, ALM processes enable the realization of bionic-designedcomponents like honeycombs, which are optimized depending upon load and outer boundary conditions.This optimization is based on a closed-loop, three-steps methodology: At first, each honeycomb is conformed to the surface of the part. Secondly, the structure is optimizedfor lightweight design.It is possible to achieve a homogeneous stress distribution in the part by varying the wall thickness, honeycombdiameter and the amount of honeycombs, depending on the subjected stresses and strains. At last, the functional components like threads or bearing carriers are integrated directly into the honeycomb core.Using all these steps as an iterative process, it is possible to reduce the mass of sandwich components about 50 percent compared to conventional approaches.

  19. Surface deformation monitoring and reconstruction of honeycomb structure based on FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulin; Lu, Jiyun; Zheng, Zhaoyu

    2015-07-01

    Honeycomb structure with high stiffness and light weight is expected to be more applied in the field of morphing wing. We propose a surface reconstruction algorithm based on FBG sensors to reconstruct the surface deformation of honeycomb structure real-timely and rapidly. When flexible honeycomb cores are driven by SMA actuators, the surface curvature monitored by FBG sensing array can be inferred from the changes of central wavelength. According to the surface reconstruction algorithm we proposed, the surface shape can be reconstructed. Composite single-row honeycomb structure specimen consisting of 8 cores, whose cell walls length and thickness is 8mm and 2mm respectively, is bended by electrified SMA actuators into the new steady shape. The experiment shows that the reconstructed surface shape has great agreement with the visual recording surface shape and the error is 5.76% on average.

  20. Study on moisture absorption and sweat discharge of honeycomb polyester fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Aifen; Zhang, Yongjiu

    2015-07-01

    The moisture absorption and liberation properties of honeycomb polyester fiber were studied in order to understand its moisture absorption and sweat discharge. Through testing moisture absorption and liberation regains of honeycomb polyester fiber and normal polyester fiber in standard atmospheric conditions, their moisture absorption and liberation curves were depicted, and the regression equations of moisture regains to time during their reaching the balance of moisture absorption and moisture liberation were obtained according to the curves. Their moisture absorption and liberation rate curves were analyzed and the regression equations of the rates to time were obtained. The results shows that the moisture regain of honeycomb polyester fiber is much bigger than the normal polyester fiber's, and the initial moisture absorption and moisture liberation rates of the former are much higher than the latter's, so that the moisture absorbance and sweat discharge of honeycomb polyester fiber are excellent.